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Sample records for including exotic quark

  1. Exotic Signals of Vectorlike Quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A. [Fermilab; Yu, Felix [U. Mainz, PRISMA

    2016-12-06

    Vectorlike fermions are an important target for hadron collider searches. We show that the vectorlike quarks may predominantly decay via higher-dimensional operators into a quark plus a couple of other Standard Model fermions. Pair production of vectorlike quarks of charge 2/3 at the LHC would then lead to a variety of possible final states, including $t\\bar t + 4\\tau$, $t\\bar b\

  2. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis,One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Jung, Sunghoon [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,85 Hoegiro, Dongdaemun-gu, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory,2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Salvioni, Ennio [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis,One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Tsai, Yuhsin [Department of Physics, University of California, Davis,One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics,Department of Physics, University of Maryland,College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    The Twin Higgs model provides a natural theory for the electroweak symmetry breaking without the need of new particles carrying the standard model gauge charges below a few TeV. In the low energy theory, the only probe comes from the mixing of the Higgs fields in the standard model and twin sectors. However, an ultraviolet completion is required below ∼ 10 TeV to remove residual logarithmic divergences. In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of the model. Some of them carry standard model color, and may therefore be copiously produced at current or future hadron colliders. Once produced, these exotic quarks can decay into a top together with twin sector particles. If the twin sector particles escape the detection, we have the irreducible stop-like signals. On the other hand, some twin sector particles may decay back into the standard model particles with long lifetimes, giving spectacular displaced vertex signals in combination with the prompt top quarks. This happens in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario with typical parameters, and sometimes is even necessary for cosmological reasons. We study the potential displaced vertex signals from the decays of the twin bottomonia, twin glueballs, and twin leptons in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario. Depending on the details of the twin sector, the exotic quarks may be probed up to ∼ 2.5 TeV at the LHC and beyond 10 TeV at a future 100 TeV collider, providing a strong test of this class of ultraviolet completions.

  3. Search for Multi-quark Exotic States with Heavy Flavor at D0 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, Alexei [Serpukhov, IHEP

    2017-12-20

    We present the results for multi-quark exotic states search from D0 Collaboration at the FNAL Tevatron. This includes an evidence for a state (X(5568)) with hadronic decays of Bs meson, a confirmation of the X(5568) state with semileptonic decays of Bs meson, and a search for exotic baryons decaying to J/ψΛ pairs.

  4. Exotic hadron production in a quark combination model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wei; Shao Fenglan; Li Shiyuan; Shang Yonghui; Yao Tao

    2009-01-01

    The philosophy on production of exotic hadrons (multiquark states) in the framework of the quark combination model is investigated, taking f 0 (980) as an example. The production rate and p T spectra of f 0 (980) considered as (ss) or (sqsq), respectively, are calculated and compared in Au+Au collisions at √(s NN )=200 GeV. The unitarity of various combination models, when open for exotic hadron production, is addressed.

  5. X(3872): an exotic combination of quarks?

    CERN Document Server

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2013-01-01

    According to the Standard Model of particles, quarks are the smallest building blocks of matter. So far, only quark-antiquark pairs (mesons) and quark triplets (baryons) have been observed. However, over the last few decades, some not-yet-understood states have started to appear in the particle zoo. Their nature is still unclear but the LHCb experiment has now made a big step towards understanding one of them: the X(3872).   A proton-lead ion collision, as observed by the LHCb detector during the 2013 data-taking period. The X(3872) has not yet made headlines, but its existence is an intriguing mystery that scientists have been trying to elucidate over the past ten years since the particle was first observed by the Belle experiment. So far, its inner nature has remained unknown because of theoretical difficulties in cataloguing it as a quark-antiquark state in the so-called "charmonium" spectrum (as charm quarks are involved) and because of the experimental difficulties inv...

  6. E6 exotic quark production in ep collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hewett, J.L.

    1987-06-01

    We examine the possibility of producing exotic quarks from E 6 theories via flavor changing couplings in high energy ep collisions at HERA and the proposed LEP x LHC. We find that the rate is rather small and very mixing angle dependent. Assuming maximal mixing, the production rates are ≅10 to 30 events per year at HERA (for masses up to 100 GeV) and ≅200 events per year at LEP x LHC (for masses up to 300 GeV)

  7. Color exotic constituent quarks and their possible manifestations in hadron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisovich, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    Hypothetical colour-exotic constituent (or dressed) quarks are discussed. It is shown that the data on the excited baryons with Jsup(P)=1/2 + , 3/2 + and excited mesons with Jsup(P)=0 - , 1 - are in reasonable agreement with the hypothesis of the existence of colour-exotic quark in the colour state 6

  8. Dynamical symmetry breaking: Exotic quarks and the strong CP problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furlong, R.C.

    1988-10-01

    Decuplet quarks (quens) transforming as 10's under SU(3)/sub C/ are shown to be superior to sextet quarks (quixes) in their ability to resolve the Strong CP problem, resulting in composite invisible axions (CIAs). 8 refs

  9. Population of multi-quark states in exotic multiplets and thermalization in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.; Bleicher, M.; Haussler, S.; Stoecker, H.

    2008-01-01

    The recent discussion about experimental evidence for pentaquark states has revitalized the interest in exotic hadrons. If such states really exist, it is natural to assume that they will be formed at the late hadronization stage of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, given the success of quark recombination models in the description of hadronization. Here, we apply the qMD model to study the formation of color neutral exotic multi-quark clusters at hadronization. We search for color neutral clusters made up of up to six color charges, respectively. We thus obtain estimates for the numbers and phase space distributions of exotic hadronic states produced by clustering in heavy ion collisions, including the members of the pentaquark multiplets. We obtain particle abundances that are smaller than thermal model predictions. Moreover, the results obtained in recombination from ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions can be compared to the estimates based on equal population of the corresponding multiplets, and to results from fully thermalized systems. We find that the distribution of exotic hadrons from recombination over large multiplets provides a sensitive signal for thermalization and decorrelation of the initial, non-equilibrium state of the collision. (author)

  10. Ruling out exotic models of b quark decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.; Goldberg, M.; Horwitz, N.; Jawahery, A.; Jibaly, M.; Kooy, H.; Lipari, P.; Moneti, G.C.; Van Hecke, H.; Alam, M.S.; Csorna, S.E.; Fridman, A.; Mestayer, M.; Panvini, R.S.; Andrews, D.; Avery, P.; Berkelman, K.; Cassel, D.G.; DeWire, J.W.; Ehrlich, R.; Ferguson, T.; Galik, R.; Gilchriese, M.G.D.; Gittelman, B.; Hartill, D.L.; Herrup, D.; Herzlinger, M.; Holner, S.; Ito, M.; Kandaswamy, J.; Kistiakowsky, V.; Kreinick, D.L.; Kubota, Y.; Mistry, N.B.; Morrow, F.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Perchonok, R.; Plunckett, R.; Silverman, A.; Stein, P.C.; Stone, S.; Weber, D.; Wilcke, R.; Sadoff, A.J.; Bebek, C.; Haggerty, J.; Hassard, J.; Hempstead, M.; Izen, J.M.; MacKay, W.W.; Pipkin, F.M.; Rohlf, J.; Wilson, R.; Kagan, H.; Chadwick, K.; Chauveau, J.; Ganci, P.; Gentile, T.; Guida, J.A.; Kass, R.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.L.; Parkhurst, G.; Poling, R.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rucinski, G.; Thorndike, E.H.; Green, J.; Hicks, R.G.; Sannes, F.; Skubic, P.; Snyder, A.; Stone, R.

    1983-01-01

    We consider three broad classes of nonstandard models for b quark decay: (1) b->llq with charged or neutral leptons of arbitrary flavor; (2) b->lanti qanti q; and (3) b->qa - where a - is a Higgs boson or hyperpion. For these classes of models we have calculated the charged energy fraction and the inclusive yields of electrons, muons, protons, and lambdas. We demonstrate that these model predictions are inconsistent with CLEO measurements at the T(4S). (orig.)

  11. Search for exotic penta quark baryons with hidden strangeness in the experiment on the SPHINX setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lansberg, L.G.

    1999-01-01

    The results of studying the diffractive production reactions on the IHEP proton beam with E p = 70 GeV on the SPHINX setup are discussed. The searches for exotic penta-quark baryons with hidden strangeness are performed in these processes. The main results were obtained for the reaction p + N → [Σ 0 K + ] + N, where in the invariant mass spectrum M(Σ 0 K + ) the peak with parameters M = 1989 ± 6 MeV and Γ = 91 ± 20 MeV is dominated. The anomalous properties of this state make it a serious candidate for exotic baryon. The additional data which are supported the real existence of this baryon are also presented [ru

  12. Exotic events at the pp-bar collider: an excited quark or an excited colored boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershtein, S.S.; Jickia, G.V.; Pirogov, Y.F.

    1984-01-01

    We show that the exotic events with large missing transverse momentum (up to 80--90 GeV/c) observed at the pp-bar collider at CERN require by their signature and effective cross section the existence of an object with a mass of about 180 GeV/c 2 , which is produced like a resonance from the constituents of the hardronic beams and is capable of decaying into a W-jet and a Z-jet. An excited quark q*, produced like a resonance in qg collisions and decaying into Wq and Zq, is the best candidate for such a object. However, colored W* and Z* bosons, produced in qq-bar collisions and decaying into Wg and Zg, cannot be excluded. We discuss possible experiments at pp-bar, pp, and ep colliders for verifying the hypothesis of the excited quark and for investigating its properties

  13. Searches for exotic heavy quarks decaying into a W-Boson and a b-Quark with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Nektarijevic, Snezana

    In this thesis, searches for two hypothetical heavy quarks are presented: the fourth Standard Model generation up-type quark t’, and the vector-like quark T, predicted by the new physics models involving extra dimensions or a composite Higgs boson. Both searches assume pair production of the heavy quarks decaying to a W-boson and a b-quark, and are performed in final states with one electron or muon, at least three jets, and significant missing transverse energy. The first search employs the kinematic fitting of the reconstructed quark mass, while the second relies on the artificial neural network method. In both searches no excess of data over the Standard Model expectation is observed, resulting in observed lower bounds on the quark masses of mt’>404 GeV and mT>618 GeV. Both searches are based on proton-proton collision data at 7 TeV centre-of-mass energy collected by the ATLAS experiment at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider in 2011.

  14. Search for exotic light-flavor quark partners in pp collisions at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onsem, Gerrit van [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Vector-like quarks appear in many new-physics models extending the standard model. We search for vector-like quarks coupling to first-generation quarks using 8 TeV pp collision data collected by the CMS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The exotic quarks are assumed to be produced both singly and in pairs, and to decay via a W, Z or Higgs boson. We have defined various sets of selections on the reconstructed physics objects, subdividing the data set in different event categories, considering final states with at least one muon or electron. No significant excess over standard model expectations has been found, and exclusion limits on the mass of the exotic quarks are set.

  15. Exclusion of exotic top-like quarks with -4/3 electric charge using jet-charge tagging in single-lepton ttbar events at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernandez Ramos, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.J.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Luca, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martinez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernandez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J.L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2013-08-05

    We report on a measurement of the top-quark electric charge in ttbar events in which one W boson originating from the top-quark pair decays into leptons and the other into hadrons. The event sample was collected by the CDF II detector in sqrt(s)=1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions and corresponds to 5.6 fb^(-1). We find the data to be consistent with the standard model and exclude the existence of an exotic quark with -4/3 electric charge and mass of the conventional top quark at the 99% confidence level.

  16. Nuclear matter descriptions including quark structure of the hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, R.

    2008-07-01

    It is nowadays well established that nucleons are composite objects made of quarks and gluons, whose interactions are described by Quantum chromodynamics (QCD). However, because of the non-perturbative character of QCD at the energies of nuclear physics, a description of atomic nuclei starting from quarks and gluons is still not available. A possible alternative is to construct effective field theories based on hadronic degrees of freedom, in which the interaction is constrained by QCD. In this framework, we have constructed descriptions of infinite nuclear matter in relativistic mean field theories taking into account the quark structure of hadrons. In a first approach, the in medium modifications of mesons properties is dynamically obtained in a Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) quark model. This modification is taken into account in a relativistic mean field theory based on a meson exchange interaction between nucleons. The in-medium modification of mesons masses and the properties of infinite nuclear matter have been studied. In a second approach, the long and short range contributions to the in-medium modification of the nucleon are determined. The short range part is obtained in a NJL quark model of the nucleon. The long range part, related to pions exchanges between nucleons, has been determined in the framework of Chiral Perturbation theory. These modifications have been used to constrain the couplings of a point coupling relativistic mean field model. A realistic description of the saturation properties of nuclear matter is obtained. (author)

  17. Quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhter, V [AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki

    1981-04-01

    The history is described of the concept of quarks, ie., hypothetical particles of which,hadrons (strongly interacting particles) are believed to consist. The quark properties differ from those of known elementary particles. The electric charge of quarks is 1/3 and 2/3 of the electron charge and they obviously only exist inside hadrons. Quark existence is generally recognized because it has been confirmed by experimental verification of predictions made using a quark model.

  18. Exotic hardrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landsberg, L.G.

    1994-01-01

    In this review, the present status of the physics of exotic hadrons (mesons and baryons) is considered. It is shown that, that during the last decade, several new meson states were observed, whose properties can hardly be explained in terms of the simple quark model. These particles have become serious candidates for exotic hadrons. The search for narrow, heavy baryons in different production and formation reactions is also discussed. 143 refs., 52 figs., 7 tabs

  19. Search for exotic light-flavor quark partners in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 8~\\mathrm{TeV}$

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A search is presented for vector-like quarks (VLQ) that only couple to light generation quarks in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The data were collected by the CMS experiment during the 2012 LHC run, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $19.7~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. Both single and pair production of VLQ are considered. The single production search is restricted to down-type vector-like quarks (electric charge $-1/3$), while the pair production search is sensitive to up-type (charge $+2/3$) and down-type heavy quarks. Final states with at least one muon or one electron are considered. No significant excess over standard model expectations is observed, and lower limits on the mass of VLQ are derived. Combining all processes together (including single production), the lower mass limits range from $400~\\mathrm{GeV}$ to $1800~\\mathrm{GeV}$, depending on the VLQ branching fractions (BF) to W, Z or H bosons and the electroweak single-production strength....

  20. Quark and lepton masses at the GUT scale including supersymmetric threshold corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antusch, S.; Spinrath, M.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effect of supersymmetric (SUSY) threshold corrections on the values of the running quark and charged lepton masses at the grand unified theory (GUT) scale within the large tanβ regime of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. In addition to the typically dominant SUSY QCD contributions for the quarks, we also include the electroweak contributions for quarks and leptons and show that they can have significant effects. We provide the GUT scale ranges of quark and charged lepton Yukawa couplings as well as of the ratios m μ /m s , m e /m d , y τ /y b and y t /y b for three example ranges of SUSY parameters. We discuss how the enlarged ranges due to threshold effects might open up new possibilities for constructing GUT models of fermion masses and mixings.

  1. Four-quark bound states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zouzou, S.

    1986-01-01

    In the framework of simple non-relativistic potential models, we examine the system consisting of two quarks and two antiquarks with equal or unequal masses. We search for possible bound states below the threshold for the spontaneous dissociation into two mesons. We solve the four body problem by empirical or systematic variational methods and we include the virtual meson-meson components of the wave function. With standard two-body potentials, there is no proliferation of multiquarks. With unequal quark masses, we obtain however exotic (anti Qanti Qqq) bound states with a baryonic antidiquark-quark-quark structure very analogous to the heavy flavoured (Q'qq) baryons. (orig.)

  2. Constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quarks in the full CDF data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2015-04-10

    A search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific alternative Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity J^{P}=0^{-} and a gravitonlike Higgs boson with J^{P}=2^{+}, assuming for both a mass of 125  GeV/c^{2}. We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45  fb^{-1}. We exclude deviations from the predictions of the standard model with a Higgs boson of mass 125  GeV/c^{2} at the level of 5 standard deviations, assuming signal strengths for exotic boson production equal to the prediction for the standard model Higgs boson, and set upper limits of approximately 30% relative to the standard model rate on the possible rate of production of each exotic state.

  3. Constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quarks in the full CDF data set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero [Univ. of Helsinki, Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, Helsinki (Finland). et al.

    2015-04-10

    In this study, a search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific alternative Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity JP = 0 and a gravitonlike Higgs boson with JP = 2+, assuming for both a mass of 125 GeV/c2. We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb–1. We exclude deviations from the predictions of the standard model with a Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV/c2 at the level of 5 standard deviations, assuming signal strengths for exotic boson production equal to the prediction for the standard model Higgs boson, and set upper limits of approximately 30% relative to the standard model rate on the possible rate of production of each exotic state.

  4. BROOKHAVEN: Glueballs, hybrids and exotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, S. -U.

    1988-12-15

    A workshop at Brookhaven from August 29 to September 1 looked at the current status of hadron spectroscopy beyond the realm of states conventionally built up from quarks and discussed future experimental effort to explore such exotic states.

  5. Exotic composite vector boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, K.; Hattori, T.; Yasue, M.

    1991-01-01

    An exotic composite vector boson V is introduced in two dynamical models of composite quarks, leptons, W, and Z. One is based on four-Fermi interactions, in which composite vector bosons are regarded as fermion-antifermion bound states and the other is based on the confining SU(2) L gauge model, in which they are given by scalar-antiscalar bound states. Both approaches describe the same effective interactions for the sector of composite quarks, leptons, W, Z, γ, and V

  6. Search for an exotic decay of the Higgs boson to a pair of light pseudoscalars in the final state with two b quarks and two $\\tau$ leptons in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; CMS Collaboration; Adam, Wolfgang; Ambrogi, Federico; Asilar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Flechl, Martin; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Krammer, Natascha; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Madlener, Thomas; Mikulec, Ivan; Rad, Navid; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Spanring, Markus; Spitzbart, Daniel; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wittmann, Johannes; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Zarucki, Mateusz; Chekhovsky, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; De Wolf, Eddi A; Di Croce, Davide; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Pieters, Maxim; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; De Bruyn, Isabelle; De Clercq, Jarne; Deroover, Kevin; Flouris, Giannis; Lontkovskyi, Denys; Lowette, Steven; Marchesini, Ivan; 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Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Marinov, Andrey; Misheva, Milena; Rodozov, Mircho; Shopova, Mariana; Sultanov, Georgi; Dimitrov, Anton; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Gao, Xuyang; Yuan, Li; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Yazgan, Efe; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Levin, Andrew; Li, Jing; Li, Linwei; Li, Qiang; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Wang, Yi; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Segura Delgado, Manuel Alejandro; Courbon, Benoit; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; 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Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Leloup, Clément; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Negro, Giulia; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Amendola, Chiara; Antropov, Iurii; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Kucher, Inna; Lisniak, Stanislav; Lobanov, Artur; Martin Blanco, Javier; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Pigard, Philipp; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Stahl Leiton, Andre Govinda; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Chabert, Eric Christian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Jansová, Markéta; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Tonon, Nicolas; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chanon, Nicolas; Chierici, Roberto; 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Loukas, Demetrios; Paspalaki, Garyfallia; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Karathanasis, George; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kontaxakis, Pantelis; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Vellidis, Konstantinos; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Papakrivopoulos, Ioannis; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Gianneios, Paraskevas; Katsoulis, Panagiotis; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Mallios, Stavros; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Triantis, Frixos A; Tsitsonis, Dimitrios; Bartók, Márton; Csanad, Mate; Filipovic, Nicolas; Major, Péter; Nagy, Marton Imre; Pasztor, Gabriella; Surányi, Olivér; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Hunyadi, Ádám; Sikler, Ferenc; Vámi, Tamás Álmos; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Tiwari, Praveen Chandra; Bahinipati, Seema; Kar, Chandiprasad; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chauhan, Sushil; Chawla, Ridhi; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Rajat; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Amandeep; Kaur, Manjit; Kaur, Sandeep; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Lohan, Manisha; Mehta, Ankita; Sandeep, Kaur; Sharma, Sandeep; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Gola, Mohit; Keshri, Sumit; Kumar, Ashok; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Priyanka, Priyanka; Ranjan, Kirti; Shah, Aashaq; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Bhardwaj, Rishika; Bharti, Monika; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Bhowmik, Debabrata; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Mondal, Kuntal; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Rout, Prasant Kumar; Roy, Ashim; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Singh, Bipen; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Bhat, Muzamil Ahmad; Dugad, Shashikant; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Ravindra Kumar Verma, Ravindra; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Soham; Chatterjee, Suman; Das, Pallabi; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Karmakar, Saikat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Di Florio, Adriano; Errico, Filippo; Fiore, Luigi; Gelmi, Andrea; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lezki, Samet; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Borgonovi, Lisa; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Ciocca, Claudia; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Iemmi, Fabio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Latino, Giuseppe; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Ferro, Fabrizio; Ravera, Fabio; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; Beschi, Andrea; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Crescenzo, Antonia; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Galati, Giuliana; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Khan, Wajid Ali; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Voevodina, Elena; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Bragagnolo, Alberto; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lujan, Paul; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Montecassiano, Fabio; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Rossin, Roberto; Simonetto, Franco; Tiko, Andres; Zanetti, Marco; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Ressegotti, Martina; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Cecchi, Claudia; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Manoni, Elisa; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Mariani, Valentina; Menichelli, Mauro; Rossi, Alessandro; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiga, Daniele; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Boccali, Tommaso; Borrello, Laura; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fedi, Giacomo; Fiori, Francesco; Giannini, Leonardo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Manca, Elisabetta; Mandorli, Giulio; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Daci, Nadir; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Cometti, Simona; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Demaria, Natale; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Soldi, Dario; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Vazzoler, Federico; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Jeongeun; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Moon, Chang-Seong; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Kim, Hyunchul; Moon, Dong Ho; Oh, Geonhee; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Kim, Hyunsoo; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Kim, Jae Sung; Lee, Haneol; Lee, Kyeongpil; Nam, Kyungwook; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Jeon, Dajeong; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Choi, Young-Il; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Duran-Osuna, Cecilia; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Ramirez-Sanchez, Gabriel; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Rabadán-Trejo, Raúl Iraq; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Reyes-Almanza, Rogelio; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Eysermans, Jan; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Bheesette, Srinidhi; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Szleper, Michal; Traczyk, Piotr; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Pyskir, Andrzej; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Galinhas, Bruno; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Seixas, Joao; Strong, Giles; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Alexakhin, Vadim; Golunov, Alexander; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbounov, Nikolai; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavine, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sosnov, Dmitry; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stepennov, Anton; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Aushev, Tagir; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Parygin, Pavel; Philippov, Dmitry; Polikarpov, Sergey; Tarkovskii, Evgenii; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Rusakov, Sergey V; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Blinov, Vladimir; Dimova, Tatyana; Kardapoltsev, Leonid; Shtol, Dmitry; Skovpen, Yuri; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Godizov, Anton; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Mandrik, Petr; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Slabospitskii, Sergei; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Babaev, Anton; Baidali, Sergei; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Álvarez Fernández, Adrian; Bachiller, Irene; Barrio Luna, Mar; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cerrada, Marcos; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Moran, Dermot; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; Triossi, Andrea; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Erice, Carlos; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Rodríguez Bouza, Víctor; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Vischia, Pietro; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chazin Quero, Barbara; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Fernandez, Marcos; Fernández Manteca, Pedro José; García Alonso, Andrea; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Prieels, Cédric; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Akgun, Bora; Auffray, Etiennette; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bendavid, Joshua; Bianco, Michele; Bocci, Andrea; Botta, Cristina; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cepeda, Maria; Cerminara, Gianluca; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Yi; Cucciati, Giacomo; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Roeck, Albert; Deelen, Nikkie; Dobson, Marc; Du Pree, Tristan; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Everaerts, Pieter; Fallavollita, Francesco; Fasanella, Daniele; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gilbert, Andrew; Gill, Karl; Glege, Frank; Guilbaud, Maxime; Gulhan, Doga; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Jafari, Abideh; Janot, Patrick; Karacheban, Olena; Kieseler, Jan; Kornmayer, Andreas; Krammer, Manfred; Lange, Clemens; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Meijers, Frans; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Mulders, Martijn; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pantaleo, Felice; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuel; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pitters, Florian Michael; Rabady, Dinyar; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Selvaggi, Michele; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Stakia, Anna; Steggemann, Jan; Tosi, Mia; Treille, Daniel; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veckalns, Viesturs; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Caminada, Lea; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Wiederkehr, Stephan Albert; Backhaus, Malte; Bäni, Lukas; Berger, Pirmin; Chernyavskaya, Nadezda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dorfer, Christian; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Klijnsma, Thomas; Lustermann, Werner; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marionneau, Matthieu; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrin, Gaël; Perrozzi, Luca; Pigazzini, Simone; Quittnat, Milena; Ruini, Daniele; Sanz Becerra, Diego Alejandro; Schönenberger, Myriam; Shchutska, Lesya; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Vesterbacka Olsson, Minna Leonora; Wallny, Rainer; Zhu, De Hua; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Brzhechko, Danyyl; Canelli, Maria Florencia; De Cosa, Annapaola; Del Burgo, Riccardo; Donato, Silvio; Galloni, Camilla; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Neutelings, Izaak; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Schweiger, Korbinian; Seitz, Claudia; Takahashi, Yuta; Zucchetta, Alberto; Chang, Yu-Hsiang; Cheng, Kai-yu; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Chang, Paoti; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Kumar, Arun; Li, You-ying; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Steen, Arnaud; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Bat, Ayse; Boran, Fatma; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dolek, Furkan; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Isik, Candan; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Tok, Ufuk Guney; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Atakisi, Ismail Okan; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Tekten, Sevgi; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Agaras, Merve Nazlim; Atay, Serhat; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Komurcu, Yildiray; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Davignon, Olivier; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Penning, Bjoern; Sakuma, Tai; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Taylor, Joseph; Titterton, Alexander; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Linacre, Jacob; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Womersley, William John; Auzinger, Georg; Bainbridge, Robert; Bloch, Philippe; Borg, Johan; Breeze, Shane; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Casasso, Stefano; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Komm, Matthias; Laner, Christian; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Martelli, Arabella; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Palladino, Vito; Pesaresi, Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Scott, Edward; Seez, Christopher; Shtipliyski, Antoni; Singh, Gurpreet; Stoye, Markus; Strebler, Thomas; Summers, Sioni; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Virdee, Tejinder; Wardle, Nicholas; Winterbottom, Daniel; Wright, Jack; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Mackay, Catherine Kirsty; Morton, Alexander; Reid, Ivan; Teodorescu, Liliana; Zahid, Sema; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Madrid, Christopher; Mcmaster, Brooks; Pastika, Nathaniel; Smith, Caleb; Bartek, Rachel; Dominguez, Aaron; Buccilli, Andrew; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; West, Christopher; Arcaro, Daniel; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Benelli, Gabriele; Coubez, Xavier; Cutts, David; Hadley, Mary; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Hogan, Julie Managan; Kwok, Ka Hei Martin; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Lee, Jangbae; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Pazzini, Jacopo; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Usai, Emanuele; Yu, David; Band, Reyer; Brainerd, Christopher; Breedon, Richard; Burns, Dustin; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Flores, Chad; Funk, Garrett; Ko, Winston; Kukral, Ota; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Shalhout, Shalhout; Shi, Mengyao; Stolp, Dustin; Taylor, Devin; Tos, Kyle; Tripathi, Mani; Wang, Zhangqier; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Bachtis, Michail; Bravo, Cameron; Cousins, Robert; Dasgupta, Abhigyan; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Mccoll, Nickolas; Regnard, Simon; Saltzberg, David; Schnaible, Christian; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Bouvier, Elvire; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Gary, J William; Ghiasi Shirazi, Seyyed Mohammad Amin; Hanson, Gail; Karapostoli, Georgia; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Si, Weinan; Wang, Long; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Gilbert, Dylan; Hashemi, Bobak; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Kole, Gouranga; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Masciovecchio, Mario; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Citron, Matthew; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Gouskos, Loukas; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Wang, Sicheng; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bornheim, Adolf; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Newman, Harvey B; Nguyen, Thong; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wilkinson, Richard; Xie, Si; Zhang, Zhicai; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Mudholkar, Tanmay; Paulini, Manfred; Sun, Menglei; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; MacDonald, Emily; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Cheng, Yangyang; Chu, Jennifer; Datta, Abhisek; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Quach, Dan; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Alyari, Maral; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Apyan, Aram; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Canepa, Anadi; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cremonesi, Matteo; Duarte, Javier; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Freeman, Jim; Gecse, Zoltan; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Pena, Cristian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Schneider, Basil; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Cadamuro, Luca; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Field, Richard D; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Joshi, Bhargav Madhusudan; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Shi, Kun; Sperka, David; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Joshi, Yagya Raj; Linn, Stephan; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Kolberg, Ted; Martinez, German; Perry, Thomas; Prosper, Harrison; Saha, Anirban; Sharma, Varun; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Rahmani, Mehdi; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Cavanaugh, Richard; Chen, Xuan; Dittmer, Susan; Evdokimov, Olga; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hangal, Dhanush Anil; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Kamin, Jason; Mills, Corrinne; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Tonjes, Marguerite; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Zhenbin; Zhang, Jingyu; Alhusseini, Mohammad; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Hung, Wai Ting; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Bylinkin, Alexander; Castle, James; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Rogan, Christopher; Sanders, Stephen; Schmitz, Erich; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Kim, Doyeong; Maravin, Yurii; Mendis, Dalath Rachitha; Mitchell, Tyler; Modak, Atanu; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Feng, Yongbin; Ferraioli, Charles; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonwar, Suresh C; Wong, Kak; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Azzolini, Virginia; Baty, Austin; Bauer, Gerry; Bi, Ran; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Harris, Philip; Hsu, Dylan; Hu, Miao; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lee, Yen-Jie; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Tatar, Kaya; Velicanu, Dragos; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Zhaozhong, Shi; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Turkewitz, Jared; Wadud, Mohammad Abrar; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Golf, Frank; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kharchilava, Avto; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Freer, Chad; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Morse, David Michael; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Wamorkar, Tanvi; Wang, Bingran; Wisecarver, Andrew; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Bucci, Rachael; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Li, Wenzhao; Loukas, Nikitas; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Siddireddy, Prasanna; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wightman, Andrew; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Luo, Wuming; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Higginbotham, Samuel; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Lange, David; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Norberg, Scarlet; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Das, Souvik; Gutay, Laszlo; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Peng, Cheng-Chieh; Qiu, Hao; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xiao, Rui; Xie, Wei; Cheng, Tongguang; Dolen, James; Parashar, Neeti; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Freed, Sarah; Geurts, Frank JM; Kilpatrick, Matthew; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Shi, Wei; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Zhang, Aobo; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Dulemba, Joseph Lynn; Fallon, Colin; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Taus, Rhys; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Montalvo, Roy; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Luo, Sifu; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Mengke, Tielige; Muthumuni, Samila; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Padeken, Klaas; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Verweij, Marta; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Hirosky, Robert; Joyce, Matthew; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Poudyal, Nabin; Sturdy, Jared; Thapa, Prakash; Zaleski, Shawn; Brodski, Michael; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Carlsmith, Duncan; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Hussain, Usama; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Woods, Nathaniel

    2018-01-01

    A search for an exotic decay of the Higgs boson to a pair of light pseudoscalar bosons is performed for the first time in the final state with two b quarks and two $\\tau$ leptons. The search is motivated in the context of models of physics beyond the standard model (SM), such as two Higgs doublet models extended with a complex scalar singlet (2HDM+S), which include the next-to-minimal supersymmetric SM (NMSSM). The results are based on a data set of proton-proton collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb$^{-1}$, accumulated by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2016 at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV. Masses of the pseudoscalar boson between 15 and 60 GeV are probed, and no excess of events above the SM expectation is observed. Upper limits between 3 and 12% are set on the branching fraction ${\\mathcal{B}({{{\\mathrm{h}}\\to{\\mathrm{a}\\mathrm{a}}\\to2\\tau2\\mathrm{b}}}} )$ assuming the SM production of the Higgs boson. Upper limits are also set on the branching fraction of the Higgs boson to...

  7. Backward exotic meson production in π-n→px--

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantell, D.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion is given of some of the theory and theoretical techniques as well as actual previous experiments for the study of π - + n → p + X -- interactions. Included are the forces, classification, inclusive reactions, quark diagrams, properties of the unobserved X, cross sections, exotic mesons, duality and crossing, the working and normalization of some actual rexperiments, and analysis. 10 references

  8. Charge parity exotic mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burden, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Evidence for a meson with exotic quantum numbers J PC 1 -+ , the ρ(1405), has been observed at the AGS at Brookhaven and Crystal Barrel at CERN. This meson is exotic to the extent that its quantum numbers are not consistent with the generalised Pauli exclusion principle applied to the naive constituent quark model. In a fully relativistic field theoretic treatment, however, there is nothing in principle to preclude the existence of charge parity exotics. Using our earlier covariant Bethe-Salpeter model of light-quark mesons with no new parameter fitting we demonstrate the existence of a q - q-bar bound state with the quantum numbers of the ρ

  9. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, D.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography on exotic atoms covers the years 1939 till 1982. The annual entries are headed by an introduction describing the state of affairs of the branch of science and listing the main applications in quantum electrodynamics, particle physics, nuclear physics, atomic physics, chemical physics and biological sciences. The bibliography includes an author index and a subject index. (Auth.)

  10. AAMQS: A non-linear QCD analysis of new HERA data at small-x including heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albacete, Javier L.; Armesto, Nestor; Salgado, Carlos A.; Milhano, Jose Guilherme; Quiroga Arias, Paloma

    2011-01-01

    We present a global analysis of available data on inclusive structure functions and reduced cross sections measured in electron-proton scattering at small values of Bjorken-x, x<0.01, including the latest data from HERA on reduced cross sections. Our approach relies on the dipole formulation of DIS together with the use of the non-linear running coupling Balitsky-Kovchegov equation for the description of the small-x dynamics. We improve our previous studies by including the heavy quark (charm and beauty) contribution to the reduced cross sections, and also by considering a variable flavor scheme for the running of the coupling. We obtain a good description of the data, with the fit parameters remaining stable with respect to our previous analyses where only light quarks were considered. The inclusion of the heavy quark contributions resulted in a good description of available experimental data for the charm component of the structure function and reduced cross section provided the initial transverse distribution of heavy quarks was allowed to differ from (more specifically, to have a smaller radius than) that of the light flavors. (orig.)

  11. AAMQS: A non-linear QCD analysis of new HERA data at small-x including heavy quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albacete, Javier L. [CEA/Saclay, URA 2306, Unite de Recherche Associee au CNRS, Institut de Physique Theorique, Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Armesto, Nestor; Salgado, Carlos A. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Departamento de Fisica de Particulas and IGFAE, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Milhano, Jose Guilherme [Instituto Superior Tecnico (IST), Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, CENTRA, Lisboa (Portugal); Theory Unit, CERN, Physics Department, Geneve 23 (Switzerland); Quiroga Arias, Paloma [UPMC Univ. Paris 6 and CNRS UMR7589, LPTHE, Paris (France)

    2011-07-15

    We present a global analysis of available data on inclusive structure functions and reduced cross sections measured in electron-proton scattering at small values of Bjorken-x, x<0.01, including the latest data from HERA on reduced cross sections. Our approach relies on the dipole formulation of DIS together with the use of the non-linear running coupling Balitsky-Kovchegov equation for the description of the small-x dynamics. We improve our previous studies by including the heavy quark (charm and beauty) contribution to the reduced cross sections, and also by considering a variable flavor scheme for the running of the coupling. We obtain a good description of the data, with the fit parameters remaining stable with respect to our previous analyses where only light quarks were considered. The inclusion of the heavy quark contributions resulted in a good description of available experimental data for the charm component of the structure function and reduced cross section provided the initial transverse distribution of heavy quarks was allowed to differ from (more specifically, to have a smaller radius than) that of the light flavors. (orig.)

  12. The baryonic spectrum in a constituent quark model including a three-body force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desplanques, B.; Gignoux, C.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Gonzalez, P.; Navarro, J.; Noguera, S.

    1992-01-01

    We analyze, within a non-relativistic quark model, the low energy part of the baryonic spectrum in the octet and decuplet flavour representations. The relevance of a strong Coulomb potential is emphasized in order to explain its general features. The addition of a three-body force allows to solve the 'Roper puzzle', giving a consistent explanation to its relative position in the spectrum. (orig.)

  13. Exotic Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Sigamani, Michael

    2016-01-01

    A selection of results for searches for exotic physics at the LHC are presented. These include a search for massive resonances, dark matter with a high energy jet in association with large missing transverse momentum, long-lived neutral particles, and narrow dijet resonances. The results are based on 20/fb of LHC proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV taken with the CMS detector.

  14. The Poincar group in a demisemidirect product with a non-associative algebra with representations that Include particles and quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeck, Franklin E.

    2008-01-01

    The quarks have always been a puzzle, as have the particles' mass and mass/spin relations as they seemed to have no coordinates in configuration space and/or momentum space. The solution to this seems to lie in the marriage of ordinary Poincare group representations with a non-associative algebra made through a demisemidirect product. Then, the work of G. Dixon applies; so, we may obtain all the relations between masses, mass and spin, and the attribution of position and momentum to quarks--this in spite of the old restriction that the Poincare group cannot be extended to a larger group by any means (including the (semi)direct product) to get even the mass relations. Finally, we will briefly discuss a possible connection between the phase space representations of the Poincare group and the phase space representations of the object we will obtain. This will take us into Leibniz (co)homology.

  15. ATLAS Exotic Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Bousson, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Thanks to the outstanding performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that delivered more than 2 fb^-1 of proton-proton collision data at center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the ATLAS experiment has been able to explore a wide range of exotic models trying to address the questions unanswered by the Standard Model of particle physics. Searches for leptoquarks, new heavy quarks, vector-like quarks, black holes, hidden valley and contact interactions are reviewed in these proceedings.

  16. Geometric Scaling Analysis of Deep Inelastic Scattering Data Including Heavy Quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Qing-Dong; Zeng Ji; Hu Yuan-Yuan; Li Quan-Bo; Xiang Wen-Chang; Zhou Dai-Cui

    2016-01-01

    An analytic massive total cross section of photon-proton scattering is derived, which has geometric scaling. A geometric scaling is used to perform a global analysis of the deep inelastic scattering data on inclusive structure function F_2 measured in lepton–hadron scattering experiments at small values of Bjorken x. It is shown that the descriptions of the inclusive structure function F_2 and longitudinal structure function F_L are improved with the massive analytic structure function, which may imply the gluon saturation effect dominating the parton evolution process at HERA. The inclusion of the heavy quarks prevent the divergence of the lepton–hadron cross section, which plays a significant role in the description of the photoproduction region. (paper)

  17. Search for the exotic decay of the Higgs boson to a pair of light pseudoscalars in the final state with two b quarks and two $\\tau$ leptons

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A search for the exotic decay of the Higgs boson to a pair of light pseudoscalar bosons is performed in the final state with two b jets and two $\\tau$ leptons. The motivation lies in models beyond the standard model (SM), such as two-Higgs-doublet models extended with a complex scalar singlet, which include the next-to-minimal supersymmetric SM (NMSSM). The results are based on an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$, accumulated by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2016 at 13 TeV center-of-mass energy. Masses of the pseudoscalar boson between 15 and 60 GeV are probed, and upper limits as low as $23\\%$ are set on the branching fraction of the Higgs boson to two light pseudoscalar bosons in the NMSSM, assuming that the production cross section of the Higgs boson is the one predicted in the SM. No mass constraint is set on the b jet pair, making this search sensitive to Higgs boson decays to two scalars with different masses.

  18. Tevatron constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quark pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agnew, J P; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Askew, A; Atkins, S; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Avila, C; Azfar, F; Badaud, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartlett, J F; Bartos, P; Bassler, U; Bauce, M; Bazterra, V; Bean, A; Bedeschi, F; Begalli, M; Behari, S; Bellantoni, L; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bhat, P C; Bhatia, S; Bhatnagar, V; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bortoletto, D; Borysova, M; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brigliadori, L; Brock, R; Bromberg, C; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brucken, E; Bu, X B; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buszello, C P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camacho-Pérez, E; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Caughron, S; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chakrabarti, S; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapon, E; Chen, G; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Chokheli, D; Choudhary, B; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Clutter, J; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corbo, M; Corcoran, M; Cordelli, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cutts, D; Das, A; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, G; de Barbaro, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demina, R; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; D'Errico, M; Desai, S; Deterre, C; DeVaughan, K; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Ding, P F; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Eads, M; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Edmunds, D; Elagin, A; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Farrington, S; Fauré, A; Feng, L; Ferbel, T; Fernández Ramos, J P; Fiedler, F; Field, R; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Fuess, S; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garbincius, P H; Garcia-Bellido, A; García-González, J A; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gavrilov, V; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gershtein, Y; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Ginther, G; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gogota, O; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Golovanov, G; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guillemin, T; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hahn, S R; Haley, J; Han, J Y; Han, L; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Harder, K; Hare, M; Harel, A; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinrich, J; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herndon, M; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hocker, A; Hoeneisen, B; Hogan, J; Hohlfeld, M; Holzbauer, J L; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Howley, I; Hubacek, Z; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Ilchenko, Y; Illingworth, R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ito, A S; Ivanov, A; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; James, E; Jang, D; Jayasinghe, A; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jeong, M S; Jesik, R; Jiang, P; Jindariani, S; Johns, K; Johnson, E; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jones, M; Jonsson, P; Joo, K K; Joshi, J; Jun, S Y; Jung, A W; Junk, T R; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Karmanov, D; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Katsanos, I; Kaur, M; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kiselevich, I; Knoepfel, K; Kohli, J M; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurata, M; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lammers, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lei, X; Lellouch, J; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, D; Li, H; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lim, J K; Limosani, A; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipeles, E; Lipton, R; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lobodenko, A; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lokajicek, M; Lopes de Sa, R; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Luna-Garcia, R; Lungu, G; Lyon, A L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Maciel, A K A; Madar, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Mansour, J; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez-Ortega, J; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Miao, T; Miconi, F; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondal, N K; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nagy, E; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neustroev, P; Nguyen, H T; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Nunnemann, T; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Orduna, J; Ortolan, L; Osman, N; Osta, J; Pagliarone, C; Pal, A; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parker, W; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, Y; Petridis, K; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pleier, M-A; Podstavkov, V M; Pondrom, L; Popov, A V; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Prokopenko, N; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ripp-Baudot, I; Ristori, L; Rizatdinova, F; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Rominsky, M; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ross, A; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sajot, G; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santi, L; Santos, A S; Sato, K; Savage, G; Saveliev, V; Savitskyi, M; Savoy-Navarro, A; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwanenberger, C; Schwarz, T; Schwienhorst, R; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Sekaric, J; Semenov, A; Severini, H; Sforza, F; Shabalina, E; Shalhout, S Z; Shary, V; Shaw, S; Shchukin, A A; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simak, V; Simonenko, A; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, H; Sonnenschein, L; Sorin, V; Soustruznik, K; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stark, J; Stentz, D; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, M; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suter, L; Svoisky, P; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Titov, M; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tokmenin, V V; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, Y-T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Verkheev, A Y; Vernieri, C; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vidal, M; Vilanova, D; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wahl, H D; Wallny, R; Wang, M H L S; Wang, S M; Warchol, J; Waters, D; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weichert, J; Welty-Rieger, L; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wobisch, M; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wood, D R; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yamada, R; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, S; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, W; Ye, Z; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Youn, S W; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, J M; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zennamo, J; Zhao, T G; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zucchelli, S

    2015-04-17

    Combined constraints from the CDF and D0 Collaborations on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin J and parity P are presented and compared with results obtained assuming the standard model value JP=0+. Both collaborations analyzed approximately 10  fb(-) of proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV collected at the Fermilab Tevatron. Two models predicting exotic Higgs bosons with JP=0- and JP=2+ are tested. The kinematic properties of exotic Higgs boson production in association with a vector boson differ from those predicted for the standard model Higgs boson. Upper limits at the 95% credibility level on the production rates of the exotic Higgs bosons, expressed as fractions of the standard model Higgs boson production rate, are set at 0.36 for both the JP=0- hypothesis and the JP=2+ hypothesis. If the production rate times the branching ratio to a bottom-antibottom pair is the same as that predicted for the standard model Higgs boson, then the exotic bosons are excluded with significances of 5.0 standard deviations and 4.9 standard deviations for the JP=0- and JP=2+ hypotheses, respectively.

  19. New possibilities for exotic hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    New theoretical ideas and experimental evidence for exotic hadrons are presented. A new exciting candidate is an anticharmed baryon; i.e., a bound state of a nucleon and an F (now called D 3 ). New experimental evidence for four-quark exotic mesons presented at this conference is discussed. The confusion in the E-iota region and the pseudoscalar spectrum still await further experimental clarification

  20. An exotic composite vector boson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Keiichi; Hattori, Takashi; Yasue, Masaki.

    1990-08-01

    An exotic composite vector boson, V, is introduced in two dynamical models of composite quarks, leptons, W and Z. One is based on four Fermi interactions, in which composite vector bosons are regarded as fermion-antifermion bound states and the other is based on the confining SU(2) L gauge model, in which they are given by scalar-antiscalar bound states. Both approaches describe the same effective interactions for the sector of composite quarks, leptons, W, Z, γ and V. (author)

  1. Exotic phases in neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, A.; Burgio, G.F.; Lombardo, U.; Peng, G.X.

    2008-01-01

    The appearance of exotic phases in neutron stars is studied. The possible transition from hadron to quark phase is studied within the density dependent mass quark model, and the kaon condensation within the Nelson and Kaplan model. In both cases a microscopic approach is adopted for dense hadron matter. From the study of the possible coexistence between the two phases it is found that the hybrid phase may strongly hinder the onset of kaon condensation. (author)

  2. Meson Spectroscopy in the Light Quark Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vita, R.

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the hadron spectrum is one of the fundamental issues in modern particle physics. We know that existing hadron configurations include baryons, made of three quarks, and mesons, made of quark-antiquark pairs. However most of the mass of the hadrons is not due to the mass of these elementary constituents but to their binding force. Studying the hadron spectrum is therefore a tool to understand one of the fundamental forces in nature, the strong force, and Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD), the theory that describes it. This investigation can provide an answer to fundamental questions as what is the origin of the mass of hadrons, what is the origin of quark confinement, what are the relevant degrees of freedom to describe these complex systems and how the transition between the elementary constituents, quarks and gluons, and baryons and mesons occurs. In this field a key tool is given by meson spectroscopy. Mesons, being made by a quark and an anti-quark, are the simplest quark bound system and therefore the ideal benchmark to study the interaction between quarks and understand what the role of gluons is. In this investigation, it is fundamental to precisely determine the spectrum and properties of mesons but also to search for possible unconventional states beyond the qbar q configuration as tetraquarks (qqoverline{qq}), hybrids (qbar qg) and glueballs. These states can be distinguished unambiguously from regular mesons when they have exotic quantum numbers, i.e. combinations of total angular momentum, spin and parity that are not allowed for qbar q states. These are called exotic quantum numbers and the corresponding states are referred to as exotics. The study of the meson spectrum and the search for exotics is among the goals of several experiments in the world that exploit different reaction processes, as e+e- annihilation, pbar p annihilation, pion scattering, proton-proton scattering and photo-production, to produce meson states. This intense effort is

  3. Multiquark exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The question Are Anomalons Multiquark Exotics is discussed. It is concluded that so far there is no convincing experimental evidence for any multiquark exotic bound state nor for any exotic resonance. Except for the delta and S* there are no candidates for bound states and no firm theoretical predictions waiting to be tested. Exotic resonances may exist in the 1.5 to 2.0 GeV region and in the charmed sector, e.g., the charmed-strange exotics. The experimental search for multiquark resonances is still open and active

  4. Strange exotic states and compact stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagert, Irina; Wietoska, Mirjam; Schaffner-Bielich, Juergen

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the possible appearance of strange exotic multi-quark states in the interiors of neutron stars and signals for the existence of strange quark matter in the cores of compact stars. We show how the in-medium properties of possible pentaquark states are constrained by pulsar mass measurements. The possibility of generating the observed large pulsar kick velocities by asymmetric emission of neutrinos from strange quark matter in magnetic fields is outlined

  5. Quark model and QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisovich, V.V.

    1989-06-01

    Using the language of the quarks and gluons for description of the soft hadron physics it is necessary to take into account two characteristic phenomena which prevent one from usage of QCD Lagrangian in the straightforward way, chiral symmetry breaking, and confinement of colour particles. The topics discussed in this context are: QCD in the domain of soft processes, phenomenological Lagrangian for soft processes and exotic mesons, spectroscopy of low-lying hadrons (mesons, baryons and mesons with heavy quarks - c,b -), confinement forces, spectral integration over quark masses. (author) 3 refs.; 19 figs.; 3 tabs

  6. Exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villari, A.C.C.

    1990-01-01

    The actual tendencies to study exotic nuclei; applications of exotic nuclei beams in material study and medicine; recent results obtained by GANIL and Berkeley Laboratories of measurements of binding energy and radii of light nuclei; the future experiences to be carry out in several international laboratories and; proposal of studies in Brazil using Pelletron-USP accelerator and the LINAC superconductor accelerator, in construction in the same laboratory, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  7. Exotics. Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Ahmed; Lange, Jens Soeren; Stone, Sheldon

    2017-07-01

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e"+e"- and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ''exotics''. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c anti c or b anti b pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ''molecules'' similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  8. Exotics. Heavy pentaquarks and tetraquarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Lange, Jens Soeren [Giessen Univ. (Germany). II. Physikalisches Inst.; Stone, Sheldon [Syracuse Univ., Syracuse, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    2017-07-15

    For many decades after the invention of the quark model in 1964 there was no evidence that hadrons are formed from anything other than the simplest pairings of quarks and antiquarks, mesons being formed of a quark-antiquark pair and baryons from three quarks. In the last decade, however, in an explosion of data from both e{sup +}e{sup -} and hadron colliders, there are many recently observed states that do not fit into this picture. These new particles are called generically ''exotics''. They can be either mesons or baryons. Remarkably, they all decay into at least one meson formed of either a c anti c or b anti b pair. In this review, after the introduction, we explore each of these new discoveries in detail first from an experimental point of view, then subsequently give a theoretical discussion. These exotics can be explained if the new mesons contain two-quarks and two antiquarks (tetraquarks), while the baryons contain four-quarks plus an antiquark (pentaquarks). The theoretical explanations for these states take three divergent tracks: tightly bound objects, just as in the case of normal hadrons, but with more constituents, or loosely bound ''molecules'' similar to the deuteron, but formed from two mesons, or a meson or baryon, or more wistfully, they are not multiquark states but appear due to kinematic effects caused by different rescatterings of virtual particles; most of these models have all been post-dictions. Both the tightly and loosely bound models predict the masses and related quantum numbers of new, as yet undiscovered states. Thus, future experimental discoveries are needed along with theoretical advances to elucidate the structure of these new exotic states.

  9. Single top quark production with ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Finelli, Kevin Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of single top-quark production in proton proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV are presented. In the leading order process, a W boson is exchanged in the t-channel. The single top-quark and anti-top total production cross sections, their ratio, as well as a measurement of the inclusive production cross section is presented. In addition, a measurement of the production cross section of a single top quark in association with a W boson is presented. All measurements are compared to state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and the CKM matrix element |Vtb| is determined. In addition, the s-channel production is explored and limits on exotic production in single top quark processes are discussed. This includes the search for flavor changing neutral currents and the search for additional W’ bosons or a search for monotops.

  10. Single top quark production in ATLAS at the LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stillings Jan A.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the single top quark production cross-sections in proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented. The single top-quark production in the t and Wt-channels and the determination of the CKM matrix element |Vtb| are discussed. A separate measurement of the top and antitop quark cross-sections and their ratio is shown. These measurements are sensitive to the parton distribution function in the proton. In addition, limits on exotic production in single top quark processes are outlined. This also includes the search for flavour-changing neutral currents and for additional W’ bosons in the s-channel.

  11. A malacological survey in the Manso Power Plant, State of Mato Grosso, Brazil: new records of freshwater snails, including transmitters of schistosomiasis and exotic species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Ammon Fernandez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease of public health concern in Brazil, and the construction of hydroelectric dams, in addition to increasing permanent human settlement and tourism, has created conditions suitable for the establishment of mollusks that can transmit schistosomiasis. Such areas require a number of actions to prevent the establishment of schistosomiasis. This paper reports on a freshwater malacological survey carried out in the geographical area of the Manso Power Plant. Methods Mollusks were collected in 18 municipalities in the State of Mato Grosso between February 2002 and February 2004 (qualitative study and from April 2009 to February 2011 (quantitative study. Results Thirty-one species of mollusks were collected, including newly recorded species (Antillorbis nordestensis and Burnupia ingae. In addition, the geographic distributions of known species, including Biomphalaria straminea, a snail vector of Schistosoma mansoni, were expanded. A total of 4,507 specimens were collected in the APM Manso reservoir (Usina Hidrelétrica de Aproveitamento Múltiplo de Manso during the quantitative study, and Biomphalaria amazonica was found in six of the 10 localities analyzed. The Afroasiatic species Melanoides tuberculata, introduced after February 2009, was the dominant species (relative abundance 94.96%. Conclusions The study area is epidemiologically important due to the occurrence of B. straminea and B. amazonica, which are vectors of schistosomiasis, and M. tuberculata, a snail host of Centrocestus formosanus, which is responsible for centrocestiasis transmission. Observations of M. tuberculata and the exotic freshwater clams Corbicula fluminea and Corbicula largillierti raise concerns about biodiversity.

  12. The quark bag model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasenfratz, P.; Kuti, J.

    1978-01-01

    The quark bag model is reviewed here with particular emphasis on spectroscopic applications and the discussion of exotic objects as baryonium, gluonium, and the quark phase of matter. The physical vacuum is pictured in the model as a two-phase medium. In normal phase of the vacuum, outside hadrons, the propagation of quark and gluon fields is forbidden. When small bubbles in a second phase are created in the medium of the normal phase with a characteristic size of one fermi, the hadron constituent fields may propagate inside the bubbles in normal manner. The bubble (bag) is stabilized against the pressure of the confined hadron constituent fields by vacuum pressure and surface tension. Inside the bag the colored quarks and gluons are governed by the equations of quantum chromodynamics. (Auth.)

  13. Exotic charmonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakhlova, Galina V; Pakhlov, Pavel N [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Russian Federation State Scientific Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Eidel' man, Semen I [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-06-07

    The most significant results on the spectroscopy, production, and decay of charmonium and charmonium-like states are reviewed. The surprise-filled physics of charmonium is currently attracting great experimental and theoretical attention. Unexpected properties exhibited by numerous discovered states fail to be explained by the theory, which instead suggests the existence in the spectra of charmonium-like particles of exotic systems different from usual bound states. (reviews of topical problems)

  14. Meson-Meson molecules and compact four-quark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.

    2010-01-01

    The physics of charm has become one of the best laboratories exposing the limitations of the naive constituent quark model and also giving hints into a more mature description of meson spectroscopy, beyond the simple quark-antiquark configurations. In this talk we review some recent studies of multiquark components in the charm sector and discuss in particular exotic and non-exotic four-quark systems.

  15. Quark degrees of freedom in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lovas, I.

    1986-03-01

    Experimental facts which can not be interpreted in terms of nucleonic degrees of freedom are reviewed. Attempts to explain these observations by the help of the notions of quark physics are indicated. Some predicted exotic states are enumerated. The most promising models of the nucleon-nucleon interactions in terms of quarks are briefly discussed. (author)

  16. Why stop at two tops? Search for exotic production of top quarks in final states with same-sign leptons and $b$-jets at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00220614; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    An analysis is presented of events containing jets including at least one $b$-tagged jet, sizable missing transverse momentum, and at least two charged leptons including a pair of the same electric charge, with the scalar sum of the jet and lepton transverse momenta being large. Standard Model processes rarely produce these final states, but several models of physics beyond the Standard Model predict an enhanced production rate of such events. Specific models with this feature are considered here: vector-like $T$, $B$, and $T_{5/3}$ quark pair production, and four top quark production under three scenarios (Standard Model, contact interaction, and extra-dimensions). A data sample of 3.2 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$=13 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is used in this analysis. Several signal regions are defined, in which the consistency between the data yield and the background-only hypothesis is checked, and 95% confidence level limits ar...

  17. Quark-quark interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, M.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter discusses interactions only at the constituent level, as observed in hadron-hadron collisions. It defines quarks and gluons as constituents of the colliding hadrons, reviews some applications of perturbative OCD, discussing in turn lepton pair production, which in lowest order approximation corresponds to the Drell-Yan process. It investigates whether quark-quark interactions could not lead to some new color structure different from those prevalent for known baryons and mesons, which could be created in hadron interactions, and whether color objects (not specifically quarks or gluons) could not appear as free particles. Discussed is perturbative QCD in hadron collisions; the quark approach to soft processes; and new color structures. It points out that perturbative QCD has been at the origin of much progress in the understanding of hadron interactions at the constituent level

  18. Exotic quantum states for charmed baryons at finite temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxing Zhao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The significantly screened heavy-quark potential in hot medium provides the possibility to study exotic quantum states of three-heavy-quark systems. By solving the Schrödinger equation for a three-charm-quark system at finite temperature, we found that, there exist Borromean states which might be realized in high energy nuclear collisions, and the binding energies of the system satisfy precisely the scaling law for Efimov states in the resonance limit.

  19. Signatures for exotic quark singlets from superstrings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, V.; Deshpande, N.G.; Gunion, J.F.

    1986-09-01

    We consider various scenarios, at Superconducting Super Collider energy and luminosity, for detection of the extra colored, weak isospin singlet, charge -1/3 heavy fermion resulting from E 6 compactification in superstring theories

  20. Subquark model of leptons and quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazawa, Hidezumi.

    1979-09-01

    1) First, various subquark models so far proposed are briefly reviewed. Classifications of leptons and quarks in the models and their comparison are made. Our spinor-subquark model of leptons and quarks in which leptons and quarks are made of three subquarks of spin 1/2 is discussed in detail. 2) The possibility that guage bosons and Higgs scalars are also made of a subquark-antisubquark pair is discussed. 3) Exotic states of subquarks such as leptons and quarks of spin 3/2, exotic fermions, and exotic bosons are predicted in our model. 4) Subquark currents and their algebra are proposed. 5) Two unified subquark models of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed. The one is a gauge model and the other is a model of the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type. 6) A subquark model of gravity and its supergrand unification is proposed. 7) An finally, a speculation is made on ''color-space correspondence''. (author)

  1. Top quark measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Grancagnolo, Sergio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, this gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks at the Large Hadron Collider. This talk will present highlights of a few recent precision measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration of the top quark using 13 TeV and 8 TeV collision data: top-quark pair and single top production cross sections including differential distributions will be presented alongside top quark properties measurements. These measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top quark production in the TeV regime. Measurements of the top quark mass and searches for rare top quark decays are also presented.

  2. Top quark measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00041686; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, it allows us to probe the properties of bare quarks at the Large Hadron Collider. Highlights of a few recent precision measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration of the top quark using 13 TeV and 8 TeV collision data will be presented: top-quark pair and single top production cross sections including differential distributions will be presented alongside measurements of top-quark properties, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top-quark production in the TeV regime. Measurements of the top-quark mass and searches for rare top quark decays are also presented.

  3. Single Top quark production cross section and properties using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sapp, Kevin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of single top-quark production in proton proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV are presented. In the leading order process, a W boson is exchanged in the t-channel. The single top-quark and anti-top total production cross sections, their ratio, as well as a measurement of the inclusive production cross section is presented. In addition, a measurement of the production cross section of a single top quark in association with a W boson is presented. All measurements are compared to state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and the CKM matrix element |Vtb| is determined. In addition, the s-channel production is explored and limits on exotic production in single top quark processes are discussed. This includes the search for flavor changing neutral currents and the search for additional W’ bosons or a search for monotops.

  4. Single Top quark production cross section and properties using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    ATLAS Collaboration; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of single top­quark production in proton proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV are presented. In the leading order process,​a W boson is exchanged in the t­channel. The single top­ quark and anti­top total production cross sections, their ratio, as well as a measurement of the inclusive production cross section is presented. In addition, a measurement of the production cross section of a single top quark in association with a W boson is presented. All measurements are compared to state­-of­-the­-art theoretical calculations and the CKM matrix element |Vtb| is determined. In addition, the s­-channel production is explored and limits on exotic production in single top quark processes are discussed. This includes the search for flavor changing neutral currents and the search for additional W’ bosons or a search for monotops.

  5. Single Top quark production cross section using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Monini, C; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of single top-quark production cross section in proton proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV are presented. In the leading order process, a W boson is exchanged in the t-channel. The single top-quark and anti-top total production cross sections, their ratio, as well as a measurement of the inclusive production cross section is presented. In addition, a measurement of the production cross section of a single top quark in association with a W boson is presented. All measurements are compared to NLO and NLO+NNLO calculations and the CKM matrix element |Vtb| is determined. In addition, the s-channel production is explored and limits on exotic production in single top quark processes are discussed. This includes the search for flavor changing neutral currents and the search for additional W’ bosons in the s-channel.

  6. Top quark forward-backward asymmetry from new t-channel physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Sunghoon; Pierce, Aaron; Wells, James D

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by recent measurements of the top quark forward-backward asymmetry at the Tevatron, we study how t-channel new physics can contribute to a large value. We concentrate on a theory with an abelian gauge boson possessing flavor changing couplings between up and top quarks, but satisfies flavor physics constraints. Collider constraints are strong, but can be consistent with the aid of small flavor diagonal couplings. We find that M_Z' ~ 160 GeV can yield a total lab-frame asymmetry of ~18% without being in conflict with other observables. There are implications for future collider searches, including exotic top quark decays, like-sign top quark production, and detailed measurements of the top production cross section. An alternate model with a gauged non-Abelian flavor symmetry would have similar phenomenology, but lacks the like-sign top signal.

  7. A measurement of the top quark's charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unalan, Zeynep Gunay [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The top quark was discovered in 1995 at the Fermilab National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). One way to confirm if the observed top quark is really the top quark posited in the Standard Model (SM) is to measure its electric charge. In the Standard Model the top quark is the isospin partner of the bottom quark and is expected to have a charge of +2/3. However, an alternative 'exotic' model has been proposed with a fourth generation exotic quark that has the same characteristics, such as mass, as our observed top but with a charge of -4/3. This thesis presents the first CDF measurement of the top quark's charge via its decay products, a W boson and a bottom quark, using ~ 1 fb-1 of data. The data were collected by the CDF detector from proton anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at Fermilab. We classify events depending on the charges of the bottom quark and associated W boson and count the number of events which appear 'SM-like' or 'exotic-like' with a SM-like event decaying as t → W+b and an exotic event as t → W-b. We find the p-value under the Standard Model hypothesis to be 0.35 which is consistent with the Standard Model. We exclude the exotic quark hypothesis at an 81% confidence level, for which we have chosen a priori that the probability of incorrectly rejecting the SM would be 1%. The calculated Bayes Factor (BF) is 2 x Ln(BF)=8.54 which is interpreted as the data strongly favors the Standard Model over the exotic quark hypothesis.

  8. The exotic atoms of QCD: glueballs, hybrids and baryonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, T.

    1984-05-01

    The theoretical basis underlying the expected ''exotic'' states in QCD, the theory of quarks and gluons, is reviewed in three lectures. The first lecture is an historical introduction to QCD. The second lecture is a critical review of the MIT bag model and QCD on a lattice. The status of three candidate ''exotic'' states seen in psi radiative decays, the i(1440), O(1700) and zeta(2220) are discussed in the third lecture. (author)

  9. The Quark's Model and Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novozhilov, Yuri V.

    1977-01-01

    Quarks are elementary particles considered to be components of the proton, the neutron, and others. This article presents the quark model as a mathematical concept. Also discussed are gluons and bag models. A bibliography is included. (MA)

  10. Color sextet quarks and new high-energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, A.R.; Kang, Kyungsik

    1992-01-01

    We review the implications of adding a flavor doublet of color sextet quarks to QCD. Theoretical attractions include -- ''minimal'' dynamical symmetry breaking of the electroweak interaction, solution of the Strong CP problem via the ''heavy axion'' η 6 , and Critical Pomeron Scaling at asymptotic energies. Related experimental phenomena, which there may be evidence for, include -- production of the η 6 at LEP, large cross-sections for W + W - and Z o Z o pairs and very high energy jets in hadron colliders, and a hadronic threshold above which high-energy ''exotic'' diffractive processes appear in Cosmic Ray events

  11. Exotic nuclei: another aspect of nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobaczewski, J.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Flocard, H.; Garcia Borge, M.J.; Nowacki, F.; Rombouts, S.; Theisen, Ch.; Marques, F.M.; Lacroix, D.; Dessagne, P.; Gaeggeler, H.

    2002-01-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot Curie international summer school in 2002 whose theme that year was exotic nuclei. There were 11 contributions whose titles are: 1) interactions, symmetry breaking and effective fields from quarks to nuclei; 2) status and perspectives for the study of exotic nuclei: experimental aspects; 3) the pairing interaction and the N = Z nuclei; 4) borders of stability region and exotic decays; 5) shell structure of nuclei: from stability to decay; 6) variational approach of system with a few nucleons; 7) from heavy to super-heavy nuclei; 8) halos, molecules and multi-neutrons; 9) macroscopic approaches for fusion reactions; 10) beta decay: a tool for spectroscopy; 11) the gas phase chemistry of super-heavy elements

  12. Quasi-exotic open-flavor mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A. [University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Institute of Physics, Graz (Austria)

    2017-06-15

    Meson states with exotic quantum numbers arise naturally in a covariant bound-state framework in QCD. We investigate the consequences of shifting quark masses such that the states are no longer restricted to certain C-parities, but only by J{sup P}. Then, a priori, one can no longer distinguish exotic or conventional states. In order to identify signatures of the different states to look for experimentally, we provide the behavior of masses, leptonic decay constants, and orbital-angular-momentum decomposition of such mesons, as well as the constellations in which they could be found. Most prominently, we consider the case of charged quasi-exotic excitations of the pion. (orig.)

  13. Production and decay of exotic fermions in high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queiroz Filho, Pedro Pacheco de

    1995-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the production and decay of exotic fermions predicted by some extensions of the standard model. We select for our study the more popular models: vector singlet, vector doublet and Fermion Mirror-Fermion. We want to establish the differences between these models and also in relation to the Standard Model. We make investigations by Monte Carlo simulations, to study the phenomenology of the particles expected in these models, particularly the exotic fermions. These studies were done for electron-proton collisions at DESY HERA energies. We considered the investigation of exotic quark production, electron-positron collisions in LEP II and NLC energies in order to study the production of exotic leptons, and virtual exotic lepton contribution in the specific process e + e - → ιν-bar ι W + . (author)

  14. Single top quark production cross-section measurements using the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Finelli, Kevin Daniel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of single top quark production in proton--proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV using the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC are presented. In the leading order process, a $W$ boson is exchanged in the $t$-channel. The single top quark and anti-top total production cross-sections ratio, as well as a measurement of the inclusive and fiducial production cross-sections are presented. In addition, a measurement of the production cross-section of a single top quark in association with a $W$ boson is presented. All measurements are compared to state-of-the-art theoretical calculations and the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ is determined. The $s$-channel production is also explored and limits on exotic production in single top quark processes are discussed. This includes the search for additional $W’$ bosons and a search for monotops.

  15. Beyond Standard Model searches with top quarks at ATLAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevalier, F.

    2008-01-01

    At the Lhc, the top quark is expected to provide a huge and clean signal. With about eight millions of expected top pairs and three millions of single top events produced per year in the low luminosity runs, and with a low level of backgrounds, the Lhc will open a new opportunity for precision measurements of the top quark properties and for exotic topology searches involving top quarks. As the ATLAS discovery potential on new physics with top quarks is being assessed with many analyses, this paper focuses on two particular topics: heavy neutral resonance and charged Higgs boson searches with top quarks. The analyses and the ATLAS expectations are described.

  16. Confinement and deconfinement of quarks in nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baym, G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear matter at high baryon density or excitation energy is expected to undergo a transition to deconfined quark matter, a new state of matter, whose production and detection would be an exciting and basic advance in nuclear physics. These lectures summarize current understanding of quark matter and the deconfinement transition. Beginning with a review of elementary models of confinement, the basic properties of quark matter are described, estimates of the transition from hadronic to quark matter are made, and various ways one might see quark matter experimentally by production in nuclear collisions or in the form of metastable exotic nuclear objects are discussed. (author)

  17. On the exotic Higgs decays in effective field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélusca-Maïto, Hermès; Falkowski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We discuss exotic Higgs decays in an effective field theory where the Standard Model is extended by dimension-6 operators. We review and update the status of two-body lepton- and quark-flavor-violating decays involving the Higgs boson. We also comment on the possibility of observing three-body flavor-violating Higgs decays in this context.

  18. On the exotic Higgs decays in effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belusca-Maito, Hermes; Falkowski, Adam [Universite Paris-Sud, Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Orsay (France)

    2016-09-15

    We discuss exotic Higgs decays in an effective field theory where the Standard Model is extended by dimension-6 operators. We review and update the status of two-body lepton- and quark-flavor-violating decays involving the Higgs boson. We also comment on the possibility of observing three-body flavor-violating Higgs decays in this context. (orig.)

  19. Baryons in the unquenched quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bijker, R.; Díaz-Gómez, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, AP 70-543, 04510 Mexico DF (Mexico); Lopez-Ruiz, M. A. [Physics Department and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Santopinto, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Genova, via Dodecaneso 33, I-16146 Italy (Italy)

    2016-07-07

    In this contribution, we present the unquenched quark model as an extension of the constituent quark model that includes the effects of sea quarks via a {sup 3}P{sub 0} quark-antiquark pair-creation mechanism. Particular attention is paid to the spin and flavor content of the proton, magnetic moments and β decays of octet baryons.

  20. Exotic power and propulsion concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forward, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The status of some exotic physical phenomena and unconventional spacecraft concepts that might produce breakthroughs in power and propulsion in the 21st Century are reviewed. The subjects covered include: electric, nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, antimatter, high energy density materials, metallic hydrogen, laser thermal, solar thermal, solar sail, magnetic sail, and tether propulsion

  1. Energy exotic options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminski, V.; Gibner, S.; Pinnamaneni, K.

    1999-01-01

    This chapter with 88 references focuses on the use of exotic options to control exposure to energy prices. Exotic options are defined, and the conversion of a standard option into an exotic option and pricing models are examined. Pricing and hedging exotic options, path-dependent options, multi-commodity options, options on the minimum-or-maximum of two commodities, compound options, digital options, hybrid and complex structures, and natural gas daily options are described. Formulas for option pricing for vanilla, barrier, compound, options on minimum or maximum of two assets, and look back options are given in an appendix

  2. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  3. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented

  4. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1996-08-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and D null collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented

  5. Quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joos, H.

    1976-07-01

    The main topics of these lectures are: phenomenological approach to quark confinement, standard Lagrangian of hadrondynamics, Lagrangian field theory and quark confinement, classical soliton solutions in a simple model, quantization of extended systems, colour charge screening and quantization on a lattice and remarks on applications. A survey of the scientific publications listed according to the topics until 26 March 1976 is supplemented. (BJ) [de

  6. Nuclei with exotic constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Toshimitsu.

    1990-08-01

    We discuss various interesting features in the behavior of exotic constituents of nuclei such as hyperons and mesons, in particular, with emphases on the aspect of exotic halos which are formed in general by short-range repulsion and long-range attraction. Specifically, Λ and Σ hypernuclei and pionic nuclei are discussed. (author)

  7. Bounds on the mixing of the down-type quarks with vector-like singlet quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavoura, L.; Silva, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    We derive bounds on the mixing of the standard charge -1/3 quarks with vector-like isosinglet quarks, as they exist in some extensions of the standard model. We make no assumptions about the unitarity or any other features of the mixing matrix. We find that the mixing is quite constrained: we are able to set bounds on all the extra parameters which arise in the mixing matrix (CKM matrix), except on two phases. The assumption that there exists only one exotic quark leads to some extra relationships among the parameters of the mixing matrix

  8. Nucleon quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloet, I.C. [Special Research Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter and Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia) and Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)]. E-mail: icloet@physics.adelaide.edu.au; Bentz, W. [Department of Physics, School of Science, Tokai University, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)]. E-mail: bentz@keyaki.cc.u-tokai.ac.jp; Thomas, A.W. [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)]. E-mail: awthomas@jlab.org

    2005-08-18

    Spin-dependent and spin-independent quark light-cone momentum distributions and structure functions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquark channels are included. We find excellent agreement between our model results and empirical data.

  9. Top quark production at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Gilles, Geoffrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, it gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks at the Large Hadron Collider. This talk will present highlights of a few recent precision measurements of the top quark using 13 TeV and 8 TeV collision data: top-quark pair and single top production cross sections, including differential distributions and production in association with bosons, will be presented alongside top quark properties measurements. These measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top quark production in the TeV regime. Measurements of the top quark mass are also presented.

  10. On exotic fireballs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tati, T.

    1984-01-01

    Exotic fireballs found by Brazil-Japan Collaboration of Chacaltaya Emulsion Chamber Experiment are interpreted in terms of a model of hadronic matter (of which hadrons are made) based on the theory of finite degree of freedom. It is considered in our picture that exotic fireballs reveal the part left undefined in the renormalization theory of quantum field and nonappearance of exotic fireballs (of relatively small mass, i.e. Mini-Centauro and Geminion) in CERN SPS collider experiment is possibly due to the existence of universal time realized by the cutoff of momentum degree of freedom of the field of basic particles. (Author) [pt

  11. Phenomenology of heavy quark systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1987-03-01

    The spectroscopy of heavy quark systems is examined with regards to spin independent and spin dependent potentials. It is shown that a qualitative picture exists of the spin-independent forces, and that a semi-quantitative understanding exists for the spin-dependent effects. A brief review is then given of the subject of the decays of hadrons containing heavy quarks, including weak decays at the quark level, and describing corrections to the spectator model

  12. Transversity quark distributions in a covariant quark-diquark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloet, I.C. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4843 (United States)], E-mail: icloet@anl.gov; Bentz, W. [Department of Physics, School of Science, Tokai University, Hiratsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)], E-mail: bentz@keyaki.cc.u-tokai.ac.jp; Thomas, A.W. [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)], E-mail: awthomas@jlab.org

    2008-01-17

    Transversity quark light-cone momentum distributions are calculated for the nucleon. We utilize a modified Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in which confinement is simulated by eliminating unphysical thresholds for nucleon decay into quarks. The nucleon bound state is obtained by solving the relativistic Faddeev equation in the quark-diquark approximation, where both scalar and axial-vector diquark channels are included. Particular attention is paid to comparing our results with the recent experimental extraction of the transversity distributions by Anselmino et al. We also compare our transversity results with earlier spin-independent and helicity quark distributions calculated in the same approach.

  13. Exotic Small Mammals and Bartonella

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Nina Marano discusses Bartonella, a bacterial agent that’s prevalent in many species, including cats, dogs, and cattle. Wild animals are normally thought to carry Bartonella, so when animals are caught in the wild for pet trade, the risk that humans can become infected with Bartonella increases. Bartonella is an identified risk associated with ownership of exotic animals and has serious health consequences.

  14. Search for exotic physics with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Delsart, Pierre-Antoine

    2006-01-01

    At the LHC, the program of research in particle physics beyond the Standard Model is extremely rich. With the ATLAS detector, besides SUSY mainstream studies, many exotic theoretical models will be investigated. They range from compositeness of fundamental fermions to extra dimension scenarii through GUT models and include many variants. I shall review some selected typical studies by the ATLAS collaboration on exotic physics, highlighting the discovery prospects and the recent analyses using the latest full detector simulations.

  15. On the Coulomb gauge quark propagator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kloker, M.; Alkofer, R.; Krassnigg, A.; Krenn, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A solution of the quark Dyson-Schwinger equation including transverse gluons is presented. The corresponding retardation effects in the quark propagator are discussed. Especially, their effects on confinement properties and dynamical mass generation are described. (author)

  16. The decays Psub(c) -> VP in the group theoretical and quark diagrammatic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuan, S.F.; Xiaoyuan Li.

    1983-08-01

    Decays of charmed meson into one vector meson and one pseudoscalar meson Psub(c) -> VP in both the group theoretical and quark diagrammatic approaches are considered. A complete decay amplitude analysis is given. The present available experimental data can be accomodated if the contributions from exotic final states and exotic piece of weak Hamiltonian are also taken into account. (orig.)

  17. QCD with two light dynamical chirally improved quarks: Mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Georg P.; Lang, C. B.; Limmer, Markus; Mohler, Daniel; Schäfer, Andreas

    2012-02-01

    We present results for the spectrum of light and strange mesons on configurations with two flavors of mass-degenerate Chirally Improved sea quarks. The calculations are performed on seven ensembles of lattice size 163×32 at three different gauge couplings and with pion masses ranging from 250 to 600 MeV. To reliably extract excited states, we use the variational method with an interpolator basis containing both Gaussian and derivative quark sources. Both conventional and exotic channels up to spin 2 are considered. Strange quarks are treated within the partially quenched approximation. For kaons we investigate the mixing of interpolating fields corresponding to definite C-parity in the SU(3) limit. This enlarged basis allows for an improved determination of the low-lying kaon spectrum. In addition to masses we also extract the ratio of the pseudoscalar decay constants of the kaon and pion and obtain FK/Fπ=1.215(41). The results presented here include some ensembles from previous publications and the corresponding results supersede the previously published values.

  18. Hadron interactions in quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narodetskij, I.M.

    1987-01-01

    Some recent developments on the study of quark degrees of freedom in hadron scattering at intermediate energy are reviewed. Physical foundations of the P-matrix approach and the Quark Compound Bag method are discussed including applications to pion-pion, pion-nucleon, nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon systems

  19. Exotic Nuclei and Yukawa's Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Suzuki, Toshio; Utsuno, Yutaka

    2008-01-01

    In this plenary talk, we will overview the evolution of the shell structure in stable and exotic nuclei as a new paradigm of nuclear structure physics. This shell evolution is primarily due to the tensor force. The robust mechanism and some examples will be presented. Such examples include the disappearance of existing magic numbers and the appearance of new ones. The nuclear magic numbers have been believed, since Mayer and Jensen, to be constants as 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, ... This turned out to be changed, once we entered the regime of exotic nuclei. This shell evolution develops at many places on the nuclear chart in various forms. For example, superheavy magic numbers may be altered. Thus, we are led to a new paradigm as to how and where the nuclear shell evolves, and what consequences arise. The evolution of the shell affects weak process transitions, and plays a crucial role in deformation. The π and ρ mesons generate tensor forces, and are the fundamental elements of such intriguing phenomena. Thus, physics of exotic nuclei arises as a manifestation of Yukawa's forces

  20. Many-Body Coulomb Gauge Exotic and Charmed Hybrids

    OpenAIRE

    Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Cotanch, Stephen R.

    2000-01-01

    Utilizing a QCD Coulomb gauge Hamiltonian with linear confinement specified by lattice, we report a relativistic many-body calculation for the light exotic and charmed hybrid mesons. The Hamiltonian successfully describes both quark and gluon sectors, with vacuum and quasiparticle properties generated by a BCS transformation and more elaborate TDA and RPA diagonalizations for the meson ($q\\bar{q}$) and glueball ($gg$) masses. Hybrids entail a computationally intense relativistic three quasipa...

  1. Heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoze, V.A.

    1983-10-01

    We discuss the results accumulated during the last five years in heavy quark physics and try to draw a simple general picture of the present situation. The survey is based on a unified point of view resulting from quantum chromodynamics. (orig.)

  2. The penta-quark: a new kind of elementary particle?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeke, K.; Praszatowicz, M.

    2005-01-01

    The discovery of the exotic Θ + with minimal quark structure uudds-bar may provide a sensation since, if confirmed, it is the first baryonic particle that cannot be composed of three quarks. The chiral quark soliton description of baryons has predicted the mass and an upper limit for the decay width of this particle prior to the experiments and in agreement with the present data. The model corresponds to a relativistic mean field description of the nucleon, where the quarks move in a self-consistent mean field of pionic and kaonic character. It uses an effective chiral Lagrangian based on spontaneously broken chiral symmetry of the QCD. In a natural way the chiral quark soliton model describes the well known lowest two multiplets (8, 1 + /2), (10, 3 + /2) and it predicts two more exotic particles being members of an anti-decuplet (10-bar, 1 + /2) consisting of penta-quarks. The very narrow width of the Θ + can be explained by the small overlap of the 5-quark light cone wave function of the Θ + with the small 5-quark light cone component of the wave function of the nucleon. If confirmed, Θ + will not only be a new kind of subatomic particle but will seriously influence our understanding of the structure of ordinary nucleons. (authors)

  3. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2007-11-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban settings, that are confronted with these exposures. It is important for emergency departments to be aware of the large underground presence of exotic venomous reptile pets and to utilise the expertise of regional poison centres that will also assist in the procurement of exotic antivenoms.

  4. On hypercharge flux and exotics in F-theory GUTs

    CERN Document Server

    Dudas, Emilian; 10.1007

    2010-01-01

    We study SU(5) Grand Unified Theories within a local framework in F-theory with multiple extra U(1) symmetries arising from a small monodromy group. The use of hypercharge flux for doublet-triplet splitting implies massless exotics in the spectrum that are protected from obtaining a mass by the U(1) symmetries. We find that lifting the exotics by giving vacuum expectation values to some GUT singlets spontaneously breaks all the U(1) symmetries which implies that proton decay operators are induced. If we impose an additional R-parity symmetry by hand we find all the exotics can be lifted while proton decay operators are still forbidden. These models can retain the gauge coupling unification accuracy of the MSSM at 1-loop. For models where the generations are distributed across multiple curves we also present a motivation for the quark-lepton mass splittings at the GUT scale based on a Froggatt-Nielsen approach to flavour.

  5. Exotic fermions in the left-right symmetric model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J.; Volkas, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study is made of non-standard fermion multiplets in left-right symmetric models with gauge group SU(3) x SU(2) L x SU(2) R x U(1) BL . Constraints from gauge anomaly cancellation and invariance of Yukawa coupling terms are used to define interesting classes of exotic fermions. The standard quark lepton spectrum of left-right symmetric models was identified as the simplest member of an infinite class. Phenomenological implications of the next simplest member of this class are then studied. Classes of exotic fermions which may couple to the standard fermions through doublet Higgs bosons were also considered, then shown that some of these exotics may be used to induce a generalised universal see-saw mechanism. 12 refs., 1 tab

  6. Time delayed K sup + N reactions and exotic baryon resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G; Khemchandani, K P

    2003-01-01

    Evidence and hints, from both the theoretical and experimental sides, of exotic baryon resonances with B = S, have been with us for the last 30 years. The poor status of the general acceptance of these Z* resonances is partly due to the prejudice against penta-quark baryons and partly due to the opinion that a proof of the existence of exotic states must be rigorous. This can refer to the quality and amount of data gathered, and also to the analytical methods applied in the study of these resonances. It then seems mandatory that all possibilities and aspects be exploited. We do that by analysing the time delay in K sup + N scattering, encountering clear signals of the exotic Z* resonances close to the pole values found in partial wave analyses.

  7. The search for exotic baryons at the HERMES experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deconinck, Wouter

    2008-07-15

    One of the interesting questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory that governs the interactions between quarks and gluons, has been whether it is possible to observe hadrons which can not be explained as a combination of only two or three valence quarks. In numerous searches the existence of these exotic hadrons could not be confirmed. Recently, calculations based on the quark soliton model predicted the narrow exotic baryons {theta}{sup +} and {xi}{sup --}. A narrow resonance identified as the {theta}{sup +} was observed by several experiments at the predicted mass of 1540 MeV, but later followed by several dedicated experiments that could not confirm these positive results. At the HERMES experiment a search for the quasi-real photoproduction of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on a deuterium target and the subsequent decay through pK{sup 0}{sub S} {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} revealed a narrow resonance in the pK{sup 0}{sub S} invariant mass distribution at 1528 MeV. In the search for the corresponding antiparticle {xi}{sup --} the result is consistent with zero events. In this thesis we present the search for the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} on a deuterium target in the data sample used for the observation of the {theta}{sup +}. An upper limit on the cross section of the exotic baryon {xi}{sup --} is determined. The search for the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} on hydrogen and deuterium targets at the HERMES experiment is extensively discussed. The event mixing method can be used to estimate the distribution of background events. Several difficulties with this method were addressed, but the background description in the case of the exotic baryon {theta}{sup +} remains unconvincing. Between the years 2002 and 2005 the HERMES experiment operated with a magnetic holding field around the hydrogen target. A method for the reconstruction of displaced vertices in this field was developed. The data collected during the years 2006 and 2007 offer an integrated

  8. The search for exotic baryons at the HERMES experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconinck, Wouter

    2008-07-01

    One of the interesting questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, the theory that governs the interactions between quarks and gluons, has been whether it is possible to observe hadrons which can not be explained as a combination of only two or three valence quarks. In numerous searches the existence of these exotic hadrons could not be confirmed. Recently, calculations based on the quark soliton model predicted the narrow exotic baryons Θ + and Ξ -- . A narrow resonance identified as the Θ + was observed by several experiments at the predicted mass of 1540 MeV, but later followed by several dedicated experiments that could not confirm these positive results. At the HERMES experiment a search for the quasi-real photoproduction of the exotic baryon Θ + on a deuterium target and the subsequent decay through pK 0 S → pπ + π - revealed a narrow resonance in the pK 0 S invariant mass distribution at 1528 MeV. In the search for the corresponding antiparticle Ξ -- the result is consistent with zero events. In this thesis we present the search for the exotic baryon Ξ -- on a deuterium target in the data sample used for the observation of the Θ + . An upper limit on the cross section of the exotic baryon Ξ -- is determined. The search for the exotic baryon Θ + on hydrogen and deuterium targets at the HERMES experiment is extensively discussed. The event mixing method can be used to estimate the distribution of background events. Several difficulties with this method were addressed, but the background description in the case of the exotic baryon Θ + remains unconvincing. Between the years 2002 and 2005 the HERMES experiment operated with a magnetic holding field around the hydrogen target. A method for the reconstruction of displaced vertices in this field was developed. The data collected during the years 2006 and 2007 offer an integrated luminosity that is several times higher than in previous data sets. After investigating all data sets collected with the HERMES

  9. Quarks, QCD [quantum chromodynamics] and the real world of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1987-07-01

    The experimental evidence that supports quantum chromodynamics as the theory that describes how the quarks interact is briefly discussed. The indications of the existence of quarks are reviewed, and calculation of hadron masses is discussed. Additional evidence of hadron substructure as seen in the antiproton is reviewed. Arguments for the existence of color as the ''charge'' carried by quarks by which they interact are given. Hadron masses and the hyperfine interaction are presented, followed by more exotic quark systems and a study of multiquark systems. Weak interactions in the quark model are discussed

  10. ΛN-ΣN interaction with isobar coupling and six-quark resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, W.R.; Lomon, E.L.

    1993-01-01

    The long-range ΛN-ΣN interaction is modeled by a configuration-space meson-exchange potential matrix coupling to channels with Δ and Σ(1385) isobars. An inner boundary condition, based on R-matrix theory, replaces form factors for short-range effects and includes the effects of free quark configurations. An excellent fit is obtained to the available data, with only the energy-independent boundary conditions as free parameters. The effect of isobar thresholds is shown to be substantial in several partial waves and is crucial to the understanding of the higher-energy ΛN elastic scattering data. The positions and widths of [q(1s 1/2 )] 5 s(1s 1/2 ) quark exotics are predicted

  11. Heavy quark hadron mass scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.T.

    1994-01-01

    Without the spin interactions the hardron masses within a multiplet are degenerate. The light quark hadron degenerate mulitplet mass spectrum is extended from the 3 quark ground state multiplets at J P =0 - , 1/2 + , 1 - to include the excited states which follow the spinorial decomposition of SU(2)xSU(2). The mass scales for the 4, 5, 6, .. quark hadrons are obtained from the degenerate multiplet mass m 0 /M=n 2 /α with n=4, 5, 6, .. The 4, 5, 6, .. quark hadron degenerate multiplet masses follow by splitting of the heavy quark mass scales according to the spinorial decomposition of SU(2)xSU(2). (orig.)

  12. Exotic invasive plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carolyn Hull Sieg; Barbara G. Phillips; Laura P. Moser

    2003-01-01

    Ecosystems worldwide are threatened by nonnative plant invasions that can cause undesirable, irreversible changes. They can displace native plants and animals, out-cross with native flora, alter nutrient cycling and other ecosystem functions, and even change an ecosystem's flammability (Walker and Smith 1997). After habitat loss, the spread of exotic species is...

  13. Exotic biological control agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajek, Ann E.; Hurley, Brett P.; Kenis, Marc; Garnas, Jeffrey R.; Bush, Samantha J.; Wingfield, Michael J.; Lenteren, van Joop C.; Cock, Matthew J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Biological control is a valuable and effective strategy for controlling arthropod pests and has been used extensively against invasive arthropods. As one approach for control of invasives, exotic natural enemies from the native range of a pest are introduced to areas where control is needed.

  14. Glueballs, Hybrids and Exotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, M. A.; Moreno, G.

    2006-09-01

    We comment on the physics analysis carried out by the Experimental High Energy Physics (EHEP) group of the Instituto de Fisica of the University of Guanajuato (IFUG), Mexico. In particular, this group has been involved in analysis carried out to search for glueball, hybrid and exotic candidates.

  15. Glueballs, Hybrids and Exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, M. A.; Moreno, G.

    2006-01-01

    We comment on the physics analysis carried out by the Experimental High Energy Physics (EHEP) group of the Instituto de Fisica of the University of Guanajuato (IFUG), Mexico. In particular, this group has been involved in analysis carried out to search for glueball, hybrid and exotic candidates

  16. Exotic baryonium exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolescu, B.

    1978-05-01

    The prominent effects supposed to be associated with the exchange of exotic baryonium Regge trajectories are reviewed. The experimental presence of all expected effects leads to suggest that the baryonium exchange mechanism is a correct phenomenological picture and that mesons with isospin 2 or 3/2 or with strangeness 2, strongly coupled to the baryon-antibaryon channels, must be observed

  17. Exotic reptile bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, J; Ehrlich, M; Henderson, S O

    1997-09-01

    Reptiles are a growing part of the exotic pet trade, and reptile bites have been considered innocuous in the emergency medicine literature. Two cases are reported of reptile bites, one from a green iguana and the other from a reticulated python. The treatment concerns associated with reptile bites are discussed.

  18. Is the exotic X(5568) a bound state?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Ping, Jialun [Nanjing Normal University, Department of Physics and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Numerical Simulation of Large Scale Complex Systems, Nanjing (China)

    2016-06-15

    Stimulated by the recent observation of the exotic X(5568) state by the D0 Collaboration, we study the four-quark system us anti b anti d with quantum numbers J{sup P} = 0{sup +} in the framework of the chiral quark model. Two structures, diquark-antidiquark and meson-meson, with all possible color configurations are investigated by using the Gaussian expansion method. The results show that the energies of the tetraquark states with diquark-antiquark structure are too high to be candidates of X(5568), and no molecular structure can be formed in our calculations. The calculation is also extended to the four-quark system us anti c anti d and the same results as that of us anti b anti d are obtained. (orig.)

  19. Exotic Small Mammals and Bartonella

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-04-09

    In this podcast, Dr. Nina Marano discusses Bartonella, a bacterial agent that’s prevalent in many species, including cats, dogs, and cattle. Wild animals are normally thought to carry Bartonella, so when animals are caught in the wild for pet trade, the risk that humans can become infected with Bartonella increases. Bartonella is an identified risk associated with ownership of exotic animals and has serious health consequences.  Created: 4/9/2009 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/9/2009.

  20. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients.

  1. π-π scattering in a consistent relativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micu, L.

    1977-12-01

    Introducing the expression of the interpolating field of a pion as a product of suitable modified free quark fields and of a scalar unquantified field into the LSZ formalism one deduces the vanishing of the exotic amplitudes and of the π-π scattering lengths. The asymptotic vanishing of the elastic π - π scattering amplitude may also be obtained under special requirements. (author)

  2. Heavy quark and magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mubarak, Ahmad; Jallu, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic moments and transition moments of heavy hadrons including the conventional particles are obtained under the SU(5) truth symmetry scheme. To this end state vectors are defined and the quark additivity principle is taken into account. (author)

  3. Exotic meson decay widths using lattice QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, M. S.; Fiebig, H. R.

    2006-01-01

    A decay width calculation for a hybrid exotic meson h, with J PC =1 -+ , is presented for the channel h→πa 1 . This quenched lattice QCD simulation employs Luescher's finite box method. Operators coupling to the h and πa 1 states are used at various levels of smearing and fuzzing, and at four quark masses. Eigenvalues of the corresponding correlation matrices yield energy spectra that determine scattering phase shifts for a discrete set of relative πa 1 momenta. Although the phase shift data is sparse, fits to a Breit-Wigner model are attempted, resulting in a decay width of about 60 MeV when averaged over two lattice sizes having a lattice spacing of 0.07 fm

  4. Top quark mass measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maki, Tuula; Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Helsinki U. of Tech.

    2008-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle. Its mass is one of the fundamental parameters of the standard model of particle physics, and an important input to precision electroweak tests. This thesis describes three measurements of the top-quark mass in the dilepton decay channel. The dilepton events have two neutrinos in the final state; neutrinos are weakly interacting particles that cannot be detected with a multipurpose experiment. Therefore, the signal of dilepton events consists of a large amount of missing energy and momentum carried off by the neutrinos. The top-quark mass is reconstructed for each event by assuming an additional constraint from a top mass independent distribution. Template distributions are constructed from simulated samples of signal and background events, and parameterized to form continuous probability density functions. The final top-quark mass is derived using a likelihood fit to compare the reconstructed top mass distribution from data to the parameterized templates. One of the analyses uses a novel technique to add top mass information from the observed number of events by including a cross-section-constraint in the likelihood function. All measurements use data samples collected by the CDF II detector

  5. Exotic Black Holes?

    OpenAIRE

    Brans, Carl H.

    1993-01-01

    Exotic smooth manifolds, ${\\bf R^2\\times_\\Theta S^2}$, are constructed and discussed as possible space-time models supporting the usual Kruskal presentation of the vacuum Schwarzschild metric locally, but {\\em not globally}. While having the same topology as the standard Kruskal model, none of these manifolds is diffeomorphic to standard Kruskal, although under certain conditions some global smooth Lorentz-signature metric can be continued from the local Kruskal form. Consequently, it can be ...

  6. Clusters and exotic processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt is made to present some data which may be construed as indicating that perhaps clusters play a role in high energy and exotic pion or kaon interactions with complex (A much greater than 16) nuclei. Also an attempt is made to summarize some very recent experimental work on pion interactions with nuclei which may or may not in the end support a picture in which clusters play an important role. (U.S.)

  7. Heavy hybrid stars from multi-quark interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benic, Sanjin

    2014-01-01

    We explore the possibility of obtaining heavy hybrid stars within the framework of the two flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model that includes 8-quark interactions in the scalar and in the vector channel. The main impact of the 8-quark scalar channel is to reduce the onset of quark matter, while the 8-quark vector channel acts to stiffen the equation of state at high densities. Within the parameter space where the 4-quark vector channel is small, and the 8-quark vector channel sizeable, stable stars with masses of 2 M ⊙ and above are found to hold quark matter in their cores. (orig.)

  8. Quark bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerman, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    This short talk gives some very general comments on what I see as the impact on nuclear physics of the last ten years' developments in the picture of the nucleon and the hadron. On the other hand there may also be some nuclear physics lessons - lessons we've learned by trying to deal with the multi-fermion system over a long period - and I will discuss what those lessons might be for the problem at hand, hadron phy-physics up to 31 GeV. After that I will discuss a number of implications of quarks for low energy physics

  9. Confinement of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nambu, J.

    1978-01-01

    Three quark models of hadron structure, which suggest an explanation of quarks confinement mechanism in hadrons are considered. Quark classifications, quark flawors and colours, symmetry model of hadron structure based on the colour theory of strong interaction are discussed. Diagrams of colour combinations of quarks and antiquarks, exchange of gluons, binding quarks in hadron. Quark confinement models based on the field theory, string model rotating and bag model are discussed. Diagrams of the colour charge distribution explaining the phenomena of infrared ''slavery'' and ultraviolet ''freedom'' are given. The models considered explain but some quark properties, creating prerequisites for the development of the consequent theory of hadron structure

  10. Quark mass effects in quark number susceptibilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, Thorben; Petreczky, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The quark degrees of freedom of the QGP with special focus on mass effects are investigated. A next-to-leading-order perturbation theory approach with quark mass dependence is applied and compared to lattice QCD results. (paper)

  11. Astrophysical searches for exotic phenomena in ultrahigh energy neutrino-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, D.A.; Ringwald, A.

    1994-03-01

    We investigate the potential of near-future neutrino telescopes like NESTOR for searches for exotic processes in ultrahigh energy neutrino-quark scattering. We consider signatures such as muon bundles and/or contained cascades from the nonperturbative production of multiple weak gauge bosons in the Standard Model, compositeness and leptoquark production. (orig.)

  12. Top 5 exotic clones for potato breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild and cultivated relatives of potato feature prominently in breeding programs. In this short article, I describe five exotic clones that have promising traits for the future of the US potato industry. They include M6, an inbred line of S. chacoense that provides a source of genes for self-compati...

  13. Exotic smoothness and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladkowski, J.

    1996-01-01

    Short introduction to exotic differential structures on manifolds is given. The possible physical context of this mathematical curiosity is discussed. The topic is very interesting although speculative. (author)

  14. Two-Quark Condensate Changes with Quark Current Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Changfang; Lue Xiaofu; Wu Xiaohua; Zhan Yongxin

    2009-01-01

    Using the Schwinger-Dyson equation and perturbation theory, we calculate the two-quark condensates for the light quarks u, d, strange quark s and a heavy quark c with their current masses respectively. The results show that the two-quark condensate will decrease when the quark mass increases, which hints the chiral symmetry may be restored for the heavy quarks.

  15. Exotic searches at lep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seager, P.

    2001-01-01

    The search for exotic processes at LEP is presented. The Standard Model Higgs has as yet not been observed. This provides freedom to search for processes beyond the Standard Model and even beyond the minimal version of the supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model. This paper outlines the searches for charged Higgs bosons, fermiophobic Higgs bosons, invisibly decaying Higgs bosons, technicolor, leptoquarks, unstable heavy leptons and excited leptons. The results presented are those from the LEP collaborations using data taken up to a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 202 GeV. (author)

  16. Euroschool on Exotic Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Pfützner, Marek

    2018-01-01

    This is the fifth volume in a series of Lecture Notes based on the highly successful Euro Summer School on Exotic Beams. The aim of these notes is to provide a thorough introduction to radioactive ion-beam physics at the level of graduate students and young postdocs starting out in the field. Each volume covers a range of topics from nuclear theory to experiment and applications. Vol I has been published as LNP 651, Vol II as LNP 700, Vol. III as LNP 764 and Vol. IV as LNP 879.

  17. Top Quark Physics with CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Higgs mechanism. There are various hints at deviations from the Standard Model expectation which have been observed recently by Tevatron experiments in top final states. Several signatures of new physics accessible at the LHC either suffer from top-quark production as a significant background or contain top quarks themselves. In this talk, we present results on top quark physics obtained from the first LHC data collected by the CMS experiment.They include measurements of the top pair production cross section in various channels and their combination, measurements of the top quark mass, the single top cross section, a search for new particles decaying into top pairs, and a first look at the charge asymmetry.

  18. Properties of the Top Quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicke, Daniel; /Wuppertal U., Dept. Math.

    2009-08-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  19. Properties of the Top Quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicke, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The aim of particle physics is the understanding of elementary particles and their interactions. The current theory of elementary particle physics, the Standard Model, contains twelve different types of fermions which (neglecting gravity) interact through the gauge bosons of three forces. In addition a scalar particle, the Higgs boson, is needed for theoretical consistency. These few building blocks explain all experimental results found in the context of particle physics, so far. Nevertheless, it is believed that the Standard Model is only an approximation to a more complete theory. First of all the fourth known force, gravity, has withstood all attempts to be included until now. Furthermore, the Standard Model describes several features of the elementary particles like the existence of three families of fermions or the quantisation of charges, but does not explain these properties from underlying principles. Finally, the lightness of the Higgs boson needed to explain the symmetry breaking is difficult to maintain in the presence of expected corrections from gravity at high scales. This is the so called hierarchy problem. In addition astrophysical results indicate that the universe consists only to a very small fraction of matter described by the Standard Model. Large fractions of dark energy and dark matter are needed to describe the observations. Both do not have any correspondence in the Standard Model. Also the very small asymmetry between matter and anti-matter that results in the observed universe built of matter (and not of anti-matter) cannot be explained until now. It is thus an important task of experimental particle physics to test the predictions of the Standard Model to the best possible accuracy and to search for deviations pointing to necessary extensions or modifications of our current theoretical understanding. The top quark was predicted to exist by the Standard Model as the partner of the bottom quark. It was first observed in 1995 by the

  20. Diagnostic imaging of exotic pets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, S.

    1993-01-01

    Radiographic, ultrasonographic, and computed tomographic (CT) imaging are important diagnostic modalities in exotic pets. The use of appropriate radiographic equipment, film-screen combinations, and radiographic projections enhances the information obtained from radiographs. Both normal findings and common radiographic abnormalities are discussed. The use of ultrasonography and CT scanning for exotic small mammals and reptiles is described

  1. Current Status of Exotic Hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, M.A.; Ahmed, Maqsood; Fazal-e-Aleem

    2005-01-01

    Physics of exotic hadrons is in the limelight these days. The models for these baryons are discussed as well as their production and decay processes and methods of their identification. The results of recent experiments in this field are presented, in which some unusual states are observed. These states are candidates for exotic hadrons

  2. LHCB : Exotic hadrons at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Salazar De Paula, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations by Belle and CDF. Using the data collected at pp collisions at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment we present the unambiguous new observation of exotic charmonia hadrons produced in B decays.

  3. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  4. Phenomenology of heavy leptons and heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.

    1978-11-01

    The review of the quark and lepton family includes properties of the tau, SU(2) x U(1) classification of the tau and its decays, heavier leptons, the spectroscopy of heavy hadrons composed of quarks, their strong and electromagnetic decays, the weak interaction properties of the c, b, and t quarks, and the decays of hadrons containing them expected within the context of the standard SU(2) x U(1) model. 76 references

  5. Polarization in heavy quark decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimujiang, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this thesis I concentrate on the angular correlations in top quark decays and their next.to.leading order (NLO) QCD corrections. I also discuss the leading.order (LO) angular correlations in unpolarized and polarized hyperon decays. In the first part of the thesis I calculate the angular correlation between the top quark spin and the momentum of decay products in the rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a charged Higgs boson and a bottom quark in Two-Higgs-Doublet-Models: t({up_arrow}) {yields} b + H{sup +}. I provide closed form formulae for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized and the polar correlation functions for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the second part I concentrate on the semileptonic rest frame decay of a polarized top quark into a bottom quark and a lepton pair: t({up_arrow}){yields}X{sub b}+l{sup +}+{nu}{sub l}. I present closed form expressions for the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative corrections to the unpolarized part and the polar and azimuthal correlations for m{sub b}{ne}0 and m{sub b}=0. In the last part I turn to the angular distribution in semileptonic hyperon decays. Using the helicity method I derive complete formulas for the leading order joint angular decay distributions occurring in semileptonic hyperon decays including lepton mass and polarization effects. (orig.)

  6. Study of stellar objects with strange quark matter crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hothi, N.; Bisht, S.

    2012-01-01

    The absolute stability of strange quark matter is a viable possibility and immensely effects physics at the astrophysical scale. Relativistic heavy-ion reactions offer a stage to produce this exotic state of matter and the enhanced production of strange particles during these reactions can be studied within the framework of quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We have tried to investigate the role of strangeness under the compact star phenomenology. Emphasis is laid upon the possibility of existence of a third family of strange quark stars and its study help in revealing a number of unexplored features of the cosmos. Bag model parameters have been used to determine some integral parameters for a sequence of strange stars with crust and strange dwarfs constructed out of strange quark matter crust. A comparative analysis is performed between the strange and neutron stars and the strange and white dwarfs based upon these intrinsic parameters and paramount differences are observed. The intimacy between astrophysics and strange quarks depends strongly upon the strange quark matter hypothesis. It states that for a collection of more than a few hundred u, d and s quarks, the energy per baryon E/A of strange quark matter (SQM) can be well below the energy per baryon of the most stable atomic nuclei

  7. Strange sea quark effects for low lying baryons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, A.; Batra, Meenakshi

    2013-01-01

    Assuming hadrons as an ensemble of quark-gluon Fock states, contributions from sea quarks and gluons can be studied in detail for ground state baryons. Spin crisis of nucleons say that only a small fraction of proton spin is carried by valence quarks. Rest part is distributed among gluons and sea which includes both strange and non-strange quark-anti-quark pairs. This necessitates the study of strange sea quark contribution for other baryons too due to higher mass and presence of strange quark in valence part. Recent studies have also studied strange sea contribution for baryons using different models. We implement the statistical modeling techniques to compute strange sea quark content for baryon octet. Statistical model has already been applied to study sea quark content for nucleons in the form of scalar, vector and tensor sea. In our present work the same idea has been extended for strange sea to probe the structure in more detail. (author)

  8. The significance of the heavy top quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, Elizabeth H.

    1997-01-01

    Experiment shows that the top quark is far heavier than the other elementary fermions. This finding has stimulated research on theories of electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking that include physics beyond the standard model. Efforts to accommodate a heavy top quark within existing frameworks have revealed constraints on model-building. Other investigations have started from the premise that a large top quark mass could signal a qualitative difference between the top quark and other fermions, perhaps in the form of new interactions peculiar to the top quark. Such new dynamics may also help answer existing questions about electroweak and flavor physics. This talk explores the implications of the heavy top quark in the context of weakly-coupled (e.g., SUSY) and strongly-coupled (e.g., technicolor) theories of electroweak symmetry breaking

  9. Quark matter and quark stars at finite temperature in Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Peng-Cheng; Wang, Bin; Dong, Yu-Min; Jia, Yu-Yue; Wang, Shu-Mei; Ma, Hong-Yang [Qingdao Technological University, School of Science, Qingdao (China); Li, Xiao-Hua [University of South China, School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Hengyang (China); University of South China, Cooperative Innovation Center for Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology and Equipment, Hengyang (China)

    2017-08-15

    We extend the SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model to include two types of vector interaction. Using these two types of vector interaction in NJL model, we study the quark symmetry free energy in asymmetric quark matter, the constituent quark mass, the quark fraction, the equation of state (EOS) for β-equilibrium quark matter, the maximum mass of QSs at finite temperature, the maximum mass of proto-quark stars (PQSs) along the star evolution, and the effects of the vector interaction on the QCD phase diagram. We find that comparing zero temperature case, the values of quark matter symmetry free energy get larger with temperature increasing, which will reduce the difference between the fraction of u, d and s quarks and stiffen the EoS for β-equilibrium quark matter. In particular, our results indicate that the maximum masses of the quark stars increase with temperature because of the effects of the quark matter symmetry free energy, and we find that the heating(cooling) process for PQSs will increase (decrease) the maximum mass within NJL model. (orig.)

  10. Quark confinement in a constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langfeld, K.; Rho, M.

    1995-01-01

    On the level of an effective quark theory, we define confinement by the absence of quark anti-quark thresholds in correlation function. We then propose a confining Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type model. The confinement is implemented in analogy to Anderson localization in condensed matter systems. We study the model's phase structure as well as its behavior under extreme conditions, i.e. high temperature and/or high density

  11. Single top quark production with CMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccolo Davide

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of single top quark production performed using the CMS experiment [1] data collected in 2011 at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and in 2012 at 8 TeV, are presented. The cross sections for the electroweak production of single top quarks in the t-channel and in association with W-bosons is measured and the results are used to place constraints on the CKM matrix element Vtb. Measurements of top quark properties in single top quark production are also presented. The results include the measurement of the charge ratio in the single top t-channel.

  12. Heavy quark production in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1986-09-01

    For very heavy quark masses, the inclusive hadronic production of hadron pairs containing heavy quarks is predicted to be governed by QCD fusion subprocesses. For intermediate mass scales other QCD mechanisms can be important including higher-twist intrinsic contributions and low relative velocity enchancements, possibly accounting for the anomalies observed in charm hadroproduction, such as the nuclear number dependence, the longitudinal momentum distributions, and beam flavor dependence. We also discuss scaling laws for exclusive processes involving heavy quarks and diffractive excitation into heavy quark systems

  13. Highlights of top quark cross-section measurements at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Bielski, Rafal; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of inclusive and differential top-quark production cross sections in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The inclusive measurements of top quark pair and single top quark production reach high precision and are compared to the best available theoretical calculations. Differential measurements of the kinematic properties of top quark events are also discussed. These measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top quark production in the TeV regime.

  14. The Ways of Four-Quark Hadrons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    Ten years after the discovery of the X(3872) we can assert that a number of exotic four-quark hadrons with hidden charm and beauty have been discovered, the most recent, Z(3900), found by BES in 2013, being among the top-striking ones. However, ten years have not been enough to dispel the controversy about their inner structure, with two body hadron molecules and compact multiquark states being the withstanding antipodal models. In this seminar I will review the status of the field, presenting both the experimental facts and the theoretical pictures attempting to interpret them.

  15. Black Holes and Exotic Spinors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Hoff da Silva

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exotic spin structures are non-trivial liftings, of the orthogonal bundle to the spin bundle, on orientable manifolds that admit spin structures according to the celebrated Geroch theorem. Exotic spin structures play a role of paramount importance in different areas of physics, from quantum field theory, in particular at Planck length scales, to gravity, and in cosmological scales. Here, we introduce an in-depth panorama in this field, providing black hole physics as the fount of spacetime exoticness. Black holes are then studied as the generators of a non-trivial topology that also can correspond to some inequivalent spin structure. Moreover, we investigate exotic spinor fields in this context and the way exotic spinor fields branch new physics. We also calculate the tunneling probability of exotic fermions across a Kerr-Sen black hole, showing that the exotic term does affect the tunneling probability, altering the black hole evaporation rate. Finally we show that it complies with the Hawking temperature universal law.

  16. Heavy Quark Effective Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, A. V.

    2003-02-01

    These lecture notes present some of the basic ideas of heavy quark effective theory. The topics covered include the classification of states, the derivation of the HQET Lagrangian at tree level, hadron masses, meson form factors, Luke's theorem, reparameterization invariance and inclusive decays. Radiative corrections are discussed in some detail, including an explicit computation of a matching correction for HQET. Borel summability, renormalons, and their connection with the QCD perturbation series is covered, as well as the use of the upsilon expansion to improve the convergence of the perturbation series.

  17. Exotic baryon resonances. Modern status. Possibilities to search and investigate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdasaryan, L.S.; Galumyan, P.I.; Grigoryan, A.A.; Kazaryan, S.P.; Khachatryan, G.N.; Oganesyan, A.G.; Vartapetyan, H.H.

    1985-01-01

    A possibility to investigate the exotic baryon resonances with qqqqq quark composition, in the systems pπ + π + , Λπ - π - , Σ - π - , etc. possessing exotic quantum numbers of isospin is considered. The most favourable reactions and kinematical regions where an effective search for the exotic baryons is possible are grounded. The contribution of the background subprocesses to the investigated systems is analyzed in various reactions and momenta configurations of the particles. The analysis shows that the search for the I=5/2 resonances in the system pπ + π + (Δ ++ π + ) is more reasonable in the π + p-interaction process, this system carrying the main portion of momentum in the lab. system. The exotic hyperons with S=-1 srangeness and I=2 isospin are to be searched in the fast-flying systems Λπ - π - (Σ* - (1385)π - ) and Σ - π - produced in the reactions on the K - beams. The cross sections of the production of the E 55 -baryon (J p =5/2 + , I=5/2) in the π + p → E 55 +++ π- and π + p → E 55 +++ x processes are theoretically estimated. The estimations show that in the experiments with the OMEGA spectometer at CERN one can get a substantial increase in the statistics as compared to that available, thus providing a detailed analysis of the pπ + π + system on the high confidence level. The question of investigation of the exotic baryon Regge trajectories in the processes of the inclusive production of ordinary (nonexotic) Δ ++ (1232), Σ* + (1385)- and Σ + -resonances in the π - -beam fragmentation region is also considered

  18. The heavy quark expansion of QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    These lectures contain an elementary introduction to heavy quark symmetry and the heavy quark expansion. Applications such as the expansion of heavy meson decay constants and the treatment of inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decays are included. Heavy hadron production via nonperturbative fragmentation processes is also discussed. 54 refs., 7 figs

  19. The heavy quark expansion of QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, A.F. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1997-06-01

    These lectures contain an elementary introduction to heavy quark symmetry and the heavy quark expansion. Applications such as the expansion of heavy meson decay constants and the treatment of inclusive and exclusive semileptonic B decays are included. Heavy hadron production via nonperturbative fragmentation processes is also discussed. 54 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Observability of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-12-01

    Even if stable hadrons with fractional charge do not exist, most of the criteria of observability used for ordinary elementary particles apply in principle to quarks as well. This is especially true in a simplified world containing only hadrons made of top quarks and gluons. In the real world containing light quarks, essential complications do occur, but most of the conclusions survive

  1. CONFERENCE: Quark matter 88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Maurice

    1988-01-01

    The 'Quark Matter' Conference caters for physicists studying nuclear matter under extreme conditions. The hope is that relativistic (high energy) heavy ion collisions allow formation of the long-awaited quark-gluon plasma, where the inter-quark 'colour' force is no longer confined inside nucleon-like dimensions

  2. Production of exotic and conventional quarkonia and open beauty/open charm at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    C. Bini; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at LHC is carrying on a wide programme to study the production properties of conventional and exotic quarkonium, beauty, and charm bound states. The latest results on J/$\\psi$, $\\psi$(2s) and X(3872) production at 7, 8, and 13 TeV, together with D meson production with Run-1 are presented. Studies of associated production of charmonium with vector bosons, searches for exotic states in the bottomonium sector and a new measurement of the ratio of b-quark fragmentation functions are also briefly presented.

  3. Constraints on fermion mixing with exotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, E.; Tommasini, D.

    1991-11-01

    We analyze the constraints on the mixing angles of the standard fermions with new heavy particles with exotic SU(2) x U(1) quantum number assignments (left-handed singlets or right-handed doublets), that appear in many extensions of the electroweak theory. The updated Charged Current and Neutral Current experimental data, including also the recent Z-peak measurements, are considered. The results of the global analysis of all these data are then presented

  4. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    OpenAIRE

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-01-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosi...

  5. Exotic nuclei and radioactive beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chomaz, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclei called exotic are all the nuclei that it is necessary to recreate in laboratory to study them. Their life time is too short -in relation to earth age- for it remains enough on earth. The researchers are going to have at their s disposal at GANIL (Caen) with the S.P.I.R.A.L. project, exotic nuclei beams and will study new kinds of nuclear reactions to better understand the atom nucleus. (N.C.). 2 refs., 9 figs

  6. Future energy, exotic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumon, R

    1974-01-01

    The Detroit Energy Conference has highlighted the declining oil reserves, estimated worldwide at 95 billion tons vs. an annual rate of consumption of over 3 billion tons. The present problem is one of price; also, petroleum seems too valuable to be simply burned. New sources must come into action before 1985. The most abundant is coal, with 600 billion tons of easily recoverable reserves; then comes oil shale with a potential of 400 billion tons of oil. Exploitation at the rate of 55 go 140 million tons/yr is planned in the U.S. after 1985. More exotic and impossible to estimate quantitatively are such sources as wind, tides, and the thermal energy of the oceans--these are probably far in the future. The same is true of solar and geothermal energy in large amounts. The only other realistic energy source is nuclear energy: the European Economic Community looks forward to covering 60% of its energy needs from nuclear energy in the year 2000. Even today, from 400 mw upward, a nuclear generating plant is more economical than a fossil fueled one. Conservation will become the byword, and profound changes in society are to be expected.

  7. Single top quark production cross-section and properties using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00358737; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS measurements of single top-quark processes are summarized. Measurements using data at 7 and 8 TeV collisions from the LHC are presented. The measurements are performed using the semi-leptonic decay mode of the top-quark. Production cross-sections and the $\\left|V_{tb}\\right|$ CKM matrix element extraction are shown. All measurements are compared to theoretical calculations. In addition, the $s$-channel production mode is explored along with limits on exotic production modes.

  8. Phase transition from nuclear matter to color superconducting quark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bentz, W. E-mail: bentz@keyaki.cc.u-tokai.ac.jp; Horikawa, T.; Ishii, N.; Thomas, A.W

    2003-06-02

    We construct the nuclear and quark matter equations of state at zero temperature in an effective quark theory (the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model), and discuss the phase transition between them. The nuclear matter equation of state is based on the quark-diquark description of the single nucleon, while the quark matter equation of state includes the effects of scalar diquark condensation (color superconductivity). The effect of diquark condensation on the phase transition is discussed in detail.

  9. Hadron spectra and quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasiorowicz, S.; Rosner, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The quark model began as little more than a quantum-number counting device. After a brief period during which quarks only played a symmetry role, serious interest in quark dynamics developed. The marriage of the principle of local gauge invariance and quarks has been astonishingly productive. Although many questions still need to be be answered, there is little doubt that the strong, weak and electroweak interactions of matter are described by gauge theories of interactions of the quarks. This review is focussed on the successes

  10. Properties of exotic matter for heavy-ion searches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffner-Bielich, J.; Greiner, C.; Stoecker, H.; Vischer, A.P.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the properties of both forms of strange matter, small lumps of strange quark matter (strangelets) and of strange hadronic matter (metastable exotic multihypernuclear objects (MEMOs)) and their relevance for present and future heavy-ion searches. The strong and weak decays are discussed separately to distinguish between long- and short-lived candidates where the former ones are detectable in present heavy-ion experiments while the latter ones are present in future heavy-ion experiments, respectively. We find some long-lived strangelet candidates which are highly negatively charged with a mass-to-charge ratio like a anti deuteron (M/Z approx.= -2) but masses of A 10-16. We also predict many short-lived candidates, both in quark and hadronic form, which can be highly charged. Purely hyperonic nuclei such as the Ξα (2Ξ 0 2Ξ - ) are bound and have a negative charge while carrying a positive baryon number. We also demonstrate that multiply charmed exotics (charmlets) might be bound and can be produced at future heavy-ion colliders. (author)

  11. Waves in magnetized quark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogaça, D. A.; Sanches, S. M.; Navarra, F. S.

    2018-05-01

    We study wave propagation in a non-relativistic cold quark-gluon plasma immersed in a constant magnetic field. Starting from the Euler equation we derive linear wave equations and investigate their stability and causality. We use a generic form for the equation of state, the EOS derived from the MIT bag model and also a variant of the this model which includes gluon degrees of freedom. The results of this analysis may be relevant for perturbations propagating through the quark matter phase in the core of compact stars and also for perturbations propagating in the low temperature quark-gluon plasma formed in low energy heavy ion collisions, to be carried out at FAIR and NICA.

  12. Human salmonellosis associated with exotic pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, D L; Khakhria, R; Johnson, W M

    1997-11-01

    During the period from 1994 to 1996, an increase in the number of laboratory-confirmed cases of human salmonellosis associated with exposure to exotic pets including iguanas, pet turtles, sugar gliders, and hedgehogs was observed in Canada. Pet turtle-associated salmonellosis was recognized as a serious public health problem in the 1960s and 1970s, and in February 1975 legislation banning the importation of turtles into Canada was enacted by Agriculture Canada. Reptile-associated salmonellosis is once again being recognized as a resurgent disease. From 1993 to 1995, there were more than 20,000 laboratory-confirmed human cases of salmonellosis in Canada. The major source of Salmonella infection is food; however, an estimated 3 to 5% of all cases of salmonellosis in humans are associated with exposure to exotic pets. Among the isolates from these patients with salmonellosis, a variety of Salmonella serotypes were also associated with exotic pets and included the following: S. java, S. stanley, S. poona, S. jangwani, S. tilene, S. litchfield, S. manhattan, S. pomona, S. miami, S. rubislaw, S. marina subsp. IV, and S. wassenaar subsp. IV.

  13. Exotic helium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, M.

    2007-12-01

    We study the photo-association of an ultracold cloud of magnetically trapped helium atoms: pairs of colliding atoms interact with one or two laser fields to produce a purely long range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 P 0 ) molecule, or a 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) long range molecule. Light shifts in one photon photo-association spectra are measured and studied as a function of the laser polarization and intensity, and the vibrational state of the excited molecule. They result from the light-induced coupling between the excited molecule, and bound and scattering states of the interaction between two metastable atoms. Their analysis leads to the determination of the scattering length a = (7.2 ± 0.6) ruling collisions between spin polarized atoms. The two photon photo-association spectra show evidence of the production of polarized, long-range 4 He 2 (2 3 S 1 -2 3 S 1 ) molecules. They are said to be exotic as they are made of two metastable atoms, each one carrying a enough energy to ionize the other. The corresponding lineshapes are calculated and decomposed in sums and products of Breit-Wigner and Fano profiles associated to one and two photon processes. The experimental spectra are fit, and an intrinsic lifetime τ = (1.4 ± 0.3) μs is deduced. It is checked whether this lifetime could be limited by spin-dipole induced Penning autoionization. This interpretation requires that there is a quasi-bound state close to the dissociation threshold in the singlet interaction potential between metastable helium atoms for the theory to match the experiment. (author)

  14. Effects of exotic species on Yellowstone's grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Daniel P.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Mattson, D.J.; Gunther, Kerry A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans have affected grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) by direct mortality, competition for space and resources, and introduction of exotic species. Exotic organisms that have affected grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Area include common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), nonnative clovers (Trifolium spp.), domesticated livestock, bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Some bears consume substantial amounts of dandelion and clover. However, these exotic foods provide little digested energy compared to higher-quality bear foods. Domestic livestock are of greater energetic value, but use of this food by bears often leads to conflicts with humans and subsequent increases in bear mortality. Lake trout, blister rust, and brucellosis diminish grizzly bears foods. Lake trout prey on native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in Yellowstone Lake; white pine blister rust has the potential to destroy native whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) stands; and management response to bovine brucellosis, a disease found in the Yellowstone bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus), could reduce populations of these 2 species. Exotic species will likely cause more harm than good for Yellowstone grizzly bears. Managers have few options to mitigate or contain the impacts of exotics on Yellowstone's grizzly bears. Moreover, their potential negative impacts have only begun to unfold. Exotic species may lead to the loss of substantial highquality grizzly bear foods, including much of the bison, trout, and pine seeds that Yellowstone grizzly bears currently depend upon.

  15. Space-Time Geometry of Quark and Strange Quark Matter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We study quark and strange quark matter in the context of general relativity. For this purpose, we solve Einstein's field equations for quark and strange quark matter in spherical symmetric space-times. We analyze strange quark matter for the different equations of state (EOS) in the spherical symmetric space-times, thus we are able to obtain the space-time geometries of quark and strange quark matter. Also, we discuss die features of the obtained solutions. The obtained solutions are consistent with the results of Brookhaven Laboratory, i.e. the quark-gluon plasma has a vanishing shear (i.e. quark-gluon plasma is perfect).

  16. Correlations among static quark masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewin, K.; Motz, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    Nonrelativistic heavy quarkonia potentials with Coulomb and linearly rising limiting behaviour are correlated additively by Taylor expansion extracting the limiting structure and a constant term. Relations between fit parameters of different potentials including the quark masses m b and m c , are obtained. The known stability of the difference m b -m c , appears as direct consequence of flavour invariance of the potentials

  17. Hydrodynamics of a quark droplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, Johan J.; Mishustin, Igor N.; Døssing, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple model of a multi-quark droplet evolution based on the hydrodynamical description. This model includes collective expansion of the droplet, effects of the vacuum pressure and surface tension. The hadron emission from the droplet is described following Weisskopf's statistical...

  18. Quark-Gluon Plasma Signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Vogt, Ramona

    1998-01-01

    Aspects of quark-gluon plasma signatures that can be measured by CMS are discussed. First the initial conditions of the system from minijet production are introduced, including shadowing effects. Color screening of the Upsilon family is then presented, followed by energy loss effects on charm and bottom hadrons, high Pt jets and global observables.

  19. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  20. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers

  1. Everyday and Exotic Foodborne Parasites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilyn B Lee

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyday foodborne parasites, which are endemic in Canada, include the protozoans Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium parvum. However, these parasites are most frequently acquired through unfiltered drinking water, homosexual activity or close personal contact such as in daycare centres and occasionally via a food vehicle. It is likely that many foodborne outbreaks from these protozoa go undetected. Transmission of helminth infections, such as tapeworms, is rare in Canada because of effective sewage treatment. However, a common foodborne parasite of significance is Toxoplasma gondii. Although infection can be acquired from accidental ingestion of oocysts from cat feces, infection can also result from consumption of tissue cysts in undercooked meat, such as pork or lamb. Congenital transmission poses an immense financial burden, costing Canada an estimated $240 million annually. Also of concern is toxoplasmosis in AIDS patients, which may lead to toxoplasmosis encephalitis, the second most common AIDS-related opportunistic infection of the central nervous system. Exotic parasites (ie, those acquired from abroad or from imported food are of growing concern because more Canadians are travelling and the number of Canada?s trading partners is increasing. Since 1996, over 3000 cases of Cyclospora infection reported in the United States and Canada were epidemiologically associated with importation of Guatemalan raspberries. Unlike toxoplasmosis, where strategies for control largely rest with individual practices, control of cyclosporiasis rests with government policy, which should prohibit the importation of foods at high risk.

  2. P fluxes and exotic branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardo, Davide M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Riccioni, Fabio [INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Risoli, Stefano [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma “La Sapienza”,Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2016-12-21

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T{sup 6}/[ℤ{sub 2}×ℤ{sub 2}] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  3. P fluxes and exotic branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, Davide M.; Riccioni, Fabio; Risoli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    We consider the N=1 superpotential generated in type-II orientifold models by non-geometric fluxes. In particular, we focus on the family of P fluxes, that are related by T-duality transformations to the S-dual of the Q flux. We determine the general rule that transforms a given flux in this family under a single T-duality transformation. This rule allows to derive a complete expression for the superpotential for both the IIA and the IIB theory for the particular case of a T 6 /[ℤ 2 ×ℤ 2 ] orientifold. We then consider how these fluxes modify the generalised Bianchi identities. In particular, we derive a fully consistent set of quadratic constraints coming from the NS-NS Bianchi identities. On the other hand, the P flux Bianchi identities induce tadpoles, and we determine a set of exotic branes that can be consistently included in order to cancel them. This is achieved by determining a universal transformation rule under T-duality satisfied by all the branes in string theory.

  4. Experimental Status of Exotic Mesons and the GlueX Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel Carman

    2006-10-22

    One of the unanswered and most fundamental questions in physics regards the nature of the confinement mechanism of quarks and gluons in QCD. Exotic hybrid mesons manifest gluonic degrees of freedom and their spectroscopy will provide the data necessary to test assumptions in lattice QCD and the specific phenomenology leading to confinement. Within the past two decades a number of experiments have put forth tantalizing evidence for the existence of exotic hybrid mesons in the mass range below 2 GeV. This talk represents an overview of the available data and what has been learned. In looking toward the future, the GlueX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory represents a new initiative that will perform detailed spectroscopy of the light-quark meson spectrum. This experiment and its capabilities will be reviewed.

  5. Infectious threats from exotic pets: dermatological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Ted; Jablon, Jennifer

    2003-04-01

    Zoonoses are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. More than 250 distinct zoonoses have been described in the literature. It is estimated that 56% of United States households contain at least one pet, and although considerable research has been performed regarding the more common household animals including dogs, cats, small birds, and rodents, surprisingly little is known about the zoonotic hazards of owning the more exotic pets. According to the 1997 USPHS/IDSA Report on the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections in Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, the immunocompromised patient should avoid contact with feces-laden soil, litter boxes, reptiles, most pet birds, and any animal less than 6 months old . It has also been documented that because of their inquisitive nature, children are at even higher risk for infection from animals than adolescents or immunocompetent adults. In this article the authors have reviewed the available data regarding hazards associated with the hedgehog, flying squirrel, iguana, chinchilla, and cockatoo. With the growing popularity of such exotic pets, further observation and research is warranted. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of zoonotic disease related to exotic pet ownership, and they should address this issue when obtaining a history and formulating a differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions suggestive of such illnesses.

  6. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book for Snowmass 2001, 3 Studies of Exotic and Standard Model Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, T.; Asner, D.; Baer, H.; Bagger, J.; Balazs, C.; Baltay, C.; Barker, T.; Barklow, T.; Barron, J.; Baur, U.; Beach, R.; Bellwied, R.; Bigi, I.; Blochinger, C.; Boege, S.; Bolton, T.; Bower, G.; Brau, J.; Breidenbach, M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Burke, D.; Burrows, P.; Butler, J.N.; Chakraborty, D.; Cheng, H.C.; Chertok, M.; Choi, S.Y.; Cinabro, D.; Corcella, G.; Cordero, R.K.; Danielson, N.; Davoudiasl, H.; Dawson, S.; Denner, A.; Derwent, P.; Diaz, M.A.; Dima, M.; Dittmaier, S.; Dixit, M.; Dixon, L.; Dobrescu, B.; Doncheski, M.A.; Duckwitz, M.; Dunn, J.; Early, J.; Erler, J.; Feng, J.L.; Ferretti, C.; Fisk, H.E.; Fraas, H.; Freitas, A.; Frey, R.; Gerdes, D.; Gibbons, L.; Godbole, R.; Godfrey, S.; Goodman, E.; Gopalakrishna, S.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P.D.; Gronberg, J.; Gunion, J.; Haber, H.E.; Han, T.; Hawkings, R.; Hearty, C.; Heinemeyer, S.; Hertzbach, S.S.; Heusch, C.; Hewett, J.; Hikasa, K.; Hiller, G.; Hoang, A.; Hollebeek, R.; Iwasaki, M.; Jacobsen, R.; Jaros, J.; Juste, A.; Kadyk, J.; Kalinowski, J.; Kalyniak, P.; Kamon, T.; Karlen, D.; Keller, L.; Koltick, D.; Kribs, G.; Kronfeld, A.; Leike, A.; Logan, H.E.; Lykken, J.; Macesanu, C.; Magill, S.; Marciano, W.; Markiewicz, T.W.; Martin, S.; Maruyama, T.; Matchev, K.; Moenig, K.; Montgomery, H.E.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Moreau, G.; Mrenna, S.; Murakami, B.; Murayama, H.; Nauenberg, U.; Neal, H.; Newman, B.; Nojiri, M.; Orr, L.H.; Paige, F.; Para, A.; Pathak, S.; Peskin, M.E.; Plehn, T.; Porter, F.; Potter, C.; Prescott, C.; Rainwater, D.; Raubenheimer, T.; Repond, J.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, T.; Ronan, M.; Rosenberg, L.; Rosner, J.; Roth, M.; Rowson, P.; Schumm, B.; Seppala, L.; Seryi, A.; Siegrist, J.; Sinev, N.; Skulina, K.; Sterner, K.L.; Stewart, I.; Su, S.; Tata, X.; Telnov, V.; Teubner, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turcot, A.S.; van Bibber, K.; van Kooten, R.; Vega, R.; Wackeroth, D.; Wagner, D.; Waite, A.; Walkowiak, W.; Weiglein, G.; Wells, J.D.; W. Wester, III; Williams, B.; Wilson, G.; Wilson, R.; Winn, D.; Woods, M.; Wudka, J.; Yakovlev, O.; Yamamoto, H.; Yang, H.J.

    2001-01-01

    This Resource Book reviews the physics opportunities of a next-generation e+e- linear collider and discusses options for the experimental program. Part 3 reviews the possible experiments on that can be done at a linear collider on strongly coupled electroweak symmetry breaking, exotic particles, and extra dimensions, and on the top quark, QCD, and two-photon physics. It also discusses the improved precision electroweak measurements that this collider will make available.

  7. Exotic heavy baryons at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, T.S.; Zimanyi, J.

    1993-06-01

    A heavy bottom-charm six-quark baryon is considered. A semiclassical and a Gaussian estimate show that the octet-octet bbb-ccc configuration can be favoured energetically rather than the singlet-singlet one. This result suggests that a confined bbb-ccc six-quark state may exist. Such objects may be produced in suitable amounts by heavy-ion collisions at Large Hadronic Collider energies. (R.P.) 8 refs. 1 fig

  8. Duality and quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, D.V.; Zheltukhin, A.A.; Pashnev, A.I.

    1975-01-01

    As it has shown, the study of vacuum transitions in dual models makes it possible to establish certain relations between duality, on the one hand, and the quark structure of resonances and the internal symmetries, on the other. In the case of Veneziano model the corresponding quark structure of resonances is determined by the infinity number of quarks of increasing mass. The intercents of the main trajectory and all adopted trajectories are additive with respect to squares of mass-forming quarks. The latter circumstance results in a number of important consequences: the presence of quadratic mass formulas for resonance states; the exact SU(infinity)-symmetry for the three-resonance coupling constants; the validity of Adler's self-consistency principle for external particles composed of different quarks and anti-quarks, etc

  9. Reproducing the Higgs boson data with vector-like quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonne, N.; Moreau, G.

    2012-01-01

    Vector-Like (VL) quarks arise in the main alternatives to the supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model (SM). Given the experimental possibility of a 125 GeV Higgs boson with rates significantly different from the SM expectations, it is motivating to study the effects of VL quarks on the Higgs boson cross sections and branching ratios. We perform a systematic search for the minimal field contents and gauge group representations of VL quarks able to significantly improve the fit of the measured Higgs rates, and simultaneously, to satisfy the direct constraints on VL quark masses as well as the electro-weak precision tests. In particular, large enhancements can be achieved in certain diphoton channels - as pointed out by both the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations - optimizing then the Higgs rate fit. This is a consequence of the introduction of VL quarks, with high electric charges of 8/3 or -7/3, which are exchanged in the Higgs-to-diphoton loop. Interestingly, the field contents and formal Higgs couplings obtained here are similar to those of scenarios in warped/composite frameworks arising from different motivations. The various exotic-charge quarks predicted, possibly below the TeV scale, might lead to a rich phenomenology soon at the LHC.

  10. The asymptotic hadron spectrum, anti-nuclei, hyper-nuclei and quark phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1978-01-01

    The only hope of determining the hadronic spectrum in the high mass region is through a study of matter produced in very high energy nuclear collisions. Along the way, exotic nuclei, i.e., anti-nuclei and hyper-nuclei may be produced in appreciable numbers, and the detection of a quark phase may be possible. (orig.) [de

  11. Heavy quark masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Massimo

    1990-01-01

    In the large quark mass limit, an argument which identifies the mass of the heavy-light pseudoscalar or scalar bound state with the renormalized mass of the heavy quark is given. The following equation is discussed: m(sub Q) = m(sub B), where m(sub Q) and m(sub B) are respectively the mass of the heavy quark and the mass of the pseudoscalar bound state.

  12. Soap opera: the sad tale of the quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipkin, H.

    1984-01-01

    The history of quark physics is briefly reviewed, followed by an introduction to quantum chromodynamics, leading terms, and the OZI rule. The basic physics of hadron structure as revealed by experiment is then discussed, followed by the models used to treat it. The two complementary models are the quasinuclear colored quark model and the quark-parton model. Another model for orthogonal physical properties is the bag model. Several applications of the constituent quark model are considered, including hadron masses, spin physics, and multiquark physics. The theoretical basis and phenomenology of the OZI rule forbids processes described by disconnected quark line diagrams

  13. Confirmation of the Z(4430)- resonance and other exotic meson results from the LHCb experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHCb experiment at CERN has recently confirmed the existence of the exotic Z(4430)- state first observed by the Belle experiment in 2008. Its quantum numbers have been measured and the resonant nature of this state has been demonstrated for the first time. As it is charged, the Z(4430)- cannot be classified as a conventional charmonium (ccbar) state, making it a candidate for an exotic resonance composed of four quarks (ccbar udbar). This talk will outline the history of the Z(4430)-, its possible interpretations and describe how the signature of this exotic state can be extracted from the large sample of B0 -> psi(2S) K+pi- decays that LHCb has collected during Run-1 of the LHC. I will also describe recent LHCb results that probe the nature of the exotic X(3872) particle and help to clarify our understanding of the f0(500) and f0(980) scalar mesons that have long thought to be four quark states.

  14. Quarks in hadrons and nuclei and electromagnetic probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faessler, Amand

    1995-01-01

    Deuteron properties and nuclear magnetic moments are studied in the non-relativistic quark cluster model. The quark cluster model is modified to include chiral symmetry. This reduces the number of parameters. The σ meson is exchanged between quarks and not as in earlier versions between nucleons. The charge monopole, quadrupole and magnetic-dipole form factors and the tensor polarization of the deuteron in this microscopic meson-quark cluster model are calculated. The deuteron wave function is derived from a microscopic 6-quark Hamiltonian which, in addition to a quadratic confinement potential, includes the one-pion and the one-gluon exchange potentials between quarks. The electromagnetic current operators are constructed on the quark level, i.e., the photon is coupled directly to the quarks. Aside from the one-body impulse current, pionic and gluonic exchange current corrections are included. Due to the Pauli principle on the quark level, new quark interchange terms arise in the one-body and two-body current matrix elements, that are not present on the nucleon level. While these additional quark exchange currents are small for low momentum transfers, we find that they appreciably influence the electromagnetic structure of the deuteron beyond a momentum transfer of q = 5fm -1 . (author)

  15. Quark diquark symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, M.M. de

    1980-01-01

    Assuming the baryons are made of quark-diquark pairs, the wave functions for the 126 allowed ground states are written. The quark creation and annihilations operators are generalized to describe the quark-diquark structure in terms of a parameter σ. Assuming that all quark-quark interactions are mediated by gluons transforming like an octet of vector mesons, the effective Hamiltonian and the baryon masses as constraint equations for the elements of the mass matrix is written. The symmetry is the SU(6) sub(quark)x SU(21) sub(diquark) broken by quark-quark interactions respectively invariant under U(6), U(2) sub(spin), U(3) and also interactions transforming like the eighth and the third components of SU(3). In the limit of no quark-diquark structure (σ = 0), the ground state masses is titted to within 1% of the experimental data, except for the Δ(1232), where the error is almost 2%. Expanding the decuplet mass equations in terms of σ and keeping terms only up to the second order, this error is reduced to 67%. (Author) [pt

  16. Shell model calculations for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.A.; Wildenthal, B.H.

    1991-01-01

    A review of the shell-model approach to understanding the properties of light exotic nuclei is given. Binding energies including p and p-sd model spaces and sd and sd-pf model spaces; cross-shell excitations around 32 Mg, including weak-coupling aspects and mechanisms for lowering the ntw excitations; beta decay properties of neutron-rich sd model, of p-sd and sd-pf model spaces, of proton-rich sd model space; coulomb break-up cross sections are discussed. (G.P.) 76 refs.; 12 figs

  17. Hadronic interaction and structure of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2009-01-01

    I will overview recent studies on the evolution of the shell structure in stable and exotic nuclei, and will show its relevance to hadronic interaction, including nuclear forces. This shell evolution is primarily due to the tensor force. The robust mechanism and some examples will be presented. Such examples include the disappearance of existing magic numbers and the appearance of new ones. The shell structure and existing limit of nuclei depend also on the three-body interaction in a specific way. I will sketch how the Δ-hole excitation induced three-body force (Fujita-Miyazawa force) modifies them. (author)

  18. Measurements of heavy quark and lepton lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaros, J.A.

    1985-02-01

    The PEP/PETRA energy range has proved to be well-suited for the study of the lifetimes of hadrons containing the b and c quarks and the tau lepton for several reasons. First, these states comprise a large fraction of the total interaction rate in e + e - annihilation and can be cleanly identified. Second, the storage rings have operated at high luminosity and so produced these exotic states copiously. And finally, thanks to the interplay of the Fermi coupling strength, the quark and lepton masses, and the beam energy, the expected decay lengths are in the 1/2 mm range and so are comparatively easy to measure. This pleasant coincidence of cleanly identified and abundant signal with potentially large effects has made possible the first measurements of two fundamental weak couplings, tau → nu/sub tau/W and b → cW. These measurements have provided a sharp test of the standard model and allowed, for the first time, the full determination of the magnitudes of the quark mixing matrix. This paper reviews the lifetime studies made at PEP during the past year. It begins with a brief review of the three detectors, DELCO, MAC and MARK II, which have reported lifetime measurements. Next it discusses two new measurements of the tau lifetime, and briefly reviews a measurement of the D 0 lifetime. Finally, it turns to measurements of the B lifetime, which are discussed in some detail. 18 references, 14 figures, 1 table

  19. The Quark - A Decade Later

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakin, James T.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews theoretical principles underlying the quark model. Indicates that the agreement with experimental results and the understanding of the quark-quark force are two hurdles for the model to survive in the future. (CC)

  20. The top quark as a probe for searching new physics at the LHC using the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukla, Romain

    2016-01-01

    The work of this thesis focuses on the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model in the compositeness framework, which postulates strongly coupled sectors at the TeV-scale consisting of exotic particles. Their existence can be tested at the CERN proton-proton collider, the LHC, using the ATLAS detector. The production of an heavy quark, such as the T5/3 predicted in those models, can be inferred from an enhancement of the cross-section of a given signature. Some final states, such as the one studied in this thesis involving 2 same-sign leptons, are very rare and have an excellent sensitivity. Searches for T5/3 production at the LHC using 8 and 13 TeV ATLAS data are presented. A small excess is seen at 8 TeV. Preliminary results of the 13 TeV analysis are presented and do not show any excess. The inferior limits put on the T5/3 mass is 745 GeV at 8 TeV and 990 GeV at 13 TeV. Composite models include also heavy bosons such as top-philic Z' coupled only to the top quark whose production in association to a top quark pair gives a final state similar to those from 4 tops events. A phenomenological study on the discovery potential of those exotic (Z' and effective theory) or standard (tttt) processes at 13 and 14 TeV is done and gives the minimal luminosities needed to observe deviations from the Standard Model. An instrumental study for the conception of the new LTDB card, part of the electromagnetic calorimeter's level 1 trigger system is described in the context of the ATLAS upgrade program. (author) [fr

  1. Heavy-quark physics in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1991-04-01

    Heavy quarks can expose new symmetries and novel phenomena in QCD not apparent in ordinary hadronic systems. In these lectures I discuss the use of effective-Lagrangian and light-cone Fock methods to analyze exclusive heavy hadron decays such as Υ → p bar p and B → ππ, and also to derive effective Schroedinger and Dirac equations for heavy quark systems. Two contributions to the heavy quark structure functions of the proton and other light hadrons are identified: an ''extrinsic'' contribution associated with leading twist QCD evolution of the gluon distribution, and a higher twist ''intrinsic'' contribution due to the hardness of high-mass fluctuations of multi-gluon correlations in hadronic wavefunctions. A non-perturbative calculation of the heavy quark distribution of a meson in QCD in one space and one time is presented. The intrinsic higher twist contributions to the pion and proton structure functions can dominate the hadronic production of heavy quark systems at large longitudinal momentum fraction x F and give anomalous contributions to the quark structure functions of ordinary hadrons at large x bj . I also discuss a number of ways in which heavy quark production in nuclear targets can test fundamental QCD phenomena and provide constraints on hadronic wavefunctions. The topics include color transparency, finite formation time, and predictions for charm production at threshold, including nuclear-bound quarkonium. I also discuss a number of QCD mechanisms for the suppression of J/ψ and Υ production in nuclear collisions, including gluon shadowing, the peripheral excitation of intrinsic heavy quark components at large x F , and the coalescence of heavy quarks with co-moving spectators at low x F

  2. Searches for Fourth Generation, Vector-like Quarks and ttbar Resonances with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nektarijevic, S

    2013-01-01

    The LHC operation at the high center of mass energies has opened the insight into the potential production of exotic heavy particles. A summary of the searches for the heavy quarks and the heavy bosons decaying into the top-antitop pairs ($t\\bar{t}$ resonances) with $14.3~\\rm{fb^{-1}}$ of the ATLAS detector data at $\\sqrt{s} =8~\\rm{TeV}$ is presented here. The searches for heavy quarks are performed in frameworks of the chiral fourth generation and vector-like quarks. One of the searches is also sensitive to the production of four top quarks and positively-charged top quark pairs. The searches for the $t\\bar{t}$ resonances rely on the narrow width topcolor leptophobic $Z'$ and broad width Kaluza-Klein gluon as bench mark.

  3. Multiquark exotics (baryonium, dibaryons etc)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    The multiquark exotic resonant states q 2 -(anti q) 2 , q 3 -(anti q) 3 , q 6 and q 9 are discussed as systems composed of the few colour clusters. Special attention is devoted to the problem of narrow resonances in channels anti NN, Δanti p+pions, πNN and NN. 42 refs.; 2 figs.; 5 tabs

  4. Exotic meson studies at LHCb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreps Michal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The latest years have seen a resurrection of interest in searches for exotic states motivated by tantalising observations of several states. Using the pp collisions data collected at 7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment, we performed studies of the X(3872 decay rate to ψ (2Sγ final state, as well as confirmation the Z(4430+ state.

  5. Exotic decay in cerium isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geiger–Nuttall plots were studied for different clusters and are found to be linear. Inclusion of proximity potential will not produce much deviation to linear nature of Geiger–Nuttall plots. It is observed that neutron excess in the parent nuclei slow down the exotic decay process. These findings support the earlier observations ...

  6. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2009-01-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban sett...

  7. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2007-01-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban sett...

  8. Bulk viscosity in 2SC quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, Mark G; Schmitt, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The bulk viscosity of three-flavour colour-superconducting quark matter originating from the nonleptonic process u + s ↔ u + d is computed. It is assumed that up and down quarks form Cooper pairs while the strange quark remains unpaired (2SC phase). A general derivation of the rate of strangeness production is presented, involving contributions from a multitude of different subprocesses, including subprocesses that involve different numbers of gapped quarks as well as creation and annihilation of particles in the condensate. The rate is then used to compute the bulk viscosity as a function of the temperature, for an external oscillation frequency typical of a compact star r-mode. We find that, for temperatures far below the critical temperature T c for 2SC pairing, the bulk viscosity of colour-superconducting quark matter is suppressed relative to that of unpaired quark matter, but for T ∼> T c /30 the colour-superconducting quark matter has a higher bulk viscosity. This is potentially relevant for the suppression of r-mode instabilities early in the life of a compact star

  9. Heavy-Quark Production

    CERN Document Server

    Frixione, Stefano; Nason, Paolo; Ridolfi, Giovanni

    1997-01-01

    We review the present theoretical and experimental status of heavy quark production in high-energy collisions. In particular, we cover hadro- and photoproduction at fixed target experiments, at HERA and at the hadron colliders, as well as aspects of heavy quark production in e+e- collisions at the Z0 peak.

  10. Systematics of quark mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frampton, P.H.; Jarlskog, C.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that the quark mass matrices in the Standard Electroweak Model satisfy the empirical relation M = M 1 + Ψ(Λ 2 ), where M(M sp (')) refers to the mass matrix of the charge 2/3(-1/3) quarks normalized to the largest eigenvalue, m sub (t)(m sub (b)), and Λ = V sub (us) = 0.22

  11. Colourless confinement for quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The enigma of quarks is that they are there, hidden deep inside nucleons and other strongly interacting particles, but refuse to come out. The tighter the quark bonds are stretched, the more difficult they are to break. This dogma has been accepted for some thirty years but has never been mathematically proved

  12. Quark radiation from LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, Susan

    1992-01-01

    Like any other electrically charged particles, quarks should give out electromagnetic radiation (photons) when they vibrate. One of the physics results from CERN's LEP collider is the first clear observation of this quark radiation from electron-positron collisions. At lower energies this radiation could only be inferred

  13. Quark radiation from LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartwright, Susan

    1992-04-15

    Like any other electrically charged particles, quarks should give out electromagnetic radiation (photons) when they vibrate. One of the physics results from CERN's LEP collider is the first clear observation of this quark radiation from electron-positron collisions. At lower energies this radiation could only be inferred.

  14. Top Quark Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larios, F.

    2006-01-01

    We give an overview of the physics of the Top quark, from the experimental discovery to the studies of its properties. We review some of the work done on the Electroweak and Flavor Changing couplings associated with the Top quark in the Standard Model and beyond. We will focus on the specific contribution of phycisits working in Mexico and Mexican physicists working abroad

  15. Top quark theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laenen, E.

    2012-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of a number of top quark properties such as its mass and its couplings are reviewed. Essential aspects in the theoretical description of top quark production, singly, in pairs and in association, as well as its decay related to spin and angular correlations are discussed.

  16. Heavy quarks and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azimov, Ya.I.; Khoze, V.A.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental results which proved the reality of quarks are reviewed along with further experiments broadening the representation of quarks and leptons and providing the basis to develop the theory of elementary particles. The discovery of the J/psi particle is noted to give rise to the discovery of c-quark, the existance of which is confirmed by the discovery of charmed hadrons. The main aspects of quantum chromodynamics explaining the mechanism of strong interaction of quarks are considered along with those of the Weinberg-Salam theory proposed to describe weak and electromagnetic interactions of quarks and leptons. Experimental data testifying to the existance of heavy tausup(+-) leptons are presented. The history of discovery of γ mesons and of a new heavier b-quark is described. Perspectives for studying elementary particles are discussed. Further studies of γ mesons, discovery and investigation of charmed particles are noted to be immediate tasks along with the search for manifestation of t-quark considered to be a partner of b-quark from the viewpoint of the Weinberg-Salam model

  17. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for 'hands-on' projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the "1"2C(d,p)"1"3C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  18. Fourteenth Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedenhoever, Ingo [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2016-07-11

    The Fourteenth Annual Exotic Beam Summer School EBSS 2015 was held August 2nd - August 7th, 2015, and belongs to the series of summer programs aimed at educating future workforce in nuclear physics-related areas, mostly about the challenges of radioactive ion beam physics. Through these schools the research community will be able to exploit fully the opportunities created by the exotic beam facilities. These facilities in the US include CARIBU at ANL, the NSCL and the future FRIB laboratory as well as smaller-scale university laboratories. The skill set needed by the future workforce is very diverse and a fundamental understanding of theoretical, technical, computational and applied fields are all important. Therefore, the Exotic Beam Summer Schools follow a unique approach, in which the students not only receive lectures but also participate in hands-on activities. The lectures covered broad topics in both the experimental and theoretical physics of nuclei far from stability as well as radioactive ions production and applications. The afternoons provided opportunities for "hands-on" projects with experimental equipment and techniques useful in FRIB research. Five activities were performed in groups of eight students, rotating through the activities over the five afternoons of the school. The center of the activities was an experiment at the FSU tandem accelerator, measuring the angular distribution and cross section of the 12C(d,p)13C transfer reaction, measured with a silicon telescope in a scattering chamber. The experimental data were analyzed by performing a DWBA calculation with the program DWUCK, and the resulting spectroscopic factors were compared to a shell model calculation. The other activities included target preparation, digital gamma-spectroscopy and modern neutron detection methods.

  19. Chiral Lagrangians and quark condensate in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, J.; Chanfray, G.; Ericson, M.

    1996-03-01

    The evolution of density of quark condensate in nuclear medium with interacting nucleons, including the short range correlations is examined. Two chiral models are used, the linear sigma model and the non-linear one. It is shown that the quark condensate, as other observables, is independent on the variant selected. The application to physical pions excludes the linear sigma model as a credible one. The non-linear models restricted to pure s-wave pion-nucleon scattering are examined. (author)

  20. Quark masses: An environmental impact statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffe, Robert L.; Jenkins, Alejandro; Kimchi, Itamar

    2009-01-01

    We investigate worlds that lie on a slice through the parameter space of the standard model over which quark masses vary. We allow as many as three quarks to participate in nuclei, while fixing the mass of the electron and the average mass of the lightest baryon flavor multiplet. We classify as congenial worlds that satisfy the environmental constraint that the quark masses allow for stable nuclei with charge one, six, and eight, making organic chemistry possible. Whether a congenial world actually produces observers capable of measuring those quark masses depends on a multitude of historical contingencies, beginning with primordial nucleosynthesis and including other astrophysical processes, which we do not explore. Such constraints may be independently superimposed on our results. Environmental constraints such as the ones we study may be combined with information about the a priori distribution of quark masses over the landscape of possible universes to determine whether the measured values of the quark masses are determined environmentally, but our analysis is independent of such an anthropic approach. We estimate baryon masses as functions of quark masses via first-order perturbation theory in flavor SU(3) breaking. We estimate nuclear masses as functions of the baryon masses using two separate tools: for a nucleus made of two baryon species, when possible we consider its analog in our world, a nucleus with a similar binding energy, up to Coulomb contributions. For heavy nuclei or nuclei made of more than two baryons, we develop a generalized Weizsaecker semiempirical mass formula, in which strong kinematic flavor symmetry violation is modeled by a degenerate Fermi gas . We check for the stability of nuclei against fission, strong particle emission (analogous to α decay), and weak nucleon emission. For two light quarks with charges 2/3 and -1/3 , we find a band of congeniality roughly 29 MeV wide in their mass difference, with our own world lying comfortably

  1. Quark confinement and the quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuti, J.

    1977-01-01

    The CERN-JINR School of Physics is meant to give young experimental physicists and introduction to the theoretical aspects of recent advances in elementary particle physics. The purpose of the lectures contained in this paper is to discuss recent work on the quark model and its applications to hadron spectroscopy and some high-energy phenomena. (Auth.)

  2. Exotic nuclei with charm and bottom flavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasui S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the possibility of existence of exotic nuclei containing charm and bottom mesons. We study the interaction between $ar{D}$ (B mesons and nucleons from view of heavy quark symmetry, and derive the one pion exchange potentials. We apply these potentials to the two body system of $ar{D}$ (B meson and nucleon N , and find there are possible stable bound states with spin JP = 1/2− and isospin I = 0. We find that the tensor interaction mixing $ar{D}$N and $ar{D}$*N (BN and B*N plays an important role. We also qualitatively discuss the possible bound states of $ar{D}$ (B meson and two nucleons.

  3. New results on exotic baryon resonances at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Observation of exotic resonant structures decaying into $J/\\psi p$ found in the LHCb experiment is discussed. Examination of the $J/\\psi p$ system in $\\Lambda^{0}_{b} \\to J/\\psi K^{-} p$ decays shows two states, each of which must be composed of at least $c \\bar{c} uud$ quarks, and are thus consistent with pentaquarks. The significance of each of these resonances is more than 9 standard deviations. Their masses are ($4 380 \\pm 8 \\pm 29$) MeV and ($4 449.8 \\pm 1.7 \\pm 2.5$) MeV, and their corresponding widths are ($205 \\pm 18 \\pm 86$) MeV, and ($39 \\pm 5 \\pm 19$) MeV. The preferred $J^{P}$ assignments are of opposite parity, with one state having spin 3/2 and the other 5/2.

  4. Bottomonium, charmonium and exotic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, M.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy quarkonia states have been extensively studied in the past decade by B-factories and other experiments, and have provided many surprises that suggest that our understanding of the meson is still incomplete. The recent BaBar and Belle data filled many of the missing seats in the bottomonium table such as η b or h b , while LHC experiments are also contributing, for example in the observation of χ b (3P) state by ATLAS. There are clear signs of exotic states, such as the charged Z b + and Z c + found by Belle, yet puzzling X(3872), and overpopulated Y state series. Recent progress on the bottomonium, charmonium and exotic states is discussed in this review. (author)

  5. Quark i mattoni del mondo

    CERN Document Server

    Fritzsch, Harald

    1983-01-01

    Quark rossi, verdi e blu ; quark dotati di stranezza e di incanto ; quark 'su' e 'giù' : sembra che i fisici delle particelle giochino a confondere la curiosità del profano, con queste denominazioni fantasiose. Che cosa significano ? e, soprattutto, i quark sono i costituenti davvero elementari della materia ?

  6. Top Quark Properties at Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lysák, Roman [Prague, Inst. Phys.

    2017-11-27

    The latest CDF and D0 experiment measurements of the top quark properties except the top quark mass are presented. The final combination of the CDF and D0 forward-backward asymmetry measurements is shown together with the D0 measurements of the inclusive top quark pair cross-section as well as the top quark polarization.

  7. Top quark mass measurements with CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Kovalchuk, Nataliia

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the top quark mass are presented, obtained from CMS data collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at centre-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV. The mass of the top quark is measured using several methods and channels, including the reconstructed invariant mass distribution of the top quark, an analysis of endpoint spectra as well as measurements from shapes of top quark decay distributions. The dependence of the mass measurement on the kinematic phase space is investigated. The results of the various channels are combined and compared to the world average. The top mass and also $\\alpha_{\\textnormal S}$ are extracted from the top pair cross section measured at CMS.

  8. Quest for quark soup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldhaber, J.

    1986-11-13

    The paper concerns the experimental search for quark-gluon plasma. The theory of a quark-gluon plasma is first given. Then the method which researchers hope will create the quark-gluon plasma is described; the idea is to use heavy ion beams in, the CERN SPS. The CERN 'heavy-ion programme' involves research groups mainly from CERN, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Gellsellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung. The experiments in the research programme are outlined, together with the detector equipment employed in the experiments.

  9. Hands on exotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandy. Bivens

    1998-01-01

    To lead, teach, rear, bring up, instruct, train, show, inform, guide, direct, inspire, and foster expansion of knowledge-that is education. Environmental education has been defined as the interdisciplinary process of developing a citizenry that is knowledgeable about the total environment, including both its natural and built aspects, that has the capacity and the...

  10. Quark soup al dente: applied superstring theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, R C; Vazquez, S E [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline St N, Waterloo, Ontario N2 L 2Y5 (Canada)], E-mail: rmyers@perimeterinstitute.ca, E-mail: svazquez@perimeterinstitute.ca

    2008-06-07

    In recent years, experiments have discovered an exotic new state of matter known as the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (sQGP). At present, it seems that standard theoretical tools, such as perturbation theory and lattice gauge theory, are poorly suited to understand this new phase. However, recent progress in superstring theory has provided us with a theoretical laboratory for studying very similar systems of strongly interacting hot non-Abelian plasmas. This surprising new perspective extracts the fluid properties of the sQGP from physical processes in a black hole spacetime. Hence we may find the answers to difficult particle physics questions about the sQGP from straightforward calculations in classical general relativity.

  11. SU(3)xSU(2) color symmetry and Usub(B)(1)xSUsub(f)(4) quark model of hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khrushchov, V.V.

    1982-01-01

    A quark model with a generalized color group SUsub(c)(3)xSU'sub(c)(2) is treated in the framework of the SUsub(f)(4)xUsub(B)(1) symnetry of strong interactions. The model contains twelve standard u, d, s, c quarks and new quarks belonging to representation 6 of the SU(4) group. The properties of new quarks are considered with respect to the color group and some properties of the exotic states, predicted by the model are presented

  12. Chemical Potential Dependence of the Dressed-Quark Propagator from an Effective Quark-Quark Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZONG Hong-Shi; PING Jia-Lun; SUN Wei-Min; CHANG Chao-Hsi; WANG Fan

    2002-01-01

    We exhibit a method for obtaining the low chemical potential dependence of the dressed quark propagatorfrom an effective quark-quark interaction model. Within this approach we explore the chemical potential dependenceof the dressed-quark propagator, which provides a means of determining the behavior of the chiral and deconfinementorder parameters. A comparison with the results of previous researches is given.

  13. Single production of an exotic bottom partner at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Álvarez, Ezequiel; Rold, Leandro Da; Vietto, Juan Ignacio Sanchez

    2014-01-01

    We study single production and detection at the LHC run II of exotic partners of the bottom quark. For masses larger than 1 TeV single production can dominate over pair production that is suppressed due to phase space. The presence of exotic partners of the bottom is motivated in models aiming to solve the A FB b anomaly measured at LEP and SLC. Minimal models of this type with partial compositeness predict, as the lightest bottom partner, a new fermion V of electric charge −4/3, also called mirror. The relevant coupling for our study is a WVb vertex, which yields a signal that corresponds to a hard W, a hard b-jet and a forward light jet. We design a search strategy for the leptonic decay of the W, which avoids the large QCD multijet background and its large uncertainties. We find that the main backgrounds are W+jets and tt-bar, and the key variables to enhance the signal over them are a hard b-jet and the rapidity of the light jet. We determine the discovery reach for the LHC run II, in particular we predict that, for couplings of order ∼g/10, this signal could be detected at a 95% confidence level with a mass up to 2.4 TeV using the first 100 fb −1

  14. Strong interactions - quark models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, M.; Ferreira, P.L.

    1979-01-01

    The variational method is used for the PSI and upsilon family spectra reproduction from the quark model, through several phenomenological potentials, viz.: linear, linear plus coulomb term and logarithmic. (L.C.) [pt

  15. Multileptons from heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, R.J.N.

    1984-03-01

    The paper is concerned with a brief look at the various multilepton signals that are expected at p-barp colliders from the production and cascade decay of top quarks, plus the backgrounds from b and c production. (author)

  16. Quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.G.

    1984-11-01

    The paper concerns the behaviour of quarks in nuclei. Confinement size changes and dynamical rescaling; A dependence; low-x region; gluons and confinement size; and nucleons in a nucleus; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  17. A matter of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Quarks are understood to interact through the 'colour' force, carried by gluons. Under normal conditions these quarks are confined - frozen together in 'colourless' states such as protons, neutrons and other strongly interacting particles. However if the quarks are compressed tightly together and/or are 'heated' by increasing their energy, they should eventually break loose from their colour bonds to form a new kind of matter – the so-called quark-gluon plasma. Although QGP has not yet been synthesized in the Laboratory, it was most likely the stuff of the Universe 10 -5 second after the Big Bang. Thus the search for this 'new' matter is attracting a growing number of physicists, theorists and experimenters from both the particle physics and nuclear physics fields

  18. Color quarks and octonions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guersey, F.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical framework based on octonions is developed for the description of the color quark scheme in which quarks are unobservable, the color SU(3) is exact, and only color singlets correspond to observable hadrons. The fictitious Hilbert space in which quarks operate is taken to be a space of vectors with octonion components. This space admits as a gauge group an exact SU(3) identified with the color SU/sub C/(3). Because of the nonassociativity of the underlying algebra, nonsinglet representations of SU/sub C/(3) are unobservable, while the subspace of color singlets satisfies associativity along with conditions for observability. Octonion quark fields satisfy the commutation relations of parafermions of order 3, leading to the correct SU(6) multiplets for hadrons. (U.S.)

  19. Top quark discovered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Nine months after a careful announcement of tentative evidence for the long-awaited sixth 'top' quark, physicists from the CDF and DO experiments at Fermilab's Tevatron proton-antiproton collider declared on 2 March that they had finally discovered the top quark. Last year (June 1994, page 1), the CDF experiment at the Tevatron reported a dozen candidate top events. These, said CDF, had all the characteristics expected of top, but the difficulties of extracting the tiny signal from a trillion proton-antiproton collisions made them shy of claiming a discovery. For its part, the companion DO Tevatron experiment reported a few similar events but were even more guarded about their interpretation as top quarks. Just after these hesitant announcements, performance at the Tevatron improved dramatically last summer. After the commissioning of a new linear accelerator and a magnet realignment, the machine reached a new world record proton-antiproton collision luminosity of 1.28 x 10 31 per sq cm per s, ten times that originally planned. Data began to pour in at an unprecedented rate and the data sample grew to six trillion collisions. Luminosity has subsequently climbed to 1.7 x 10 31 . The top quark is the final letter in the alphabet of Standard Model particles. According to this picture, all matter is composed of six stronglyinteracting subnuclear particles, the quarks, and six weakly interacting particles, the leptons. Both sextets are neatly arranged as three pairs in order of increasing mass. The fifth quark, the 'beauty' or 'b' quark, was also discovered at Fermilab, back in 1977. Since then physicists have been eagerly waiting for the top to turn up, but have been frustrated by its heaviness - the top is some 40 times the mass of its 'beautiful' partner. Not only is the top quark the heaviest by far, but it is the only quark which has been actively hunted. After the quarry was glimpsed last year, the net has now been

  20. Exotic nuclear excitations

    CERN Document Server

    Pancholi, S C

    2011-01-01

    By providing the reader with a foundational background in high spin nuclear structure physics and exploring exciting current discoveries in the field, this book presents new phenomena in a clear and compelling way. The quest for achieving the highest spin states has resulted in some remarkable successes which this monograph will address in comprehensive detail. The text covers an array of pertinent subject matter, including the rotational alignment and bandcrossings, magnetic rotation, triaxial strong deformation and wobbling motion and chirality in nuclei. Dr. Pancholi offers his readers a clearly-written and up-to-date treatment of the topics covered. The prerequisites for a proper appreciation are courses in nuclear physics and nuclear models and measurement techniques of observables like gamma-ray energies, intensities, multi-fold coincidences, angular correlations or distributions, linear polarization, internal conversion coefficients, short lifetime (pico-second range) of excited states etc. and instrum...

  1. Exotic nuclei and astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penionzhkevich Yu.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nuclear physics investigations of the laws of the microscopic world contributed significantly to extension of our knowledge of phenomena occurring in the macroscopic world (Universe and made a formidable contribution to the development of astrophysical and cosmological theories. First of all, this concerns the expanding universe model, the evolution of stars, and the abundances of elements, as well as the properties of various stars and cosmic objects, including “cold” and neutron stars, black holes, and pulsars. Without claiming to give a full account of all cosmological problems, we will dwell upon those of them that, in my opinion, have much in common with nuclear-matter properties manifesting themselves in nuclear interactions.

  2. Do Quarks Propagate?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Paul Haase; Taylor, John C.

    1984-01-01

    Processes with coloured particles in the initial state are generally infrared divergent. We investigate the effect of this on processes with colourless particles in the initial state, when the amplitude is near an intermediate quark pole. The result is a characteristic logarithmic depedence...... on the 'binding energy'(even though spectator interactions are taken into account), and the result is gauge-invariant. Summed to all orders the logarithms could perhaps suppress the quark pole....

  3. Heavy quark condensates from dynamically borken flavour symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, T.; King, S.F.

    1992-01-01

    We study the dynamics of top quark condensation induced by gauge interactions resulting from a broken flavour symmetry. The gap equation in dressed ladder approximation is solved numerically to obtain directly the top quark mass. The new high energy dynamics reduces the prediction of m t somewhat, but the usual problems of m t being too large and fine tuning remain. In order to solve these problems we extend our discussion to include fourth generation quark condensates. (orig.)

  4. Top quark mass measurement in dilepton channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysak, R.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, we measured the top quark mass in tt'-' events produced in pp'-' interactions at the center-of-mass energy 1.96 TeV using CDF detector. We used dilepton in tt'-' events where both W bosons from top quarks are decaying into leptons. The data sample corresponds to 340 pb -1 . We found there 33 tt'-' candidates while expecting 10.5 ± 1.9 background events. In the measurement, we reconstruct one, representative mass for each event using the assumption about longitudinal momentum of in tt'-' system, in order to be able to kinematically solve the under-constrained system. The mass distributions (templates) are created for simulated signal and background events. Templates are parametrized in order to obtain smooth probability density functions. Likelihood maximization which includes these parametrized templates is then performed on reconstructed masses obtained from data sample in order to obtain final top quark mass estimate. The result of applying this procedure on data events is top quark mass estimate 169.5 +7. 7 - 7.2 (stat.) ± 4.0(syst.) GeV/c 2 for 30 out of 33 candidates, where the solution for top quark mass was found. This measurement was a part of first top quark mass measurement in dilepton channel at CDF in Run II. The top quark mass measured here is consistent with the CDF measurement in dilepton channel from Run I M top = 167.4 ± 10.3(stat.) ± 4.8(syst.) GeV/c 2 . Moreover, the combined result of four top quark mass measurements in dilepton channel from Run II (one of these four measurements is our measurement) M top = 167.9 ± 5.2(stat.) ± 3.7(syst.) GeV/c 2 significantly (by ∼ 40%) improved the precision of top quark mass determination from Run I. It should be also noted, that this combined result is consistent with measurement obtained in 'lepton+jets' channel at CDF in Run II (M top = 173.5 +3.9 -3.8 GeV/c 2 ). So, we don't have yet any indication about new physics beyond the Standard Model. My main contribution in this analysis was

  5. Characterization of Indian and exotic quality protein maize (QPM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymorphism analysis and genetic diversity of normal maize and quality protein maize (QPM) inbreds among locally well adapted germplasm is a prerequisite for hybrid maize breeding program. The diversity analyses of 48 maize accessions including Indian and exotic germplasm using 75 simple sequence repeat (SSR) ...

  6. The calculation of multiquark hadrons by the quark model baryon, meson and multiquark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, Sachiko; Takizawa, Makoto; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-01-01

    The 1st new hadron summer school related with the new science field, 'the comprehensive research of new hadron states searched by variable flavor number scheme', was held on August 18-20, 2010. This report is one of the 'quark model' lectures. The chapter 1 describes following problems: 1. The background and the significance as a phenomenological theory of the constituent quark model. 2. The introduction of the quark model. 3. The summary of the properties of hadrons in which the quark model can apply to three quarks (qqq) and, one quark and antiquark (q - q) configurations, but is difficult to apply to some configurations. 4. A brief summary of exotic hadrons and recent problems. In chapter 2, the introduction and some exercises of the stochastic variational method are reported as a technique of solving spatial part of multiquark states. In the chapter 3, spins and color parts in multiquark states are calculated. The group theory is applied to calculate the eigenvalues of the Casimir operators of SU(2), SU(3) and SU(6). In the problems of being unable to apply Casimir operators, the direct matrix diagonalization method, m-scheme, is employed for interacting quarks and for the interaction involving quark mass. To find the attractive interaction in tetraquark (QQqq-bar) state is given as an exercise problem. (Y. Kazumata)

  7. Top-quark mass measurements: Alternative techniques (LHC + Tevatron)

    CERN Document Server

    Adomeit, Stefanie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of the top-quark mass employing alternative techniques are presented, performed by the D0 and CDF collaborations at the Tevatron as well as the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. The alternative methods presented include measurements using the lifetime of $B$-hadrons, the transverse momentum of charged leptons and the endpoints of kinematic distributions in top quark anti-quark pair ($t\\bar{t}$) final states. The extraction of the top-quark pole mass from the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross-section and the normalized differential $t\\bar{t}$ + 1-jet cross-section are discussed as well as the top-quark mass extraction using fixed-order QCD predictions at detector level. Finally, a measurement of the top-quark mass using events enhanced in single top t-channel production is presented.

  8. Critical parameters of Quark-Hadron phase transition with interacting and massive quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, C.P.; Patra, B.K.

    1994-06-01

    Current techniques to simulate the dynamical behaviour of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) reveal that the order of the phase transition as well as the values of the critical parameters depend on the number of quark flavours as well as on the quark-masses included in the simulation. We attempt to show here the effects of the number of quark flavours and quark-masses on critical parameters by using the perturbative, finite temperature field theory to g 3 s order in the strong coupling g s . We treat the hadrons as particles with finite size and its implications on the equation of state for hadron gas are studied. We find that the critical temperature T c is lowered by 9 MeV as we move from two to three quark flavours. The nature of the phase transition always remains as first order. However, the inclusion of quark-masses in our calculation does not affect the result much. (author). 14 refs, 3 figs

  9. A second order QCD effect. quark-quark bremsstrahlung contribution to transverse momentum of lepton pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaichian, M.; Hayashi, M.; Honkaranta, T.

    1980-01-01

    We consider in QCD the second order, in gluon-quark coupling constant, contribution of the quark-quark scatte-ring (bremsstrahlung) to the transverse momentum distribution of muon pairs produced in proton-proton collisions. In certain kinematical regions accesible to experimental tests, this contribution is quite large in comparison with the first order calculations. This happens for a specific choice of scale violating structure functions which fit the deep inelastic data. Thus the first order QCD calcula-tion alone is not conclusive in trying to fit the data -one must necessarily check the effect of the second order quark-quark scattering as compared with the first order quark-gluon and the quark-antiquark scattering. This remark concerns also the case when in the first order diagrams the effect of primordial transverse momentum of partons is included as well as the case when the first order is replaced by DDT type of formulae. Mass regularization and different prescriptions for the constant term in q → g + q vertex are considered. Results are presented for the energies √s=6.5, 27, 63, 800 GeV and are compared with experiment. Implications of these results for the detection of W +- -mesons via psub(T) distribution of their decay products μ +- in proton-proton collisions are mentioned. (author)

  10. Exotic Nuclei Arena in JHP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, T.

    1991-12-01

    The Exotic Nuclei Arena planned in Japanese Hadron Project aims to accelerate various unstable nuclei produced in 1-GeV proton-induced reactions up to 6.5 MeV/u by means of heavy-ion linacs. The present status of research and development for the Earena is briefly reported. The construction of the prototype facility to accelerate unstable beams up to 0.8 MeV/u is planned in 1992-94, in which the existing cyclotron in INS is used as the primary accelerator. (author)

  11. Mitigating exotic impacts: restoring native deer mouse populations elevated by an exotic food subsidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean E. Pearson; Robert J. Fletcher

    2008-01-01

    The threat posed by exotic organisms to native systems has led to extensive research on exotic invaders, yet management of invasives has progressed relatively slowly. This is partly due to poor understanding of how exotic species management influences native organisms. To address this shortfall, we experimentally evaluated the efficacy of an invasives management tool...

  12. Prediction of new Quarks, Generations and Quark Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Thedore

    2002-04-01

    The Standard model currently suggests no relationship between the quark and lepton masses. The CBM (model) of the nucleus has resulted in the prediction of two new quarks, an up quark mass of 237.31 MeV/c2 and a dn quark mass of 42.392 MeV/c2. These two new quarks help explain the numerical relationship between all the quark and lepton masses in a single function. The mass of each SNU-P (quark or lepton) is just the geometric mean of two related SNU-Ps, either in the same generation or in the same family. This numerology predicts the following masses for the electron family: 0.511000 (electron), 7.743828 (predicted), 117.3520, 1778.38, 26950.08 MeV. The resulting slope of these masses when plotted on semi log paper is "e" to 5 significant figures using the currently accepted mass for Tau. This theory suggests that all the "dn like" quarks have a mass of just 10X multiples of 4.24 MeV (the mass of the "d" quark). The first 3 "up like" quark masses are 38, 237 and 1500 MeV. This theory also predicts a new heavy generation with a lepton mass of 27 GeV, a "dn like" quark of 42.4 GeV, and an "up like" quark of 65 GeV. Significant evidence already exists for the existence of these quarks, and lepton.

  13. Unintegrated sea quark at small x and vector boson production

    CERN Document Server

    Hautmann, F; Jung, H

    2012-01-01

    Parton-shower event generators that go beyond the collinear-ordering approximation at small x have so far included only gluon and valence quark channels at transverse momentum dependent level. In this contribution we provide a denition of a transverse momentum depend (TMD) sea quark distribution valid in the small x region, which is based on the TMD gluon-to-quark splitting function. As an example process we consider vector boson production in the forward direction of one of the protons. The qq ! Z matrix element (with one o-shell quark) is calculated in an explicit gauge invariant way, making use of high energy factorization.

  14. Testing the constituent quark model in KN scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, S. E-mail: lemaire@cenbg.in2p3.fr; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B

    2003-02-10

    The kaon-nucleon S, P, D, F, G waves phase shifts have been calculated using a non-relativistic quark potential model and the resonating group method (RGM). The calculation has been performed using quark-quark potential which both includes gluon, pion and sigma exchanges and reproduces as well as possible the meson spectrum. The agreement obtained with the existing experimental phase shifts is quite poor. The results are also compared with a previous calculation based only on gluon exchanges at the quark level.

  15. Testing the constituent quark model in KN scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.; Labarsouque, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    2003-01-01

    The kaon-nucleon S, P, D, F, G waves phase shifts have been calculated using a non-relativistic quark potential model and the resonating group method (RGM). The calculation has been performed using quark-quark potential which both includes gluon, pion and sigma exchanges and reproduces as well as possible the meson spectrum. The agreement obtained with the existing experimental phase shifts is quite poor. The results are also compared with a previous calculation based only on gluon exchanges at the quark level

  16. arXiv Top quark measurements in the CMS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00102167

    2017-01-01

    Experimental results on top-quark physics obtained at the CMS experiment are reported based on the data recorded at centre-of-mass energy up to 13 TeV. Inclusive and differential cross sections for both top-quark pair and single top-quark production are presented, as well as measurements of top-quark properties in production and decay, and searches for anomalous couplings. The presented measurements test theoretical predictions, including recent perturbative QCD calculations, provide constraints of fundamental standard model parameters, and set limits on physics beyond the standard model.

  17. Radiative seesaw-type mechanism of fermion masses and non-trivial quark mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbelaez, Carolina; Hernandez, A.E.C.; Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso-CCTVal, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2017-06-15

    We propose a predictive inert two-Higgs doublet model, where the standard model (SM) symmetry is extended by S{sub 3} x Z{sub 2} x Z{sub 12} and the field content is enlarged by extra scalar fields, charged exotic fermions and two heavy right-handed Majorana neutrinos. The charged exotic fermions generate a non-trivial quark mixing and provide one-loop-level masses for the first- and second-generation charged fermions. The masses of the light active neutrinos are generated from a one-loop-level radiative seesaw mechanism. Our model successfully explains the observed SM fermion mass and mixing pattern. (orig.)

  18. Towards a realistic composite model of quarks and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaoyuan; Marshak, R.E.

    1985-06-01

    Within the context of the 't Hooft anomaly matching scheme, some guiding principles for the model building are discussed with an eye to low energy phenomenology. It is argued that Λsub(ch) (chiral symmetry breaking scale of the global color-flavor group Gsub(CF)) proportional Λsub(MC) (metacolor scale) and Λ sub(gsub(CF)) (unification scale of the gauge subgroup of Gsub(CF)) < or approx. Λsub(ch). As illustrations of the method, two composite models are suggested that can give rise to three or four generations of ordinary quarks and leptons without exotic fermions. (orig.)

  19. Effective quark-diquark supersymmetry an algebraic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, S.

    1989-01-01

    Effective hadronic supersymmetries and color algebra, where extended Miyazawa U(6/21) supersymmetry between mesons and baryons are derived from QCD under some assumptions and within some approximation, also using a dynamical suppression of color-symmetric states. This shows the hadronic origin of supersymmetry as well as the underlying structure of exceptional algebras to the quark model. Supergroups, and infinite groups like Virasoro algebra, then emerge as useful descriptions of certain properties of the hadronic spectrum. Applications to exotic mesons and baryons are discussed

  20. Measurement of toverline{t} production with additional jet activity, including b quark jets, in the dilepton decay channel using pp collisions at √{s} = 8 {TeV}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Yonamine, R.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Júnior, W. L. Aldá; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El Sawy, M.; El-Khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Lomidze, D.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garcia, J. Garay; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Akbiyik, M.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Miniello, G.; Maggi, M.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Primavera, F.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bellato, M.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanzago, F.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, T. A.; Nam, S. 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A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Primavera, F.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    Jet multiplicity distributions in top quark pair ({t}{overline{t}}) events are measured in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 {fb}^ {-1}. The measurement is performed in the dilepton decay channels (e^+e^-, μ^+ μ^-, and e^{±} μ^{∓}). The absolute and normalized differential cross sections for {t}overline{t} production are measured as a function of the jet multiplicity in the event for different jet transverse momentum thresholds and the kinematic properties of the leading additional jets. The differential {t overline{t} b} and {t overline{t} b overline{b}} cross sections are presented for the first time as a function of the kinematic properties of the leading additional b jets. Furthermore, the fraction of events without additional jets above a threshold is measured as a function of the transverse momenta of the leading additional jets and the scalar sum of the transverse momenta of all additional jets. The data are compared and found to be consistent with predictions from several perturbative quantum chromodynamics event generators and a next-to-leading order calculation.

  1. Bootstrapping quarks and gluons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chew, G.F.

    1979-04-01

    Dual topological unitarization (DTU) - the approach to S-matrix causality and unitarity through combinatorial topology - is reviewed. Amplitudes associated with triangulated spheres are shown to constitute the core of particle physics. Each sphere is covered by triangulated disc faces corresponding to hadrons. The leading current candidate for the hadron-face triangulation pattern employs 3-triangle basic subdiscs whose orientations correspond to baryon number and topological color. Additional peripheral triangles lie along the hadron-face perimeter. Certain combinations of peripheral triangles with a basic-disc triangle can be identified as quarks, the flavor of a quark corresponding to the orientation of its edges that lie on the hadron-face perimeter. Both baryon number and flavor are additively conserved. Quark helicity, which can be associated with triangle-interior orientation, is not uniformly conserved and interacts with particle momentum, whereas flavor does not. Three different colors attach to the 3 quarks associated with a single basic subdisc, but there is no additive physical conservation law associated with color. There is interplay between color and quark helicity. In hadron faces with more than one basic subdisc, there may occur pairs of adjacent flavorless but colored triangles with net helicity +-1 that are identifiable as gluons. Broken symmetry is an automatic feature of the bootstrap. T, C and P symmetries, as well as up-down flavor symmetry, persist on all orientable surfaces.

  2. The quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, Mannque.

    1980-04-01

    The present status of our understanding of the physics of hadronic (nuclear or neutron) matter under extreme conditions, in particular at high densities is discussed. This is a problem which challenges three disciplines of physics: nuclear physics, astrophysics and particle physics. It is generally believed that we now have a correct and perhaps ultimate theory of the strong interactions, namely quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The constituents of this theory are quarks and gluons, so highly dense matters should be describable in terms of these constituents alone. This is a question that addresses directly to the phenomenon of quark confinement, one of the least understood aspects in particle physics. For nuclear physics, the possibility of a phase change between nuclear matter and quark matter introduces entirely new degrees of freedom in the description of nuclei and will bring perhaps a deeper understanding of nuclear dynamics. In astrophysics, the properties of neutron stars will be properly understood only when the equation of state of 'neutron' matter at densities exceeding that of nuclear matter can be realiably calculated. Most fascinating is the possibility of quark stars existing in nature, not entirely an absurd idea. Finally the quark matter - nuclear matter phase transition must have occured in the early stage of universe when matter expanded from high temperature and density; this could be an essential ingredient in the big-bang cosmology

  3. Bootstrapping quarks and gluons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, G.F.

    1979-04-01

    Dual topological unitarization (DTU) - the approach to S-matrix causality and unitarity through combinatorial topology - is reviewed. Amplitudes associated with triangulated spheres are shown to constitute the core of particle physics. Each sphere is covered by triangulated disc faces corresponding to hadrons. The leading current candidate for the hadron-face triangulation pattern employs 3-triangle basic subdiscs whose orientations correspond to baryon number and topological color. Additional peripheral triangles lie along the hadron-face perimeter. Certain combinations of peripheral triangles with a basic-disc triangle can be identified as quarks, the flavor of a quark corresponding to the orientation of its edges that lie on the hadron-face perimeter. Both baryon number and flavor are additively conserved. Quark helicity, which can be associated with triangle-interior orientation, is not uniformly conserved and interacts with particle momentum, whereas flavor does not. Three different colors attach to the 3 quarks associated with a single basic subdisc, but there is no additive physical conservation law associated with color. There is interplay between color and quark helicity. In hadron faces with more than one basic subdisc, there may occur pairs of adjacent flavorless but colored triangles with net helicity +-1 that are identifiable as gluons. Broken symmetry is an automatic feature of the bootstrap. T, C and P symmetries, as well as up-down flavor symmetry, persist on all orientable surfaces

  4. Exotic nuclei: another aspect of nuclear structure; Les noyaux exotiques: un autre regard sur la structure nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobaczewski, J [Warsaw Univ., Institute of Theoretical Physics (Poland); Blumenfeld, Y; Flocard, H; Garcia Borge, M J; Nowacki, F; Rombouts, S; Theisen, Ch; Marques, F M; Lacroix, D; Dessagne, P; Gaeggeler, H

    2002-07-01

    This document gathers the lectures made at the Joliot Curie international summer school in 2002 whose theme that year was exotic nuclei. There were 11 contributions whose titles are: 1) interactions, symmetry breaking and effective fields from quarks to nuclei; 2) status and perspectives for the study of exotic nuclei: experimental aspects; 3) the pairing interaction and the N = Z nuclei; 4) borders of stability region and exotic decays; 5) shell structure of nuclei: from stability to decay; 6) variational approach of system with a few nucleons; 7) from heavy to super-heavy nuclei; 8) halos, molecules and multi-neutrons; 9) macroscopic approaches for fusion reactions; 10) beta decay: a tool for spectroscopy; 11) the gas phase chemistry of super-heavy elements.

  5. Heavy quark fragmentation functions in the heavy quark effective theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    The fragmentation of b-bar-antiquark into polarized B c * -mesons and b-quark into P-wave (c-bar b) states in the Heavy Quark Effective Theory. The heavy quark fragmentation functions in longitudinally and transversely polarized S-wave b-bar c-states and P-wave mesons containing b-, c-quarks also, with the exact account of corrections of first order in 1/m b . 20 refs., 2 figs

  6. Experimental evidence for hadroproduction of exotic mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    G. S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J. M. Bishop; V. A. Bodyagin; B. B. Brabson; D. S. Brown; N. M. Cason; S. U. Chung; R. R. Crittenden; J. P. Cummings; K. Danyo; S. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J. P. Dowd; A. R. Dzierba; P. Eugenio; J. Gunter; R. W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; E. I. Ivanov; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O. L. Kodolova; V. L. Korotkikh; M. A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; R. Lindenbusch; V. Lipaev; J. M. LoSecco; J. J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A. I. Ostrovidov; T. K. Pedlar; A. Popov; D. R. Rust; D. Ryabchikov; A. H. Sanjari; L. I. Sarycheva; E. Scott; K. K. Seth; N. Shenhav; W. D. Shephard; N. B. Sinev; J. A. Smith; P. T. Smith; D. L. Stienike; T. Sulanke; S. A. Taegar; S. Teige; D. R. Thompson; I. N. Vardanyan; D. P. Weygand; D. White; H. J. Willutzki; J. Wise; M. Witkowski; A. A. Yershov; D. Zhao

    2001-01-01

    New measurements of peripheral meson production are presented. The data confirm the existence of exotic mesons at 1.4 and 1.6 GeV/c2. The latter state dominates the eta'pi- decay spectrum. The data on eta pi+pi-pi- decay show large strength in several exotic (Jpc = 1- +) waves as well

  7. The mass and radius of exotic fragment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schutz, Y.

    1989-01-01

    Recent developments in the study of exotic nuclei are presented. A method to measure the ground-state mass is presented and the results are compared with standard models. Total reaction cross section measurements for exotic nuclei are also presented and interpreted in terms of matter distribution in the nucleus

  8. Domestic exotics and the perception of invasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo; Robert Ricklefs

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility of an area to invasion by exotic species is often judged by the fraction of introduced species in the local biota. However, the degree of invasion, particularly in mainland areas, has often been underestimated because of the exclusion of ‘domestic exotics’ (those introduced to internal units from within the national border) in calculations. Because all...

  9. Exotic highly ionising particles at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    De Roeck, A; Mermod, P; Milstead, D; Sloan, T

    2012-01-01

    The experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are able to discover or set limits on the production of exotic particles with TeV-scale masses possessing values of electric and/or magnetic charge such that they appear as highly ionising particles (HIPs). In this paper the sensitivity of the LHC experiments to HIP production is discussed in detail. It is shown that a number of different detection methods are required to investigate as fully as possible the charge-mass range. These include direct detection as the HIPs pass through detectors and, in the case of magnetically charged objects, the so-called induction method with which monopoles which stop in accelerator and detector material could be observed. The benefit of using complementary approaches to HIP detection is discussed.

  10. Search for exotic mesons at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonamy, P.; Baggett, N.; Fieguth, T.

    1975-01-01

    The theoretical justification and results from recent experimental searches for backward-produced exotic mesons including two experiments carried out by the collaboration at SLAC are reviewed. The first experiment put upper limits of about 1 to 2 μb for X ++ → (2π, 4π, 6π) ++ and anti ppπ + π + in the reaction π + + p → X ++ + n/sub forward/ at 8.4 GeV/c studied with the SLAC 14 inch rapid cycling bubble chamber triggered by a downstream neutron detector. Also the important features of the recently completed second experiment with the SLAC streamer chamber to study the reaction π - + p → X -- + p/sub forward/ at 14 GeV/c are discussed

  11. Probing exotic physics with cosmic neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, Dan; Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Traditionally, collider experiments have been the primary tool used in searching for particle physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk, I will discuss alternative approaches for exploring exotic physics scenarios using high energy and ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos. Such neutrinos can be used to study interactions at energies higher, and over baselines longer, than those accessible to colliders. In this way, neutrino astronomy can provide a window into fundamental physics which is highly complementary to collider techniques. I will discuss the role of neutrino astronomy in fundamental physics, considering the use of such techniques in studying several specific scenarios including low scale gravity models, Standard Model electroweak instanton induced interactions, decaying neutrinos and quantum decoherence

  12. Medium effects in strange quark matter and strange stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schertler, K.; Greiner, C.; Thoma, M.H.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the properties of strange quark matter at zero temperature including medium effects. The quarks are considered as quasiparticles which acquire an effective mass generated by the interaction with the other quarks of the dense system. The effective quark masses are derived from the zero momentum limit of the dispersion relations following from an effective quark propagator obtained from resumming one-loop self-energy diagrams in the hard dense loop approximation. This leads to a thermodynamic self-consistent description of strange quark matter as an ideal Fermi gas of quasiparticles. Within this approach we find that medium effects reduce the overall binding energy with respect to 56 Fe of strange quark matter. For typical values of the strong coupling constant (α s >or∼1) strange quark matter is not absolutely stable. The application to pure strange quark matter stars shows that medium effects have, nevertheless, no impact on the mass-radius relation of the stars. However, a phase transition to hadronic matter at the surface of the stars becomes more likely. (orig.)

  13. Detecting heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benenson, G.; Chau, L.L.; Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.E.; Platner, E.D.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    In this exercise we examine the performance of a detector specifically configured to tag heavy quark (HQ) jets through direct observations of D-meson decays with a high resolution vertex detector. To optimize the performance of such a detector, we assume the small diamond beam crossing configuration as described in the 1978 ISABELLE proposal, giving a luminosity of 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 . Because of the very large backgrounds from light quark (LQ) jets, most triggering schemes at this luminosity require high P/sub perpendicular to/ leptons and inevitably give missing neutrinos. If alternative triggering schemes could be found, then one can hope to find and calculate the mass of objects decaying to heavy quarks. A scheme using the high resolution detector will also be discussed in detail. The study was carried out with events generated by the ISAJET Monte Carlo and a computer simulation of the described detector system

  14. Top Quark Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Mulders, Martijn

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of the top quark at the Tevatron collider in 1995 the measurement of its mass has been a high priority. As one of the fundamental parameters of the Standard Theory of particle physics, the precise value of the top quark mass together with other inputs provides a test for the self-consistency of the theory, and has consequences for the stability of the Higgs field that permeates the Universe. In this review I will briefly summarize the experimental techniques used at the Tevatron and the LHC experiments throughout the years to measure the top quark mass with ever improving accuracy, and highlight the recent progress in combining all measurements in a single world average combination. As experimental measurements became more precise, the question of their theoretical interpretation has become important. The difficulty of relating the measured quantity to the fundamental top mass parameter has inspired alternative measurement methods that extract the top mass in complementary ways. I wil...

  15. Heavy quarks at hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paige, F.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses a conference at which the standard model requiring the existence of a top quark + to form a weak isospin doublet with the b quark is explored. Collaboration suggestions are offered. Results are explored

  16. Important configurations in six-quark N-N states. II. Current quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancu, F.; Wilets, L.

    1989-01-01

    Quark basis states constructed from molecular-type orbitals were shown previously to be more convenient to use than cluster model states for N-N processes. The usual cluster model representation omits configurations which emerge naturally in a molecular basis which contains the same number of spatial functions. The importance of the omitted states was demonstrated for a constituent quark model. The present work extends the study to the prototypical current quark model, namely the MIT bag. In order to test the expansion for short-range N-N interactions, the eigenstates and eigenenergies of six quarks in a spherical bag, including one-gluon exchange, are calculated. The lowest eigenenergies are lowered significantly with respect to the usual cluster model. This reaffirms the importance of dynamics for obtaining the needed short-range repulsion

  17. Present and Future Experiments with Stored Exotic Nuclei at GSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geissel, H.

    2009-01-01

    Recent results and perspectives of experiments with stored exotic nuclei at GSI-FAIR will presented. An overview on the planned NUSTAR experiments will also presented. Relativistic exotic nuclei produced via projectile fragmentation and fission were separated in flight by the fragment separator FRS and injected into the storage-cooler ring ESR for accurate mass- and lifetime measurements. Direct mass measurements of electron-cooled exotic nuclei were performed using time-resolved Schottky spectrometry. Fragments with half-lives shorter than the time required for electron cooling have been investigated by time-of-flight measurements with the ESR being operated in the isochronous mode. This novel experimental technique gives access to all nuclei with half-lives down to the microsecond range and has been successfully applied. Lifetimes of stored bare and few-electron ions have been measured with the goal to study the beta-decay under ionization conditions prevailing in stellar plasma. For the first time the direct observation of bound-state beta decay has been achieved with 2 07T l fragments. The future project FAIR includes a new large-acceptance in-flight separator (Super-FRS) in combination with a new storage ring system (CR, NESR) which will be ideal tools to study exotic nuclei far from stability.(author)

  18. Clustering in a quark gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welke, G.M.; Heiss, W.D.

    1986-01-01

    In an infinite one-dimensional quark gas it is shown that a static color force, which increases at large distance, leads to a density fluctuation in the ground state. A self-consistent mean field can only be found for an effectively attractive quark-quark interaction that increases less than linearly at large distances. For a fixed coupling constant, the clustering disappears at high quark density

  19. Quark chemistry: charmonium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Rujula, A.; Jaffe, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidence for two quark-two antiquark hadrons is reviewed. Concentration is placed on predictions for S-wave ''charmonium molecules,'' built of a c anti c charmonium pair and a light quark-antiquark pair. Their spectrum and quantum numbers are predicted and an estimate of their decay couplings and their prediction in monochromatic pion decays from charmonium resonances produced in e + e - -annihilation is given. Some S-wave charmonium resonances should be detectable in these decays, but typical branching ratios are only at the 1% level. 19 references

  20. Thermodynamics of quark gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, S. N.

    1980-07-01

    The application of quantum statistical mechanics to a system of particles consisting of quarks is considered. Realistic theoretical investigations have been underway to understand highly dense objects such as white dwarfs and neutron stars. The various possibilities in the case of very high densities such as 10/sup 15/ or 10/sup 16/ g/cm/sup 3/ are enumerated. The thermodynamics of a phase transition from neutron matter phase to quark matter phase is analysed. Preliminary results based on quantum chromodynamics and other phenomenological models are reported.

  1. Quarks in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette

    1983-01-01

    Some features of quark degrees of freedom in nuclei are discussed in the light of recent developments in QCD. The principal aim of this talk is to propose, and give a tentative support to, the motion that one can study through nuclear matter different facets of the vacuum structure implied by quantum chromodynamics (QCD). This will be done using the recent (exciting) results obtained in particle physics, in particular lattice gauge calculations. Relevance of this aspect of problem to quark degrees of freedom as well as meson degrees of freedom in nuclei will be discussed. (orig.)

  2. Quark Orbital Angular Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkardt Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of orbital angular momentum based on Wigner distributions are used as a framework to discuss the connection between the Ji definition of the quark orbital angular momentum and that of Jaffe and Manohar. We find that the difference between these two definitions can be interpreted as the change in the quark orbital angular momentum as it leaves the target in a DIS experiment. The mechanism responsible for that change is similar to the mechanism that causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  3. Quark search conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    In spite of (or perhaps because of) the present doctrine of total quark confinement held by the majority of particle theorists, experimental searches for free fractional charge and other anomalous stable particles in ordinary matter have been increasing in number during recent years, using a range of techniques of increasing sophistication and sensitivity. As a result, researchers in this area had a conference to themselves in June. About 40 participants and 150 observers gathered at San Francisco State University to report progress and discuss future plans, with representatives present from almost every group involved in quark searches

  4. Twisted mass lattice QCD with non-degenerate quark masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenster, Gernot; Sudmann, Tobias

    2006-01-01

    Quantum Chromodynamics on a lattice with Wilson fermions and a chirally twisted mass term is considered in the framework of chiral perturbation theory. For two and three numbers of quark flavours, respectively, with non-degenerate quark masses the pseudoscalar meson masses and decay constants are calculated in next-to-leading order including lattice effects quadratic in the lattice spacing a

  5. Search for single production of a vector-like T quark decaying into a top quark and a Higgs boson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Daniel; Marchesini, Ivan; Nowatschin, Dominik; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Tholen, Heiner; Usai, Emanuele [Universitaet Hamburg (Germany). Institut fuer Experimentalphysik

    2016-07-01

    We search for singly produced vector-like top quark partners (T) in pp-collisions at √(s)=13 TeV with the CMS experiment. Several BSM models, such as composite Higgs and extra dimensions, predict vector-like quarks to be accessible at the LHC. At 13 TeV, single production of vector-like quarks might be enhanced over pair production, depending on the coupling parameters for the individual interactions. In this analysis, we target the decay of the vector-like heavy T quark into a Higgs boson and a top quark, where the top quark decay includes a lepton. Higgs-boson candidates are reconstructed using new methods to resolve the substructure of boosted jets and top-quark candidates are formed by combining leptons, missing transverse energy and jets. With the top-quark and Higgs-boson candidates, we aim for the complete reconstruction of the four-vector of the new particle in question. The largest fraction of the background is contributed through the top-quark pair production process. First results on the search for single vector-like top partners at 13 TeV are presented.

  6. Possibility of stable quark stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, R.L.; Gleeson, A.M.; Pedigo, R.D.

    1976-08-01

    A recent zero temperature equation of state which contains quark-partons separated from conventional baryons by a phase transition is used to investigate the stability of quark stars. The sensitivity to the input physics is also considered. The conclusions, which are found to be relatively model independent, indicate that a separately identifiable class of stable objects called quark stars does not exist

  7. Top quark mass measurement and color effects at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalchuk, Nataliia

    2018-04-01

    The top quark, the heaviest fundamental particle discovered to date, is one of the most peculiar particles that were discovered so far. It plays a crucial role in consistency checks of the Standard Model and in searches for new physics, e.g., supersymmetry, composite Higgs, and many other exotic models. In this thesis, an important property of the top quark is measured: the mass. This analysis is based on the data recorded at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV in 2016 with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC, and corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 35.9 fb -1 . The mass of the top quark is measured using the top quark pair event candidate, which corresponds to events with one muon or electron and at least four jets. The corresponding decay products are used in a kinematic fit to perform the jet quark assignment, increase the fraction of correctly reconstructed top quarks and to improve the mass resolution. Using the ideogram method the top quark mass is measured simultaneously with the jet scale factor (JSF), constrained by the jets arising from the W boson decay. The estimated result is calibrated with samples simulated with a next-to-leading order matrix element generator matched to the parton shower. The top quark mass is measured to be m t =172.25±0.08 (stat+JSF)±0.62 (syst) GeV. The results are tested for possible kinematic dependence by performing measurements of the top quark mass in different phase space regions. The residual data-to-simulation calibration of the energy of the jets is also estimated from dijet events with data collected at center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV in 2015 with the CMS detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.1 fb -1 . The corrections are performed using selected back-to-back dijet events by the MPF and dijet balance methods and are found to differ from unity by less then 3% in the barrel region and up to 17% in the endcap and forward regions of the detector. This result was used in the top mass measurement

  8. Exotic RG flows from holography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiritsis, Elias [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France); Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Institute for Theoretical and Computational Physics, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Crete Center for Quantum Complexity and Nanotechnology, Department of Physics, University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Nitti, Francesco; Silva Pimenta, Leandro [APC, Universite Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Obs. de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cite (France)

    2017-02-15

    Holographic RG flows are studied in an Einstein-dilaton theory with a general potential. The superpotential formalism is utilized in order to characterize and classify all solutions that are associated with asymptotically AdS space-times. Such solutions correspond to holographic RG flows and are characterized by their holographic β-functions. Novel solutions are found that have exotic properties from a RG point-of view. Some have β-functions that are defined patch-wise and lead to flows where the β-function changes sign without the flow stopping. Others describe flows that end in non-neighboring extrema in field space. Finally others describe regular flows between two minima of the potential and correspond holographically to flows driven by the VEV of an irrelevant operator in the UV CFT. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Recent results on top, bottom and exotic physics at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, N.M.

    1993-08-01

    A summary of results from the recently concluded 1991--1993 Tevatron run is presented. Selected topics from b physics and exotic particle searches from the CDF and D0 collaborations are reviewed. Preliminary results from the CDF top search, using 12pb -1 from the 1992--1993 run, are given. In particular, the lepton + b-tag and dilepton analyses are discussed. Preliminary results from the CDF dilepton analysis places a lower limit on the top quark mass of 108GeV/c 2 at the 95% C.L

  10. Marine exotic isopods from the Iberian Peninsula and nearby waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Laiz, Gemma; Ros, Macarena; Guerra-García, José M

    2018-01-01

    Effective management of marine bioinvasions starts with prevention, communication among the scientific community and comprehensive updated data on the distribution ranges of exotic species. Despite being a hotspot for introduction due to numerous shipping routes converging at the Strait of Gibraltar, knowledge of marine exotics in the Iberian Peninsula is scarce, especially of abundant but small-sized and taxonomically challenging taxa such as the Order Isopoda. To fill this gap, we conducted several sampling surveys in 44 marinas and provide the first comprehensive study of marine exotic isopods from the Iberian Peninsula, the southern side of the Strait of Gibraltar (northern Africa) and the Balearic Islands. Exotic species included Ianiropsis serricaudis (first record for the Iberian Peninsula and Lusitanian marine province), Paracerceis sculpta (first record for the Alboran Sea ecoregion), Paradella dianae , Paranthura japonica (earliest record for the Iberian Peninsula) and Sphaeroma walkeri . Photographs with morphological details for identification for non-taxonomic experts are provided, their worldwide distribution is updated and patterns of invasion are discussed. We report an expansion in the distribution range of all species, especially at the Strait of Gibraltar and nearby areas. Ianiropsis serricaudis and Paranthura japonica are polyvectic, with shellfish trade and recreational boating being most probable vectors for their introduction and secondary spread. The subsequent finding of the studied species in additional marinas over the years points at recreational boating as a vector and indicates a future spread. We call for attention to reduce lags in the detection and reporting of small-size exotics, which usually remain overlooked or underestimated until the invasion process is at an advanced stage.

  11. Heavy quark spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosner, J.L.

    1985-10-01

    New experimental and theoretical developments in heavy quark spectroscopy are reviewed. From studies of J/psi decays, the eta' is found to have some ''glue'' or other inert component, while the iota (a glueball candidate) probably contains some quarks as well. The xi(2.2) persists in new Mark III data, but is not seen by the DM2 collaboration. The production of charmonium states by anti pp reactions is reviewed. First evidence for a P- wave charmed meson, D(2420), has been presented by the ARGUS group. Radiative UPSILON decay studies fail to confirm the zeta(8.3) and begin to place useful limits on Higgs bosons. First results from an experiment at Fermilab on low-background hadronic production of UPSILON states are shown. Accurate measurements of chi/sub b/(1P) masses by the ARGUS collaboration are noted, and interpreted as favoring scalar quark confinement. Studies of t and other heavy quarks will probe the q anti q interaction below 0.05 fm, are likely to be strongly affected by t anti t-Z interference, and can provide varied information on Higgs bosons. 144 refs., 21 figs

  12. Top quark theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-04

    Oct 4, 2012 ... The theoretical aspects of a number of top quark properties such as ... to the quadratic divergences of the Higgs self-energy, while yet, ..... given in the literature, each with the aim of recovering a well-behaved expansion in αs.

  13. Top quark properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    eter for the tests of the electroweak theory, since radiative corrections to many ... The uncertainty due to jet energy scale (JES) is the dominating systematic .... In the Standard Model, the charge of the top quark is predicted to be that of a normal up- ..... non-negative and f+ + f0 < 1, and the star marks the expectation from the ...

  14. Heavy quarks photoproduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cacciari, M.

    1996-08-01

    The state of the art of the theoretical calculations for heavy quarks photoproduction is reviewed. The full next-to-leading order calculation and two possible resummations, the high energy one for total cross sections and the large p T one for differential cross sections, are described. (orig.)

  15. Highlights of top quark cross-section measurements at ATLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Peter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The highlights of the measurements of top quark production in proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider with the ATLAS detector are presented. The inclusive measurements of the top-pair production cross section have reached high precision and are compared to the best available theoretical calculations. The differential cross section measurements, including results using boosted top quarks, probe our understanding of top-pair production in the TeV regime. The results are compared to Monte Carlo generators implementing LO and NLO matrix elements matched with parton showers. Measurements of the single top quark production cross section are presented in the t-channel and s-channel, and with associated production with a W boson. For the t-channel production, results on the ratio between top quark and antitop quark production cross sections and differential measurements are also included.

  16. Small quarks make big nuggets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deligeorges, S.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief recall on the classification of subatomic particles, this paper deals with quark nuggets, particle with more than three quarks, a big bag, which is called ''nuclearite''. Neutron stars, in fact, are big sacks of quarks, gigantic nuggets. Now, physicists try to calculate which type of nuggets of strange quark matter is stable, what has been the influence of quark nuggets on the primordial nucleosynthesis. At the present time, one says that if these ''nuggets'' exist, and in a large proportion, they may be candidates for the missing mass [fr

  17. Young and Exotic Stellar Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Universe. Westerlund 1 will certainly provide new opportunities in the long-standing quest for more and finer details about how stars, and especially massive ones, do form. ... and the Most Dense The large number of stars in Westerlund 1 was not the only surprise awaiting Clark and his colleagues. From their observations, the team members also found that all these stars are packed into an amazingly small volume of space, indeed less than 6 light-years across. In fact, this is more or less comparable to the 4 light-year distance to the star nearest to the Sun, Proxima Centauri! It is incredible: the concentration in Westerlund 1 is so high that the mean separation between stars is quite similar to the extent of the Solar System. "With so many stars in such a small volume, some of them may collide", envisages Simon Clark. "This could lead to the formation of an intermediate-mass black hole more massive than 100 solar masses. It may well be that such a monster has already formed at the core of Westerlund 1." The huge population of massive stars in Westerlund 1 suggests that it will have a very significant impact on its surroundings. The cluster contains so many massive stars that in a time span of less than 40 million years, it will be the site of more than 1,500 supernovae. A gigantic firework that may drive a fountain of galactic material! Because Westerlund 1 is at a distance of only about 10,000 light-years, high-resolution cameras such as NAOS/CONICA on ESO's Very Large Telescope can resolve its individual stars. Such observations are now starting to reveal smaller stars in Westerlund 1, including some that are less massive than the Sun. Astronomers will thus soon be able to study this exotic galactic zoo in great depth. More information The research presented in this ESO Press Release will soon appear in the leading research journal Astronomy and Astrophysics ("On the massive stellar population of the Super Star Cluster Westerlund 1" by J.S. Clark and colleagues). The

  18. Heavy quarks - experimental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollebeek, R.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of these lectures, given at the 1989 SLAC Summer School, was to discuss the experimental aspects of heavy quark production. A companion set of lectures on the theoretical point of view were to be given by Keith Ellis. An experimentalist should gather together the measurements which have been made by various groups, compare, contrast and tabulate them, and if possible point out the ways in which these measurements confirm or contradict current theories. Here the authors has tried to do this, although the reader who expects to find here the latest of all experimental measurements should probably be forewarned that the field is moving extremely rapidly. In some cases, he has added and updated materials where crucial new information became available after or during the summer of 1989, but not in all cases. He has concentrated on trying to select those measurements which are at the moment most crucial in refining our understanding of heavy quarks as opposed to those which merely measure things which are perhaps too complicated to be enlightening at the moment. While theorists worry primarily about production mechanisms, cross sections, QCD corrections, and to some extent about signatures, the experimentalist must determine which measurements he is interested in making, and which signatures for heavy quark production are realistic and likely to produce results which will shed some new light on the underlying production model without undo theoretical complications. Experimentalists also need to evaluate the available experimental equipment, both machines and detectors to find the best way to investigate the properties of heavy quarks. In many cases, the things which we would like to measure are severely restricted by what we can measure. Nevertheless, many properties of heavy quark production and decay can be measured, and the results have already taught us much about the weak interactions and QCD

  19. Top quark kinematics and mass determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.H.

    1994-10-01

    An analysis is presented of 10 W + ≥ 3 jet events, each with evidence for the presence of a b quark, that were recently observed by the CDF collaboration. Seven of these events include a fourth jet and can be explicitly reconstructed as t bar t production. The best estimate of the top quark mass is M t = 174 ± 10 -12 +13 GeV/c 2 . A study has also been performed to see if the kinematical properties of events with W + ≥ 3 jets gives evidence for top production. An excess of events with large jet energies, compared to that expected from direct production of W + ≥ 3 jets, is observed. A large fraction of these events also contain a b-quark and a fourth jet

  20. Mass spectra of four-quark states in the hidden charm sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Smruti; Shah, Manan; Vinodkumar, P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Masses of the low-lying four-quark states in the hidden charm sector (cq anti c anti q; q element of u,d) are calculated within the framework of a non-relativistic quark model. The four-body system is considered as two two-body systems such as diquark-antidiquark (Qq- anti Q anti q) and quark-antiquark-quark-antiquark (Q anti q- anti Qq) molecular-like four-quark states. Here, the Cornell-type potential has been used for describing the two-body interactions among Q-q, anti Q- anti q, Q- anti q, Qq- anti Q anti q and Q anti q- anti Qq, with appropriate string tensions. Our present analysis suggests the following exotic states: X(3823), Z c (3900), X(3915), Z c (4025), ψ (4040), Z 1 (4050) and X(4160) as Q anti q- anti Qq molecular-like four-quark states, while Z c (3885), X(3940) and Y(4140) as the diquark-antidiquark four-quark states. We have been able to assign the J PC values for many of the recently observed exotic states according to their structure. Apart from this, we have identified the charged state Z(4430) recently confirmed by LHCb as the first radial excitation of Zc(3885) with G = + 1 and Y(4360) state as the first radial excitation of Y(4008) with G = - 1 and the state ψ(4415) as the first radial excitation of the ψ(4040) state. (orig.)

  1. Kaon-Nucleon scattering in a constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, S.

    2002-06-01

    We have investigated Kaon-Nucleon (KN) interaction in a constituent quark model in the momentum range for the Kaon between 0 and 1 GeV/c in the laboratory frame. This study has been motivated by the fact that in an approach relying on a boson exchange mechanism the Bonn group was forced, in order to obtain good agreement with I = 0 s-wave phase shifts, to add the exchange of a short range fictitious repulsive scalar meson. This need for repulsion, whose range (∼ 0.2 fm) is smaller than the nucleon radius, clearly shows that the quark substructure of the nucleons and K + mesons cannot be neglected. The Kaon-Nucleon phase shifts are calculated in a quark potential model using the resonating group method (RGM). We have to cope with a five body problem with antisymmetrization with respect to the four ordinary quarks of the Kaon-Nucleon system. One requirement of our approach is that the quark-quark interaction must give a quite good description of the hadron spectra. One goal of the present work aims at determining the influence of a relativistic kinematics, in this constituent quark model, for the calculation of KN phase shifts. We have also investigated s, p, d, f, g waves KN elastic phase shifts and we have included a spin-orbit term in the quark-quark interaction. Then we have studied the influence of medium and long range exchange mechanism in the quark quark interaction on KN phase shifts. (author)

  2. Quark effects in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    A phenomenological approach which enables the size of quark effects in various nuclear processes is discussed. The principle of conservation of probability provides significant constraints on six quark wave functions. Using this approach, it is found that the low-energy proton-proton weak interaction can be explained in terms of W and Z boson exchanges between quarks. That the value of the asymptotic ratio of D to S state wave functions is influenced (at the 5% level) by quark effects, is another result of our approach. We have not discovered a nuclear effect that can be uniquely explained by quark-quark interactions. However it does seem that quark physics is very relevant for nuclear physics. 52 references

  3. Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez, Martin A; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R; Amico, Guillermo C; Dimarco, Romina D; Barrios-Garcia, M Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area.

  4. submitter Searches for New Physics, involving Top Quarks, Dark Matter and the Higgs Bosons, at the ATLAS, CDF and Fermi-LAT Particle Experiments, and a description of a new limit re-interpretation tool, Basis-Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, Kanury Kanishka

    Searches for new physics are presented in the lepton + jets channel at the CDF and ATLAS experiments. At CDF, we search for exotic quarks that couple to dark matter, new particle resonances in top-quark pairs, a Z' boson decaying quarks, and a two-Higgs doublet model. At ATLAS, we search for fourth generation down-type quarks, new particle resonances in top-quark pairs, and a multi-Higgs boson cascade. A novel methodology, Basis-limits, which allows for re-interpretation of experimental limits is presented. Basis-limits is used to extend ATLAS limits on fourth generation quarks to set limits on a new vector-like quark for all its decay modes. Finally, a spatial analysis of the gamma-ray excess, seen by the Fermi-LAT experiment, is performed. We find the location of the excess to be consistent with a dark matter halo at the Galactic center as the source.

  5. Quark-gluon plasma (Selected Topics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, V. I.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory lectures to the theory of (strongly interacting) quark-gluon plasma given at the Winter School of Physics of ITEP (Moscow, February 2010). We emphasize theoretical issues highlighted by the discovery of the low viscosity of the plasma. The topics include relativistic hydrodynamics, manifestations of chiral anomaly in hydrodynamics, superfluidity, relativistic superfluid hydrodynamics, effective stringy scalars, holographic models of Yang-Mills theories.

  6. Quarked!--Adventures in Particle Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Teresa; Bean, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Particle physics is a subject that can send shivers down the spines of students and educators alike--with visions of long mathematical equations and inscrutable ideas. This perception, along with a full curriculum, often leaves this topic the road less traveled until the latter years of school. Particle physics, including quarks, is typically not…

  7. The fourth family of quarks and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.B.; Soni, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of The Fourth Family of Quarks and Leptons. Topics covered include: Missing Transverse Energy Events and a Search for Additional Neutrino Families and a Fourth-Generation Lepton; Cosmological Limit on the Number of Families; and Charmed Baryon Decay

  8. Top quark properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Span\\`o, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark test the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to constrain new physics models. As it may be significantly enhanced by the presence of new physics, the $t\\overline{t}$ production charge asymmetry is measured inclusively and differentially using the 8 TeV ATLAS dataset using both the lepton+jets and dilepton channels, including a dedicated measurement for highly boosted top quarks. In the SM the top quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into W boson and a $b$-quark. Measurements of the W-helicity and spin correlations in $t\\overline{t}$ production are presented as well as new measurements of CP asymmetries in $b$-hadron decays using top-quark events.

  9. Top quark properties measurements with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Spano, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Precise measurements of the properties of the top quark test the Standard Model (SM) and can be used to constrain new physics models. As it may be significantly enhanced by the presence of new physics, the ttbar production charge asymmetry is measured inclusively and differentially using the 8 TeV ATLAS dataset using both the lepton+jets and dilepton channels, including a dedicated measurement for highly boosted top-quarks. In the SM the top-quark is predicted to decay almost exclusively into a W boson and a b-quark. Measurements of the W-helicity and spin correlations in ttbar production are presented as well as new measurements of CP asymmetries in b-hadron decays using top-quark events.

  10. Analytic solutions for neutrino momenta in decay of top quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betchart, Burton A., E-mail: bbetchar@pas.rochester.edu; Demina, Regina, E-mail: regina@pas.rochester.edu; Harel, Amnon, E-mail: amnon.harel@cern.ch

    2014-02-01

    We employ a geometric approach to analytically solve equations of constraint on the decay of top quarks involving leptons. The neutrino momentum is found as a function of the 4-vectors of the associated bottom quark and charged lepton, the masses of the top quark and W boson, and a single parameter, which constrains it to an ellipse. We show how the measured imbalance of momenta in the event reduces the solutions for neutrino momenta to a discrete set, in the cases of one or two top quarks decaying to leptons. The algorithms can be implemented concisely with common linear algebra routines. -- Highlights: • Neutrino momentum from top quark decay is constrained to an ellipse. • We find analytically the best neutrino momenta given the momentum imbalance. • A reference implementation of the algorithms is included.

  11. Recent results on top quark physics with the CMS detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Top quarks are produced abundantly at the LHC due to the large cross section, high luminosity and outstanding performance of the accelerator chain. These unique conditions have opened the door to precise measurements of the top quark cross section, the top quark's peculiar properties and to searches for new physics in the top quark sector. In this seminar, recent top quark measurements performed by the CMS experiment will be reviewed. The measurements are based on the data collected at center-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV. Special emphasis will be given to the latest inclusive cross section measurements including those that analyse the data taken after the restart of the LHC.

  12. Detection of Higgs bosons decaying to bottom quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilman, F.J.; Price, L.E.

    1986-11-01

    Several developments affecting the possibility of Higgs detection are discussed. These include the level of certainty about the t quark mass, Monte Carlo programs to generate both signal and background events, and separation and/or enhancement of heavy quark jets from jets due to light quarks or gluons, and the possibility that the neutral Higgs decay into bottom quarks might be the decay mode of choice for detecting the intermediate mass Higgs. Possible means of detection of an intermediate mass Higgs at the SSC, particularly if a prominent decay mode is to bottom quarks, are examined, using the PYTHIA Monte Carlo program to generate both signal and background events. For the signal, events were generated in which Higgs bosons are created in proton-proton collisions, with the Higgs decaying into bottom quarks. The presence of W or Z bosons, created in the same proton-proton collision, is used to enhance the likelihood of Higgs production and to reduce the potentially enormous background. It is found that the Higgs decay to bottom quarks, if important, would be more favorable for detection of the Higgs than decay to top quarks was found to be because of the smaller background. 3 refs., 4 figs

  13. Nucleon-nucleon interaction and the quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faessler, A.

    1985-01-01

    The NN phase shifts are calculated using the quark model with a QCD inspired quark-quark force. The short range part of the NN force is given by quark and gluon exchange. The long range part is described by π and σ-meson exchange. The data fitted in the model are five values connected with three quarks only: the nucleon mass, the Δ mass, the root mean square radius of the charge distribution of the proton including the pion cloud, the π-N and the σ-N coupling constant at zero momentum transfer. The 1 S and 3 S phase shifts are nicely reproduced. The short range repulsion is decisively influenced by the node in the [42] r relative wave function. Very important is the colour magnetic quark-quark force which enlarges the [42] r admixture. In the OBEP's the short range repulsion is connected with the exchange of the ω-meson. But to reproduce the short range repulsion one had to blow up the ω-N coupling constant by a factor 2 to 3 compared to flavour SU 3 . With quark and gluon exchange the best fit to the ω-N coupling constant lies close to the SU 3 flavour value. This fact strongly supports the notion that the real nature of the short range repulsion of the NN interaction have been found

  14. Trends in exotic-atom research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Horvath, D.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt was made to analyze the trends in the development of exotic-atom research on the basis of a recently compiled bibliography. The analysis of nearly 4000 publications demonstrated that: (1) exotic atoms are nuclear probes used in every field of physics, from the test of quantum electrodynamics (QED) to chemical physics, to materials sciences; (2) the role of nuclear and atomic physics in exotic atom research is decreasing (although it is still significant), while that of materials sciences and chemial physics is exponentially increasing; and (3) prior to 1980 most investigators were mainly interested in atoms with negative muons, while during the last few years the positive muon (μSR) studies have dominated exotic atom research

  15. Probabilistic methods in exotic option pricing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderluh, J.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    The thesis presents three ways of calculating the Parisian option price as an illustration of probabilistic methods in exotic option pricing. Moreover options on commidities are considered and double-sided barrier options in a compound Poisson framework.

  16. A comprehensive method for exotic option pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Rossella Agliardi

    2010-01-01

    This work illustrates how several new pricing formulas for exotic options can be derived within a Levy framework by employing a unique pricing expression. Many existing pricing formulas of the traditional Gaussian model are obtained as a by-product.

  17. Search for single production of vector-like quarks decaying into a b quark and a W boson in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Sirunyan, Albert M; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; König, Axel; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Strauss, Josef; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Dvornikov, Oleg; Makarenko, Vladimir; Mossolov, Vladimir; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Zykunov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Alderweireldt, Sara; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Lauwers, Jasper; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Lowette, Steven; Moortgat, Seth; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Skovpen, Kirill; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Parijs, Isis; Brun, Hugues; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Delannoy, Hugo; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Luetic, Jelena; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Vannerom, David; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Cimmino, Anna; Cornelis, Tom; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Gul, Muhammad; Khvastunov, Illia; Poyraz, Deniz; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Schöfbeck, Robert; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; De Visscher, Simon; Delaere, Christophe; Delcourt, Martin; Francois, Brieuc; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Komm, Matthias; Krintiras, Georgios; Lemaitre, Vincent; Magitteri, Alessio; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Wertz, Sébastien; Beliy, Nikita; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; Da Silveira, Gustavo Gil; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Torres Da Silva De Araujo, Felipe; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Fang, Wenxing; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Tongguang; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Liu, Zhenan; Romeo, Francesco; Ruan, Manqi; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Zhao, Jingzhou; Ban, Yong; Chen, Geng; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; González Hernández, Carlos Felipe; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Sculac, Toni; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Ferencek, Dinko; Kadija, Kreso; Mesic, Benjamin; Susa, Tatjana; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Tsiakkouri, Demetra; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Carrera Jarrin, Edgar; El-khateeb, Esraa; Elgammal, Sherif; Mohamed, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Perrini, Lucia; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Jarvinen, Terhi; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Ghosh, Saranya; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Kucher, Inna; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Miné, Philippe; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Zghiche, Amina; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Grenier, Gérald; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Popov, Andrey; Sabes, David; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Preuten, Marius; Schomakers, Christian; Schulz, Johannes; Verlage, Tobias; Albert, Andreas; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hamer, Matthias; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Müller, Thomas; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Arndt, Till; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Beernaert, Kelly; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Bin Anuar, Afiq Aizuddin; Borras, Kerstin; Campbell, Alan; Connor, Patrick; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Eren, Engin; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Grados Luyando, Juan Manuel; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gunnellini, Paolo; Harb, Ali; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Keaveney, James; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Krücker, Dirk; Lange, Wolfgang; Lelek, Aleksandra; Lenz, Teresa; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Dreyer, Torben; Garutti, Erika; Gonzalez, Daniel; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Niedziela, Marek; Nowatschin, Dominik; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Stöver, Marc; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Akbiyik, Melike; Barth, Christian; Baur, Sebastian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Butz, Erik; Caspart, René; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Freund, Benedikt; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kudella, Simon; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Shvetsov, Ivan; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Filipovic, Nicolas; Pasztor, Gabriella; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Makovec, Alajos; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Bahinipati, Seema; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Nayak, Aruna; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Kumari, Priyanka; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Keshri, Sumit; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Rajarshi; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutt, Suneel; Dutta, Suchandra; Ghosh, Shamik; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Nandan, Saswati; Purohit, Arnab; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Thakur, Shalini; Behera, Prafulla Kumar; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Dugad, Shashikant; Kole, Gouranga; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Jain, Sandhya; Kumar, Sanjeev; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Sarkar, Tanmay; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Hegde, Vinay; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Pandey, Shubham; Rane, Aditee; Sharma, Seema; Chenarani, Shirin; Eskandari Tadavani, Esmaeel; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Sharma, Archana; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Verwilligen, Piet; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Albergo, Sebastiano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Russo, Lorenzo; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Strom, Derek; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Brivio, Francesco; Ciriolo, Vincenzo; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malberti, Martina; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Pigazzini, Simone; Ragazzi, Stefano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; De Nardo, Guglielmo; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Fienga, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Carlin, Roberto; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, Alexandra; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fantinel, Sergio; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gonella, Franco; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Torassa, Ezio; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Fallavollita, Francesco; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Leonardi, Roberto; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Cipriani, Marco; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Marzocchi, Badder; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bartosik, Nazar; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Cenna, Francesca; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Monteno, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Shchelina, Ksenia; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Traczyk, Piotr; Belforte, Stefano; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Anna; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Sangeun; Lee, Seh Wook; Oh, Young Do; Sekmen, Sezen; Son, Dong-Chul; Yang, Yu Chul; Lee, Ari; Kim, Hyunchul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Tae Jeong; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Ha, Seungkyu; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Youngkwon; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Almond, John; Kim, Junho; Lee, Haneol; Oh, Sung Bin; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Seo, Seon-hee; Yang, Unki; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Yu, Geum Bong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Hwang, Chanwook; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Mejia Guisao, Jhovanny; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Carpinteyro, Severiano; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Saddique, Asif; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Calpas, Betty; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Savina, Maria; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Chtchipounov, Leonid; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Sulimov, Valentin; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Toms, Maria; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Polikarpov, Sergey; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Terkulov, Adel; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Savrin, Viktor; Blinov, Vladimir; Skovpen, Yuri; Shtol, Dmitry; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Elumakhov, Dmitry; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Dordevic, Milos; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Barrio Luna, Mar; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Senghi Soares, Mara; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; González Fernández, Juan Rodrigo; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Sanchez Cruz, Sergio; Suárez Andrés, Ignacio; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Curras, Esteban; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; 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Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Fiori, Francesco; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Paganis, Efstathios; Psallidas, Andreas; Tsai, Jui-fa; Asavapibhop, Burin; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kara, Ozgun; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Kiminsu, Ugur; Oglakci, Mehmet; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Tali, Bayram; Turkcapar, Semra; Zorbakir, Ibrahim Soner; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Burns, Douglas; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Di Maria, Riccardo; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Haddad, Yacine; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; James, Thomas; Lane, Rebecca; Laner, Christian; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; 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Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Derdzinski, Mark; Gerosa, Raffaele; Holzner, André; Klein, Daniel; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Wood, John; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Amin, Nick; Bhandari, Rohan; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Heller, Ryan; Incandela, Joe; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Ovcharova, Ana; Qu, Huilin; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Bendavid, Joshua; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Duarte, Javier; Lawhorn, Jay Mathew; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Weinberg, Marc; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Mulholland, Troy; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Mcdermott, Kevin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Tan, Shao Min; Tao, Zhengcheng; Thom, Julia; Tucker, Jordan; Wittich, Peter; Zientek, Margaret; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Apresyan, Artur; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Cremonesi, Matteo; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Magini, Nicolo; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Ristori, Luciano; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strait, James; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Wu, Yujun; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Low, Jia Fu; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Shchutska, Lesya; Sperka, David; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Santra, Arka; Yohay, Rachel; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Jung, Kurt; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Varelas, Nikos; Wang, Hui; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Blumenfeld, Barry; Cocoros, Alice; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Roskes, Jeffrey; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Al-bataineh, Ayman; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Boren, Samuel; Bowen, James; Castle, James; Forthomme, Laurent; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Khalil, Sadia; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Majumder, Devdatta; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tapia Takaki, Daniel; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Mignerey, Alice; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Abercrombie, Daniel; Allen, Brandon; Apyan, Aram; Azzolini, Virginia; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hsu, Dylan; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Maier, Benedikt; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Tatar, Kaya; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Benvenuti, Alberto; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Evans, Andrew; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Claes, Daniel R; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Kravchenko, Ilya; Malta Rodrigues, Alan; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Stieger, Benjamin; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Nguyen, Duong; Parker, Ashley; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Charaf, Otman; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kumar, Ajay; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Hurtado Anampa, Kenyi; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Rupprecht, Nathaniel; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Alimena, Juliette; Antonelli, Louis; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Francis, Brian; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Cooperstein, Stephane; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Lange, David; Luo, Jingyu; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mei, Kelvin; Ojalvo, Isabel; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Tully, Christopher; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Folgueras, Santiago; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Shi, Xin; Sun, Jian; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Duh, Yi-ting; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Agapitos, Antonis; Chou, John Paul; Gershtein, Yuri; Gómez Espinosa, Tirso Alejandro; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Kyriacou, Savvas; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Osherson, Marc; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Delannoy, Andrés G; Foerster, Mark; Heideman, Joseph; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Juska, Evaldas; Kamon, Teruki; Mueller, Ryan; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Perniè, Luca; Rathjens, Denis; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; De Guio, Federico; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Gurpinar, Emine; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Peltola, Timo; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Wang, Zhixing; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Barria, Patrizia; Cox, Bradley; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Buchanan, James; Caillol, Cécile; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Woods, Nathaniel

    2017-09-10

    A search is presented for a heavy vector-like quark, decaying into a b quark and a W boson, which is produced singly in association with a light flavor quark and a b quark. The analysis is performed using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of $ \\sqrt{s} = $ 13 TeV collected at the LHC in 2015. The data set used in the analysis corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 2.3 fb$^{-1}$. The search is carried out using events containing one electron or muon, at least one b-tagged jet with large transverse momentum, at least one jet in the forward region of the detector, and missing transverse momentum. No excess over the standard model prediction is observed. Upper limits are placed on the production cross section of heavy exotic quarks: a T quark with a charge of $ 2/3 $, and a Y quark with a charge of $ -4/3 $. For Y quarks with coupling of 0.5 and ${\\cal{B}}(\\mathrm{Y} \\to \\mathrm{ b } \\mathrm{ W }) = $ 100%, the observed (expected) lower mass limits are 1.40 (1.0) TeV. This i...

  18. Meteors, space aliens, and other exotic encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom. Hofacker

    1998-01-01

    Exotics have had a big impact on our environment. If you do not think so, just look at how many people believe that humans would not exist on this planet were it not for exotics. This belief centers on two main theories: (1) that humans could not have evolved were it not for a huge meteor from outer space striking the earth resulting in extinction of the dinasours, the...

  19. Exotic hadron and string junction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imachi, Masahiro

    1978-01-01

    Hadron structure is investigated adopting string junction model as a realization of confinement. Besides exotic hadrons (M 4 , B 5 etc.), unconventional hadrons appear. A mass formula for these hadrons is proposed. New selection rule is introduced which requires the covalence of constituent line at hadron vertex. New duality appears due to the freedom of junction, especially in anti BB→anti BB reaction. A possible assignment of exotic and unconventional hadrons to recently observed narrow meson states is presented. (auth.)

  20. Deep electroproduction of exotic hybrid mesons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anikin, I.V.; Pire, B.; Szymanowski, L.; Teryaev, O.V.; Wallon, S.

    2004-01-01

    We evaluate the leading order amplitude for the deep exclusive electroproduction of an exotic hybrid meson in the Bjorken regime. We show that, contrarily to naive expectation, this amplitude factorizes at the twist 2 level and thus scales like usual meson electroproduction when the virtual photon and the hybrid meson are longitudinally polarized. Exotic hybrid mesons may thus be studied in electroproduction experiments at JLAB, HERA (HERMES) or CERN (Compass)

  1. CARBONIFEROUS CORALS AND CHAETETIDS FROM EXOTIC LIMESTONE BLOCK OF THE CRIMEA

    OpenAIRE

    OGAR, VICTOR; KLEVTSOVSKYI, ANDREY

    2015-01-01

    A chaetetid sponge and coral fauna from a Carboniferous exotic limestone block in the Lower Jurassic Esciorda olistostrome on the Bodrak River (Crimean Mountains) are described for the first time. The Bodrak exotic block is composed of massive limestone. It contains the chaetetid Chaetetes (Boswellia) sp., the tabulate coral Multithecopora sp., and poorly preserved rugose corals, including Dibunophyllum? sp., Cordibia? sp. and gen. et sp. indet. Only the fasciculate colonies of the rugose cor...

  2. Qualitative quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, T.L.

    1976-01-01

    The infrared limit in asymptotically free non-abelian gauge theories using recently developed non-perturbative methods which allow derivation of zero momentum theorems for Green's functions and vertices is described. These low-energy theorems are compared to the infrared behavior predicted from the renormalization group equation when the existence of an infrared fixed point is assumed. A set of objects is exhibited whose low energy theorems violate the scaling behavior predicted by the renormalization group. This shows that the assumed fixed point cannot exist and that in the Landau gauge the effective charge becomes infinite in the infrared. Qualitatively this implies that as an attempt is made to separate elementary quanta the interaction between the quanta becomes arbitrarily strong. This indicates at least that the theories studied are capable of color confinement. Results are true only for theories with large numbers of quarks. This opens the possibility that large numbers of quarks are actually necessary for confinement

  3. Prediction of new Quarks, Generations & low Mass Quarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lach, Theodore

    2003-04-01

    The CBM (model) of the nucleus has resulted in the prediction of two new quarks, an "up" quark of mass 237.31 MeV/c2 and a "dn" quark of mass 42.392 MeV/c2. These two new predicted quarks helped to determine that the masses of the quarks and leptons are all related by a geometric progression relationship. The mass of each quark or lepton is just the "geometric mean" of two related elementary particles, either in the same generation or in the same family. This numerology predicts the following masses for the electron family: 0.511000 (electron), 7.74 (predicted), 117.3, 1778.4 (tau), 26950.1 MeV. The geometric ratio of this progression is 15.154 (e to the power e). The mass of the tau in this theory agrees very well with accepted values. This theory suggests that all the "dn like" quarks have a mass of just 10X multiples of 4.24 MeV (the mass of the "d" quark). The first 3 "up like" quark masses are 38, 237.31 and 1500 MeV. This theory also predicts a new heavy generation with a lepton mass of 27 GeV, a "dn like" quark of 42.4 GeV, and an "up like" quark of 65 GeV. Significant evidence already exists for the existence of these new quarks, and lepton. Ref. Masses of the Sub-Nuclear Particles, nucl-th/ 0008026, @ http://xxx.lanl.gov. Infinite Energy, Vol 5, issue 30.

  4. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karataglidis, S.

    2017-01-01

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  5. EXOTIC: Development of ceramic tritium breeding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flipot, A.J.; Kennedy, P.; Conrad, R.

    1989-03-01

    As part of the joint European Programme on fusion blanket technology three laboratories, Northern Research Laboratories (NRL), Springfields in the UK, SCK/CEN-Mol in Belgium and ECN-Petten in conjunction with JRC-Petten in the Netherlands have worked closely together since 1983 on the development of ceramic breeder materials, the programme being codenamed EXOTIC. Lithium oxides, aluminates, silicates and zirconates have been produced, characterised and irradiated in the HFR-Petten in experiments EXOTIC-1, -2 and -3. EXOTIC-4 is in preparation. In this fourth annual progress report the work achieved in 1987 is reported. For EXOTIC-1 to -3 mainly post irradiation examinations have been carried out like: visual inspection, puncturing of closed capsules, tritium retention measurements and material characterisation. Moreover, tritium release experiments on small specimens have started. SCK/CEN performed a general study on lithium silicates, in particular on the thermal stability. Finally, the fabrication and the characterisation of the materials to be irradiated in experiment EXOTIC-4 are presented. The eight capsules of EXOTIC-4 will be loaed with samples of Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 2 O, Li 2 ZrO 3 , Li 6 Zr 2 O 7 and Li 8 ZrO 6 . The irradiation will last 4 reactor cycles or about 100, Full Power Day, FPD. The main objective is to determine the tritium residence time of the various lithium zirconates. 18 figs., 8 refs., 15 tabs

  6. Electron scattering and reactions from exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karataglidis, S. [University of Johannesburg, Department of Physics, Auckland Park (South Africa); University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria (Australia)

    2017-04-15

    The SCRIT and FAIR/ELISe experiments are the first to attempt to measure directly electron scattering form factors from nuclei far from stability. This will give direct information for the (one-body) charge densities of those systems, about which there is little information available. The SCRIT experiment will be taking data for medium-mass exotic nuclei, while the electron-ion collider at ELISe, when constructed, will be able to measure form factors for a wide range of exotic nuclei, as available from the radioactive ion beams produced by the FAIR experiment. Other facilities are now being proposed, which will also consider electron scattering from exotic nuclei at higher energies, to study short-range correlations in exclusive reactions. This review will consider all available information concerning the current status (largely theoretical) of electron scattering from exotic nuclei and, where possible, complement such information with equivalent information concerning the neutron densities of those exotic systems, as obtained from intermediate energy proton scattering. The issue of long- and short-range correlations will be discussed, and whether extending such studies to the exotic sector will elicit new information. (orig.)

  7. Quark-Gluon Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 14 review articles on the theory and phenomenology of the creation and diagnosis of quark-gluon plasma. They are written by active investigators of in the various research topics, which range from the QCD foundation through transport theory and thermalization models to the examination of possible signatures. The monograph should be useful not only to the experienced researchers in the subject but also to newcomers.

  8. Quarks, culture, combogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Barry

    2018-01-01

    The value of Tyler Volk’s Quarks to Culture is evident when the book is placed against popular histories of the universe, dozens of which have provided evidence for an immense cosmic past. But such histories are often anecdotal, like early British histories of the kings of England. Unlike these works, Volk artfully presents the case for structural continuity and systematic cre­ativity across 13.8 billion years of cosmic history.

  9. Quarks and partons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschos, E.A.

    1976-08-01

    The quark parton model describes the inclusive electro- and neutrino production data if a clear distinction is made between reactions which take place at high and at low energies. For the low energy region the classical view of six structure functions of the proton is still adequate. For the high energy region models can be constructed which are consistent with the experimental data. (BJ) [de

  10. The conventional quark picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalitz, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    For baryons, mesons and deep inelastic phenomena the ideas and the problems of the conventional quark picture are pointed out. All observed baryons fit in three SU(3)-multiplets which cluster into larger SU(6)-multiplets. No mesons are known which have quantum numbers inconsistent with belonging to a SU(3) nonet or octet. The deep inelastic phenomena are described in terms of six structure functions of the proton. (BJ) [de

  11. Quark gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Nayak, Tapan; Sarkar, Sourav

    2014-01-01

    At extremely high temperatures and densities, protons and neutrons may dissolve into a "soup" of quarks and gluons, called the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). For a few microseconds, shortly after the Big Bang, the Universe was filled with the QGP matter. The search and study of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) is one of the most fundamental research topics of our times. The QGP matter has been probed by colliding heavy ions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory, New York and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva. By colliding heavy-ions at a speed close to that of light, scientists aim to obtain - albeit over a tiny volume of the size of a nucleus and for an infinitesimally short instant - a QGP state. This QGP state can be observed by dedicated experiments, as it reverts to hadronic matter through expansion and cooling. This volume presents some of the current theoretical and experimental understandings in the field of QGP.

  12. The quark gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granier de Cassagnac, R.

    2010-01-01

    The quark-gluon plasma (QGP) is a state of matter in which the universe was expected to be a few micro-seconds after the big-bang. Violent collisions of heavy ions are supposed to re-create this state in particle accelerators. Numerous signatures of this fugacious state have already been observed at the RHIC (relativistic heavy ion collider). The first evidence of the violence of collisions is the number of generated particles: about 6000 per collision, mostly hadrons. This figure seems high but in fact is less than theoretically expected and is the first sign of the formation of a QGP that saturates the density of gluons. Another sign, observed at the RHIC is the damping of the particle jets that are produced in the collision. This damping is consistent with the crossing of a medium whose density is so high that it can not be made of hadrons but of partons. In the RHIC experiments the collective behaviour of quarks and gluons shows that they are strongly interacting with one another. This fact supports the idea that the QGP is more a perfect liquid rather than an ideal gas in which quarks and gluons move freely. (A.C.)

  13. Fields, symmetries, and quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosel, U.

    1989-01-01

    'Fields, symmetries, and quarks' covers elements of quantum field theory, symmetries, gauge field theories and phenomenological descriptions of hadrons, with special emphasis on topics relevant to nuclear physics. It is aimed at nuclear physicists in general and at scientists who need a working knowledge of field theory, symmetry principles of elementary particles and their interactions and the quark structure of hadrons. The book starts out with an elementary introduction into classical field theory and its quantization. As gauge field theories require a working knowledge of global symmetries in field theories this topic is then discussed in detail. The following part is concerned with the general structure of gauge field theories and contains a thorough discussion of the still less widely known features of Non-Abelian gauge field theories. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), which is important for the understanding of hadronic matter, is discussed in the next section together with the quark compositions of hadrons. The last two chapters give a detailed discussion of phenomenological bag-models. The MIT bag is discussed, so that all theoretical calculations can be followed step by step. Since in all other bag-models the calculational methods and steps are essentially identical, this chapter should enable the reader to actually perform such calculations unaided. A last chapter finally discusses the topological bag-models which have become quite popular over the last few years. (orig.)

  14. Quark core stars, quark stars and strange stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, F.

    1988-01-01

    A recent one flavor quark matter equation of state is generalized to several flavors. It is shown that quarks undergo a first order phase transition. In addition, this equation of state depends on just one parameter in the two flavor case, two parameters in the three flavor case, and these parameters are constrained by phenomenology. This equation of state is then applied to the hadron-quark transition in neutron stars and the determination of quark star stability, the investigation of strange matter stability and possible strange star existence. 43 refs., 6 figs

  15. Top quark pair production and top quark properties at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Chang-Seong [INFN, Pisa

    2016-06-02

    We present the most recent measurements of top quark pairs production and top quark properties in proton-antiproton collisions with center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using CDF II detector at the Tevatron. The combination of top pair production cross section measurements and the direct measurement of top quark width are reported. The test of Standard Model predictions for top quark decaying into $b$-quarks, performed by measuring the ratio $R$ between the top quark branching fraction to $b$-quark and the branching fraction to any type of down quark is shown. The extraction of the CKM matrix element $|V_{tb}|$ from the ratio $R$ is discussed. We also present the latest measurements on the forward-backward asymmetry ($A_{FB}$) in top anti-top quark production. With the full CDF Run II data set, the measurements are performed in top anti-top decaying to final states that contain one or two charged leptons (electrons or muons). In addition, we combine the results of the leptonic forward-backward asymmetry in $t\\bar t$ system between the two final states. All the results show deviations from the next-to-leading order (NLO) standard model (SM) calculation.

  16. On the exercise of exotic and non-exotic multiquark meson states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.; Weissman, E.; Barnea

    2008-01-01

    To obtain an exact solution of a four-body system containing two quarks and two antiquarks interacting through two-body terms is a cumbersome task that has been tackled with more or less success during the last decades. We present an exact method for the study of four-quark systems based on the hyperspherical harmonics formalism that allows us to solve it without resorting to further approximations, like for instance the existence of diquark components. We apply it to systems containing two heavy and two light quarks using different quark-quark potentials. While QQnn states may be stable in nature, the stability of QQnn states would imply the existence of quark correlations not taken into account by simple quark dynamical models. Presented at the 20th Few-Body Conference, Pisa, Italy, 10-14 September 2007. (author)

  17. Study of the top quark electric charge at the CDF experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartos, Pavol [Comenius Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the top quark electric charge using the jet charge tagging method on events containing a single lepton collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab between February 2002 and February 2010 at the center-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. There are three main components to this measurement: determining the charge of the W (using the charge of the lepton), pairing the W with the b-jet to ensure that they are from the same top decay branch and finally determining the charge of the b-jet using the Jet Charge algorithm. We found, on a sample of 5.6 fb-1 of data, that the p-value under the standard model hypothesis is equal to 13.4%, while the p-value under the exotic model hypothesis is equal to 0.014%. Using the a priori criteria generally accepted by the CDF collaboration, we can say that the result is consistent with the standard model, while we exclude an exotic quark hypothesis with 95% confidence. Using the Bayesian approach, we obtain for the Bayes factor (2ln(BF)) a value of 19.6, that favors very strongly the SM hypothesis over the XM one. The presented method has the highest sensitivity to the top quark electric charge among the presented so far top quark charge analysis.

  18. Study of the top quark electric charge at the cdf experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartos, P.

    2011-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the top quark electric charge using the jet charge tagging method on events containing a single lepton collected by the CDF II detector at Fermilab between February 2002 and February 2010 at the center-of-mass energy ps = 1.96 TeV . There are three main components to this measurement: determining the charge of the W (using the charge of the lepton), pairing the W with the b-jet to ensure that they are from the same top decay branch and finally determining the charge of the b-jet using the Jet Charge algorithm. We found, on a sample of 5.6 fb -1 of data, that the p-value under the standard model hypothesis is equal to 13.4%, while the p-value under the exotic model hypothesis is equal to 0.014%. Using the a priori criteria generally accepted by the CDF collaboration, we can say that the result is consistent with the standard model, while we exclude an exotic quark hypothesis with 95% confidence. Using the Bayesian approach, we obtain for the Bayes factor (2 · ln(BF)) a value of 19.6, that favors very strongly the SM hypothesis over the XM one. The presented method has the highest sensitivity to the top quark electric charge among the presented so far top quark charge analysis. (author)

  19. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2006 Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yu-Gang; Wang, En-Ke; Cai, Xu; Huang, Huan-Zhong; Wang, Xin-Nian; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan

    2007-07-01

    scientific program of the conference began with an overview of high energy nuclear physics in China by Professor Wenqing Shen, vice president of the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Professor Shen highlighted many contributions made by the Chinese scientists in both theory and experiment. Dr Nick Samios, former director of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), gave a vivid account of the early years of RHIC and recent accomplishments. Highlights of the conference include new results from RHIC at BNL and SPS (Super Proton Synchrotron) at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Many experimental results reported at the conference support the notion that the quark-gluon matter at RHIC behaves like a perfect liquid with minimum viscosity to entropy ratio. There were 15 plenary sessions which covered 54 plenary talks, 12 parallel sessions and 1 poster session. A total of 320 abstracts were submitted to the conference out of which 124 were selected for oral presentation and the rest were assigned to the poster session. Talks and posters in the conference covered a broad range of experimental and theoretical progress in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions, which includes new evidence of sQGP, jet quenching and heavy quark energy loss, heavy-ion collision phenomenology, quantum field theory at finite temperature and/or density, and relevant areas of astrophysics and plasma physics. The Quark Matter 2006 conference coincided with the 80th birthday of Professor T D Lee. A special reception was held in the banquet hall of the Shanghai Grand Theatre to celebrate Professor Lee's birthday and to honor his great contributions to physics, in particular, to the development of high energy nuclear physics research in China. We would like to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee for providing valuable advice on a variety of matters, from the general structure of the conference to the selection of the plenary speakers and selection of abstracts for

  20. Exotic superconducting states in the extended attractive Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Swagatam; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2018-04-04

    We show that the extended attractive Hubbard model on a square lattice allows for a variety of superconducting phases, including exotic mixed-symmetry phases with [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] symmetries, and a novel [Formula: see text] state. The calculations are performed within the Hartree-Fock Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer framework. The ground states of the mean-field Hamiltonian are obtained via a minimization scheme that relaxes the symmetry constraints on the superconducting solutions, hence allowing for a mixing of s-, p- and d-wave order parameters. The results are obtained within the assumption of uniform-density states. Our results show that extended attractive Hubbard model can serve as an effective model for investigating properties of exotic superconductors.

  1. Nuclear shapes: From the mundane to the exotic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    The collection of protons and neutrons that forms an atomic nucleus can be characterized as having a shape. Surprisingly, the nuclei of most atoms are not spherical but exhibit shapes that are football-like, pear-like, etc. Following a brief review of the characteristics of these open-quotes mundaneclose quotes nuclear shapes, recent observations of nuclei that are superdeformed or even hyperdeformed are presented. In addition, the evidence for more exotic nuclei that can be described as exhibiting halos, forming a nuclear sausage, or undergoing a scissors-like motion are examined. The discussion concludes with some speculation about additional exotic shapes, such as the nuclear banana. Since nuclear shapes cannot be observed directly, one must rely on knowledge from indirect sources. Some of the details about these sources of information, including excitation spectra and nuclear lifetimes, are presented

  2. Quarks for hadrons and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    The simplest, naive, model for a unified description of leptons and hadrons consists in postulating, besides the usual quarks p, n, lambda a fourth quark, with very heavy mass and very high binding to pairs like anti p n and anti p lambda. In a SU(4) scheme the fourth quark has a quantum number charm which may be taken as proportional to the lepton number. Muons would be distinguished from electrons by the occurence of a lambda-quark instead of a n-quark in their structure. The forces among these quarks would have to be such as to give leptons an almost point-like structure at the experimentally known energies as well as absence of strong interactions at these energies. However, one would expect the display of strong interactions by leptons at extremely high energies [pt

  3. Static quark-antiquark potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, B.B.; Barik, B.K.

    1983-01-01

    A heavy-quark--antiquark potential is suggested which connects asymptotic freedom and quark confinement in a unified manner by formal methods of field theory using some plausible assumptions. The potential has only one additional adjustable parameter B which is proportional to (M/sub q//m/sub q/), where M/sub q/ and m/sub q/ are the constituent and current quark masses, respectively

  4. Infrared slavery and quark confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Alabiso, C

    1976-01-01

    The question is considered of whether the so-called infrared slavery mechanism as, e.g., being manifest in non-Abelian gauge theories, necessarily confines quarks. Making a specific ansatz for the long- range forces, the Schwinger-Dyson equation is solved for the quark Green function. Besides having a confining solution, it appears that quarks may by-pass the long-range forces and be produced. (20 refs).

  5. Infrared slavery and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabiso, C.; Schierholz, G.

    1976-01-01

    The question of whether the so-called infrared slavery mechanism as, e.g., being manifest in non-Abelian gauge theories, necessarily confines quarks is posed. Making a specific ansatz for the long-range forces, the Schwinger-Dyson equation is solved for the quark Green function. Besides having a confining solution, it appears that quarks may by-pass the long-range forces and be produced. (Auth.)

  6. Quark matter or new particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. Curtis

    1988-01-01

    It has been argued that compression of nuclear matter to somewhat higher densities may lead to the formation of stable quark matter. A plausible alternative, which leads to radically new astrophysical scenarios, is that the stability of quark matter simply represents the stability of new particles compounded of quarks. A specific example is the SU(3)-symmetric version of the alpha particle, composed of spin-zero pairs of each of the baryon octet (an 'octet' particle).

  7. Camel as a transboundary vector for emerging exotic Salmonella serovars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, Nahed H; Abdel-Moein, Khaled A; Zaher, Hala

    2017-05-01

    The current study was conducted to shed light on the role of imported camels as a transboundary vector for emerging exotic Salmonella serovars. Fecal samples were collected from 206 camels directly after slaughtering including 25 local camels and 181 imported ones as well as stool specimens were obtained from 50 slaughterhouse workers at the same abattoir. The obtained samples were cultured while Salmonella serovars were identified through Gram's stain films, biochemical tests and serotyping with antisera kit. Moreover, the obtained Salmonella serovars were examined by PCR for the presence of invA and stn genes. The overall prevalence of Salmonella serovars among the examined camels was 8.3%. Stn gene was detected in the vast majority of exotic strains (11/14) 78.6% including emerging serovars such as Salmonella Saintpaul, S. Chester, S. Typhimurium whereas only one isolate from local camels carried stn gene (1/3) 33.3%. On the other hand, none of the examined humans yielded positive result. Our findings highlight the potential role of imported camels as a transboundary vector for exotic emerging Salomenella serovars.

  8. Nucleon-nucleon interaction with quark exchange and prediction of the color van der Waals potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1988-01-01

    The nucleon-nucleon interaction is considered by including the color nucleon clusters. The nucleon-nucleon system is treated as a six-quark system. The obtained local potentials reduce the short-range repulsion. The resulting nucleon-nucleon potential, using a quark-quark potential, agress well with the central-force potentials. The phase shifts calculated by using these local potentials are in good agreement with those obtained from other methods. Introducing the quark-quark potential in the nucleon-nucleon interaction leads to a color van der Waals potential much stronger than that implied by experiments

  9. Heavy-quark free energies, internal-energy and entropy contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczmarek, O.

    2009-01-01

    We present lattice QCD results on heavy-quark free energies, extract from its temperature dependence the entropy and internal-energy contributions, and discuss the onset of medium effects that lead to screening of static quark-antiquark sources in a thermal medium. The detailed analysis of the temperature and distance dependence of the different contributions indicate the complex non-perturbative nature of strongly interacting matter. We shall discuss the necessity to include those effects in studies on the behavior of heavy quarks, heavy-quark bound states and their dissociation in the quark-gluon plasma phase. (orig.)

  10. Nucleon-nucleon interaction with quark exchanges and prediction to colour van der Waals potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1985-11-01

    The nucleon-nucleon interaction is considered by including the colour nucleon clusters. The nucleon-nucleon system is treated as a six-quark system. The obtained local potentials reduce the short-range repulsion. The resulted nucleon-nucleon potential by using a quark-quark potential well agrees with the central-force potentials. The phase shifts calculated by using these local potentials are in good agreement with those obtained from other methods. Introducing the quark-quark potential in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, leads to a colour van der Waals potential very strong compared with that predicted by experiments. (author)

  11. Measurements of the top quark mass using the CMS and ATLAS detectors at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Menke, Sven; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the top quark mass obtained by the ATLAS and CMS experiments in proton-proton collisions at the LHC for centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV are presented. The mass of the top quark is measured using several methods and channels, including the reconstructed invariant mass distribution of the top quark and shapes of kinematic observables from top quark decay products. Measurements of the top-quark pole-mass based on the inclusive and differential top-anti-top production cross sections and observables based on the differential cross section in the top-pair plus 1 jet channel are also discussed.

  12. Dark matter and exotic neutrino interactions in direct detection searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertuzzo, Enrico [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,R. do Matão 1371, CEP. 05508-090, São Paulo (Brazil); Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Suchita [Institut für Hochenergiephysik, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften,Nikolsdorfer Gasse 18, 1050 Wien (Austria); Gonzalez, Yuber F. Perez; Funchal, Renata Zukanovich [Departamento de Física Matemática, Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo,R. do Matão 1371, CEP. 05508-090, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-04-12

    We investigate the effect of new physics interacting with both Dark Matter (DM) and neutrinos at DM direct detection experiments. Working within a simplified model formalism, we consider vector and scalar mediators to determine the scattering of DM as well as the modified scattering of solar neutrinos off nuclei. Using existing data from LUX as well as the expected sensitivity of LUX-ZEPLIN and DARWIN, we set limits on the couplings of the mediators to quarks, neutrinos and DM. Given the current limits, we also assess the true DM discovery potential of direct detection experiments under the presence of exotic neutrino interactions. In the case of a vector mediator, we show that the DM discovery reach of future experiments is affected for DM masses m{sub χ}≲10 GeV or DM scattering cross sections σ{sub χ}≲10{sup −47} cm{sup 2}. On the other hand, a scalar mediator will not affect the discovery reach appreciably.

  13. Rotating neutron stars with exotic cores: masses, radii, stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haensel, P.; Bejger, M.; Fortin, M.; Zdunik, L. [Polish Academy of Sciences, N. Copernicus Astronomical Center, Warszawa (Poland)

    2016-03-15

    A set of theoretical mass-radius relations for rigidly rotating neutron stars with exotic cores, obtained in various theories of dense matter, is reviewed. Two basic observational constraints are used: the largest measured rotation frequency (716Hz) and the maximum measured mass (2M {sub CircleDot}). The present status of measuring the radii of neutron stars is described. The theory of rigidly rotating stars in general relativity is reviewed and limitations of the slow rotation approximation are pointed out. Mass-radius relations for rotating neutron stars with hyperon and quark cores are illustrated using several models. Problems related to the non-uniqueness of the crust-core matching are mentioned. Limits on rigid rotation resulting from the mass-shedding instability and the instability with respect to the axisymmetric perturbations are summarized. The problem of instabilities and of the back-bending phenomenon are discussed in detail. Metastability and instability of a neutron star core in the case of a first-order phase transition, both between pure phases, and into a mixed-phase state, are reviewed. The case of two disjoint families (branches) of rotating neutron stars is discussed and generic features of neutron-star families and of core-quakes triggered by the instabilities are considered. (orig.)

  14. Resonance X(5568) as an exotic axial-vector state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agaev, S.S. [Baku State University, Institute for Physical Problems, Baku (Azerbaijan); Azizi, K. [Dogus University, Department of Physics, Istanbul (Turkey); Barsbay, B.; Sundu, H. [Kocaeli University, Department of Physics, Izmit (Turkey)

    2017-01-15

    The mass and meson-current coupling constant of the resonance X(5568), as well as the width of the decay X(5568) → B{sub s}{sup *}π are calculated by modeling the exotic X(5568) resonance as a diquark-antidiquark state X{sub b} = [su][bd] with quantum numbers J{sup P} = 1{sup +}. The calculations are made employing QCD two-point sum rule method, where the quark, gluon and mixed vacuum condensates up to dimension eight are taken into account. The sum rule approach on the light-cone in its soft-meson approximation is used to explore the vertex X{sub b}B{sub s}{sup *}π and extract the strong coupling g{sub X{sub bB{sub s{sup *}π}}}, which is a necessary ingredient to find the width of the X{sub b} → B{sub s}{sup *}π{sup +} decay process. The obtained predictions are compared with the experimental data of the D0 Collaboration, and results of other theoretical works. (orig.)

  15. Hadron production at RHIC: recombination of quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Rainer J [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    We discuss quark recombination applied to the hadronization of a quark gluon plasma. It has been shown that the quark recombination model can explain essential features of hadron production measured in high energy heavy ion collisions.

  16. Cold quark matter in compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzon, B.; Fogaca, D. A.; Navarra, F. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Horvath, J. E. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, 1226, 05508-090, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-03-25

    We used an equation of state for the cold quark matter to the study of properties of quark stars. We also discuss the absolute stability of quark matter and compute the mass-radius relation for self-bound stars.

  17. Models of quark bags and their consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolubov, P.N.

    1977-01-01

    The development of the first Dubna Quark Bag and the results obtained in this way are considered. The idea of the first Dubna Quark Bag is as follows: baryons are constructed of three quarks measons are constructed of two quarks, and each quark is interpreted as the Dirac particle which moves in a scalar square well. The so-called quasiindependent quark model is considered too. It is a simple quark model based on an analogy with the shell model for nuclei. The quarks are considered as moving in an arbitrary radially-symmetric field, and their one-particle wave function satisfies the usual Dirac equation. Such quark model can give at least the same results as the relativistic bag model. A possibility exists to improve the results of the relativistic quark model with the oscillator interaction between quarks. The results of the MIT-Bag model and the quasiindependent quark model coincide

  18. Distinctive exotic flavor and aroma compounds of some exotic tropical fruits and berries: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasekan, Ola; Abbas, Kassim A

    2012-01-01

    The characteristic flavor of exotic tropical fruits is one of their most attractive attributes to consumers. In this article, the enormous diversity of exotic fruit flavors is reviewed. Classifying some of the exotic fruits into two classes on the basis of whether esters or terpenes predominate in the aroma was also attempted. Indeed, as far as exotic tropical fruits are concerned, the majority of fruits have terpenes predominating in their aroma profile. Some of the fruits in this group are the Amazonian fruits such as pitanga, umbu-caja, camu-camu, garcinia, and bacuri. The ester group is made up of rambutan, durians, star fruit, snake fruit, acerola, tamarind, sapodilla, genipap, soursop, cashew, melon, jackfruit, and cupuacu respectively. Also, the role of sulphur-volatiles in some of the exotic fruits is detailed.

  19. Quark and Gluon Relaxation in Quark-Gluon Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiselberg, H.; Pethick, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    The quasiparticle decay rates for quarks and gluons in quark-gluon plasmas are calculated by solving the kinetic equation. Introducing an infrared cutoff to allow for nonperturbative effects, we evaluate the quasiparticle lifetime at momenta greater than the inverse Debye screening length to leading order in the coupling constant.

  20. Decoupling of heavy quarks in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernreuther, W.

    1983-01-01

    Decoupling of heavy quarks in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) defined by mass-independent renormalization is investigated. The structure of the relations between the parameters of f flavour QCD below a heavy-quark threshold is discussed to all orders in the loop expansion, and the relations are computed to two-loop approximation for the minimal subtraction schemes (MS) and to one-loop approximation for some Weinberg schemes. These matching relations can be used to systematically determine the renormalization group (RG)-invariant parameters of the effective theory in terms of the RG-invariant parameters of the theory which includes the heavy quark, or vice versa. For MS scheme the connection between Λ/sub f/-1 and Λ/sub f/ to two and three loops is given as well as the two-loop connection between the RG-invariant mass parameters of the f-1 and f flavour theory. The effect of heavy quarks on the evolution of the QCQ coupling is of significance for present QCD phenomenology based on next-to-leading-order perturbation theory. This is illustrated with a few examples within the MS scheme

  1. Top quark production cross-section measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Ye; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the inclusive and differential cross-sections for top-quark pair and single top production cross sections in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented at center-of-mass energies of 8 TeV and 13 TeV. The inclusive measurements reach high precision and are compared to the best available theoretical calculations. These measurements, including results using boosted tops, probe our understanding of top-pair production in the TeV regime. The results are compared to Monte Carlo generators implementing LO and NLO matrix elements matched with parton showers and NLO QCD calculations. For the t-channel single top measurement, the single top-quark and anti-top-quark total production cross-sections, their ratio, as well as differential cross sections are also presented. A measurement of the production cross-section of a single top quark in association with a W boson, the second largest single-top production mode, is also presented. Finally, measurements of ...

  2. Single top quarks and dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinna, Deborah; Zucchetta, Alberto; Buckley, Matthew R.; Canelli, Florencia

    2017-08-01

    Processes with dark matter interacting with the standard model fermions through new scalars or pseudoscalars with flavor-diagonal couplings proportional to fermion mass are well motivated theoretically, and provide a useful phenomenological model with which to interpret experimental results. Two modes of dark matter production from these models have been considered in the existing literature: pairs of dark matter produced through top quark loops with an associated monojet in the event, and pair production of dark matter with pairs of heavy flavored quarks (tops or bottoms). In this paper, we demonstrate that a third, previously overlooked channel yields a non-negligible contribution to LHC dark matter searches in these models. In spite of a generally lower production cross section at LHC when compared to the associated top-pair channel, non-flavor violating single top quark processes are kinematically favored and can significantly increase the sensitivity to these models. Including dark matter production in association with a single top quark through scalar or pseudoscalar mediators, the exclusion limit set by the LHC searches for dark matter can be improved by 30% up to a factor of two, depending on the mass assumed for the mediator particle.

  3. The discovery of the top quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the Τ resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark

  4. The Discovery of the Top Quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinervo, P.K.

    1995-12-01

    The top quark and the Higgs boson are the heaviest elementary particles predicted by the standard model. The four lightest quark flavours, the up, down, strange and charm quarks, were well-established by the mid-1970's. The discovery in 1977 of the {Tau} resonances, a new family of massive hadrons, required the introduction of the fifth quark flavour. Experimental and theoretical studies have indicated that this quark also has a heavier partner, the top quark.

  5. Exotic nuclear structures and decays: new nuclear collective phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies of the properties of exotic nuclei have revealed a surprising richness and diversity in their shapes, structures, and decay modes far exceeding our understandings and expectations of even a decay ago. From studies of far-off-stability exotic nuclei have come evidence for the coexistence of different nuclear shapes in the same nucleus, new regions of unusually large deformation, new ground-state phase transitions from one shape to another, new magic numbers but now for deformed shapes, and for the importance of reinforcing shell gaps. New exotic decay modes include a wide variety of beta delayed particle emission and heavy cluster emissions such as 14 C and 24 Ne. The new deformed magic numbers of 38 and 60 seen far off stability clearly support that there are likely other ''magic'' numbers for protons and neutrons which give stability to different deformed shapes. Perhaps these other new magic shell gap numbers at large deformation could influence the sticking of two very heavy nuclei in collisions such as U on Cm. Finally, another area which could have a bearing on the formation, motions, and structures of giant nuclear systems involves the recent observation of very energetic, light particle (proton, alpha) emission with up to 50% and more of the total incoming energy in a collision, for example in 300 MeV 32 S on Ta. 43 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Quark matter 93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otterlund, Ingvar; Ruuskanen, Vesa

    1993-12-15

    In his welcome address to the 10th International Conference on Ultra- Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Quark Matter '93), held in Borlange, Sweden, from 20-24 June, Hans-Ake Gustafsson was puzzled why this year's conference was billed as the tenth in the series. He had tried to count but could only find eight forerunners - Bielefeld (1982), Brookhaven (1983), Helsinki (1984), Asilomar (1986), Nordkirchen (1987), Lenox (1988), Menton (1990), Gatlinburg (1991), making this year's meeting at Borlange the ninth. The answer was given by Helmut Satz in his introductory talk, pointing out that at the time of the Bielefeld meeting, a few conferences dealing with similar topics had already been held. The Bielefeld organizers thus did not consider their conference the first. Whatever its pedigree, the Borlange meeting covered particle production in highly excited and compressed nuclear matter, fluctuations and correlations, quark phenomena (quantum chromodynamics - QCD) in nuclear collisions, probes and signatures of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), future collider experiments and instrumentation. The theoretical talks were split between the fundamental properties of the hot and dense matter at or near equilibrium, and the interface between theory and experiment. The phenomenological modelling of heavy ion collisions seems to reproduce at least all the main features of the data with hadrons, resonances and strings as the degrees of freedom. However secondary interactions among the produced hadrons or strings need to be added. Hydrodynamic calculations lead to results which reproduce the main features of the collisions. With increasing collision energy, the parton degrees of freedom become more important. Klaus Geiger described an ambitious scheme treating the whole nucleus-nucleus collision in terms of a kinetic parton (quark/gluon) cascade. The initial parton distribution at the beginning of the collision is determined from the quark-gluon nuclear structure and the

  7. Quark matter 93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otterlund, Ingvar; Ruuskanen, Vesa

    1993-01-01

    In his welcome address to the 10th International Conference on Ultra- Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions (Quark Matter '93), held in Borlange, Sweden, from 20-24 June, Hans-Ake Gustafsson was puzzled why this year's conference was billed as the tenth in the series. He had tried to count but could only find eight forerunners - Bielefeld (1982), Brookhaven (1983), Helsinki (1984), Asilomar (1986), Nordkirchen (1987), Lenox (1988), Menton (1990), Gatlinburg (1991), making this year's meeting at Borlange the ninth. The answer was given by Helmut Satz in his introductory talk, pointing out that at the time of the Bielefeld meeting, a few conferences dealing with similar topics had already been held. The Bielefeld organizers thus did not consider their conference the first. Whatever its pedigree, the Borlange meeting covered particle production in highly excited and compressed nuclear matter, fluctuations and correlations, quark phenomena (quantum chromodynamics - QCD) in nuclear collisions, probes and signatures of Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP), future collider experiments and instrumentation. The theoretical talks were split between the fundamental properties of the hot and dense matter at or near equilibrium, and the interface between theory and experiment. The phenomenological modelling of heavy ion collisions seems to reproduce at least all the main features of the data with hadrons, resonances and strings as the degrees of freedom. However secondary interactions among the produced hadrons or strings need to be added. Hydrodynamic calculations lead to results which reproduce the main features of the collisions. With increasing collision energy, the parton degrees of freedom become more important. Klaus Geiger described an ambitious scheme treating the whole nucleus-nucleus collision in terms of a kinetic parton (quark/gluon) cascade. The initial parton distribution at the beginning of the collision is determined from the quark-gluon nuclear structure

  8. Hot nuclear matter in the modified quark-meson coupling model with quark-quark correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakout, I.; Jaqaman, H.R.

    2000-01-01

    Short-range quark-quark correlations in hot nuclear matter are examined within the modified quark-meson coupling (MQMC) model by adding repulsive scalar and vector quark-quark interactions. Without these correlations, the bag radius increases with the baryon density. However, when the correlations are introduced the bag size shrinks as the bags overlap. Also as the strength of the scalar quark-quark correlation is increased, the decrease of the effective nucleon mass M* N with the baryonic density is slowed down and tends to saturate at high densities. Within this model we study the phase transition from the baryon-meson phase to the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) phase with the latter modelled as an ideal gas of quarks and gluons inside a bag. Two models for the QGP bag parameter are considered. In one case, the bag is taken to be medium-independent and the phase transition from the hadron phase to QGP is found to occur at five to eight times ordinary nuclear matter density for temperatures less than 60 MeV. For lower densities, the transition takes place at a higher temperature, reaching up to 130 MeV at zero density. In the second case, the QGP bag parameter is considered to be medium-dependent as in the MQMC model for the hadronic phase. In this case, it is found that the phase transition occurs at much lower densities. (author)

  9. Human land use promotes the abundance and diversity of exotic species on caribbean islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Wendy A M; Behm, Jocelyn E; Helmus, Matthew R; Ellers, Jacintha

    2018-05-31

    Human land use causes major changes in species abundance and composition, yet native and exotic species can exhibit different responses to land use change. Native populations generally decline in human-impacted habitats while exotic species often benefit. In this study, we assessed the effects of human land use on exotic and native reptile diversity, including functional diversity, which relates to the range of habitat use strategies in biotic communities. We surveyed 114 reptile communities from localities that varied in habitat structure and human impact level on two Caribbean islands, and calculated species richness, overall abundance and evenness for every plot. Functional diversity indices were calculated using published trait data, which enabled us to detect signs of trait filtering associated with impacted habitats. Our results show that environmental variation among sampling plots was explained by two PCA ordination axes related to habitat structure (i.e. forest or non-forest) and human impact level (i.e. addition of man-made constructions such as roads and buildings). Several diversity indices were significantly correlated with the two PCA axes, but exotic and native species showed opposing responses. Native species reached the highest abundance in forests, while exotic species were absent in this habitat. Human impact was associated with an increase in exotic abundance and species richness, while native species showed no significant associations. Functional diversity was highest in non-forested environments on both islands, and further increased on St. Martin with the establishment of functionally unique exotic species in non-forested habitat. Habitat structure, rather than human impact, proved to be an important agent for environmental filtering of traits, causing divergent functional trait values across forested and non-forested environments. Our results illustrate the importance of considering various elements of land use when studying its impact on

  10. Hunting, Exotic Carnivores, and Habitat Loss: Anthropogenic Effects on a Native Carnivore Community, Madagascar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach J Farris

    Full Text Available The wide-ranging, cumulative, negative effects of anthropogenic disturbance, including habitat degradation, exotic species, and hunting, on native wildlife has been well documented across a range of habitats worldwide with carnivores potentially being the most vulnerable due to their more extinction prone characteristics. Investigating the effects of anthropogenic pressures on sympatric carnivores is needed to improve our ability to develop targeted, effective management plans for carnivore conservation worldwide. Utilizing photographic, line-transect, and habitat sampling, as well as landscape analyses and village-based bushmeat hunting surveys, we provide the first investigation of how multiple forms of habitat degradation (fragmentation, exotic carnivores, human encroachment, and hunting affect carnivore occupancy across Madagascar's largest protected area: the Masoala-Makira landscape. We found that as degradation increased, native carnivore occupancy and encounter rates decreased while exotic carnivore occupancy and encounter rates increased. Feral cats (Felis species and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris had higher occupancy than half of the native carnivore species across Madagascar's largest protected landscape. Bird and small mammal encounter rates were negatively associated with exotic carnivore occupancy, but positively associated with the occupancy of four native carnivore species. Spotted fanaloka (Fossa fossana occupancy was constrained by the presence of exotic feral cats and exotic small Indian civet (Viverricula indica. Hunting was intense across the four study sites where hunting was studied, with the highest rates for the small Indian civet (mean=90 individuals consumed/year, the ring-tailed vontsira (Galidia elegans (mean=58 consumed/year, and the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox (mean=31 consumed/year. Our modeling results suggest hunters target intact forest where carnivore occupancy, abundance, and species richness, are highest

  11. Hunting, Exotic Carnivores, and Habitat Loss: Anthropogenic Effects on a Native Carnivore Community, Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Zach J; Golden, Christopher D; Karpanty, Sarah; Murphy, Asia; Stauffer, Dean; Ratelolahy, Felix; Andrianjakarivelo, Vonjy; Holmes, Christopher M; Kelly, Marcella J

    2015-01-01

    The wide-ranging, cumulative, negative effects of anthropogenic disturbance, including habitat degradation, exotic species, and hunting, on native wildlife has been well documented across a range of habitats worldwide with carnivores potentially being the most vulnerable due to their more extinction prone characteristics. Investigating the effects of anthropogenic pressures on sympatric carnivores is needed to improve our ability to develop targeted, effective management plans for carnivore conservation worldwide. Utilizing photographic, line-transect, and habitat sampling, as well as landscape analyses and village-based bushmeat hunting surveys, we provide the first investigation of how multiple forms of habitat degradation (fragmentation, exotic carnivores, human encroachment, and hunting) affect carnivore occupancy across Madagascar's largest protected area: the Masoala-Makira landscape. We found that as degradation increased, native carnivore occupancy and encounter rates decreased while exotic carnivore occupancy and encounter rates increased. Feral cats (Felis species) and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) had higher occupancy than half of the native carnivore species across Madagascar's largest protected landscape. Bird and small mammal encounter rates were negatively associated with exotic carnivore occupancy, but positively associated with the occupancy of four native carnivore species. Spotted fanaloka (Fossa fossana) occupancy was constrained by the presence of exotic feral cats and exotic small Indian civet (Viverricula indica). Hunting was intense across the four study sites where hunting was studied, with the highest rates for the small Indian civet (mean=90 individuals consumed/year), the ring-tailed vontsira (Galidia elegans) (mean=58 consumed/year), and the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox) (mean=31 consumed/year). Our modeling results suggest hunters target intact forest where carnivore occupancy, abundance, and species richness, are highest. These various

  12. Acceleration of exotic plant invasion in a forested ecosystem by a generalist herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschtruth, Anne K; Battles, John J

    2009-04-01

    The successful invasion of exotic plants is often attributed to the absence of coevolved enemies in the introduced range (i.e., the enemy release hypothesis). Nevertheless, several components of this hypothesis, including the role of generalist herbivores, remain relatively unexplored. We used repeated censuses of exclosures and paired controls to investigate the role of a generalist herbivore, white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), in the invasion of 3 exotic plant species (Microstegium vimineum, Alliaria petiolata, and Berberis thunbergii) in eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) forests in New Jersey and Pennsylvania (U.S.A.). This work was conducted in 10 eastern hemlock (T. canadensis) forests that spanned gradients in deer density and in the severity of canopy disturbance caused by an introduced insect pest, the hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae). We used maximum likelihood estimation and information theoretics to quantify the strength of evidence for alternative models of the influence of deer density and its interaction with the severity of canopy disturbance on exotic plant abundance. Our results were consistent with the enemy release hypothesis in that exotic plants gained a competitive advantage in the presence of generalist herbivores in the introduced range. The abundance of all 3 exotic plants increased significantly more in the control plots than in the paired exclosures. For all species, the inclusion of canopy disturbance parameters resulted in models with substantially greater support than the deer density only models. Our results suggest that white-tailed deer herbivory can accelerate the invasion of exotic plants and that canopy disturbance can interact with herbivory to magnify the impact. In addition, our results provide compelling evidence of nonlinear relationships between deer density and the impact of herbivory on exotic species abundance. These findings highlight the important role of herbivore density in determining impacts on

  13. Quark fragmentation function and the nonlinear chiral quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Z.K.

    1993-01-01

    The scaling law of the fragmentation function has been proved in this paper. With that, we show that low-P T quark fragmentation function can be studied as a low energy physocs in the light-cone coordinate frame. We therefore use the nonlinear chiral quark model which is able to study the low energy physics under scale Λ CSB to study such a function. Meanwhile the formalism for studying the quark fragmentation function has been established. The nonlinear chiral quark model is quantized on the light-front. We then use old-fashioned perturbation theory to study the quark fragmentation function. Our first order result for such a function shows in agreement with the phenomenological model study of e + e - jet. The probability for u,d pair formation in the e + e - jet from our calculation is also in agreement with the phenomenological model results

  14. Study of dibaryon states containing three different types of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leandri, J.; Silvestre-Brac, B.

    1997-01-01

    Previously we have shown, in a simple chromomagnetic model, that including heavy quarks in the dibaryon sector can lead to favorable configurations for stability against decay into two baryons. In this study we investigate a reduced set of favorable candidates that have emerged from our previous works. We use a non-relativistic quark model with quarks interacting through a QCD-inspired potential, which has been tested previously in meson and baryon spectroscopy. A variational procedure is performed using a great number of Gaussian functions containing all the possibilities for colour, isospin, and spin components. (author)

  15. Cool quark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkela, Aleksi

    2016-07-20

    We generalize the state-of-the-art perturbative Equation of State of cold quark matter to nonzero temperatures, needed in the description of neutron star mergers and core collapse processes. The new result is accurate to order g^5 in the gauge coupling, and is based on a novel framework for dealing with the infrared sensitive soft field modes of the theory. The zero Matsubara mode sector is treated using a dimensionally reduced effective theory, while the soft non-zero modes are resummed using the Hard Thermal Loop approximation. This combination of known effective descriptions offers unprecedented access to small but nonzero temperatures, both in and out of beta equilibrium.

  16. Exotic plant species attack revegetation plants in post-coal mining areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Muhammad; Arisoesilaningsih, Endang

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to explore some invasive exotic plant species that have the potential to disrupt the growth of revegetation plants in post-coal mining areas. This research was conducted in a revegetation area of PT, Amanah Anugerah Adi Mulia (A3M) Kintap site, South Borneo. Direct observation was carried out on some revegetation areas by observing the growth of revegetation plants disturbed by exotic plant species and the spread of exotic plant species. Based on observation, several invasive exotic plant species were identified including Mikania cordata, Centrosema pubescence, Calopogonium mucunoides, Mimosa pudica, Ageratum conyzoides, and Chromolaena odorata. These five plant species grew wild in the revegetation area and showed ability to disrupt the growth of other plants. In some tree species, such as Acacia mangium, Paraserianthes falcataria, M. cordata could inhibit the growth and even kill the trees through covering the tree canopy. So, the trees could not receive optimum sun light for photosynthesis processes. M. cordata was also observed to have the most widespread distribution. Several exotic plant species such as C. mucunoides, M. pudica, and A. conyzoides were observed to have deep root systems compared with plant species used for revegetation. This growth characteristic allowed exotic plant species to win the competition for nutrient absorption with other plant species.

  17. Energy change of a heavy quark in a viscous quark–gluon plasma with fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Bing-feng; Hou, De-fu; Li, Jia-rong

    2016-01-01

    When a heavy quark travels through the quark–gluon plasma, the polarization and fluctuating chromoelectric fields will be produced simultaneously in the plasma. The drag force due to those fields exerting in return on the moving heavy quark will cause energy change to it. Based on the dielectric functions derived from the viscous chromohydrodynamics, we have studied the collisional energy change of a heavy quark traversing the viscous quark–gluon plasma including fluctuations of chromoelectric field. Numerical results indicate that the chromoelectric field fluctuations lead to an energy gain of the moving heavy quark. Shear viscosity suppresses the fluctuation-induced energy gain and the viscous suppression effect for the charm quark is much more remarkable than that for the bottom quark. While, the fluctuation energy gain is much smaller than the polarization energy loss in magnitude and the net energy change for the heavy quark is at loss.

  18. Electromagnetic properties of baryons in the constituent quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warns, M.

    1992-01-01

    The electromagnetic properties of baryons are investigated in the framework of a relativized quark model. The model includes beyond the usual single quark transition ansatz relativistic effects due to the strong interaction and confinement forces between the quarks. Furthermore the center-of-mass motion of the three-quark system is separated off in a Lorentz-invariant way. All relativistic correction terms are obtained by expanding the corresponding relativistic expressions in powers of the quark velocity. In this way recoil effects on the electromagnetic interaction between the photon and the baryon could be explicitly studied. Using the harmonic oscillator wavefunctions with the configuration mixing from the Isgur-Karl model, the form factors of the nucleon and the electromagnetic transition amplitudes both for longitudinally and transversely polarized photons are calculated for the most important baryon resonances. An extension to baryons involving strange quarks is also considered. Comparisons are made with the results of the nonrelativistic quark model and with some other approaches. (orig.)

  19. Recent results on top quark physics with the CMS detector

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The dawn of the LHC Run II brings the prospect of pushing precision in top quark physics to a new level probing further the standard model and beyond. The inclusive production of top quark pairs and single top quarks has been rapidly established with as much as 42/pb of integrated luminosity and has been further probed with increased precision using up to 2.7/fb of proton-proton collision data acquired by the CMS detector during 2015. Inclusive and differential production cross sections of top-quark pairs and single-top quarks have been measured using new selection and top kinematics reconstruction techniques. The results have been compared to several predictions which include the state of the art next-to-leading order matched to parton shower generators as well as several fixed-order theory calculations. In addition the associated production of top quark pairs with a Z boson has also been re-established at 13 TeV. These results re-open the door to an exciting top quark physics programme ahead of us during th...

  20. Study of quark structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, F.T.; Flaminio, E.; Lai, K.; Metcalf, M.; Wang, L.

    1977-01-01

    The quark structure functions of the proton are determined through a combined analysis of the reactions pN → ll-barX and eN → eX. The valence-quark structure function of the pion is also given by analyzing the πN → μμ-barX data measured by the Branson et al

  1. X-ray spectroscopy from exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, F.J.

    1994-01-01

    Why do experimentalists study exotic atoms, in particular antiprotonic atoms? The answer is simple: the information about electromagnetic, weak, and strong interactions that can be obtained by doing X-ray spectroscopy from exotic atoms is really worth the effort. It is possible to (1) enlarge the knowledge about the properties of exotic particles (such as mass and magnetic moment); (2) open a possibility to test quantum electrodynamics; (3) get detailed insight into the shape of nuclei (characterized by the nuclear radium and higher momenta) and even into the neutron distribution in the nucleus (neutron halo); and (4) use it as a powerful tool to learn about the strong interaction at very low relative hadron-nucleon velocities

  2. Quark models in hadron physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phatak, Shashikant C.

    2007-01-01

    In this talk, we review the role played by the quark models in the study of interaction of strong, weak and electromagnetic probes with hadrons at intermediate and high momentum transfers. By hadrons, we mean individual nucleons as well as nuclei. We argue that at these momentum transfers, the structure of hadrons plays an important role. The hadron structure of the hadrons is because of the underlying quark structure of hadrons and therefore the quark models play an important role in determining the hadron structure. Further, the properties of hadrons are likely to change when these are placed in nuclear medium and this change should arise from the underlying quark structure. We shall consider some quark models to look into these aspects. (author)

  3. Quarks and the cosmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Michael S

    2007-01-05

    Cosmology is in the midst of a period of revolutionary discovery, propelled by bold ideas from particle physics and by technological advances from gigapixel charge-coupled device cameras to peta-scale computing. The basic features of the universe have now been determined: It is 13.7 billion years old, spatially flat, and expanding at an accelerating rate; it is composed of atoms (4%), exotic dark matter (20%), and dark energy (76%); and there is evidence that galaxies and other structures were seeded by quantum fluctuations. Although we know much about the universe, we understand far less. Poised to dramatically advance our understanding of both the universe and the laws that govern it, cosmology is on the verge of a golden age.

  4. Quark matter and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.; Fields, B.; Thomas, D.

    1992-01-01

    The possible implications of the quark-hadron transition for cosmology are explored. Possible surviving signatures are discussed. In particular, the possibility of generating a dark matter candidate such as strange nuggets or planetary mass black holes is noted. Much discussion is devoted to the possible role of the transition for cosmological nucleosynthesis. It is emphasized that even an optimized first order phase transition will not significantly alter the nucleosynthesis constraints on the cosmological baryon density nor on neutrino counting. However, it is noted that Be and B observations in old stars may eventually be able to be a signature of a cosmologically significant quark-hadron transition. It is pointed out that the critical point in this regard is whether the observed B/Be ratio can be produced by spallation processes or requires cosmological input. Spallation cannot produce a B/Be ratio below 7.6. A supporting signature would be Be and B ratios to oxygen that greatly exceed galactic values. At present, all data is still consistent with a spallagenic origin

  5. PREFACE: Quark Matter 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan-e~Alam; Subhasis~Chattopadhyay; Tapan~Nayak

    2008-10-01

    Quark Matter 2008—the 20th International Conference on Ultra-Relativistic Nucleus-Nucleus Collisions was held in Jaipur, the Pink City of India, from 4-10 February, 2008. Organizing Quark Matter 2008 in India itself indicates the international recognition of the Indian contribution to the field of heavy-ion physics, which was initiated and nurtured by Bikash Sinha, Chair of the conference. The conference was inaugurated by the Honourable Chief Minister of Rajasthan, Smt. Vasundhara Raje followed by the key note address by Professor Carlo Rubbia. The scientific programme started with the theoretical overview, `SPS to RHIC and onwards to LHC' by Larry McLerran followed by several theoretical and experimental overview talks on the ongoing experiments at SPS and RHIC. The future experiments at the LHC, FAIR and J-PARC, along with the theoretical predictions, were discussed in great depth. Lattice QCD predictions on the nature of the phase transition and critical point were vigorously debated during several plenary and parallel session presentations. The conference was enriched by the presence of an unprecedented number of participants; about 600 participants representing 31 countries across the globe. This issue contains papers based on plenary talks and oral presentations presented at the conference. Besides invited and contributed talks, there were also a large number of poster presentations. Members of the International Advisory Committee played a pivotal role in the selection of speakers, both for plenary and parallel session talks. The contributions of the Organizing Committee in all aspects, from helping to prepare the academic programme down to arranging local hospitality, were much appreciated. We thank the members of both the committees for making Quark Matter 2008 a very effective and interesting platform for scientific deliberations. Quark Matter 2008 was financially supported by: Air Liquide (New Delhi) Board of Research Nuclear Sciences (Mumbai) Bose

  6. Status of exotic states at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Yeletskikh, Ivan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We review the status of searches and measurements of exotic hadron states at ATLAS. Among them: the search for the beauty partner of X(3872) charmonium state, the measurement of differential cross-section of the prompt and non-prompt production of X(3872) in the J/psi pi pi final states, the search for the structure in the B_s pi invariant mass, reported by D0 experiment, search for exotic states in B-hadron decays: pentaquarks in Lambda_b decays and tetraquarks in B-meson decays. ATLAS results and ongoing analyses perspectives are highlighted together with CMS and LHCb results.

  7. Review of Physics Results from the Tevatron: Top Quark Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Cecilia E.; Vellidis, Costas

    2014-09-17

    We present results on top quark physics from the CDF and D0 collaborations at the Fermilab Tevatron proton anti-proton collider. These include legacy results from Run II that were published or submitted for publication before mid-2014, as well as a summary of Run I results. The historical perspective of the discovery of the top quark in Run I is also described.

  8. Quark bags, P-matrix and nucleon-nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narodetskij, I.M.

    1984-01-01

    This paper is an extended version of the talk given at IX European Conference on Few Body Problems in Physics, Tbilisi, 1984. It reviews recent developments of the quark compound bag (QCB) model including explicit examples of the QCB nucleon-nucleon potentials, description of the deuteron properties, calculation of the six quark admixture in the deuteron and applications to the three-nucleon system

  9. Light-quark, heavy-quark systems: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, B.

    1993-06-01

    We review many of the recently developed applications of Heavy Quark Effective Theory techniques. After a brief update on Luke's theorem, we describe striking relations between heavy baryon form factors, and how to use them to estimate the accuracy of the extraction of (vert bar)V(sub cb)(vert bar). We discuss factorization and compare with experiment. An elementary presentation, with sample applications, of reparametrization invariance comes next. The final and most extensive chapter in this review deals with phenomenological lagrangians that incorporate heavy-quark spin-flavor as well as light quark chiral symmetries. We compile many interesting results and discuss the validity of the calculations.

  10. Light-quark, heavy-quark systems: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grinstein, B.

    1993-01-01

    The author reviews many of the recently developed applications of Heavy Quark Effective Theory techniques. After a brief update on Luke's theorm, he describes striking relations between heavy baryon form factors, and how to use them to estimate the accuracy of the extraction of |B cb |. He discusses factorization and compares with experiment. An elementary presentation, with sample applications, of reparametrization invariance comes next. The final and most extensive chapter in this review deals with phenomenological lagrangians that incorporate heavy-quark spin-flavor as well as light quark chiral symmetries. He compiles many interesting results and discuss the validity of the calculations

  11. LHCb experiment reports observation of exotic pentaquark particles

    CERN Multimedia

    Dominguez, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Illustration of the possible layout of the quarks in a pentaquark particle such as those discovered at LHCb. The five quarks might be tightly bonded. They might also be assembled into a meson (one quark and one antiquark) and a baryon (three quarks), weakly bonded together.

  12. A Model-Independent Discussion of Quark Number Density and Quark Condensate at Zero Temperature and Finite Quark Chemical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Shu-Sheng; Shi Chao; Cui Zhu-Fang; Zong Hong-Shi; Jiang Yu

    2015-01-01

    Generally speaking, the quark propagator is dependent on the quark chemical potential in the dense quantum chromodynamics (QCD). By means of the generating functional method, we prove that the quark propagator actually depends on p_4 + iμ from the first principle of QCD. The relation between quark number density and quark condensate is discussed by analyzing their singularities. It is concluded that the quark number density has some singularities at certain μ when T = 0, and the variations of the quark number density as well as the quark condensate are located at the same point. In other words, at a certain μ the quark number density turns to nonzero, while the quark condensate begins to decrease from its vacuum value. (paper)

  13. Chiral quark model with relativistic kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcilazo, H.; Valcarce, A.

    2003-01-01

    The nonstrange baryon spectrum is studied within a three-body model that incorporates relativistic kinematics. We found that the combined effect of relativistic kinematics together with the pion exchange between quarks is able to reverse the order of the first positive- and negative-parity nucleon excited states as observed experimentally. Including the chiral partner of the pion (the σ meson) leads to an overall good description of the spectrum

  14. Chiral quark model with relativistic kinematics

    OpenAIRE

    Garcilazo, H.; Valcarce, A.

    2003-01-01

    The non-strange baryon spectrum is studied within a three-body model that incorporates relativistic kinematics. We found that the combined effect of relativistic kinematics together with the pion exchange between quarks is able to reverse the order of the first positive- and negative-parity nucleon excited states as observed experimentally. Including the chiral partner of the pion (the $\\sigma$ meson) leads to an overall good description of the spectrum.

  15. How the physicists nailed the quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews quarks, from its prediction in 1962, to the experiments confirming its existence in the 1970's and 1980's. The elementary particles of matter; building particles from quarks; why quarks can never be isolated; and the six quarks; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  16. Heavy baryons in the relativistic quark model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, D.; Faustov, R.N.; Galkin, V.O.; Martynenko, A.P.; Saleev, V.A.

    1996-07-01

    In the framework of the relativistic quasipotential quark model the mass spectrum of baryons with two heavy quarks is calculated. The quasipotentials for interactions of two quarks and of a quark with a scalar and axial vector diquark are evaluated. The bound state masses of baryons with J P =1/2 + , 3/2 + are computed. (orig.)

  17. Top quark physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menzione, A.

    1995-10-01

    Most of the material presented in this report, comes from contributions to the parallel session PL20 of this conference. We summarise the experimental results of direct production of Top quarks, coming from the CDF and C0 Collaborations at Fermilab, and compare these results to what one expects within current theoretical understanding. Particular attention is given to new results such as all hadronic modes of t bar t decay. As far as the mass is concerned, a comparison is made with precision measurements of related quantities, coming from LEP and other experiments. An attempt is made to look at the medium-term future and understand which variables and with what accuracy one can measure them with increased integrated luminosity

  18. Quarks and partons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, F.E.

    1976-01-01

    The studies of inelastic electron scattering at SLAC and of neutrino scattering at CERN have been widely interpreted as giving support to the idea that the nucleon is built from elementary constituents, called partons, and that these partons have the same quantum numbers as the quarks that are familiar in spectroscopy. In particular, a very simple regularity in the data, known as scale invariance or just 'scaling' was seen at least at moderate energies (2 2 > approximately 1 GeV) which is natural in the parton model. The data on e + e - annihilation also appear to be consistent with scaling when Esub(cm) approximately 5 GeV. These lectures are concerned with the scaling phenomena. One may expect the new hadronic degree of freedom to generate scaling violations in inelastic electron and neutrino scattering. These are mentioned briefly in these lectures. (Auth.)

  19. Quarks and numerical simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weingarten, D.

    1996-01-01

    This work deals with the quantum chromodynamics and the theory of quarks's behaviour. The experimentation supports this theory but until now no computation have prove it. The resolution of the mathematic equations were far beyond the capability of human or the quickest computer of the seventies. A dedicated computer was built: the GF11. The mass of eight hadrons was computed in 91. In 95, a new particle was found by computation. The author explains the mathematical modeling of chromodynamics and the methods to solve it. It requires 10 17 arithmetic operations. So specific computer is needed. GF11 uses 566 processors in parallel. New machines hundred of times more efficient will be needed to go further. That will be a new tool for theorician physicists. (O.M.). 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  20. Results from searches for exotic phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Martyniuk, Alex; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This talk will review the current state of experimental searches for "exotic" physics beyond the standard model of particle physics. The talk will cover a wide range of searches from ATLAS and CMS, in a (hopefully) jargon free pedagogical fashion, showing the big picture of the field at this time.

  1. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M; Buervenich, T; Maruhn, J A; Greiner, W [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); Rutz, K [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Frankfurt (Germany); [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Reinhard, P G [Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik, Univ. Erlangen (Germany)

    1998-06-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  2. Microscopic Cluster Theory for Exotic Nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaselli, M; Kuehl, T; Ursescu, D; Fritzsche, S

    2006-01-01

    For a better understanding of the dynamics of complex exotic nuclei it is of crucial importance to develop a practical microscopic theory easy to be applied to a wide range of masses. In this paper we propose to calculate the structure of neutron-rich nuclei within a dynamic model based on the EoM theory

  3. Biodiversity and the exotic species threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter S. White

    1998-01-01

    Exotic species invasions, called by one conservation biologist the "least reversible" of all human impacts, cause harm to economies (e.g., fisheries, wildlife populations, tourism), the environment (e.g., in the form of broadcast of pesticides and herbicides), human health and wellbeing (e.g., allergic responses and the increase in fire severity in some...

  4. EXOTIC: Development of ceramic tritium breeding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwast, H.; Conrad, R.

    1989-09-01

    In this fifth EXOTIC annual progress report the work carried out in 1988 is reported. For EXOTIC-1, -2 and -3 the post-irradiation examinations have been continued with tritium retention measurements, annealng experiments, determination of physical and mechanical properties and X-ray diffraction analysis. Irradiation of EXOTIC-4 has been performde and the post-irradiation examination has started. Transient tritium release curves are given and analysed. The resulting tritium residence times show that for the Li-zirconates a residence time of less than one day can be achieved in the temperature region of 350-600 C. The loading scheme, the objectives and some fabrication data of EXOTIC-5 are give. Moreover, the fabrication of laboratory scale batches has started to investigate the effect of microstructural parameters on tritium release. Finally, an investigation was started on the system Li 2 O-ZrO 2 , with emphasis on the lithia-rich compositions. 40 figs., 9 refs., 10 tabs

  5. Mean-field models and exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.; Buervenich, T.; Maruhn, J.A.; Greiner, W.; Rutz, K.; Reinhard, P.G.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss two widely used nuclear mean-field models, the relativistic mean-field model and the (nonrelativistic) Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model, and their capability to describe exotic nuclei. Test cases are superheavy nuclei and neutron-rich Sn isotopes. New information in this regime helps to fix hitherto loosely determined aspects of the models. (orig.)

  6. Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Proceeding for the conference plenary talk at HEPMAD16, Madagascar on the topic of "Overview of Exotic Physics at ATLAS" (ATL-PHYS-SLIDE-2016-807 https://cds.cern.ch/record/2225222) Deadline: 16/12/2016 (could be postponed for some days later upon request as recently suggested by the conference organizer)

  7. Summary of exotic collider concepts group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, C.

    1995-01-01

    We present a summary of the discussions in the Exotic Collider Concepts Group. Most of the discussions were centered around the status and open problems for muon-muon and gamma-gamma colliders. In addition the group discussed some general problems and new results of accelerator physics. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. Searches for New Physics with Top Quarks in CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01

    We will present a review of non-MSSM inspired searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model in final states containing top quarks or bottom quarks performed by the CMS experiment. These include searches for heavy gauge bosons, excited quarks, sequential and vector-like top quark partners. The analyses span a range of final states, from multi-leptonic to entirely hadronic, and many use modern reconstruction and analysis techniques to reconstruct the highly boosted final states that are created in these topologies. The talk will focus on the most recent results from CMS, using the full dataset collected in proton-proton collisions at the LHC at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV.

  9. The breaking of flavor democracy in the quark sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Xing, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Di

    2017-09-01

    The democracy of quark flavors is a well-motivated flavor symmetry, but it must be properly broken in order to explain the observed quark mass spectrum and flavor mixing pattern. We reconstruct the texture of flavor democracy breaking and evaluate its strength in a novel way, by assuming a parallelism between the Q=+2/3 and Q=-1/3 quark sectors and using a nontrivial parametrization of the flavor mixing matrix. Some phenomenological implications of such democratic quark mass matrices, including their variations in the hierarchy basis and their evolution from the electroweak scale to a super-high energy scale, are also discussed. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11375207) and National Basic Research Program of China (2013CB834300)

  10. Resource Letter Q-1: quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, O.W.

    1982-01-01

    Quarks as fundamental constituents of hadrons play a central role in elementary particle physics. We give an annotated bibliography of references to quarks and related topics in elementary particle physics, as well as to the role of quarks in areas outside elementary particle physics, such as nuclear physics, and astrophysics and cosmology. We label references E (elementary), I (intermediate), and A (advanced) to guide the reader. Articles selected for incorporation in a reprint volume (to be published separately by the American Association of Physics Teachers) are indicated by an an asterisk. A short list of particularly helpful elementary and intermediate references is indicated by a star

  11. Weak decays of heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1978-08-01

    The properties that may help to identify the two additional quark flavors that are expected to be discovered. These properties are lifetime, branching ratios, selection rules, and lepton decay spectra. It is also noted that CP violation may manifest itself more strongly in heavy particle decays than elsewhere providing a new probe of its origin. The theoretical progress in the understanding of nonleptonic transitions among lighter quarks, nonleptonic K and hyperon decay amplitudes, omega minus and charmed particle decay predictions, and lastly the Kobayashi--Maskawa model for the weak coupling of heavy quarks together with the details of its implications for topology and bottomology are treated. 48 references

  12. Holographic lessons for quark dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernicoff, Mariano; García, J. Antonio; Güijosa, Alberto; Pedraza, Juan F.

    2012-05-01

    We give a brief overview of recent results obtained through the gauge/gravity correspondence, concerning the propagation of a heavy quark in strongly coupled conformal field theories (such as {N}=4 super-Yang-Mills), both at zero and finite temperature. In the vacuum, we discuss energy loss, radiation damping, signal propagation and radiation-induced fluctuations. In the presence of a thermal plasma, our emphasis is on early-time energy loss, screening and quark-antiquark evolution after pair creation. Throughout, quark dynamics is seen to be efficiently encapsulated in the usual string worldsheet dynamics.

  13. How many quarks are there

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harari, H

    1976-01-01

    The experimental information which was accumulated in the last 18 months in e/sup +/e/sup -/ collisions and ..nu..N scattering indicates that more than four kinds of quarks are already present. Six different pieces of evidence for the existence of six quarks: the triangle anomalies, the value of R, psi-spectroscopy, neutrino processes, CP-violation and the possible existence of V+A currents are discussed. It is concluded that there is strong (but not yet conclusive) evidence for the existence of six quarks and six leptons.

  14. How many quarks are there

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harari, Haim

    The experimental information which was accumulated in the last 18 months in e + e - collisions and neutrino+N scattering indicates that more than four kinds of quarks are already present. Six different pieces of evidence for the existence of six quarks are discussed: the triangle anomalies, the value of R, psi-spectroscopy, neutrino processes, CP-violation and the possible existence of V+A currents. It is concluded that there is strong (but not yet conclusive) evidence for the existence of six quarks and six leptons

  15. Decays of the b quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorndike, E.H.; Poling, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experimental results on the decay of b-flavored hadrons are reviewed. Substantial progress has been made in the study of exclusive and inclusive B-meson decays, as well as in the theoretical understanding of these processes. The two most prominent developments are the continuing failure to observe evidence of decays of the b quark to a u quark rather than a c quark, and the surprisingly high level of B 0 -anti B 0 mixing which has recently been reported by the ARGUS collaboration. Notwithstanding these results, we conclude that the health of the Standard Model is excellent. (orig.)

  16. Quark chiral condensate from the overlap quark propagator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Bi, Yujiang; Cai, Hao; Chen, Ying; Gong, Ming; Liu, Zhaofeng

    2017-05-01

    From the overlap lattice quark propagator calculated in the Landau gauge, we determine the quark chiral condensate by fitting operator product expansion formulas to the lattice data. The quark propagators are computed on domain wall fermion configurations generated by the RBC-UKQCD Collaborations with N f = 2+1 flavors. Three ensembles with different light sea quark masses are used at one lattice spacing 1/a = 1.75(4) GeV. We obtain in the SU(2) chiral limit. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11575197, 11575196, 11335001, 11405178), joint funds of NSFC (U1632104, U1232109), YC and ZL acknowledge the support of NSFC and DFG (CRC110)

  17. Diquark condensation and the quark-quark interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloch, J. C. R.; Roberts, C. D.; Schmidt, S. M.

    1999-01-01

    We employ a bispinor gap equation to study superfluidity at nonzero chemical potential, μ≠0, in two- and three-color QCD, exploring the gap's sensitivity to the nature of the quark-quark interaction. The two-color theory, QC 2 D, is an excellent exemplar; the order of truncation of the quark-quark scattering kernel K has no qualitative impact, which allows a straightforward elucidation of the effects of μ when the coupling is strong. In the three-color theory the rainbow-ladder truncation admits diquark bound states, a defect that is eliminated by an improvement of K. The corrected gap equation describes a superfluid phase that is semiquantitatively similar to that obtained using the rainbow truncation. A model study suggests that the width of the superfluid gap and the transition point in QC 2 D provide reliable quantitative estimates of those quantities in QCD. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society

  18. Quark-anti-quark potential in N=4 SYM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, Nikolay [Mathematics Department, King’s College London,The Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); St. Petersburg INP,Gatchina, 188 300, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation); Levkovich-Maslyuk, Fedor [Mathematics Department, King’s College London,The Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-12-22

    We construct a closed system of equations describing the quark-anti-quark potential at any coupling in planar N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. It is based on the Quantum Spectral Curve method supplemented with a novel type of asymptotics. We present a high precision numerical solution reproducing the classical and one-loop string predictions very accurately. We also analytically compute the first 7 nontrivial orders of the weak coupling expansion. Moreover, we study analytically the generalized quark-anti-quark potential in the limit of large imaginary twist to all orders in perturbation theory. We demonstrate how the QSC reduces in this case to a one-dimensional Schrodinger equation. In the process we establish a link between the Q-functions and the solution of the Bethe-Salpeter equation.

  19. Quark virtuality and QCD vacuum condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Lijuan; Ma Weixing

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Dyson-Schwinger equations (DSEs) in the 'rainbow' approximation, the authors investigate the quark virtuality in the vacuum state and quantum-chromodynamics (QCD) vacuum condensates. In particular, authors calculate the local quark vacuum condensate and quark-gluon mixed condensates, and then the virtuality of quark. The calculated quark virtualities are λ u,d 2 =0.7 GeV 2 for u, d quarks, and λ s 2 =1.6 GeV 2 for s quark. The theoretical predictions are consistent with empirical values used in QCD sum rules, and also fit to lattice QCD predictions

  20. Ticks imported to Europe with exotic reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalca, Andrei Daniel

    2015-09-30

    It is known that traded exotic animals carry with them an immense number of associated symbionts, including parasites. Reptiles are no exception. Most of the imported reptiles originate from tropical countries and their possibility to carry potentially dangerous pathogens is high. According to CITES, Europe is currently the main reptile importer in the world. Despite this, there is no review or analysis available for the risk related to the importation of tick-borne diseases with traded reptile to the EU. The main aim of the manuscript is to provide a review on the available literature on ticks introduced to and exchanged between European countries via the live reptile trade. So far, the published reports of ticks imported on reptiles are limited to few European countries: Italy, Poland, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Slovenia and UK. The following species have been reported: Hyalomma aegyptium, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma exornatum, Amblyomma flavomaculatum, Amblyomma fuscolineatum, Amblyomma latum, Amblyomma quadricavum, Amblyomma marmoreum, Amblyomma nuttalli, Amblyomma sparsum, Amblyomma sphenodonti, Amblyomma transversale and Amblyomma varanense. The majority of species are of African origin, followed by American and Asian species. All groups of reptiles (chelonians, snakes, lizards, crocodiles, tuataras) were involved. However, it seems that certain groups (i.e. tortoises of genus Testudo, monitor lizards of genus Varanus, snakes of genus Python) are more important as host for imported ticks, but this may be related to higher levels of international trade. Even fewer are the reports of tick-borne pathogens associated with imported reptile ticks. Despite the diversity of tick species reported on imported reptiles, the situations of truly invasive species are atypical and are limited in natural environments to maximum two cases where H. aegyptium was involved. Otherwise, the risk associated with reptile trade for introduction of invasive tick to Europe is low

  1. Effects of dynamical quarks in UKQCD simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allton, Chris

    2002-01-01

    Recent results from the UKQCD Collaboration's dynamical simulations are presented. The main feature of these ensembles is that they have a fixed lattice spacing and volume, but varying sea quark mass from infinite (corresponding to the quenched simulation) down to roughly that of the strange quark mass. The main aim of this work is to uncover dynamical quark effects from these 'matched' ensembles. We obtain some evidence of dynamical quark effects in the static quark potential with less effects in the hadronic spectrum

  2. Heavy quarks and CP: Moriond 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1985-03-01

    The presentations at the Fifth Moriond Workshop on Heavy Quarks, Flavor Mixing, and CP Violation (La Plagne, France, January 13-19, 1985) are summarized. The following topics are reviewed. What's New (beyond the top, top quarks, bottom quarks, charm quarks, strange quarks, and others); why is all this being done (strong interactions and hadron structure, and electroweak properties); and what next (facilities and can one see CP violation in the B-anti B system). 64 refs., 10 figs

  3. Quarks, leptons and the big bang

    CERN Document Server

    Allday, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Quarks, Leptons and The Big Bang, Third Edition, is a clear, readable and self-contained introduction to particle physics and related areas of cosmology. It bridges the gap between non-technical popular accounts and textbooks for advanced students. The book concentrates on presenting the subject from the modern perspective of quarks, leptons and the forces between them. This book will be of interest to students, teachers and general science readers interested in fundamental ideas of modern physics. This edition brings the book completely up to date by including advances in particle physics and cosmology, such as the discovery of the Higgs boson, the LIGO gravitational wave discovery and the WMAP and PLANCK results.

  4. Phenomenology of 2HDM with vectorlike quarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arhrib, A.; Benbrik, R.; King, S. J. D.; Manaut, B.; Moretti, S.; Un, C. S.

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we examine the consistency of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) data collected during Runs 1 and 2 by the ATLAS and CMS experiments with the predictions of a 2-Higgs doublet model embedding vectorlike quarks (VLQs) for p p →H , A production and H , A →γ γ decay mechanisms, respectively, of (nearly) degenerate C P -even (H ) and C P -odd (A ) Higgs bosons. We show that a scenario containing one single VLQ with electromagnetic charge 2 /3 can explain the above ATLAS and CMS data for masses in the region 350 GeV ≤mVLQ≤1.5 TeV or so, depending on tan β , and for several values of the mixing angle between the top quark (t ) and its VLQ counterpart (T ). We then perform a global fit onto the model by including all relevant experimental as well as theoretical constraints. The surviving samples of our analysis are discussed within 2 σ of the LHC measurements. Additionally, we also comment on the recent anomalous result reported by CMS using Run 2 data on the associated Standard Model Higgs boson production with top quark pairs p p →t t ¯ h with an observed significance of 3.3 σ . Other than these specific examples, we also present a phenomenological analysis of the main features of the model, including the most promising T decay channels.

  5. Quark effects in nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholten, O.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude of the quark effect for low-energy nuclear physics is investigated. Coulomb energy is studied in the A=3 system in order to determine the effect of the composite structure of the nucleon. In the actual calculations a non-relativistic quark-cluster model description has been used. A nucleon size b=0.617 fm, the width of the relative wave function Φ of the quarks in the nucleon, has been assumed. It is concluded that the contribution to Coulomb energies due to quark effects are significant compared to the observed Nolen-Schiffer anomaly. However these do not provide the long searched for 'smoking gun'. When the free parameters that appear in the calculation are adjusted to reproduce the same charge form factor, the calculated anomalies are not significantly different. 2 figs., 2 tabs., 8 refs.2

  6. Quark potential of spontaneous strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    German, G.; Kleinert, H.

    1989-01-01

    The authors present some recent developments in string models with an extrinsic curvature term in action. Particular emphasis is placed upon the static quark potential and on the thermal deconfinement properties of spontaneous strings

  7. Top quark properties at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Dilip, Jana

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS potential for the study of the top quark properties and physics beyond the Standard Model in the top quark sector, is described. The measurements of the top quark charge, the spin and spin correlations, the Standard Model decay (t-> bW), rare top quark decays associated to flavour changing neutral currents (t-> qX with X = gluon, Z, photon) and ttbar resonances are discussed. The sensitivity of the ATLAS experiment is estimated for an expected luminosity of 1fb-1 at the LHC. The full simulation of the ATLAS detector is used. For the Standard Model measurements the expected precision is presented. For the tests of physics beyond the Standard Model, the 5 sigma discovery potential (in the presence of a signal) and the 95% Confidence Level (CL) limit (in the absence of a signal) are given.

  8. Lab cooks up quark soup

    CERN Multimedia

    Dumé, Belle

    2003-01-01

    "Physicists working at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the US say that they have come closer than ever before to creating a quark-gluon plasma" (0.5 page)

  9. Colour screening and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1978-03-01

    It is proposed that in Quantum Chromodynamics the colour charge of gluons and of anything with zero triality is screened by a dynamical Higgs mechanism with Higgs scalars made out of gluons. The center Z 3 of the gauge group SU(3) is left unbroken in this way, and single quarks, which have nonzero triality, cannot be screened. Long range forces between them persist therefore. Given that the Higgs mechanism produces a mass gap, the most favorable configuration of field lines between e.g. quark and antiquark will be in strings analogous to magnetic field lines in a superconductor. The strings confine the quarks. The screening mechanism, on the other hand, produces not only the mass gap (which leads to string formation) but is also responsible for saturation of forces, i.e. absence of bound states of six quarks etc. (orig.) [de

  10. Colour screening and quark confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, G.

    1978-01-01

    It is proposed that in quantum chromodynamics the colour charge of gluons and of anything with zero triality is screened by a dynamic Higgs mechanism with Higgs scalars made out of gluons, but the center Z 3 of the gauge group SU(3) is left unbroken, and single quarks, which have nonzero triality, are not screened. Long range forces between them persist therefore. Given that the Higgs mechanism produces a mass gap, the most favourable configuration of field lines between e.g., quark and antiquark will be in strings analogous to magnetic field lines in a superconductor. The string confine the quarks. The screening mechanism, on the other hand, produces not only the mass gap (which leads to string formation) but is also responsible for saturation of forces, i.e. absence of bound states of six quarks, etc. (Auth.)

  11. Greater soil carbon accumulation in deeper soils in native- than in exotic-dominated grassland plantings in the southern Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilsey, B. J.; Xu, X.; Polley, H. W.; Hofmockel, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    Global change includes invasion by non-native plant species, and invasion may affect carbon cycling and storage. We tested predictions in central Texas in an experiment that compares mixtures of all exotic or all native species under two summer irrigation treatments (128 or 0 mm) that varies the amount of summer drought stress. At the end of the eighth growing season after establishment, soils were sampled in 10 cm increments to 100 cm depth to determine if soil C differed among treatments, and if treatments differentially affected soil C in deeper soils. Soil C content was significantly (5%) higher under native plantings than under exotic species plantings (P plantings increased with depth, and native plantings had higher soil C in deeper soil layers than in surface layers (native-exotic x depth, P plantings had decreasing soil C with depth. Soil C:N ratio and δ13C/12C were also significantly affected by native-exotic status, with soils in exotic plots having a significantly greater C4 contribution than native soils. Soil C was unaffected by summer irrigation treatments. Our results suggest that a significant amount of carbon could be sequestered by replacing exotic plant species with native species in the southern Plains, and that more work should be conducted at deeper soil depths. If we had restricted our analyses to surface soil layers (e.g. top 30 cm), we would have failed to detect depth differences between natives and exotics.

  12. Quark nuclear physics at JHF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toki, H.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the research fields to be studied by the Japan Hadron Facility being planned in the site of JAERI as a joint project with Neutron Science Project. We would expect to reveal the most microscopic structure of matter using the intensity frontier proton machine. In particular, we would like to develop Quark Nuclear Physics to describe hadrons and nuclei in terms of quarks and gluons. (author)

  13. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation

  14. Quark effects in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, A.

    1987-01-01

    Some experimental data in nuclear structure physics cannot be explained on the assumption that nuclei consist of inert protons and neutrons. The quark model attributes a definite internal structure to nucleons and implies that their properties should change when embedded in a nucleus. This article reviews some of the experimental evidence for these effects and discusses some new aspects of nuclear structure predicted by the quark model

  15. Sextet quarks and light pseudoscalars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, T.E.; Leung, C.N.; Love, S.T.; Rosner, J.L.; Chicago Univ., IL

    1986-01-01

    Light pseudoscalar bosons are a very general consequence of the existence of higher-color representations (such as sextets) of quarks. It is shown that if the condensate vertical stroke vertical stroke=F 3 defines a scale F>>Λ QCD , as has been expected on the basis of perturbative and lattice calculations, then present limits on axions exclude a wide range of values of F. Such limits therefore serve as complements to direct accelerator searches for higher-color quarks. (orig.)

  16. On one pion exchange potential with quark exchange in the resonating group method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braeuer, K.; Faessler, A.; Fernandez, F.; Shimizu, K.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of quark exchange between different nucleons on the one pion exchange potential is studied in the framework of the resonating group method. The calculated phase shifts including the one pion exchange potential with quark exchange in addition to the one gluon plus sigma meson exchange are shown to be consistent with experiments. Especially the p-wave phase shifts are improved by taking into account the quark exchange on the one pion exchange potential. (orig.)

  17. Top quark production at the LHC (single top and tt-bar cross sections)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, J.

    2014-01-01

    With the large number of top quarks produced at the LHC, top quark physics enters an era of precision and properties measurements. This article reviews the recent advances in top quark cross section measurements performed by ATLAS and CMS using data recorded in 2011 with integrated luminosities up to 5 fb -1 . They include precision inclusive cross sections, the establishment of challenging channels, first differential cross section measurements and single top production. An overall good agreement with Standard Model predictions is observed

  18. A quark-antiquark potential from a superconducting model of confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.W. Alcock

    1983-10-01

    Full Text Available The Landau-Ginzburg phenomenological theory of superconductivity is used as a model of flux confinement. A monopole pair of sources is included to simulate a quark-antiquark system. The interaction energy is found in the static approximation appropriate for heavy quark systems, and equated with the interquark potential. This potential is compared with other suggested phenomenological potentials and succeeds in reproducing heavy quark spectra.

  19. Lattice analysis of SU(2) chromodynamics with light quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laermann, E.

    1986-01-01

    I report on the Monte-Carlo simulation of a SU(2) lattice gauge theory which includes dynamical Kogut-Susskind quarks. On a 16*8 3 lattice the masses of ρ and π mesons are studied, the condensate measuring the chiral symmetry breaking determined, and the potential between static quarks measured. Extrapolations to vanishing quark mass yield a finite ρ mass but a value for the π mass which is compatible with zero, as well as a result different from zero for the quark condensate in accordance with the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry of massless non-Abelian gauge theories. The shape of the q-anti q potential equals the pure gauge potential for small to intermediate distances. However at large distances (σ(fm)) deviations from the linear increase are indicated as they are expected due to the breakup of the flux tube between heavy quarks because of spontaneous quark-pair production. For all numerical calculations it is common that they favor a value for the scale parameter Λsub(anti Manti S)(N F =4) of quantum chromodynamics which is smaller than in the pure gauge field theory. (orig.) [de

  20. Same-sign dilepton excesses and vector-like quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chuan-Ren [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University,Ting-Chou Road, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Hsin-Chia [Department of Physics, University of California,One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Low, Ian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University,Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory,S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Multiple analyses from ATLAS and CMS collaborations, including searches for ttH production, supersymmetric particles and vector-like quarks, observed excesses in the same-sign dilepton channel containing b-jets and missing transverse energy in the LHC Run 1 data. In the context of little Higgs theories with T parity, we explain these excesses using vector-like T-odd quarks decaying into a top quark, a W boson and the lightest T-odd particle (LTP). For heavy vector-like quarks, decay topologies containing the LTP have not been searched for at the LHC. The bounds on the masses of the T-odd quarks can be estimated in a simplified model approach by adapting the search limits for top/bottom squarks in supersymmetry. Assuming a realistic decay branching fraction, a benchmark with a 750 GeV T-odd b{sup ′} quark is proposed. We also comment on the possibility to fit excesses in different analyses in a common framework.

  1. Production of the exotic 1{sup --} hadrons {phi}(2170), X(4260) and Y{sub b}(10890) at the LHC and Tevatron via the Drell-Yan mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Ahmed; Wang, Wei

    2011-03-15

    We calculate the Drell-Yan production cross sections and differential distributions in the transverse momentum and rapidity of the J{sup PC}=1{sup --} exotic hadrons {phi}(2170), X(4260) and Y{sub b}(10890) at the hadron colliders LHC and the Tevatron. These hadrons are tetraquark (four-quark) candidates, with a hidden s anti s, c anti c and b anti b quark pair, respectively. In deriving the distributions and cross sections, we include the order {alpha}{sub s} QCD corrections, resum the large logarithms in the small transverse momentum region in the impact-parameter formalism, and use the state of the art parton distribution functions. Taking into account the data on the production and decays of these vector hadrons from the e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments, we present the production rates for the processes pp(anti p){yields} {phi}(2170)({yields} {phi}(1020){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})+.., pp(anti p){yields} X(4260)({yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})+.., and pp(anti p){yields} Y{sub b}(10890)({yields} ({upsilon}(1S), {upsilon}(2S), {upsilon}(3S)){pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})+.. Their measurements at the hadron colliders will provide new experimental avenues to explore the underlying dynamics of these hadrons. (orig.)

  2. Highlights on searches for supersymmetry and exotic models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerbaux, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we present highlight results of the first three years of the LHC running on searches for new physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM). The excellent performance of the LHC machine and detectors has provided a large, high-quality dataset, mainly proton-proton interactions at a centre of mass energy of 7 TeV (collected in 2010 and 2011) and 8 TeV (collected in 2012). This allowed the experiments to test the Standard Model (SM) at the highest available energy and to search for new phenomena in a considerably enlarged phase space compared to previous colliders. The present review is organised as follows. Section 2 gives motivations to search for new physics beyond the SM, and a brief description of the main classes of BSM theory candidates is reported in Section 3. Section 4 summarises the characteristics of the 3-year LHC dataset, called in the following the Run 1 dataset. Precise tests of the SM are reported in Section 5. The following next sections are the core of the review and present a selection of results from the ATLAS and CMS experiments on BSM searches, gathered in four parts: the search for new physics in the scalar sector in Section 6, the search for supersymmetric particles in Section 7, the search for dark matter candidates in Section 8, and a non-exhaustive list of other exotics BSM (heavy resonances, excited fermions, leptoquarks and vector-like quarks) searches in Section 9. Future plans of the LHC running are reported in Section 10

  3. Quark-diquark approximation of the three-quark structure of baryons in the quark confinement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.; Ivanov, M.A.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.

    1990-01-01

    Octet (1 + /2) and decuplet (3 + /2) of baryons as relativistic three-quark states are investigated in the quark confinement model (QCM), the relativistic quark model, based on some assumptions about hadronization and quark confinement. The quark-diquark approximation of the three-quark structure of baryons is proposed. In the framework of this approach the description of the main low-energy characteristics of baryons as magnetic moments, electromagnetic radii and form factors, ratio of axial and vector constants in semileptonic baryon octet decays, strong form factors and decay widths is given. The obtained results are in agreement with experimental data. 31 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  4. The quark beam function at two loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaunt, Jonathan R.; Stahlhofen, Maximilian; Tackmann, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    In differential measurements at a hadron collider, collinear initial-state radiation is described by process-independent beam functions. They are the field-theoretic analog of initial-state parton showers. Depending on the measured observable they are differential in the virtuality and/or transverse momentum of the colliding partons in addition to their usual longitudinal momentum fractions. Perturbatively, the beam functions can be calculated by matching them onto standard quark and gluon parton distribution functions. We calculate the inclusive virtuality-dependent quark beam function at NNLO, which is relevant for any observables probing the virtuality of the incoming partons, including N-jettiness and beam thrust. For such observables, our results are an important ingredient in the resummation of large logarithms at N 3 LL order, and provide all contributions enhanced by collinear t-channel singularities at NNLO for quark-initiated processes in analytic form. We perform the calculation in both Feynman and axial gauge and use two different methods to evaluate the discontinuity in the two-loop Feynman diagrams, providing nontrivial checks of the calculation. As part of our results we reproduce the known two-loop QCD splitting functions and confirm at two loops that the virtuality-dependent beam and final-state jet functions have the same anomalous dimension.

  5. Photon radiation from quarks at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, J C

    1994-01-01

    Earlier measurements at LEP of isolated hard photons in hadronic zo decays attributed to radiation from primary quark pairs, have been extended in the ALEPH experiment to include their production inside hadron jets. Events are selected where all particles combine "democratically" to form 2 hadron jets, one of which contains a photon with a fractional energy z � 0. 7. After the statistical subtraction of events arising from non-prompt photons, the quark-to-photon fragmentation function, D(z), is extracted directly from the measured prompt production rate. Taking into account the perturbative contributions to D(z) obtained in an O(aa,) MS renormalisation scheme enables the unknown non-perturbative component of D(z) to be determined at high z. This measurement provides a better description of quark bremmstrahlung than hitherto employed in high energy hadron-hadron collisions. A updated analysis is also presented from OPAL of comparisons between 1-jet plus isolated photon rates and different QCD matrix element ...

  6. Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses

    CERN Document Server

    Blum, T.; Christ, N.H.; Frison, J.; Garron, N.; Hudspith, R.J.; Izubuchi, T.; Janowski, T.; Jung, C.; Jüttner, A.; Kelly, C.; Kenway, R.D.; Lehner, C.; Marinkovic, M.; Mawhinney, R.D.; McGlynn, G.; Murphy, D.J.; Ohta, S.; Portelli, A.; Sachrajda, C.T.; Soni, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\bar {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, $B_K$...

  7. Study of heavy quarks production with ALEPH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perret, P.

    1990-05-01

    The first data collected by the ALEPH detector at LEP have provided the matter of this study concerning the measure of the partial widths of the Z boson decay into heavy quarks from an analysis of inclusive leptons spectrum. After a presentation of the expected Z decay width into bantib, we explain the phase during which the b quark becomes observable as a beautiful hadron and discuss the present model validity describing this transition by a comparison with the data. Come afterwards the beautiful mesons semileptonic decays description. A more specific work, the possibility of testing the B mesons semileptonic decay model with the D * polarisation measure, is also presented. By fitting the momentum-transverse momentum spectrum of the electrons observed in the hadronic Z decays, we measure the partial widths. We extract Z → bantib, first in an ample dominated by leptons coming from b decays, and then Z → bantib and Z → cantic simultaneously by a global fit of the electron spectrum, including also a determination of the heavy quarks fragmentation parameters in the Peterson framework. We have measured the ratio of the b partial width and the total hadronic width (0.212 ± 0.024) and that of the c (0.182 ± 0.070) in good agreement with the Standard Model. Statistic and systematic errors have comparable values [fr

  8. Composite quarks and their magnetic moments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parthasarathy, R.

    1980-08-01

    A composite quark model based on the symmetry group SU(10)sub(flavour) x SU(10)sub(colour) with the assumption of mass non-degenerate sub-quarks is considered. Magnetic moments of quarks and sub-quarks are obtained from the observed nucleon magnetic moments. Using these quark and sub-quark magnetic moments, a satisfactory agreement for the radiative decays of vector mesons (rho,ω) is obtained. The ratio of the masses of the sub-quarks constituting the u,d,s quarks are found to be Msub(p)/Msub(n) = 0.3953 and Msub(p)/Msub(lambda) = 0.596, indicating a mass hierarchy Msub(p) < Msub(n) < Msub(lambda) for the sub-quarks. (author)

  9. Chiral dynamics of baryons in the perturbative chiral quark model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pumsa-ard, K.

    2006-07-01

    In this work we develop and apply variants of a perturbative chiral quark model (PCQM) to the study of baryonic properties dominantly in the low-energy region. In a first step we consider a noncovariant form of the PCQM, where confinement is modelled by a static, effective potential and chiral corrections are treated to second order, in line with similar chiral quark models. We apply the PCQM to the study of the electromagnetic form factors of the baryon octet. We focus in particular on the low-energy observables such as the magnetic moments, the charge and magnetic radii. In addition, the electromagnetic N-delta transition is also studied in the framework of the PCQM. In the chiral loop calculations we consider a quark propagator, which is restricted to the quark ground state, or in hadronic language to nucleon and delta intermediate states, for simplicity. We furthermore include the low-lying excited states to the quark propagator. In particular, the charge radius of the neutron and the transverse helicity amplitudes of the N-delta transition are considerably improved by this additional effect. In a next step we develop a manifestly Lorentz covariant version of the PCQM, where in addition higher order chiral corrections are included. The full chiral quark Lagrangian is motivated by and in analogy to the one of Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT). This Lagrangian contains a set of low energy constants (LECs), which are parameters encoding short distance effects and heavy degrees of freedom. We evaluate the chiral Lagrangian to order O(p{sup 4}) and to one loop to generate the dressing of the bare quark operators by pseudoscalar mesons. In addition we include the vector meson degrees of freedom in our study. Projection of the dressed quark operators on the baryonic level serves to calculate the relevant matrix elements. In a first application of this scheme, we resort to a parameterization of the valence quark form factors in the electromagnetic sector. Constraints

  10. Quarks and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harari, H.

    1977-01-01

    The physics of quarks and leptons within the framework of gauge theories for the weak and electromagnetic interactions is reviewed. The Weinberg-Salam SU(2)xU(1) theory is used as a ''reference point'' but models based on larger gauge groups, especially SU(2)sub(L)xSU(2)sub(R)xU(1), are discussed. We distinguish among three ''Generations'' of fundamental fermions: The first generation (e - , νsub(e), u, d), the second generation (μ - , νsub(μ), c, s) and the third generation (tau - , νsub(tau), t, b). For each generation are discussed the classification of all fermions, the charged and neutral weak currents, possible right-handed currents, parity and CP-violation, fermion masses and Cabibbo-like angles and related problems. Theoretical ideas as well as experimental evidence, emphasizing open theoretical problems and possible experimental tests are reviewed, as well as the possibility of unifying the weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions in a grand unification scheme. The problems and their possible solutions are presented, generation by generation, but a brief subject-index (following the table of contents) enbales the interested reader to follow any specific topic throughout the three generations. (author)

  11. Heavy quarks in proton

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)655637

    The measurement of prompt photon associated with a b jet in proton-proton interactions can provide us insight into the inner structure of proton. This is because precision of determination of parton distribution functions of b quark and gluon can be increased by such a measurement. The measurement of cross-section of prompt photon associated with a b jet (process $pp\\longrightarrow \\gamma + b + X$) at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector is presented. Full 8 TeV dataset collected by ATLAS during the year 2012 was used in this analysis. Corresponding integrated luminosity is 20.3 $fb^{-1}$. Fiducial differential cross-section as a function of photon transverse momentum at particle level was extracted from data and compared with the prediction of leading order event generator Pythia 8. Cross-section extracted from data is normalised independently on the Monte Carlo prediction. Values of data distribution lie above Monte Carlo values. The difference can be explained by presence of higher order effects not ...

  12. Probing new physics at the LHC: searches for heavy top-like quarks with the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Succurro, Antonella; Casado Lechuga, María Pilar

    Is our Standard Model (SM) of the fundamental particle interactions complete? Apparently, the answer is “no”. Many theories have been proposed to explain what is currently not understood, like the nature of Dark Matter, or the reason why the Higgs boson is so light. Now that the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is fully operational, it is possible for experiments like ATLAS to explore very high-energy regimes where new physics can be probed. The work presented in this dissertation consists of two analyses aimed at the discovery (or exclusion) of a signal from a new particle: a quark similar to the top quark (the heaviest particle of the Standard Model) but with a larger mass. This new “top-like” quark could be a simple replica of the SM top quark, just with higher mass, i.e. a chiral fourth-generation up-type quark, or it could have exotic features. The latter hypothesis is particularly interesting as many “beyond-Standard Model” theories predict new heavy so-called vector-like quarks. Both sea...

  13. Electroweak scale physics & exotic searches at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Lupton, Olli

    2018-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer covering the pseudorapidity range 2–5 that is principally designed for the study of b- and c-hadrons, but which is well-suited to a wide variety of electroweak scale measurements and exotic searches that are highly complementary to other experiments at the LHC and elsewhere. Several features of the detector that are crucial for the core flavour physics programme, such as excellent vertex and momentum resolution, and a powerful trigger system, contribute to excellent jet tagging performance and sensitivity to low mass exotic states. LHCb operates at a substantially lower instantaneous luminosity than the general purpose detectors at the LHC, ATLAS and CMS, which results in a clean, low pile-up environment in which to search for physics beyond the Standard Model (SM).

  14. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as “wormholes” and “warp drives”. However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg- Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions is investigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energy fluctuations, cosmological scalar (i. e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  15. Electron microscopy of some exotic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T.E.

    1998-01-01

    Just about every material has been looked at under the microscope, either out of pure inquisitiveness or the need to relate the microstructure to its properties. Some of these materials are mundane, like steels or glass or polyethylene; others are so-called advanced, such as intermetallics, silicon nitride or zirconia; yet others might be called exotic whether they be martian rocks, high temperature superconductors, fullerenes, diamonds, or the latest thin film device. Many exotic materials are important in Los Alamos, not only weapons materials such as actinides, tritium and explosives, but also civilian materials for energy applications. Here the author will report briefly on plutonium and uranium, on rhenium disilicide, and on Cu-Nb nanolayered composites

  16. Exotic Material as Interactions Between Scalar Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson G. A.

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Many theoretical papers refer to the need to create exotic materials with average negative energies for the formation of space propulsion anomalies such as "wormholes" and "warp drives". However, little hope is given for the existence of such material to resolve its creation for such use. From the standpoint that non-minimally coupled scalar fields to gravity appear to be the current direction mathematically. It is proposed that exotic material is really scalar field interactions. Within this paper the Ginzburg-Landau (GL scalar fields associated with superconductor junctions isinvestigated as a source for negative vacuum energy fluctuations, which could be used to study the interactions among energyfluctuations, cosmological scalar (i.e., Higgs fields, and gravity.

  17. Kulit ikan kakap tersamak: Exotic dan prospektif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliana Kasmudjiastuti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Kakap fish skins are waste products of fillet industry. Up to now they have been wasted, of course accumulatively will cause environmental pollution. They are classified as the type of non conventional leather and exotic ones for the reasons of having special, beautiful, unique, typical, and attractive grain. Kakap fish skin have relatively small dimentions, there fore the tanning process can be done by home industry because simple equipments are possible to be used to process the fish skins into leather. In addition, Kakap fish leather have physical property of good tensile strength that may be used as material for leather goods. Although small however the exotic leather of kakap fish skins are prospective to be developed as material to manufacture exclusive leather goods, especially for niche markets. They also can be used as an alternative to substitute conventional leather.

  18. Exotic nuclei: production, properties and specificity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Duppen, Piet

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we will put the production of energetic radioactive ion beams of exotic nuclei in perspective and describe the two complementary production processes that are used nowadays: Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) followed by post-acceleration, and In-Flight Separation (IFS). After a general description of the process we will focus on recent technical developments in the field. In the subsequent section we give some 'typical' examples of physics cases that are addressed with exotic beams. The examples are chosen not only because their physics importance but also to demonstrate the complementary aspects in the production process and the detection systems. This overview will not be complete and the reader is referred to literature for further information, nor is the lecture intended to give an overview of all the efforts that are taking place in the field by mentioning every project separately. (author)

  19. Exotic components of the deuteron wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobushkin, A.P.; Syamtonov, A.I.

    1996-01-01

    Problems of quark exchange effects in cross sections and polarization observables of d p elastic backward scattering and (d, p) deuteron breakup at high and intermediate energy are considered. Theoretical predictions for new polarization observables of the d p elastic backward scattering are given [ru

  20. Search for pair production of vector-like top quarks in events with one lepton, jets, and missing transverse momentum in √s = 13 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aaboud, M.; Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Chudoba, Jiří; Hejbal, Jiří; Hladík, Ondřej; Jakoubek, Tomáš; Kepka, Oldřich; Kroll, Jiří; Kupčo, Alexander; Kůs, Vlastimil; Lokajíček, Miloš; Lysák, Roman; Marčišovský, Michal; Mikeštíková, Marcela; Němeček, Stanislav; Penc, Ondřej; Šícho, Petr; Staroba, Pavel; Svatoš, Michal; Taševský, Marek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 2017, č. 8 (2017), s. 1-40, č. článku 052. ISSN 1029-8479 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : exotics * Hadron-Hadron scattering (experiments) * vector-like quarks Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 6.063, year: 2016

  1. 2d orbifolds with exotic supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florakis, Ioannis; García-Etxebarria, Iñaki; Lüst, Dieter; Regalado, Diego

    2018-02-01

    We analyse various two dimensional theories arising from compactification of type II and heterotic string theory on asymmetric orbifolds. We find extra supersymmetry generators arising from twisted sectors, giving rise to exotic supersymmetry algebras. Among others we discover new cases with a large number of supercharges, such as N=(20,8), N=(24,8), N=(32,0), N=(24,24) and N=(48,0).

  2. From heavy ions to exotic atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Indelicato, Paul; Trassinelli, Martino

    2005-01-01

    We review a number of experiments and theoretical calculations on heavy ions and exotic atoms, which aim at providing informations on fundamental interactions. Among those are propositions of experiments for parity violation measurements in heavy ions and high-precision mesurements of He-like transition energies in highly charged ions. We also describe recent experiments on pionic atoms, that make use of highly-charged ion transitions to obtain accurate measurements of strong interaction shif...

  3. Remarks on the exotic U-meson

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan Hongmo; Tsou Sheungtsun

    1991-12-01

    In expectation of imminent results from the new hyperon beam experiment at CERN concerning the exotic U-meson at 3.1 GeV, we propose a detailed program of experimental tests to check the suggestion that U is a qqq-barq-bar ''M-diquonium'' state. Apart from some very characteristic decay modes, the U is expected to occur together with several analogous states with various quantum numbers to which it is intimately related. (author)

  4. Exotic rotational correlations in quantum geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, Craig

    2017-05-01

    It is argued by extrapolation of general relativity and quantum mechanics that a classical inertial frame corresponds to a statistically defined observable that rotationally fluctuates due to Planck scale indeterminacy. Physical effects of exotic nonlocal rotational correlations on large scale field states are estimated. Their entanglement with the strong interaction vacuum is estimated to produce a universal, statistical centrifugal acceleration that resembles the observed cosmological constant.

  5. Production and identification of very exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pougheon, F.

    1986-01-01

    New very exotic nuclei have been produced by fragmentation of the projectile at intermediate energy at GANIL. They have been identified through time of flight and ΔE-E measurements after a magnetic separation with the 0 0 LISE spectrometer. New neutron rich isotopes have been identified up to Z = 26 and evidence for the stability of the new series Tz = -5/2 has been shown. These results improve the knowledge of the neutron and proton drip lines

  6. Several crucial problems in evaluating spectra of baryons with two heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong Shengping; Ding Yibing; Guo Xinheng; Shen Pengnian; Li Xueqian; Zhang Rui

    2000-01-01

    The spectra of baryons which include two heavy quarks and one light quark can be treated as a two-body system, where two heavy quarks constitute a bosonic diquark. The authors derive the effective potential between the light quark and the heavy diquark. In this work authors have discussed several serious problems: (1) the operator ordering, (2) the errors caused by the non-relativistic expansion, (3) spin-spin coupling and (4) the mixing between baryon states with scalar-diquark and vector-diquark

  7. Highlights of top quark measurements in hadronic final states at ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Serena

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of inclusive and differential top quark production cross sections in hadronic final states, including hadronic τ decays, in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented at center-of-mass energies of 7, 8 and 13 TeV. The inclusive cross section measurements reach high precision and are compared to other decay modes and the best available theoretical calculations. Differential measurements of the kinematic properties of top quark events are also discussed. These measurements use boosted top quarks, probing our understanding of top quark production in the TeV regime.

  8. Rare processes with top quarks: FCNCs, tt+X, tttt, t+X

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yichen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The latest ATLAS and CMS searches or measurements of rare processes with top quarks, including FCNCs, tt+X, tttt, and t+X, are presented. FCNC branching ratio limits are pushed to new low, with some of them even reaching the expected limits for some BSMs. Associated production of W/Z/photon with a pair of top quarks are established and their cross sections are measured. The evidence of associated production of Z boson with a top quark is found. While there is no evidence for the four top quark production yet.

  9. Exploring exotic states with twisted boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agadjanov, Dimitri

    2017-01-01

    he goal of this thesis is to develop methods to study the nature and properties of exotic hadrons from lattice simulations. The main focus lies in the application of twisted boundary conditions. The thesis consists of a general introduction and the collection of three papers, represented respectively in three chapters. The introduction of the thesis reviews the theoretical background, which is further used in the rest of the thesis. Further implementing partially twisted boundary conditions in the scalar sector of lattice QCD is studied. Then we develop a method to study the content of the exotic hadrons by determining the wave function renormalization constant from lattice simulations, exploiting the dependence of the spectrum on the twisted boundary conditions. The final chapter deals with a novel method to study the multi-channel scattering problem in a finite volume, which is relevant for exotic states. Its key idea is to extract the complex hadron-hadron optical potential, avoiding the difficulties, associated with the solution of the multi-channel Luescher equation.

  10. Exploring exotic states with twisted boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agadjanov, Dimitri

    2017-09-11

    he goal of this thesis is to develop methods to study the nature and properties of exotic hadrons from lattice simulations. The main focus lies in the application of twisted boundary conditions. The thesis consists of a general introduction and the collection of three papers, represented respectively in three chapters. The introduction of the thesis reviews the theoretical background, which is further used in the rest of the thesis. Further implementing partially twisted boundary conditions in the scalar sector of lattice QCD is studied. Then we develop a method to study the content of the exotic hadrons by determining the wave function renormalization constant from lattice simulations, exploiting the dependence of the spectrum on the twisted boundary conditions. The final chapter deals with a novel method to study the multi-channel scattering problem in a finite volume, which is relevant for exotic states. Its key idea is to extract the complex hadron-hadron optical potential, avoiding the difficulties, associated with the solution of the multi-channel Luescher equation.

  11. Use of exotic species in afforestation and facilitation for the establishment of biological invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Ricardo Fabricante

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to inventory the species used in landscaping the Campus of Agricultural Sciences of the Federal University of Paraíba, Areia, PB, Brazil and to rank them according to their origin and their invasive potential. Through walks throughout the study area (active search, we cataloged all the species used in local afforestation and classified them as native or exotic. Exotic plants were also classified as to their invasive potential. Altogether, we identified 76 species belonging to 67 genera and 25 families. Of these, only 26 species were native. The results of this study are worrisome because of the large number of exotic species used for planting at the study site (50 species, including known aggressive species: Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam., Azadirachta indica A. Juss. and Leucaena leucocephala (Lam. de Wit.

  12. Anisotropic harmonic oscillator, non-commutative Landau problem and exotic Newton-Hooke symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Pedro D.; Gomis, Joaquim; Kamimura, Kiyoshi; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the planar anisotropic harmonic oscillator with explicit rotational symmetry as a particle model with non-commutative coordinates. It includes the exotic Newton-Hooke particle and the non-commutative Landau problem as special, isotropic and maximally anisotropic, cases. The system is described by the same (2+1)-dimensional exotic Newton-Hooke symmetry as in the isotropic case, and develops three different phases depending on the values of the two central charges. The special cases of the exotic Newton-Hooke particle and non-commutative Landau problem are shown to be characterized by additional, so(3) or so(2,1) Lie symmetry, which reflects their peculiar spectral properties

  13. Inclusive production of large-p/sub T/ protons and quark-quark elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.K.

    1978-01-01

    A proton-formation process in combination with hard quark-quark scattering is capable of explaining the observed large-p/sub T/ single-proton inclusive production data. This model implies that the inclusive production of two large-p/sub T/ protons at opposite directions is dominated by large-angle elastic scattering of two up quarks, and becomes an ideal place to study elastic quark-quark scattering. This two-proton inclusive production process is also ideal for the study of the spin structure of quark-quark elastic scattering, so the assumptions of pure vector-type quark-quark interaction and of colored quarks can be checked empirically. The consistency of applying the quark-elastic-scattering idea to large-angle elastic proton-proton scattering and to the inclusive production of large-p/sub T/ protons is also demonstrated

  14. Heavy quark energy loss in nuclear medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Benr-Wei; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2003-01-01

    Multiple scattering, modified fragmentation functions and radiative energy loss of a heavy quark propagating in a nuclear medium are investigated in perturbative QCD. Because of the quark mass dependence of the gluon formation time, the medium size dependence of heavy quark energy loss is found to change from a linear to a quadratic form when the initial energy and momentum scale are increased relative to the quark mass. The radiative energy loss is also significantly suppressed relative to a light quark due to the suppression of collinear gluon emission by a heavy quark

  15. Strange Quark Matter Status and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandweiss, J.

    2004-01-01

    The existence of quark states with more than three quarks is allowed in QCD. The stability of such quark matter states has been studied with lattice QCD and phenomenological bag models, but is not well constrained by theory. The addition of strange quarks to the system allows the quarks to be in lower energy states despite the additional mass penalty. There is additional stability from reduced Coulomb repulsion. SQM is expected to have a low Z/A. Stable or metastable massive multiquark states contain u, d, and s quarks.

  16. Searches for new heavy quarks in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Nikiforou, Nikiforos; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A search for new heavy quarks focusing on recent vector-like quark searches with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider is presented. Two recent searches targeting the pair production of type vector-like quarks are described. The first search is sensitive to vector-like up-type quark (T ) decays to a t quark and either a Standard Model Higgs boson or a Z boson. The second search is primarily sensitive to T decays to W boson and a b quark. Additionally, the results can be interpreted for alternative VLQ decays.

  17. $Z_b(10650)$ and $Z_b(10610)$ states in a chiral quark model

    OpenAIRE

    Li, M. T.; Wang, W. L.; Dong, Y. B.; Zhang, Z. Y.

    2012-01-01

    We perform a systematic study of $B\\bar{B}^*$, $B^*\\bar{B}^*$, $D\\bar{D}^*$ and $D^*\\bar{D}^*$ systems by using effective interaction in our chiral quark model. Our results show that the interactions of $B\\bar{B}^*$, $B^*\\bar{B}^*$, $D\\bar{D}^*$ and $D^*\\bar{D}^*$ states are attractive, which consequently result in $B\\bar{B}^*$, $B^*\\bar{B}^*$, $D\\bar{D}^*$ and $D^*\\bar{D}^*$ bound states. The recent observed exotic-like hadrons of $Z_b(10610)$ and $Z_b(10650)$ are, therefore in our approach,...

  18. CARBONIFEROUS CORALS AND CHAETETIDS FROM EXOTIC LIMESTONE BLOCK OF THE CRIMEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VICTOR OGAR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A chaetetid sponge and coral fauna from a Carboniferous exotic limestone block in the Lower Jurassic Esciorda olistostrome on the Bodrak River (Crimean Mountains are described for the first time. The Bodrak exotic block is composed of massive limestone. It contains the chaetetid Chaetetes (Boswellia sp., the tabulate coral Multithecopora sp., and poorly preserved rugose corals, including Dibunophyllum? sp., Cordibia? sp. and gen. et sp. indet. Only the fasciculate colonies of the rugose coral Lytvophyllum askynensis (Kossovaya, 2009 are confidently identified. The studied association of fossils is similar to that of the Donets Basin and the Urals and confirms the Lower Bashkirian age of the Bodrak limestone block. 

  19. Nuclear matter from effective quark-quark interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldo, M; Fukukawa, K

    2014-12-12

    We study neutron matter and symmetric nuclear matter with the quark-meson model for the two-nucleon interaction. The Bethe-Bruckner-Goldstone many-body theory is used to describe the correlations up to the three hole-line approximation with no extra parameters. At variance with other nonrelativistic realistic interactions, the three hole-line contribution turns out to be non-negligible and to have a substantial saturation effect. The saturation point of nuclear matter, the compressibility, the symmetry energy, and its slope are within the phenomenological constraints. Since the interaction also reproduces fairly well the properties of the three-nucleon system, these results indicate that the explicit introduction of the quark degrees of freedom within the considered constituent quark model is expected to reduce the role of three-body forces.

  20. Kaon quark distribution functions in the chiral constituent quark model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira; Sawada, Takahiro; Kao, Chung Wen

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the valence u and s ¯ quark distribution functions of the K+ meson, vK (u )(x ,Q2) and vK (s ¯)(x ,Q2), in the framework of the chiral constituent quark model. We judiciously choose the bare distributions at the initial scale to generate the dressed distributions at the higher scale, considering the meson cloud effects and the QCD evolution, which agree with the phenomenologically satisfactory valence quark distribution of the pion and the experimental data of the ratio vK (u )(x ,Q2)/vπ (u )(x ,Q2) . We show how the meson cloud effects affect the bare distribution functions in detail. We find that a smaller S U (3 ) flavor symmetry breaking effect is observed, compared with results of the preceding studies based on other approaches.

  1. Electron scattering for exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suda, T.

    2013-01-01

    An electron scattering facility is under construction in RIKEN RI Beam Factory, Japan, which is dedicated to the structure studies of short-lived nuclei. This is the world's first and currently only facility of its type. The construction is nearly completed, and the first electron scattering experiment off short-lived nuclei will be carried out in the beginning of next year. The charge density distributions of short-lived nuclei will be precisely determined by elastic electron scattering for the first time. Physics pursued at this facility including future perspectives are explained

  2. Exotic atoms - a new scope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehl, T.

    1993-01-01

    Heavy ion cooler rings have been installed in a number of laboratories around the world. They allow for a new generation of experiments using the products of high energy heavy ion collisions, i.e. highly charged and possibly radioactive ions. The first series of investigations at the SIS-ESR facility at the GSI, reviewed here, includes the observation of beta decay into a bound state of a highly charged ion and precision spectroscopy of inner-shell levels by means of X-ray spectroscopy, laser spectroscopy and resonant di-electronic recombination. (orig.)

  3. Spin effects in high energy quark-quark scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goloskokov, S.V.; Selyugin, O.V.

    1993-01-01

    The spin amplitudes in high-energy quark-quark scattering at /t/>1 GeV 2 are analyzed. It is shown that the gluon contributions in the QCDα s 3 order lead to the spin-flip amplitude growing as s. This means the existence of the spin-flip part in pomeron exchange. The resulting T f is about few per cent of the spin-non-flip contribution. The factorization of the large-distance and high-energy effects in the spin-flip amplitude is obtained. 13 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  4. Top Quark Properties Measurements with the ATLAS Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quijada, J A Murillo

    2016-01-01

    Results on recent measurements of top quark properties with the ATLAS experiment at the European Laboratory, CERN, are shown. The measurements are performed using the full data set recorded during the LHC Run-I. The full data set consists of a collected integrated luminosities ∫Tdt of 4.6 fb -1 recorded at a proton-proton collision energy of √ s = 7 TeV and 20.3 fb -1 collected at 8 TeV. The mentioned top quark properties include: spin correlation, charge asymmetry, W-boson polarization, color flow, top mass and top width in events with a top and anti-top quark pair ( tt ). An introduction to the LHC and the ATLAS detector is included and latest main results from this experiment. The contents include the current world benchmark results for the different properties and plans for future measurements during the ongoing LHC Run-II. (paper)

  5. Heavy-heavy and heavy-light quarks interactions generated by QCD vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musakhanov Mirzayusuf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The QCD vacuum is populated by instantons that correspond to the tunneling processes in the vacuum. This mechanism creates the strong vacuum gluon fields. As result, the QCD vacuum instantons induce very strong interactions between light quarks, initially almost massless. Such a strong interactions bring a large dynamical mass M of the light quarks and bound them to produce almost massless pions in accordance with the spontaneous breaking of the chiral symmetry (SBCS. On the other hand, the QCD vacuum instantons also interact with heavy quarks and responsible for the generation of the heavy-heavy and heavy-light quarks interactions, with a traces of the SBCS. If we take the average instanton size ρ¯=0.33$\\bar \\rho = 0.33$ fm, and the average inter-instanton distance R¯=1$\\bar R = 1$ fm we obtain the dynamical light quark mass to be M = 365 MeV and the instanton media contribution to the heavy quark mass ΔM=70 MeV. These factors define the coupling between heavy-light and heavy-heavy quarks induced by the QCD vacuum instantons. We consider first the instanton effects on the heavy-heavy quarks potential, including its spin-dependent part. We also discuss those effects on the masses of the charmonia and their hyperfine mass splittings. At the second part we discuss the interaction between a heavy and light quarks generated by instantons and it’s effects.

  6. Quark exchange and nuclear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moniz, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper gives a qualitative understanding of hadronic phenomena in terms of quark degrees of freedom. The basic model which incorporates saturating confining interactions and the study of hadron-hadron scattering has been carried through in collaboration with F. Lenz, J.T. Londergan, R. Rosenfelder, M. Stingl and K. Yazaki. It is shown that minimal confining dynamics together with exchange symmetry indeed leads to a remarkable range of phenomena at both the nuclear and particle energy scales. Most observables are well described by an effective hadron theory, the quark momentum distribution being the major exception. These features emerge even in the simplest model, namely, U(1) color and hadrons composed of two quarks (anti qq or qq). The author concentrates here on this model. In the concluding section, he remarks on the SU(N) results, particularly on the extent to which the color-hidden dynamics are constrained by examining the systematics of nuclear and hadronic phenomena. (Auth.)

  7. Compositeness of quarks and leptons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    I review along grand lines the theoretical ideas associated with the notion that quarks and leptons are composite. I first discuss various constituent pictures which have been proposed to account for the quantum numbers of the observed quarks and leptons, a study I call the Quantum Numerology. I then discuss some new theoretical developments of the past two years which bear on the subject of composite fermions and which make plausible (or rule out) some of the major dynamical assumptions of these constituent models. Finally, I discuss the consequences of the compositeness of quarks and leptons by setting up a series of scenarios for this compositeness and exploring, for each scenario, its experimental implications. (orig./HSI)

  8. Measuring the sea quark polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makdisi, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Spin is a fundamental degree of freedom and measuring the spin structure functions of the nucleon should be a basic endeavor for hadron physics. Polarization experiments have been the domain of fixed target experiments. Over the years large transverse asymmetries have been observed where the prevailing QCD theories predicted little or no asymmetries, and conversely the latest deep inelastic scattering experiments of polarized leptons from polarized targets point to the possibility that little of the nucleon spin is carried by the valence quarks. The possibility of colliding high luminosity polarized proton beams in the Brookhaven Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) provides a great opportunity to extend these studies and systematically probe the spin dependent parton distributions specially to those reactions that are inaccessible to current experiments. This presentation focuses on the measurement of sea quark and possibly the strange quark polarization utilizing the approved RHIC detectors

  9. Heavy quark spectroscopy and decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The understanding of q anti q systems containing heavy, charmed, and bottom quarks has progressed rapidly in recent years, through steady improvements in experimental techniques for production and detection of their decays. These lectures are meant to be an experimentalist's review of the subject. In the first of two lectures, the existing data on the spectroscopy of the bound c anti c and b anti b systems will be discussed. Emphasis is placed on comparisons with the theoretical models. The second lecture covers the rapidly changing subject of the decays of heavy mesons (c anti q and b anti q), and their excited states. In combination, the spectroscopy and decays of heavy quarks are shown to provide interesting insights into both the strong and electroweak interactions of the heavy quarks. 103 refs., 39 figs

  10. Quark matter brings heavy ions to Oakland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Spencer; Nystrand, Joakim

    2004-01-01

    The Quark Matter 2004 conference, held in Oakland, California, in January, provided participants with evidence for the elusive quark-gluon plasma. Spencer Klein and Joakim Nystrand describe the highlights of the meeting

  11. Exotic atoms. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunselman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The experiments use a variety of hydrogen isotopic mixtures to form solid targets for muons to produce muonic hydrogen isotope atoms that escape into vacuum. The method relies on transfer of the muon from a proton to either a deuteron or a triton. The resulting muonic deuterium or muonic tritium will not immediately thermalize because of the very low elastic cross sections (RT effect), and are emitted from the surface of the layer. A second solid hydrogen isotopic target is produced downstream on which the muonic hydrogen atom can react. Measurements which detect decay electrons, muonic x-rays, and fusion products have been used to study the processes of energy dependence of transfer, production rates, and muon molecular formation. The processes include muon catalyzed fusion of muonic tritium with deuterium which is the most possible candidate for energy production fusion. Our interest is the nuclear physics reaction rates and to use the muonic hydrogen isotopes in vacuum for energy level measurements. The method uses time of flight and is reminiscent of double scattering experiments. Two other experiments are in the development stages. First to measure the energy dependence of the Ramsauer-Townsend cross section in tritium where it has not been measured. The measurements would be compared to deuterium and calculations. Second, kaonic atoms, hypernuclei, and kaon-nucleon scattering at DAPHNE

  12. Static super-replicating strategies for a class of exotic options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Deelstra, G.; Dhaene, J.; Vanmaele, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate static super-replicating strategies for European-type call options written on a weighted sum of asset prices. This class of exotic options includes Asian options and basket options among others. We assume that there exists a market where the plain vanilla options on the

  13. Quarks and mesons in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rho, M.

    1981-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics is believed to be candidate theory for the strong interactions and contains as its ingredients spinor quark fields and vector gluons, none of which can perhaps be ever liberated and detected in laboratories. A nucleus consists of nucleons bound by nuclear force which are however separately observable and which seem to preserve their identities even under extreme conditions. An intriguing question is: when compressed to high densities or heated to high temperature, at what point does a nuclear matter cease to be describable in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom, but become a plasma of quarks and gluons; and how does this transition occur. This is not an idle question. If quarks and gluons are never to be observed isolated, then it may be that at low energies (or at low densities) they are not the right variables to do physics with. Instead hadrons must be. On the other hand, asymptotic freedom - the unique property of non-abelian gauge theories to which QCD belongs that quark-gluon and gluon-gluon interactions get weaker at short distances - tells us that at some large matter density the matter must necessarily be in the form of quark gas interacting only weakly. This means that a change in degrees of freedom must take place. We would like to know where this occurs and how. In this talk, I would like to address to this question by discussing first the large success we have had in understanding the role that mesons play in finite nuclei and nuclear matter and then attempting to correlate nucleon and meson degrees of freedom to quark-gluon degrees of freedom. In my opinion we are now at a stage where we feel fairly confident in our understanding of nucleon-meson structure of nuclei and nuclear matter and any further progress in deeper understanding of nuclear dynamics - and strong interactions - must come from QCD or its effective version, bags or strings. (orig.)

  14. Quark degrees of freedom in compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marranghello, G.F.; Vasconcellos, C.A.Z. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica; Hadjimichef, D. [Pelotas Univ., RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Matematica. Dept. de Fisica

    2001-07-01

    Nuclear matter may show a phase transition at high densities, where quarks and gluons are set free, forming a so called quark-gluon plasma. At the same range of densities, neutron stars are formed. In this work we have grouped both ideas in the study of the quark-gluon plasma formation inside compact stars, here treated as pure neutron star, hybrid star and pure quark matter star. (author)

  15. Quark degrees of freedom in compact stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marranghello, G.F.; Vasconcellos, C.A.Z.; Hadjimichef, D.

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear matter may show a phase transition at high densities, where quarks and gluons are set free, forming a so called quark-gluon plasma. At the same range of densities, neutron stars are formed. In this work we have grouped both ideas in the study of the quark-gluon plasma formation inside compact stars, here treated as pure neutron star, hybrid star and pure quark matter star. (author)

  16. The weak conversion rate in quark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiselberg, H.

    1992-01-01

    The weak conversion rate of strange to down quarks, s + u ↔ u + d, is calculated analytically for degenerate u, d and s quark matter to leading orders in temperature and deviations from chemical equilibrium. The rate is applied to burning of neutron matter into quark matter, to evaporation from quark nuggets in the early universe, for estimating the lifetime of strangelets, and to pulsar glitches

  17. Top quark production at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnes, Erich W.; /Arizona U.

    2010-09-01

    The Fermilab Tevatron has, until recently, been the only accelerator with sufficient energy to produce top quarks. The CDF and D0 experiments have collected large samples of top quarks. We report on recent top quark production measurements of the single top and t{bar t} production cross sections, as well as studies of the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution and a search for highly boosted top quarks.

  18. Free-quark phases in dense stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keister, B D; Kisslinger, L S [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Physics

    1976-08-30

    The possibility is examined that superdense matter can undergo a transition to a phase of free quarks within models which assume that the quark confinement potential is screened at high densities. The results imply that a phase of pure quarks of this type is unlikely to be found in stable stellar systems although they do not preclude the possible existence of a transition region which contains quarks and neutrons in equilibrium at the center of neutron stars.

  19. Triplicity of hadrons, quarks and subquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terazawa, Hidezumi.

    1989-11-01

    Triplicity of hadrons, quarks and subquarks asserting that a certain physical quantity such as the weak current is taken equally well as either one of a composite operator of hadrons, that of quarks and that of subquarks is proposed. Among other things, the weak mixing angle, the quark mixing matrix and the mass sum rules for quarks and leptons are revisited, reinterpreted and discussed in detail in triplicity. (author)

  20. An alternative approach to heavy quark bags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baacke, J.; Kasperidus, G.

    1980-01-01

    We discuss a formulation of quark bags where the quark wave function depends only on the relative coordinate and the bag boundary is fixed with respect to the center of mass of the quark system. For technical reasons we have to restrict ourselves to a heavy quark-antiquark system in an s-wave with spherical boundary. A phenomenological application to quarkonium states encourages further investigation of the approach. (orig.)