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Sample records for included wound infection

  1. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hours There are different levels of wound infections: Superficial -- the infection is in the skin area only ... the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch). The information provided herein should ...

  2. Wound Infections PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-25

    This 30 second public service announcement is about how to avoid a wound infection after a disaster.  Created: 10/25/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/25/2017.

  3. Fungal Wound Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-28

    Dr. David Tribble, acting director of the infectious disease clinical research program at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, discusses fungal wound infections after combat trauma.  Created: 1/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/28/2016.

  4. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Aspergillus), Blasto- T he use of effective topical chemotherapeutic agents to myces (Candida), and Zygomycetes (Mucor, Rhizopus ).6 reduce...below the infected burn wound . If the infection was controlled by these measures and the patient’s condition permit- ted, the involved area was...species, 18%; Mucor species and Rhizopus species, acetate in the morning and silver sulfadiazine in the evening. Prophy- 9.1%; and Microspora species and

  5. Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    generalized. Clinically, the like- controlled Pseudomonas burn wound infection in most lihood of septicemia appears to increase as the area of patients (2,4...31 patients, dida, Coccidiodes, Phycomyces, and Rhizopus . In 69 of pneumonia was the primary septic process in 27 (20 of these 75 patients (92%), the...carried out as described above and appropriate systemic anti- to which the invading organisms were sensitive and fungal agents are employed to control

  6. Prophylactic Antibiotics and Wound Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Elbur, Abubaker Ibrahim; M.A., Yousif; El-Sayed, Ahmed S.A.; Abdel-Rahman, Manar E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Surgical site infections account for 14%-25% of all nosocomial infections. The main aims of this study were to audit the use of prophylactic antibiotic, to quantify the rate of post-operative wound infection, and to identify risk factors for its occurrence in general surgery.

  7. MODERN WOUND DRESSING FOR WOUND INFECTION: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Novida Rizani

    2012-01-01

    When the tissue of skin is break means a wound is happens. To seal it, many choices of wound healing are available. Moist wound dressing can be better optional than the conservative ones. A bioactive agent that being added at the dressing in fact can increase healing rate of wound, moreover can subjugate wound infection caused by the pathogens, and also capable to prevent it. In this review, there are summary of modern moist wound healing, the wound pathogens, and some of sturdy bioactive age...

  8. Current issues in burn wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, D; Stutman, H R

    1991-01-01

    As we have emphasized, the diagnosis of burn wound infections in the high-risk burned child can be difficult and depends on a very high degree of suspicion and daily clinical evaluation of the burn wound site by consistent observers. Appropriate precautions include meticulous hand-washing and the use of gloves when handling the wound site and prophylactic application of a topical antibacterial agent such as SSD cream. Wound therapy should include routine vigorous surgical débridement. Surveillance wound cultures should be done weekly to determine the emergency of colonization and aid in the selection of empiric antimicrobial regimens when these are appropriate. Wound biopsy for histological examination and quantitative culture is highly recommended in the severely ill child with an unclear etiology or site of infection. If, despite these measures, sepsis ensues, then systemic antibiotics must be started empirically as an adjuctive therapy to surgical débridement. Knowledge of the organisms colonizing a wound will prove useful in choosing an antibiotic regimen while awaiting definitive results of blood and wound biopsy cultures. Without this information, early burn sepsis therapy should focus on gram-positive organisms, while infection later in the course should raise suspicion of nosocomial pathogens such as P. aeruginosa, other enteric bacilli, and C. albicans. An initial regimen might include nafcillin plus ceftazidime or an aminoglycoside, with anaerobic coverage depending on considerations noted previously. Once the causative agent is identified, therapy must be modified accordingly. Amphotericin B and acyclovir use should be guided by positive cultures from the burn wound site along with systemic evidence of dissemination. Available studies do not yet make clear the role of empiric immunotherapy with intravenous gamma globulin in the burned child. Therefore, its use cannot be recommended at the present time, although the development of specific

  9. Automatic wound infection interpretation for postoperative wound image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jui-Tse; Ho, Te-Wei; Shih, Hsueh-Fu; Chang, Chun-Che; Lai, Feipei; Wu, Jin-Ming

    2017-02-01

    With the growing demand for more efficient wound care after surgery, there is a necessity to develop a machine learning based image analysis approach to reduce the burden for health care professionals. The aim of this study was to propose a novel approach to recognize wound infection on the postsurgical site. Firstly, we proposed an optimal clustering method based on unimodal-rosin threshold algorithm to extract the feature points from a potential wound area into clusters for regions of interest (ROI). Each ROI was regarded as a suture site of the wound area. The automatic infection interpretation based on the support vector machine is available to assist physicians doing decision-making in clinical practice. According to clinical physicians' judgment criteria and the international guidelines for wound infection interpretation, we defined infection detector modules as the following: (1) Swelling Detector, (2) Blood Region Detector, (3) Infected Detector, and (4) Tissue Necrosis Detector. To validate the capability of the proposed system, a retrospective study using the confirmation wound pictures that were used for diagnosis by surgical physicians as the gold standard was conducted to verify the classification models. Currently, through cross validation of 42 wound images, our classifiers achieved 95.23% accuracy, 93.33% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 100% positive predictive value. We believe this ability could help medical practitioners in decision making in clinical practice.

  10. Topical silver for preventing wound infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storm-Versloot, Marja N.; Vos, Cornelis G.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; Vermeulen, Hester

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Silver-containing treatments are popular and used in wound treatments to combat a broad spectrum of pathogens, but evidence of their effectiveness in preventing wound infection or promoting healing is lacking. OBJECTIVES: To establish the effects of silver-containing wound dressings and

  11. PREPARATIVE SKIN PREPARATION AND SURGICAL WOUND INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjanappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is an established fact now that the normal skin of healthy human beings harbours a rich bacterial fl ora. Normally considered non - pathogenic , these organisms way be a potential source of infection of the surgical wound. Approximately 20% of the resident flora is beyond the reach of surgical scrubs and antiseptics. The goal of surgical preparation of the skin with antiseptics is to remove transient and pathogenic microorganisms on the skin surface and to reduce the resident flora to a low level. Povidone iodine (I odophors and chlorhexidine are most often used antiseptics for pre - operative skin preparation. OBJECTIVES : To evaluate the efficacy of povidone iodine alone and in combination with antiseptic agent containing alcoholic chlorhexidine in preoperative skin p reparation by taking swab culture. (2 To compare the rate of postoperative wound infection in both the groups. METHODS: One hundred patients (fifty in each group undergoing clean elective surgery with no focus of infection on the body were included in th e study. The pre - operative skin preparation in each group is done with the respective antiseptic regimen. In both the groups after application of antiseptics , sterile saline swab culture was taken immediately from site of incision. In cases which showed gr owth of organisms , the bacteria isolated were identified by their morphological and cultural characteristics. Grams staining , coagulase test and antibiotic sensitivity test were done wherever necessary and difference in colonization rates was determined as a measure of efficacy of antiseptic regimen. RESULTS: The results of the study showed that when compared to povidone iodine alone , using a combination of povidone iodine and alcoholic solution of chlorhexidine , the colonization rates of the site of incisi on were reduced significantly. As for the rate of post - operative wound infection , it is also proven that wound infections are also

  12. Microbial profile of canine persistent wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Padhy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyse the microbial profile of canine persistent wound infections. Materials and Methods: The total wound samples (n=172 taken from both traumatic (140 and post-surgical (32 persistent wounds in canines were processed for routine microbial isolation and identification during a period of 15 months. Results: Staphylococcus intermedius was found to be the predominant isolate from all types of wounds under study. It was followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. coli, Pasteurella spp., Corynaebacterium spp. and Bacillus spp. From different traumatic wounds of dogs, S. intermedius (92/140=65.7% and from surgical wounds, P. aeruginosa (24/32=75% were found to be the predominant isolates recovered whereas the most commonly isolated bacterial genus in both traumatic and surgical wounds of dogs was Staphylococcus spp. Conclusion: Canine wounds are polymicrobial in nature. Hence proper microbial laboratory diagnosis and presence of multiple organisms in a wound are to be taken into consideration for effective treatment of persistent wound infections in dogs.

  13. Topical silver for treating infected wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, H.; van Hattem, J. M.; Storm-Versloot, M. N.; Ubbink, D. T.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical silver treatments and silver dressings are increasingly used for the local treatment of contaminated or infected wounds, however, there is a lack of clarity regarding the evidence for their effectiveness. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects on wound healing of topical silver and

  14. Prevention and management of cesarean wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzwater, Joseph L; Tita, Alan T N

    2014-12-01

    Cesarean wound infections represent a significant health and economic burden. Several modifiable risk factors have been identified for their development. Understanding these risks and techniques to manage cesarean wounds is essential for providers. In this article, these factors and prophylactic and therapeutic interventions are reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gina L; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H Anne

    2017-06-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which the current treatment options are inadequate. Recent Advances: Standard-of-care employs the use of fluorescein dye for the diagnosis of ocular defects and is followed by the use of antibiotics and/or steroids to treat the infection and reduce inflammation. Recent advances for treating corneal wounds include the development of amniotic membrane therapies, wound chambers, and drug-loaded hydrogels. In this review, we will discuss an innovative approach using AMPs with the dual effect of promoting corneal wound healing and clearing infections. Critical Issues: An important aspect of treating ocular injuries is that treatments need to be effective and administered expeditiously. This is especially important for injuries that occur during combat and in individuals who demonstrate delayed wound healing. To overcome gaps in current treatment modalities, bioactive peptides based on naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial proteins are being investigated as new therapeutics. Future Directions: The development of new therapeutics that can treat ocular infections and promote corneal wound healing, including the healing of persistent corneal epithelial defects, would be of great clinical benefit.

  16. Aerobic bacteriology of burn wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Otta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Burn wound infections are important cause of mortality, morbidity and prolonged hospitalization in burn patients as the causative agent is generally a multidrug resistant organism. The pattern of microbial flora infecting burn wound varies according to geographical pattern as well as with duration of hospital stay. Objective: The present study aims to identify the causative agents of burn wound infections in our hospital, to assess the change in pattern of flora in accordance to duration of wound as well as to determine the sensitivity pattern of isolates. Materials and Methods: Wound swabs from 52 patients admitted in Burn unit of IMS and SUM Hospital, Bhubaneswar were collected every 5th day during their hospital stays and were cultured. The results were interpreted according to the standard methods and antibiotic susceptibility pattern was noted. Results: The most common organism isolated was Staphylococcus aureus, that is, 20 (47.6% while Klebsiella spp. 12 (28.6% was the most common Gram-negative isolate. The commonest organism isolated in the 1st week of hospital stay was S. aureus (15.4%, but it was Acinetobacter spp. (22.2% in 2nd week and coagulase negative Staphylococcus in 3rd week of hospital stay S. aureus was mostly sensitive to levofloxacin (77.8% and netilmycin (98%. Conclusion: The pattern of bacterial flora changes according to duration of hospital stay. Effective strict isolation techniques and infection control are thus needed to decrease the occurrence of burn wound infection.

  17. Wounds with complicated shapes tend to develop infection during negative pressure wound therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fujioka, Masaki; Hayashida, Kenji; Senjyu, Chikako

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: While negative pressure wound therapy (NPWP) has been shown to be useful, we felt that patients with wounds of complicated shapes were likely to develop infection during performing NPWT. We conducted an investigation to determine the factors of wound shape responsible for the occurrence of infection. Materials and methods: A total of 55 patients with wounds were treated using NPWT in our unit in 2011. Eight whose wounds formed a pocket, 7 whose wounds were deep, and 40 whose wou...

  18. Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Steinstraesser

    Full Text Available Innate defense regulators (IDRs are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP. IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018.

  19. Therapy of spinal wound infections using vacuum-assisted wound closure: risk factors leading to resistance to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploumis, Avraam; Mehbod, Amir A; Dressel, Thomas D; Dykes, Daryll C; Transfeldt, Ensor E; Lonstein, John E

    2008-07-01

    This study retrospectively reviewed spine surgical procedures complicated by wound infection and managed by a protocol including the use of vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC). To define factors influencing the number of debridements needed before the final wound closure by applying VAC for patients with postoperative spinal wound infections. VAC has been suggested as a safe and probably effective method for the treatment of spinal wound infections. The risk factors for infection resistance and need for debridement revisions after VAC placement are unknown. Seventy-three consecutive patients with 79 wound infections after undergoing spine surgery were studied (6 of them had recurrence of infection). All patients were taken to the operating room for irrigation and debridement under general anesthesia followed by placement of the VAC with subsequent delayed closure of the wound. Linear regression and t test were used to identify if the following variables were risk factors for the resistance of infection to VAC treatment: timing of clinical appearance of infection, depth of infection (deep or superficial), presence of instrumentation, positive culture for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or more than 1 microorganism, age of the patient, and presence of other comorbidities. There were 34 males and 39 females with an average age of 58.4 years (21 to 82). Once the VAC was initiated, there was an average of 1.4 procedures until and including closure of the wound. The wound was closed an average of 7 days (range 5 to 14) after the placement of the initial VAC on the wound. The average follow-up was 14 months (range 12 to 28). All of the patients but 2 achieved a clean, closed wound without removal of instrumentation at a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Sixty patients had implants (instrumentation or allograft) within the site of wound infection. Thirteen patients had a decompression with exposed dura. Sixty-four infections (81%) presented with a draining

  20. Mouse Model of Burn Wound and Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2017-01-01

    The immunosuppression induced by thermal injury renders the burned victim susceptible to infection. A mouse model was developed to examine the immunosuppression, which was possible to induce even at a minor thermal insult of 6% total body surface area. After induction of the burn (48 hr......) a depression of leukocytes in the peripheral blood was found of the burned mice. This depression was due to a reduction in the polymorphonuclear cells. The burned mice were not able to clear a Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infection, since the infection spread to the blood as compared to mice only infected...... with P. aeruginosa subcutaneously. The burn model offers an opportunity to study infections under these conditions. The present model can also be used to examine new antibiotics and immune therapy. Our animal model resembling the clinical situation is useful in developing new treatments of burn wound...

  1. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Infected Wound following Posterior Spinal Instrumentation using Simple Self-assembled System: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CW Chang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative wound infection in an instrumented spine patient is often disastrous. Management includes implant removal leading to spine instability. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT applied to the spine surgical wound is one of the wound care technique with successful results. We report a case of a man who sustained Chance fracture of Lumbar 1 (L1 vertebra treated with long segment posterior instrumentation, who unfortunately developed Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL positive E. coli infection one month after the operation. After careful debridement of the wound, the implant became exposed. Three cycles of NPWT were applied and the wound healed with granulation tissue completely covering the implant, and thus negating the need to remove the implant. In conclusion, the NPWT is a good alternative in postoperative wound management especially in an instrumented spine patient.

  2. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Griffith, Gina L.; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H. Anne

    2017-01-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which th...

  3. Role of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Deep Sternal Wound Infection After Open Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin Aydın

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mediastinitis is a devastating complication in open heart surgery. The most common treatments after debridement are rewiring with antibiotic irrigation. Vacuum assisted closure therapy is a recently introduced technique that promotes the healing of difficult wounds, including post-sternotomy mediastinitis.Patients and Methods: Forty one patients with deep sternal wound infection were divided into two groups based on the treatment method used. Twenty two patients with post-cardio to my deep sternal wound infection were treated primarily by vacuum assisted closure method (group A and 19 patients with deep sternal wound infection who received closed mediastinal irrigation were treated with antibiotics (group B between January 2006 and January 2010.Results: The two groups were compared. Three patients died during treatment in group B. The median healing time was significantly shorter in group A (mean, 13.5 ± 3.2 days compared to 18 days (mean, 21.2 ± 16.4 days in group B (p< 0.001. Deep sternal wound infection showed no recurrences after the vacuum treatment, while 7 (24% patients in group B suffered recurrences. Hospital stay was significantly shorter in group A (median, 30.5 days; mean, 32.2 ± 11.3 days vs. median, 45 days; mean, 49.2 ± 19.3 days (p= 0.001.Conclusion: A significantly shorter healing time was confirmed with vacuum assisted closure. Hospital stay remained significantly shorter in group A (35 vs. 46 days.

  4. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of Aeromonas hydrophila wound infections in healthy hosts after water-associated injury is being reported more frequently. This paper reports our experience with 3 such cases and outlines the importance of recognising the association between a water-related injury and, this organism.

  5. Innate Defense Regulator Peptide 1018 in Wound Healing and Wound Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hirsch, Tobias; Schulte, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Innate defense regulators (IDRs) are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP). IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy....... Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR....... It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018....

  6. Fat Body Cells Are Motile and Actively Migrate to Wounds to Drive Repair and Prevent Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Anna; Wood, Will; Martin, Paul

    2018-02-26

    Adipocytes have many functions in various tissues beyond energy storage, including regulating metabolism, growth, and immunity. However, little is known about their role in wound healing. Here we use live imaging of fat body cells, the equivalent of vertebrate adipocytes in Drosophila, to investigate their potential behaviors and functions following skin wounding. We find that pupal fat body cells are not immotile, as previously presumed, but actively migrate to wounds using an unusual adhesion-independent, actomyosin-driven, peristaltic mode of motility. Once at the wound, fat body cells collaborate with hemocytes, Drosophila macrophages, to clear the wound of cell debris; they also tightly seal the epithelial wound gap and locally release antimicrobial peptides to fight wound infection. Thus, fat body cells are motile cells, enabling them to migrate to wounds to undertake several local functions needed to drive wound repair and prevent infections. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  8. Determinants of wound infections for breast procedures: assessment of the risk of wound infection posed by an invasive procedure for subsequent operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, M; Biswas, J; Gupta, S; Alam, N

    2009-12-01

    Wound infection remains a major source of postoperative morbidity leading to prolonged hospital stays and increased total cost, including indirect expenses related to the wound infection. We examined whether there is any higher risk of wound infection in patients undergo a reoperation after an initial operation or excision/incision biopsy. A retrospective review of medical charts of patients with breast operations between January 1990 and July 2008 was carried out. The overall incidence of wound infection was 18.2% (231/1267). The rate of wound infection was (32%) when reoperation was done after previous modified radical mastectomy, 18.9% and 16.8% when the previous operations were lumpectomy/segmenectomy with axillary dissection and simple mastectomy without axillary dissection, respectively and (10.8%) when reoperation was performed after previous biopsy. Reoperation involving axillary dissection was associated with significantly higher rates of wound infection (pprocedure affects the risk of wound infection in subsequent operation in patients with breast cancer. Significantly higher risks of wound infection are seen in those patients who had undergone axillary dissection or modified radical mastectomy.

  9. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy for infected perineal wounds after abdominoperineal resection. A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walma, M S; Burbach, J P M; Verheijen, P M; Pronk, A; van Grevenstein, W M U

    2016-02-01

    Perineal wound complications are a main problem after abdominoperineal resection (APR). There is little evidence concerning perineal wound management. This study describes and evaluates the role of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in wound management strategies of perineal wound infections after APR. Patients undergoing APR for malignant disease between January 2007 and January 2013 were identified retrospectively. Data regarding occurrence and management of perineal wound complications were collected. Perineal wound infections were classified into minor or major complications and time to wound healing was measured. Time to wound healing was compared between patients receiving routine care or with additional VAC therapy. Of 171 included patients, 76 (44.4%) had minor and 36 (21.1%) major perineal wound infections. Management of major infected perineal wounds consisted of drainage (n = 16), debridement (n = 4), drainage combined with debridement (n = 4), VAC therapy alone (n = 5), or VAC therapy combined with other treatments (n = 7). Median duration of perineal wound healing in major infected wounds was 141 days (range 17-739). Median time to wound healing was not different in patients treated with (172 days, range 23-368) or without VAC therapy (131 days, range 17-739). In this study, VAC therapy did not shorten time to wound healing. However, prospective studies are required to investigate the role of VAC therapy in management of infected perineal wounds after APR. Up to then, wound management will remain to be based on clinical perception and 'gut-feeling'. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of sternal wound infection with vacuum-assisted closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezfuli, Bobby; Li, Chin-Shang; Young, J Nilas; Wong, Michael S

    2013-02-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the efficacy of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) in the treatment of poststernotomy local wound infections, compared to historical treatment protocol. The negative pressure has been found to protect wounds against contamination, prevent wound fluid retention, increase blood flow, and increase rates of granulation tissue formation. For this study, a retrospective analysis compared patients receiving VAC as definitive treatment versus bridging to delayed flap closure. Sixteen patients developed sternal wound infections after cardiac surgeries at the authors' institution from 2006 to 2008. Data was gathered regarding patient comorbidities, treatment method, and outcome. Study objectives included assessment of risk factors that warranted secondary surgicalclosure and examination of long-term followup where VAC was thedefinitive treatment modality. Group A (n = 12) had VAC as the final treatment modality. Group B (n = 4) required myocutaneous flap closure. One patient in Group B passed away prior to flap surgery. Both groups had similar risk factors, except Group B had a higher risk of body mass index (BMI) > 35 that was near statistically significant (P = 0.085; odds ratio = 0.0, 95% CI = [0.0 - 1.21]). Group A required a shorter hospital stay on average. Long-term follow-up showed the majority of Group A had completely healed sternal wounds 2-3 years from initial cardiac surgery. Vacuum-assisted closure as definitive treatment modality is a successful, first line therapy for local superficial sternal wound infections. When deep infections occur, however, VAC as bridge-to-flap coverage is recommended over attempted secondary healing with VAC. .

  11. Betadine irrigation and post-craniotomy wound infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kunal S.; Goldenberg, Brandon; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Object The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of betadine irrigation in preventing postoperative wound infection in cranial neurosurgical procedures. Methods A total of 473 consecutive cranial neurosurgical procedures, including craniotomies and burr hole procedures were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had either antibiotic irrigation or dilute betadine plus antibiotic irrigation prior to skin closure. Infection was determined by purulence noted on reoperation and confirmed with bacterial growth culture. One and three month postoperative infection rates were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared tests. Results This study included 404 patients. Betadine was used in 117 (29.0%). At 1 month after surgery, there was no difference in the rate of wound infection between the two groups (1.7% each). However, at 90 days, the betadine group had a 2.6% infection rate compared with 3.8% in the antibiotic group, indicating a 33% decrease in infection rates with the addition of betadine (p=.527). The small sample size of the study produced a low power and high beta error. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, betadine decreased postoperative infection rates compared with antibiotic prophylaxis alone at 90 days but not 30 days. This was not statistically significant, but a larger sample size would lower the beta error and decrease confounding bias associated with group heterogeneity. The potential for betadine, a cheap, low toxicity antimicrobial, to decrease infection rates and reoperations for infection warrants a larger multicenter trial. PMID:24529229

  12. Acetic acid dressings: Finding the Holy Grail for infected wound management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil S Agrawal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Wounds have since long, contributed majorly to the health-care burden. Infected long-standing non-healing wounds place many demands on the treating surgeon and are devastating for the patients physically, nutritionally, vocationally, financially, psychologically and socially. Acetic acid has long been included among agents used in the treatment of infected wounds. In this study, we have evaluated the use of acetic acid for topical application in the treatment of infected wounds. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 patients with infected wounds were treated with topical application of 1% acetic acid as dressing material after appropriate cleaning. A specimen of wound swab was collected before first application and further on days 3, 7, 10 and 14. Daily dressings of wounds were done similarly. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of acetic acid against various organisms isolated was determined. Results: The patients treated ranged between 9 and 60 years, with the mean age 33 years. Nearly 70% of patients were male. Aetiologies of wounds: infective 35, diabetic 25, trauma 20, burns 10, venous ulcers 5 and infected graft donor site 5. Various microorganisms isolated include Pseudomonas aeruginosa (40%, Staphylococcus aureus (2%, Acinetobacter (12%, Escherichia Coli (5%, Proteus mirabilis (3%, Klebsiella (18%, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (10%, Streptococcus (2% and Enterococcus (1%, Citrobacter (1%. Few wounds (6% also isolated fungi. About 28%, 64% and 8% of patients isolated no growth on culture after 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. MIC of all isolated organisms was ≤0.5%. Conclusion: pH of the wound environment plays a pivotal role in wound healing. Acetic acid with concentration of 1% has shown to be efficacious against wide range of bacteria as well as fungi, simultaneously accelerating wound healing. Acetic acid is non-toxic, inexpensive, easily available and efficient topical agent for effective elimination of wound

  13. Acetic acid dressings: Finding the Holy Grail for infected wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Kapil S; Sarda, Anup Vidyadhar; Shrotriya, Raghav; Bachhav, Manoj; Puri, Vinita; Nataraj, Gita

    2017-01-01

    Wounds have since long, contributed majorly to the health-care burden. Infected long-standing non-healing wounds place many demands on the treating surgeon and are devastating for the patients physically, nutritionally, vocationally, financially, psychologically and socially. Acetic acid has long been included among agents used in the treatment of infected wounds. In this study, we have evaluated the use of acetic acid for topical application in the treatment of infected wounds. A total of 100 patients with infected wounds were treated with topical application of 1% acetic acid as dressing material after appropriate cleaning. A specimen of wound swab was collected before first application and further on days 3, 7, 10 and 14. Daily dressings of wounds were done similarly. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of acetic acid against various organisms isolated was determined. The patients treated ranged between 9 and 60 years, with the mean age 33 years. Nearly 70% of patients were male. Aetiologies of wounds: infective 35, diabetic 25, trauma 20, burns 10, venous ulcers 5 and infected graft donor site 5. Various microorganisms isolated include Pseudomonas aeruginosa (40%), Staphylococcus aureus (2%), Acinetobacter (12%), Escherichia Coli (5%), Proteus mirabilis (3%), Klebsiella (18%), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (10%), Streptococcus (2%) and Enterococcus (1%), Citrobacter (1%). Few wounds (6%) also isolated fungi. About 28%, 64% and 8% of patients isolated no growth on culture after 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. MIC of all isolated organisms was ≤0.5%. pH of the wound environment plays a pivotal role in wound healing. Acetic acid with concentration of 1% has shown to be efficacious against wide range of bacteria as well as fungi, simultaneously accelerating wound healing. Acetic acid is non-toxic, inexpensive, easily available and efficient topical agent for effective elimination of wound infections caused due to multi-drug resistant, large variety of

  14. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel de Alcântara; Neves Filho, Wilson Vasconcelos; Guimarães, Janice de Souza; Castro, Daniel de Araújo; Ferracini, Antonio Marcos

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in patients with infected wounds. This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years) with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC. ® (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States) applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound), length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm 2 ; p  wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  15. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Alcântara Jones

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in patients with infected wounds. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC.(r (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound, length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm2; p < 0.05. Only one patient did not show any improvement in the final appearance of the wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. CONCLUSION: NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  16. Study of Bacteriology of Post-Operative Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Abdulrauf Bagwan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: While many patients are admitted to hospital for treatment of infections, some acquire infection during their stay in the hospital. These infections are called as nosocomial infections. Surgical site infection or post operative wound infection is one of them. It is defined as infection of previously sterile tissue incised to gain exposure for operating deeper spaces operatively exposed or organs manipulated by a surgeon. It is one of the feared complications of surgery as it increases morbidity as well as cost of medical care. Aims and Objectives: Study was conducted to find out incidence of surgical site infection rate in surgical ward, evaluate various factors contributing to infection and to identify causative pathogens and their antibiogram patterns. Material and Methods: All clean and clean contaminated operative cases admitted in surgery ward in study period of 18 months were included. Preoperative, operative and postoperative management protocols of the cases were recorded in detail. Results: A total of 1082 operated cases were studied among which 59 infected cases were found. Surgical Site Infection (SSI rate was 5.45%. E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus were the commonest pathogen isolated from the infected wound. 50 % were Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA among them and 50% of rd Enterobacteriaceae group were resistant to 3 generation Cephalosporins. Conclusion: Surgical site infection rate of a hospital can be reduced easily by following proper pre-operative protocol for the patients. Those patients with surgical site infection can be treated effectively by following the antibiotic policy as provided by the Department of Microbiology.

  17. Innovations in Wound Infection Prevention and Management and Antimicrobial Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    guidelines – Rapid evacuation to surgical care (irrigation/debridement) – Limit antibiotic spectrum/duration around wound management – Emphasize basic...clinical wound management decisions.  Expected Outcomes: – Discovery & characterization of host immune response biomarkers associated with...infection to inform clinical wound - management decisions (e.g., optimal wound closure time) – Development of tools for: • early detection of multidrug

  18. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy—Patient experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Hassel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Poor perineal wound healing and infections after proctectomy surgery cause a significant proportion of physical and psychological morbidities, such as pain, leakage, and abscesses. In the long run, some of these symptoms will lead to extended periods of hospitalization. These kinds of postoperative complications are also associated with delays in possible chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care support from the nurse for these patients. Five women and five men (61–87 years, median age 71 years were included and interviewed. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out and the following main categories emerged: “Managing postoperative complications,” “Being independent,” “Feeling safe,” and “Accepting the situation.” A perineal wound infection after a proctectomy is devastating for the individual patient. The limitations and changes to the patients’ lives turn into new daily routines, which force them to find new ways to live and to accept the situation. For many of them, the infections remained for several months and, sometimes, for years. The ability to lead an independent life is drastically reduced, but through continuity in care it is possible to create a feeling of safety. Information, communication, and self-care support are all important and valuable factors for recovery. Specialized care containing an action plan is therefore needed in clinical practice to reduce the number of perineal wound infections postoperatively and should be initiated when the patient is discharged from the ward and continue until recovery.

  19. Profiling wound healing with wound effluent: Raman spectroscopic indicators of infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    The care of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. Many of the extremity wounds inflicted during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom are colonized or infected with multi-drug resistant organisms, particularly Acinetobacter baumannii. Biofilm formation and resistance to current treatments can significantly confound the wound healing process. Accurate strain identification and targeted drug administration for the treatment of wound bioburden has become a priority for combat casualty care. In this study, we use vibrational spectroscopy to examine wound exudates for bacterial load. Inherent chemical differences in different bacterial species and strains make possible the high specificity of vibrational spectroscopy.

  20. IMPORTANCE OF SOUTHAMPTON WOUND GRADING SYSTEM IN SURGICAL SITE INFECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Shaleen; Mahendra; Shahapurkar; Md. Javed; Ankur; Shiv; Eshan

    2014-01-01

    : Post-operative wound infection is defined as surgical site infection from 0-30 days after surgery, or infection to surgical site till one year in cases of implants like mesh, vascular grafts and prosthesis. This study was done to find out incidence of post-operative wound infection in surgical patients in rural setup. This study of post-operative wound infection was carried out from August 2008 to August 2010. The study is of 3275 patients who underwent surgery in the A.V.B....

  1. Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection following a tiger bite in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easow, J M; Tuladhar, Rashmi

    2007-09-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is a rare human pathogen. Reports of zoonotic infection developing after large feline bites are even rarer. We are documenting the first case of human wound infection with A. hydrophila following a tiger bite. The patient responded well following wound debridement, secondary suturing and combination antibiotic therapy.

  2. Infected wound healing and antimicrobial effects of Chenopodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chenopodium ambrosioides Linn. (Chenopdiaceae) and Mitracarpus scaber Zucc. (Rubiaceae) are herbal medicinal plants. They are commonly used in Togolese folk medicine to treat skin infections such as infected wounds, dermatoses, and scabies. The aim of this work was to evaluate the wound healing and ...

  3. Anti-infective and wound healing properties of Flabellaria paniculata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-infective and wound healing properties of Flabellaria paniculata. A Abo, JAO Olugbuyiro, SA Famakinde ... was recorded in Pseudomonas aeruginosa group on day 18. This drug is anti-infective as well as wound healing agent thus justifying the local uses of the plant for the treatment of skin diseases and sores.

  4. Vacuum-assisted closure versus closure without vacuum assistance for preventing surgical site infections and infections of chronic wounds: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansarli, Giannoula S; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Stratoulias, Constantinos; Peppas, George; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2014-08-01

    We sought to examine whether vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is associated with fewer surgical site infections (SSIs) or infections of chronic wounds than other management procedures for surgical wounds. The PubMed and Scopus databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the development of SSIs or infections of chronic wounds between patients treated with VAC for acute or chronic wounds and those whose wounds were treated without VAC were considered eligible for inclusion in the study. Eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria for the study. Four of the studies included chronic or diabetic lower extremity wounds and four included fractures. In three of four studies reporting on fractures, the wounds were not closed post-operatively, whereas in one study primary closure of the wound was performed. With regard to wounds left open after the stabilization of fractures, patients whose wounds were treated with VAC developed fewer SSIs than those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([367 patients (196 with VAC; 171 without VAC) relative risk [RR], 0.47; 95% CI 0.28-0.81]). On the contrary, no difference in the development of SSIs occurred among patients with chronic or diabetic lower-extremity wounds treated with VAC and those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([638 patients (320 with VAC; 318 without VAC) RR 1.67; 95% CI: 0.71-3.94]). The available evidence suggests that the development of infections in wounds treated with VAC depends on the type of wound being treated.

  5. Frequency of wound infection in non-perforated appendicitis with use of single dose perforative antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, K.; Latif, H.; Ahmad, S.

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are used both pre and post-operatively in acute appendicitis for preventing wound infection. It has been observed that the routine use of post-operative antibiotics is not necessary in cases of non-perforated appendicitis as only prophylactic antibiotics are sufficient to prevent wound infection. The aim of this study was to see the frequency of wound infection in non-perforated appendicitis with single dose preoperative antibiotics only. Method: This observational study was conducted at the Department of Surgery, Ayub Medical College, Abbottabad from May to November 2014. A total of 121 patients with non-perforated appendicitis were included in the study. Only single dose preoperative antibiotics were used. The patients were followed for wound infection till 8th post-operative day. Results: 121 patients, 56(46.28%) male and 65(53.72%) female were included in the study. The mean age of patients was 27.41 ± 7.12 years with an age range of 18 to 45 years. In the entire series, 7(5.78%) patients developed wound infection. The infection was minor which settled with conservative therapy. Prophylactic antibiotics were found efficacious in 114(94.21%) patients. There was no significant association between wound infection and age and gender. Conclusion: Single dose preoperative antibiotics were found effective in controlling post-operative wound infection without the need of extending the antibiotics to post-operative period in cases of non-perforated appendicitis. (author)

  6. Intelligent Wound Dressing for Therapeutic and Diagnostic Management of Wound Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Thet, Naing; Jenkins, Andrew; Bean, Jessica; Alves, Diana

    2016-01-01

    Wound infection is a global problem and approximately 13,000 patients with burns required treatment in hospitals in England and Wales every year. Diagnosis of burn infection is problematic and currently diagnosed by clinical observation and judgement. Standard microbiological culture to identify causative pathogens usually take several days. If pathogens present, this will causes tissue damage by further colonization, extensive infection and formation of difficult-to-treat wound biofilm in wo...

  7. Risk factors and microbiology of wound infections following cesarean delivery: Experience of a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Gülşah; Verit Atmaca, Fatma Ferda; Kaya, Abdurrahman; Ergin, Ahmet Hasan; Gökmen Karasu, Ayşe Filiz; Turfan, Mehtap

    2016-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of wound infection following cesarean delivery, risk factors, common bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity. The study population consisted of 5787 cesarean deliveries. All of the patients received 2 g doses of cephazolin perioperatively for antibiotic prophylaxis. Patients with wound infection who had two doses of 1 g cephazolin postoperatively and who were continued on oral preparations of 500 mg of cephuroxime twice daily for 5 days after hospital discharge were included in Group A. Patients with wound infection whose postoperative antibiotics and antibiotics after discharge were omitted were included in Group B. Patient related variables, gestational age, co-morbidities, cesarean section indications, neonatal intensive care requirements were assessed. Risk factors were evaluated according to the type of the procedure (elective or emergent) and administered antibiotic protocol. The incidence of wound infection following cesarean section was 0,37% in elective operations and 5,4% in emergency cases. On the other hand, wound infection rate was found to be 1,35% in antibiotic receiving group (Group A) and 1,12% in the group not receiving antibiotics (Group B). Increased rate of wound infections were remarkable in emergency cases and postoperative antibiotics did not have a major impact in reducing the rate of wound infection following cesarean section. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Mono- and associated microflora during wound infection in patients with burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men'shikov, D D; Godkov, M A; Chernen'kaia, T V; Kiselevskaia-Babinina, I V; Semenova, A V; Men'shikova, E D; Kurilin, B L

    2009-01-01

    To study etiologic role of microorganisms during wound infection and elucidation of their populations interaction in patientswith burns. 2137 patients with wound infection treated in burn center were studied. 3179 samples of wound exudates and 6501 strains of microorganisms were studied. Assessment of microorganism's etiologic role was carried out using results of calculation of various statistic indexes, including indexes of ecological similarities of microorganisms in the wound (indexes of contamination, prevalence or persistence, incidence). Ecological similarity of wounds' microflora was determined by calculation of the coefficient Kj. It was established that Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of mono- and mixed wound infections. It was determined that Kj value for common agents points to antagonism or associative interaction. During particular time periods of the study values of Kj significantly differed and depended from species. Specifically, for Pseudomonas aeruginosa the values of Kj were equal or exceeded 30% during several years. It was the first time when correlation between persistence and ecological similarity indexes was studied in agents of wound infections. In order to reveal factors influencing on microbial etiology of mixed wound infections it is reasonable to consider the nature of interspecies interactions of causative agents.

  9. Evaluation of Punica granatum Peel Against Diabetic Wound Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Foot infections are a common and serious problem in diabetic patients. Objectives: To investigate the antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants used by traditional healers for diabetic wounds and to examine in-vivo wound healing activity of active extracts. Materials and Methods: An experimental study in ...

  10. Post-operative wound infection in developing country - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi over a three-month period from April to June, 1985. The methods whereby wound sepsis data were obtained are presented. The results show an overall infection rate of 25.8% and that for clean wounds of 14.8%. These figures are relatively unfavourable and an attempt is made ...

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Post-operative Wound Infections in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of post-operative wound infections was studied over a period of five months in the University College Hospital, Ibadan between February to July, 2003. Two hundred Surgical wounds were collected and routinely processed by Gram staining and culture in the Microbiology Laboratory. Of the 200 samples ...

  12. Is a wound swab for microbiological analysis supportive in the clinical assessment of infection of a chronic wound?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondas, Armand A L M; Halfens, Ruud J G; Schols, Jos M G A; Thiesen, Kelly P T; Trienekens, Thera A M; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether bacteriological analysis of a wound swab is supportive in the clinical assessment of infection of a chronic wound. Patients attending an outpatient wound clinic who had endured a chronic wound for more than 3 weeks were clinically assessed for infection. In addition, standardized wound swabs were taken according to the Levine technique and the microbiological findings of the swabs compared with the clinical assessment of the wounds. There was no significant relationship between the clinical assessments of the chronic wounds and the qualitative or quantitative bacteriological results of the swabs. Microbiological analysis of wound swabs taken from chronic wounds to support clinical assessment of the wounds is waste of time and money. It may be preferable to assess chronic wounds clinically, however, validation studies of these signs and symptoms are needed.

  13. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  14. Bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds in Ogun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OSUTH) between August 1999 and July 2000 in the Orthopaedics, Obstetrics and Gynaecological units to identify the bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds as well as their antibiotic sensitivity profile. A total of 1670 patients were ...

  15. Wound healing and infection in surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    : The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved.......: The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved....

  16. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    Nurs. Times. 1985; 81:16-19. 5. Calvin M. Cutaneous wound repair. Wounds. 1998; 10(1): 12-32. 6. Brook I. Aerobic and anaerobic microbiology of necrotizing fasciitis in children. PediatrDermatol. 1996; 13:281-284. 7. Madsen SM, Westh H, Danielson L,. Rosadahi VT Bacterial colonization and healing of venous leg ulcers.

  17. Modeling Acinetobacter baumannii wound infections: The critical role of iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Irma D.; Krezalek, Monika A.; Belogortseva, Natalia; Zaborin, Alexander; Defazio, Jennifer; Chandrasekar, Laxmipradha; Actis, Luis A.; Zaborina, Olga; Alverdy, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as an increasingly important and successful opportunistic human pathogen due to its ability to withstand harsh environmental conditions, its characteristic virulence factors and quick adaptability to stress. Methods We developed a clinically relevant murine model of A. baumannii traumatic wound infection to determine the effect of local wound environment on A. baumannii virulence. Mice underwent rectus muscle crush injury combined with ischemia created by epigastric vessel ligation, followed by A. baumannii inoculation. Reiterative experiments were performed using 1) a mutant deficient in the production of the siderophore acinetobactin, or 2) iron supplementation of the wound milieu. Mice were euthanized 7 days later and rectus muscle analyzed for signs of clinical infection, HIF1α accumulation, bacterial abundance and colony morphotype. To determine the effect of wound milieu on bacterial virulence, the Galleria mellonella infection model was utilized. Results The combination of rectus muscle injury with ischemia and A. baumannii inoculation resulted in 100% incidence of clinical wound infection that was significantly higher compared to other groups (n=15/group, pbaumannii colonization (pbaumannii strains isolated from injured/ischemic muscle with clinical infection displayed a rough morphotype and a higher degree of virulence as judged by G. mellonella killing assay as compared to smooth morphotype colonies isolated from injured muscle without clinical infection (100% vs. 60%, n=30 Log-Rank test, p=0.0422). Iron supplementation prevented wound infection (n=30, pbaumannii wild type was replaced with its derivative mutant ΔBasD deficient in acinetobactin production. Conclusions The ability of A. baumannii to cause infections in traumatized wound relies on its ability to scavenge iron and can be prevented by iron supplementation to the wound milieu. PMID:28030490

  18. In Vivo Modeling of Biofilm-Infected Wounds: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-15

    with the bacterial biofilm (e.g., lung mucosa in association with cystic fibrosis ) [10,11,22,69e71]. In addition, infections in foreign materials such...predicament of cystic fibrosis patients. Trends Microbiol 2000;8:247. [72] Darouiche RO. Treatment of infections associated with surgical implants. N Engl...chronic wound diagnosis . However, similar to previously discussed models, there was no assessment of the wound healing impairment or host inflammatory

  19. Triclosan-coated sutures and sternal wound infections: a prospective randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steingrimsson, S; Thimour-Bergström, L; Roman-Emanuel, C; Scherstén, H; Friberg, Ö; Gudbjartsson, T; Jeppsson, A

    2015-12-01

    Surgical site infection is a common complication following cardiac surgery. Triclosan-coated sutures have been shown to reduce the rate of infections in various surgical wounds, including wounds after vein harvesting in coronary artery bypass grafting patients. Our purpose was to compare the rate of infections in sternotomy wounds closed with triclosan-coated or conventional sutures. A total of 357 patients that underwent coronary artery bypass grafting were included in a prospective randomized double-blind single-center study. The patients were randomized to closure of the sternal wound with either triclosan-coated sutures (Vicryl Plus and Monocryl Plus, Ethicon, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA) (n = 179) or identical sutures without triclosan (n = 178). Patients were followed up after 30 days (clinical visit) and 60 days (telephone interview). The primary endpoint was the prevalence of sternal wound infection according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. The demographics in both groups were comparable, including age, gender, body mass index, and rate of diabetes and smoking. Sternal wound infection was diagnosed in 43 patients; 23 (12.8%) sutured with triclosan-coated sutures compared to 20 (11.2%) sutured without triclosan (p = 0.640). Most infections were superficial (n = 36, 10.1%), while 7 (2.0%) were deep sternal wound infections. There were 16 positive cultures in the triclosan group and 17 in the non-coated suture group (p = 0.842). The most commonly identified main pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (45.4%) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (36.4%). Skin closure with triclosan-coated sutures did not reduce the rate of sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass grafting. (clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01212315).

  20. knowledge and practice of post-operative wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    honey

    2014-03-31

    Mar 31, 2014 ... Surgical site infections (SSI) previously referred to as wound infection is one of the most common causes of health care associated infection. It is also one of ... advanced age, malnutrition, metabolic diseases, smoking, obesity, hypoxia, immune-suppression, and length of pre- operative stay. Extrinsic factors ...

  1. Knowledge and Practice of Post-Operative Wound Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Excess work load and poor attitude featured most frequently among the respondents as factors that militate against the prevention of post operative wound infection. The findings of this study suggest that nurses had poor knowledge and attitude of infection contact and poor attitude towards infection control. Therefore, there ...

  2. Pyoderma gangrenosum following a routine caesarean section: Pseudo-infection in a caesarean wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, A G; Singal, Archana; Radhakrishnan, Gita; Singh, Smita

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old booked primigravida underwent lower segment caesarean section for breech presentation. She developed signs and symptoms of wound infection by the fourth postoperative day. This was initially managed with antibiotics and wound dressing, but debridement was later undertaken after consulting surgeons. This resulted in an alarming worsening of the wound with sudden and fast increase in its size along with systemic symptoms. Wound biopsy established the diagnosis of pyoderma gangrenosum. The patient's management included oral medication with prednisolone, cyclosporin and dapsone and wound care. There was a dramatic response to this treatment. The wound completely healed by the eighth postoperative month. The oral medications were tapered off slowly and stopped by that time.

  3. Burn wound infections and antibiotic susceptibility patterns at pakistan institute of medical sciences, islamabad, pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shehzad; Zaib, Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    Burn wound infections carry considerable mortality and morbidity amongst burn injury victims who have been successfully rescued through the initial resuscitation. This study assessed the prevalent microrganisms causing burn wound infections among hospitalized patients; their susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics; and the frequency of infections with respect to the duration of the burn wounds. This study was carried out at Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan over a period of two years (i.e. from June 2010 to May 2012). The study included all wound-culture-positive patients of either gender and all ages, who had sustained deep burns and underwent definitive management with wound excisions and skin auto-grafting. Patients with negative cultures of the wounds were excluded. Tissue specimens for culture and sensitivity were collected from burn wounds using standard collection techniques and analyzed at microbiological laboratory. Out of a total of 95 positive microbial growths, 36 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35.29%) as the most frequent isolate found, followed by 21 Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.58%), 19 Staphylococcus aureaus (18.62%), 10 Proteus (9.80%), 7 E. coli (6.86%), 7 Acinetobacter (6.86%), and 4 Candida (3.92%). A variable antibiotic susceptibility pattern was observed among the grown microbes. Positive cultures were significantly more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus constituted the most common bacterial microbes of burn wounds in our in-patients cases. Positive cultures were more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. Early excision and skin grafting of deep burns and adherence to infection control measures can help to effectively reduce the burden of these infections.

  4. An evaluation of surgical site infections by wound classification system using the ACS-NSQIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Gezzer; Rhee, Daniel S; Papandria, Dominic J; Yang, Jessica; Ibrahim, Andrew M; Shore, Andrew D; Makary, Martin A; Abdullah, Fizan

    2012-05-01

    Surgical wound classification has been the foundation for infectious risk assessment, perioperative protocol development, and surgical decision-making. The wound classification system categorizes all surgeries into: clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty, with estimated postoperative rates of surgical site infection (SSI) being 1%-5%, 3%-11%, 10%-17%, and over 27%, respectively. The present study evaluates the associated rates of the SSI by wound classification using a large risk adjusted surgical patient database. A cross-sectional study was performed using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) dataset between 2005 and 2008. All surgical cases that specified a wound class were included in our analysis. Patient demographics, hospital length of stay, preoperative risk factors, co-morbidities, and complication rates were compared across the different wound class categories. Surgical site infection rates for superficial, deep incisional, and organ/space infections were analyzed among the four wound classifications using multivariate logistic regression. A total of 634,426 cases were analyzed. From this sample, 49.7% were classified as clean, 35.0% clean/contaminated, 8.56% contaminated, and 6.7% dirty. When stratifying by wound classification, the clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty wound classifications had superficial SSI rates of 1.76%, 3.94%, 4.75%, and 5.16%, respectively. The rates of deep incisional infections were 0.54%, 0.86%, 1.31%, and 2.1%. The rates for organ/space infection were 0.28%, 1.87%, 2.55%, and 4.54%. Using ACS-NSQIP data, the present study demonstrates substantially lower rates of surgical site infections in the contaminated and dirty wound classifications than previously reported in the literature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prophylactic Groin Wound Vacuum-assisted Therapy in Vascular Surgery Patients at Enhanced Risk for Postoperative Wound Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesonen, Luke O; Halloran, Brian G; Aziz, Abdulhameed

    2018-01-01

    Vascular groin wounds have higher than expected surgical site infection (SSI) rates and some patients are at enhanced risk. The Wiseman et al. paper suggests an objective scoring system that identifies patients at enhanced risk of postdischarge SSI. We hypothesize that prophylactic groin wound vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in enhanced risk patients will decrease SSI and readmission and the Wiseman model provides potential evidence that enhanced risk patients can be objectively identified. A single institution, retrospective analysis was conducted from January 2013 to September 2016 utilizing procedure codes to identify patients with wound VACs placed in the operating room. Two distinct groups were identified. The first was a wound complication patient group with 15 limbs (13 patients) with a groin wound VAC placed within 45 days postoperatively for groin wound complications. Eleven of these limbs had the VAC placed at readmission. The second group was a prophylactic patient group that included 8 limbs (7 patients) who received a VAC prophylactically placed in the enhanced risk wounds. These wounds were determined to be enhanced risk based on clinical criteria judged by the operating surgeon such as a large overhanging panniculus and/or one of several ongoing medical issues. We calculated a Wiseman score for all patients, determined total cost of the readmissions, and determined 30-day postsurgical SSI incidence for the prophylactic VAC group. Per the Wiseman scores, 9 limbs with postoperative complications were high risk and 3 limbs were moderate/high risk. Eleven limbs had a VAC placed at readmission with an average readmission cost of $8876.77. For the prophylactic group, 8 limbs were high risk with no observed postdischarge SSI in the first 30 days from surgery. The Wiseman scores showed close correlation between the retrospective high and moderate/high risk groups versus the prophylactic VAC group (31.5 ± 7.3 vs. 32 ± 5.5, P = 0.87). The Wiseman

  6. Increased wound pH as an indicator of local wound infection in second degree burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Sayaka; Imai, Ryutro; Ida, Yukiko; Shibata, Dai; Komiya, Takako; Matsumura, Hajime

    2015-06-01

    Wound pH affects a number of important factors in wound healing. It is known that the pH of the skin surface of healthy adults and children is 4.2-5.6 and that it decreases with the lapse of epithelialization. We measured the pH of the exudates from second degree burns in 26 cases. Among these, local burn wound infection developed in 6 cases. The causative organisms were Staphylococcus aureus in 2 cases and Staphylococcus epidermidis in 4 cases. The maximum pH value measured was 10.0 and the minimum was 5.0 for all samples. There were no differences in the initial measurements of pH between the non-infected cases and the local-infected cases. In cases of local infection, the pH rose prior to the onset of clinical signs of local burn infection. By consecutive measurement of pH, early detection of local wound infection can be achieved and this is very beneficial in clinical practice. Moreover, measurement is very easy and results are available immediately. In conclusion, consecutive pH measurement of exudates is considered to be a useful indicator in the treatment of second degree burns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Validation of a Novel Murine Wound Model of Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mitchell G.; Black, Chad C.; Pavlicek, Rebecca L.; Honnold, Cary L.; Wise, Matthew C.; Alamneh, Yonas A.; Moon, Jay K.; Kessler, Jennifer L.; Si, Yuanzheng; Williams, Robert; Yildirim, Suleyman; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Green, Romanza K.; Hall, Eric R.; Palys, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Patients recovering from traumatic injuries or surgery often require weeks to months of hospitalization, increasing the risk for wound and surgical site infections caused by ESKAPE pathogens, which include A. baumannii (the ESKAPE pathogens are Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species). As new therapies are being developed to counter A. baumannii infections, animal models are also needed to evaluate potential treatments. Here, we present an excisional, murine wound model in which a diminutive inoculum of a clinically relevant, multidrug-resistant A. baumannii isolate can proliferate, form biofilms, and be effectively treated with antibiotics. The model requires a temporary, cyclophosphamide-induced neutropenia to establish an infection that can persist. A 6-mm-diameter, full-thickness wound was created in the skin overlying the thoracic spine, and after the wound bed was inoculated, it was covered with a dressing for 7 days. Uninoculated control wounds healed within 13 days, whereas infected, placebo-treated wounds remained unclosed beyond 21 days. Treated and untreated wounds were assessed with multiple quantitative and qualitative techniques that included gross pathology, weight loss and recovery, wound closure, bacterial burden, 16S rRNA community profiling, histopathology, peptide nucleic acid-fluorescence in situ hybridization, and scanning electron microscopy assessment of biofilms. The range of differences that we are able to identify with these measures in antibiotic- versus placebo-treated animals provides a clear window within which novel antimicrobial therapies can be assessed. The model can be used to evaluate antimicrobials for their ability to reduce specific pathogen loads in wounded tissues and clear biofilms. Ultimately, the mouse model approach allows for highly powered studies and serves as an initial multifaceted in vivo assessment prior to

  8. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilova, N. V., E-mail: n.kirilova@vitavallis.com; Fomenko, A. N., E-mail: alserova@ispms.tsc.ru; Korovin, M. S., E-mail: msk@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheskii pr., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5–3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  9. Comparison of PHMB-containing dressing and silver dressings in patients with critically colonised or locally infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, T; Haemmerle, G; Signer, M; Gruber Moesenbacher, U; Traber, J; Mittlboeck, M; Abel, M; Strohal, R

    2012-01-01

    This study compares treatment with a polihexanide-containing biocellulose wound dressing (BWD+PHMB) versus the best local standard of silver dressings (Ag) in painful, critically colonised (wounds-at-risk) or locally-infected wounds. Patients with wounds of various aetiologies, a baseline VAS pain score >4 and a semi-quantitative bacterial load of ++ or higher were randomly allocated to receive treatment with either BWD+PHMB or Ag. Patients with systemic infections and/or using systemic antibiotics were excluded. The primary endpoint, patient-reported pain (VAS total pain, including the sub-scores pain at night, during the day, before, and 15min after dressing changes), was compared between treatment groups and scored on days 0, 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28. Secondary outcomes of bacterial load, wound bed and periwound skin condition, quality of life and dressing handling were assessed at the same visits. Thirty-eight patients (BWD+PHMB, n=21 [24 wounds]; Ag, n=17 [18 wounds]) were included in the analyses. Baseline variables showed no significant differences. Wound pain was reduced significantly in both groups, with a better pain reduction noted for BWD+ PHMB (pdressing changes. Compared with Ag, in the BWD+PHMB group critical colonisation and local wound infection had been reduced significantly faster and better (pdressing an attractive therapeutic option to treat critically colonised and locally-infected wounds.

  10. Surgical wound infection in urology. Analysis of risk factors and associated microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Isa, M; Medina-Polo, J; Lara-Isla, A; Pérez-Cadavid, S; Arrébola-Pajares, A; Sopeña-Sutil, R; Benítez-Sala, R; Justo-Quintas, J; Gil-Moradillo, J; Passas-Martínez, J B; Tejido-Sánchez, A

    2017-03-01

    Open surgery continues to have a fundamental role in urology, and one of its main complications is surgical wound infection. Our objective was to analyse surgical wound infection in patients who underwent surgery in our Department of Urology and to assess the risk factors, microorganisms and resistances by type of surgery. This was a prospective observational study that included 940 patients: 370 abdominal/open lumbar surgeries and 570 genitoperineal surgeries. We analysed age, sex, comorbidities, stay and type of surgery, as well as the causal microorganisms and antibiotic resistances. For genitoperineal surgery, we found 15 cases (2.6%) of surgical wound infection associated with previous urinary catheterisation. Most of the isolated microorganisms corresponded to enterobacteriaceae, highlighting the resistance to beta-lactam. In abdominal/lumbar surgery, we found 41 cases (11.1%) of surgical wound infection. The incidence rate was 3.3% in prostate surgery; 9.8% in renal surgery; and 45.0% in cystectomy. Heart disease was associated with a higher incidence rate of surgical wound infection. The most common microorganisms were Enterococcus spp. (27.1%), E.coli (22.9%) and Staphylococcus aureus (14.6%). Enterococcus and beta-lactamase-producing E.coli are resistant to ampicillin in 37.5% and 41.7% of cases, respectively. We found a low incidence rate of surgical wound infection in genitoperineal surgery, compared with renal surgery and cystectomy. The presence of heart disease and carrying a previous urinary catheter are factors associated with surgical wound infection. Enterococcus and E.coli are the most common pathogens, with high rates of resistance. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel protease-based diagnostic devices for detection of wound infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinzle, A.; Papen-Botterhuis, N.E.; Schiffer, D.; Schneider, K.P.; Binder, B.; Schintler, M.; Haaksman, I.K.; Lenting, H.B.; Gübitz, G.M.; Sigl, E.

    2013-01-01

    A gelatinase-based device for fast detection of wound infection was developed. Collective gelatinolytic activity in infected wounds was 23 times higher (p ≤ 0.001) than in noninfected wounds and blisters according to the clinical and microbiological description of the wounds. Enzyme activities of

  12. Honey ointment': a natural remedy of skin wound infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasleem, S.; Naqvi, S.B.S.; Hashimi, K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Honey is a gift of nature, principally identified and valued to possess antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity and has been used as a natural remedy of wounds since ancient times. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of honey against micro-organisms, to formulate a honey ointment and to evaluate the efficacy of such ointment by conducting clinical trials on skin wound infection. Methods: This experimental study was conducted at Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Karachi and Out-patient Department of Dermatology, Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi from November 2009 to October 2010. The antimicrobial activity of Pakistani floral sources (Trachysperm copticum, Acacia nilotica species indica, Zizyphus) honey samples was investigated by disc diffusion method against freshly isolated wound infecting bacteria (Staphylococci aureus, Staphylococci epidermidis, Streptococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris and Candida albicans), and Staphylococci aureus ATCC 6538, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9022, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Candida albican ATCC 15146. An ointment containing 20% active antimicrobial honey was formulated. The efficacy of such ointment was evaluated by passing thought clinical trials. A total number of 27 patients (23 skin wound infection, and 4 diabetic foot ulcer) were involved in the study. Thin layer of newly formulated honey ointment on gauze were applied two to three times per day till complete healing. Results: In microbiological assay the honey samples were found to exhibit a very promising antimicrobial activity against all the micro-organisms tested. In clinical trial very significant results (99.15%) healing was observed in skin wound infections cases with mean healing time of 5.86 (2-20) days, and 95% diabetic foot ulcers healed with the mean healing time of 20 (8-40) days. Conclusion: Newly formulated

  13. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... sources, marine animals and soil. A. hydrophila was cultured from human sources as early as 19374and is being recognised increasingly in human/ocal and systemic infections.2. After gastro-intestinal infections manifesting as diarrhoeas, skin and soft-tissue infections are the second most common.

  14. NOSOCOMIAL WOUND INFECTION AMONGST POST OPERATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with nosocomial infections also becomes a major therapeutic challenge for physicians. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify post operative bacterial infections in the patients developing surgical site infections at a tertiary University hospital in North India during July 2013 to Dec 2013. Methods: One hundred ...

  15. Effects of irrigation with different solution on Incidence of Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Zamani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management of acute and chronic wounds has significantly altered in the last decade but little attention has been paid to the solution used for cleansing the wounds. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare the effects of tap water, distilled water, and normal saline for wound cleansing in emergency department. Methods: This is a double-blind randomized clinical trial with a 10-day follow up. Patients who had superficial wounds were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups: normal saline, distilled water, and tap water. The wounds were cleansed using a 20 - 60 milliliter syringe with an 18 gauge needle. All the patients were discharged with the same antibiotic and were followed 48 hours and 10-day to determine the presence or absence of infection symptoms. The evaluated outcomes were infection incidence in the first 48 hours and 10 days after being discharged. Results: 1200 patients were included in the present study (57% male, average age 25.5 ± 11.0 years. 43 (3.5% patients showed infection symptoms in the first 48 hours. Ten (2.5% patients were in normal saline treated group, 15 (3.7% patients were in distilled water group, and 18 (4.4% patients were in tap water treated group (p=0.32. 13 (3.2% patients in normal saline group, 20 (4.9% patients in distilled water group and 23 (5.6% in the tap water group did not take their antibiotics. Prevalence of infection were higher in patients who did not take antibiotics (p < 0.001. The 10-day follow-up revealed that all the patients were recovered and showed no infection symptoms. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the prevalence of infection in using the 3 agents (normal saline, distilled water and tap water for cleansing wounds was similar. Therefore, drinking water could be considered as an alternative for cleansing wounds.

  16. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S L Rajasekhar Karna

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection-first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome. This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts

  17. Occurrence of pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguntibeju, O.O.; Nwobu, R.A.U.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in post-operative wound infection. Results: Out of the 60 bacterial isolates found in post-operative wound infection, 20 (33.3%) were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, followed by Staphylococcus aureus 13(21.7%), Klebsiella species 10(16.7%), Escherichia coli 7(11.7%), Atypical coliform 4(6.7%), Proteus species 4(6.7%), Streptococcus pyogenes 1(1.7%) and Enterococcus faecalis 1(1.7%) in the order. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was higher in female than male, ratio 3:2 and was found more among young and elderly debilitated patients. The in vitro sensitivity pattern of 20 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa showed colistin (100%), gentamicin (75%), streptomycin (30%), and tetracycline (10%). Conclusion: The role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an agent of nosocomial infection is re-emphasised. (author)

  18. The laparoscopically harvested omental flap for deep sternal wound infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, Jan J.; Coret, Matijn E. H.; van Nieuwenhoven, Christianne A.; Totté, Eric R.

    2010-01-01

    To report our experience with the laparoscopically harvested omental flap in the treatment of deep sternal wound infection, and to present a modification and introduce two supportive techniques in the perioperative management. Between June 2005 and September 2007, six patients with grade IV (El

  19. Bacteriology of Post Caesarean Wound Infection in a Specialist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the present study is to establish the spectrum of microbes causing post caesarean wound infection and antibiotic sensitivity pattern in our locality. ... used antibiotics such as cotrimoxazole, tetracycline, cefuroxime and cloxacillin, while cephalosporin and fluoroquinolones were highly effective against the isolates.

  20. Wound infection secondary to snakebite | Wagener | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Children are particularly vulnerable to snakebite, and the consequences can be devastating. While the majority of patients in this study were shown to have secondary bacterial infection, debridement and subsequent wound management is considered the mainstay of treatment. Common organisms are Enterobacteriaceae ...

  1. Microbiology of post-operative wound infection in implant surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of fractures with implants and prosthesis has become the first line in the management of fractures in most trauma centres. Incidentally, this is associated with post-operative wound infection which is accompanied by significant morbidity, cost and mortality.

  2. Surgical wound infection in clean-contaminated and contaminated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical wound (site) infection is the commonest complication following laparotomy for clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations. Good surgical technique and perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations contribute to the low rate of ...

  3. Risk Factors For Wound Infections After Implant Surgery | Onche ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: Post-operative wound infection (POWI) rates for implant surgery are in the range of 0.08 to 13% in spite of the many advances in surgery in the past decades. It is therefore imperative that we develop a system of predicting the occurrence of POWI as a key to effective prevention. One approach is for each ...

  4. Bacteriology of post–operative wound infections in the surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 248 swab specimens from post-operative wounds suspected to be infected were bacteriologically evaluated. Of these, bacterial growth was recorded in 204 specimens (82.3%) while 44 specimens (17.7%) yielded no growth. The bacteria isolated from the samples in decreasing order of prevalence were: ...

  5. Histamine enhances keratinocyte-mediated resolution of inflammation by promoting wound healing and response to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowska-Owsiak, D; Selvakumar, T A; Salimi, M; Taylor, S; Ogg, G S

    2014-03-01

    The role of the epidermis in the immune response is well known. While multiple cytokines are implicated in keratinocyte-mediated infection clearance and wound healing, little is known about the involvement of keratinocytes in promoting resolution of inflammation. To assess effects of histamine stimulation on keratinocyte function. We performed a combined microarray/Gene Ontology analysis of histamine-stimulated keratinocytes. Functional changes were tested by apoptosis assessment and scratch assays. Histamine receptor involvement was also assessed by blocking wound closure with specific antagonists. Histamine treatment had extensive effects on keratinocytes, including effects on proinflammatory responses and cellular functions promoting wound healing. At the functional level, there was reduced apoptosis and enhancement of wound healing in vitro. At the receptor level, we identified involvement of all keratinocyte-expressed histamine receptors (HRHs), with HRH1 blockage resulting in the most prominent effect. Histamine activates wound healing and infection clearance-related functions of keratinocytes. While enhancement of histamine-mediated wound healing is mediated predominantly via the HRH1 receptor, other keratinocyte-expressed receptors are also involved. These effects could promote resolution of skin inflammation caused by infection or superficial injury. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Microbiology and risk factors associated with war-related wound infections in the Middle East.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahli, Z T; Bizri, A R; Abu-Sittah, G S

    2016-10-01

    The Middle East region is plagued with repeated armed conflicts that affect both civilians and soldiers. Injuries sustained during war are common and frequently associated with multiple life-threatening complications. Wound infections are major consequences of these war injuries. The microbiology of war-related wound infections is variable with predominance of Gram-negative bacteria in later stages. The emergence of antimicrobial resistance among isolates affecting war-related wound injuries is a serious problem with major regional and global implications. Factors responsible for the increase in multidrug-resistant pathogens include timing and type of surgical management, wide use of antimicrobial drugs, and the presence of metallic or organic fragments in the wound. Nosocomial transmission is the most important factor in the spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens. Wound management of war-related injuries merits a multidisciplinary approach. This review aims to describe the microbiology of war-related wound infections and factors affecting their incidence from conflict areas in Iraq, Syria, Israel, and Lebanon.

  7. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B.; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection—first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  8. Mycobacterium fortuitum causing surgical site wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaleem, F.; Usman, J.; Omair, M.; Din, R.U.; Hassan, A.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum, a rapidly growing mycobacterium, is ubiquitous in nature. The organism was considered to be a harmless saprophyte but now there have been several reports from different parts of the world wherein it has been incriminated in a variety of human infections. We report a culture positive case of surgical site infection caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum, who responded well to the treatment. (author)

  9. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification independently predicts wound healing in diabetic foot ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald; Malas, Mahmoud B; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2018-04-02

    Previous studies have reported correlation between the Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system and wound healing time on unadjusted analyses. However, in the only multivariable analysis to date, WIfI stage was not predictive of wound healing. Our aim was to examine the association between WIfI classification and wound healing after risk adjustment in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from June 2012 to July 2017 were enrolled in a prospective database. A Cox proportional hazards model accounting for patients' sociodemographics, comorbidities, medication profiles, and wound characteristics was used to assess the association between WIfI classification and likelihood of wound healing at 1 year. There were 310 DFU patients enrolled (mean age, 59.0 ± 0.7 years; 60.3% male; 60.0% black) with 709 wounds, including 32.4% WIfI stage 1, 19.9% stage 2, 25.2% stage 3, and 22.4% stage 4. Mean wound healing time increased with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 96.9 ± 8.3 days; stage 4, 195.1 ± 10.6 days; P wound healing at 1 year was 94.1% ± 2.0% for stage 1 wounds vs 67.4% ± 4.4% for stage 4 (P wound healing (stage 4 vs stage 1: hazard ratio, [HR] 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-0.59). Peripheral artery disease (HR, 0.73), increasing wound area (HR, 0.99 per square centimeter), and longer time from wound onset to first assessment (HR, 0.97 per month) also decreased the likelihood of wound healing, whereas use of clopidogrel was protective (HR, 1.39; all, P ≤ .04). The top three predictors of poor wound healing were WIfI stage 4 (z score, -5.40), increasing wound area (z score, -3.14), and WIfI stage 3 (z score, -3.11), respectively. Among patients with DFU, the WIfI classification system predicts wound healing at 1 year in both crude and risk-adjusted analyses. This is the first study to validate the WIfI score as an

  10. Suction-irrigation drainage: an underestimated therapeutic option for surgical treatment of deep sternal wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschka, Heinz; Erler, Stefan; El-Ayoubi, Lemir; Vogel, Cordula; Vöhringer, Luise; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Deep sternal wound infections are significant and severe complications following cardiac surgery and substantially influence perioperative morbidity and mortality. We present the experience of our department using two different surgical treatments over a three-year period. Between January 2009 and December 2011, a total of 3274 cardiac procedures with complete median sternotomy were performed in our department. In 94 patients (3%), a deep sternal wound infection occurred, including sternal instability with consecutive surgical treatment. The patients either received wound debridement with sternum refixation and suction-irrigation drainage (SID; n = 72) or sternum refixation only (RF; n = 22) if there was sternal instability with limited signs of infection. SID was routinely installed for 7 days: the irrigation solution contained neomycin. In all cases, swabs were taken and analysed. The different methods were evaluated in respect of their clinical outcomes. The success rate-defined as single, uncomplicated procedure-of the SID treatment was 74%, compared with 59% of the isolated sternum refixation. Complications included continuous infection, recurrence of sternal instability and wound necrosis. Eighty-eight percent of the swabs in the SID group were positive, compared with 32% in the sternal refixation only group. The dominating pathogenic germs were coagulase-negative staphylococci and staphylococcus aureus. Mortality was 10% for the SID group and 5% for the RF group. Contrary to accepted opinion, the suction-irrigation drainage is an appropriate therapy for deep sternal wound infections. Nevertheless, deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery remain severe complications and are related to increased morbidity and mortality.

  11. Deep sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass surgery: management and risk factor analysis for mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumun, Gunduz; Erdolu, Burak; Toktas, Faruk; Eris, Cuneyt; Ay, Derih; Turk, Tamer; As, Ahmet Kagan

    2014-08-01

    Deep sternal wound infection is a life-threatening complication after cardiac surgery. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors leading to mortality, and to explore wound management techniques on deep sternal wound infection after coronary artery bypass surgery. Between 2008 and 2013, 58 patients with deep sternal wound infection were analyzed. Risk factors for mortality and morbidity including age, gender, body mass index, smoking status, chronic renal failure, hypertension, diabetes, and treatment choice were investigated. In this study, 19 patients (32.7%) were treated by primary surgical closure (PSC), and 39 patients (67.3%) were treated by delayed surgical closure following a vacuum-assisted closure system (VAC). Preoperative patient characteristics were similar between the groups. Fourteen patients (24.1%) died in the postoperative first month. The mortality rate and mean duration of hospitalization in the PSC group was higher than in the VAC group (P = .026, P = .034). Significant risk factors for mortality were additional operation, diabetes mellitus, and a high level of EuroSCORE. Delayed surgical closure following VAC therapy may be associated with shorter hospitalization and lower mortality in patients with deep sternal wound infection. Additional operation, diabetes mellitus, and a high level of EuroSCORE were associated with mortality.

  12. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    32). In the case of the latter infective agents, miltefosine proved to be an effective antibacterial agent against P. aeruginosa; its administration ...neutropenic via intraperitoneal administration of 150 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg cyclophosphamide in sterile saline on day 4 and day 1 prior to infection (day...319 putative nicotinate -nucleotide diphosphorylase is located downstream of plc1 and transcribed in 320 the opposite direction. The plc1 gene

  13. Bacterial colonisation of suture material after routine neurosurgical procedures: relevance for wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bujung; Winkel, Andreas; Ertl, Philipp; Stumpp, Sascha Nico; Schwabe, Kerstin; Stiesch, Meike; Krauss, Joachim K

    2018-03-01

    Wound healing impairment is a serious problem in surgical disciplines which may be associated with chronic morbidity, increased cost and patient discomfort. Here we aimed to investigate the relevance of bacterial colonisation on suture material using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect and taxonomically classify bacterial DNA in patients with and without wound healing problems after routine neurosurgical procedures. Repeat surgery was performed in 25 patients with wound healing impairment and in 38 patients with well-healed wounds. To determine the presence of bacteria, a 16S rDNA-based PCR detection method was applied. Fragments of 500 bp were amplified using universal primers which target hypervariable regions within the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Amplicons were separated from each other by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis, and finally classified using Sanger sequencing. PCR/SSCP detected DNA of various bacteria species on suture material in 10/38 patients with well-healed wounds and in 12/25 patients with wound healing impairment including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Propionibacterium acnes and Escherichia coli. Microbiological cultures showed bacterial growth in almost all patients with wound healing impairment and positive results in PCR/SSCP (10/12), while this was the case in only one patient with a well-healed wound (1/10). Colonisation of suture material with bacteria occurs in a relevant portion of patients with and without wound healing impairment after routine neurosurgical procedures. Suture material may provide a nidus for bacteria and subsequent biofilm formation. Most likely, however, such colonisation of sutures is not a general primer for subsequent wound infection.

  14. Management of wound infection after lumbar arthrodesis maintaining the instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determinate whether a surgical protocol with immediate extensive debridement, closed irrigation system and antibiotic therapy would be effective to achieve healing of deep wound infection without removing the instrumentation.METHODS: Prospective cohort study with 19 patients presenting degenerative spinal stenosis or degenerative spondylolisthesis, who developed infection after posterior lumbar arthrodesis. The diagnosis was confirmed by a microbial culture from subfascial lumbar fluid and/or blood. Patients were treated with a protocol of wound exploration, extensive flushing and debridement, placement of a closed irrigation system that was maintained for five days and intravenous antibiotics. The instrumentation system was not removed.RESULTS: Mean age was 59.31 (±13.17 years old and most patients were female (94.7%; 18/19. The mean period for the identification of the infection was 2 weeks and 57.9% underwent a single wound exploration. White blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein showed a significant decrease post-treatment when compared to pre-treatment values. A significant reduction of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein was also observed at the final evaluation. No laboratory test was useful to predict the need for more than one debridement.CONCLUSION: Patients with wound infection after instrumentation can be treated without removal of the instrumentation through wound exploration, extensive flushing, debridement of necrotic tissue, closed irrigation system during 5 days and proper antibiotic therapy. The blood tests were not useful to predict surgical re-interventions.

  15. Evaluation of Mouse Wound Models for Probiotics-Based Wound Infection Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    infection. The cryo burn and skin incision with circulatory disruption models were not reproducible. Application of probiotic ( L . reuteri ) had some...were inoculated with 1 x 106 CFU P. aeruginosa, 5 x 105 CFU S. pyogenes, 5 x 106 CFU L . reuteri , or a combination of bacteria with the probiotic in...U ni ts /g T is su e L . reuteri Figure 1. Colonization of the wound site with probiotic. 6 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release

  16. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... healthy hosts after water-associated injury was first emphasised in 2 cases of mixed infection ... hydrophila and the antibiotic regimen was changed to cefta- zidime and amikacin. Department of .... Most penicil- lins, the fIrst-generation cephalosporins and older aminoglyco- sides (e.g. streptomycin and ...

  17. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léguillier, Teddy; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Lémus, Christelle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Nour, Mohammed; Aalbersberg, William; Ghazi, Kamelia; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Rat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae) is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO). In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1), Tahiti (CIO2, 3), Fiji islands (CIO4) and New Caledonia (CIO5) were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety. Methods The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Results Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore

  18. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léguillier, Teddy; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Lémus, Christelle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Nour, Mohammed; Aalbersberg, William; Ghazi, Kamelia; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Rat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae) is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO). In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1), Tahiti (CIO2, 3), Fiji islands (CIO4) and New Caledonia (CIO5) were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety. The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore, our results showed that CIO

  19. Impact of using prophylactic antibiotic on prevention of wound infection in inguinal herniorrhaphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, K.; Khan, Z.; Bhatti, A.M.; Mahmood, K.

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis with placebo in prevention of wound infection amongst patients undergoing clean open inguinal herniorrhaphy (without mesh). Study Design: Randomized Controlled Trial. Place and Duration of Study: Pakistan Air Force Hospital, Faisal Base Karachi from October 2009 to November 2011. Material and Methods: One hundred and fifty patients undergoing inguinal herniorrhaphy were included and randomly assigned to one of the two groups using random numbers table. Group A patients were given intravenous antibiotic while those in Group B were given equal volume of normal saline just before the induction of anaesthesia. Patients from both groups were observed for the presence of wound infection. Results: Total seven cases (4.7%) of surgical site infection were detected; two cases (2.7%) occurred in group A whereas five cases (6.7%) occurred in group B. The low frequency of post-operative wound infection was seen in group A as compared to group B but the difference was statistically insignificant. Conclusion: Antibiotic prophylaxis has no significant effect on prevention of wound infection in inguinal herniorrhaphy. (author)

  20. Interventions for wound healing among diabetic patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Anacássia Fonseca; Costa, Lívia Bandeira; Silva, Joás Lucas da; Maia, Maria Bernadete Sousa; Ximenes, Eulália Camelo Pessoa Azevedo

    2011-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent agent isolated in diabetic foot infections and may be associated with changes to wound healing times. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature, including studies that assessed the efficacy of any clinical or surgical intervention, as well as oral or topical therapy for diabetic ulcers infected with S. aureus. DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review with a search conducted in databases. METHODS: W...

  1. Effects of Aloe Vera and Chitosan Nanoparticle Thin-Film Membranes on Wound Healing in Full Thickness Infected Wounds with Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Reza; Yousefi, Alireza

    2018-01-01

    To assess effect of Aleo vera with chitosan nanoparticle biofilm on wound healing in full thickness infected wounds with antibiotic resistant gram positive bacteria. Thirty rats were randomized into five groups of six rats each. Group I: Animals with uninfected wounds treated with 0.9% saline solution. Group II: Animals with infected wounds treated with saline. Group III: Animals with infected wounds were dressed with chitosan nanoparticle thin-film membranes. Group IV: Animals with infected wounds were treated topically with Aloe vera and Group V: Animals with infected wounds were treated topically with Aloe vera and dressed with chitosan nanoparticle thin-film membranes. Wound size was measured on 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21days after surgery. Microbiology, reduction in wound area and hydroxyproline contents indicated that there was significant difference ( p vera with chitosan nanoparticle thin-film membranes had a reproducible wound healing potential and hereby justified its use in practice.

  2. Komodo dragon-inspired synthetic peptide DRGN-1 promotes wound-healing of a mixed-biofilm infected wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M C Chung, Ezra; Dean, Scott N; Propst, Crystal N; Bishop, Barney M; van Hoek, Monique L

    2017-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are multifunctional molecules that have a high potential as therapeutic agents. We have identified a histone H1-derived peptide from the Komodo dragon ( Varanus komodoensis) , called VK25. Using this peptide as inspiration, we designed a synthetic peptide called DRGN-1. We evaluated the antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity of both peptides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus . DRGN-1, more than VK25, exhibited potent antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity, and permeabilized bacterial membranes. Wound healing was significantly enhanced by DRGN-1 in both uninfected and mixed biofilm ( Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus )-infected murine wounds. In a scratch wound closure assay used to elucidate the wound healing mechanism, the peptide promoted the migration of HEKa keratinocyte cells, which was inhibited by mitomycin C (proliferation inhibitor) and AG1478 (epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor). DRGN-1 also activated the EGFR-STAT1/3 pathway. Thus, DRGN-1 is a candidate for use as a topical wound treatment. Wound infections are a major concern; made increasingly complicated by the emerging, rapid spread of bacterial resistance. The novel synthetic peptide DRGN-1 (inspired by a peptide identified from Komodo dragon) exhibits pathogen-directed and host-directed activities in promoting the clearance and healing of polymicrobial ( Pseudomonas aeruginosa & Staphylococcus aureus ) biofilm infected wounds. The effectiveness of this peptide cannot be attributed solely to its ability to act upon the bacteria and disrupt the biofilm, but also reflects the peptide's ability to promsote keratinocyte migration. When applied in a murine model, infected wounds treated with DRGN-1 healed significantly faster than did untreated wounds, or wounds treated with other peptides. The host-directed mechanism of action was determined to be via the EGFR-STAT1/3 pathway. The pathogen-directed mechanism of action was

  3. Deep sternal wound infections: a severe complication after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgante, A; Romeo, F

    2017-01-01

    Sternal Wound Infections (SWI) represent a dangerous complication after cardiac surgery entailing significantly longer hospital stays and worse short-term survival, especially in case of deep infections (DSWI) with the onset of osteomielitis or mediastinitis. The real incidence of SWI can be estimated between 0.25% and 10%; among the risk factors for sternal dehiscences after a longitudinal median sternotomy, several experiences underline the role of diabetes as an independent risk factor for post-operative infections, especially in patients affected by COPD with higher BMI. The application of a negative-pressure therapy, through instill modality too, assures a wound cleansing through periodic irrigation of topical solutions with particulate secretion removal; moreover it improves the granulation process owing to the increased blood flow and makes the size wound reduction easier, representing very often the treatment of first-line in DSWI and an optimal bridge for another reconstructive procedure of the sternal defect. The following case report shows how a plastic surgical approach associated to the adoption of a VAC-therapy instill after specific antibiotictherapy has integrated and optimized the trend of a very complex clinical circumstance.

  4. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/VAC (R) - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, J.J.; Segers, P.; Jekel, L.

    2011-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.(R)) therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious) interim (prior to flap reconstruction) or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which

  5. Wound management with vacuum-assisted closure in postoperative infections after surgery for spinal stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaaslan F

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fatih Karaaslan,1 Şevki Erdem,2 Musa Ugur Mermerkaya11Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Bozok University Medical School, Yozgat, Turkey; 2Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Haydarpasa Numune Training Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyObjective: To evaluate the results of negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT in the treatment of surgical spinal site infections.Materials and methods: The use of NPWT in postoperative infections after dorsal spinal surgery (transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion plus posterior instrumentation was studied retrospectively. From February 2011 to January 2012, six patients (females out of 317 (209 females; 108 males were readmitted to our clinic with surgical site infections on postoperative day 14 (range 9–19 and were treated with debridement, NPWT, and antibiotics. We evaluated the clinical and laboratory data, including the ability to retain the spinal hardware and recurrent infections.Results: The incidence of deep postoperative surgical site infection was six (1.89% patients (females out of 317 patients (209 females; 108 males at 1 year. All patients completed their wound NPWT regimen successfully. An average of 5.1 (range 3–8 irrigation and debridement sessions was performed before definitive wound closure. The mean follow-up period was 13 (range 12–16 months. No patient had a persistent infection requiring partial or total hardware removal. The hospital stay infection parameters normalized within an average of 4.6 weeks.Conclusion: The study illustrates the usefulness of NPWT as an effective adjuvant treatment option for managing complicated deep spinal surgical wound infections.Keywords: surgical infection, NPWT, VAC, TLIF

  6. Antiseptic wick: does it reduce the incidence of wound infection following appendectomy?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGreal, Gerald T

    2012-02-03

    The role of prophylactic antibiotics is well established for contaminated wounds, but the use of antiseptic wound wicks is controversial. The aim of this work was to study the potential use of wound wicks to reduce the rate of infection following appendectomy. This prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at a university hospital in the department of surgery. The subjects were patients undergoing appendectomy for definite acute appendicitis. They were randomized by computer to primary subcuticular wound closure or use of an antiseptic wound wick. For the latter, ribbon gauze soaked in povidone-iodine was placed between interrupted nylon skin sutures. Wicks were soaked daily and removed on the fourth postoperative day. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis. They were reviewed while in hospital and 4 weeks following operation for evidence of wound infection. The main outcome measures were wound infection, wound discomfort, and cosmetic result. The overall wound infection rate was 8.6% (15\\/174). In patients with wound wicks it was 11.6% (10\\/86) compared to 5.6% (5\\/88) in those whose wounds were closed by subcuticular sutures (p = NS). We concluded that the use of wound wicks was not associated with decreased wound infection rates following appendectomy. Subcuticular closure is therefore appropriate in view of its greater convenience and safety.

  7. Incidence of sternal wound infection after tracheostomy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeg, Hadi; French, Daniel; Gilbert, Sebastien; Rubens, Fraser

    2017-06-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to determine whether timing or type of tracheostomy was associated with superficial or deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery. All studies reporting the incidence of sternal wound infection after tracheostomy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery were collected and analyzed. Subgroup analyses determined a priori included timing of tracheostomy and type of procedure (open vs percutaneous). All analyses used the random effects model. A meta-regression analysis was performed on the proportion of sternal wound infection and number of days between tracheostomy and initial cardiac surgery. A total of 13 studies met inclusion criteria. The incidence of sternal wound infection across all studies reported was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4-10). The percutaneous tracheostomy group had a sternal wound infection proportion of 3% (95% CI, 1-8), and the open tracheostomy group had a sternal wound infection proportion of 9% (95% CI, 5-14). The incidence of sternal wound infection with early (<14 days) (7%; 95% CI, 3-11) versus late (≥14 days) (7%; 95% CI, 4-10) tracheostomy was similar. Meta-regression demonstrated no significant relationship between incidence of sternal wound infection and number of days between tracheostomy and initial cardiac surgery (R 2  = 6.13%, P = .72). Reported secondary outcomes included 30-day and 1-year mortality, which were high at 23% (95% CI, 19-28) and 63% (95% CI, 43-80), respectively. The incidence of sternal wound infection after tracheostomy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery remains high at 7% (95% CI, 4-10). Open or percutaneous tracheostomy after cardiac surgery is a feasible option because the incidence of sternal wound infection and short-term mortality are comparable. Moreover, the timing of tracheostomy (early or late) had comparable rates of sternal wound infection and short-term mortality. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic

  8. Use of antibiotics in the management of postirradiation wound infection and sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brook, I.

    1988-01-01

    Ionizing gamma irradiation depresses the host defenses and enhances the susceptibility of the immunocompromised host to local and systemic infection due to endogenous or exogenous microorganisms. Trauma and wounding act synergistically and decrease the survival after exposure to irradiation. The current antimicrobial agents suitable for controlling serious infections and their use in post irradiation local and systemic infection with and without trauma are discussed. The experience gained in managing immunocompromised patients following chemotherapy is reviewed. Empiric single agent or combination agent therapy should be directed at the eradication of potential gram-negative as well as gram-positive pathogens. The most important organisms known to cause these infections are Pseudomonas sp. and Enterobacteriaceae. Management of intra-abdominal infections following trauma should include early surgical correlation and antimicrobials directed against the Bacteroides fragilis group and Enterobacteriaceae. Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes cause most skin and soft tissue infections following trauma. Chemoprophylaxis of enteric sources of systemic infection can be achieved by antimicrobials that selectively inhibit the Enterobacteriaceae sp. and preserve the anaerobic flora. The management of infection in the injured and irradiated host includes supportive and restorative therapy. Supportive therapy includes debridement and cleansing of wounds, fluids, immunoglobulin, and antimicrobials. Restorative therapy includes definite surgery repair and replenishment of the immune system by use of immunomodulators, growth factors, and bone marrow transplantation. Further studies are needed to examine the usefulness of presently available drugs and experimental agents in the irradiated and traumatized host. 111 references

  9. Vacuum-assisted wound closure versus alginate for the treatment of deep perivascular wound infections in the groin after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Christina; Wann-Hansson, Christine; Wictorsson, Catharina; Acosta, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC) therapy may heal wounds faster than conventional dressings after surgical debridement of perivascular groin infections after vascular surgery. Patients with deep infected wounds (Szilagyi grade III) were surgically revised and left open for secondary healing, then randomized to either VAC or alginate (Sorbalgon) therapy, between February 2007 and November 2011. To test the hypothesis, it was calculated that 42 patients needed to be included (90% power, 5% level of significance). It was decided to perform an interim analysis after inclusion of 20 patients. Among 66 patients undergoing groin revision, 20 patients were included in this study. Patients were randomized to VAC (n = 10) or alginate (n = 10). The two groups were comparable in patient and wound characteristics. Time to full skin epithelialization was significantly shorter in the VAC group (median, 57 days) compared with the alginate group (median, 104 days; P = .026). The number of positive wound cultures of bacteria and C-reactive protein values decreased equally in both groups between surgical revision and day 21. One femur amputation was performed in each group as a consequence of the groin infection, one patient died during the in-hospital stay in the alginate group, and none died in the VAC group. VAC achieves faster healing than alginate therapy after wound debridement for deep perivascular wound infections in the groin after vascular surgery. This finding does not allow further inclusion of patients from an ethical point of view, and this study was, therefore, stopped prematurely. Copyright © 2014 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nanomedicine and advanced technologies for burns: Preventing infection and facilitating wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofazzal Jahromi, Mirza Ali; Sahandi Zangabad, Parham; Moosavi Basri, Seyed Masoud; Sahandi Zangabad, Keyvan; Ghamarypour, Ameneh; Aref, Amir R; Karimi, Mahdi; Hamblin, Michael R

    2018-01-01

    According to the latest report from the World Health Organization, an estimated 265,000 deaths still occur every year as a direct result of burn injuries. A widespread range of these deaths induced by burn wound happens in low- and middle-income countries, where survivors face a lifetime of morbidity. Most of the deaths occur due to infections when a high percentage of the external regions of the body area is affected. Microbial nutrient availability, skin barrier disruption, and vascular supply destruction in burn injuries as well as systemic immunosuppression are important parameters that cause burns to be susceptible to infections. Topical antimicrobials and dressings are generally employed to inhibit burn infections followed by a burn wound therapy, because systemic antibiotics have problems in reaching the infected site, coupled with increasing microbial drug resistance. Nanotechnology has provided a range of molecular designed nanostructures (NS) that can be used in both therapeutic and diagnostic applications in burns. These NSs can be divided into organic and non-organic (such as polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) and silver NPs, respectively), and many have been designed to display multifunctional activity. The present review covers the physiology of skin, burn classification, burn wound pathogenesis, animal models of burn wound infection, and various topical therapeutic approaches designed to combat infection and stimulate healing. These include biological based approaches (e.g. immune-based antimicrobial molecules, therapeutic microorganisms, antimicrobial agents, etc.), antimicrobial photo- and ultrasound-therapy, as well as nanotechnology-based wound healing approaches as a revolutionizing area. Thus, we focus on organic and non-organic NSs designed to deliver growth factors to burned skin, and scaffolds, dressings, etc. for exogenous stem cells to aid skin regeneration. Eventually, recent breakthroughs and technologies with substantial potentials in tissue

  11. Effect of skin coverage method following subcuticular suturing on wound infection rates at cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westcott, Jill M; Crockett, Libby; Qiu, Fang; Berg, Teresa G

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of cyanoacrylate skin glue following subcuticular skin closure was associated with a decrease in wound outcomes in comparison with subcuticular closure plus Steri-strips at cesarean delivery. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients undergoing cesarean delivery at a single center over a two-year period. The primary outcome of wound infection and secondary outcomes of wound separation and composite wound complication rate were assessed throughout the six-week postpartum period. Of 660 women who met inclusion criteria, 35 (5.3%) experienced a wound infection and 90 (13.6%) experienced a wound separation. The composite wound complication rate was 16.4% (n = 108). Of the 515 cases with a skin coverage method noted, use of skin glue was associated with a marginal decrease in wound infections (p = 0.057), as well as a significantly reduced incidence of wound separation (p = 0.03) and composite wound complications (p = 0.006). Cyanoacrylate skin glue may be superior to Steri-strips for wound separation and composite wound complication rates when utilized with subcuticular suture at the time of cesarean delivery and may yield some benefit for prevention of wound infection.

  12. Isolation of Leclercia adecarboxylata from a wound infection after exposure to hurricane-related floodwater

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Vernissia; Nayak, Seema

    2012-01-01

    A man in his early 80s presented to our emergency department with painless redness and swelling in his right leg. One week prior, he cleaned up floodwater in his basement after Hurricane Irene passed the Mid-Atlantic region of the USA in August 2011. Physical examination included large purple bullae and raised concern for necrotising fasciitis. Wound culture revealed a polymicrobial infection including Leclercia adecarboxylata.

  13. Isolation of Leclercia adecarboxylata from a wound infection after exposure to hurricane-related floodwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vernissia; Nayak, Seema

    2012-10-29

    A man in his early 80s presented to our emergency department with painless redness and swelling in his right leg. One week prior, he cleaned up floodwater in his basement after Hurricane Irene passed the Mid-Atlantic region of the USA in August 2011. Physical examination included large purple bullae and raised concern for necrotising fasciitis. Wound culture revealed a polymicrobial infection including Leclercia adecarboxylata.

  14. [Plate fixation and open wound treatment in infected intramedullar nails].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusser, G M; Müller, J

    1978-12-01

    In treating patients who present with an extensive non-union due to infected intramedullary nail, bone healing can be achieved within a few weeks through a policy of active management. Following excision of the infected tissue and thorough irrigation, the fracture site is stabilized by a plate fixation and a packet with cancellous bone. The wound overlying the bone is left open to granulate. No complications were observed during the course of healing in 7 cases (5 tibia, 2 femur) managed this way. The method is based on classical principles of orthopedics and the treatment of infection. Such has been its impressive success, that it would seem to warrant not only close attention but also strong recommendation.

  15. Risk analysis and outcome of mediastinal wound and deep mediastinal wound infections with specific emphasis to omental transposition

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Parissis, Haralabos

    2011-09-19

    Abstract Background To report our experience, with Deep mediastinal wound infections (DMWI). Emphasis was given to the management of deep infections with omental flaps Methods From February 2000 to October 2007, out of 3896 cardiac surgery patients (prospective data collection) 120 pts (3.02%) developed sternal wound infections. There were 104 males & 16 females; (73.7%) CABG, (13.5%) Valves & (9.32%) CABG and Valve. Results Superficial sternal wound infection detected in 68 patients (1.75%) and fifty-two patients (1.34%) developed DMWI. The incremental risk factors for development of DMWI were: Diabetes (OR = 3.62, CI = 1.2-10.98), Pre Op Creatinine > 200 μmol\\/l (OR = 3.33, CI = 1.14-9.7) and Prolong ventilation (OR = 4.16, CI = 1.73-9.98). Overall mortality for the DMWI was 9.3% and the specific mortality of the omental flap group was 8.3%. 19% of the "DMWI group", developed complications: hematoma 6%, partial flap loss 3.0%, wound dehiscence 5.3%. Mean Hospital Stay: 59 ± 21.5 days. Conclusion Post cardiac surgery sternal wound complications remain challenging. The role of multidisciplinary approach is fundamental, as is the importance of an aggressive early wound exploration especially for deep sternal infections.

  16. Development and Preclinical Testing of Laser-Generated Shockwave Therapy for Infected Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nathan Craig

    The goal of this thesis is to translate laser-generated shockwave (LGS) therapy from a bench-top, research system into a portable, clinical system for in vivo animal trials. Prior research along this topic was completed using a benchtop system, in a physical setup dissimilar to the clinical setup. So the technology required re-engineering in order to apply it to animal studies. This began with the construction of a portable LGS therapy system, mobile enough to transport from laboratory to clinical settings. Included in the portable system is a 2D scanning system to consistently treat wound areas of varying geometries with shockwaves of 3 mm diameter spot sizes. The shockwaves generated by the portable laser system were characterized, along with the varying shockwave-generating substrates possible for clinical application. A final material selection of black polyimide was chosen because of its complete absorption of laser light and its ability to conform to tight wound geometries. Since shockwaves have never been demonstrated to delaminate biofilm from a tissue surface, a proof-of-concept study was completed successfully delaminating Staphylococcus epidermidis from wounded ex vivo pigskin. Through false-colored SEM imaging, biofilm area reduction between treated and non-treated samples were calculated. A 53% reduction in biofilm area and signifcant biofilm fragmentation was seen. An in vivo safety study was conducted next to observe potential physiological effects of LGS on healthy dermal tissue. Treated subjects were observed over a 3 day period, and no physiological or inflammatory effects were seen in the histological analysis. Finally, a pilot wound healing study was com- pleted on excisional wound healing model in rats, with S. epidermidis as the infectious agent, to measure the effect of LGS on wound healing area and rate compared to other treatments. After 9 days of wound healing, no treatment or controls showed a significant difference in wound healing rate

  17. Infections in traumatic wounds sutured at a Norwegian Accident and Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudvik, Christina; Tariq, Hina; Bernardshaw, Soosaipillai V; Steen, Knut

    2015-05-05

    Different countries have different wound treatment traditions. We have studied the incidence and different factors related to infections in wound injuries sutured at a Norwegian A&E department. In this prospective study, clinical data were collected on 102 patients with traumatic wound injuries treated with sutures at Bergen Accident and Emergency Department between 30 February 2011 and 30 June 2011. Any wound infections in 97 of these patients at the time of suture removal were assessed and classified according to severity on a scale of grade 0 to grade 4. There were no serious infections, but mild clinical wound infections occurred in 15% of patients: 11% grade 1 and 4% grade 2 infections. Patients less than 65 years old had often cut themselves with knives (n = 33, 37%), and on their hands (n = 60, 67%), Men were most frequently injured at work (n = 38, 54%) and women most often at home (n = 18, 56%). No statistically significant correlation was found between the incidence of wound infections and the length of the wound, the time elapsed before suturing, the wound's location on the body, contamination or underlying chronic diseases. Two of the three self-inflictors in our study had clinical wound infections. Half of the bacteriological samples from ten of 15 wounds with clinical infection had plentiful growth of Staphylococcus aureus. One patient received oral antibiotic treatment for wound infection, and two had local antibiotic treatment. Mild clinical infections were found in almost one of six wounds sutured at a Norwegian A&E department. More studies are necessary to provide basic data to enable targeted improvements in wound treatment in the primary healthcare service.

  18. [Postoperative surveillance of wound infection after cesarean section at Kenézy Hospital, Debrecen, Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várkonyi, István; Makai, Ildikó; Papdiné Nyíri, Gyöngyi; Bacskó, György; Kardos, László

    2011-01-02

    Wound infection is a typical, partly preventable complication of cesarean sections. We started extended recording of cesarean section data in October, 2008 as part of our general wound infection surveillance program. To describe the circumstances and outcomes of the sections and analyze associations between them. We analyzed 523 cases over the period October 1, 2008 to September 30, 2009. Variables were assessed using descriptive statistics. Associations between explanatory factors and wound infection were evaluated using logistic regression. Infections (overall rate: 3.6%) were more frequent in younger subjects, those with anemia, subcutaneous hematoma, in pregnancies with meconium stained or purulent amniotic fluid, and decreased to about a third after infection control was tightened. by being a proxy variable of factors with which wound infection is associated, age is a clinically valuable predictive variable. Good infection control practice is effective in preventing wound infections. The results are consistent with appropriate prescription practices of prophylactic antibiotic use, and with prophylactic measures being effective.

  19. Treatment of gram-positive deep sternal wound infections in cardiac surgery -experiences with daptomycin-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coskun Kasim O

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The reported incidence of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI after cardiac surgery is 0.4-5% with Staphylococcus aureus being the most common pathogen isolated from infected wound sternotomies and bacteraemic blood cultures. This infection is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality than other known aetiologies. Little is reported about the optimal antibiotic management. The aim of the study is to quantify the application of daptomycin treatment of DSWI due to gram-positive organisms post cardiac surgery. We performed an observational analysis in 23 cases of post sternotomy DSWI with gram-positive organisms February 2009 and September 2010. When the wound appeared viable and the microbiological cultures were negative, the technique of chest closure was individualised to the patient. The incidence of DSWI was 1.46%. The mean dose of daptomycin application was 4.4 ± 0.9 mg/kg/d and the average duration of the daptomycin application was 14.47 ± 7.33 days. In 89% of the patients VAC therapy was used. The duration from daptomycin application to sternal closure was 18 ± 13.9 days. The parameters of infection including, fibrinogen (p = 0.03, white blood cell count (p = 0.001 and C-reactive protein (p = 0.0001 were significantly reduced after daptomycin application. We had no mortality and wound healing was successfully achieved in all patients. Treatment of DSWI due to gram-positive organisms with a daptomycin-containing antibiotic regimen is safe, effective and promotes immediate improvement of local wound conditions. Based on these observations, daptomycin may offer a new treatment option for expediting surgical management of DSWI after cardiac surgery.

  20. Wound-Healing Peptides for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Other Infected Skin Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gomes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As the incidence of diabetes continues to increase in the western world, the prevalence of chronic wounds related to this condition continues to be a major focus of wound care research. Additionally, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized bacterial biofilms underlying severe infections that contribute to tissue destruction, delayed wound-healing and other serious complications. Most current biomedical approaches for advanced wound care aim at providing antimicrobial protection to the open wound together with a matrix scaffold (often collagen-based to boost reestablishment of the skin tissue. Therefore, the present review is focused on the efforts that have been made over the past years to find peptides possessing wound-healing properties, towards the development of new and effective wound care treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and other skin and soft tissue infections.

  1. Thermal injury induces impaired function in polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes and reduced control of burn wound infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, H.; Moser, C.; Jensen, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    of the skin showed a more polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs)-dominated inflammation in the group of mice with infected burn wound compared with the with burn wound group. In contrast, a higher degree of inflammation was observed in the burn wound group compared with the group of mice...... of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization...

  2. Mono- and combined antimicrobial agents efficiency in experimental wound infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Ігорівна Філімонова

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern problems of antibiotic therapy are shown by wide range of side effects, both on organism and microbiological levels: the spread of allergies, toxic for organ systems reactions, dysbiosis development, and resistant pathogens formation and dissemination. Therefore the necessity of search for new effective drugs with significant antimicrobial activity applied for the wounds treatment arises. Development of combined remedies on the background of different origin antimicrobial agents’ derivatives is one of the fight directions against infectious diseases in the skin pathology. Recently among the existing antimicrobial agents one should focus on antiseptic drugs, due to degenerative and dysfunctional effect on microbial cell.Aim of research. The comparison of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents chemotherapeutic efficiency in the treatment of localized purulent infection under experimental conditions.Metods. The study of chemotherapeutic efficiency was carried out on the model of localized purulent Staphylococcus infection on albino mice weighting 14 – 16 g. S.aureus ATCC 25923 strains were used as infectious agents. The contamination was performed subcutaneously to the right side of mice’s skin after depilation. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: the 1st group – infected mice without treatment (control; the 2nd group – infected mice treated with a ciprofloxacin; the 3rd group – infected mice treated with a Ciprofloxacin and Decamethoxin combination; the 4th group – infected mice treated with a combined drug on the base of mutual prodrugs (Hexamethylenetetramine and Phenyl salicylate.Results. The efficiency of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents under experimental Staphylococcus wound infection conditions was studied. It was found that localized purulent staph center was formed more slowly in comparison with control and mono preparation use (2nd group of animals. The average index of skin lesions in comparison

  3. Pyoderma gangrenosum following a routine caesarean section: Pseudo-infection in a caesarean wound

    OpenAIRE

    Radhika, A.G.; Singal, Archana; Radhakrishnan, Gita; Singh, Smita

    2015-01-01

    A 22-year-old booked primigravida underwent lower segment caesarean section for breech presentation. She developed signs and symptoms of wound infection by the fourth postoperative day. This was initially managed with antibiotics and wound dressing, but debridement was later undertaken after consulting surgeons. This resulted in an alarming worsening of the wound with sudden and fast increase in its size along with systemic symptoms. Wound biopsy established the diagnosis of pyoderma gangreno...

  4. Maggot debridement therapy of infected ulcers: patient and wound factors influencing outcome - a study on 101 patients with 117 wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenvoorde, Pascal; Jacobi, Cathrien E; Van Doorn, Louk; Oskam, Jacques

    2007-09-01

    It has been known for centuries that maggots are potent debriding agents capable of removing necrotic tissue and slough. In January 2004, the US Food and Drug Administration decided to regulate maggot debridement therapy (MDT). As it is still not clear which wounds are likely or unlikely to benefit from MDT, we performed a prospective study to gain more insight in patient and wound characteristics influencing outcome. In the period between August 2002 and December 2005, patients with infected wounds with signs of gangrenous or necrotic tissue who seemed suited for MDT were enrolled in the present study. In total, 101 patients with 117 ulcers were treated. Most wounds were worst-case scenarios, in which maggot therapy was a treatment of last resort. In total, 72 patients (71%) were classified as ASA III or IV. In total, 78 of 116 wounds (67%) had a successful outcome. These wounds healed completely (n = 60), healed almost completely (n = 12) or were clean at least (n = 6) at last follow-up. These results seem to be in line with those in the literature. All wounds with a traumatic origin (n = 24) healed completely. All wounds with septic arthritis (n = 13), however, failed to heal and led in half of these cases to a major amputation. According to a multivariate analysis, chronic limb ischaemia (odds ratio [OR], 7.5), the depth of the wound (OR, 14.0), and older age (>or= 60 years; OR, 7.3) negatively influenced outcome. Outcome was not influenced by gender, obesity, diabetes mellitus, smoking, ASA-classification, location of the wound, wound size or wound duration. Some patient characteristics (i. e. gender, obesity, smoking behaviour, presence of diabetes mellitus and ASA-classification at presentation) and some wound characteristics (i. e. location of the wound, wound duration and size) do not seem to contra-indicate eligibility for MDT. However, older patients and patients with chronic limb ischaemia or deep wounds are less likely to benefit from MDT. Septic

  5. Novel peptidoglycan-based diagnostic devices for detection of wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasmann, Andrea; Wehrschuetz-Sigl, Eva; Kanzler, Gertraud; Gewessler, Ulrike; Hulla, Elisabeth; Schneider, Konstantin P; Binder, Barbara; Schintler, Michael; Guebitz, Georg M

    2011-09-01

    Detection of wound infection is based on evaluation of the well-known signs of inflammation like rubor (redness), calor (heat), tumor (swelling), and dolor (pain) by medical doctors and/or time-consuming procedures requiring special machinery. There is currently no rapid diagnostic device available for the indication of wound infection, which would especially be helpful in home care of chronic ulcer patients. In this study, a new concept for a fast diagnostic tool for wound infection based on lysozyme and elastase triggered release of dye from a peptidoglycan matrix was investigated. The matrix consisted of alginate/agarose and peptidoglycan covalently labeled with Remazol brilliant blue. Lysozyme activity in postoperative wounds and decubitus wound fluids was significantly elevated upon infection (4830 ± 1848 U mL(-1)) compared to noninfected wounds (376 ± 240 U mL(-1)). Consequently, incubation of 8% (w/v) labeled agarose/peptidoglycan blend layers with infected wound fluid samples for 2 h at 37 °C resulted in a 4-fold higher amount of dye released than measured for noninfected wounds. For alginate/peptidoglycan beads, a 7-fold higher amount of dye was released in case of infected wound fluid samples compared to noninfected ones. Apart from lysozyme, proteases [i.e., gelatinase matrix metalloproteinase MMP-2 and MMP-9 and elastase] were detected in wound fluids (e.g., using Western blotting). When dosed in ratios typical for wounds, a slight synergistic effect was measured for peptidoglycan hydrolysis (i.e., dye release) between lysozyme and these proteases. Incubation of a double-layer system consisting of stained and nonstained peptidoglycan with infected wound fluids resulted in a color change from yellow to blue, thus allowing simple visual detection of wound infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy as a point-of-care diagnostic for infection in wound effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebremedhin, Meron; Yesupriya, Shubha; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In military medicine, one of the challenges in dealing with large combat-related injuries is the prevalence of bacterial infection, including multidrug resistant organisms. This can prolong the wound healing process and lead to wound dehiscence. Current methods of identifying bacterial infection rely on culturing microbes from patient material and performing biochemical tests, which together can take 2-3 days to complete. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy technique that allows for highly sensitive structural detection of analytes adsorbed onto specially prepared metal surfaces. In the past, we have been able to discriminate between bacterial isolates grown on solid culture media using standard Raman spectroscopic methods. Here, SERS is utilized to assess the presence of bacteria in wound effluent samples taken directly from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt for the application of SERS directly to wound effluent. The utilization of SERS as a point-of-care diagnostic tool would enable physicians to determine course of treatment and drug administration in a matter of hours.

  7. Effect of antiseptic irrigation on infection rates of traumatic soft tissue wounds: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, B; Neuenschwander, R; Brill, F; Wurmitzer, F; Wegner, C; Assadian, O; Kramer, A

    2017-03-02

    Acute traumatic wounds are contaminated with bacteria and therefore an infection risk. Antiseptic wound irrigation before surgical intervention is routinely performed for contaminated wounds. However, a broad variety of different irrigation solutions are in use. The aim of this retrospective, non-randomised, controlled longitudinal cohort study was to assess the preventive effect of four different irrigation solutions before surgical treatment, on wound infection in traumatic soft tissue wounds. Over a period of three decades, the prophylactic application of wound irrigation was studied in patients with contaminated traumatic wounds requiring surgical treatment, with or without primary wound closure. The main outcome measure was development of wound infection. From 1974-1983, either 0.04 % polihexanide (PHMB), 1 % povidone-iodine (PVP-I), 4 % hydrogen peroxide, or undiluted Ringer's solution were concurrently in use. From 1984-1996, only 0.04 % PHMB or 1 % PVP-I were applied. From 1997, 0.04 % PHMB was used until the end of the study period in 2005. The combined rate for superficial and deep wound infection was 1.7 % in the 0.04 % PHMB group (n=3264), 4.8 % in the 1 % PVP-I group (n=2552), 5.9 % in the Ringer's group (n=645), and 11.7 % in the 4 % hydrogen peroxide group (n=643). Compared with all other treatment arms, PHMB showed the highest efficacy in preventing infection in traumatic soft tissue wounds (p<0.001). However, compared with PVP-I, the difference was only significant for superficial infections. The large patient numbers in this study demonstrated a robust superiority of 0.04 % PHMB to prevent infection in traumatic soft tissue wounds. These retrospective results may further provide important information as the basis for power calculations for the urgently needed prospective clinical trials in the evolving field of wound antisepsis.

  8. An analysis of risk factors associated with traumatic extremity amputation stump wound infection in a Nigerian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoke, Njoku Isaac; Nwigwe, Chinedu Gregory

    2012-11-01

    We aimed to determine the risk factors associated with traumatic extremity amputation stump wound infection in our environment. This was a retrospective analysis of databases that included the entire patient population with traumatic extremity amputation seen in Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital and Federal Medical Centre Abakaliki from January 2001 to December 2011. There were 63 patients studied and stump wound infection was a complication in 38 (60 %) of them. Stump wound infection rate significantly correlated with the form of amputation, i.e., a higher rate in crushing than guillotine (sharp clear-cut) amputation (80.5 vs. 22.7 % p amputation (80.6 vs. 33.3 % p amputation (71.1 vs. 60.7 % p amputation interval (p amputation as an independent risk factor (p traumatic amputation stump wound infection. The only independent predictor of traumatic extremity amputation stump wound infection is a crushing form of amputation; it should be accorded a high priority in interventions aimed at reducing infection rate.

  9. Conventional wound management versus a closed suction irrigation method for infected laparotomy wound--a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Zuo Jun; Lai, Eric C H; Lee, Qing Han; Chen, Huan Wei; Lau, Wan Yee; Wang, Feng Jie

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a closed suction irrigation method for the management of infected laparotomy wounds. This is a retrospective study on consecutive patients with infected laparotomy wounds managed in a single tertiary referral hospital from January 2004 to March 2009. The wounds were laid open, debrided and cleansed with hydrogen peroxide, povidone iodine and normal saline. The wounds were either conventionally treated with normal saline dressings followed by secondary suturing when healthy granulation tissues were formed (the Control group) or by the closed suction irrigation method after suturing the wound (the Study Group). There were 70 patients in the Study Group and 60 patients in the Control Group. The hospital stay (mean ± SD, 9.2 ± 0.1 vs. 20.5 ± 0.6 days, P irrigation method for infected laparotomy wounds. The closed suction irrigation method decreased hospital stay and allowed early rehabilitation. The findings of our study need to be substantiated in large-scale randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2011 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biofilms and Persistent Wound Infections in United States Military Trauma Patients: a Case-control Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-08

    Acinetobacter baumannii , Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli. Akers et al. BMC Infectious Diseases 2014, 14:190 Page 5 of 11 http...on a per wound basis (June 2009–August 2012)1 SSTI Case wounds SSTI Control wounds p-value Bacterial organism ɘ.0001 Acinetobacter baumannii 79 (24.0...Patients2 (N = 60) Acinetobacter baumannii Total Infections 9 21 MDR 9 (100) 21 (100) Pseudomonas aeruginosa Total Infections 10 24 MDR 0 2 (8.3

  11. [APPLICATION OF TOPICAL HEMOGLOBIN SPRAY IN INFECTED POSTTRAUMATIC AND POSTOPERATIVE WOUNDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marubivuc, Marin; Fumic, Nera; Laginja, Stanislava; Smokrovic, Eva; Bakota, Bore; Bekic, Marijo; Čoklo, Miran

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic and postoperative infective wounds that progress to chronic wounds can pose serious problem for the traumatized patient with reduced biological potential for healing. Also, due to the need for specific and individual approach to such a patient, they represent a challenge for physicians. The use of topical hemoglobin spray (Granulox®) with protective and supportive local action ensures and improves physiological conditions for healing, thus providing additional possibilities for adequate and safe healing of complicated infected wounds.

  12. Isolation of Leclercia adecarboxylata from an infected war wound in an immune competent patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Zapor; McGann, Patrick T; Alao, Omolara; Stevenson, Lindsay; Lesho, Emil; Viscount, Helen

    2013-03-01

    We describe the case of a wounded soldier with a gluteus infection from which Leclercia adecarboxylata was cultured. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of this unusual pathogen being isolated from an abscess and the first report of L. adecarboxylata as the etiology of a war wound infection. Reprint & Copyright © 2013 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  13. Wound and soft tissue infections of Serratia marcescens in patients receiving wound care: A health care-associated outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us, Ebru; Kutlu, Huseyin H; Tekeli, Alper; Ocal, Duygu; Cirpan, Sevilay; Memikoglu, Kemal O

    2017-04-01

    We described a health care-associated Serratia marcescens outbreak of wound and soft tissue infection lasting approximately 11 months at Ankara University Ibni Sina Hospital. After identification of S marcescens strains from the clinical and environmental samples, and their susceptibility testing to antimicrobial agents, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed to detect molecular epidemiologic relationships among these isolates. The strains which were isolated from the saline bottles used for wound cleansing in the wound care unit were found to be 100% interrelated by PFGE to the strains from the samples of the outbreak patients. Reuse of the emptied bottles has no longer been allowed since the outbreak occurred. Besides, more efficient and frequent infection control training for hospital staff has been conducted. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Incidence of Infection After Early Closure of Evulsive Facial Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosseini-e- Todashki H

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of postoperative wound dehiscence and"ninfection after early closure of evulsive facial wounds. This treatment was conducted on 28 male patients"nwith evulsive facial wounds. The formation of these evulsive wounds was due to the rupture of"ntemporary cavitation caused by high and extra high velocity messiles. All patients with average age of 18"nyears old were treated 24-48 hrs afire accidents at base hospitals (1988-1990."nPrimary healing was achieved in 24 subjects from 7 tO 15 days after the standard operation. Wound"ndehiscences and bacterial infections were observed in 4 subjects."nThe conclusion can be made from the results is that the early closure of evulsive facial wounds may"nreduce the rate of wound dehiscence and infection because of high vascularity in this area.

  15. Treating infected diabetic wounds with superoxidized water as anti-septic agent: a preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, S.F.; Khaliq, T.; Zubair, M.; Saaiq, M.; Sikandar, I.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of superoxidized water (MicrocynTM) in diabetic patients with different wounds. One hundred known diabetic patients were enrolled. Half were randomized to the intervention group (those whose wounds were managed with superoxidized water) and half to the control group (whose wounds were treated with normal saline) using a table of random numbers. The two groups were matched for age, gender, duration of diabetes and category of wound. All patients received appropriate surgical treatment for their wounds as required. Local wound treatment was carried out daily using superoxidized water soaked gauzes on twice daily basis in the intervention group and normal saline in the control group. The treatment was continued until wound healing. The main outcome measures were duration of hospital stay, downgrading of the wound category, wound healing time and need for interventions such as amputation. Statistically significant differences were found in favour of the superoxidized water group with respect to duration of hospital stay, downgrading of the wound category and wound healing time. Although the initial results of employing superoxidized water for the management of infected diabetic wounds are encouraging, further multicentre clinical trials are warranted before this antiseptic is recommended for general use. It may offer an economical alternative to other expensive antiseptics with positive impact on the prevailing infection rates, patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. (author)

  16. Wound management with negative pressure wound therapy in postoperative infection after open reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saku, Isaku; Kanda, Shotaro; Saito, Toshihiro; Fukushima, Takashi; Akiyama, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Deep infection after reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon rupture is a major and intractable complication. We report a case of late deep infection following a surgery for chronic Achilles tendon rupture, and its simple and successful treatment with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT). Six months following the reconstruction of chronic Achilles tendon rupture, a deep infection developed and reconstructed part of the tendon ruptured again. After appropriate debridement. There is no definitive treatment strategy for postoperative infection following open Achilles tendon repair. NPWT was applied to the wound, to promote wound healing and healthy granulation. In our case, NPWT promoted the wound healing and the infected Achilles tendon with tendon loss formed a healthy bridge with granulation tissue spontaneously. The patient resumed her normal activities of daily living, without requiring tendon transfer surgery. NPWT seems to be a simple and successful candidate for this situation. NPWT seems to be effective for the treatment of postoperative infection following Achilles tendon repair, even in cases of tendon loss. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Determination of Pathogens in Postoperative Wound Infection After Surgically Reduced Calcaneal Fractures and Implications for Prophylaxis and Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Manouk; Spijkerman, Ingrid J.; de Muinck-Keizer, Robert-Jan O.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schepers, Tim

    2018-01-01

    High rates of postoperative wound infection (POWI) have been reported after surgery for calcaneal fractures. This is a retrospective cohort study to determine the causative pathogens of these infections and subsequent treatment strategies. In addition, microbacterial growth from superficial wound

  18. [Vacuum-assisted closure therapy for the treatment of sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K; Nakamura, Y; Harada, S; Saiki, M; Marumoto, A; Kanaoka, Y; Nishimura, M

    2009-11-01

    Sternal wound infection is still one of the critical and challenging complications after cardiac surgery. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a unique and simple system that helps promote wound healing. We report 3 cases with the sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery, in which VAC therapy was applied between January, 2005 and April, 2007. Two of them had good response to VAC therapy and had their wound healed after 3 and 5 weeks, respectively. However, the remaining case, in which bilateral internal thoracic artery had been taken down for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and osteomyelitis of the sternum was not well controlled, did not respond to VAC therapy. Our results suggested that VAC might facilitate wound healing of the patients with sternal wound infection only after abscess was drained and opened, while it might not be useful for the patents with osteomyelitis.

  19. Local medicamentous treatment of wound infection in patients with diabetic foot syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaeva I.O.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the parameters and comparison of wound healing in patients with diabetic foot syndrome using modern dressings and traditional scheme of local treatment of chronic wounds. Materials and methods: Clinical part of the work has been based on the results of a comprehensive investigation of the parameters of wound healing in 154 diabetic foot patients. Results: Optimum results are obtained by treatment of wound infection in patients with neuropathic diabetic foot shape using highly technological dressings. Conclusion: The modern interactive dressings may actively interfere to all phases of wound healing in patients with purulent-necrotic complications of diabetes mellitus

  20. Electromagnetic radiation influence on clinical course of experimental wound infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pronina Е.А.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The article gives close attention to the study of electromagnetic radiation influence (EMR at the frequency of molecular spectrum absorption and radiation (MSAR of nitric oxide (150 GHz and atmospheric oxygen (129 GHz on the clinical course of experimental wound infection caused by antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The panoramic spectrometric measuring complex, developed in Saratov Scientific Research Institute of Measuring Equipment was used while carrying out the research. Electromagnetic vibrations of extremely high frequencies were stimulated in this complex imitating the atmospheric oxygen and nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum structure. The experiments proved the fact that exposure to radiation at the frequency of molecular spectrum absorption and radiation (MSAR of nitric oxide and atmospheric oxygen had positive impact on the course of traumatic process

  1. Comparison of post-operative wound infection after inguinal hernia repair with polypropylene mesh and polyester mesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mughal, M.A.; Ahmed, M.; Sajid, M.T.; Mustafa, Q.U.A.; Shukr, I.; Ahsan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare post operative wound infection frequency after inguinal hernia repair with polypropylene and polyester mesh using standard Lichtenstein hernioplasty technique. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration: This study was conducted at general surgery department CMH/MH Rawalpindi from 8th April 2007 to 1st Jan 2008 over a period of 09 months. Patients and Materials: Sixty patients received through outpatient department with diagnosis of inguinal hernia satisfying inclusion/exclusion criteria were included. Patients were divided into two groups randomly. Group 1 included those patients in whom polypropylene mesh was used while group II patients were implanted with polyester mesh. Demographic as well as data concerning post operative wound infection was collected and analyzed. Results: Fifty seven patients (95%) were males while remaining (05%) were females. Mean age in group I was 41.17+-9.99 years while in group II was 41.47+-9.79 years (p=0.907). One patient (3.3%) in each group developed wound infection diagnosed by clinical evidence of pain at wound site, redness, induration and purulent discharge. Conclusion: There is no difference in post operative wound infection rate after inguinal Lichtenstein hernioplasty using either polypropylene or polyester mesh. (author)

  2. Terbinafine-loaded wound dressing for chronic superficial fungal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paskiabi, Farnoush Asghari; Bonakdar, Shahin; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Imani, Mohammad; Jahanshiri, Zahra; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, Masoomeh; Razzaghi-Abyaneh, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    In spite of developing new drugs and modern formulations, the treatments of chronic fungal infections are still challenging. Fibrous wound dressings are new suggestions for the treatment of chronic superficial infections. In the present study, we formulated an antifungal agent, terbinafine hydrochloride (TFH), which is a hydrophobic drug, in wound dressings prepared by electrospun polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone/gelatin (50:50 w/w) and gelatin. To obtain more water-stable meshes, the preparations were treated by glutaraldehyde and their properties were determined before and after treatment. The morphology of fibrous meshes was observed by scanning electron microscopy. Drug loading efficiency and release rate were measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the release rate was monitored for 144 h. Antifungal tests were performed on Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans cultured on Muller-Hinton agar. The toxicity of the meshes was measured after 24 h and 14 days by MTT assay. Terbinafine loading of polycaprolactone/gelatin (50:50) was 100% and it released the highest amount of TFH too. In antifungal tests, all samples were able to hinderT. mentagrophytes and A. fumigatus but not C. albicans growth among them, polycaprolactone fibers made the largest inhibition zone. In MTT assay, none of prepared samples showed toxicity against L929 cells. Teken together, the prepared TFH-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun meshes were able to release TFH slowly and in a steady state in time. With respect to no obvious cytotoxicity in MTT assay and stong antifungal activity toward T. mentagrophytesin vitro, these TFH-based meshes could be considered as potential candidates in clinical application as wound dressing for treatment of chronic dermatophytosis. - Highlights: • Terbinafine (TFH)-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun fibers were successfully fabricated. • TFH-loaded PCL/gelatin electrospun fibers showed a slow drug release

  3. Tilapia Piscidin 4 (TP4 Stimulates Cell Proliferation and Wound Closure in MRSA-Infected Wounds in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang-Ning Huang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are endogenous antibiotics that directly affect microorganisms, and also have a variety of receptor-mediated functions. One such AMP, Tilapia piscidin 4 (TP4, was isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus; TP4 has antibacterial effects and regulates the innate immune system. The aim of the present study was to characterize the role of TP4 in the regulation of wound closure in mice and proliferation of a keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT and fibroblast cell line (Hs-68. In vitro, TP4 stimulated cell proliferation and activated collagen I, collagen III, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF gene expression in Hs-68 cells, which induces keratin production by HaCaT cells. This effect was detectable at TP4 concentrations of 6.25 µg/mL in both cell lines. In vivo, TP4 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis and wound infection caused by MRSA in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that TP4 enhances the survival rate of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen MRSA through both antimicrobial and wound closure activities mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF, transforming growth factor (TGF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. The peptide is likely involved in antibacterial processes and regulation of tissue homeostasis in infected wounds in mice. Overall, these results suggest that TP4 may be suitable for development as a novel topical agent for wound dressing.

  4. Triclosan-coated sutures reduce wound infections after spinal surgery: a retrospective, nonrandomized, clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Saito, Wataru; Yamagata, Megumu; Imura, Takayuki; Inoue, Gen; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Takahira, Naonobu; Uchida, Kentaro; Fukahori, Nobuko; Shimomura, Kiyomi; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a serious postoperative complication. The incidence of SSIs is lower in clean orthopedic surgery than in other fields, but it is higher after spinal surgery, reaching 4.15% in high-risk patients. Several studies reported that triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 sutures (Vicryl Plus; Ethicon, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA) significantly reduced the infection rate in the general surgical, neurosurgical, and thoracic surgical fields. However, there have been no studies on the effects of such coated sutures on the incidence of SSIs in orthopedics. To compare the incidence of wound infections after spinal surgery using triclosan-coated suture materials with that of noncoated ones. A retrospective, nonrandomized, and clinical study. From May 2010 to April 2012, 405 patients underwent a spinal surgical procedure in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery of two university hospitals. The primary outcome was the number of wound infections and dehiscences. Two hundred five patients had a conventional wound closure with polyglactin 910 suture (Vicryl) between May 2010 and April 2011 (Time Period 1 [TP1]), and 200 patients underwent wound closure with triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 suture (Vicryl Plus) between May 2011 and April 2012 (TP2). Statistical comparisons of wound infections, dehiscence, and risk factors for poor wound healing or infection were performed. None of the authors has any conflict of interest associated with this study. There were two cases of wound dehiscence in TP1 and one in TP2 (p=.509). Using noncoated sutures in TP1, eight patients (3.90%) had wound infections, whereas one patient (0.50%) had wound infections in TP2 (using triclosan-coated sutures); the difference was significant (p=.020). The use of triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 sutures instead of polyglactin 910 sutures may reduce the number of wound infections after spinal surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved wound care product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention pertains to use of sodium diacetate (NaHAc 2) as an antimicrobial agent against bacteria growing in biofilms. The aspects of the invention include a wound care product comprising sodium diacetate, a kit comprising a wound care product,and a methodof treating an infected wound....

  6. Staged Concept for Treatment of Severe Postsaphenectomy Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schroeter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The saphenous vein remains the most commonly used conduit in coronary artery bypass surgery. Vein harvest is a critical component with significant morbidity associated with leg wounds from open technique. Occurring complications are hematoma, postoperative pain, skin changes, neuropathy, and septic or nonseptic wound complications. Within the context of a recent case, we present our approach to postsaphenectomy wound management.

  7. Disposable surgical face masks for preventing surgical wound infection in clean surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson Lipp

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical face masks were originally developed to contain and filter droplets containing microorganisms expelled from the mouth and nasopharynx of healthcare workers during surgery, thereby providing protection for the patient. However, there are several ways in which surgical face masks could potentially contribute to contamination of the surgical wound, e.g. by incorrect wear or by leaking air from the side of the mask due to poor string tension. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether disposable surgical face masks worn by the surgical team during clean surgery prevent postoperative surgical wound infection. SEARCH METHODS: We searched The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register (searched 14 September 2011; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 3; Ovid MEDLINE (2008 to August Week 5 2011; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process &Other Non-Indexed Citations September 13, 2011; Ovid EMBASE (2008 to 2011 Week 35; and EBSCO CINAHL (2008 to 9 September 2011. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing the use of disposable surgical masks with the use of no mask. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors extracted data independently. MAIN RESULTS: Three trials were included, involving a total of 2113 participants. There was no statistically significant difference in infection rates between the masked and unmasked group in any of the trials. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: From the limited results it is unclear whether the wearing of surgical face masks by members of the surgical team has any impact on surgical wound infection rates for patients undergoing clean surgery.

  8. Maggot therapy for repairing serious infective wound in a severely burned patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Jun-cheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】The larvae of musca domestica were put in use to discard the dead tissue of a case of severe burn. A total of 50 000 aseptic maggots were put onto the infective wound surface, and aseptic dressings overlaid the surface. Three days later, another 20 000 maggots were put onto the wound for the second therapy. After twice maggot debridement, most necrotic muscle tissues of the wound were cleaned up, and eventually fresh granulation tissue grew and later the wound was covered and healed by 3 times of skin grafting. The result demonstrates that maggot therapy is safe and effective with no adverse complications except pain. Key words: Biological therapy; Wound infection; Burns; Wound healing; Debridement

  9. Risk factors for post-operative wound infection in the setting of chorioamnionitis and cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Feldman, Chelsea; Puechl, Allison; Grotegut, Chad A; Heine, R Phillips

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors associated with an increased risk of post-operative wound infection in women with chorioamnionitis who undergo cesarean delivery. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women with clinical chorioamnionitis who underwent cesarean delivery at a tertiary-care center between June 2010 and May 2013. Demographic data, labor and delivery details and post-operative outcomes were collected. Women with and without post-operative wound infections were compared. Of 213 women with clinical chorioamnionitis who underwent cesarean delivery, 32 (15%) developed wound infections. Women with wound infection were more likely to have a body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 40 (p = 0.04), chronic hypertension (p = 0.03), leukocytosis on presentation (p = 0.046) or use tobacco (p = 0.002). Women who received ertapenem postpartum were less likely to develop wound infection than those who did not receive antibiotics (p = 0.02) or those that received ampicillin, gentamicin and clindamycin (p = 0.005). Elevated BMI, tobacco use, chronic hypertension and leukocytosis at admission were associated with an increased risk of wound infection. Ertapenem appeared to reduce the risk of post-operative wound infections in women who had chorioamnionitis and underwent cesarean delivery. This could be considered as a treatment option for this high-risk population.

  10. Prevena™, negative pressure wound therapy applied to closed Pfannenstiel incisions at time of caesarean section in patients deemed at high risk for wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglim, B; O'Connor, H; Daly, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our retrospective study is to report on our experience using the Prevena™ wound system in obese patients undergoing caesarean section delivery. A total of 26 cases were identified from July 2012 to October 2013. The median BMI of these women was 45.3 kg/m(2). Elective caesarean sections were performed in 20 women (77%). There were four cases (15%) of superficial dehiscence. Factors associated with wound breakdown were wound infection (p = 0.03), increasing BMI (p infection was the only factor which remained associated with wound breakdown. Wound disruption is a major cause of morbidity following caesarean section in morbidly obese patients. The wound complication rate in our experience was low with the Prevena™ dressing with no cases of sheath dehiscence, and no patient required a second operation. The presence of infection is the most important factor in wound breakdown and should be the focus for management protocols.

  11. Evaluation of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides as Topical Anti-Infectives with Broad-Spectrum Activity against Combat-Related Bacterial and Fungal Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    succeeded in developing resistance to a variety of AMPs. 2. Keywords Antimicrobial, peptides, anti-fungal, wounds, burns, bacterial resistance ...against Combat- Related Bacterial and Fungal Wound Infections PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Louis Edward Clemens Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Riptide...Anti-Infectives with Broad- Spectrum Activity against Combat-Related Bacterial and Fungal Wound Infections 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  12. [Experimental study on radiofrequency ablation technology for treatment of infected wounds in minipigs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rungong; Zuo, Tantan; Zhu, Jialiang; Zhong, Hongbin; Wu, Kejian; Hou, Shuxun

    2013-09-01

    To observe the effect of radiofrequency ablation technology for the treatment of infected wounds in minipigs. Infected wounds of full-thickness skin defects (about 6.15 cm2/wound) were prepared in 8 6-month-old minipigs (weighing, 30-35 kg) using the method of Davis et al. The 160 wounds were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 40). Infected wounds were debrided with the radiofrequency ablation technology in group A, with the electric knife in group B, and with the scalpel in group C; no treatment was done in group D as a control. The healing rate, healing time, and tissue filling rate were observed; bacterial quantitative examination and histological examination were done at 0, 2, 7, and 14 days after operation. All infected wounds were successfully established after 48 hours when Staphylococcus aureus dilution were inoculated. The wounds after radiofrequency ablation technology treatment were fresh and flat with slight bleeding; the healing time of group A was significantly shorter than that of groups B, C, and D (P observation showed that the surface of wound was smooth in group A at 0 day, and group A was better than the other groups in wound healing; at 2 days, some exudates were observed in 4 groups, but it was least in group A. There was inflammatory cell infiltration in various degrees in 4 groups at 7 and 14 days; it was lightest in group A with thick epithelium and dense collagen bundles, followed by groups B and C, and it was severe in group D. The radiofrequency ablation technology can effectively remove the necrotic tissues of infected wounds, remarkably reduce the number of bacteria, improve the healing rate, and shorten the healing time of wounds.

  13. Intracavity lavage and wound irrigation for prevention of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Atkinson, Ross A; Smith, Tanya A; Rowlands, Ceri; Rithalia, Amber D; Crosbie, Emma J; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after an operative procedure. A preventable complication, they are costly and associated with poorer patient outcomes, increased mortality, morbidity and reoperation rates. Surgical wound irrigation is an intraoperative technique, which may reduce the rate of SSIs through removal of dead or damaged tissue, metabolic waste, and wound exudate. Irrigation can be undertaken prior to wound closure or postoperatively. Intracavity lavage is a similar technique used in operations that expose a bodily cavity; such as procedures on the abdominal cavity and during joint replacement surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of wound irrigation and intracavity lavage on the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Search methods In February 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions on language, date of publication or study setting. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgical procedures in which the use of a particular type of intraoperative washout (irrigation or lavage) was the only systematic difference between groups, and in which wounds underwent primary closure. The primary outcomes were SSI and wound dehiscence. Secondary outcomes were mortality, use of systemic antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, adverse events, re-intervention, length of hospital stay, and readmissions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion at each stage. Two review authors also undertook data extraction, assessment of risk of bias and GRADE assessment. We calculated risk ratios or differences in means with 95% confidence intervals where

  14. Effects of ketanserin on hypergranulation tissue formation, infection, and healing of equine lower limb wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Marc; Besche, Béatrice; Lefay, Marie-Paul; Hare, Jonathan; Vlaminck, Kathleen

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this multicentre, randomized, controlled field study was to determine the efficacy of ketanserin gel in preventing exuberant granulation tissue formation (hypergranulation) and infection in equine lower limb wounds. Horses and ponies (n = 481) with naturally occurring wounds were randomized to either topical treatment with ketanserin gel (n = 242) or a positive control (Belgium, Germany: ethacridin lactate solution, n = 120; France, United Kingdom: malic, benzoic, and salicylic acid [MBS] cream, n = 119). Treatment continued until the wound healed (success), formed hypergranulation tissue (failure), or became infected (failure). Treatment was terminated after 6 months in all remaining animals. Ketanserin was successful in 88% of cases. Wounds treated with ketanserin were 2 and 5 times more likely to heal successfully than were those treated with MBS or ethacridin lactate, respectively. Ketanserin gel is thus more effective than these standard treatments in preventing hypergranulation tissue and infection of equine lower limb wounds.

  15. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Combat Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    the distal part of the femur of a patient with fractures of the femoral shaft and tibial plateau, above a transtibial amputation. The ...showing a femoral shaft fracture . Fracture - healing was complicated by hetero- topic ossification, which caused symptomatic entrapment of the sciatic...in vivo, i.e. monitor wound healing during surgical debridements. - Is it the best time to close the wound?

  16. First case of Chlorella wound infection in a human in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hart

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old man developed an infected knee wound 2 days after jumping his bicycle into a freshwater dam. He required repeated debridement and tissue grew bright green colonies typical of the alga Chlorella plus Aeromonas hydrophila. This, and one previously reported case, responded to surgical debridement and careful wound management.

  17. Prevention of surgical wound infection in obese women undergoing cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Vinter, Christina Anne; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Obese women undergoing caesarean section are at increased risk of surgical wound infection, which may lead to reduced quality of life, and increased health care cost. The aim is to evaluate the effect of incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy applied prophylactically in obese women under...

  18. A STUDY ON THE POST SURGICAL WOUND INFECTIONS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN KANCHIPURAM

    OpenAIRE

    Sivasankari; Thenmozhi Valli Pitchai; Anitha; Senthamarai; Venugopal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Surgical site infections are the infections that occur within thirty days after the operative procedure (Except in case of added implants). Surgical site infections are the 3rd most commonly reported nosocomial infections accounting for a quarter of all such infections. A wide range of organisms are known to infect wounds like gram positive cocci, gram negative bacilli, spore formers, aerobes and anaerobes. Despite the advances in operative technique and better unde...

  19. Reducing Surgical Site Infection in Spinal Surgery with Betadine Irrigation and Intra-Wound Vancomycin Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomov, Marko; Mitsunaga, Lance; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Nallur, Deepak; Roberto, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a surgical site infection (SSI) prevention protocol instituted in the Orthopaedic Spine Department at our institution. Summary of Background Data SSI is an undesired complication of orthopaedic spine surgeries. It poses a significant risk to the patient, as well as a financial toll on the healthcare system. A wide range of prophylactic measures have been used to attempt to reduce SSI rates. Methods A protocol consisting of a combination of 0.3% Betadine wound irrigation and 1 gram of intra-wound Vancomycin powder application was developed at our institution. Multiple data sources were consolidated for thorough evaluation of changes in SSI rates, patient risk factors, and changes in bacteriology. Identification of risk factors that predispose patients to SSI was performed using mixed effects logistic regression in a univariate fashion. Risk factors with p-values of ≤ 0.05 in univariate analysis were included together in a multivariate mixed effects logistic regression model. Results SSI rates were reduced by 50% following the intervention; Chi square analysis comparing the SSI rates between the pre- and post-intervention periods yielded a p-value of 0.042. Rates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus dropped from 30% to 7% and the rates of multi-bacterial infections dropped from 37% to 27%. The risk factors that were statistically significant in multivariate analysis were the following: age (OR 0.93), anemia (OR 30.73), prior operation (OR 27.45), and vertebral fracture (OR 22.22). Conclusion The combination of Betadine wound irrigation and intra-wound vancomycin powder application led to both a clinically and statistically significant decrease in SSI rates by 50%. Bacteriology analysis and risk factor assessment proved to be valuable tools in assessing the efficacy of a new prophylactic measure and in the planning of future protocols. PMID:25608241

  20. Vacuum-assisted closure in the treatment of sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, Martin; Nemec, Petr; Zalesak, Bohumil; Kalab, Martin; Hajek, Roman; Jecminkova, Lenka; Kolar, Milan

    2007-12-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) was primarily designed for the treatment of pressure ulcers or chronic, debilitating wounds. Recently, VAC has become an encouraging treatment modality for sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery, providing superior results to conventional treatment strategies. From November 2004 to September 2006, 34 patients, undergoing VAC therapy for sternal wound infection following cardiac surgery, were prospectively evaluated. Ten patients (29 %) were treated for superficial sternal wound infection and 24 (71 %) for deep sternal wound infection. The median age was 69.9 years (range 48 to 82) and the median BMI was 33.4 kg/m(2) (range 28 to 41). Twenty patients (59 %) were women and 19 patients (59 %) were diabetics. Owing to sternal wound infection complications, 16 patients (47 %) were readmitted to the department. VAC was used following the previous failure of the conventional treatment strategy in 7 patients (21 %). Thirty-three patients (97 %) were treated successfully. One patient (3 %) died of multiple organ failure. The overall length of hospitalization was 34.6 days (range 9 to 62). The median number of dressing changes was 4.6 (range 3 to 10). The median VAC treatment time until surgical closure was 9.2 days (range 6 to 21 days). VAC therapy was solely used as a bridge to definite wound closure. Three patients (9 %) with chronic fistula were re-admitted 1 to 6 months after VAC therapy. VAC therapy is a safe and reliable option in the treatment of sternal wound infection in cardiac surgery. VAC therapy should be considered an effective adjunct to conventional treatment modalities for the treatment of extensive and life-threatening wound infections following cardiac surgery, particularly in the presence of risk factors.

  1. Risk factors for surgical wound infection in HIV-positive patients undergoing surgery for orthopaedic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalo, Anani; Patassi, Akouda; James, Yaovi Edem; Walla, Atsi; Sangare, Aly; Dossim, Assang

    2010-08-01

    To identify risk factors associated with surgical wound infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) undergoing surgery for orthopaedic trauma. Records of 29 male and 7 female HIV-positive patients aged 18 to 47 years who underwent surgery for orthopaedic trauma were reviewed. Data on HIV-specific variables (HIV clinical classification, CD4+ lymphocyte count) and highly active antiretroviral therapy were retrieved, as were data on wound class, fracture type, surgery type, surgical wound infections, and outcomes. Possible risk factors associated with surgical wound infection were analysed. The median follow-up period was 27 (range, 19-41) months. Of the 36 patients, 14 (39%) developed surgical wound infections (4 were deep and 10 superficial). 89% and 67% of them were in HIV clinical category B and in CD4+ T-lymphocyte category 3, respectively. 12 of these infections resolved after debridement and prolonged antibiotic treatment, and 2 developed chronic osteomyelitis. Four of the patients had non-union. Surgical wound infections were associated with HIV clinical category B (pwounds (p=0.003). Identification of risk factors may help minimise morbidity in HIV-positive patients.

  2. Bacteria Isolated from Conspecific Bite Wounds in Norway and Black Rats: Implications for Rat Bite–Associated Infections In People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabek, Erin; Tang, Patrick; Parsons, Kirbee L.; Koehn, Martha; Jardine, Claire M.; Patrick, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bites associated with wild and domestic Norway and black rats (Rattus norvegicus and Rattus rattus) may have a variety of health consequences in people. Bite-related infections are among the most significant of these consequences; however, there is little data on the infectious agents that can be transmitted from rats to people through biting. This is problematic because without an accurate understanding of bite-related infection risks, it is difficult for health professionals to evaluate the adequacy of existing guidelines for empirical therapy. The objectives of this study were to increase our knowledge of the bacterial species associated with rat bites by studying bite wounds that wild rats inflict upon one another and to review the literature regarding rat bites and bite wound management. Wild Norway and black rats (n=725) were trapped in Vancouver, Canada, and examined for bite wounds in the skin. All apparently infected wounds underwent aerobic and anaerobic culture, and isolated bacteria were identified. Thirty-six rats had bite wound–related infections, and approximately 22 different species of bacteria belonging to 18 genera were identified. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate; however, the majority of infections (72.5%) were polymicrobial. Rat bites can result in infection with a number of aerobic and anaerobic Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In humans, these wounds are best managed through early recognition and cleansing. The benefit of prophylactic antimicrobial treatment is debatable, but given the deep puncturing nature of rodent bites, we suggest that they should be considered a high risk for infection. Antibiotics selected should include coverage for a broad range of bacterial species. PMID:24528094

  3. Incidence and risk factors for caesarean wound infection in Lagos Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gab-Okafor Chidinma V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post caesarean wound infection is not only a leading cause of prolonged hospital stay but a major cause of the widespread aversion to caesarean delivery in developing countries. In order to control and prevent post caesarean wound infection in our environment there is the need to access the relative contribution of each aetiologic factor. Though some studies in our environment have identified factors associated with post caesarean wound infection, none was specifically designed to address these issues prospectively or assess the relative contribution of each of the risk factors. Findings Prospective multicentre study over a period of 56 months in Lagos Nigeria. All consecutive and consenting women scheduled for caesarean section and meeting the inclusion criteria were enrolled into the study. Cases were all subjects with post caesarean wound infection. Those without wound infection served as controls. Data entry and analysis were performed using EPI-Info programme version 6 and SPSS for windows version 10.0. Eight hundred and seventeen women were enrolled into the study. Seventy six (9.3% of these cases were complicated with wound infection. The proportion of subjects with body mass index greater than 25 was significantly higher among the subjects with wound infection (51.3% than in the subjects without wound infection (33.9% p = 0.011. There were also significantly higher proportions of subjects with prolonged rupture of membrane (p = 0.02, prolonged operation time (p = 0.001, anaemia (p = 0.031 and multiple vaginal examinations during labour (0.021 among the women that had wound infection compared to the women that did not have wound infection. After adjustment for confounders only prolonged rupture of membrane (OR = 4.45, prolonged operation time (OR = 2.87 and body max index > 25 (2.34 retained their association with post caesarean wound infection. Conclusion Effort should be geared towards the prevention of prolonged

  4. Treatment of Early Post-Op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0133 TITLE: Treatment of Early Post -op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William...14Sep2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treatment of Early Post -Op Wound Infection after Internal 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0133 Fixation 5b. GRANT...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Severe fractures are common in modern warfare with fractures

  5. Omental Herniation: A Rare Complication of Vacuum-Assisted Closure of Infected Sternotomy Wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon Gukop

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC has recently been adopted as an acceptable modality for management of sternotomy wound infections. Although generally efficacious, the use of negative pressure devices has been associated with complications such as bleeding, retention of sponge, and empyema. We report the first case of greater omental hernia as a rare complication of vacuum-assisted closure of sternal wound infection following coronary artery bypass grafting.

  6. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Pastar

    Full Text Available Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  7. Characterization of sucrose-negative Pasteurella multocida variants, including isolates from large-cat bite wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Grimmig; Bisgaard, Magne; Angen, Øystein

    2005-01-01

    To validate the identification of Pasteurella multocida-like bacteria negative for acid formation from sucrose, including isolates from bite wounds caused by large cats, 17 strains were phenotypically and genotypically characterized. Phylogenetic analysis of partially sequenced rpoB and infB genes......-negative strains of P. multocida-like bacteria belong to two genotypically distinct groups. The study further confirms the phenotypic heterogeneity of P. multocida strains and documents two new species-like taxa of Pasteurella related to P. multocida. Until diagnostic tools have been further elaborated, special...... showed the monophyly of the strains characterized and the reference strains of P. multocida. The sucrose-negative strains formed two groups, one related to reference strains of P. multocida and the other related to a separate species-like group (taxon 45 of Bisgaard). DNA-DNA hybridization further...

  8. Prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy after cesarean is associated with reduced risk of surgical site infection: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lulu; Kronen, Ryan J; Simon, Laura E; Stoll, Carolyn R T; Colditz, Graham A; Tuuli, Methodius G

    2018-02-01

    The objective of the study was to assess the effect of prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy on surgical site infections and other wound complications in women after cesarean delivery. We searched Ovid Medline, Embase, SCOPUS, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We included randomized controlled trials and observational studies comparing prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy with standard wound dressing for cesarean delivery. The primary outcome was surgical site infection after cesarean delivery. Secondary outcomes were composite wound complications, wound dehiscence, wound seroma, endometritis, and hospital readmission. Heterogeneity was assessed using Higgin's I 2 . Relative risks with 95% confidence intervals were calculated using random-effects models. Six randomized controlled trials and 3 cohort studies in high-risk mostly obese women met inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. Six were full-text articles, 2 published abstracts, and 1 report of trial results in ClinicalTrials.gov. Studies were also heterogeneous in the patients included and type of negative-pressure wound therapy device. The risk of surgical site infection was significantly lower with the use of prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy compared with standard wound dressing (7 studies: pooled risk ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.31-0.66; adjusted risk ratio, -6.0%, 95% confidence interval, -10.0% to -3.0%; number needed to treat, 17, 95% confidence interval, 10-34). There was no evidence of significant statistical heterogeneity (I 2  = 9.9%) or publication bias (Egger P = .532). Of the secondary outcomes, only composite wound complications were significantly reduced in patients receiving prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy compared with standard dressing (9 studies: pooled risk ratio, 0.68, 95% confidence interval, 0.49-0.94). Studies on the effectiveness of prophylactic negative-pressure wound therapy at

  9. A 2000 patient retrospective assessment of a new strategy for burn wound management in view of infection prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glik, Justyna; Łabuś, Wojciech; Kitala, Diana; Mikuś-Zagórska, Karolina; Roberts, Christopher D; Nowak, Mariusz; Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Kawecki, Marek

    2017-12-15

    Infections in burn patients are still the principal cause of complications in burn injuries. The aim of this study is to assess a new strategy for burn wound management in view of infection prevention and treatment in the experience of the Burn Treatment Center in Siemianowice Śląskie. The applied methodology involved the analysis of patient records describing the hospital's epidemiological situation between 2014 and 2016. The analysis also included the use and cost of antibiotics, silver-containing dressings, and other antiseptics relative to the number of sepsis cases, including those caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as the mortality ratio. The total costs of prevention and treatment of infections were reduced, while the use of silver-containing dressings and antiseptics increased. The number of patients with sepsis decreased, including cases caused by P. aeruginosa, and the mortality ratio was reduced. Introducing a strategy for burn wound-oriented infection prevention and treatment in burn patients provides a number of benefits. It is also cost-effective. Using locally applied active dressings and antiseptics can be a welcome choice for often-unnecessary antibiotic therapy of a suspected or existing burn wound infection. © 2017 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae uses proteasome inhibitor syringolin A to colonize from wound infection sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johana C Misas-Villamil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of plants by bacterial leaf pathogens at wound sites is common in nature. Plants defend wound sites to prevent pathogen invasion, but several pathogens can overcome spatial restriction and enter leaf tissues. The molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to suppress containment at wound infection sites are poorly understood. Here, we studied Pseudomonas syringae strains causing brown spot on bean and blossom blight on pear. These strains exist as epiphytes that can cause disease upon wounding caused by hail, sand storms and frost. We demonstrate that these strains overcome spatial restriction at wound sites by producing syringolin A (SylA, a small molecule proteasome inhibitor. Consequently, SylA-producing strains are able to escape from primary infection sites and colonize adjacent tissues along the vasculature. We found that SylA diffuses from the primary infection site and suppresses acquired resistance in adjacent tissues by blocking signaling by the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA. Thus, SylA diffusion creates a zone of SA-insensitive tissue that is prepared for subsequent colonization. In addition, SylA promotes bacterial motility and suppresses immune responses at the primary infection site. These local immune responses do not affect bacterial growth and were weak compared to effector-triggered immunity. Thus, SylA facilitates colonization from wounding sites by increasing bacterial motility and suppressing SA signaling in adjacent tissues.

  11. Wounding of Arabidopsis leaves causes a powerful but transient protection against Botrytis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassot, Céline; Buchala, Antony; Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; Métraux, Jean-Pierre; Lamotte, Olivier

    2008-08-01

    Physical injury inflicted on living tissue makes it vulnerable to invasion by pathogens. Wounding of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves, however, does not conform to this concept and leads to immunity to Botrytis cinerea, the causal agent of grey mould. In wounded leaves, hyphal growth was strongly inhibited compared to unwounded controls. Wound-induced resistance was not associated with salicylic acid-, jasmonic acid- or ethylene-dependent defence responses. The phytoalexin camalexin was found to be involved in this defence response as camalexin-deficient mutants were not protected after wounding and the B. cinerea strains used here were sensitive to this compound. Wounding alone did not lead to camalexin production but primed its accumulation after inoculation with B. cinerea, further supporting the role of camalexin in wound-induced resistance. In parallel with increased camalexin production, genes involved in the biosynthesis of camalexin were induced faster in wounded and infected plants in comparison with unwounded and infected plants. Glutathione was also found to be required for resistance, as mutants deficient in gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase showed susceptibility to B. cinerea after wounding, indicating that wild-type basal levels of glutathione are required for the wound-induced resistance. Furthermore, expression of the gene encoding glutathione-S-transferase 1 was primed by wounding in leaves inoculated with B. cinerea. In addition, the priming of MAP kinase activity was observed after inoculation of wounded leaves with B. cinerea compared to unwounded inoculated controls. Our results demonstrate how abiotic stress can induce immunity to virulent strains of B. cinerea, a process that involves camalexin and glutathione.

  12. A study of post-caesarean section wound infections in a regional referral hospital, oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, Hansa; Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim; Rathi, Bhawna; Nimre, Eman A; Sachdeva, Vibha; Hamdi, Ilham

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI) in patients undergoing a Caesarean section (CS) and to identify risk factors, common bacterial pathogens and antibiotic sensitivity. SSI significantly affect the patient's quality of life by increasing morbidity and extending hospital stays. A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in Nizwa Hospital, Oman, to determine the incidence of post-Caesarean (PCS) SSI from 2001 to 2012. This was followed by a case-control study of 211 PCS cases with SSI. Controls (220) were randomly selected cases, at the same hospital in the same time period, who had undergone CS without any SSI. Data was collected on CS type, risk factors, demographic profile, type of organism, drug sensitivity and date of infection. The total number of PCS wound infections was 211 (2.66%). There was a four-fold higher incidence of premature rupture of the membranes (37, 17.53%) and a three-fold higher incidence of diabetes (32, 15.16%) in the PCS cases compared with controls. The most common organisms responsible for SSI were Staphylococcus aureus (66, 31.27%) and the Gram-negative Escherichia coli group (40, 18.95%). The most sensitive antibiotics were aminoglycoside and cephalosporin. Polymicrobial infections were noted in 42 (19.90%), while 47 (22.27%) yielded no growth. A high incidence of associated risk factors like obesity, hypertension, anaemia and wound haematoma was noted. Measures are recommended to reduce the incidence of SSI, including the implementation of infection prevention practices and the administration of antibiotic prophylaxis with rigorous surgical techniques.

  13. A Study of Post-Caesarean Section Wound Infections in a Regional Referral Hospital, Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansa Dhar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of surgical site infections (SSI in patients undergoing a Caesarean section (CS and to identify risk factors, common bacterial pathogens and antibiotic sensitivity. SSI significantly affect the patient’s quality of life by increasing morbidity and extending hospital stays. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in Nizwa Hospital, Oman, to determine the incidence of post-Caesarean (PCS SSI from 2001 to 2012. This was followed by a case-control study of 211 PCS cases with SSI. Controls (220 were randomly selected cases, at the same hospital in the same time period, who had undergone CS without any SSI. Data was collected on CS type, risk factors, demographic profile, type of organism, drug sensitivity and date of infection. Results: The total number of PCS wound infections was 211 (2.66%. There was a four-fold higher incidence of premature rupture of the membranes (37, 17.53% and a three-fold higher incidence of diabetes (32, 15.16% in the PCS cases compared with controls. The most common organisms responsible for SSI were Staphylococcus aureus (66, 31.27% and the Gram-negative Escherichia coli group (40, 18.95%. The most sensitive antibiotics were aminoglycoside and cephalosporin. Polymicrobial infections were noted in 42 (19.90%, while 47 (22.27% yielded no growth. A high incidence of associated risk factors like obesity, hypertension, anaemia and wound haematoma was noted. Conclusion: Measures are recommended to reduce the incidence of SSI, including the implementation of infection prevention practices and the administration of antibiotic prophylaxis with rigorous surgical techniques.

  14. Surgical wound infection rates in Spain: data summary, January 1997 through June 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Agero Pérez, Cristina; Robustillo Rodela, Ana; Pita López, María José; López Fresneña, Nieves; Monge Jodrá, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    The Indicadores Clínicos de Mejora Continua de la Calidad (INCLIMECC) program was established in Spain in 1997. INCLIMECC is a prospective system of health care-associated infection (HAI) surveillance that collects incidence data in surgical and intensive care unit patients. The protocol is based on the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance system, formerly known as the National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance (NNIS) system, and uses standard infection definitions from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Each hospital takes part voluntarily and selects the units and surgical procedures to be surveyed. This report is a summary of the data collected between January 1997 and June 2012. A total of 370,015 patients were included, and the overall incidence of surgical wound infection (SWI) was 4.51%. SWI rates are provided by NHSN operating procedure category and NNIS risk index category. More than 27% of the patients received inadequate antibiotic prophylaxis, the main reason being unsuitable duration (57.05% of cases). Today, the INCLIMECC network includes 64 Spanish hospitals. We believe that an HAI surveillance system with trained personnel external to the surveyed unit is a key component not only in infection control and prevention, but also in a quality improvement system. Copyright © 2014. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  15. Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Infected Wounds with Clinical Wound Care Strategies: A Quantitative Study Using an In Vivo Rabbit Ear Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    polysaccharide matrix, biofilm is the predominant state of bacteria23 found throughout the body (e.g., gastrointestinal tract, dental enamel) and in association...EXPERIMENTAL Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm –Infected Wounds with Clinical Wound Care Strategies: A Quantitative Study Using an In Vivo...Thomas A. Mustoe, M.D. Chicago, Ill.; and Fort Sam Houston, Texas Background: Bacterial biofilm is recognized as a major detriment to wound healing

  16. Reduction of wound infections in laparoscopic-assisted colorectal resections by plastic wound ring drapes (REDWIL)?--A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauscher, J C; Grittner, F; Stroux, A; Zimmermann, M; le Claire, M; Buhr, H J; Ritz, J P

    2012-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are frequent complications in colorectal surgery and may lead to burst abdomen, incisional hernia, and increased perioperative costs. Plastic wound ring drapes (RD) were introduced some decades ago to protect the abdominal wound from bacteria and reduce SSIs. There have been no controlled trials examining the benefit of RD in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The Reduction of wound infections in laparoscopic assisted colorectal resections by plastic wound ring drapes (REDWIL) trial was thus designed to assess their effectiveness in preventing SSIs after elective laparoscopic colorectal resections. REDWIL is a randomized controlled monocenter trial with two parallel groups (experimental group with RD and control group without RD). Patients undergoing elective laparoscopic colorectal resection were included. The primary endpoint was SSIs. Secondary outcomes were colonization of the abdominal wall with bacteria, reoperations/readmissions, early/late postoperative complications, and cost of hospital stay. The duration of follow-up was 6 months. Between January 2008 and October 2010, 109 patients were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group (with or without RD). Forty-six patients in the RD group and 47 patients in the control group completed follow-up. SSIs developed in ten patients with RD (21.7 %) and six patients without RD (12.8 %) (p = 0.28). An intraoperative swab taken from the abdominal wall was positive in 66.7 % of patients with RD and 57.5 % without RD (p = 0.46). The number of species cultured within one swab was significantly higher in those without RD (p = 0.03). The median total inpatient costs including emergency readmissions were 3,402 ± 4,038 in the RD group and 3,563 ± 1,735 in the control group (p = 0.869). RD do not reduce the rate of SSIs in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The inpatient costs are similar with and without RD.

  17. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility in wound infections: A pilot study from Bangladesh [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    OpenAIRE

    Sushmita Roy; Mejbah Uddin Ahmed; Bhuiyan Mohammad Mahtab Uddin; Zubair Ahmed Ratan; Monali Rajawat; Varshil Mehta; Sojib Bin Zaman

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Infections due to antibiotic resistant bacteria have increased alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Unrestrained and rapidly spreading bacterial growth has turned the management of wound infections into a serious challenge. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of different bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in various types of wound infections. Methods:  A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect 105 wound swabs. All isolated ...

  18. [How do I prevent caesarean wound infections in obese patients in 2017?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, B; Raia-Barjat, T; Chauleur, C; Mathevet, P

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor of cesarean section and is associated with an increased risk of wound complications such as infections. This review focuses on the available strategies to limit complications in this population. Choice of antiseptic solution, appropriate dose and type of antibiotic prophylaxy, suture closure of subcutaneous fat, suture skin closure and closed incision negative pressure wound therapy may reduce the risk of wound infections associated with cesarean section in obese patients. Vaginal desinfection, plastic adhesive draps, high-concentration supplemental perioperative oxygen, use of a barrier retractor, wound drainage and type of skin incision are discussed in this review. Clinical trials of good quality are needed to improve our clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/V.A.C.®--therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection--a critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, Jan J.; Segers, Patrique; Jekel, Lilian

    2011-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.®) therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious) interim (prior to flap reconstruction) or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which

  20. Human skin equivalents to study the prevention and treatment of wound infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haisma, I.

    2018-01-01

    Infection of burn wounds remains the leading cause of death in burn patients. Topical treatment of such infections with conventional antibiotics is often unsuccessful due to the presence of drug-resistant bacteria and/or to the formation of bacterial biofilms. Taken together there is a clear

  1. Effects of ketanserin on hypergranulation tissue formation, infection, and healing of equine lower limb wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Engelen, Marc; Besche, Béatrice; Lefay, Marie-Paul; Hare, Jonathan; Vlaminck, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this multicentre, randomized, controlled field study was to determine the efficacy of ketanserin gel in preventing exuberant granulation tissue formation (hypergranulation) and infection in equine lower limb wounds. Horses and ponies (n = 481) with naturally occurring wounds were randomized to either topical treatment with ketanserin gel (n = 242) or a positive control (Belgium, Germany: ethacridin lactate solution, n = 120; France, United Kingdom: malic, benzoic, and salicyl...

  2. A CLINICAL STUDY ON POSTOPERATIVE WOUND INFECTIONS IN RIMS, KADAPA- 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ramanaiah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical wound infections continue to consume a considerable portion of healthcare finance. Even though, the complete elimination of wound infections is not possible, a reduction of the observed wound infection rate to a minimum level could have marked benefits in terms of both patient comfort and resources used. 1 MATERIALS AND METHODS The clinical study of postoperative wound infection conducted at RIMS General Hospital, Kadapa, during the period of 2013 to 2016. RESULTS In this clinical study, 150 patients were clinically diagnosed of having SSIs out of 925 patients who underwent major surgeries in Department of General Surgery, an incidence of 16.2%. Dirty type of surgeries have high incidence of SSI at 63.6%. SSI occurred more in patients who didn’t receive preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. prior to surgery, i.e. 32.1%. Most of the patients presented with discharge through the wound (81.3%. The most common type of discharge was purulent (52.5%. CONCLUSION Preoperative preparation <24 hrs., preoperative bathing and preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. before surgery help in reducing surgical site infections. Early diagnosis of SSI and prompt management by isolation of organism causing SSI using sensitive antibiotics and regular dressing help in reducing morbidity for the patients.

  3. Effects of low intensity laser in in vitro bacterial culture and in vivo infected wounds

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    Pâmela Rosa Pereira

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to compare the effects of low intensity laser therapy on in vitro bacterial growth and in vivo in infected wounds, and to analyze the effectiveness of the AsGa Laser technology in in vivo wound infections. METHODS: in vitro: Staphylococcus aureus were incubated on blood agar plates, half of them being irradiated with 904 nm wavelength laser and dose of 3J/cm2 daily for seven days. In vivo: 32 male Wistar rats were divided into control group (uninfected and Experimental Group (Infected. Half of the animals had their wounds irradiated. RESULTS: in vitro: there was no statistically significant variation between the experimental groups as for the source plates and the derived ones (p>0.05. In vivo: there was a significant increase in the deposition of type I and III collagen in the wounds of the infected and irradiated animals when assessed on the fourth day of the experiment (p=0.034. CONCLUSION: low-intensity Laser Therapy applied with a wavelength of 904nm and dose 3J/cm2 did not alter the in vitro growth of S. aureus in experimental groups; in vivo, however, it showed significant increase in the deposition of type I and III collagen in the wound of infected and irradiated animals on the fourth day of the experiment.

  4. Wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Hui; Huang, Ben-Shian; Horng, Huann-Cheng; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2018-02-01

    Wound healing is an important physiological process to maintain the integrity of skin after trauma, either by accident or by intent procedure. The normal wound healing involves three successive but overlapping phases, including hemostasis/inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling phase. Aberration of wound healing, such as excessive wound healing (hypertrophic scar and keloid) or chronic wound (ulcer) impairs the normal physical function. A large number of sophisticated experimental studies have provided insights into wound healing. This article highlights the information after 2010, and the main text includes (i) wound healing; (ii) wound healing in fetus and adult; (iii) prostaglandins and wound healing; (iv) the pathogenesis of excessive wound healing; (v) the epidemiology of excessive wound healing; (vi) in vitro and in vivo studies for excessive wound healing; (vii) stem cell therapy for excessive wound healing; and (viii) the prevention strategy for excessive wound healing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  5. Wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Hui Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is an important physiological process to maintain the integrity of skin after trauma, either by accident or by intent procedure. The normal wound healing involves three successive but overlapping phases, including hemostasis/inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling phase. Aberration of wound healing, such as excessive wound healing (hypertrophic scar and keloid or chronic wound (ulcer impairs the normal physical function. A large number of sophisticated experimental studies have provided insights into wound healing. This article highlights the information after 2010, and the main text includes (i wound healing; (ii wound healing in fetus and adult; (iii prostaglandins and wound healing; (iv the pathogenesis of excessive wound healing; (v the epidemiology of excessive wound healing; (vi in vitro and in vivo studies for excessive wound healing; (vii stem cell therapy for excessive wound healing; and (viii the prevention strategy for excessive wound healing.

  6. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Combat Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Wartewig et al., “Noninvasive characterization of human stratum corneum of undiseased skin of patients with atopic dermatitis and psoriasis as studied...appearance of the wound, and the patient’s general condi- tion are fairly obvious and can be reasonably assessed, para - meters such as the adequacy of...dermatitis and psoriasis as studied by Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy,” Biopolymers, 62(3), 141-6 (2001). [39] B. G. Frushour, and J. L. Koenig

  7. Treatment of open upper limb injuries with infection prevention and negative pressure wound therapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, E; Raghuvanshi, M

    2017-12-02

    Open upper limb injuries requiring soft reconstruction can pose a dilemma for trauma surgeons when considering the treatment options. The British Orthopaedic Association and British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons Standard for Trauma (BOAST) have addressed the management of severe open lower limb fractures with the creation of the BOAST 4 guidelines. However, no such gold standard exists for the treatment of open injuries of the upper limb. Furthermore, treatment of these injuries is often more difficult and requires complicated strategies. Since the advent of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), there has been an improvement in wound care, though a focused review of its use in wound closure and infection prevention in the upper limb has not been published. We examine wound care management for open upper limb injuries with regard to the dressings applied, NPWT, wound closure and infection prevention. A systematic search of Medline, Cochrane and Google Scholar was performed using the key words. The key word searches were performed by two independent reviewers and 8,792 papers were found. Manuscripts between 1990 and 2010 were included, with the addition of key manuscripts before this date. Each manuscript was assessed by the two authors independently for methodology and validity Results: Approximately 120 manuscripts fulfilled selection criteria examining the influence of NPWT on open upper and lower limb injuries, and those examining infection risk in the same injuries. Of these 120 manuscripts, 28 were suitable for inclusion in the review. The systematic review is presented, allied to the BOAST 4 principles, examining the use of NPWT and the tools available for infection prevention for wounds of the upper and lower limb. The use of NPWT in conjunction with antibiotic-bead therapy improved the way in which open fractures of both the upper and lower limb are treated. Production of guidelines is warranted for the treatment of upper

  8. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the management of wound infection following renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B M; Nathan, V C; Delbridge, M C; Parker, K; Throssell, D; McKane, W S; Karim, M S; Raftery, A T

    2007-01-01

    Wound infection in the setting of immunosuppressed state such as renal transplantation (RT) causes significant morbidity from sepsis, prolongs hospital stay and is expensive. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy is a new technique of management of wound based on the principle of application of controlled negative pressure. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of VAC therapy in the management of wound infection following RT. This is a prospective study of a cohort of 180 consecutive RTs performed over a period of 4 years, where the data were retrieved from a prospectively maintained computerised database and case-notes. 9 of 180 (5%) patients developed wound infection following RT which led to cavitations and dehiscence with copious discharge, and refused to heal with conventional treatment. All 9 cases were treated with VAC therapy. The VAC system was removed after a median of 9 (range 3-30) days when discharge from the wound ceased. Four patients were discharged home with portable VAC device and managed on an outpatient basis, where the system was removed after a median 5.5 (range 3-7) days. The median hospital stay after initiation of VAC therapy was significantly shorter (5, range 2-12 days) than on conventional treatment prior to VAC therapy (11, range, 5-20 days) (p=0.003). Complete healing was achieved in all cases. The use of VAC therapy is an effective and safe adjunct to conventional and established treatment modalities for the management of wound infection and dehiscence following RT. Key words: Renal transplantation, wound infection, vacuum-assisted closure therapy.

  9. Antibiotic therapy for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in surgical wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Koti, Rahul; Toon, Clare D; Wilson, Peter; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-08-20

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection after surgery is usually rare, but incidence can be up to 33% in certain types of surgery. Postoperative MRSA infection can occur as surgical site infections (SSI), chest infections, or bloodstream infections (bacteraemia). The incidence of MRSA SSIs varies from 1% to 33% depending upon the type of surgery performed and the carrier status of the individuals concerned. The optimal antibiotic regimen for the treatment of MRSA in surgical wounds is not known. To compare the benefits and harms of various antibiotic treatments in people with established surgical site infections (SSIs) caused by MRSA . In February 2013 we searched the following databases: The Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register; The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE); NHS Economic Evaluation Database; Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database; Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid MEDLINE (In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations); Ovid EMBASE; and EBSCO CINAHL. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing one antibiotic regimen with another antibiotic regimen for the treatment of SSIs due to MRSA. All RCTs irrespective of language, publication status, publication year, or sample size were included in the analysis. Two review authors independently decided on inclusion and exclusion of trials, and extracted data. We planned to calculate the risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for comparing the binary outcomes between the groups and mean difference (MD) with 95% CI for comparing the continuous outcomes. We planned to perform the meta-analysis using both a fixed-effect and a random-effects model. We performed intention-to-treat analysis whenever possible. We included one trial involving 59 people hospitalised because of MRSA SSIs. Thirty participants were randomised to linezolid (600 mg either intravenously or orally every 12 hours for seven to 14 days

  10. Isolates from wound infections at federal medical centre, bida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 589 wound swabs from 334 patients in Federal Medical Centre, Bida were studied. Samples were collected between Jan 2002 to Dec. 2003. Swabs were plated within one hour after collection unto blood, chocolate and Mac Conkey after plate, and incubated aerobically for 24hrs. The chocolate plated swabs were ...

  11. Wound scabs protect regenerating tissue against harmful ultraviolet radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, E.; Mudde, Y. D.; Coumans, F. A. W.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Sturk, A.; Nieuwland, R.

    2016-01-01

    Benefits attributed to wound scabs include prevention of blood loss and protection against infection. However, when formation of a wound scab is prevented, the risk of infection is reduced. Moreover, in the absence of a wound scab, wounds heal faster and scar formation is reduced. The question

  12. Changes in levels of cytokines in the treatment of infected wounds and festering in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Spakhi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Informative and prognostic significance of cytokines in assessing the effectiveness of treatment tactics no doubt. The aim was to study the levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the dynamics of the treatment of infected wounds and purulent (IWP in children using the proposed optimized local treatment compared with standard procedure. Materials and methods. 45 children with IWP who were treated in the department of purulent surgery of Zaporozhye Regional Children's Hospital during the period of 2015-2016 years were divided into main (n = 26 and control groups (n = 19 depending on the tactics of treatment. The therapy of the main group patients were added by optimized integrated local treatment, which included a combination of magnetic therapy, antibacterial drug liposomal solutions and hirudotherapy. Efficacy of treatment was assessed by clinical characteristics and serum levels of IL-1β and IL-10 on the 1st and the 7th day of treatment. Results. The highest levels of pro-inflammatory IL-1β were defined in children with lymphadenitis on the first day of treatment. Common trends in the dynamics of cytokines content changes on the 7th day were in the line with generally accepted: decreased in IL-1β and increased in IL-10 levels. The level of IL-1β was not statistically different on the 7th day only in children with phlegmon. The most significant changes in IL-10 were observed in children with abscesses and lymphadenitis than in children with infected wound and phlegmon. Changes in markers of inflammation conform to positive changes in the clinical course of wound healing in children at the study. Generally, there was a lag dynamics of cytokines changes in the children who received standard therapy compared with the children who received the proposed optimized local treatment. Conclusions. The use of proposed IWP complex treatment in children showed the most significant effect on the anti-inflammatory IL-10 level in children with

  13. Novel nitric oxide producing probiotic wound healing patch: preparation and in vivo analysis in a New Zealand white rabbit model of ischaemic and infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mitchell; Ganopolsky, Jorge G; Labbé, Alain; Gilardino, Mirko; Wahl, Christopher; Martoni, Christopher; Prakash, Satya

    2012-06-01

    The treatment of chronic wounds poses a significant challenge for clinicians and patients alike. Here we report design and preclinical efficacy of a novel nitric oxide gas (gNO)-producing probiotic patch for wound healing. Specifically, a wound healing patch using lactic acid bacteria in an adhesive gas permeable membrane has been designed and investigated for treating ischaemic and infected full-thickness dermal wounds in a New Zealand white rabbit model for ischaemic wound healing. Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed increased wound closure with gNO-producing patch-treated wounds over 21 days of therapy (log-rank P = 0·0225 and Wilcoxon P = 0·0113). Cox proportional hazard regression showed that gNO-producing patch-treated wounds were 2·52 times more likely to close compared with control patches (hazard P = 0·0375, score P = 0·032 and likelihood ratio P = 0·0355), and histological analysis showed improved wound healing in gNO-producing patch-treated animals. This study may provide an effective, safe and less costly alternative for treating chronic wounds. © 2012 The Authors. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  14. Wound management with vacuum assisted closure in surgical site infection after ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with standard moist wound care (SMWC) in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. A prospective cohort was performed among patients with surgical site infection after ankle surgery between 2012 and 2013. The follow-up period was three month, and the efficacy end point was complete wound closure rate. Ninety-four patients were analyzed, with 61 patients in the VAC group and 33 in the SMWC group. The complete wound closure rate in the VAC group was higher than that in the SMWC group at 3 month follow up (90.2% Vs. 72.7%, p = 0.028). The median time to complete wound closure was 31 days (95% CI 20.2-41.8) for VAC, and 63 days (95% CI 46.9-79.1) for SMWC (χ(2) = 4.023, p = 0.045). In the superficial infection subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 20 days (95% CI 14.2-35.1) in the VAC group and 42 days (95% CI 35.4-69.4) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 4.331, p = 0.041). In the deep subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 46 days (95% CI 28.2-65.9) in the VAC group and 75 days (95% CI 43.2-79.6) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 6.475, p = 0.026). Our result showed that vacuum assisted closure was more effective than standard moist wound care in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparison of primary and delayed primary closure in dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, O.B.A.; Ahmed, N.; Butt, M.W.U.D.; Saleem, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Objective of this study was to compare primary and delayed primary wound closure for dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection. Study Design: Randomized Controlled Trial. Place and Duration of Study: Combined Military Hospital, Multan. From 16 Sep 2010 to 15 Mar 2011. Patients and Methods: A total of 110 patients were randomly divided into two groups of 55 patients each using random numbers table. Abdominal wounds of one group were closed primarily and of other group were subjected to delayed primary wound closure. The wounds were then checked for surgical site infection for seven post operative days. Results: A higher frequency of surgical site infection was observed in primary closure group (27.3%) as compared to delayed primary closure group (9.1%) which was statistically significant (p=0.013). Conclusion: Delayed primary closure is superior to primary closure in dirty abdominal wounds in terms of frequency of surgical site infection. (author)

  16. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system predicts wound healing but not major amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Sherman, Ronald L; Hines, Kathryn F; Lum, Ying W; Perler, Bruce A; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2017-06-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) threatened limb classification has been shown to correlate well with risk of major amputation and time to wound healing in heterogeneous diabetic and nondiabetic populations. Major amputation continues to plague the most severe stage 4 WIfI patients, with 1-year amputation rates of 20% to 64%. Our aim was to determine the association between WIfI stage and wound healing and major amputation among patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary DFU clinic from July 2012 to December 2015 were enrolled in a prospective database. Wound healing and major amputation were compared for patients stratified by WIfI classification. There were 217 DFU patients with 439 wounds (mean age, 58.3 ± 0.8 years; 58% male, 63% black) enrolled, including 28% WIfI stage 1, 11% stage 2, 33% stage 3, and 28% stage 4. Peripheral arterial disease and dialysis were more common in patients with advanced (stage 3 or 4) wounds (P ≤ .05). Demographics of the patients, socioeconomic status, and comorbidities were otherwise similar between groups. There was a significant increase in the number of active wounds per limb at presentation with increasing WIfI stage (stage 1, 1.1 ± 0.1; stage 4, 1.4 ± 0.1; P = .03). Mean wound area (stage 1, 2.6 ± 0.6 cm 2 ; stage 4, 15.3 ± 2.8 cm 2 ) and depth (stage 1, 0.2 ± 0.0 cm; stage 4, 0.8 ± 0.1 cm) also increased progressively with increasing wound stage (P wound healing (P wounds, the mean wound healing time was 190 ± 17 days, and risk of major amputation at 1 year was 5.7% ± 3.2%. Among patients with DFU, the WIfI classification system correlated well with wound healing but was not associated with risk of major amputation at 1 year. Although further prospective research is warranted, our results suggest that use of a multidisciplinary approach for DFUs may augment healing

  17. 75 FR 11919 - Smith and Nephew, Inc., Wound Management-Largo Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-70,151] Smith and Nephew, Inc., Wound Management-Largo Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Olsten Staffing, Aerotek, Staffworks, and Adecco, Largo, FL; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker Adjustment Assistance In accordance with Section 223 o...

  18. Norfloxacin and metronidazole topical formulations for effective treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Kamal; Malipeddi, Venkata Ramana; Madan, Jyotsna; Gupta, Gaurav; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Awasthi, Rajendra; Kikuchi, Irene Satiko; De Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha

    2016-06-01

    Our various previous findings have shown the suitability of norfloxacin in the treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds in alone as well as in combination with Curcuma longa in various topical (ointments, gels, and creams) and transdermal drug delivery systems. Keeping these facts in consideration, we have made an another attempt to prepare semisolid formulations containing 1% w/w of norfloxacin and metronidazole with different bases like Carbopol, polyethylene glycol, and hydroxypropylmethyl cellulose for effective treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds. The prepared formulations were evaluated for physicochemical parameters, in vitro drug release, antimicrobial activity, and burn wound healing properties. The prepared formulations were compared with Silver Sulfadiazine cream 1%, USP. Antimicrobial activity of norfloxacin semisolid formulations was found to be equally effective against both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria in comparison to a marketed formulation of Silver Sulfadiazine 1% cream, USP. Based on the burn wound healing property, the prepared norfloxacin semisolid formulation was found to be in good agreement with marketed Silver Sulfadiazine 1% cream, USP. These findings suggest formulations containing norfloxacin and metronidazole may also prove as an effective alternative for existing remedies in the treatment of bacterial infections and burn wounds.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  20. Fast Blue RR—Siloxane Derivatized Materials Indicate Wound Infection Due to a Deep Blue Color Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Schiffer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a strong need for simple and fast methods for wound infection determination. Myeloperoxidase, an immune system-derived enzyme was found to be a suitable biomarker for wound infection. Hence, alkoxysilane-derivatized Fast Blue RR was immobilized via simple hydrolytic polymerization. The resulting enzyme-responsive siloxane layers were incubated with myeloperoxidase, wound fluid or hemoglobin. The reaction was monitored via HPLC measurements and the color development quantified spectrophotometrically. Myeloperoxidase was indeed able to oxidize immobilized Fast Blue RR leading to a blue colored product. No conversion was detected in non-infected wound fluids. The visible color changes of these novel materials towards blue enable an easy distinction between infected and non-infected wound fluids.

  1. Neutropenia exacerbates infection by Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in a murine wound model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laryssa eGrguric-Smith

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Gram negative coccobacillus Acinetobacter baumannii has become an increasingly prevalent cause of hospital-acquired infections in recent years. The majority of clinical A. baumannii isolates display high-level resistance to antimicrobials, which severely compromises our capacity to care for patients with A. baumannii disease. Neutrophils are of major importance in the host defense against microbial infections. However, the contribution of these cells of innate immunity in host resistance to cutaneous A. baumannii infection has not been directly investigated. Hence, we hypothesized that depletion of neutrophils increases severity of bacterial disease in an experimental A. baumannii murine wound model. In this study, the anti-Ly-6G monoclonal antibody (mAb, 1A8, was used to generate neutropenic mice and the pathogenesis of several A. baumannii clinical isolates on wounded cutaneous tissue was investigated. We demonstrated that neutrophil depletion enhances bacterial burden using colony forming unit determinations. Also, mAb 1A8 reduces global measurements of wound healing in A. baumannii-infected animals. Interestingly, histological analysis of cutaneous tissue excised from A. baumannii-infected animals treated with mAb 1A8 displays enhanced collagen deposition. Furthermore, neutropenia and A. baumannii infection alter pro-inflammatory cytokine release leading to severe microbial disease. Our findings provide a better understanding of the impact of these innate immune cells in controlling A. baumannii skin infections.

  2. Far-UVC light prevents MRSA infection of superficial wounds in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Ponnaiya

    Full Text Available Prevention of superficial surgical wound infections from drug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA currently present major health care challenges. The majority of surgical site infections (SSI are believed to be caused by airborne transmission of bacteria alighting onto the wound during surgical procedures. We have previously shown that far-ultraviolet C light in the wavelength range of 207-222 nm is significantly harmful to bacteria, but without damaging mammalian cells and tissues. It is important that the lamp be fitted with a filter to remove light emitted at wavelengths longer than 230 nm which are harmful.Using a hairless mouse model of infection of superficial wounds, here we tested the hypothesis that 222-nm light kills MRSA alighting onto a superficial skin incisions as efficiently as typical germicidal light (254 nm, but without inducing skin damage.To simulate the scenario wherein incisions are infected during surgical procedures as pathogens in the room alight on a wound, MRSA was spread on a defined area of the mouse dorsal skin; the infected skin was then exposed to UVC light (222 nm or 254 nm followed by a superficial incision within the defined area, which was immediately sutured. Two and seven days post procedure, bactericidal efficacy was measured as MRSA colony formation unit (CFU per gram of harvested skin whereas fixed samples were used to assess skin damage measured in terms of epidermal thickness and DNA photodamage.In the circumstance of superficial incisions infected with bacteria alighting onto the wound, 222-nm light showed the same bactericidal properties of 254-nm light but without the associated skin damage.Being safe for patient and hospital staff, our results suggested that far-UVC light (222 nm might be a convenient approach to prevent transmission of drug-resistant infectious agents in the clinical setting.

  3. Wound infections following open reduction and internal fixation of calcaneal fractures with an extended lateral approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Manouk; Schepers, Tim; Beerekamp, M. Suzan H.; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative wound infections (PWI) following calcaneal fracture surgery can lead to prolonged hospital stay and additional treatment with antibiotics, surgical debridement or implant removal. Our aim was to determine the incidence of superficial and deep PWI and to identify risk factors (RF).

  4. Self-Taught Learning Based on Sparse Autoencoder for E-Nose in Wound Infection Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peilin He

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For an electronic nose (E-nose in wound infection distinguishing, traditional learning methods have always needed large quantities of labeled wound infection samples, which are both limited and expensive; thus, we introduce self-taught learning combined with sparse autoencoder and radial basis function (RBF into the field. Self-taught learning is a kind of transfer learning that can transfer knowledge from other fields to target fields, can solve such problems that labeled data (target fields and unlabeled data (other fields do not share the same class labels, even if they are from entirely different distribution. In our paper, we obtain numerous cheap unlabeled pollutant gas samples (benzene, formaldehyde, acetone and ethylalcohol; however, labeled wound infection samples are hard to gain. Thus, we pose self-taught learning to utilize these gas samples, obtaining a basis vector θ. Then, using the basis vector θ, we reconstruct the new representation of wound infection samples under sparsity constraint, which is the input of classifiers. We compare RBF with partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA, and reach a conclusion that the performance of RBF is superior to others. We also change the dimension of our data set and the quantity of unlabeled data to search the input matrix that produces the highest accuracy.

  5. Use of the Wound, Ischemia, foot Infection classification system in hemodialysis patients after endovascular treatment for critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Takahiro; Hirano, Keisuke; Sakamoto, Yasunari; Mori, Shisuke; Kobayashi, Norihiro; Araki, Motoharu; Yamawaki, Masahiro; Ito, Yoshiaki

    2017-12-07

    The Wound, Ischemia, foot Infection (WIfI) classification system is used to predict the amputation risk in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). The validity of the WIfI classification system for hemodialysis (HD) patients with CLI is still unknown. This single-center study evaluated the prognostic value of WIfI stages in HD patients with CLI who had been treated with endovascular therapy (EVT). A retrospective analysis was performed of collected data on CLI patients treated with EVT between April 2007 and December 2015. All patients were classified according to their wound status, ischemia index, and extent of foot infection into the following four groups: very low risk, low risk, moderate risk, and high risk. Comorbidities and vascular lesions in each group were analyzed. The prognostic value of the WIfI classification was analyzed on the basis of the wound healing rate and amputation-free survival at 1 year. This study included 163 consecutive CLI patients who underwent HD and successful endovascular intervention. The rate of the high-risk group (36%) was the highest among the four groups, and the proportions of very-low-risk, low-risk, and moderate-risk patients were 10%, 18%, and 34%, respectively. The mean follow-up duration was 784 ± 650 days. The wound healing rates at 1 year were 92%, 70%, 75%, and 42% in the very-low-risk, low-risk, moderate-risk, and high-risk groups, respectively (P WIfI classification system predicted the wound healing and amputation risks in a highly selected group of HD patients with CLI treated with EVT, with a statistically significant difference between high-risk patients and other patients. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of various silver-containing dressing on infected excision wound healing study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Hsin; Hsu, Wei-Shan; Chung, Wan-Yu; Ko, Tse-Hao; Lin, Jui-Hsiang

    2014-05-01

    Silver-containing dressings have been widely used for controlling wound infection. However, the relationship between different concentrations of silver in dressings and their antimicrobial activities and wound-healing efficacies remains unclear. In the present study, we (in cooperation with Bio-medical Carbon Technology) investigated various silver-containing activated carbon fibers to understand the effects of different silver concentrations on the efficacies of a silver containing dressing. Our results indicated that various silver-containing activated carbon fibers exhibited good antibacterial effects and biocompatibility in terms of cell viability and that silver concentration showed a minor influence on cell growth. The infected excision wound model indicated that compared to silver-containing activated carbon fiber and other commercial silver-containing dressings assisted wound healing by promoting granulation and collagen deposition. Meanwhile, the silver ion can only be restrained in epidermis by intact skin. During application on the wound area, a temporary increase of serum silver can be detected, but this elevated serum silver level decreased to a subtle level after the removal of silver-containing activated carbon fiber.

  7. Efficacy and safety of negative pressure wound therapy for Szilagyi grade III peripheral vascular graft infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsu-Tang; Hsu, Yung-Chang; Wu, Chao-I

    2014-12-01

    A best evidence topic in vascular surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was whether it is safe and effective to use negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for Szilagyi grade III (i.e. the arterial implant proper involved in the infection) peripheral vascular graft infection. Altogether, 69 papers were found using the reported search. From the search results, reference lists of potentially eligible studies and related citations in PubMed, seven papers represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. In the only randomized, controlled trial that compared NPWT (n = 10) and alginate dressing change (n = 10), the NPWT group demonstrated shorter time to full skin epithelialization (median 57 vs 104 days; P = 0.026). In the other six case series, the recruited case number ranged from 12 to 72. The mode of NPWT varied among the included studies, with the majority using a continuous negative pressure of 125 mmHg. One study combined NPWT and sartorius myoplasty, another used sartorius myoplasty in selected cases and others did not. The mean duration of using NPWT ranged from 14.2 to 43 days. The mean duration to achieve complete wound healing ranged from 24 (the study with sartorius myoplasty) to 51 days. The NPWT treatment failure rate ranged from 0 (the study with sartorius myoplasty) to 25%. The major complication of NPWT was bleeding and the incidence rate was reported to be 1 year of follow-up) showed that NPWT with a continuous negative pressure of 125 mmHg, or combined NPWT and sartorius myoplasty, may shorten the time to complete wound healing by 2 months, have a >70% success rate, and have a <10% NPWT-related complication rate. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights

  8. Nitrosoglutathione generating nitric oxide nanoparticles as an improved strategy for combating Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouake, Jason; Schairer, David; Kutner, Allison; Sanchez, David A; Makdisi, Joy; Blecher-Paz, Karin; Nacharaju, Parimala; Tuckman-Vernon, Chaim; Gialanella, Phil; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2012-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a community-acquired, nosocomial pathogen that is an important cause of human morbidity and mortality; it is intrinsically resistant to several antibiotics and is capable of developing resistance to newly developed drugs via a variety of mechanisms. P aeruginosa's ubiquity and multidrug resistance (MDR) warrants the development of innovative methods that overcome its ability to develop resistance. We have previously described a nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticle (NO-np) platform that effectively kills gram-positive and gram-negative organisms in vitro and accelerates clinical recovery in vivo in murine wound and abscess infection models. We have also demonstrated that when glutathione (GSH) is added to NO-np, the nitroso intermediate S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is formed, which has greater activity against P aeruginosa and other gram-negative organisms compared with NO-np alone. In the current study, we evaluate the potential of NO-np to generate GSNO both in vitro and in vivo in a murine excisional wound model infected with an MDR clinical isolate of P aeruginosa. Whereas NO-np alone inhibited P aeruginosa growth in vitro for up to 8 hours, NO-np+GSH completely inhibited P aeruginosa growth for 24 hours. Percent survival in the NO-np+GSH-treated isolates was significantly lower than in the NO-np (36.1% vs 8.3%; P=.004). In addition, NO-np+GSH accelerated wound closure in P aeruginosa-infected wounds, and NO-np+GSH-treated wounds had significantly lower bacterial burden when compared to NO-np-treated wounds (Pnp platform and has the potential to be used as an antimicrobial agent against MDR organisms such as P aeruginosa.

  9. Antimicrobial Peptides and Their Therapeutic Potential for Bacterial Skin Infections and Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfalzgraff, Anja; Brandenburg, Klaus; Weindl, Günther

    2018-01-01

    Alarming data about increasing resistance to conventional antibiotics are reported, while at the same time the development of new antibiotics is stagnating. Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are mainly caused by the so called ESKAPE pathogens (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Enterobacter species) which belong to the most recalcitrant bacteria and are resistant to almost all common antibiotics. S. aureus and P. aeruginosa are the most frequent pathogens isolated from chronic wounds and increasing resistance to topical antibiotics has become a major issue. Therefore, new treatment options are urgently needed. In recent years, research focused on the development of synthetic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) with lower toxicity and improved activity compared to their endogenous counterparts. AMPs appear to be promising therapeutic options for the treatment of SSTIs and wounds as they show a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity, low resistance rates and display pivotal immunomodulatory as well as wound healing promoting activities such as induction of cell migration and proliferation and angiogenesis. In this review, we evaluate the potential of AMPs for the treatment of bacterial SSTIs and wounds and provide an overview of the mechanisms of actions of AMPs that contribute to combat skin infections and to improve wound healing. Bacteria growing in biofilms are more resistant to conventional antibiotics than their planktonic counterparts due to limited biofilm penetration and distinct metabolic and physiological functions, and often result in chronification of infections and wounds. Thus, we further discuss the feasibility of AMPs as anti-biofilm agents. Finally, we highlight perspectives for future therapies and which issues remain to bring AMPs successfully to the market. PMID:29643807

  10. Prospect of a method of infected wound healing with a help of Calliphoridae blowfly screwworms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Faly

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex assessment of possibilities of infected wound healing with a help of screwworms of blowfly of the family Calliphoridae in the hospitals of Ukraineis offered. On the basis of available data the mechanism of therapeutic action is shown, and the medicinal properties of substances containing in the secretions and excretions of the blowfly screwworms are described. The gist of the treatment method and traits of the blowfly cultivation in a laboratory are highlighted. The quality standards for specialized biological laboratories are presented. The proposed wound healing method is proved as promising.

  11. Clinical evaluation of a dressing with poly absorbent fibres and a silver matrix for managing chronic wounds at risk of infection: a non comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalac, S; Sigal, L; Addala, A; Chahim, M; Faivre-Carrere, C; Lemdjadi, Z; Bohbot, S

    2016-09-01

    To assess the efficacy, safety and acceptability of a new silver poly absorbent dressing (UrgoCleanAg) in the local management of exudative chronic wounds at risk of infection, with inflammatory signs suggesting heavy bacterial load. This prospective, multicentre, non-comparative clinical trial was conducted in French hospital wards (dermatology and vascular medicine) or specialised private-practice physicians. Patients were considered at high-risk of infection when presenting with at least three of five selected inflammatory clinical signs, suggesting a heavy bacterial load (pain between two dressing changes, erythema, oedema, malodorous wound and presence of a heavy exudate). They were treated for a maximum period of four weeks, and followed by the physician on a weekly basis, including a clinical examination, area tracings and photographs. The primary efficacy criterion of the trial was the relative wound surface area reduction at the end of the four weeks of treatment. Acceptability was documented by the nursing staff at each dressing change between the weekly evaluations. We recruited 37 patients with chronic wounds. Wound surface area, mostly covered by sloughy tissue, was reduced by 32.5% at the end of the treatment (median value), while the clinical score (maximum value of 5, based on inflammatory clinical signs) decreased from 4.0 to 2.0. Effective debridement properties were documented (62.5% relative reduction of sloughy tissue at week 4; 58.8% of debrided wounds at week 4) and improvement of the periwound skin status was noted (healthy for 28.6% of the patients at week 4 versus 2.7% at baseline). In addition, the tested wound dressing presented a good safety profile associated to a high level of acceptability, noted by both patients and nursing staff. These clinical data support that the tested dressing is a credible therapeutic alternative for the management of chronic wounds at risk of infection with inflammatory signs suggesting heavy bacterial load.

  12. Validation of COLA score for predicting wound infection in patients undergoing surgery for rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylam, Baris; Tez, Mesut; Comcali, Bulent; Vural, Veli; Duzgun, Arife Polat; Ozer, Mehmet Vasfi; Coskun, Faruk

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to estimate the incidence of SSI (Surgical site infection) and the effect of COLA (contamination, obesity, laparotomy and ASA grade) score on SSI in patients undergoing rectal surgical procedures for rectal cancer. A total of 92 patients who underwent operation for rectum cancer were enrolled in this study. Wound surveillance was performed in all patients by a staff surgeon identified infected wounds during the hospital stay, and collected information for up to 30 days after operation. The overall rate of incisional SSI and organ/space SSI was 22.8% and 7.6% respectively. Surgical site infection rates were 14.2%, 20.58%, 40.7%, 57.1% for COLA 1,2,3 and 4 scores respectively. The area under the receiver/ operator characteristic curve for the score was 0,660. COLA scoring systems predict, with reasonable accuracy, the risk of SSI in rectal cancer patients undergoing elective rectal surgery. COLA score Rectal surgery, Surgical site infection, Risk prediction, Wound infection.

  13. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging To Evaluate Systemic and Topical Antibiotics against Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus-Infected Skin Wounds in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S.; Donegan, Niles P.; Cheung, Ambrose L.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:23208713

  14. Pantoea agglomerans as an indicator of a foreign body of plant origin in cases of wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiman, M; Lazarovich, T; Lotan, G

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the role of Pantoea agglomerans as an infectious agent that causes infection in a wound even after the wound was managed at the emergency department. A retrospective cohort study, reviewing the medical records of patients with traumatic wounds that were admitted to the emergency department from 2007-20 12 and had signs of wound infection for more than I 0 days after the wound was managed. Bacteriological results, clinical picture,and treatment results were obtained. Nine cases were identified. Pantoea agglomerans was detected in all cases. After 1-2 months of ineffective treatment, patients were hospitalised and surgical revisions of the wounds were performed.In all cases, small foreign bodies of plant origin were detected. After surgical revision, wounds were healed in 2-3 days. In cases of prolonged healing of post-traumatic wounds, the presence of foreign bodies of plant origin infected with Pantoea agglomerans should be taken into account. Removal of such foreign bodies leads to rapid healing of the wounds.

  15. Human Wound Infection with Mannheimia glucosida following Lamb Bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jillian S Y; Omaleki, Lida; Turni, Conny; Barber, Stuart Richard; Browning, Glenn Francis; Francis, Michelle J; Graham, Maryza; Korman, Tony M

    2015-10-01

    Mannheimia spp. are veterinary pathogens that can cause mastitis and pneumonia in domestic cattle and sheep. While Mannheimia glucosida can be found as normal flora in oral and respiratory mucosa in sheep, there have been no reported cases of human infection with this organism. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Prevention of perioperative wound infections | Buteera | East and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aiming at short preoperative stay in hospital, and pre-washing of the area concerned before cleaning with antiseptic are also imperative in reducing SSI. Preoperative skin preparation is an important element in prevention of infection, but removes only up to 80% of skin flora. Standard surgical antisepsis is an accepted ...

  17. Wound Infection following Caesarean Section in a University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Caesarean section is a common operation in obstetric practice, but there is a general aversion to caesarean section amongst Nigerian women due to a myriad of reasons amongst which are its associated morbidity and mortality. Surgical site infection following caesarean section is both a major cause of ...

  18. The use of liposomal solutions of antibiotics in treatment of infected and festering wounds in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олег Владимирович Спахи

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of research. To study the use of liposomal solutions of antibiotics in the complex treatment of infected and festering wounds in children.Materials and methods of research: The results of clinical and laboratory examinations of 77 children 3-18 years old with infected and festering wounds were analyzed. All children were distributed into groups of observation by the character of the treatment: in 37 sick children (the main group liposomal preparations were used in the complex treatment. Patients of the control group (40 children get the generally accepted complex treatment. The groups of comparison were statistically similar by the character and localization of pathological process, age, prescription of disease. In the main group an antibacterial-liposomal mixture was injected into the wound alongside with the generally accepted methods. The dynamics of the clinical, laboratory, cytological, bacteriological and morphological indicators was defined using the generally accepted technics. The general condition of patient’s organism was assessed with a help of laboratory methods of research (general clinical and biochemical analyses.Results. In the main group it was observed a persistent tendency to normalization of leukocytal formula and of the number of leukocytes in peripheral blood that reached normal values (p < 0,05 on 7th day. In 36 patients of the control group leukocytosis remained for 7 days. Evident differences of indicators of leukocytal index of intoxication and of an index of the shift of leukocytal formula in the main and the control groups were observed on 3-4th day. In addition its decrease was combined with diminution of an intensity of clinical symptoms and with decrease of manifestations of the local pathological process.Bacteriological examination of the nidus of inflammation in patients of examined groups revealed that in the main group the diminution of the degree of infectious contamination passed faster (p<0,05 – on

  19. Effect of hBD2 genetically modified dermal multipotent stem cells on repair of infected irradiated wounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong Zhaowen; Li Nan; Xiao Taoyuan

    2010-01-01

    Deficiencies in repair cells and infection are two of the main factors that can hinder the process of wound healing. In the present study, we investigated the ability of human beta-defensin-2 (hBD2) genetically modified dermal multipotent stem cells (dMSCs) to accelerate the healing irradiated wounds complicated by infections. An hBD2 adenovirus expression vector (Adv-hBD2) was firstly constructed and used to infect dMSCs. The antibacterial activity of the supernatant was determined by Kirby-Bauer method and macrodilution broth assay. Time to complete wound healing, residual percentage of wound area, and the number of bacteria under the scar were measured to assess the effects of Adv-hBD2-infected dMSC transplantation on the healing of irradiated wounds complicated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Results showed that the supernatant from Adv-hBD2-infected dMSCs had obvious antibacterial effects. Transplantation of Adv-hBD2-infected dMSCs killed bacteria in the wound. The complete wound healing time was 19.8±0.45 days, which was significantly shorter than in the control groups (P<0.05). From 14 days after transplantation, the residual wound area was smaller in the experimental group than in the control groups (P<0.05). In conculsion, we found that transplantation of hBD2 genetically modified dMSCs accelerated the healing of wounds complicated by P. aeruginosa infection in whole body irradiated rats. (author)

  20. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility in wound infections: A pilot study from Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ahmed, Mejbah Uddin; Uddin, Bhuiyan Mohammad Mahtab; Ratan, Zubair Ahmed; Rajawat, Monali; Mehta, Varshil; Zaman, Sojib Bin

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Infections due to antibiotic resistant bacteria have increased alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Unrestrained and rapidly spreading bacterial growth has turned the management of wound infections into a serious challenge. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of different bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in various types of wound infections. Methods:  A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect 105 wound swabs. All isolated bacteria were identified based on colony characteristics, gram stain and standard biochemical tests, and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) with the disc diffusion method. Descriptive statistics were used to present the study findings, and all analyses were performed using Stata Version 13. Results:  The rate of isolation of bacteria was 92.3%. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be the most frequent isolate (55.7%), followed by Escherichia coli (23.7%), Pseudomonas spp. (8.2%), and Streptococcus pyogenes (7.2%). Gram-positive bacteria were mostly (60%) found sensitive to vancomycin, azithromycin, gentamicin, imipenem, cefixime, and ceftriaxone in this study. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli (>60%) showed sensitivity to cefixime, azithromycin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, gentamycin, and ceftazidime. Conclusions: The diversity of isolated bacteria and their susceptibility patterns signify a need to implement a proper infection control strategy, which can be achieved by carrying out antibiotic sensitivity tests of the isolates. PMID:29527295

  1. Prevalence of Post-operative Wound Infections in Rural area of Latur District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Rajput

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a major source of morbidity following operative procedures. The modern surgeon cannot escape the responsibility of dealing with infections, having the knowledge for the appropriate use of aseptic and antiseptic technique, proper use of prophylactic and therapeutic antibiotics, and adequate monitoring and support with novel surgical and pharmacologic as well as nonpharmacologic aids. Objective: To study the most common organisms encountered in postoperative wound infections and to find out the most effective Antibiotics in case of Post Operative Wound Infections. Methodology: It is an Observational study done on 50 operated cases of post operative wounds. Results: Most common microorganism encountered in present series was E. coli in 13 cases (26%. Least common micro organism was Proteus (2%. E. coli was also encountered in mixed culture with Kleibsiella, Pseudomonas and Citrobacter. Most effective antibiotic in present series was Imipenem. Other common effective antibiotics were Amikacin, Netillin, Piperacillin, Tetracycline and Gentamycin. Least effective antibiotics were Penicillin, Cefotaxime, Cefuroxime and Cefoxitin. Conclusion: E. coli was the most common organism cultured. Imipenem and Amikacin were the most effective antibiotics.

  2. Evaluation of mannosidase and trypsin enzymes effects on biofilm production of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn wound infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banar, M. (Maryam); Emaneini, M. (Mohammad); Satarzadeh, M. (Mhboubeh); Abdellahi, N. (Nafiseh); Beigverdi, R. (Reza); W.B. van Leeuwen; Jabalameli, F. (Fereshteh)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBiofilm is an important virulence factor in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and has a substantial role in antibiotic resistance and chronic burn wound infections. New therapeutic agents against P. aeruginosa, degrading biofilms in burn wounds and improving the efficacy of current antimicrobial

  3. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  4. [Application of modern wound dressings in the treatment of chronic wounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Smrke, Dragica Maja

    2012-10-01

    Chronic and acute infected wounds can pose a major clinical problem because of associated complications and slow healing. In addition to classic preparations for wound treatment, an array of modern dressings for chronic wound care are currently available on the market. These dressings are intended for the wounds due to intralesional physiological, pathophysiological and pathological causes and which failed to heal as expected upon the use of standard procedures. Classic materials such as gauze and bandage are now considered obsolete and of just historical relevance because modern materials employed in wound treatment, such as moisture, warmth and appropriate pH are known to ensure optimal conditions for wound healing. Modern wound dressings absorb wound discharge, reduce bacterial contamination, while protecting wound surrounding from secondary infection and preventing transfer of infection from the surrounding area onto the wound surface. The use of modern wound dressings is only justified when the cause of wound development has been established or chronic wound due to the underlying disease has been diagnosed. Wound dressing is chosen according to wound characteristics and by experience. We believe that the main advantages of modern wound dressings versus classic materials include more efficient wound cleaning, simpler placement of the dressing, reduced pain to touch, decreased sticking to the wound surface, and increased capacity of absorbing wound exudate. Modern wound dressings accelerate the formation of granulation tissue, reduce the length of possible hospital stay and facilitate personnel work. Thus, the overall cost of treatment is reduced, although the price of modern wound dressings is higher than that of classic materials. All types of modern wound dressings, their characteristics and indications for use are described.

  5. Factors associated with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci as causing organisms in deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sommerstein

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Established preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery is ineffective against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS. This case–control study aimed to determine factors predicting deep sternal wound infections due to methicillin-resistant CoNS. All cardiac surgery patients undergoing sternotomy between June 2009 and March 2013 prospectively documented in a Swiss tertiary care center were included. Among 1999 patients, 82 (4.1% developed deep sternal wound infection. CoNS were causal in 36 (44% patients, with 25/36 (69% being methicillin resistant. Early reintervention for noninfectious causes (odds ratio (OR 4.3; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.9–9.5 was associated with methicillin-resistant CoNS deep sternal wound infection. Among CoNS deep sternal wound infection, perioperative antimicrobial therapy (p 0.002, early reintervention for noninfectious causes (OR 7.9; 95% CI 0.9–71.1 and time between surgery and diagnosis of infection over 21 days (OR 10.8; 95% CI 1.2–97.8 were associated with methicillin resistance. These findings may help to better tailor preoperative antimicrobial prophylaxis.

  6. Factors associated with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci as causing organisms in deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerstein, R.; Kohler, P.; Wilhelm, M.J.; Kuster, S.P.; Sax, H.

    2015-01-01

    Established preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery is ineffective against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This case–control study aimed to determine factors predicting deep sternal wound infections due to methicillin-resistant CoNS. All cardiac surgery patients undergoing sternotomy between June 2009 and March 2013 prospectively documented in a Swiss tertiary care center were included. Among 1999 patients, 82 (4.1%) developed deep sternal wound infection. CoNS were causal in 36 (44%) patients, with 25/36 (69%) being methicillin resistant. Early reintervention for noninfectious causes (odds ratio (OR) 4.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9–9.5) was associated with methicillin-resistant CoNS deep sternal wound infection. Among CoNS deep sternal wound infection, perioperative antimicrobial therapy (p 0.002), early reintervention for noninfectious causes (OR 7.9; 95% CI 0.9–71.1) and time between surgery and diagnosis of infection over 21 days (OR 10.8; 95% CI 1.2–97.8) were associated with methicillin resistance. These findings may help to better tailor preoperative antimicrobial prophylaxis. PMID:26042188

  7. Factors associated with methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci as causing organisms in deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerstein, R; Kohler, P; Wilhelm, M J; Kuster, S P; Sax, H

    2015-07-01

    Established preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac surgery is ineffective against methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS). This case-control study aimed to determine factors predicting deep sternal wound infections due to methicillin-resistant CoNS. All cardiac surgery patients undergoing sternotomy between June 2009 and March 2013 prospectively documented in a Swiss tertiary care center were included. Among 1999 patients, 82 (4.1%) developed deep sternal wound infection. CoNS were causal in 36 (44%) patients, with 25/36 (69%) being methicillin resistant. Early reintervention for noninfectious causes (odds ratio (OR) 4.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9-9.5) was associated with methicillin-resistant CoNS deep sternal wound infection. Among CoNS deep sternal wound infection, perioperative antimicrobial therapy (p 0.002), early reintervention for noninfectious causes (OR 7.9; 95% CI 0.9-71.1) and time between surgery and diagnosis of infection over 21 days (OR 10.8; 95% CI 1.2-97.8) were associated with methicillin resistance. These findings may help to better tailor preoperative antimicrobial prophylaxis.

  8. Healing Potentials of Oral Moringa Oleifera Leaves Extract and Tetracycline on Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infected Wounds of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyarefe, Oghenemega D; Idowu, Aderayo; Afolabi, Jeremiah M

    2015-12-20

    The effects of oral dose of aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera and tetracycline antibiotics on cutaneous wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus were studied in eighteen adult wistar rats (159±31.5g) randomized into three groups: Group A, n = 6, Moringa oleifera-(300 mg/kg). Group B, n = 6, tetracycline (9.4 mg/kg) and Group C, n = 6, Sterile water (control). Six millimetres diameter nape wound, created on each rat under 2% xylazine (5 mg/kg) and 5% ketamine (35 mg/kg), was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (108 Colony Forming Unit (CFU). Following infection, treatment was commenced with daily oral dose of test preparations and the wounds were evaluated every other day i.e., day 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 for wetness (wound exudation), wound edge oedema, hyperaemia, granulation tissues and contraction (diameter). Severe wound exudation existed in all the groups between days 0-3 (p = 1.00). A significantly less wound exudation was observed at days 3-5 (p = 0.000) and 5-9 (p = 0.003) (ControlMoringa). Wound edge oedema was significantly less on days 5-9 (p = 0.000) and 9-15 (p = 0.001) (ControlMoringaMoringa Moringa> Tetracycline). Differences in wound diameter was not significant except at days 5-9 (p = 0.013) (Control> Moringa >Tetracycline). Oral doses of Moringa oleifera extract (300mg/kg) and tetracycline (9.4mg/kg) are not effective as antimicrobial or immune-boosting agents to enhance healing of wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus and hence not recommended for rapid clearance of Staphylococcus aureus infected wounds.

  9. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/V.A.C.® - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segers Patrique

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.® therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious interim (prior to flap reconstruction or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which may occur during negative-pressure therapy but not necessarily due to it, are often attributed to a single factor and reported as such. However, despite the wealth of clinical experience internationally available, information regarding certain simple considerations is still lacking. Garnering information on all the factors that could possibly influence the outcome has become more difficult due to a (fortunate decrease in the incidence of deep sternal wound infection. If more insight is to be gained from fewer clinical cases, then various potentially confounding factors should be fully disclosed before complications can be attributed to the technique itself or improvements to negative-pressure wound therapy for deep sternal wound infection can be accepted as evidence-based and the guidelines for its use adapted. The authors propose the adoption of a simple checklist in such cases.

  10. Immune Modulating Topical S100A8/A9 Inhibits Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Mitigates Biofilm Infection in Chronic Wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    . Treatment slightly augmented key inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), but dampened interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels and blood polymorphonuclear count. In conclusion, topical S100A8/A9 displays remarkable novel immune stimulatory and anti-infective properties in vivo and in vitro. Importantly......Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maintains and perturbs local host defense, hindering timely wound healing. Previously, we showed that P. aeruginosa suppressed S100A8/A9 of the murine innate host defense. We assessed the potential antimicrobial effect of S100A8/A9 on biofilm-infected wounds...... murine S100A8/A9 and a group of vehicle controls (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) all treated with s.c. injections daily for up to five days. Wounds were analyzed for quantitative bacteriology and contents of key inflammatory markers. Count of blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes was included. S100A8/A9...

  11. Wound management in disaster settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthisuthimethawee, Prasit; Lindquist, Samuel J; Sandler, Nicola; Clavisi, Ornella; Korin, Stephanie; Watters, David; Gruen, Russell L

    2015-04-01

    Few guidelines exist for the initial management of wounds in disaster settings. As wounds sustained are often contaminated, there is a high risk of further complications from infection, both local and systemic. Healthcare workers with little to no surgical training often provide early wound care, and where resources and facilities are also often limited, and clear appropriate guidance is needed for early wound management. We undertook a systematic review focusing on the nature of wounds in disaster situations, and the outcomes of wound management in recent disasters. We then presented the findings to an international consensus panel with a view to formulating a guideline for the initial management of wounds by first responders and subsequent healthcare personnel as they deploy. We included 62 studies in the review that described wound care challenges in a diverse range of disasters, and reported high rates of wound infection with multiple causative organisms. The panel defined a guideline in which the emphasis is on not closing wounds primarily but rather directing efforts toward cleaning, debridement, and dressing wounds in preparation for delayed primary closure, or further exploration and management by skilled surgeons. Good wound care in disaster settings, as outlined in this article, can be achieved with relatively simple measures, and have important mortality and morbidity benefits.

  12. Role of different negative pressure values in the process of infected wounds treated by vacuum-assisted closure: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Yu, Aixi; Wu, Gang; Xia, Chengyan; Hu, Xiang; Qi, Baiwen

    2013-10-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) device is widely used to treat infected wounds in clinical work. Although the effect of VAC with different negative pressure values is well established, whether different negative pressures could result in varying modulation of wound relative cytokines was not clear. We hypothesise that instead of the highest negative pressure value the suitable value for VAC is the one which is the most effective on regulating wound relative cytokines. Infected wounds created on pigs' back were used to investigate the effects of varying negative pressure values of VAC devices. Wounds were treated with VAC of different negative pressure values or moist gauze, which was set as control. The VAC foam, semiocclusive dresses and moist gauze were changed on days 3, 5, 7 and 9 after wounds were created. When changing dressings, tissues from wounds were harvested for bacteria count and histology examination including Masson's trichrome stain and immunohistochemistry for microvessels. Western blot was carried out to test the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Results showed that on days 3 and 5 the number of bacteria in wounds treated by VAC with 75, 150, 225 and 300 mmHg was significantly decreased compared with that in wounds treated by gauze and 0 mmHg pressure value. However, there was no difference in wounds treated with negative pressure values of 75 , 150, 225 and 300 mmHg at any time spot. Immunohistochemistry showed that more microvessels were generated in wounds treated by VAC using 75 and 150 mmHg negative pressure comparing with that using 225 and 300 mmHg on days 3 and 5. However this difference vanished on days 7 and 9. Morphological evaluation by Masson's trichrome staining showed increased collagen deposition in VAC of 75 and 150 mmHg compared with that in VAC of 225 and 300 mmHg. Western blot showed that the expression of VEGF and bFGF significantly increased when the wounds

  13. Calmodulin Gene Expression in Response to Mechanical Wounding and Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomato Fruit

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Peng; Tianbao Yang; Wayne M. Jurick II

    2014-01-01

    Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various plant physiological responses. To determine the functions of calmodulin in fleshy fruit, expression studies were performed on a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs) in mature-green stage tomato fruit in response to mechanical injury and Botrytis cinerea infection. Both wounding and pathogen in...

  14. Fungal Wound Infection (Not Colonization) Is Independently Associated With Mortality in Burn Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    fungal-status category was defined according to the deepest level of fungal involvement observed during the hospital course: no fungus (2476 patients...week to give advance guidance for antimicrobial therapy. Patients were examined daily for signs of infection. Protein and calorie needs were supplied...necrotic wound surface), but not viable tissue; and “no fungus ” as absence of fungal elements. Statistical Analysis Each patient’s fungal-status category was

  15. Wound infections after median sternotomy treated by VAC therapy, summary of results, and risk factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulman, M; Bezak, B; Artemiou, P; Cikrai, R

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to summarize results and analyze risk factors for the development of wound infection in heart surgery patients after median sternotomy. In this retrospective analysis with assessment of multiple risk factors, we examined 143 patients with infection after median sternotomy treated with VAC therapy from total of 4,650 patients operated in our department from 2012 to 2015. Total of 143 patients developed significant SSI treated by VAC therapy following cardiac surgery. Of these, only 14 patients developed DSWI and one patient was diagnosed with suspected osteomyelitis. BMI, female gender, and use of BIMA proved to be statistically significant risk factors in our study (p infection (p infection proved to be a significant prognostic factor for patients' outcome (p infection (Tab. 3, Ref. 30).

  16. Efficacy of 1% acetic acid in the treatment of chronic wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa: prospective randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, V L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds are those wounds that are persistent and do not respond to any sort of treatment. The concept of using topical antiseptics on open wounds is to prevent and treat infections. They also help to shorten the time taken to heal the wounds. The use of topical agents on wounds to prevent infection is a minimal ability to develop resistance to the microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen with innate resistance to many antibiotics. In places that are economically backward, these problems get compounded by the inability of patients to afford newer expensive drugs. Topically applied dilute acetic acid, which is cheap and easily available, has been found to be effective in such chronic wounds. In the present study, an attempt has been made to use 1% acetic acid as the sole antimicrobial agent for the treatment of pseudomonal wound infections. A control limb was used in which the wounds were treated with normal saline. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of acetic acid in low concentration of 1% in chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. This was a prospective study conducted over a period of 6 months. All patients with chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. Wounds due to massive burns, suspected malignancy, immunocompromised individuals and individuals with sepsis. A total of 32 patients enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomised equally to the 1% acetic acid group and saline dressing group. None of the patients received any systemic antibiotics during the study period and received twice daily dressings. The endpoint of the treatment was wounds free of P. aeruginosa. The duration of treatment required to eliminate the Pseudomonas from the wounds in the acetic acid group was on an average 7 days less than that required by the saline group. P value was acetic acid group irrespective of the sensitivity of the organism to antibiotics, Pseudomonas organisms were eliminated within the same time period - 4·5

  17. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  18. An Inexpensive Modified Primary Closure Technique for Class IV (Dirty) Wounds Significantly Decreases Superficial and Deep Surgical Site Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bradford J; Aloia, Thomas A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the creation of several programs to decrease the incidence of surgical site infection, it remains a common complication that has a significant impact on patient recovery and medical costs. The following is a description and brief outcome report of a modified primary closure technique used for dirty (Class IV) wounds. There were 14 consecutive patients who had a laparotomy with Class IV wounds treated by a single surgeon (TAA) from 2011 to 2015. All patients had a history of cancer and either showed signs suggestive for an acute abdomen and required an emergent exploratory laparotomy or were found to have purulent intraabdominal infection at the time of elective surgery. The operation and "modified primary closure" technique (subcutaneous wound wicks with stapled skin closure) were performed in every case. The modified primary closure technique was utilized in 14 patients with a Class IV wound. There were no 30-day mortalities or readmissions. Wound wicks were slowly advanced out over a 7-day period, and only one patient required subsequent wound packing of a single-wicked area. There were no superficial or deep surgical site infections, or wound dehiscence during the hospital course, or 30-day postoperative period. The modified primary closure technique is efficient and inexpensive and was effective in a series of 14 patients with wounds classified as dirty.

  19. Understanding the Host Inflammatory Response to Wound Infection: An In Vivo Study of Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Rabbit Ear Wound Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    J, Moser C, Tolker-Nielsen T, Hoiby N, Givskov M, Bjarnsholt T. The distribution, organization, and ecology of bacteria in chronic wounds. J Clin...2002; 15: 167–93. 29. van Belkum A. Staphylococcal colonization and infection: homeostasis versus disbalance of human (innate) immunity and bacterial

  20. Calmodulin Gene Expression in Response to Mechanical Wounding and Botrytis cinerea Infection in Tomato Fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Peng

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin, a ubiquitous calcium sensor, plays an important role in decoding stress-triggered intracellular calcium changes and regulates the functions of numerous target proteins involved in various plant physiological responses. To determine the functions of calmodulin in fleshy fruit, expression studies were performed on a family of six calmodulin genes (SlCaMs in mature-green stage tomato fruit in response to mechanical injury and Botrytis cinerea infection. Both wounding and pathogen inoculation triggered expression of all those genes, with SlCaM2 being the most responsive one to both treatments. Furthermore, all calmodulin genes were upregulated by salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate, two signaling molecules involved in plant immunity. In addition to SlCaM2, SlCaM1 was highly responsive to salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate. However, SlCaM2 exhibited a more rapid and stronger response than SlCaM1. Overexpression of SlCaM2 in tomato fruit enhanced resistance to Botrytis-induced decay, whereas reducing its expression resulted in increased lesion development. These results indicate that calmodulin is a positive regulator of plant defense in fruit by activating defense pathways including salicylate- and jasmonate-signaling pathways, and SlCaM2 is the major calmodulin gene responsible for this event.

  1. Surgical site infection in cesarean sections with the use of a plastic sheath wound retractor compared to the traditional self-retaining metal retractor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkson, Larry; Siedentopf, Jan-Peter; Weichert, Alexander; Henrich, Wolfgang

    2016-08-01

    A cesarean section rate of up to 19.4% is reported worldwide. Surgical site infection occurs with rates of up to 13.5%. Plastic-sheath wound retractors show reduced rates of surgical site infections in abdominal surgery. There is limited evidence in women having cesarean sections. This study evaluates the use of the Alexis(®) O C-Section Retractor in the prevention of surgical site infection in patients undergoing their first planned cesarean section compared to the traditional Collins self-retaining metal retractor. A single center, prospective, randomized, controlled, observational trial. The primary outcome is surgical site infection as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The secondary outcomes included intraoperative surgical parameters, postoperative pain scores and the short and long-term satisfaction with wound healing. From October 2013 to December 2015 at the Charité University Hospital, Berlin. 98 patients to the Alexis(®) O C-Section Retractor group and 100 to the traditional Collins self-retaining metal retractor group. A statistically significant reduction in the rate of surgical site infections, when the Alexis(®) O C-Section Retractor was used for wound retraction compared to the traditional Collins metal self-retaining wound retractor, 1% vs. 8% (RR 7.84, 95% CI (2.45-70.71) p=0.035). The use of plastic-sheath wound retractors compared to the traditional self-retaining metal retractor in low risk women, having the first cesarean section is associated with a significantly reduced risk of surgical site infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Sulfamethoxazole-Trimethoprim (Cotrimoxazole) for Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Including Impetigo, Cellulitis, and Abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Asha C; Carapetis, Jonathan R; Currie, Bart J; Fowler, Vance; Chambers, Henry F; Tong, Steven Y C

    2017-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) affect millions of people globally, which represents a significant burden on ambulatory care and hospital settings. The role of sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (SXT) in SSTI treatment, particularly when group A Streptococcus (GAS) is involved, is controversial. We conducted a systematic review of clinical trials and observational studies that address the utility of SXT for SSTI treatment, caused by either GAS or Staphylococcus aureus , including methicillin-resistant (MRSA). We identified 196 studies, and 15 underwent full text review by 2 reviewers. Observational studies, which mainly focused on SSTI due to S aureus , supported the use of SXT when compared with clindamycin or β-lactams. Of 10 randomized controlled trials, 8 demonstrated the efficacy of SXT for SSTI treatment including conditions involving GAS. These findings support SXT use for treatment of impetigo and purulent cellulitis (without an additional β-lactam agent) and abscess and wound infection. For nonpurulent cellulitis, β-lactams remain the treatment of choice.

  3. Fungating wounds: management and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandler, Suzanne; Stephen-Haynes, Jackie

    2017-06-22

    This article defines fungating wounds and considers the underlying cause, location and presentation. The clinical challenges presented by fungating wounds are discussed, with reference to evidence-based care delivery. This includes wound assessment, cleansing, debridement and management of malodour, infection, bleeding and exudate. Guidance on the use of wound management dressings is considered in relation to symptom management. The importance of clinical decision-making and educational preparation in the delivery of evidenced-based care for those with fungating wounds is emphasised. A conclusion is made that the clinician can support the patient with a fungating wound by the delivery of evidenced-based care.

  4. Isolation and in vitro evaluation of bacteriophages against MDR-bacterial isolates from septic wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavali, Roja Rani; Degati, Vijaya Lakshmi; Lomada, Dakshayani; Reddy, Madhava C; Durbaka, Vijaya Raghava Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Multi-drug resistance has become a major problem for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial infections. The use of bacteriophages is an attractive approach to overcome the problem of drug resistance in several pathogens that cause fatal diseases. Our study aimed to isolate multi drug resistant bacteria from patients with septic wounds and then isolate and apply bacteriophages in vitro as alternative therapeutic agents. Pus samples were aseptically collected from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Science (RIMS), Kadapa, A.P., and samples were analyzed by gram staining, evaluating morphological characteristics, and biochemical methods. MDR-bacterial strains were collected using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method against a variety of antibiotics. Bacteriophages were collected and tested in vitro for lytic activity against MDR-bacterial isolates. Analysis of the pus swab samples revealed that the most of the isolates detected had Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the predominant bacterium, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Our results suggested that gram-negative bacteria were more predominant than gram-positive bacteria in septic wounds; most of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, vancomycin and tetracycline. All the gram-positive isolates (100%) were multi-drug resistant, whereas 86% of the gram-negative isolates had a drug resistant nature. Further bacteriophages isolated from sewage demonstrated perfect lytic activity against the multi-drug resistant bacteria causing septic wounds. In vitro analysis of the isolated bacteriophages demonstrated perfect lysis against the corresponding MDR-bacteria, and these isolated phages may be promising as a first choice for prophylaxis against wound sepsis, Moreover, phage therapy does not enhance multi-drug resistance in bacteria and could work simultaneously on a wide variety of MDR-bacteria when used in a bacteriophage cocktail. Hence, our results suggest

  5. Isolation and in vitro evaluation of bacteriophages against MDR-bacterial isolates from septic wound infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roja Rani Pallavali

    Full Text Available Multi-drug resistance has become a major problem for the treatment of pathogenic bacterial infections. The use of bacteriophages is an attractive approach to overcome the problem of drug resistance in several pathogens that cause fatal diseases. Our study aimed to isolate multi drug resistant bacteria from patients with septic wounds and then isolate and apply bacteriophages in vitro as alternative therapeutic agents. Pus samples were aseptically collected from Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Medical Science (RIMS, Kadapa, A.P., and samples were analyzed by gram staining, evaluating morphological characteristics, and biochemical methods. MDR-bacterial strains were collected using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method against a variety of antibiotics. Bacteriophages were collected and tested in vitro for lytic activity against MDR-bacterial isolates. Analysis of the pus swab samples revealed that the most of the isolates detected had Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the predominant bacterium, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Our results suggested that gram-negative bacteria were more predominant than gram-positive bacteria in septic wounds; most of these isolates were resistant to ampicillin, amoxicillin, penicillin, vancomycin and tetracycline. All the gram-positive isolates (100% were multi-drug resistant, whereas 86% of the gram-negative isolates had a drug resistant nature. Further bacteriophages isolated from sewage demonstrated perfect lytic activity against the multi-drug resistant bacteria causing septic wounds. In vitro analysis of the isolated bacteriophages demonstrated perfect lysis against the corresponding MDR-bacteria, and these isolated phages may be promising as a first choice for prophylaxis against wound sepsis, Moreover, phage therapy does not enhance multi-drug resistance in bacteria and could work simultaneously on a wide variety of MDR-bacteria when used in a bacteriophage cocktail. Hence

  6. Secondary omental and pectoralis major double flap reconstruction following aggressive sternectomy for deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirasawa Bungo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery carries high morbidity and mortality. Our strategy for deep sternal wound infection is aggressive strenal debridement followed by vacuum-assisted closure (VAC therapy and omental-muscle flap reconstrucion. We describe this strategy and examine the outcome and long-term quality of life (QOL it achieves. Methods We retrospectively examined 16 patients treated for deep sternal wound infection between 2001 and 2007. The most recent nine patients were treated with total sternal resection followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with omental-muscle flap reconstruction (recent group; whereas the former seven patients were treated with sternal preservation if possible, without VAC therapy, and four of these patients underwent primary closure (former group. We assessed long-term quality of life after DSWI by using the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey, Version 2 (SF36v2. Results One patient died and four required further surgery for recurrence of deep sternal wound infection in the former group. The duration of treatment for deep sternal wound infection in the recent group was significantly shorter than that in previous group (63.4 ± 54.1 days vs. 120.0 ± 31.8 days, respectively; p = 0.039. Despite aggressive sternal resection, the QOL of patients treated for DSWI was only minimally compromised compared with age-, sex-, surgical procedures-matched patients without deep sternal wound infection. Conclusions Aggressive sternal debridement followed by VAC therapy and secondary closure with an omental-muscle flap is effective for deep sternal wound infection. In this series, it resulted in a lower incidence of recurrent infection, shorter hospitalization, and it did not compromise long-term QOL greatly.

  7. Prospective Randomized Evaluation of Intraoperative Application of Autologous Platelet-Rich Plasma on Surgical Site Infection or Delayed Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SanGiovanni, Thomas P; Kiebzak, Gary M

    2016-05-01

    Prevention of surgical site infections and the reduction of wound-related complication rates have become increasingly emphasized by hospital task groups and government agencies given the degree of economic burden it places on the health care system. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains growth factors and other biomolecules that promote endogenous microbicidal activity. We hypothesized that PRP would help prevent postoperative infection and delayed wound healing (DWH). We randomized patients having foot or ankle surgery to the treatment group receiving intraoperative PRP (applied to operative field) and platelet-poor plasma at closing (PPP, on the sutured skin) or the control group (no PRP/PPP). The incidence of deep surgical site infection and DWH (collectively called endpoints) was compared between groups (n = 250/group). PRP had a mean 5.3-fold platelet concentration compared to whole blood, with concentrated white blood cells. Mean age (±SD) of patients was 52 years (±15), 65% were women. Minor and major operative procedures were included. Patients were followed for 60 days. Seventy controls had PRP prepared for assay of growth factors. Procedure mix, ASA scores, mean operative times, and comorbidity mix were similar between groups. The primary result was no difference in number of endpoints between groups: 19 patients in the PRP group (7.6%) versus 18 controls (7.2%). Endpoints were deep surgical site infections in 2 PRP/PPP patients and 1 control, and DWH in 17 PRP/PPP patients and 17 controls. Analysis of PRP samples revealed a large variation in growth factor concentrations between patients. Intraoperative application of PRP/PPP did not reduce the incidence of postoperative infection or DWH. Growth factor profiles varied greatly between patients, suggesting that the potentially therapeutic treatment delivered was not consistent from patient-to-patient. Level I, prospective randomized trial. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Some Virulence Factors of Staphylococci Isolated From Wound and Skin Infections in Shahrekord, IR Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Ghasemi, Maryam; Ghasemi, Bahram

    2014-04-01

    Staphylococci release a large number of enzymes. Some of these, such as coagulase, beta- lactamase, hemolysins and biofilms are considered indices of pathogenicity. The aim of the current study was based on the isolation and identification of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative Staphylococci (CNS) strains from various skin lesions and examining their biofilms, beta- lactamase, hemolysins production and antibiotic resistance pattern. Sixty one infected wounds and 39 skin infections samples were collected and examined. After the culture and identification, examination for production of hemolysins, beta- lactamase, biofilm and susceptibility toward 9 antimicrobials was performed. Out of 75 isolated Staphylococci, sixty (80%) were biofilm producers. Two overall prevalence of 28.5% and 100% of ß-lactamase production were recorded for isolated S. aureus and CNS, respectively. Twenty out of 49 (40.8%), the same number of α- and β- hemolytic S. aureus, were isolated while six (12.24%) were ∂ -hemolysin producers. Twenty two of Twenty six (84.6%) isolates of CNS, were hemolysin producers that all were ∂ type. The S. aureus isolates from wound infections, show a high sensitivity pattern to all examined antibiotics, this sensitivity pattern for isolates from skin dermatitis is relatively low, though. High percentage of hemolysins, biofilm and beta lactamase production by isolated Staphylococci, suggests an important role of these virulence factors in the pathogenesis of isolated Staphylococci from dermatitis lesions. The S. aureus isolates from wound infections, show a high sensitivity pattern to all examined antibiotics. Only ciprofloxacin was found to be active against all isolates from dedermatitis lesions.

  9. Sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, in the Netherlands in 2008.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koedijk, F.D.H.; Vriend, H.J.; Veen, M.G. van; Coul, E.L.M. Op de; Broek, I.V.F. van den; Sighem, A.I. van; Verheij, R.A.; Sande, M.A.B. van der

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis. Chlamydia was the most common bacterial sexual transmitted infection (STI) diagnosed in Dutch STI centres in 2008. Similar to previous years, infections were reported as occurring especially in young heterosexuals and men who have sex with men (MSM) in 2008, the

  10. Biliary bacteria, antibiotic use, and wound infection in surgery of the gallbladder and common bile duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R T; Goodall, R G; Marien, B; Park, M; Lloyd-Smith, W; Wiegand, F M

    1987-01-01

    That clinical risk groups predict postoperative infection in biliary operations has recently been challenged. To reevaluate the risk of infection, we studied 215 patients stratified by clinical risk factors. Of 100 patients having simple "low-risk" cholecystectomy, 11 had positive bile cultures (90% pure), and one with sterile bile got a staphylococcal wound infection (WI). Among 92 "high-risk" patients with acute cholecystitis, obstructive jaundice, or choledochal stones, 42 had positive bile cultures (44% pure, 12% anaerobes). One of 52 patients who received preoperative cefazolin got a staphylococcal WI, but ten of 40 patients without antibiotic therapy developed WIs, nine caused by organisms that also grew from the bile. Of 23 patients with obstructive cholangitis, 22 had positive bile cultures (88% mixed, 23% anaerobes). Despite antibiotic therapy, four developed WIs caused by these organisms. The concept of clinical risk factors is validated.

  11. Prevention of abdominal wound infection (PROUD trial, DRKS00000390: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heger Ulrike

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound infection affects a considerable portion of patients after abdominal operations, increasing health care costs and postoperative morbidity and affecting quality of life. Antibacterial coating has been suggested as an effective measure to decrease postoperative wound infections after laparotomies. The INLINE metaanalysis has recently shown the superiority of a slowly absorbable continuous suture for abdominal closure; with PDS plus® such a suture has now been made available with triclosan antibacterial coating. Methods/Design The PROUD trial is designed as a randomised, controlled, observer, surgeon and patient blinded multicenter superiority trial with two parallel groups and a primary endpoint of wound infection during 30 days after surgery. The intervention group will receive triclosan coated polydioxanone sutures, whereas the control group will receive the standard polydioxanone sutures; abdominal closure will otherwise be standardized in both groups. Statistical analysis is based on intention-to-treat population via binary logistic regression analysis, the total sample size of n = 750 is sufficient to ensure alpha = 5% and power = 80%, an interim analysis will be carried out after data of 375 patients are available. Discussion The PROUD trial will yield robust data to determine the effectiveness of antibacterial coating in one of the standard sutures for abdominal closure and potentially lead to amendment of current guidelines. The exploration of clinically objective parameters as well as quality of life holds immediate relevance for clinical management and the pragmatic trial design ensures high external validity. Trial Registration The trial protocol has been registered with the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000390.

  12. Antibacterial Efficacy of Silver-Impregnated Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Immobilized on a Biological Dressing in a Murine Wound Infection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Kathleen M.; Agarwal, Ankit; Tackes, Dana S.; Johnson, Kevin W.; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Czuprynski, Charles J.; Kierski, Patricia R.; Schurr, Michael J.; McAnulty, Jonathan F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antibacterial effect of augmenting a biological dressing with polymer films containing silver nanoparticles. Background Biological dressings, such as Biobrane, are commonly used for treating partial-thickness wounds and burn injuries. Biological dressings have several advantages over traditional wound dressings. However, as many as 19% of wounds treated with Biobrane become infected, and, once infected, the Biobrane must be removed and a traditional dressing approach should be employed. Silver is a commonly used antimicrobial in wound care products, but current technology uses cytotoxic concentrations of silver in these dressings. We have developed a novel and facile technology that allows immobilization of bioactive molecules on the surfaces of soft materials, demonstrated here by augmentation of Biobrane with nanoparticulate silver. Surfaces modified with nanometer-thick polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) impregnated with silver nanoparticles have been shown previously to result in in vitro antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus epidermidis at loadings of silver that are noncytotoxic. Methods We demonstrated that silver-impregnated PEMs can be nondestructively immobilized onto the surface of Biobrane (Biobrane-Ag) and determined the in vitro antibacterial activity of Biobrane-Ag with Staphylococcus aureus. In this study, we used an in vivo wound infection model in mice induced by topical inoculation of S aureus onto full-thickness 6-mm diameter wounds. After 72 hours, bacterial quantification was performed. Results Wounds treated with Biobrane-Ag had significantly (P silver-impregnated PEMs on the wound-contact surface of Biobrane significantly reduces bacterial bioburden in full-thickness murine skin wounds. Further research will investigate whether this construct can be considered for human use. PMID:22609841

  13. The surgical team as a source of postoperative wound infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J; Svendsen, R N; Nielsen, S V

    1997-01-01

    Postoperative wound infection, caused by Streptococcus pyogenes transmitted during the operation from members of the surgical team, is a rare but serious complication of surgery. This study describes three cases, which could be traced to an orthopaedic surgeon, who carried the epidemic strain...... surgeons and obstetricians. In outbreaks where an attack rate could be calculated, it was at least 7%. T-28 was the most commonly involved T-type, accounting for seven outbreaks. The anus and vagina were the most common carrier sites in staff members. A combination of penicillin and oral vancomycin seemed...

  14. Virulence property, phylogenetic background, and resistance pattern of Escherichia coli isolates from wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arindam Chakraborty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The aim of the present study was to characterize the E. coli isolates from surgical wounds, traumatic wounds, and from foot ulcers on the basis of virulence and drug resistance. Subjects and Methods: A total of forty E. coli strains isolated from wound infections were studied. Phylogenetic background, virulence factors (VFs, and antibiotic resistance profiles were determined by phenotypic and genotypic methods. Correlation between phylogenetic groups, VFs, and drug resistance pattern were analyzed. Results: Analysis of virulence gene possession among the isolates indicated that a maximum number were carrying the fimH (39 strains; 97.5% gene, followed by iutA (27; 67.5%, papC (16; 4%, hlyA (5; 12.5%, cnf1 ( 5; 12.5%, and neuC (1; 2.5%, respectively. The phylogroups B2 (32.5% and D (42.5% were more common. Thirty isolates (75% were found to be positive for extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes. CIT type of plasmid-mediated AmpC was seen only in 6 (15% isolates. Most effective antibiotics were carbapenem and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim groups of drugs. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that adherence factors and iron uptake systems are two of the more important CFs expressed by such isolates, and such strains are also observed to exhibit a higher degree of drug resistance. Carbapenems and co-trimoxazole may be considered as reliable and successful alternative medications for these isolates.

  15. Importance of postprocedural Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) restaging in predicting limb salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leithead, Charles; Novak, Zdenek; Spangler, Emily; Passman, Marc A; Witcher, Adam; Patterson, Mark A; Beck, Adam W; Pearce, Benjamin J

    2018-02-01

    The Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system was created to encompass demographic changes and expanding techniques of revascularization to perform meaningful analyses of outcomes in the treatment of the threatened limb. The WIfI index is intended to be analogous to the TNM staging system for cancer, with restaging to be done after control of infection and after revascularization. Our goal was to evaluate the effectiveness of WIfI restaging after therapy in the prediction of limb outcomes. Preoperative WIfI scoring was performed prospectively for all critical limb ischemia patients who underwent revascularization from January 2014 to June 2015. WIfI restaging and assessment of outcomes were performed retrospectively through August 2016. WIfI classification was determined at the following intervals: preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and 1 month and 6 months after intervention. Amputation-free survival (AFS) was the primary end point. Kaplan-Meier plot analysis and comparisons of preoperative grades with respective postoperative grades were performed using paired t-test, χ 2 test, and correlation analyses. A total of 180 limbs and 172 critical limb ischemia patients underwent revascularization, of which 29 limbs had major amputations (16%). Wound grades generally improved after surgery across the entire cohort. Major amputation was associated with preoperative wound grade and remained associated with wound grade at postoperative restaging at 1 month and beyond on the basis of amputation frequency analysis (preoperatively, 1 month, and 6 months, P = .03, < .001, and < .001, respectively). Wound grade was significantly associated with AFS at 1 month and 6 months after intervention (log-rank, P < .001 for restaging intervals). Ischemia grades improved initially with a slight decline across the cohort at 6 months. Ischemia grade at 1 month postoperatively was associated with AFS (log-rank, P = .03). Foot infection grades

  16. Regeneration of Skin Surface by Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells of Adipose Tissue in Laboratory Animals with Infected Wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Sahab, A. Haydar; Tretyak, S.; Nedzved, M.K.; Baranov, E.V.; Nadyrov, E.; Lobanok, H.H.; Vasilevich, I.B.; Welcome, M.O.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents results of experimental studies in laboratory animals with a simulated infected wound, for which mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from adipose tissue were used in its treatment. The following peculiarities of MSCs for regeneration of skin defects are established: faster arrest of inflammation, accelerated wound healing processes, as well as observed stimulation of growth of skin appendages. The results of this study may serve the basis for further research from develo...

  17. Antibacterial and Antifungal Potential of Himalayan Medicinal Plants for Treating Wound Infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habiba, U.; Ahmad, M.; Shinwari, S.; Sultana, S.; Zafar, M.; Shinwari, Z. K.

    2016-01-01

    Many bacterial and fungal strains are involved in wound infectious diseases as most of these strains become resistant to the most commonly used synthetic drugs in Himalayan region. Plant based natural products seem to be an alternative to this problem. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the In vitro antibacterial and antifungal activities of 30 medicinal plants used in folk recipes by Himalayan people to treat wound infections against multi-drug resistant pathogens. In total of six medically important Myco-bacterial strains Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger were tested against methanolic plant extracts at 5 mg/ml concentration using agar disc well diffusion method to determined Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The plant extracts showed varied levels of MICs against test microorganisms. The strongest antibacterial activity was reported in methanolic extract of Cynadon dactylon (L.) Pers. against Klebsiella pneumoniae with 20.67±1.36 mm MICs, while Candida albicans was considered to be the most resistant pathogen with MICs 9.6±0.57 mm. The findings were compared with results obtained using standard antibiotics, aminooxanilic, ciprofloxacin, cefotaxime, fluconazole and itraconazole at conc. 5mg/ ml. The results provide an evidence of folk medicinal uses of plants among the Himalayan communities to treat wounds. Further research needs to be carried out to identify the active molecules and evaluate the in vivo antibacterial and antifungal activities as well as toxicity level with clinical trials to use full potential of these plants for drug discovery development to control wounds globally. (author)

  18. Methods for identifying surgical wound infection after discharge from hospital: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Peter J

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wound infections are a common complication of surgery that add significantly to the morbidity of patients and costs of treatment. The global trend towards reducing length of hospital stay post-surgery and the increase in day case surgery means that surgical site infections (SSI will increasingly occur after hospital discharge. Surveillance of SSIs is important because rates of SSI are viewed as a measure of hospital performance, however accurate detection of SSIs post-hospital discharge is not straightforward. Methods We conducted a systematic review of methods of post discharge surveillance for surgical wound infection and undertook a national audit of methods of post-discharge surveillance for surgical site infection currently used within United Kingdom NHS Trusts. Results Seven reports of six comparative studies which examined the validity of post-discharge surveillance methods were located; these involved different comparisons and some had methodological limitations, making it difficult to identify an optimal method. Several studies evaluated automated screening of electronic records and found this to be a useful strategy for the identification of SSIs that occurred post discharge. The audit identified a wide range of relevant post-discharge surveillance programmes in England, Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; however, these programmes used varying approaches for which there is little supporting evidence of validity and/or reliability. Conclusion In order to establish robust methods of surveillance for those surgical site infections that occur post discharge, there is a need to develop a method of case ascertainment that is valid and reliable post discharge. Existing research has not identified a valid and reliable method. A standardised definition of wound infection (e.g. that of the Centres for Disease Control should be used as a basis for developing a feasible, valid and reliable approach to defining post

  19. Reduction in Surgical Wound Infection Rates Associated with Reporting Data to Surgeons

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    GD Taylor

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that wound infection (surgical site infection [ ssi ] rates fall when surgeons are provided with data on their performance. Since 1987, the authors have been performing concurrent surveillance of surgical patients and confidentially reporting surgeon-specific ssi rates to individual surgeons and their clinical directors, and providing surgeons with the mean rates of their peers. The program has been gradually refined and expanded. Data are now collected on wound infection risk and report risk adjusted rates compared with the mean for hospitals in the United States National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (nnis data bank. Since inception through to December 1993, ssi rates have fallen 68% in clean contaminated general surgery cases (relative risk [rr] 0.36, 95% ci 0.2 to 0.6, P=0.0001, 64% in clean plastic surgery cases (rr 0.35, 95% ci 0.06 to 1.8, 72% in caesarean section cases (rr 0.23, 95% ci 0.03 to 1.96 and 42% in clean cardiovascular surgery cases (rr 0.59, 95% ci 0.34 to 1.0. In clean orthopedic surgery the ssi rate remained stable from 1987 through 1992. In 1993 a marked increase was experienced. Reasons for this are being explored. Overall there was a 32% decrease in ssi rate between the index year and 1993 or, in percentage terms, 2.8% to 1.9% (rr 0.65, 95% ci 0.51 to 0.86, P=0.002. ssi surveillance should become standard in Canadian hospitals interested in improving the quality of surgical care and reducing the clinical impact and cost associated with nosocomial infection.

  20. Effect of near-infrared diode laser and indocyanine green to treat infections on different wound models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaloglu, Nermin; Yuksel, Sahru; Gulsoy, Murat

    2014-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria causes significant increase in deaths due to wound infections around the world. Nowadays, it could be impossible to find appropriate antibiotics to treat some bacterial strains, especially multidrug resistant types. The aim of this study is to use photodynamic therapy that destroys these kinds of bacteria with the interaction of Indocyanine green (ICG) and 808-nm diode laser. In this study, antibacterial Photodynamic Therapy technique that we call ICG-IR Laser PDT was applied on antibiotic-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus that infected two different types of wound model (excisional and abrasion wound model) in vivo. Wistar albino rats were used to create animal wound models. Excisional or abrasion wounds were formed on the dorsal skin of the rats. They were infected with Staphylococcus aureus. 300 mW and 500 mW of 808-nm diode laser were applied on the wounds for 30 minutes and 15 minutes of exposure duration, respectively. ICG concentrations applied topically were 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 μg/ml. Then the tissue was dissected properly and homogenized in buffer solution. From this solution, bacterial cell count was determined by serial dilution method. 1-2 log reduction in viable cell count was observed after these applications. The temperature increase in the tissue was between 6-8°C during these applications. From these findings, it was understood that this method with 808-nm and ICG is promising but it must be improved by further dosimetry studies.

  1. Management of gunshot wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

    1987-01-01

    Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

  2. Histone acetylation mediates epigenetic regulation of transcriptional reprogramming in insects during metamorphosis, wounding and infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Krishnendu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression in eukaryotes is regulated by histone acetylation/deacetylation, an epigenetic process mediated by histone acetyltransferases (HATs and histone deacetylases (HDACs whose opposing activities are tightly regulated. The acetylation of histones by HATs increases DNA accessibility and promotes gene expression, whereas the removal of acetyl groups by HDACs has the opposite effect. Results We explored the role of HDACs and HATs in epigenetic reprogramming during metamorphosis, wounding and infection in the lepidopteran model host Galleria mellonella. We measured the expression of genes encoding components of HATs and HDACs to monitor the transcriptional activity of each enzyme complex and found that both enzymes were upregulated during pupation. Specific HAT inhibitors were able to postpone pupation and to reduce insect survival following wounding, whereas HDAC inhibitors accelerated pupation and increased survival. The administration of HDAC inhibitors modulated the expression of effector genes with key roles in tissue remodeling (matrix metalloproteinase, the regulation of sepsis (inhibitor of metalloproteinases from insects and host defense (antimicrobial peptides, and simultaneously induced HAT activity, suggesting that histone acetylation is regulated by a feedback mechanism. We also discovered that both the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae and the human bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes can delay metamorphosis in G. mellonella by skewing the HDAC/HAT balance. Conclusions Our study provides for the first evidence that pathogenic bacteria can interfere with the regulation of HDACs and HATs in insects which appear to manipulate host immunity and development. We conclude that histone acetylation/deacetylation in insects mediates transcriptional reprogramming during metamorphosis and in response to wounding and infection.

  3. Evaluation of fungicides to protect pruning wounds from Botryosphaeriaceae species infections on almond trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego OLMO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In vitro efficacy of ten fungicides was evaluated against four Botryosphaeriaceae spp. (Diplodia seriata, Neofusicoccum luteum, N. mediterraneum and N. parvum associated with branch cankers on almond trees. Cyproconazole, pyraclostrobin, tebuconazole, and thiophanate-methyl were effective for the inhibition of mycelial growth of most of these fungi. An experiment on 3-year-old almond trees evaluated boscalid, mancozeb, thiophanate-methyl, pyraclostrobin and tebuconazole for preventative ability against infections caused by the four pathogens. Five months after pruning and fungicide application, lesion length measurements and isolation percentages showed no significant differences among the four pathogens after they were inoculated onto the trees, and also between the two inoculation times tested (1 or 7 d after fungicide application. Thiophanate-methyl was the most effective fungicide, resulting in the shortest lesion lengths and the lowest isolation percentages from artificially inoculated pruning wounds. This chemical is therefore a candidate for inclusion in integrated disease management, to protect pruning wounds from infections caused by species of Botryosphaeriaceae. This study represents the first approach to development of chemical control strategies for the management of canker diseases caused by Botryosphaeriaceae fungi on almond trees. 

  4. Biobased silver nanocolloid coating on silk fibers for prevention of post-surgical wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhas SP

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Sindhu Priya Dhas, Suruthi Anbarasan, Amitava Mukherjee, Natarajan Chandrasekaran Center for Nanobiotechnology, VIT University, Vellore, India Abstract: Bombyx mori silk fibers are an important biomaterial and are used in surgical sutures due to their remarkable biocompatibility. The major drawback to the application of biomaterials is the risk of bacterial invasion, leading to clinical complications. We have developed an easy and cost-effective method for fabrication of antibacterial silk fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs by an in situ and ex situ process using an aqueous extract of Rhizophora apiculata leaf. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that well dispersed nanoparticles impregnated the silk fibers both in situ and ex situ. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs in the silk fibers was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. The thermal and mechanical properties of the silk fibers were enhanced after they were impregnated with AgNPs. The silver-coated silk fibers fabricated by the in situ and ex situ method exhibited more than 90% inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Silk fibers doped with AgNPs were found to be biocompatible with 3T3 fibroblasts. The results obtained represent an important advance towards the clinical application of biocompatible AgNP-loaded silk fibers for prevention of surgical wound infections. Keywords: silk fibers, silver nanoparticles, antibacterial activity, wound infections, cytotoxicity, 3T3 fibroblast cells

  5. The effect of clary sage oil on staphylococci responsible for wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Monika; Głowacka, Anna; Poznańska-Kurowska, Katarzyna; Kaszuba, Andrzej; Urbaniak, Anna; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2015-02-01

    The spreading of bacterial antibiotic resistance among clinical strains of pathogenic bacteria has made investigators to search for other active antibacterial agents which could provide a valuable complement to the existing therapies. To determine the antibacterial activity of clary sage oil (Salvia sclarea L.) against Staphylococcus clinical strains which were isolated from patients with wound infections. A comprehensive evaluation of Staphylococcus clinical strain resistance to antibiotics was performed. The constituents of clary sage oil were assayed by GC-FID-MS analysis. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the tested essential oil against staphylococci by the micro-dilution broth method was determined. The clary sage oil was active against Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and S. xylosus with MIC values ranging from 3.75 to 7.00 µl/ml. The results of the in vitro tests encourage to use formulations containing sage oil as the active natural antimicrobial agent. Because of its antimicrobial properties clary sage oil may be applied to treat wounds and skin infections.

  6. Assessment of bacterial infection in chronic wounds in the elderly: biopsy versus VERSAJET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattera, Edi; Iovene, Maria Rosaria; Rispoli, Corrado; Falco, Giuseppe; Rocco, Nicola; Accurso, Antonello

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hydro-surgery VERSAJET system as a suitable alternative to the traditional invasive tissue sampling technique in detecting bacteria and their load in chronic wounds in the elderly. To investigate and evaluate bacterial incidence and load in chronic wounds, we simultaneously performed on 19 affected patients a deep tissue biopsy and tissue collections by the VERSAJET hydro-surgical system. After local cleaning and anesthesia, a deep biopsy was performed with a punch of 3-4 mm in diameter. Subsequently, three tissue samples were collected by the VERSAJET system: one from the first washing in order to investigate the superficial contamination; one from the second washing to investigate deep tissue infection investigation and one from the third washing as a control procedure. After treatment, all tissue samples were cultured in vitro for diagnostic and micro-biological assessment. Nineteen patients with chronic wounds of the lower limbs were enrolled from February 2010 to May 2013. Concordance between deep tissue biopsy cultures and tissue cultures collected by the VERSAJET system was examined. The deep tissue biopsy cultures showed complete concordance with the VERSAJET as follows: 2 patients (11%) for the first washing sample; 10 patients (53%) for the second washing sample; 4 patients (21%) for the third washing sample. However, with reference to only aerobic isolated strains, the concordance of the VERSAJET second washing samples cultures with a biopsy of the deep tissue cultures was very high (84%) and fairly high (63%) in the anaerobic isolated strains. The second VERSAJET washing sample cultures seem to have the highest concordance with the biopsy of the deep tissue cultures. Tissue biopsy remains the leading technique for detecting bacteria and their load in chronic wounds. However, this study shows that the hydro-surgery VERSAJET system is sufficiently effective in detecting bacteria and their load in chronic wounds

  7. Dermal Wound Transcriptomic Responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Rabbit Ear Wound Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-02

    1239. 74. Pierce GF, Tarpley JE, Tseng J , Bready J , Chang D, Kenney WC, Rudolph R, Robson MC, Vande Berg J , Reid P : Detection of platelet derived...Model. J Am Coll Surg 2012, 215:388 399. 13. Seth AK, Geringer MR, Gurjala AN, Abercrombie JA, Chen P , You T, Hong SJ, Galiano RD, Mustoe TA, Leung KP...Swogger E, Wolcott R, Pulcini E, Secor P , Sestrich J , Costerton JW, Stewart PS: Biofilms in chronic wounds. Wound Repair Regen 2008, 16:37 44. 28

  8. A systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of prophylactic topical antibiotics for the prevention of uncomplicated wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Q

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Qiao-Jing Tong,1 Kimberly DP Hammer,2,3 Erika M Johnson,4 Milagros Zegarra,2,3 Michihiko Goto,5,6 Tze Shien Lo3,7 1Department of Infection Control, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China; 2Research Service, Fargo VA Health Care System; 3Department of Internal Medicine, University of North Dakota, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, ND, USA; 4Library Resources, University of North Dakota, School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, ND, USA; 5Center for Comprehensive Access & Delivery Research & Evaluation (CADRE, Iowa City VA Health Care System, West Iowa City, IA, USA; 6Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA, USA; 7Infectious Disease Service, Fargo VA Health Care System, Fargo, ND, USA Background: The prescription of topical antibiotics for the prevention of infections in uncomplicated wounds is common. However, the efficacy is not well reported. Therefore, the objective of the study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available evidence on prevention of uncomplicated wound infections by prophylactic topical antibiotics. Materials and methods: The search included Pubmed, Google Scholar, SCOPUS, Embase, Cochrane, ClinicalTrials.gov, International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, National Technical Information Service, and the National Guidelines Clearinghouse. Results: We identified eight randomized controlled trials and four quasi-randomized trials that met the criteria for the systematic review. Of these trials, 11 studies were pooled for meta-analysis to compare the effects of topical antibiotics versus placebo and 4 studies were pooled for comparison of effects of topical antibiotics versus topical antiseptics on uncomplicated wounds. Fewer wound infections occurred in the topical antibiotic arms compared to placebo (pooled risk ratio: 0.57 [95% CI: 0.37 to 0.86]; p=0.01 and pooled risk

  9. Efficacy of the Quorum Sensing Inhibitor FS10 Alone and in Combination with Tigecycline in an Animal Model of Staphylococcal Infected Wound.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriana Simonetti

    Full Text Available In staphylococci, quorum sensing regulates both biofilm formation and toxin production, moreover it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by RNAIII inhibiting peptide (RIP. Aim our study was to evaluate the in vitro activity and its in vivo efficacy of the combined administration of FS10, a novel RIP derivative, and tigecycline in an animal model of methicillin-resistant (MR and methicillin-sensitive (MS Staphylococcus aureus wound infection. Using a 1.x2 cm template, one full thickness wound was established through the panniculus carnosus on the back subcutaneous tissue of each animal. Infection was determined by inoculation of 5x107 CFU/ml of bacteria, that produced an abscess within 24 h, after this, treatment was initiated. The study included, for each strain, a control group without infection, a control infected group that did not receive any treatment and a control infected group with drug-free foam dressing, and three infected groups treated, respectively, with: FS10-soaked foam dressing (containing 20 μg FS10, daily intraperitoneal tigecycline (7 mg/Kg, FS10-soaked foam dressing (containing 20 μg FS10 and daily intraperitoneal injections of tigecycline (7 mg/Kg. The main outcome measures were quantitative culture and histological examination of tissue repair. The highest inhibition of infection was achieved in the group that received FS10-soaked and parenteral tigecycline reducing the bacterial load from 107 CFU/ml to about 103 CFU/g for MSSA and to about 104 CFU/g for MRSA. The group treated with FS10-soaked foam dressing associated with parenteral tigecycline showed, histologically, better overall healing with epithelialization and collagen scores significantly higher than those of the other groups in both strains. In conclusion, the combined use of topical FS10 with i.p. tigecycline induced positive interaction in vivo, resulting in an enhanced therapeutic benefit versus staphylococcal infections in murine wound models.

  10. Outbreak investigation for toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae wound infections in refugees from Northeast Africa and Syria in Switzerland and Germany by whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, D M; Kuehl, R; Zbinden, R; Boskova, V; Garzoni, C; Fadini, D; Dolina, M; Blümel, B; Weibel, T; Tschudin-Sutter, S; Widmer, A F; Bielicki, J A; Dierig, A; Heininger, U; Konrad, R; Berger, A; Hinic, V; Goldenberger, D; Blaich, A; Stadler, T; Battegay, M; Sing, A; Egli, A

    2016-12-01

    Toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae is an important and potentially fatal threat to patients and public health. During the current dramatic influx of refugees into Europe, our objective was to use whole genome sequencing for the characterization of a suspected outbreak of C. diphtheriae wound infections among refugees. After conventional culture, we identified C. diphtheriae using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and investigated toxigenicity by PCR. Whole genome sequencing was performed on a MiSeq Illumina with >70×coverage, 2×250 bp read length, and mapping against a reference genome. Twenty cases of cutaneous C. diphtheriae in refugees from East African countries and Syria identified between April and August 2015 were included. Patients presented with wound infections shortly after arrival in Switzerland and Germany. Toxin production was detected in 9/20 (45%) isolates. Whole genome sequencing-based typing revealed relatedness between isolates using neighbour-joining algorithms. We detected three separate clusters among epidemiologically related refugees. Although the isolates within a cluster showed strong relatedness, isolates differed by >50 nucleotide polymorphisms. Toxigenic C. diphtheriae associated wound infections are currently observed more frequently in Europe, due to refugees travelling under poor hygienic conditions. Close genetic relatedness of C. diphtheriae isolates from 20 refugees with wound infections indicates likely transmission between patients. However, the diversity within each cluster and phylogenetic time-tree analysis suggest that transmissions happened several months ago, most likely outside Europe. Whole genome sequencing offers the potential to describe outbreaks at very high resolution and is a helpful tool in infection tracking and identification of transmission routes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Vacuum-assisted closure therapy for infected perineal wounds after abdominoperineal resection. A retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walma, M S; Burbach, J P M; Verheijen, P M; Pronk, A; van Grevenstein, W M U

    INTRODUCTION: Perineal wound complications are a main problem after abdominoperineal resection (APR). There is little evidence concerning perineal wound management. This study describes and evaluates the role of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in wound management strategies of perineal wound

  12. Postoperative abdominal wound infection – epidemiology, risk factors, identification, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azoury SC

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Saïd C Azoury,1 Norma Elizabeth Farrow,2 Qing L Hu,2 Kevin C Soares,1 Caitlin W Hicks,1 Faris Azar,1 Nelson Rodriguez-Unda,3 Katherine E Poruk,1 Peter Cornell,1 Karen K Burce,1 Carisa M Cooney,3 Hien T Nguyen,1 Frederic E Eckhauser1 1Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA; 2School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Surgical site infections (SSIs complicate the postoperative course of a significant proportion of general abdominal surgical patients and are associated with excessive health care costs. SSIs increase postoperative morbidity and mortality, and may require hospital admission, intravenous antibiotics, and even surgical reintervention. Risks associated with SSIs are related to both host and perioperative factors. However, a vast majority of these infections are preventable. More recently, quality initiative programs such as American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program are expanding their roles to help better monitor adherence to improvement measures. Indeed, standardizing preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis timing is perhaps the most persuasive example and this has been integral to reducing postoperative SSI rates. Herein, the authors provide an update on the epidemiology, risk factors, identification, and management of wound infections following abdominal surgery. Keywords: surgical site infection, diagnosis, treatment, prevention

  13. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIf a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such as peritonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient's hospital stay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason, a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominis muscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.MethodsFrom 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture, cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week after operation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds did not resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation wound and dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue from the attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa's fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath and muscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially so that the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.ResultsUpon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation, no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in terms of function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.ConclusionsUsing a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic and functional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, it enabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  14. A systematic review of maggot debridement therapy for chronically infected wounds and ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xinjuan; Jiang, Kechun; Chen, Jingan; Wu, Liang; Lu, Hui; Wang, Aiping; Wang, Jianming

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to systematically evaluate maggot debridement therapy (MDT) in the treatment of chronically infected wounds and ulcers. We performed a meta-analysis referring to the PRISMA statement (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). We searched for published articles in the following databases: PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Wanfang (Chinese), and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). The latest search was updated on March 14, 2014. For dichotomous outcomes, the effects of MDT were expressed as the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). For continuous outcomes with different measurement scales, we calculated the standardized mean difference (SMD). The pooled effects were estimated using a fixed effect model or random effect model based on the heterogeneity test. Subgroup analyses were performed according to the types of wounds or ulcers. MDT had a significantly increased positive effect on wound healing compared with conventional therapies, with a pooled RR of 1.80 (95% CI 1.24-2.60). The subgroup analysis revealed that the combined RRs were 1.79 (95% CI 0.95-3.38) for patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) and 1.70 (95% CI 1.28-2.27) for patients with other types of ulcers. The time to healing of the ulcers was significantly shorter among patients treated with MDT, with a pooled SMD of -0.95 (95% CI -1.24, -0.65). For patients with DFU, the SMD was -0.79 (95% CI -1.18, -0.41), and for patients with other types of ulcers, the SMD was -1.16 (95% CI -1.63, -0.69). MDT not only shortened the healing time but also improved the healing rate of chronic ulcers. Therefore, MDT may be a feasible alternative in the treatment of chronic ulcers. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. The Relationship between Preoperative Wound Classification and Postoperative Infection: A Multi-Institutional Analysis of 15,289 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M Mioton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDespite advances in surgical techniques, sterile protocols, and perioperative antibiotic regimens, surgical site infections (SSIs remain a significant problem. We investigated the relationship between wound classification (i.e., clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated, dirty and SSI rates in plastic surgery.MethodsWe performed a retrospective review of a multi-institutional, surgical outcomes database for all patients undergoing plastic surgery procedures from 2006-2010. Patient demographics, wound classification, and 30-day outcomes were recorded and analyzed by multivariate logistic regression.ResultsA total of 15,289 plastic surgery cases were analyzed. The overall SSI rate was 3.00%, with superficial SSIs occurring at comparable rates across wound classes. There were similar rates of deep SSIs in the clean and clean/contaminated groups (0.64%, while rates reached over 2% in contaminated and dirty cases. Organ/space SSIs occurred in less than 1% of each wound classification. Contaminated and dirty cases were at an increased risk for deep SSIs (odds ratios, 2.81 and 2.74, respectively; however, wound classification did not appear to be a significant predictor of superficial or organ/space SSIs. Clean/contaminated, contaminated, and dirty cases were at increased risk for a postoperative complication, and contaminated and dirty cases also had higher odds of reoperation and 30-day mortality.ConclusionsAnalyzing a multi-center database, we found that wound classification was a significant predictor of overall complications, reoperation, and mortality, but not an adequate predictor of surgical site infections. When comparing infections for a given wound classification, plastic surgery had lower overall rates than the surgical population at large.

  16. The efficacy and safety of cefovecin in the treatment of feline abscesses and infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, M R; Sherington, J; Passmore, C

    2007-12-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of cefovecin for the treatment of bacterial abscesses and wounds in cats at clinics in Germany, France, Spain and the UK. Cats with abscesses or wounds were enrolled. Cats (217) were randomised to treatment with either cefovecin administered by subcutaneous injection at 14 day intervals or amoxicillin/clavulanic acid as twice-daily oral tablets for 14 days. Treatment courses were repeated at 14 day intervals, when deemed necessary. Clinicians assessing lesions were masked to treatment allocation. Only animals with a confirmed pretreatment bacterial pathogen were included in the efficacy analysis. Cases were evaluated 28 days after initiation of the final course of treatment. Cefovecin was as efficacious as amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, and efficacy was 100 per cent for both treatments. Cefovecin, administered as a single subcutaneous injection repeated at 14 day intervals as required, was shown to be as efficacious as oral amoxicillin/clavulanic acid in the treatment of abscesses/wounds in cats.

  17. [Investigation of the effect of ibuprofen on wound healing in experimental Staphylococcus aureus soft tissue infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çitil, M Uğur; Mete, Ergun; Oğuz, E Oğuzhan; Abban Mete, Gülçin; Şahin, Barbaros; Kaleli, İlknur

    2015-04-01

    Soft tissue infections (STIs) occur as a result of the colonization of pathogenic bacteria upon the destruction of normal skin microbial flora and the skin integrity. Streptococci and staphylococci are the most frequent causes of bacterial STIs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen are often used in STIs because of their analgesic and antipyretic effects. However, evidence suggests that these drugs might delay both epithelization and angiogenesis in the early phases of wound healing because of an antiproliferative effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ibuprofen on the wound healing in STIs caused by Staphylococcus aureus in immunosuppressed mice. A total of 120 female Balb/c mice were used in the study and the mice were assigned to four test groups and two control groups. The test groups were defined as follows; B (Bacteria group, n= 23), BI (Bacteria + Ibuprofen group, n= 23), BA (Bacteria + Ampicillin group, n= 23), BIA (Bacteria + Ampicillin + Ibuprofen group, n= 21); and the control groups were defined as follows; S1B2 (only immunosuppressed controls, n= 15) and S2B2 (Sham group). Immunosupression was induced with cyclophosphamide and the experimental infection was generated by subcutaneous inoculation of bacterial suspension (2 x 10(8) cfu/ml) of methicillin-sensitive S.aureus ATCC 25923 to the right hind leg. Ibuprofen was given to the mice by gastric gavage (50 mg/kg/day), and ampicillin (100 mg/kg/day) by intramuscular injection. Wound sizes that appear in the animals were measured on a daily basis. Serum and tissue (epithelial tissue, connective tissue, sebaceous glands, sweat glands) samples were obtained on the first, third and seventh days. The tissue samples were examined histopathologically by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining method and IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor) levels were determined in serum samples by ELISA method. The tissue cytokine reactions were also

  18. New Is Old, and Old Is New: Recent Advances in Antibiotic-Based, Antibiotic-Free and Ethnomedical Treatments against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Wound Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Dou, Jian-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Wei; Xie, Jun-Qiu; Zhang, Xiao-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen of wound infections. Thus far, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become the major causative agent in wound infections, especially for nosocomial infections. MRSA infections are seldom eradicated by routine antimicrobial therapies. More concerning, some strains have become resistant to the newest antibiotics of last resort. Furthermore, horizontal transfer of a polymyxin resistance gene, mcr-1, has been identified in Enterobacteriaceae...

  19. Bacterial isolates from burn wound infections and their antibiograms: A eight-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Manjula

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection is an important cause of mortality in burns. Rapidly emerging nosocomial pathogens and the problem of multi-drug resistance necessitates periodic review of isolation patterns and antibiogram in the burn ward. Aim: Keeping this in mind, the present retrospective study from wounds of patients admitted to burns unit was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profile and the resistance pattern from the burn ward over a period of three years (June 2002 to May 2005 and was compared with the results obtained during the previous five years (June 1997-May 2002, to ascertain any change in the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: Bacterial isolates from 268 wound swabs taken from burn patients were identified by conventional biochemical methods and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed. Statistical comparison of bacterial isolates and their resistance pattern with previous five years data was done using c2 test. Results and Conclusions: During the period from 2002 to 2005 Pseudomonas species was the commonest pathogen isolated (51.5% followed by Acinetobacter species (14.28%, Staph. aureus (11.15%, Klebsiella species (9.23% and Proteus species (2.3%. When compared with the results of the previous five years i.e., 1997 to 2002, Pseudomonas species was still the commonest pathogen in the burns unit. However, the isolation of this organism and other gram-negative organisms had decreased in comparison to previous years. Newer drugs were found to be effective.

  20. Surgical wound assessment and documentation of nurses: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, S; Lin, F; Gillespie, B M

    2016-05-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are serious complications that can lead to adverse patient outcomes such as prolonged hospital length of stay, increased health-care costs, and even death. There is an imperative worldwide to reduce the morbidity associated with SSIs. The importance of surgical wound assessment and documentation to reduce SSI complications is increasingly recognised. Evidence-based guidelines have been published internationally to highlight recommended practices. The aim of this integrated review is to evaluate current surgical wound assessment and documentation practices of nurses in order to inform future evidence-based research on acute wound care practices. Databases including CINAHL, Cochrane, Medline and Proquest Nursing were searched using key terms of 'wound assessment' AND 'surgical, wound assessment' AND 'documentation, wound assessment' AND 'practice, wound assessment' AND 'postoperative, wound assessment' AND 'nurse, and wound assessment' AND 'surgical site infection'. A total of 188 articles were identified from the database searches; searching the reference lists provided an additional 8 articles. After careful exclusion processes, a total of six papers were included in the review. Despite the recommendations around wound assessment, there is little discussion on how the clinical characteristics of surgical wounds should be assessed, the frequency of the wound assessments and to what extent wound assessments are documented in the literature. There is limited research evidence on acute wound assessment and documentation. Therefore, further research is needed to provide evidence for surgical nurses in relation to wound assessment and documentation practices. The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

  1. The Betadine trial - antiseptic wound irrigation prior to skin closure at caesarean section to prevent surgical site infection: A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahomed, Kassam; Ibiebele, Ibinabo; Buchanan, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) occur in around 10% of women following a caesarean section. Efforts to reduce SSI include wound irrigation with povidone-iodine (PVI), but studies are nonconclusive, mostly old and few on women having caesarean section (CS). To assess povidone-iodine (PVI) (Betadine) irrigation of wound prior to skin closure in reducing incidence of SSI after CS. Our hypothesis was that there would be no benefit with its use in reducing SSIs. A randomised controlled trial with 3027 women. Women having CS were allocated to receive PVI irrigation or no irrigation after closure of fascia and before skin closure. Women were followed up to four weeks to assess for SSI. Main outcome measure was surgical site infection. The two groups (1520 in Betadine and 1507 on no Betadine group) were well balanced. The incidence of SSI was similar in the two groups (9.5% vs 9.8%, RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.78-1.21). There was no difference between groups (2.6% vs 2.0%, RR 1.29, 95% CI 0.81-2.06 Betadine vs no Betadine, respectively) in readmission for wound infection requiring intravenous antibiotics; this was so in both the elective CS group as well as CS in labour group. PVI irrigation after the closure of fascia and before closure of skin is of no benefit in the prevention of SSI in women undergoing CS. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  2. Does Fine Needle Aspiration Microbiology Offer Any Benefit Over Wound Swab in Detecting the Causative Organisms in Surgical Site Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudharsanan, Sundaramurthi; Gs, Sreenath; Sureshkumar, Sathasivam; Vijayakumar, Chellappa; Sujatha, Sistla; Kate, Vikram

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the role of ne needle aspiration microbiology (FNAM) in detecting the causative organisms of postoperative surgical site infections (SSIs) in comparison with the standard technique of surface swabbing. Ma- terials and Methods. In this study, 150 patients with SSIs following elective and emergency operations were included. In all patients, FNAM was performed along with conventional surface swabbing to identify the causative microorganism. Sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was calculated as the number of samples collected from the diagnosed case of SSI. A total of 115 positive cultures were obtained from the 150 patients with SSIs; surface swab was positive in 110 cases and FNAM was positive in 94 cases. The mean number of organisms isolated by surface swab, and FNAM was 0.95 and 0.8, respectively. The sensitivity of surface swab was 94.3% in elective cases and 96.25% in emergency cases. The sensitivity of FNAM was 82.8% in elective cases and 82.5% in emergency cases. The sensitivity and negative predictive value of FNAM and surface swab did not signi cantly differ in clean elective cases. The overall sensitivity of surface swab and FNAM was 95.65% and 81.7%, respectively. Comparing the antibiotic suscep- tibility pattern, no difference was observed when the same organ- ism was isolated by both methods, indicating that FNAM does not offer bene t over the conventional wound surface swab in detecting microorganisms in SSI in both elective and emergency surgeries. In certain cases with unexplained wound infections, FNAM can be used as an investigation to identify speci c pathogens not detected by conventional surface swab.

  3. Factors influencing treatment success of negative pressure wound therapy in patients with postoperative infections after Osteosynthetic fracture fixation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Hansen, Stephanie; Six-Merker, Julia

    2017-01-01

    logistic regression models based on data from 106 patients. RESULTS: Staged wound lavage in combination with NPWT allowed implant preservation in 44% and led to successful healing in 73% of patients. Fermentation characteristics, load and behavior after gram staining revealed no statistically significant...... correlation with either healing or implant preservation. Infecting bacteria were successfully isolated in 87% of patients. 20% of all infections were caused by bacterial combinations. We observed a change in the infecting bacterial species under therapy in 23%. Age, gender, metabolic diseases or comorbidities...... 3 (OR 10.2 [CI 1.88-55.28]). Wounds were less likely to heal in conjunction with high CRP blood levels (>20 mg/l) at the time of discharge (OR 3.6 [95% CI 1.31-10.08]) or following a change of the infecting bacterial species under therapy (OR 3.2 [95% CI, 1.13-8.99]). CONCLUSIONS: These results...

  4. Porous CS based membranes with improved antimicrobial properties for the treatment of infected wound in veterinary applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonda-Turo, C., E-mail: chiara.tondaturo@polito.it [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Ruini, F. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Argentati, M. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy); Clinic for Exotic Animals, CVS, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Rome (Italy); Di Girolamo, N. [Clinic for Exotic Animals, CVS, Via Sandro Giovannini 53, 00137 Rome (Italy); Robino, P.; Nebbia, P. [Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Turin, Largo Braccini 2, 10095 Grugliasco, Turin (Italy); Ciardelli, G. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Turin (Italy)

    2016-03-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of innovative solution for the treatment of infected wounds in animals. Current applied treatments are often un-effective leading to infection propagation and animal death. Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan (CS) can be prepared to combine local antimicrobial effect, high flexibility and easy manipulation. In this work, CS crosslinked porous membranes with improved antimicrobial properties were prepared via freeze-drying technique to promote wound healing and to reduce the bacterial proliferation in infected injuries. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gentamicin sulfate (GS) were incorporated into the CS matrices to impart antibacterial properties on a wild range of strains. CS based porous membranes were tested for their physicochemical, thermal, mechanical as well as swelling and degradation behavior at physiological condition. Additionally, GS release profile was investigated, showing a moderate burst effect in the first days followed by a decreasing release rate which it was maintained for at least 56 days. Moreover, porous membranes loaded with GS or AgNPs showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The bacterial strains used in this work were collected in chelonians after carapace injuries to better mimic the environment after trauma. - Highlights: • Innovative scaffolds for wound healing in veterinary applications • Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan with improved antibacterial properties • Highly flexible and versatile membranes for infected wounds.

  5. Porous CS based membranes with improved antimicrobial properties for the treatment of infected wound in veterinary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonda-Turo, C.; Ruini, F.; Argentati, M.; Di Girolamo, N.; Robino, P.; Nebbia, P.; Ciardelli, G.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been given to the use of innovative solution for the treatment of infected wounds in animals. Current applied treatments are often un-effective leading to infection propagation and animal death. Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan (CS) can be prepared to combine local antimicrobial effect, high flexibility and easy manipulation. In this work, CS crosslinked porous membranes with improved antimicrobial properties were prepared via freeze-drying technique to promote wound healing and to reduce the bacterial proliferation in infected injuries. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and gentamicin sulfate (GS) were incorporated into the CS matrices to impart antibacterial properties on a wild range of strains. CS based porous membranes were tested for their physicochemical, thermal, mechanical as well as swelling and degradation behavior at physiological condition. Additionally, GS release profile was investigated, showing a moderate burst effect in the first days followed by a decreasing release rate which it was maintained for at least 56 days. Moreover, porous membranes loaded with GS or AgNPs showed good bactericidal activity against both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The bacterial strains used in this work were collected in chelonians after carapace injuries to better mimic the environment after trauma. - Highlights: • Innovative scaffolds for wound healing in veterinary applications • Novel engineered membranes based on chitosan with improved antibacterial properties • Highly flexible and versatile membranes for infected wounds

  6. ‘This wound has spoilt everything’: emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to ‘germs’ or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. PMID:25470322

  7. 'This wound has spoilt everything': emotional capital and the experience of surgical site infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Brian; Tanner, Judith; Padley, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    In this article we explore the experience of suffering from a surgical site infection, a common complication of surgery affecting around 5 per cent of surgical patients, via an interview study of 17 patients in the Midlands in the UK. Despite their prevalence, the experience of surgical site infections has received little attention so far. In spite of the impairment resulting from these iatrogenic problems, participants expressed considerable stoicism and we interpret this via the notion of emotional capital. This idea derives from the work of Pierre Bourdieu, Helga Nowotny and Diane Reay and helps us conceptualise the emotional resources accumulated and expended in managing illness and in gaining the most from healthcare services. Participants were frequently at pains not to blame healthcare personnel or hospitals, often discounting the infection's severity, and attributing it to chance, to 'germs' or to their own failure to buy and apply wound care products. The participants' stoicism was thus partly afforded by their refusal to blame healthcare institutions or personnel. Where anger was described, this was either defused or expressed on behalf of another person. Emotional capital is associated with deflecting the possibility of complaint and sustaining a deferential and grateful position in relation to the healthcare system. © 2014 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2014 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Clinical relevance and effect of surgical wound classification in appendicitis: Retrospective evaluation of wound classification discrepancies between surgeons, Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse, and histology as well as surgical site infection rates by wound class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang-Chan, Anastasija; Gingert, Christian; Angst, Eliane; Hetzer, Franc Heinrich

    2017-07-01

    Surgical wound classification (SWC) is used for risk stratification of surgical site infection (SSI) and serves as the basis for measuring quality of care. The objective was to examine the accuracy and reliability of SWC. This study was purposed to evaluate the discrepancies in SWC as assessed by three groups: surgeons, an infection control nurse, and histopathologic evaluation. The secondary aim was to compare the risk-stratified SSI rates using the different SWC methods for 30 d postoperatively. An analysis was performed of the appendectomies from January 2013 to June 2014 in the Cantonal Hospital of Schaffhausen. SWC was assigned by the operating surgeon at the end of the procedure and retrospectively reviewed by a Swissnoso-trained infection control nurse after reading the operative and pathology report. The level of agreement among the three different SWC assessment groups was determined using kappa statistic. SSI rates were analyzed using a chi-square test. In 246 evaluated cases, the kappa scores for interrater reliability among the SWC assessments across the three groups ranged from 0.05 to 0.2 signifying slight agreement between the groups. SSIs were more frequently associated with trained infection control nurse-assigned SWC than with surgeons based SWC. Our study demonstrated a considerable discordance in the SWC assessments performed by the three groups. Unfortunately, the currently practiced SWC system suffers from ambiguity in definition and/or implementation of these definitions is not clearly stated. This lack of reliability is problematic and may lead to inappropriate comparisons within and between hospitals and surgeons. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, in the Netherlands in 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MG van Veen; FDH Koedijk; IVF van der Broek; ELM Op de Coul; IM de Boer; AI van Sighem; MAB van der Sande; soa-centra; Stichting HIV Monitoring; EPI/Cib

    2007-01-01

    The nationally covered low threshold STI centres offering STI care targeted at high risk groups, provide surveillance data to monitor national trends in STI, including HIV. In 2006, chlamydia remained the most commonly diagnosed bacterial STI in the Netherlands in the STI centres, in spite of

  10. Biomaterials and Nanotherapeutics for Enhancing Skin Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhamoy Das

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is an intricate process that requires complex coordination between many cells and an appropriate extracellular microenvironment. Chronic wounds often suffer from high protease activity, persistent infection, excess inflammation, and hypoxia. While there has been intense investigation to find new methods to improve cutaneous wound care; the management of chronic wounds, burns, and skin wound infection remain challenging clinical problems. Ideally, advanced wound dressings can provide enhanced healing and bridge the gaps in the healing processes that prevent chronic wounds from healing. These technologies have great potential for improving outcomes in patients with poorly healing wounds but face significant barriers in addressing the heterogeneity and clinical complexity of chronic or severe wounds. Active wound dressings aim to enhance the natural healing process and work to counter many aspects that plague poorly healing wounds including excessive inflammation, ischemia, scarring and wound infection. This review paper discusses recent advances in the development of biomaterials and nanoparticle therapeutics to enhance wound healing. In particular, this review focuses on the novel cutaneous wound treatments that have undergone significant preclinical development or currently used in clinical practice.

  11. Biomaterials and Nanotherapeutics for Enhancing Skin Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subhamoy; Baker, Aaron B.

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing is an intricate process that requires complex coordination between many cell types and an appropriate extracellular microenvironment. Chronic wounds often suffer from high protease activity, persistent infection, excess inflammation, and hypoxia. While there has been intense investigation to find new methods to improve cutaneous wound care, the management of chronic wounds, burns, and skin wound infection remain challenging clinical problems. Ideally, advanced wound dressings can provide enhanced healing and bridge the gaps in the healing processes that prevent chronic wounds from healing. These technologies have great potential for improving outcomes in patients with poorly healing wounds but face significant barriers in addressing the heterogeneity and clinical complexity of chronic or severe wounds. Active wound dressings aim to enhance the natural healing process and work to counter many aspects that plague poorly healing wounds, including excessive inflammation, ischemia, scarring, and wound infection. This review paper discusses recent advances in the development of biomaterials and nanoparticle therapeutics to enhance wound healing. In particular, this review focuses on the novel cutaneous wound treatments that have undergone significant preclinical development or are currently used in clinical practice. PMID:27843895

  12. Antimicrobial and antiseptic strategies in wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daeschlein, Georg

    2013-12-01

    Wounds, especially chronic wounds, represent a global problem costing millions of dollars per year in developed countries and are characterised by microbial complications including local or overt infection, delayed healing and spread of multiresistant germs. Therefore, antimicrobial wound management is a major challenge that continues to require new solutions against microbes and their biofilms. As systemic antibiotics can barely penetrate into wound biofilms and topically applied ones can easily lead to sensitisation, antisepsis is the method of choice to treat germs in wounds. This brief review discusses the role of antiseptics in reducing bioburden in chronic wounds. Balancing antimicrobial potency and tolerability of antiseptic procedures is critical in wound therapy. However, antiseptics alone may not be able to achieve wound healing without addressing other factors regarding the patient's general health or the wound's physical environment. Although the precise role of bioburden in chronic wounds remains to be evaluated, planktonic as well as biofilm-bound microbes are indications for antiseptic intervention. Octenidine dihydrochloride and polyhexanide are the most effective, as well as best tolerated, antiseptics in wound management today, and new strategies to reduce bacterial wound burden and support the body's immune response are being developed. © 2013 The Author. International Wound Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  13. The Relationship between Preoperative Wound Classification and Postoperative Infection: A Multi-Institutional Analysis of 15,289 Patients

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    Lauren M Mioton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite advances in surgical techniques, sterile protocols, and perioperativeantibiotic regimens, surgical site infections (SSIs remain a significant problem. We investigatedthe relationship between wound classification (i.e., clean, clean/contaminated, contaminated,dirty and SSI rates in plastic surgery.Methods We performed a retrospective review of a multi-institutional, surgical outcomesdatabase for all patients undergoing plastic surgery procedures from 2006-2010. Patientdemographics, wound classification, and 30-day outcomes were recorded and analyzed bymultivariate logistic regression.Results A total of 15,289 plastic surgery cases were analyzed. The overall SSI rate was 3.00%,with superficial SSIs occurring at comparable rates across wound classes. There were similarrates of deep SSIs in the clean and clean/contaminated groups (0.64%, while rates reachedover 2% in contaminated and dirty cases. Organ/space SSIs occurred in less than 1% of eachwound classification. Contaminated and dirty cases were at an increased risk for deep SSIs(odds ratios, 2.81 and 2.74, respectively; however, wound classification did not appear to bea significant predictor of superficial or organ/space SSIs. Clean/contaminated, contaminated,and dirty cases were at increased risk for a postoperative complication, and contaminatedand dirty cases also had higher odds of reoperation and 30-day mortality.Conclusions Analyzing a multi-center database, we found that wound classification was asignificant predictor of overall complications, reoperation, and mortality, but not an adequatepredictor of surgical site infections. When comparing infections for a given wound classification,plastic surgery had lower overall rates than the surgical population at large.

  14. Patients experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home for the treatment of deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Christina; Acosta, Stefan; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-05-01

    To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. An explorative qualitative study. Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Undergoing negative pressure wound therapy at home meant a transition from being a dependent patient to a person who must have self-care competence and be involved in their own care. A need to feel prepared for this before discharge from hospital was expressed. Lack of information and feelings of uncertainty prolonged the time before feeling confident in managing the treatment. The informants gradually accepted the need to be tied up to a machine, became competent in its management and found solutions to perform everyday tasks. Overall, it was a relief to be treated at home. Several benefits of negative pressure wound therapy at home were expressed. However, unnecessary stress and anxiety were experienced due to a lack of information on the treatment and instruction concerning the equipment. Adequate information and education must therefore be provided to facilitate the transition from a patient to a person with self-care competence and ability to manage this treatment at home. The findings revealed a need for more support and knowledge in their transition from hospital care to home care with negative pressure wound therapy. Routines must be established that ensure patient safety and security in treatment at home. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Improved results of the vacuum assisted closure and Nitinol clips sternal closure after postoperative deep sternal wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Maria Pia; Costantino, Alberto; Ballardini, Milva; D'Andrea, Claudio; Masala, Marcello; Merico, Eusebio; Mosillo, Luigi; Sordini, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    Postoperative deep sternal wound infection is a severe complication of cardiac surgery, with a high mortality rate and a high morbidity rate. The objective of this prospective study is to report our experience with the vacuum assisted closure (VAC) system for the management of deep wound infection. We also devised an innovative closure technique post VAC therapy using thermo reactive clips. The advantage of this technique is that the posterior face of the sternum does not have to be separated from the mediastinal structures thus minimising the risk of damage. From October 2006 to October 2008, we prospectively evaluated 21 patients affected by mediastinitis after sternotomy. Nineteen patients had sternotomy for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), one patient for aortic valve replacement (AVR) and another one for ascending aortic replacement (AAR). All patients were treated with the VAC system at the time of infection diagnosis. When the wound tissue appeared viable and the microbiological cultures were negative, the chest was closed using the most suitable procedure for the patient in question; nine patients were closed using pectoralis flaps, nine patients using Nitinol clips, one patient with a combined technique (use of Nitinol clips and muscle flap), one patient with a direct wound closure and another patient, who needed AAR with a homograft performed in another institution, was closed using sternal wires. We had no mortality; wound healing was successfully achieved in all patients. In more than 50% of the patients, the VAC therapy allowed direct sternal resynthesis. The average duration of the vacuum therapy was 26 days (range 14-37 days). VAC is a safe and effective option in the treatment of post-sternotomy mediastinitis, with excellent survival and immediate improvement of local wound conditions; furthermore, the use of Nitinol clips after VAC therapy demonstrated to be a safe and non-invasive option for sternal resynthesis. After VAC therapy, a

  16. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection – all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  17. Hyaluronate nanoparticles included in polymer films for the prolonged release of vitamin E for the management of skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Gabriela Garrastazu; Detoni, Cassia Britto; Balducci, Anna Giulia; Rondelli, Valeria; Colombo, Paolo; Guterres, Silvia Stanisçuaski; Sonvico, Fabio

    2016-02-15

    Lecithin and hyaluronic acid were used for the preparation of polysaccharide decorated nanoparticles loaded with vitamin E using the cationic lipid dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODMA). Nanoparticles showed mean particle size in the range 130-350 nm and narrow size distribution. Vitamin E encapsulation efficiency was higher than 99%. These nanoparticles were incorporated in polymeric films containing Aloe vera extract, hyaluronic acid, sodium alginate, polyethyleneoxide (PEO) and polyvinylalcohol (PVA) as an innovative treatment in skin wounds. Films were thin, flexible, resistant and suitable for application on burn wounds. Additionally, in vitro occlusion study highlighted the dependence of the occlusive effect on the presence of nanoparticles. The results obtained show that the bioadhesive films containing vitamin E acetate and Aloe vera could be an innovative therapeutic system for the treatment of skin wounds, such as burns. The controlled release of the vitamin along with a reduction in water loss through damaged skin provided by the nanoparticle-loaded polymer film are considered important features for an improvement in wound healing and skin regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. [PDCA cyclus and morbidity and mortality conference as a basic tool for reduction of wound infection in colorectal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, P A; Vassilev, G; Kruse, B; Cankaja, Y

    2010-08-01

    Morbidity and mortality conferences (M + M) are used for the discussion of errors and thereby further education in surgery. However, it is not clear whether this kind of quality assurance has any influence on the results of surgery. We investigated whether M + M as part of PDCA-cylce (plan, do, check, act) with prospectively collected quality data, fixing future goals using benchmarking data and defining a strategy to reach these goals can lead to an increase in quality. Using surveillance data n = 673 colorectal resections were analysed. Between 2003 and 2008 we found a wound infection rate of 5.6 %. Comparing 2003-2005 (period of strategy development using M + M) and 2006-2008 (period of strategy conversion) the frequency decreased from 7.8 % to 3.5 % (p = 0.012). Thereby the risk factors for wound infection (ASA, wound classification, duration of surgery and wound infection score) were not different. M + M as part of this PDCA cycle resulted in a clear increase in surgical quality. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart ˙ New York.

  19. Reconstruction of Abdominal Wall of a Chronically Infected Postoperative Wound with a Rectus Abdominis Myofascial Splitting Flap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background If a chronically infected abdominal wound develops, complications such asperitonitis and an abdominal wall defect could occur. This could prolong the patient’s hospitalstay and increase the possibility of re-operation or another infection as well. For this reason,a solution for infection control is necessary. In this study, surgery using a rectus abdominismuscle myofascial splitting flap was performed on an abdominal wall defect.Methods From 2009 to 2012, 5 patients who underwent surgery due to ovarian rupture,cesarean section, or uterine myoma were chosen. In each case, during the first week afteroperation, the wound showed signs of infection. Surgery was chosen because the wounds didnot resolve with dressing. Debridement was performed along the previous operation woundand dissection of the skin was performed to separate the skin and subcutaneous tissue fromthe attenuated rectus muscle and Scarpa’s fascial layers. Once the anterior rectus sheath andmuscle were adequately mobilized, the fascia and muscle flap were advanced medially sothat the skin defect could be covered for reconstruction.Results Upon 3-week follow-up after a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap operation,no major complication occurred. In addition, all of the patients showed satisfaction in termsof function and esthetics at 3 to 6 months post-surgery.Conclusions Using a rectus abdominis myofascial splitting flap has many esthetic andfunctional benefits over previous methods of abdominal defect treatment, and notably, itenabled infection control by reconstruction using muscle.

  20. Does evidence based medicine support the effectiveness of surgical facemasks in preventing postoperative wound infections in elective surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahli, Zahid Mehmood

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of postoperative wound infection is usually not the cause of death but it increases the length of hospital stay and cost of care and morbidity. Since their introduction a century ago there is still controversy about primary purpose of the facemasks as whether they provide protection for the patient from surgical team or weather they protect surgical team from the patient? The Objectives of this study were to critically analyze and systematically review the randomized trials regarding effectiveness of surgical facemasks in preventing post operative wound infection in elective surgery. Systematic literature review and analysis of all available trials (randomized controlled trials) regarding use of surgical face masks in elective surgeries. Medline (1966-2007), Embase (1996-2007), Cochrane database, Pubmed, Google Scholar, were searched for the selection of literature for the review. No significance difference in the incidence of postoperative wound infection was observed between masks group and groups operated with no masks (1.34, 95% CI, 0.58-3.07). There was no increase in infection rate in 1980 when masks were discarded. In fact there was significant decrease in infection rate (p masks harms or benefit the patients undergoing elective surgery.

  1. Psoriasis and wound healing outcomes: A retrospective cohort study examining wound complications and antibiotic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Paulina M; Parsi, Kory K; Schupp, Clayton W; Armstrong, April W

    2017-11-15

    Little is known about wound healing in psoriasis. We performed a cohort study examining differences in wound healing complications between patients with and without psoriasis. Psoriasis patients with traumatic wounds were matched 1:3 to non-psoriasis patients with traumatic wounds based on age, gender, and body mass index (BMI). We examined theincidence of wound complications including infection, necrosis, and hematoma as well as incident antibiotic use within three months following diagnosis of a traumatic wound. The study included 164 patients with traumatic wounds, comprised of 41 patients with psoriasis matched to 123 patients without psoriasis. No statistically significant differences were detected in the incidence of overall wound complications between wound patients with psoriasis and wound patients without psoriasis (14.6% versus. 13.0%, HR 1.18, CI 0.39-3.56). After adjustment for diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, and smoking, no statistically significant differences were detected in the incidence of overall wound complications between patients with and without psoriasis (HR 1.11, CI 0.34-3.58). Specifically, the adjusted rates of antibiotic use were not significantly different between those with and without psoriasis (HR 0.65, CI 0.29-1.46). The incidence of wound complications following traumatic wounds of the skin was found to be similar between patients with and without psoriasis.

  2. [Comparison of the efficacies of silver-containing dressing materials for treating a full-thickness rodent wound infected by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Chae, Jeong Don; Kim, Dong Gu; Hong, Sung Hee; Lee, Won Mi; Ki, Moran

    2010-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) may cause infections during wound dressing. We aimed to compare the antibacterial activities and wound-healing effects of commercially available silver-coated or silver-impregnated wound dressings on MRSA-infected wounds. Full-thickness skin defects were made on the back of rats (N=108) and were infected with MRSA. The rats were divided into the following 6 groups according to the dressing used for the wounds: nanocrystalline silver (Acticoat), silver carboxymethylcellulose (Aquacel-Ag), silver sulfadiazine (Medifoam silver), nanocrystalline silver (PolyMem silver), silver sulfadiazine (Ilvadon), and 10% povidone iodide (Betadine). We analyzed the wound sizes, histological findings, and bacterial colony counts for the groups. We also inoculated the silver materials on Mueller-Hinton agar plates containing MRSA and compared the inhibition zones in the agar plates. The order of the rate of wound-size decrease was Acticoat>Aquacel-Ag>PolyMem silver>Medifoam silver>Ilvadon>Betadine. The histological findings revealed that the Acticoat showed more reepithelialization and granulation tissue formation and less inflammatory cell infiltration than the other materials. The order of the time required for wound healing was Acticoat>Aquacel -Ag>PolyMem silver>Ilvadon>Medifoam silver>Betadine. The bacterial colony counts reduced in all the groups, except in the Medifoam silver group. The order of the size of the inhibition zone was Acticoat>Aquacel-Ag>Ilvadon>PolyMem silver>Betadine>Medifoam silver. Silver-coated or silver-impregnated wound dressings can be used for treating MRSAinfected wounds. Considering its superior efficacy in comparison to the efficacies of other silver-coated or silver-impregnated wound dressings, Acticoat should be preferentially used for the treatment of MRSA-infected skin wounds.

  3. Open-to-Air Is a Viable Option for Initial Wound Care in Necrotizing Soft Tissue Infection that Allows Early Detection of Recurrence without Need for Painful Dressing Changes or Return to Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Derek; Davies, April; Burge, Bailey; Watkins, Phillip; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2018-01-01

    The standard treatment of necrotizing soft tissue infection (NSTI) includes extensive surgical debridement. Care of these debridements is challenging because of the size of the wound and associated pain. A potential solution is to leave the wounds open-to-air in the period after the initial debridement, allowing for regular inspection at bedside while reducing pain associated with frequent dressing changes. We evaluated the feasibility of this approach from a pain control standpoint. An audit of wound care modalities used on adult patients with NSTI admitted to a regional burn center between January 2009 and May 2014 was performed. Patients with at least one operation were included. Those opting for palliative care were excluded. Wound care was divided into four categories: open-to-air (OTA), negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT), packing, and ointment. Wound care, pain score, pain medication use, and number of operations were collected for the first seven days after initial debridement. Pain management was assessed by pain scores. Analgesic use was measured and compared using conversion to morphine milligram equivalents (MME). Ninety-six patients were included; 67% were men with average age of 50 years, resulting in a total of 672 days of wound care evaluated: 69 days of OTA, 127 days of NPWT, 200 days of packing, and 126 days of ointment (150 days were undocumented). Average daily pain score from all wound care modalities was 2.00. Negative pressure wound therapy had the highest reported daily pain score (2.18, p = 0.034), whereas OTA had the lowest pain score (1.63, p post-debridement period of NSTI to reduce pain, while permitting frequent re-evaluation for quick recognition of disease progression and repeat operative debridement if necessary.

  4. Evaluation of the impact of six different DNA extraction methods for the representation of the microbial community associated with human chronic wound infections using a gel-based DNA profiling method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilhari, Ayomi; Sampath, Asanga; Gunasekara, Chinthika; Fernando, Neluka; Weerasekara, Deepaka; Sissons, Chris; McBain, Andrew; Weerasekera, Manjula

    2017-09-19

    Infected chronic wounds are polymicrobial in nature which include a diverse group of aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Majority of these communal microorganisms are difficult to grow in vitro. DNA fingerprinting methods such as polymerase chain reaction-denaturation gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) facilitate the microbial profiling of complex ecosystems including infected chronic wounds. Six different DNA extraction methods were compared for profiling of the microbial community associated with chronic wound infections using PCR-DGGE. Tissue debris obtained from chronic wound ulcers of ten patients were used for DNA extraction. Total nucleic acid was extracted from each specimen using six DNA extraction methods. The yield, purity and quality of DNA was measured and used for PCR amplification targeting V2-V3 region of eubacterial 16S rRNA gene. QIAGEN DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit (K method) produced good quality genomic DNA compared to the other five DNA extraction methods and gave a broad diversity of bacterial communities in chronic wounds. Among the five conventional methods, bead beater/phenol-chloroform based DNA extraction method with STES buffer (BP1 method) gave a yield of DNA with a high purity and resulted in a higher DGGE band diversity. Although DNA extraction using heat and NaOH had the lowest purity, DGGE revealed a higher bacterial diversity. The findings suggest that the quality and the yield of genomic DNA are influenced by the DNA extraction protocol, thus a method should be carefully selected in profiling a complex microbial community.

  5. Intra-operative wound irrigation to reduce surgical site infections after abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C; Loos, Martin; Haller, Bernhard; Mihaljevic, André L; Nitsche, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Dirk; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Bader, Franz G

    2015-02-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains to be one of the most frequent infectious complications following abdominal surgery. Prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (IOWI) before skin closure has been proposed to reduce bacterial wound contamination and the risk of SSI. However, current recommendations on its use are conflicting especially concerning antibiotic and antiseptic solutions because of their potential tissue toxicity and enhancement of bacterial drug resistances. To analyze the existing evidence for the effect of IOWI with topical antibiotics, povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solutions or saline on the incidence of SSI following open abdominal surgery, a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was carried out according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Forty-one RCTs reporting primary data of over 9000 patients were analyzed. Meta-analysis on the effect of IOWI with any solution compared to no irrigation revealed a significant benefit in the reduction of SSI rates (OR = 0.54, 95 % confidence Interval (CI) [0.42; 0.69], p < 0.0001). Subgroup analyses showed that this effect was strongest in colorectal surgery and that IOWI with antibiotic solutions had a stronger effect than irrigation with PVP-I or saline. However, all of the included trials were at considerable risk of bias according to the quality assessment. These results suggest that IOWI before skin closure represents a pragmatic and economical approach to reduce postoperative SSI after abdominal surgery and that antibiotic solutions seem to be more effective than PVP-I solutions or simple saline, and it might be worth to re-evaluate their use for specific indications.

  6. Efficacy of piperacillin-tazobactam in the treatment of surgical wound infection after clean-contaminated head and neck oncologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Juan P; Sŭrez, Carlos; Bernaldez, Ricardo; Collado, Diego

    2004-09-01

    Although perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis has significantly reduced surgical wound infection rates, this complication is still a frequent complication of head and neck cancer surgery. Because these infections are typically polymicrobial, our study evaluated the safety and efficacy of piperacillin-tazobactam in the treatment of surgical wound infection after clean-contaminated head and neck oncologic surgery. In this multicenter, prospective clinical trial, 70 patients with surgical wound infection received piperacillin-tazobactam. Of patients who were evaluable, 92.4% were also clinically cured or improved, and the bacteriologic eradication rate was 80.3%. Of the 70 patients enrolled in the study, six (8.5%) experienced six adverse events: two cases of moderate diarrhea, one allergic skin reaction, and three cases of phlebitis. No deaths were attributable to the study drug. Piperacillin-tazobactam is a good choice of treatment as monotherapy for surgical wound infection after clean-contaminated head and neck oncologic surgery. Copyright 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Microbial Profiling of Combat Wound Infection through Detection Microarray and Next-Generation Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jonathan E.; Brown, Trevor S.; Gardner, Shea N.; McLoughlin, Kevin S.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Kirkup, Benjamin C.; Chromy, Brett A.; Luciw, Paul A.; Elster, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Combat wound healing and resolution are highly affected by the resident microbial flora. We therefore sought to achieve comprehensive detection of microbial populations in wounds using novel genomic technologies and bioinformatics analyses. We employed a microarray capable of detecting all sequenced pathogens for interrogation of 124 wound samples from extremity injuries in combat-injured U.S. service members. A subset of samples was also processed via next-generation sequencing and metagenomic analysis. Array analysis detected microbial targets in 51% of all wound samples, with Acinetobacter baumannii being the most frequently detected species. Multiple Pseudomonas species were also detected in tissue biopsy specimens. Detection of the Acinetobacter plasmid pRAY correlated significantly with wound failure, while detection of enteric-associated bacteria was associated significantly with successful healing. Whole-genome sequencing revealed broad microbial biodiversity between samples. The total wound bioburden did not associate significantly with wound outcome, although temporal shifts were observed over the course of treatment. Given that standard microbiological methods do not detect the full range of microbes in each wound, these data emphasize the importance of supplementation with molecular techniques for thorough characterization of wound-associated microbes. Future application of genomic protocols for assessing microbial content could allow application of specialized care through early and rapid identification and management of critical patterns in wound bioburden. PMID:24829242

  8. Reduced Incidence of Early Complications of Surgical Wounds in Laparoscopic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. KHORASANI

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:The incidence of early wound related complications is assessed in laparoscopic versus open abdominal surgeries. Complications of surgical wounds(esp.wound infections are considered as a major problem in surgery wards. Complications of surgical wounds are classified as early and late.Common and early complications are hematoma, seroma and wound infection. Methods: The medical records of 104 elective laparoscopic (A and 106 diagnosis matched open surgeries (B including apendectomy,cholecystectomy,ventral hernia repair,and bariatric surgery were prospectively reviewed.Study data included patients` sex, age, wound class, type of operation, and occurrence of early wound related complications. Surgical wounds were evaluated for presence of early complications during the post-op period and 10 to 15 days after the operation. Results: The two groups were not different regarding age, sex and wound classes.No patients in group A and 7 patients in group B developed wound infection (p<0.05.Incidence of hematoma was similar in the two groups;one case in each.No patient in the two groups experienced seroma nor wound dehiscence.Gender,age and wound classes were not associated with higher rates of wound complications.Conclusions:Laparoscopic surgery significantly reduced the incidence of early wound complications,especially wound infection,and is a safe and effective alternative to conventional open procedures.

  9. Evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility in wound infections: A pilot study from Bangladesh [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Roy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infections due to antibiotic resistant bacteria have increased alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Unrestrained and rapidly spreading bacterial growth has turned the management of wound infections into a serious challenge. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of different bacterial pathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility in various types of wound infections. Methods:  A cross-sectional study was conducted to collect 105 wound swabs. All isolated bacteria were identified based on colony characteristics, gram stain and standard biochemical tests, and antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST with the disc diffusion method. Descriptive statistics were used to present the study findings, and all analyses were performed using Stata Version 13. Results:  The rate of isolation of bacteria was 92.3%. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be the most frequent isolate (55.7%, followed by Escherichia coli (23.7%, Pseudomonas spp. (8.2%, and Streptococcus pyogenes (7.2%. Gram-positive bacteria were mostly (60% found sensitive to vancomycin, azithromycin, gentamicin, imipenem, cefixime, and ceftriaxone in this study. Among the Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli (>60% showed sensitivity to cefixime, azithromycin, cefuroxime, ceftriaxone, cefotaxime, gentamycin, and ceftazidime. Conclusions: The diversity of isolated bacteria and their susceptibility patterns signify a need to implement a proper infection control strategy, which can be achieved by carrying out antibiotic sensitivity tests of the isolates.

  10. PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA BIOFILM INFECTION SUPPRESSES LOCAL HOST RESPONSE IN BURN WOUNDS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trostrup, H.; Lerche, C. J.; Christophersen, L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-invasive monitoring of wound healing is warranted. Opticalcoherence tomography (OCT) enables instant visualization of the epidermis andupper dermis. We have studied the healing of uniform epidermal wounds inhumans using OCT. Methods: Thirty-two, 16 females and 16 males, non......-smoking healthy volunteers aged18 –49 yea rs were enrolled (NCT02116725). Suction blisters were raised on each but-tock by applying chambers with a 10 mm opening at 2380 mmHg and surface tem-perature of 408C. The blister roofs comprising the entire epidermis were excised. The60 wounds were scanned by OCT on day 0...... (baseline), and post-wounding days 2 and4. Full-thickness skin biopsies (12 mm 3 3 mm) of the 60 wounds were excised andprocessed for routine histology. In two volunteers, wound healing was followed over14 days by OCT and transepidermal water loss. Data were analyzed in linear mixedmod els for repeated...

  11. Experience with Vacuum-assisted closure of sternal wound infections following cardiac surgery and evaluation of chronic complications associated with its use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapat, Vinayak; El-Muttardi, Naguib; Young, Christopher; Venn, Graham; Roxburgh, James

    2008-01-01

    We report our experience in use of Vacuum-assisted closure therapy (VAC) in the treatment of poststernotomy wound infection with emphasis on recurrent wound-related problems after use of VAC and their treatment. Between July 2000 and June 2003, 2706 patients underwent various cardiac procedures via median sternotomy. Forty-nine patients with postoperative sternal wound infection (1.9%) were managed with VAC. Wounds were classified as either superficial sternal wound infection (28 patients) or deep sternal wound infection (21 patients). In the superficial sternal wound infection group, 23 patients had VAC as definitive treatment (GroupA), while five patients (Group B) had VAC followed by surgical closure. Similarly, in the deep sternal wound infection group, 12 patients had VAC as definitive treatment (Group C), while nine patients had VAC followed by surgical closure (Group D). Patients were discharged after satisfactory wound closure. Upon discharge patients were followed up at interval of three to six months. Recurrent sternal problems when identified were investigated and additional surgical procedures were carried out when necessary. There were nine deaths, all due to unrelated causes except in one patient who died of right ventricular rupture (Group C). Nine patients in Group A had recurrent wound problems of which six had VAC system for > 21 days. Three patients underwent extensive debridement due to sternal osteomyelitis. All eight patients in Group B presented with chronic wound-related problems and underwent multiple debridements. Four patients had laparoscopic omental flaps. In contrast 14 patients (Group B and D) who were treated with shorter duration of VAC followed by either a flap or direct surgical closure, did not present with recurrent problems. VAC therapy is a safe and reliable option in the treatment of sternal wound infection. However, prolonged use of VAC system as a replacement for surgical closure of sternal wound appears to be associated

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of bacterial isolates from surgical wound infections in Tertiary Care Hospital in Allahabad, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A K Kapoor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study to analyze the occurrence and in-vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial pathogens isolated from surgical wound infections. Specimens from a total of 129 patients undergoing either emergency or elective surgery were collected from infected sites or stitch lines and inoculated onto appropriate media. The bacterial cultures were identified utilizing standard microbiological and biochemical methods. Isolates were tested for susceptibility to antimicrobials using the Kirby Bauer disk diffusion method. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. Of 129 patients investigated (62 emergency and 67 elective surgery cases, bacterial isolates were isolated with almost equal frequency both from emergency and elective surgery cases. Of 108 (83.72% culture positive samples, 62 (57.41% were Gram negative, 39 (36.11% Gram positive, and 7 (6.48% showed multiple organisms. Of total 115 bacteria isolated (101 single and 7 double organisms culture positive, 33 (28.69% were Escherichia coli and were also the commonest; followed by Staphylococcus aureus, 30 (26.09% cases. S. aureus and Streptococcus spp. showed maximum susceptibility (100% to linezolid and vancomycin. Maximum susceptibility of E. coli was observed to ciprofloxacin (75.7%, followed by gentamicin (54.5%; of Klebsiella spp. to ceftriaxone and gentamicin (66.6% each, of Proteus spp. to gentamicin (70% followed by ciprofloxacin (60%, and of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to piperacillin (100% and tobramycin (71.4%. E. coli and S. aureus were the most common and Salmonella spp. and Acinetobacter spp. were the least common organism causing surgical site infections. The definitive therapy included ciprofloxacin and gentamicin for E. coli; linezolid and vancomycin for S. aureus and Streptococcus spp; ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin for Klebsiella spp., Citrobacter spp., acinetobacter spp and Salmonella spp.

  13. Negative pressure wound therapy in the management of late deep infections after open reconstruction of achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, Philipp; Kelm, Jens; Anagnostakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Infection is a major complication after open reconstruction of Achilles tendon ruptures. We report on the use of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in the treatment of late deep infections after open Achilles tendon reconstruction. Six patients (5 males [83.33%], 1 female [16.67%]; mean age, 52.8 [range 37 to 66] years) were been treated using an identical protocol. Surgical management consisted of debridement, lavage, and necrectomy of infected tendon parts. The VAC therapy was used for local wound preconditioning and infection management. A continuous negative pressure of 125 mm Hg was applied on each wound. For final wound closure, a split-thickness skin graft was performed. The skin graft healing process was also supported by VAC therapy during the first 5 days. The VAC dressings were changed a mean average of 3 (range 1 to 4) times until split-thickness skin grafting could be performed. The mean total duration of the VAC therapy was 13.6 ± 5.9 days. The mean hospital stay was 31.2 ± 15.9 days. No complications with regard to bleeding, seroma, or hematoma formation beneath the skin graft were observed. At a mean follow-up duration of 29.9 (range 4 to 65) months, no re-infection or infection persistence was observed. The VAC device seems to be a valuable tool in the treatment of infected tendons. The generalization of these conclusions should await the results of future studies with larger patient series. Copyright © 2015 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dual-functional Polyurea Microcapsules for Chronic Wound Care Dressings: Sustained Drug Delivery and Non-leaching Infection Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei

    A new design of dual-functional polyurea microcapsules was proposed for chronic wound dressings to provide both non-leaching infection control and sustained topical drug delivery functionalities. Quaternary ammonium functionalized polyurea microcapsules (MCQs) were synthesized under mild conditions through an interfacial crosslinking reaction between branched polyethylenimine (PEI) and 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI) in a dimethylformamide/cyclohexane emulsion. An in-situ modification method was developed to endow non-leaching surface antimicrobial properties to MCQs via bonding antimicrobial surfactants to surface isocyanate residues on the polyurea shells. The resultant robust MCQs with both non-leaching antimicrobial properties and sustained drug releasing properties have potential applications in medical textiles, such as chronic wound dressings, for infection control and drug delivery.

  15. Effect of skeletonization of the internal thoracic artery for coronary revascularization on the incidence of sternal wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, Srdjan; James, David; Vecht, Joshua A; Kidher, Emaddin; Kokotsakis, John; Malinovski, Vitali; Rao, Christopher; Darzi, Ara; Anderson, Jon R; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2010-02-01

    Use of the internal thoracic artery in coronary revascularization confers excellent benefit. We assessed the impact of skeletonization on the incidence of postoperative sternal wound infection in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. We also investigated whether there is an advantage in using this technique when harvesting both internal thoracic arteries in high-risk groups, such as diabetic patients. Skeletonization was associated with beneficial reduction in the odds ratio of sternal wound infection (odds ratio, 0.41; 95% confidence interval, 0.26 to 0.64). This effect was more evident when analyzing diabetic patients undergoing bilateral internal thoracic artery grafting (odds ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.10 to 0.34). 2010 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Rhinovirus infection induces cytotoxicity and delays wound healing in bronchial epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantopoulos Andreas G

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human rhinoviruses (RV, the most common triggers of acute asthma exacerbations, are considered not cytotoxic to the bronchial epithelium. Recent observations, however, have questioned this knowledge. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of RV to induce epithelial cytotoxicity and affect epithelial repair in-vitro. Methods Monolayers of BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, seeded at different densities were exposed to RV serotypes 1b, 5, 7, 9, 14, 16. Cytotoxicity was assessed chromatometrically. Epithelial monolayers were mechanically wounded, exposed or not to RV and the repopulation of the damaged area was assessed by image analysis. Finally epithelial cell proliferation was assessed by quantitation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA by flow cytometry. Results RV1b, RV5, RV7, RV14 and RV16 were able to induce considerable epithelial cytotoxicity, more pronounced in less dense cultures, in a cell-density and dose-dependent manner. RV9 was not cytotoxic. Furthermore, RV infection diminished the self-repair capacity of bronchial epithelial cells and reduced cell proliferation. Conclusion RV-induced epithelial cytotoxicity may become considerable in already compromised epithelium, such as in the case of asthma. The RV-induced impairment on epithelial proliferation and self-repair capacity may contribute to the development of airway remodeling.

  17. Combat trauma-associated invasive fungal wound infections: epidemiology and clinical classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintrob, A C; Weisbrod, A B; Dunne, J R; Rodriguez, C J; Malone, D; Lloyd, B A; Warkentien, T E; Wells, J; Murray, C K; Bradley, W; Shaikh, F; Shah, J; Aggarwal, D; Carson, M L; Tribble, D R

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of invasive fungal wound infections (IFIs) in combat casualties led to development of a combat trauma-specific IFI case definition and classification. Prospective data were collected from 1133 US military personnel injured in Afghanistan (June 2009-August 2011). The IFI rates ranged from 0·2% to 11·7% among ward and intensive care unit admissions, respectively (6·8% overall). Seventy-seven IFI cases were classified as proven/probable (n = 54) and possible/unclassifiable (n = 23) and compared in a case-case analysis. There was no difference in clinical characteristics between the proven/probable and possible/unclassifiable cases. Possible IFI cases had shorter time to diagnosis (P = 0·02) and initiation of antifungal therapy (P = 0·05) and fewer operative visits (P = 0·002) compared to proven/probable cases, but clinical outcomes were similar between the groups. Although the trauma-related IFI classification scheme did not provide prognostic information, it is an effective tool for clinical and epidemiological surveillance and research.

  18. Biobased silver nanocolloid coating on silk fibers for prevention of post-surgical wound infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhas, Sindhu Priya; Anbarasan, Suruthi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-01-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibers are an important biomaterial and are used in surgical sutures due to their remarkable biocompatibility. The major drawback to the application of biomaterials is the risk of bacterial invasion, leading to clinical complications. We have developed an easy and cost-effective method for fabrication of antibacterial silk fibers loaded with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by an in situ and ex situ process using an aqueous extract of Rhizophora apiculata leaf. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that well dispersed nanoparticles impregnated the silk fibers both in situ and ex situ. The crystalline nature of the AgNPs in the silk fibers was demonstrated by X-ray diffraction. The thermal and mechanical properties of the silk fibers were enhanced after they were impregnated with AgNPs. The silver-coated silk fibers fabricated by the in situ and ex situ method exhibited more than 90% inhibition against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Silk fibers doped with AgNPs were found to be biocompatible with 3T3 fibroblasts. The results obtained represent an important advance towards the clinical application of biocompatible AgNP-loaded silk fibers for prevention of surgical wound infections. PMID:26491317

  19. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection impairs murine S100A8/A9 and neutrophil effector cytokines—implications for delayed wound closure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars Jackie

    2017-01-01

    The impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in chronic wounds and clinical implication for healing is receiving increased attention. However, the pathophysiology of host/pathogen interplay is not fully understood. By further revealing the mechanisms, necessary new treatment strategies...

  20. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pleteneva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic” and temperate (“lysogenic” bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine.

  1. Label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of systemic responses to local wounding and virus infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehl, Annette; Zhang, Zhe Jenny; Kuiper, Martin; Peck, Scott C; Heinlein, Manfred

    2013-06-07

    Plants are continuously exposed to changing environmental conditions and must, as sessile organisms, possess sophisticated acclimative mechanisms. To gain insight into systemic responses to local virus infection or wounding, we performed comparative LC-MS/MS protein profiling of distal, virus-free leaves four and five days after local inoculation of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with either Oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV) or inoculation buffer alone. Our study revealed biomarkers for systemic signaling in response to wounding and compatible virus infection in Arabidopsis, which should prove useful in further addressing the trigger-specific systemic response network and the elusive systemic signals. We observed responses common to ORMV and mock treatment as well as protein profile changes that are specific to local virus infection or mechanical wounding (mock treatment) alone, which provides evidence for the existence of more than one systemic signal to induce these distinct changes. Comparison of the systemic responses between time points indicated that the responses build up over time. Our data indicate stress-specific changes in proteins involved in jasmonic and abscisic acid signaling, intracellular transport, compartmentalization of enzyme activities, protein folding and synthesis, and energy and carbohydrate metabolism. In addition, a virus-triggered systemic signal appears to suppress antiviral host defense.

  2. In Vitro Assessment of the Antibacterial Potential of Silver Nano-Coatings on Cotton Gauzes for Prevention of Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, Federica; Di Franco, Cinzia; Panico, Angelica; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Sannino, Alessandro; Pollini, Mauro

    2016-05-25

    Multidrug-resistant organisms are increasingly implicated in acute and chronic wound infections, thus compromising the chance of therapeutic options. The resistance to conventional antibiotics demonstrated by some bacterial strains has encouraged new approaches for the prevention of infections in wounds and burns, among them the use of silver compounds and nanocrystalline silver. Recently, silver wound dressings have become widely accepted in wound healing centers and are commercially available. In this work, novel antibacterial wound dressings have been developed through a silver deposition technology based on the photochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The devices obtained are completely natural and the silver coatings are characterized by an excellent adhesion without the use of any binder. The silver-treated cotton gauzes were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in order to verify the distribution and the dimension of the silver particles on the cotton fibers. The effectiveness of the silver-treated gauzes in reducing the bacterial growth and biofilm proliferation has been demonstrated through agar diffusion tests, bacterial enumeration test, biofilm quantification tests, fluorescence and SEM microscopy. Moreover, potential cytotoxicity of the silver coating was evaluated through 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay (MTT) and the extract method on fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was performed in order to determine the silver release in different media and to relate the results to the biological characterization. All the results obtained were compared with plain gauzes as a negative control, as well as gauzes treated with a higher silver percentage as a positive control.

  3. In Vitro Assessment of the Antibacterial Potential of Silver Nano-Coatings on Cotton Gauzes for Prevention of Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Paladini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant organisms are increasingly implicated in acute and chronic wound infections, thus compromising the chance of therapeutic options. The resistance to conventional antibiotics demonstrated by some bacterial strains has encouraged new approaches for the prevention of infections in wounds and burns, among them the use of silver compounds and nanocrystalline silver. Recently, silver wound dressings have become widely accepted in wound healing centers and are commercially available. In this work, novel antibacterial wound dressings have been developed through a silver deposition technology based on the photochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The devices obtained are completely natural and the silver coatings are characterized by an excellent adhesion without the use of any binder. The silver-treated cotton gauzes were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA in order to verify the distribution and the dimension of the silver particles on the cotton fibers. The effectiveness of the silver-treated gauzes in reducing the bacterial growth and biofilm proliferation has been demonstrated through agar diffusion tests, bacterial enumeration test, biofilm quantification tests, fluorescence and SEM microscopy. Moreover, potential cytotoxicity of the silver coating was evaluated through 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay (MTT and the extract method on fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was performed in order to determine the silver release in different media and to relate the results to the biological characterization. All the results obtained were compared with plain gauzes as a negative control, as well as gauzes treated with a higher silver percentage as a positive control.

  4. A study of wound infections in two health institutions in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diversity of microorganisms and the high incidence of polymicrobic flora in this study give credence to the value of identifying one or more bacterial pathogens from wound cultures. Continuous dialogue between the microbiology department and wound care practitioners and education of patients on personal hygiene is ...

  5. Methylene Blue-Loaded Dissolving Microneedles: Potential Use in Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy of Infected Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffarel-Salvador, Ester; Kearney, Mary-Carmel; Mairs, Rachel; Gallo, Luigi; Stewart, Sarah A.; Brady, Aaron J.; Donnelly, Ryan F.

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy involves delivery of a photosensitising drug that is activated by light of a specific wavelength, resulting in generation of highly reactive radicals. This activated species can cause destruction of targeted cells. Application of this process for treatment of microbial infections has been termed “photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy” (PACT). In the treatment of chronic wounds, the delivery of photosensitising agents is often impeded by the presence of a thick hyperkeratotic/necrotic tissue layer, reducing their therapeutic efficacy. Microneedles (MNs) are an emerging drug delivery technology that have been demonstrated to successfully penetrate the outer layers of the skin, whilst minimising damage to skin barrier function. Delivering photosensitising drugs using this platform has been demonstrated to have several advantages over conventional photodynamic therapy, such as, painless application, reduced erythema, enhanced cosmetic results and improved intradermal delivery. The aim of this study was to physically characterise dissolving MNs loaded with the photosensitising agent, methylene blue and assess their photodynamic antimicrobial activity. Dissolving MNs were fabricated from aqueous blends of Gantrez® AN-139 co-polymer containing varying loadings of methylene blue. A height reduction of 29.8% was observed for MNs prepared from blends containing 0.5% w/w methylene blue following application of a total force of 70.56 N/array. A previously validated insertion test was used to assess the effect of drug loading on MN insertion into a wound model. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans biofilms were incubated with various methylene blue concentrations within the range delivered by MNs in vitro (0.1–2.5 mg/mL) and either irradiated at 635 nm using a Paterson Lamp or subjected to a dark period. Microbial susceptibility to PACT was determined by assessing the total viable count. Kill rates of >96%, were achieved for

  6. Methylene Blue-Loaded Dissolving Microneedles: Potential Use in Photodynamic Antimicrobial Chemotherapy of Infected Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Caffarel-Salvador

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy involves delivery of a photosensitising drug that is activated by light of a specific wavelength, resulting in generation of highly reactive radicals. This activated species can cause destruction of targeted cells. Application of this process for treatment of microbial infections has been termed “photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy” (PACT. In the treatment of chronic wounds, the delivery of photosensitising agents is often impeded by the presence of a thick hyperkeratotic/necrotic tissue layer, reducing their therapeutic efficacy. Microneedles (MNs are an emerging drug delivery technology that have been demonstrated to successfully penetrate the outer layers of the skin, whilst minimising damage to skin barrier function. Delivering photosensitising drugs using this platform has been demonstrated to have several advantages over conventional photodynamic therapy, such as, painless application, reduced erythema, enhanced cosmetic results and improved intradermal delivery. The aim of this study was to physically characterise dissolving MNs loaded with the photosensitising agent, methylene blue and assess their photodynamic antimicrobial activity. Dissolving MNs were fabricated from aqueous blends of Gantrez® AN-139 co-polymer containing varying loadings of methylene blue. A height reduction of 29.8% was observed for MNs prepared from blends containing 0.5% w/w methylene blue following application of a total force of 70.56 N/array. A previously validated insertion test was used to assess the effect of drug loading on MN insertion into a wound model. Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans biofilms were incubated with various methylene blue concentrations within the range delivered by MNs in vitro (0.1–2.5 mg/mL and either irradiated at 635 nm using a Paterson Lamp or subjected to a dark period. Microbial susceptibility to PACT was determined by assessing the total viable count. Kill rates of >96

  7. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad- Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug- Resistant Wound Infections 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...demonstrated the antimicrobial properties of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) against a broad collection of multi-drug resistant bacterial and...spectrum antimicrobial for drug- resistant wound infections) at the 54th Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC 2014

  8. Impact of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy on clinical outcomes of patients with sternal wound infections: a meta-analysis of non-randomized studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, Matthew E; Tansarli, Giannoula S; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z

    2013-01-01

    To examine the impact of VAC therapy on mortality of patients with sternal wound infections after cardiothoracic surgery. Controversial results regarding mortality of patients with sternal wound infections were published. We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Scopus. Mortality was the primary outcome of the meta-analysis. Recurrences, complications and length of stay were secondary outcomes. Twenty-two retrospective studies including 2467 patients were eligible for inclusion. Patients treated with VAC had significantly lower mortality compared to those treated without VAC [2233 patients, RR = 0.40, (95% CI 0.28, 0.57)]. This finding was consistent regardless of the study design, the exclusion of studies with positive findings, the criteria for establishment of the compared groups, the time of mortality assessment or the type of infections under study, provided that adequate data was available. VAC therapy was associated with fewer recurrences (RR = 0.34, 95% CI: 0.19-0.59). The meta-analysis did not show any difference in the length of stay (RR = -2.25, 95% CI: -7.52-3.02). VAC therapy was associated with lower mortality than other surgical techniques in retrospective cohorts of patients with DSWIs following cardiothoracic surgery.

  9. CODIFI (Concordance in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Infection): a cross-sectional study of wound swab versus tissue sampling in infected diabetic foot ulcers in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrea; Wright-Hughes, Alexandra; Backhouse, Michael Ross; Lipsky, Benjamin A; Nixon, Jane; Bhogal, Moninder S; Reynolds, Catherine; Brown, Sarah

    2018-01-31

    To determine the extent of agreement and patterns of disagreement between wound swab and tissue samples in patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). Multicentre, prospective, cross-sectional study. Primary and secondary care foot ulcer/diabetic outpatient clinics and hospital wards across England. Inclusion criteria: consenting patients aged ≥18 years; diabetes mellitus; suspected infected DFU. clinically inappropriate to take either sample. Wound swab obtained using Levine's technique; tissue samples collected using a sterile dermal curette or scalpel. Coprimary: reported presence, and number, of pathogens per sample; prevalence of resistance to antimicrobials among likely pathogens. Secondary: recommended change in antibiotic therapy based on blinded clinical review; adverse events; sampling costs. 400 consenting patients (79% male) from 25 centres.Most prevalent reported pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus (43.8%), Streptococcus (16.7%) and other aerobic Gram-positive cocci (70.6%). At least one potential pathogen was reported from 70.1% of wound swab and 86.1% of tissue samples. Pathogen results differed between sampling methods in 58% of patients, with more pathogens and fewer contaminants reported from tissue specimens.The majority of pathogens were reported significantly more frequently in tissue than wound swab samples (P<0.01), with equal disagreement for S. aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Blinded clinicians more often recommended a change in antibiotic regimen based on tissue compared with wound swab results (increase of 8.9%, 95% CI 2.65% to 15.3%). Ulcer pain and bleeding occurred more often after tissue collection versus wound swabs (pain: 9.3%, 1.3%; bleeding: 6.8%, 1.5%, respectively). Reports of tissue samples more frequently identified pathogens, and less frequently identified non-pathogens compared with wound swab samples. Blinded clinicians more often recommended changes in antibiotic therapy based on tissue compared with wound

  10. A multi-centre clinical evaluation of reactive oxygen topical wound gel in 114 wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, M; Dickinson, A; Brooks, J; Hudgell, L; Saeed, K; Cutting, K F

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the outcomes of the use of Surgihoney RO (SHRO), topical wound dressing in a multi-centre, international setting. The aims were to explore the clinical effects of SHRO, including a reduction in bacterial load and biofilm and improvement in healing in a variety of challenging non-healing and clinically infected wounds. This was a non-comparative evaluation, where both acute and chronic wounds with established delayed healing were treated with the dressing. Clinicians prospectively recorded wound improvement or deterioration, level of wound exudate, presence of pain, and presence of slough and necrosis. Analysis of this data provided information on clinical performance of the dressing. Semi-quantitative culture to assess bacterial bioburden was performed where possible. We recruited 104 patients, mean age 61 years old, with 114 wounds. The mean duration of wounds before treatment was 3.7 months and the mean duration of treatment was 25.7 days. During treatment 24 wounds (21%) healed and the remaining 90 (79%) wounds improved following application of the dressing. No deterioration in any wound was observed. A reduction in patient pain, level of wound exudate and in devitalised tissue were consistently reported. These positive improvements in wound progress were reflected in the wound cultures that showed a reduction in bacterial load in 39 out of the 40 swabs taken. There were two adverse events recorded: a stinging sensation following application of the dressing was experienced by 2 patients, and 2 elderly patients died of causes unrelated to the dressing or to the chronic wound. These patients' wounds and their response to SHRO have been included in the analysis. SHRO was well tolerated and shows great promise as an effective potent topical antimicrobial in the healing of challenging wounds. Matthew Dryden has become a shareholder in Matoke Holdings, the manufacturer of Surgihoney RO, since the completion of this study. Keith Cutting is a

  11. Can Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Silently Travel From the Gut to the Wound and Cause Postoperative Infection? Modeling the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezalek, Monika A; Hyoju, Sanjiv; Zaborin, Alexander; Okafor, Emeka; Chandrasekar, Laxmi; Bindokas, Vitas; Guyton, Kristina; Montgomery, Christopher P; Daum, Robert S; Zaborina, Olga; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Alverdy, John C

    2018-04-01

    To determine whether intestinal colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be the source of surgical site infections (SSIs). We hypothesized that gut-derived MRSA may cause SSIs via mechanisms in which circulating immune cells scavenge MRSA from the gut, home to surgical wounds, and cause infection (Trojan Horse Hypothesis). MRSA gut colonization was achieved by disrupting the microbiota with antibiotics, imposing a period of starvation and introducing MRSA via gavage. Next, mice were subjected to a surgical injury (30% hepatectomy) and rectus muscle injury and ischemia before skin closure. All wounds were cultured before skin closure. To control for postoperative wound contamination, reiterative experiments were performed in mice in which the closed wound was painted with live MRSA for 2 consecutive postoperative days. To rule out extracellular bacteremia as a cause of wound infection, MRSA was injected intravenously in mice subjected to rectus muscle ischemia and injury. All wound cultures were negative before skin closure, ruling out intraoperative contamination. Out of 40 mice, 4 (10%) developed visible abscesses. Nine mice (22.5%) had MRSA positive cultures of the rectus muscle without visible abscesses. No SSIs were observed in mice injected intravenously with MRSA. Wounds painted with MRSA after closure did not develop infections. Circulating neutrophils from mice captured by flow cytometry demonstrated MRSA in their cytoplasm. Immune cells as Trojan horses carrying gut-derived MRSA may be a plausible mechanism of SSIs in the absence of direct contamination.

  12. Risk factors for incisional surgical site infections in elective surgery for colorectal cancer: focus on intraoperative meticulous wound management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itatsu, Keita; Sugawara, Gen; Kaneoka, Yuji; Kato, Takehito; Takeuchi, Eiji; Kanai, Michio; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Arai, Toshiyuki; Yokoyama, Yukihiro; Nagino, Masato

    2014-07-01

    An incisional surgical site infection (I-SSI) is a frequently observed complication following colorectal surgery. Intraoperative wound management is one of the most important factors that determine the incidence of postoperative I-SSI. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the methods used for intraoperative wound management on the incidence of I-SSI following elective surgery for colorectal cancer. Between November 2009 and February 2011, the data of 1,980 consecutive patients who underwent elective colorectal resection for colorectal cancer were prospectively collected from 19 affiliated hospitals. The incidence of and risk factors for I-SSI were investigated. Overall, 233 I-SSIs were identified (11.7 %). Forty-two possible risk factors were analyzed. Using a multivariate analysis, the independent risk factors for I-SSI were identified to be a high body mass index, previous laparotomy, chronic liver disease, wound length, contaminated wound class, creation or closure of an ostomy, right hemicolectomy procedure, the suture material used for fascial closure and the incidence of organ/space SSI. To prevent I-SSI following elective colorectal surgery, it is crucial to avoid making large incisions and reduce fecal contamination whenever possible. A high quality randomized control trial is necessary to confirm the definitive intraoperative procedure(s) that can minimize the incidence of I-SSI.

  13. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaboyer, Wendy; Anderson, Vinah; Webster, Joan; Sneddon, Anne; Thalib, Lukman; Gillespie, Brigid M

    2014-09-30

    Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS) are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI). Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS) and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing) and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus(®) dressing). All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38-1.68); for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34-2.79). A sample size of 784 (392 per group) would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  14. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy on Surgical Site Infections in Women Undergoing Elective Caesarean Sections: A Pilot RCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy Chaboyer

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Obese women undergoing caesarean section (CS are at increased risk of surgical site infection (SSI. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT is growing in use as a prophylactic approach to prevent wound complications such as SSI, yet there is little evidence of its benefits. This pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT assessed the effect of NPWT on SSI and other wound complications in obese women undergoing elective caesarean sections (CS and also the feasibility of conducting a definitive trial. Ninety-two obese women undergoing elective CS were randomized in theatre via a central web based system using a parallel 1:1 process to two groups i.e., 46 women received the intervention (NPWT PICO™ dressing and 46 women received standard care (Comfeel Plus® dressing. All women received the intended dressing following wound closure. The relative risk of SSI in the intervention group was 0.81 (95% CI 0.38–1.68; for the number of complications excluding SSI it was 0.98 (95% CI 0.34–2.79. A sample size of 784 (392 per group would be required to find a statistically significant difference in SSI between the two groups with 90% power. These results demonstrate that a larger definitive trial is feasible and that careful planning and site selection is critical to the success of the overall study.

  15. Infection Agents Detected with Wound Culture in Patients with Diabetic Foot who will Undergo Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment

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    Gurkan Mert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: We aimed to obtain the knowledge of appropriate antibiotic therapy and to make a contribution to improving treatment efficacy by conducting a microbiological study of diabetic foot ulcers. METHOD: 30 patients (18 male and 12 female with diabetic foot ulcer applying to our center for hyperbaric oxygen (HBO treatment in 2010 were enrolled in this study. The wounds were graded according to Meggitt-Wagner classification system. Wound cultures were obtained before starting antibiotic therapy and HBO treatment. Phoenix system (Becton Dickinson, USA and Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion antibiotic sensitivity testing were used in order to detect the antimicrobial susceptibility of the infection agents. The number of HBO sessions, glycemic control and treatment results were assessed. RESULTS: Mean age of the patients was 61.3 years (range: 35-83. 24 patients had a good glycemic control and 6 patients had not. The patients were given 5 to 55 HBO sessions (mean: 20. Of the 30 patients 19 (63.33% recovered from the infection but 11 (36.67% have not responded to the treatment. 14 different infectious agents were detected in diabetic foot ulcers we examined. Gram-positive agents were isolated in 12 (40% out of 30 wound cultures and gram-negative agents were isolated in 18 (60% wound culture. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was predominantly isolated and the other agents isolated were enterococcus faecalis, klebsiella pneumoniae, staphylococcus aureus and escherichia coli. CONCLUSION: The outcomes can not represent the general population rates due to the restriction factors. They give only an idea about the probability of infectious agent spectrum in diabetic foot ulcers and their antibiotic susceptibility. We want to attract attention to the fact that although pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are mostly encountered in hospital, they can also be acquired from the community and it will be useful to develop appropriate antibiotic policies and treatment protocols. [TAF

  16. Surgical site wound infection in relation to antibiotic prophylaxis given before skin incision and after cord clamping during cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, B; Marhatha, R; Giri, A; Jaisi, S; Maskey, U

    2014-12-01

    Surgical site infection is one of the most common complications following Lower Segment Cesarean Section, which accounts for prolonged hospital stay thereby increasing expense. Prophylactic antibiotics in cesarean section reduces surgical site infection significantly. The best protection is provided when tissue level of antibiotics are adequate before incision, without prejudice to neonatal infectious morbidity. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of surgical site wound infection with prophylactic antibiotics given before skin incision and after cord clamping following delivery of baby. This was a prospective, hospital based study, in which hundred cases of cesarean deliveries who received antibiotics prophylaxis one hour before the skin incision were compared with another 100 cases where antibiotic was given after cord clamping following delivery of the baby. Surgical site infection occurred in 3% of women who received antibiotics prophylaxis before skin incision as compared to 6% in whom antibiotic was given after cord clamping. It was statistically not significant (p = 0.465).

  17. One year ago not business as usual: Wound management, infection and psychoemotional control during tertiary medical care following the 2004 Tsunami disaster in southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maegele, Marc; Gregor, Sven; Yuecel, Nedim; Simanski, Christian; Paffrath, Thomas; Rixen, Dieter; Heiss, Markus M; Rudroff, Claudia; Saad, Stefan; Perbix, Walter; Wappler, Frank; Harzheim, Andreas; Schwarz, Rosemarie; Bouillon, Bertil

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Following the 2004 tsunami disaster in southeast Asia severely injured tourists were repatriated via airlift to Germany. One cohort was triaged to the Cologne-Merheim Medical Center (Germany) for further medical care. We report on the tertiary medical care provided to this cohort of patients. Methods This study is an observational report on complex wound management, infection and psychoemotional control associated with the 2004 Tsunami disaster. The setting was an adult intensive care unit (ICU) of a level I trauma center and subjects included severely injured tsunami victims repatriated from the disaster area (19 to 68 years old; 10 females and 7 males with unknown co-morbidities). Results Multiple large flap lacerations (2 × 3 to 60 × 60 cm) at various body sites were characteristic. Lower extremities were mostly affected (88%), followed by upper extremities (29%), and head (18%). Two-thirds of patients presented with combined injuries to the thorax or fractures. Near-drowning involved the aspiration of immersion fluids, marine and soil debris into the respiratory tract and all patients displayed signs of pneumonitis and pneumonia upon arrival. Three patients presented with severe sinusitis. Microbiology identified a variety of common but also uncommon isolates that were often multi-resistant. Wound management included aggressive debridement together with vacuum-assisted closure in the interim between initial wound surgery and secondary closure. All patients received empiric anti-infective therapy using quinolones and clindamycin, later adapted to incoming results from microbiology and resistance patterns. This approach was effective in all but one patient who died due to severe fungal sepsis. All patients displayed severe signs of post-traumatic stress response. Conclusion Individuals evacuated to our facility sustained traumatic injuries to head, chest, and limbs that were often contaminated with highly resistant bacteria. Transferred patients

  18. Vancomycin Paste Does Not Reduce the Incidence of Deep Sternal Wound Infection After Cardiac Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Heather L; Ejiofor, Julius I; McGurk, Siobhan; Tsuyoshi, Kaneko; Shekar, Prem; Body, Simon C

    2017-02-01

    Deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) is a devastating complication that increases morbidity and death in cardiac surgical patients. Vancomycin is often administered intravenously for antibiotic prophylaxis in cardiac operations. Many cardiac surgeons also apply vancomycin paste topically to the sternal edges. We examined the effect of vancomycin paste on the incidence of DSWI in patients undergoing elective cardiac operations. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all patients from 2003 to 2015 who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting, valve, or combined coronary artery bypass grafting and valve operations at a single institution. We derived The Society for Thoracic Surgeons (STS) DSWI risk index for each patient and systematically reviewed operative, pharmacy, microbiology, and discharge records to document DSWI in these patients. Multivariate analyses were used to identify predictors of DSWI in this cohort and to quantify the effect of vancomycin paste. Of the 14,492 patients whose records we examined, DSWI developed in 136 patients, resulting in an overall incidence of 0.9%. After multivariate analysis, body mass index, New York Heart Association Functional Classification, and the STS DSWI risk index remained statistically significant and associated with DSWI. Although the incidence of DSWI decreased over time, the use of vancomycin paste was not associated with a reduced incidence of DSWI. There was a marked decrease in the incidence of DSWI during the study period, concurrent with institutional implementation of revised STS antibiotic dosing guidelines in 2007 and other strategies. However, the application of vancomycin paste to the sternal edges of patients undergoing cardiac operations was not associated with a reduced risk of DSWI. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Wound infection following stoma takedown: primary skin closure versus subcuticular purse-string suture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Thao T; Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Abraham, Anasooya; Madoff, Robert D; Rothenberger, David A

    2010-12-01

    Stoma closure has been associated with a high rate of surgical site infection (SSI) and the ideal stoma-site skin closure technique is still debated. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of SSI following primary skin closure (PC) versus a skin-approximating, subcuticular purse-string closure (APS). All consecutive patients undergoing stoma closure between 2002 and 2007 by two surgeons at a single tertiary-care institution were retrospectively assessed. Patients who had a new stoma created at the same site or those without wound closure were excluded. The end point was SSI, determined according to current CDC guidelines, at the stoma closure site and/or the midline laparotomy incision. There were 61 patients in the PC group (surgeon A: 58 of 61) and 17 in the APS group (surgeon B: 16 of 17). The two groups were similar in baseline and intraoperative characteristics, except that patients in the PC group were more often diagnosed with benign disease (p = 0.0156) and more often had a stapled anastomosis (p = 0.002). The overall SSI rate was 14 of 78 (18%). All SSIs occurred in the PC group (14 of 61 vs. 0 of 17, p = 0.03). Our study suggests that a skin-approximating closure with a subcuticular purse-string of the stoma site leads to less SSI than a primary closure. Randomized studies are needed to confirm our findings and assess additional end points such as healing time, cost, and patient satisfaction.

  20. Tap Water Versus Sterile Normal Saline in Wound Swabbing: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mun Che; Cheung, Kin; Leung, Polly

    2016-01-01

    The use of tap water as a wound-cleansing agent is becoming more common in clinical practice, especially in community settings. The aim of this study was to test whether there are differences in wound infection and wound healing rates when wounds are cleansed with tap water or sterile normal saline. Double-blinded randomized controlled trial. Subjects were recruited from the community nursing service of a local hospital in Hong Kong. The target sample included subjects who were aged 18 years or more, and receiving chronic or acute wound care treatment. Subjects were randomly assigned to wound cleansing with tap water (experimental group) or sterile normal saline (control group). Wound assessment was conducted at each home visit, and an assessment of wound size was conducted once a week. The main outcome measures, occurrence of a wound infection and wound healing, were assessed over a period of 6 weeks. Twenty-two subjects (11 subjects in each group) with 30 wounds participated in the study; 16 wounds were managed with tap water cleansing and 14 were randomly allocated to management with the sterile normal saline group. Analysis revealed no significant difference between the experimental and control groups in the proportions of wound infection and wound healing. Study findings indicate that tap water is a safe alternative to sterile normal saline for wound cleansing in a community setting.

  1. A comparative study of histopathological effects of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with sulfadiazine on skin burn wound healing in rats infected with Pseudomonas aeuroginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Valilou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen, is the most common infective agent of burn wounds. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological effect of a mixture of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with silver sulfadiazine on the healing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected second grade skin burn wounds in rats. To this end, 60 male rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (15 rats in each group. After inducing anesthesia, second grade burn wound with the diameter of 12 mm was created in the dorsal region of rats. Then, 1.5×108 cfu/ml P. aeruginosa PA01was equally bestrewed on the wound of all rats. Every 12 hours, silver sulfadiazine (group 1, honey (group 2 and aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey (group 3 were applied to the wounds and group 4 was kept as control. On days 7, 14, and 21, five rats were selected from each group at each time point and after inducing anesthesia and measuring the diameter of the wound by coliseum, microbial and histopathological samples were taken from the wounds. Microbial studies showed that in all groups except the control group, the growth of the microbe was stopped. Histopathological observations regarding wound healing and diameter showed that there was a significant difference between treatment groups and the control group on days 7, 14 and 21 (p

  2. A barrier retractor to reduce surgical site infections and wound disruptions in obese patients undergoing cesarean delivery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scolari Childress, Katherine M; Gavard, Jeffrey A; Ward, Donald G; Berger, Kinley; Gross, Gilad A

    2016-02-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are an important cause of morbidity following cesarean delivery, particularly in obese patients. Methods to reduce SSIs after cesarean delivery would have an important impact in obese obstetric patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the Alexis O cesarean delivery retractor, a barrier self-retaining retractor, reduces SSIs and wound disruptions in obese patients undergoing cesarean delivery. This was a randomized controlled trial of obese women (body mass index ≥ 30 kg/m(2)) undergoing nonemergent cesarean delivery. Patients were randomized to the treatment group (using the Alexis O cesarean delivery retractor) or to the control group (using conventional handheld retractors). The primary outcome was SSI or wound disruption during the 30 day postoperative period. Secondary outcomes included operative time, estimated blood loss, change in hemoglobin, antiemetic use, length of postoperative hospital stay, hospital readmission, and other postoperative complications. A total of 301 patients were enrolled in the study. One hundred forty-four patients were randomized to the treatment group and 157 to the control group. Baseline characteristics and indications for cesarean delivery were similar between the 2 groups. Median body mass index was 40.1 kg/m(2). There were no significant differences between the treatment and the control group in the primary outcome of SSI or wound disruption rates at the 30 day assessment (20.6% vs 17.6%, P = .62), during the postoperative inpatient hospitalization or at the 1-2 week postoperative visit. There were also no differences in the primary outcome when adjusting for obesity class or thickness of the subcuticular layer. Patients in the treatment group had lower rates of uterine exteriorization (54.3% vs 87.3%, P cesarean delivery deliveries did not decrease SSI or wound disruption rates in an obese population. Its use as a retractor should be left to the discretion of the surgeon

  3. Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation for the treatment of persistent periprosthetic hip infections: a report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Söylemez MS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Salih Söylemez,1 Korhan Özkan,2 Bülent Kılıç,3 Samet Erinç41Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Bingöl State Hospital, Bingöl, 2Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Medeniyet University, Istanbul, 3Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Orthopaedic Surgery Clinic, Istanbul Gelişim University, Tekirdağ, 4Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Istanbul Medeniyet University, Göztepe Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, TurkeyAbstract: Intermittent negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi is starting to be used successfully to treat early periprosthetic infections of endoprostheses. However, few articles have reported the outcome of treatment with intermittent NPWTi for late persistent periprosthetic infections of the hip. In this study, we report two cases who underwent several rounds of radical wound debridement for the treatment of a late persistent periprosthetic infection of the hip. Intermittent NPWTi was used in both cases. Patients were treated successfully and there was no recurrence after 3 and 1 years of follow-up, respectively.Keywords: negative pressure, vacuum-assisted, periprosthetic infection, hip

  4. The development, implementation and evaluation of a cross organisational clinical guideline for the management and prevention of wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Nikki; Sandoe, Jonathan; Mc Ginnis, Elizabeth; Edmunds, Heather

    2012-11-01

    The Tissue Viability services in acute and primary care in Leeds had concerns about the increasing inappropriate use of topical antiseptic dressings for wound management and were aware that the use was disproportionate to the evidence supporting their prescribing. A scoping exercise of the use of topical antiseptics and systemic antibiotic usage in Leeds led to the identification of heterogeneous prescribing of systemic antibiotics and an almost £500,000 spend on topical antiseptics across Leeds community. The project involved the following stages. 1- Local scoping of topical antiseptics and systemic antibiotic prescribing. 2- A cross organisational working group to develop and implement a clinical best practice guideline for the prevention, diagnosis and management of wound infection. 3- Development of a revised local dressings formulary. 4- The establishment of a new referral process to Tissue Viability for wounds requiring topical antiseptic treatments. 5- Evaluation of the new guideline through- monitoring prescribing- monitoring wound sampling- monitoring A & E admissions- collecting patient feedback through the ‘Tell Tissue Viability’ process. *Expenditure on topical antiseptic dressings for the period Oct 2009-Dec 2009 was £128,864 and this reduced to £65,604 for the period Nov 2011-Jan 2012. This demonstrates an overall saving of £63,260 with a projected annual saving of £237,584 within the community trust alone. *A reduction in the number of wound swabs sent to microbiology from inpatient locations by 1500/year comparing 2008/9 with 2010/11. *An increase in wound swabs sent from GPs by 100/year comparing 2008/9 with 2010/11. *A reduction in penicillin V and co-fluampicil prescriptions and an increase in flucloxacillin prescriptions in general practise suggesting greater concordance with local antibiotic prescribing recommendations. The implementation of a clinical guideline in association with support from the specialist team, for patients

  5. Evaluation of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Production and Carriage ofbla-VIMGenes inPseudomonas aeruginosaIsolated from Burn Wound Infections in Isfahan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Mahmood; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Pourbabaee, Mohammad; Zibaei, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    Metallo-β-lactamase-production among Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa , has become a challenge for treatment of infections due to these resistant bacteria. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the metallo-β-lactamase-production and carriage of bla- VIM genes among carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from burn wound infections. A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2014 to July 2015. One hundred and fifty P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from 600 patients with burn wound infections treated at Imam-Musa-Kazem Hospital in Isfahan city, Iran. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were screened by disk diffusion using CLSI guidelines. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were identified using an imipenem-EDTA double disk synergy test (EDTA-IMP DDST). For detection of MBL genes including bla - VIM-1 and bla - VIM-2 , polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods and sequencing were used. Among the 150 P. aeruginosa isolates, 144 (96%) were resistant to imipenem by the disk diffusion method, all of which were identified as metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates by EDTA-IMP DDST. Twenty-seven (18%) and 8 (5.5%) MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates harbored bla- VIM-1 and bla - VIM-2 genes, respectively. Our findings showed a high occurrence of metallo-β-lactamase production among P. aeruginosa isolates in burn patient infections in our region. Also, there are P. aeruginosa isolates carrying the bla - VIM-1 and bla - VIM-2 genes in Isfahan province.

  6. Evaluation of Metallo-β-Lactamase-Production and Carriage of bla-VIM Genes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Burn Wound Infections in Isfahan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Mahmood; Firoozeh, Farzaneh; Pourbabaee, Mohammad; Zibaei, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background Metallo-β-lactamase-production among Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has become a challenge for treatment of infections due to these resistant bacteria. Objectives The aim of the current study was to evaluate the metallo-β-lactamase-production and carriage of bla-VIM genes among carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolated from burn wound infections. Patients and Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2014 to July 2015. One hundred and fifty P. aeruginosa isolates were recovered from 600 patients with burn wound infections treated at Imam-Musa-Kazem Hospital in Isfahan city, Iran. Carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa isolates were screened by disk diffusion using CLSI guidelines. Metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates were identified using an imipenem-EDTA double disk synergy test (EDTA-IMP DDST). For detection of MBL genes including bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods and sequencing were used. Results Among the 150 P. aeruginosa isolates, 144 (96%) were resistant to imipenem by the disk diffusion method, all of which were identified as metallo-β-lactamase-producing P. aeruginosa isolates by EDTA-IMP DDST. Twenty-seven (18%) and 8 (5.5%) MBL-producing P. aeruginosa isolates harbored bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2 genes, respectively. Conclusions Our findings showed a high occurrence of metallo-β-lactamase production among P. aeruginosa isolates in burn patient infections in our region. Also, there are P. aeruginosa isolates carrying the bla-VIM-1 and bla-VIM-2 genes in Isfahan province. PMID:28144604

  7. The surgical care improvement project and prevention of post-operative infection, including surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Laura H; Politano, Amani D; Sawyer, Robert G

    2011-06-01

    In response to inconsistent compliance with infection prevention measures, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services collaborated with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on the Surgical Infection Prevention (SIP) project, introduced in 2002. Quality improvement measures were developed to standardize processes to increase compliance. In 2006, the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) developed out of the SIP project and its process measures. These initiatives, published in the Specifications Manual for National Inpatient Quality Measures, outline process and outcome measures. This continually evolving manual is intended to provide standard quality measures to unify documentation and track standards of care. Seven of the SCIP initiatives apply to the peri-operative period: Prophylactic antibiotics should be received within 1 h prior to surgical incision (1), be selected for activity against the most probable antimicrobial contaminants (2), and be discontinued within 24 h after the surgery end-time (3); (4) euglycemia should be maintained, with well-controlled morning blood glucose concentrations on the first two post-operative days, especially in cardiac surgery patients; (6) hair at the surgical site should be removed with clippers or by depilatory methods, not with a blade; (9) urinary catheters are to be removed within the first two post-operative days; and (10) normothermia should be maintained peri-operatively. There is strong evidence that implementation of protocols that standardize practices reduce the risk of surgical infection. The SCIP initiative targets complications that account for a significant portion of preventable morbidity as well as cost. One of the goals of the SCIP guidelines was a 25% reduction in the incidence of surgical site infections from implementation through 2010. Process measures are becoming routine, and as we practice more evidence-based medicine, it falls to us, the surgeons and scientists, to be active

  8. Wound emergencies: the importance of assessment, documentation, and early treatment using a wound electronic medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinko, Michael S; Clark, Sunday; Rennert, Robert; Flattau, Anna; Boulton, Andrew J M; Brem, Harold

    2009-05-01

    Chronic wounds such as diabetic foot ulcers, venous ulcers, and pressure ulcers are a major source of morbidity and mortality. To describe wound characteristics associated with a wound emergency, the Wound Electronic Medical Records (WEMR) of 200 consecutive admissions (139 patients, average number of admissions 1.4) to a dedicated inpatient wound healing unit over a period of 5 months were retrospectively reviewed. Patient mean age was 62 +/- 16 years, 59% were men, 27% had a foot ulcer and diabetes mellitus, and 29% had venous ulcers. Presenting signs and symptoms included wound pain, cellulitis, nonpurulent drainage, and undermining, but few presented with classic local clinical signs of infection. Treatment consisted of sharp debridement with deep tissue culture and pathology from the wound base and/or systemic antibiotics. Twenty-percent (20%) of patients had pathology-confirmed and 38% had pathology- or radiology-confirmed osteomyelitis on admission, supporting that new or increasing wound pain, cellulitis, and/or nonpurulent drainage or presence of significant undermining may be indicative of an invasive infection and that patients presenting with these signs and symptoms require an immediate treatment plan and consideration of hospital admission. Use of an objective documentation system such as the WEMR may help alert clinicians to subtle wound changes that require aggressive treatment; thereby, avoiding emergency room visits and hospital admissions. Future research is needed utilizing the WEMR across multiple medical centers to further define criteria for a chronic wound emergency.

  9. Preclinical evaluation of collagen type I scaffolds, including gelatin-collagen microparticles and loaded with a hydroglycolic Calendula officinalis extract in a lagomorph model of full-thickness skin wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millán, D; Jiménez, R A; Nieto, L E; Linero, I; Laverde, M; Fontanilla, M R

    2016-02-01

    Previously, we have developed collagen type I scaffolds including microparticles of gelatin-collagen type I (SGC) that are able to control the release of a hydroglycolic extract of the Calendula officinalis flower. The main goal of the present work was to carry out the preclinical evaluation of SGC alone or loaded with the C. officinalis extract (SGC-E) in a lagomorph model of full-thickness skin wound. A total of 39 rabbits were distributed in three groups, of 13 animals each. The first group was used to compare wound healing by secondary intention (control) with wound healing observed when wounds were grafted with SGC alone. Comparison of control wounds with wounds grafted with SGC-E was performed in the second group, and comparison of wounds grafted with SGC with wounds grafted with SGC-E was performed in the third group. Clinical follow-ups were carried in all animals after surgery, and histological and histomorphometric analyses were performed on tissues taken from the healed area and healthy surrounding tissue. Histological and histomorphometric results indicate that grafting of SGC alone favors wound healing and brings a better clinical outcome than grafting SGC-E. In vitro collagenase digestion data suggested that the association of the C. officinalis extract to SGC increased the SGC-E cross-linking, making it difficult to degrade and affecting its biocompatibility.

  10. Eleven leaflets for patients and visitors on healthcare associated infections - including accessible formats

    OpenAIRE

    Public Health Agency

    2015-01-01

    The following suite of nine leaflets for patients and visitors to healthcare settings include information on healthcare associated infections, C. difficile, MRSA, norovirus, scabies, ESBL resistant bacteria, multi-drug resistant bacteria and laundry and hand hygiene guidance.

  11. Short Synthetic β-Sheet Antimicrobial Peptides for the Treatment of Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Burn Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guansheng; Cheng, Junchi; Liang, Zhen Chang; Xu, Liang; Lou, Weiyang; Bao, Chang; Ong, Zhan Yuin; Dong, Huihui; Yang, Yi Yan; Fan, Weimin

    2017-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is often implicated in burn wound infections; its inherent drug resistance often renders these infections extremely challenging to treat. This is further compounded by the problem of emerging drug resistance and the dearth of novel antimicrobial drug discovery in recent years. In the perennial search for effective antimicrobial compounds, the authors identify short synthetic β-sheet folding peptides, IRIKIRIK (IK8L), IRIkIrIK (IK8-2D), and irikirik (IK8D) as prime candidates owing to their high potency against Gram-negative bacteria. In this study, the peptides are first assayed against 20 clinically isolated multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains in comparison with the conventional antibiotics imipenem and ceftazidime, and IK8L is demonstrated to be the most effective. IK8L also exhibits superior antibacterial killing kinetics compared to imipenem and ceftazidime. From transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and protein release analyses, IK8L shows membrane-lytic antimicrobial mechanism. Repeated use of IK8L does not induce drug resistance, while the bacteria develop resistance against the antibiotics after several times of treatment at sublethal doses. Analysis of mouse blood serum chemistry reveals that peptide does not induce systemic toxicity. The potential utility of IK8L in the in vivo treatment of P. aeruginosa-infected burn wounds is further demonstrated in a mouse model. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Stijn W.; Boldingh, Quirine J. J.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E. Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI

  13. Therapy of infections in mice irradiated in mixed neutron/photon fields and inflicted with wound trauma: a review of current work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledney, G D; Madonna, G S; Elliott, T B; Moore, M M; Jackson, W E

    1991-10-01

    When host antimicrobial defenses are severely compromised by radiation or trauma in conjunction with radiation, death from sepsis results. To evaluate therapies for sepsis in radiation casualties, we developed models of acquired and induced bacterial infections in irradiated and irradiated-wounded mice. Animals were exposed to either a mixed radiation field of equal proportions of neutrons and gamma rays (n/gamma = 1) from a TRIGA reactor or pure gamma rays from 60[Co sources. Skin wounds (15% of total body surface area) were inflicted under methoxyflurane anesthesia 1 h after irradiation. In all mice, wounding after irradiation decreased resistance to infection. Treatments with the immunomodulator synthetic trehalose dicorynomycolate (S-TDCM) before or after mixed neutron-gamma irradiation or gamma irradiation increased survival. Therapy with S-TDCM for mice irradiated with either a mixed field or gamma rays increased resistance to Klebsiella pneumoniae-induced infections. Combined therapy with S-TDCM and ceftriaxone for K. pneumoniae infections in mice exposed to a mixed radiation field or to gamma rays was more effective than single-agent therapy. In all irradiated-wounded mice, single therapy of acquired infections with an antibiotic or S-TDCM did not increase survival. Survival of irradiated-wounded mice after topical application of gentamicin sulfate cream suggested that bacteria colonizing the wound disseminated systemically in untreated irradiated mice, resulting in death from sepsis. In lethal models of acquired infections in irradiated-wounded mice, significant increases in survival were achieved when systemic treatments with S-TDCM or gentamicin were combined with topical treatments of gentamicin cream. Therapies for sepsis in all mice exposed to a mixed field were less effective than in mice exposed to gamma rays. Nonetheless, the data show a principle by which successful therapy may be provided to individuals receiving tissue trauma in conjunction with

  14. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    resistant bacteria and fungi was completed. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC50 and MIC90) for CDH -FA against a collection of over 600...efficacy of topical application of CDH -FA on small animal models of wound infection with a wide variety of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Approach...Establish minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC50 and MIC90) for CDH -FA against large collections of clinical isolates representing wound-associated

  15. Vacuum-assisted closure for open perineal wound after abdominoperineal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Shiki; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; Ohue, Masayuki; Noura, Shingo; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki; Yano, Masahiko; Higashiyama, Masahiko; Sakon, Masato

    2015-01-01

    In colorectal cancer surgery, surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication, and especially, perineal wound complications after abdominoperineal resection (APR) remain to be serious clinical problems. Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy was first reported in another surgical field in 1997, and it is useful for treating complex wounds because it promotes granulation. VAC therapy has been recently used for open abdominal wounds. We introduced VAC for treating open perineal wound of APR and report the usefulness of it. We treated four patients. Firstly, in cases 1 and 2, we introduced VAC therapy to the management of SSI of the perineal wound after APR, and it was useful to control postoperative perineal wound infection. And also, in cases 3 and 4, we introduced VAC therapy to prevent perineal wound infection. Perineal wound infection did not happen. A vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been reported to decrease perineal wound complications including pelvic abscess and open perineal wound; however it results in significant operative blood loss, increased operative time, and additional surgical complications. In our cases, there were no complications relating to VAC therapy and it promoted rapid wound healing. Our results suggested that it is an effective treatment for APR in a high-risk case of an open perineal wound. VAC therapy is a less invasive method and a useful treatment for open perineal wound of APR. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. [General principles of wound management in emergency departments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, M T; Högele, A M; Hanschen, M; von Matthey, F; Beer, A-K; Gebhardt, F; Biberthaler, P; Kanz, K-G

    2016-04-01

    Wound management is one of the major tasks in emergency departments. The surrounding intact skin but not the wound itself should be disinfected before starting definitive wound treatment. Hair should first be removed by clipping to 1-2 mm above the skin with scissors or clippers as shaving the area with a razor damages the hair follicles and increases the risk of wound infections. Administration of local anesthetics should be performed directly through the exposed edges of the wound. After wound examination, irrigation is performed with Ringer's solution, normal saline or distilled water. The next step is débridement of contaminated and devitalized tissue. There are several wound closure techniques available, including adhesive tapes, staples, tissue adhesives and numerous forms of sutures. Management of specific wounds requires particular strategies. A bleeding control problem frequently occurs with scalp lacerations. Superficial scalp lacerations can be closed by alternative wound closure methods, for example by twisting and fixing hair and the use of tissue adhesives, i.e. hair apposition technique (HAT). For strongly bleeding lacerations of the scalp, the epicranial aponeurosis should be incorporated into the hemostasis. Aftercare varies depending on both the characteristics of the wound and those of the patient and includes adequate analgesia as well as minimizing the risk of infection. Sufficient wound aftercare starts with the treating physician informing the patient about the course of events, potential complications and providing relevant instructions.

  17. Soft tissue infections from fish spike wounds: normal commensal bacteria are more common than marine pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Hannah; Lee, Kin Mun; Cheng, Paul T-Y; Hulme, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    A fish spike injury can be sustained by anyone handling fish; during fishing, meal preparation or in retail. Case reports of fish spikes inoculating victims with virulent marine-specific pathogens and causing systemic illness led us to question whether empirical treatment of these injuries with amoxicillin and clavulanic acid is adequate. This 2-year prospective observational study was conducted at Middlemore Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand. Wound swabs and tissue samples belonging to patients presenting to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery with an upper limb fish spike injury were sent to the laboratory (n = 60). A series of stains and cultures were performed to look specifically for marine bacteria not typically isolated in other soft tissue injuries. Patient demographic data and injury details were collected. Of the patients with adequate microbiology samples, 12% (6/50) grew clinically relevant bacteria resistant to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. These included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (8%, 4/50), Enterobacter cloacae (2%, 1/50) and an anaerobic sporing bacillus (2%, 1/50). Only one patient grew a true marine-specific bacteria, Photobacterium damselae, which was susceptible to amoxicillin and clavulanic acid. The authors concluded that amoxicillin and clavulanic acid is an adequate first-line antibiotic for fish spike injuries but that flucloxacillin may be more appropriate given most bacteria were from patients' own skin flora. The authors suggest that clinicians consider the presence of resistant marine-specific bacteria in cases where there is sepsis or inadequate response to initial therapy. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. year surveillance of wound infections at a rural tertiary hospital in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Department of Medical Microbiology, College of Health Sciences, Igbinedion University Okada, Edo. State, Nigeria. 2. ... within a 5 year period. Methods: Wound swabs collected from 156 out-patients and 353 in-patients were, cultured and microbial isolates identified ..... being largely farmers. High rate of occupational.

  19. An in vitro model of bacterial infections in wounds and other soft tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werthen, M.; Henriksson, L.; Jensen, P.O.

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence that bacteria play a crucial role in the persistence of chronic wounds. These bacteria are most probably present in polymer-embedded aggregates that represent the biofilm mode of growth. Much work has been carried out to study the development of biofilms in vitro, in par...

  20. Conventional Linear versus Purse-string Skin Closure after Loop Ileostomy Reversal: Comparison of Wound Infection Rates and Operative Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Ryeol; Kim, Young Wan; Sung, Jong Je; Song, Ok-Pyung; Kim, Hyung Chul; Lim, Cheol-Wan; Cho, Gyu-Seok; Jung, Jun Chul; Shin, Eung-Jin

    2011-04-01

    Wound infection after an ileostomy reversal is a common problem. To reduce wound-related complications, purse-string skin closure was introduced as an alternative to conventional linear skin closure. This study is designed to compare wound infection rates and operative outcomes between linear and purse-string skin closure after a loop ileostomy reversal. Between December 2002 and October 2010, a total of 48 consecutive patients undergoing a loop ileostomy reversal were enrolled. Outcomes were compared between linear skin closure (group L, n = 30) and purse string closure (group P, n = 18). The operative technique for linear skin closure consisted of an elliptical incision around the stoma, with mobilization, and anastomosis of the ileum. The rectus fascia was repaired with interrupted sutures. Skin closure was performed with vertical mattress interrupted sutures. Purse-string skin closure consisted of a circumstomal incision around the ileostomy using the same procedures as used for the ileum. Fascial closure was identical to linear closure, but the circumstomal skin incision was approximated using a purse-string subcuticular suture (2-0 Polysorb). Between group L and P, there were no differences of age, gender, body mass index, and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) scores. Original indication for ileostomy was 23 cases of malignancy (76.7%) in group L, and 13 cases of malignancy (77.2%) in group P. The median time duration from ileostomy to reversal was 4.0 months (range, 0.6 to 55.7 months) in group L and 4.1 months (range, 2.2 to 43.9 months) in group P. The median operative time was 103 minutes (range, 45 to 260 minutes) in group L and 100 minutes (range, 30 to 185 minutes) in group P. The median hospital stay was 11 days (range, 5 to 4 days) in group L and 7 days (range, 4 to 14 days) in group P (P string skin closure after a loop ileostomy reversal showed comparable outcomes, in terms of wound infection rates, to those of linear skin closure. Thus

  1. [Antiseptic effect of compound lysostaphin disinfectant and its preventive effect on infection of artificial dermis after graft on full-thickness skin defect wound in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, J; Zhou, H; Cui, Z C; Wang, L; Luo, P F; Ji, S Z; Hu, X Y; Ma, B; Wang, G Y; Zhu, S H; Xia, Z F

    2018-04-20

    Objective: To study the antiseptic effect of compound lysostaphin disinfectant and its preventive effect on infection of artificial dermis after graft on full-thickness skin defect wound in rats. Methods: (1) Each one standard strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus were selected. Each 20 clinical strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus were collected from those isolated from wound exudates of burn patients hospitalized in our wards from January 2014 to December 2016 according to the random number table. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of compound lysostaphin disinfectant to above-mentioned strains were detected. The experiment was repeated 3 times. Compared with the corresponding standard strain, the clinical strain with higher MIC and/or MBC was considered as having decreased sensitivity to the disinfectant. The percentage of strains of each of the three kinds of bacteria with decreased sensitivity was calculated. (2) Artificial dermis pieces were soaked in compound lysostaphin disinfectant for 5 min, 1 h, 2 h, and 4 h, respectively, with 21 pieces at each time point. After standing for 0 (immediately), 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, 72 h (with 3 pieces at each time point), respectively, the diameters of their inhibition zones to standard strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus were measured. The experiment was repeated 3 times. The shortest soaking time corresponding to the longest standing time, after which the disinfectant-soaked artificial dermis could form an effective inhibition zone (with diameter more than 7 mm), was the sufficient soaking time of the disinfectant to the artificial dermis. (3) Forty Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into post injury day (PID) 3, 7, 14, and 21 sampling groups according to the random number table, with 10 rats in each group. A full-thickness skin

  2. [Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Instillation in the Treatment of Critical Wounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathen, M; Petri, M; Krettek, C; Omar, M

    2016-04-01

    In recent decades, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become the gold standard in the treatment of infected wounds. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation (NPWTi) is a new development, that combines conventional NPWT with instillation of fluids. The purpose of this study was to review the results of current literature on the clinical use of NPWTi in acute and chronic wounds. A literature search was performed using Pubmed and the Cochrane Library, including articles in English and German. The data suggest that NPWTi is a promising therapeutic option in the treatment of wounds, and applicable in various fields. NPWTi appears to be a useful adjunct in the treatment of critical wounds. However, data from prospective randomised trials to support the validity of the results are sparse. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Antibacterial efficacy of silver nanoparticles against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates from post-surgical wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasithevar, Muthupandi; Periakaruppan, Prakash; Muthupandian, Saravanan; Mohan, Mahalakshmi

    2017-06-01

    In order to investigate new effective and inexpensive nano-therapeutic approach for P. aeruginosa, staphylococcus aureus and coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS), the present study reports an eco-friendly process for rapid synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using aqueous leaf extract of Corchorus Capsularis (CRCP). Formation of stable Ag-NPs at different time intervals gives mostly spherical particles with diameters ranging from 5 to 45 nm. The resulting Ag-NPs were characterized using Ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). XRD study shows that the particles are crystalline in nature with face centered cubic geometry. TEM studies show the formation of Ag-NPs with average size of 20.52 nm. The antimicrobial activity of the synthesized Ag-NPs was investigated against multi drug resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and CoNS isolates from post-surgical wound infections. The present study suggests that Ag-NPs synthesized from aqueous leaf extract of CRCP shows significant antibacterial potential against MDR isolates from post-surgical wound infections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Potential of combination therapy of endolysin MR-10 and minocycline in treating MRSA induced systemic and localized burn wound infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shivani; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    MRSA is the predominant pathogen responsible for fatal burn wound infection in patients. Antibiotic resistance and its ability to form biofilms on the surface of burn wounds limit the use of antibiotics to contain this pathogen. The results of present study have shown that single dose of combination therapy of endolysin MR-10 (50μg/s.c) and minocycline (50mg/kg/orally) resulted in 100% survival of group of mice with systemic MRSA infection. Maximum reduction in bacterial load in various organs was observed in the group that received combination therapy. In comparison to control, a significant reduction (pendolysin MR-10 and minocycline is a better option in controlling burn wound infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. The Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system correlates with cost of care for diabetic foot ulcers treated in a multidisciplinary setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Canner, Joseph K; Karagozlu, Hikmet; Mathioudakis, Nestoras; Sherman, Ronald L; Black, James H; Abularrage, Christopher J

    2017-12-13

    We have previously demonstrated that the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification correlates with wound healing time in patients with diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) treated in a multidisciplinary setting. Our aim was to assess whether the charges and costs associated with DFU care increase with higher WIfI stages. All patients presenting to our multidisciplinary diabetic limb preservation service from June 2012 to June 2016 were enrolled in a prospective database. Inpatient and outpatient charges, costs, and total revenue from initial visit until complete wound healing were compared for wounds stratified by WIfI classification. A total of 319 wound episodes in 248 patients were captured, including 31% WIfI stage 1, 16% stage 2, 30% stage 3, and 24% stage 4 wounds. Limb salvage at 1 year was 95% ± 2%, and wound healing was achieved in 85% ± 2%. The mean number of overall inpatient admissions (stage 1, 2.07 ± 0.48 vs stage 4, 3.40 ± 0.27; P WIfI stage. There were no significant differences in mean number of inpatient podiatric interventions or outpatient procedures between groups (P ≥ .10). The total cost of care per wound episode increased progressively from stage 1 ($3995 ± $1047) to stage 4 ($50,546 ± $4887) wounds (P WIfI stage (stage 1, $4182 ± $1185 vs stage 4, $55,790 ± $5540; P WIfI stage is associated with a prolonged wound healing time, a higher number of surgical procedures, and an increased cost of care. While limb salvage outcomes are excellent, the overall cost of DFU care from presentation to healing is substantial, especially for patients with advanced (WIfI stage 3/4) disease treated in a multidisciplinary setting. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-antibiotic resistant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing bacteria pose a challenge to the effective treatment of wound and skin infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oli, Angus Nnamdi; Eze, Dennis Emeka; Gugu, Thaddeus Harrison; Ezeobi, Ifeanyi; Maduagwu, Ukamaka Nwakaku; Ihekwereme, Chibueze Peter

    2017-01-01

    The increasing incidence of antibiotic resistant bacteria is a concern both to the clinicians and the patients due to obvious consequences such as treatment failures, prolonged patients' stay in hospital and nosocomial infections. The choice of the first antibiotic therapy in emergency wards in hospitals is usually not based on patient-specific microbial culture and susceptibility test result.This study is aimed at profiling extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria associated with wound injuries and highlighting their multi-antibiotic resistance character. Sixty-three wound swab samples were collected and cultured on nutrient agar and on selective media. Evaluation for ESBL production was by phenotypic method while the antibiogram screening was by disc-diffusion. The wounds evaluated were diabetic sore (14), cancer wounds (12), surgical wounds (17), wounds due to road traffic accidents (10) and wounds from fire burn (10). The result showed that 61 wounds were infected and the prevalence of the infecting pathogens was Escherichia coli 17.46%, Klebsiella Pneumonia 14.28%, Salmonella typhi 12.79%, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa 34.92% and Staphylococcus aureus 17.46%. Thirty four (55.74 %) isolates were ESBL producers, greater than 50% of which being Pseudomonas Aeruginosa . The antibiogram study of the ESBL producers showed multi-drug resistance with resistance highest against ampicillin (100%), followed by cephalosporins: cefuroxime (94.12%) and ceftriaxone (61.76%). No resistance was recorded against the β-lactamase inhibitors: amoxicillin/clavulanate and ceftriaxone/sulbactam. There was a high incidence (55.74 %) of ESBL-producing microbes in the wounds. The isolates were mostly multi-antibiotic resistant. Multi-drug resistant ESBL-producing bacteria are common in wound infections in the community. However, amoxicillin/clavulanate or ceftriaxone/sulbactam may be used to treat most patients with such infections in the hospital. This may guide antibiotic

  7. Gingival Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, M.; Martínez, C.; Oyarzún, A.; Martínez, J.

    2015-01-01

    Gingival wound healing comprises a series of sequential responses that allow the closure of breaches in the masticatory mucosa. This process is of critical importance to prevent the invasion of microbes or other agents into tissues, avoiding the establishment of a chronic infection. Wound healing may also play an important role during cell and tissue reaction to long-term injury, as it may occur during inflammatory responses and cancer. Recent experimental data have shown that gingival wound healing is severely affected by the aging process. These defects may alter distinct phases of the wound-healing process, including epithelial migration, granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. The cellular and molecular defects that may explain these deficiencies include several biological responses such as an increased inflammatory response, altered integrin signaling, reduced growth factor activity, decreased cell proliferation, diminished angiogenesis, reduced collagen synthesis, augmented collagen remodeling, and deterioration of the proliferative and differentiation potential of stem cells. In this review, we explore the cellular and molecular basis of these defects and their possible clinical implications. PMID:25527254

  8. Clinical outcome and microvascular blood flow in VAC® - and Sorbalgon® -treated peri-vascular infected wounds in the groin after vascular surgery - an early interim analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Stefan; Monsen, Christina; Dencker, Magnus

    2013-08-01

    Vacuum-assisted wound closure (VAC(®)) therapy is considered to be superior to conventional dressings in the treatment of peri-vascular groin infections after vascular surgery at our department. Therefore, we performed an early interim analysis of the clinical outcomes in these seriously ill patients at risk of amputation and death. Patients were randomised to either VAC(®) (n = 5) or Sorbalgon(®) (n = 5; best alternative treatment) therapy after surgical debridement. Non-invasive, laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI) studies of the skin adjacent to the undressed wound were performed after 14 days of wound treatment. There was no difference in LDPI values in VAC(®) versus Sorbalgon(®) treated patients (P = 0·46). One patient in the VAC(®) group suffered from two re-bleeding episodes, leading to vascular resection and transfemoral amputation and in the Sorbalgon(®) group two had a complete wound healing time of more than 4 months and one had a visible interposition bypass graft in the groin after 1 month of treatment. No patient died of the groin infection. Although not statistically proven, fewer wound treatment failures were recorded in the VAC(®) group, justifying this early interim analysis. LDPI studies were feasible. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  9. Frequency of isolation and antibiotic resistance patterns of bacterial isolates from wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović-Radić, Z.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Six hundred and thirteen bacterial strains were isolated from wound swabs and the isolates were identified on the basis of growth on differential and selective media. In order to test the sensitivity of isolated strains to different antibiotics, the disc diffusion method, according to EUCAST protocol v 5.0 was used. The most common species isolated from wound swabs was Staphylococcus epidermidis (18.4%, followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis (16.8%, 12.7% and 10.4%, respectively. The maximum resistance of Gram-positive cocci was observed to penicillin and the lowest to linezolid. Gram-negative bacteria showed the highest resistance to tetracyclines, while the same strains demonstrated the highest sensitivity to polypeptide antibiotics. Comparison of the resistance patterns of Gramnegative and Gram-positive bacterial strains showed significant difference in the tetracycline efficiency.

  10. Noncontact, Low Frequency Ultrasound as an Effective Therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected Biofilm Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, and 2. Microbiology Branch, US Army Dental and Trauma Research Detachment...Ultrasonics, Inc., Farmingdale, NY) for 2 minutes at 6–8 W to disrupt any biofilm present. The resulting solutions were serially diluted and plated on... extraction and Q-RT-PCR Wounds were harvested for mRNA extraction and subsequent cDNA conversion as part of Q-RT-PCR. The dermal layer on the dorsal side of

  11. Characterization and Expression of Drug Resistance Genes in MDROs Originating from Combat Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    C. jeikeium although the induction in this case is not specific to the presence of ethanol in the medium , unless it was produced by the co- culture ...adult (HDFa) (C-013-5C, Gibco). HDFa Culture Growth Primary HDFa were expanded in 4 x 25 cm2 flasks in Medium 106 (M-106-500, Gibco) supplemented...and virulence mechanism contributing to their success as pathogens in the wound environment . A novel bioinformatics pipeline was used to incorporate

  12. Human wound infections caused by Neisseria animaloris and Neisseria zoodegmatis, former CDC Group EF-4a and EF-4b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Heydecke

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background : Neisseria animaloris and Neisseria zoodegmatis, former CDC Group EF-4a and -4b, are considered to be rare zoonotic pathogens, usually associated with dog or cat bites. The aim of the study was to phenotypicaly characterize 13 EF-4 isolates from wound infections, determine their antibiotic susceptibility and to follow the clinical outcome of the patients. Methods : 13 of the EF-4 isolates were cultured on agar plates. Conventional biochemical tests and the Biolog system were used for phenotypical identification. An arbitrary primed polymerase chain reaction (AP-PCR was carried out to determine the genetic profiles. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values were determined for different antibiotics were determined. According to this, clinical data for the patients were recorded. Results : 11 isolates were identified as N. animaloris and 2 as N. zoodegmatis due to the production of arginine dihydrolase. A majority of the patients had a history of dog bite. In 6 cases only grewth of N. animaloris or zoodegmatis was registered. When a patient received antibiotic treatment the most common drug of choice was penicillin V. Only 3 patients received treatment for which the isolated EF-4 bacterium was fully susceptible. Conclusion : Human infections involving N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis usually present themselves as local wound infection, but severe complications can occur. Despite their pathogenic potentia, l N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis are often misidentified, dismissed as skin contaminants or not recognized at all. Due to the fact that N. animaloris and N. zoodegmatis are significant pathogens in animal bites, physicians should keep these bacteria in mind when choosing antibiotic therapy.

  13. Repair of Staphylococcus aureus-infected wound with gene-modified C3H10T1/2 cells expressing BPI-BD3 fusion antibiotic peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-ran ZHANG

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To study the antibacterial and tissue reparative effect of BPI-BD3 gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells in a mouse model of wound infection. Methods C3H10T1/2 cells were transfected with recombinant adenovirus vector pAdxsi-BPI-BD3, the expression of BPI-BD3 fusion protein was verified by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Excision wound with a diameter of 1cm was inoculated with Staphylococcus aureuswas made on the back of 30 mice. The mice were randomly divided into 3 groups (10 each. Mice in group T were injected with BPI-BD3 gene-modified C3H10T1/2 cells through caudal vein, those in group C were injected with unmodified C3H10T1/2 cells, and in group N were injected with PBS as control. The wound repair result was evaluated by estimation of the percentage of remaining wound area and the amount of wound bacteria under the scar, followed by observation of pathological changes. Inflammatory reactions of the wounds were assessed accordingly. Results The amount of bacteria under the scar was less in group T than in the other two groups (P<0.05. It was also found that the wound healing process was faster in group T than in group C and group N. Pathological observation showed that the inflammatory reaction in group T was also significantly milder than in the other two groups. Conclusion BPI-BD3 gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells may enhance wound repair by controlling infection and promoting tissue regeneration, thus it may be promising in clinical application. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.09.07

  14. Comparison between primary closure with karydakis's technique versus open procedure in treatment of pilonidal sinus in terms of frequency of postoperative wound infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nafees, A.U.A.; Ahmed, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare between primary closure with Karydakis's technique versus open procedure in treatment of pilonidal sinus in terms of frequency of postoperative wound infection. Study Design: Randomized Clinical Trials (RCT). Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out at Department of Surgery, CMH, Kharian over a period of 2 years from Sept 2010 to Oct 2012. Patients and Methods: Sixty patients were selected out of which 30 patients underwent open excision and secondary healing and 30 patients underwent Karydakis procedure. Post operatively these patients were observed for wound infection on date of discharge and weeks 1, 2 and 3. Results of both groups were compared for wound infection by applying chi-square test. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of infection between the two groups when calculated during the complete course of study. Conclusion: Primary closure with Karydakis's technique and open procedure are satisfactory surgical procedures for pilonidal sinus disease in terms of post-operative wound infection. (author)

  15. The use of purse-string skin closure in loop ileostomy reversals leads to lower wound infection rates--a single high-volume centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habbe, Nils; Hannes, Sabine; Liese, Juliane; Woeste, Guido; Bechstein, Wolf Otto; Strey, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Wound infections affect not only the individual patient but lead to an increase in medical costs. After ileostomy reversal, surgical site infections are a common problem. The objective of the study was to compare the infection rates of purse-string and conventional skin closure techniques in a high volume setting. Patients undergoing ileostomy reversal at the Goethe University Hospital between January 2009 and August 2012 were retrospectively analysed regarding surgical site infections and associated risk factors. Patients received either conventional skin closure (running, interrupted or stapled suturing; group C) or subcuticular purse-string suture (group PS). In total, 114 patients have been analysed. Conventional wound closure was performed in 81 patients and 33 patients received purse-string skin closure. The groups did not differ regarding age, gender, indication for ileostomy, previous chemotherapy, and operation time. Median hospital stay was 7 days (3-34) in group PS and 8 (3-53) in group C (p = 0.15). Wound infections only occurred in groups C (n = 10, 12 %) compared to group PS (n = 0; 0 %; p = 0.034), and the wound closure technique was the only significant factor associated with surgical site infection. Surgery performed by a resident under supervision was not a risk factor for complications compared to the procedure done by a senior surgeon (p = 0.73). This study reveals an advantage of the purse-string skin closure technique in ileostomy reversals analysing a large cohort of patients. Therefore, we recommend the use of the purse-string skin closure in ileostomy reversals as one way to lower wound infection rates.

  16. Wound healing and infection in surgery. The clinical impact of smoking and smoking cessation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-04-01

    To clarify the evidence on smoking and postoperative healing complications across surgical specialties and to determine the impact of perioperative smoking cessation intervention. Cohort studies and randomized controlled trials. Selected studies were identified through electronic databases (CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE) and by hand searching. Multiple data on study characteristics were extracted. Risk of bias was assessed by means of the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale and Jadad score. Healing outcome was classified as necrosis, healing delay and dehiscence, surgical site infection, wound complications, hernia, and lack of fistula or bone healing. Mantel-Haenszel and inverse variance methods for meta-analysis (fixed- and random-effects models) were used. Smokers and nonsmokers were compared in 140 cohort studies including 479,150 patients. The pooled adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) were 3.60 (2.62-4.93) for necrosis, 2.07 (1.53-2.81) for healing delay and dehiscence, 1.79 (1.57-2.04) for surgical site infection, 2.27 (1.82-2.84) for wound complications, 2.07 (1.23-3.47) for hernia, and 2.44 (1.66-3.58) for lack of fistula or bone healing. Former smokers and patients who never smoked were compared in 24 studies including 47,764 patients, and former smokers and current smokers were compared in 20 studies including 40,629 patients. The pooled unadjusted odds ratios were 1.30 (1.07-1.59) and 0.69 (0.56-0.85), respectively, for healing complications combined. In 4 randomized controlled trials, smoking cessation intervention reduced surgical site infections (odds ratio, 0.43 [95% CI, 0.21-0.85]), but not other healing complications (0.51 [0.22-1.19]). Postoperative healing complications occur significantly more often in smokers compared with nonsmokers and in former smokers compared with those who never smoked. Perioperative smoking cessation intervention reduces surgical site infections, but not other healing complications.

  17. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system following infrapopliteal endovascular interventions for critical limb ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Jeremy D; McCallum, John C; Soden, Peter A; Meng, Yifan; Wyers, Mark C; Hamdan, Allen D; Verhagen, Hence J; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2016-09-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee has composed a new threatened lower extremity classification system that reflects the three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI). Our goal was to evaluate the predictive ability of this scale following any infrapopliteal endovascular intervention for critical limb ischemia (CLI). From 2004 to 2014, a single institution, retrospective chart review was performed at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center for all patients undergoing an infrapopliteal angioplasty for CLI. Throughout these years, 673 limbs underwent an infrapopliteal endovascular intervention for tissue loss (77%), rest pain (13%), stenosis of a previously treated vessel (5%), acute limb ischemia (3%), or claudication (2%). Limbs missing a grade in any WIfI component were excluded. Limbs were stratified into clinical stages 1 to 4 based on the SVS WIfI classification for 1-year amputation risk, as well as a novel WIfI composite score from 0 to 9. Outcomes included patient functional capacity, living status, wound healing, major amputation, major adverse limb events, reintervention, major amputation, or stenosis (RAS) events (> ×3.5 step-up by duplex), amputation-free survival, and mortality. Predictors were identified using Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and Cox regression models. Of the 596 limbs with CLI, 551 were classified in all three WIfI domains on a scale of 0 (least severe) to 3 (most severe). Of these 551, 84% were treated for tissue loss and 16% for rest pain. A Cox regression model illustrated that an increase in clinical stage increases the rate of major amputation (hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.1-2.3). Separate regression models showed that a one-unit increase in the WIfI composite score is associated with a decrease in wound healing (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.4) and an increase in the rate of RAS events (HR, 1

  18. Candida-induced prosthetic joint infection. A literature review including 72 cases and a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Fernando; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier; López, Enrique M; Jiménez, Gemma; Sampedro, Antonio; Aliaga-Martínez, Luis; Navarro-Marí, José María

    2017-02-01

    The clinical and microbiological characteristics of prosthetic joint infection (PJI) caused by Candida species is described, including 72 cases in the literature and a case of Candida glabrata infection handled at the present centre. We describe one patient and using the key words 'fungal prosthetic joint infection' and 'candida prosthetic joint infection' we searched MEDLINE (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD), Web of Science, CINAHL and Cochrane systematic review databases for case reports of this condition. Out of the 73 patients, 38 were female; mean age at diagnosis was 65.7 (± SD 18) yrs; 50 had risk factors for candidal infection such as systemic disease (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus) and/or immunosuppressive therapy in 18 (24.6%) cases, diabetes mellitus in 14 (19.1%), immunosuppression due to malignant or chronic disease in 24 (32.8%) and long-term antibiotic use in four (5.4%) patients. Infection site was the knee in 36 patients and hip in 35; pain was present in 43 patients and swelling in 23 and the mean surgery-diagnosis interval was 32 months. The most frequent species was C. albicans, followed by C. parapsilosis. The diagnosis was obtained from joint fluid aspirate in 33 cases and intra-operative samples in 16. Susceptibility to antifungals was tested in only 21 isolates. The most frequently used antifungals were fluconazole and amphotericin B. Two-stage exchange arthroplasty was performed in 30 patients and resection arthroplasty in 31; 56 patients were cured with a combination of medical and surgical treatment; one patient died from the infection. PJI caused by Candida requires a high index of suspicion; surgery with long-term antifungal therapy is recommended.

  19. Efficacy of topical and systemic antibiotic treatment of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a murine superficial skin wound infection model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vingsbo Lundberg, Carina; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2013-01-01

    in an experimental skin wound infection model in mice. Mice were treated either topically with retapamulin (1%), fusidic acid (2%) or mupirocin (2%) or systemically with linezolid (50-100 mg/kg/day) or vancomycin (50-200 mg/kg/day) twice daily for 3 days or 6 days and the total bacterial loads in the skin lesions...

  20. The role of antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention of wound infection after Lichtenstein open mesh repair of primary inguinal hernia : a multicenter double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aufenacker, Theo J; van Geldere, Dirk; van Mesdag, Taco; Bossers, Astrid N; Dekker, Benno; Scheijde, Edo; van Nieuwenhuizen, Roos; Hiemstra, Esther; Maduro, John H; Juttmann, Jan-Willem; Hofstede, Diederik; van Der Linden, Cunera T M; Gouma, Dirk J; Simons, Maarten P

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the use of prophylactic antibiotics is effective in the prevention of postoperative wound infection after Lichtenstein open mesh inguinal hernia repair. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: A recent Cochrane meta-analysis (2003) concluded that "antibiotic prophylaxis for elective

  1. The role of antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention of wound infection after lichtenstein open mesh repair of primary inguinal hernia - A multicenter double-blind randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aufenacker, Theo J.; van Geldere, Dirk; van Mesdag, Taco; Bossers, Astrid N.; Dekker, Benno; Scheijde, Edo; van Nieuwenhuizen, Roos; Hiemstra, Esther; Maduro, John H.; Juttmann, Jan-Willem; Hofstede, Diederik; van der Linden, Cunera T. M.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Simons, Maarten P.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the use of prophylactic antibiotics is effective in the prevention of postoperative wound infection after Lichtenstein open mesh inguinal hernia repair. Summary Background Data: A recent Cochrane meta-analysis (2003) concluded that "antibiotic prophylaxis for elective

  2. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the effectiveness of antibiotic prophylaxis in prevention of wound infection after mesh repair of abdominal wall hernia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aufenacker, T. J.; Koelemay, M. J. W.; Gouma, D. J.; Simons, M. P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to determine whether systemic antibiotic prophylaxis prevented wound infection after repair of abdominal wall hernia with mesh. METHODS: This was a systematic review of the available literature identified from multiple databases using the terms 'hernia' and 'antibiotic

  3. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system after first-time lower extremity revascularizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darling (Jeremy); J.C. McCallum (John C.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); Guzman, R.J. (Raul J.); Wyers, M.C. (Mark C.); Hamdan, A.D. (Allen D.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objective:__ The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system was proposed to predict 1-year amputation risk and potential benefit from revascularization. Our goal was to evaluate the predictive ability of this scale in a

  4. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system following infrapopliteal endovascular interventions for critical limb ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Darling (Jeremy); J.C. McCallum (John C.); P.A. Soden (Peter A.); Meng, Y. (Yifan); Wyers, M.C. (Mark C.); Hamdan, A.D. (Allen D.); H.J.M. Verhagen (Hence); M.L. Schermerhorn (Marc)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee has composed a new threatened lower extremity classification system that reflects the three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI).

  5. Daptomycin as a possible new treatment option for surgical management of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmert Alexander

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We present a case of a 77-year old female who had undergone a coronary artery bypass grafting with an aortic valve replacement and developed three month later a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA sternal wound infection which was successful treated with Daptomycin combined with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC.

  6. ROLE OF VACUUM ASSISTED CLOSURE (VAC - IN WOUND HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lokanadha Rao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Large, complicated wounds pose a significant surgical problem. Negative pressure wound therapy is one of several methods enabling to obtain better treatment results in case of open infected wounds.1,2 The use of negative pressure therapy enables to obtain a reduction in the number of bacteria which significantly reduces the number of complications.3,4,5 AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To review the Role of VAC in wound healing in Orthopaedics. MATERIALS AND METHODS The cases presented in this study are those who were admitted in King George Hospital in the time period from January 2014 to August 2015. This is a prospective interventional study. In this study, 15 patients were assigned to the study group (Negative Pressure Wound Therapy- NPWT based on their willingness for undergoing treatment. OBSERVATIONS AND RESULTS 12 males and 3 females are involved in the study. There is decrease in the mean wound area from 64 cm2 to 38 cm2 . There is decrease in the duration of hospital stay. Finally, wound is closed by SSG or secondary suturing. DISCUSSION NPWT is known to reduce bacterial counts, although they remain colonised with organisms. Wounds covered with NPW dressing are completely isolated from the environment, thereby reduces cross infection. In our series, we had 73.3% (11 cases excellent results and 26.7% (4 cases good results and no poor results. As interpretation with results, VAC therapy is effective mode of adjuvant therapy for the management of infected wounds. CONCLUSION VAC has been proven to be a reliable method of treating a variety of infected wounds. It greatly increases the rate of granulation tissue formation and lowers bacterial counts to accelerate wound healing. It can be used as a temporary dressing to prepare wounds optimally prior to closure or as a definitive treatment for nonsurgical and surgical wounds. VAC is now being used in a multitude of clinical settings, including the treatment of surgical wounds, infected wounds

  7. Symbiosis theory-directed green synthesis of silver nanoparticles and their application in infected wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen L

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lu Wen,1 Pei Zeng,1 Liping Zhang,1 Wenli Huang,1 Hui Wang,2 Gang Chen1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, 2School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: In this study, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs were synthesized for the first time using an antibacterial endophytic fungus of Chinese medicinal herb Orchidantha chinensis, which has anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities. The AgNPs were analyzed by various characterization techniques to reveal their morphology, chemical composition, and stability. Also, the relationship between Chinese medicinal herbs, endophytic fungi, and the property of AgNPs was investigated for the first time. Interestingly, an experiment performed in this study revealed the proteins produced by the endophytic fungus to be capped on the nanoparticles, which led to an increase in the stability of spherical and polydispersed AgNPs with low aggregation for over 6 months. More importantly, further study demonstrated that the AgNPs possessed superior antibacterial activity and effectively promoted wound healing. Altogether, the biosynthesis of active AgNPs using the endophytic fungus from Chinese medicinal herb based on the symbiosis theory is simple, eco-friendly, and promising. Keywords: silver nanoparticles, Orchidantha chinensis, endophytic fungi, symbiosis theory, wound healing

  8. Anatomic study of the vascular perfusion of the sternum and its clinical relevance in deep sternal wound infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spindler, Nick

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Deep sternal wound infections (DSWI are a rare but devastating complication after median sternotomy. Minor perfusion in bone and soft tissue, especially after recruiting the internal mammary artery for bypass supports the development of wound infection and nonunion of the sternal bone. The aim of the study was the macroscopic and radiological presentation of the vascular system supplying the sternum, in particular the compensating blood supply routes in the event that the internal mammary artery is no longer available after use as a bypass vessel.Method: This anatomic study was carried out on the anterior chest wall of 7 specimens. The thorax plates of 7 specimens were analyzed macroscopically after microsurgical preparation. Different anatomic preparations were produced using different contrast or form-giving substances. Radiological analysis and three-dimensional reconstructions were performed to show alternative, collateral sternal vessel perfusion under estimation of the loss of the internal thoracic artery due to a bypass.Results: The length of the ITA (internal thoracic artery, measured from the beginning of the first rib to the division into the superior epigastric artery and musculophrenic artery, was an average of 16.3 cm. On average, 18.5 branches were delivered from each artery, 10 medially to the sternum supply, and the intercostal muscle. Conclusion: Our analysis gives an overview of the macroanatomic vessel system supplying the sternal bone, describing especially a common trunk deriving from the ITA and supplying multiple branches and playing an important role in building a collateral circulation of the sternum.For better evaluation, in vivo CT analysis with contrast media should be performed in patients prior to the operation and directly after the use of the double ITA to demonstrate the change in perfusion of the sternum.In the future, preconditioning of the sternum by coiling the deriving branches could become an

  9. Burn wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers weight loss in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Burkhard, Olaf; Fan, Ming H; Jacobsen, Frank; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Su, Grace; Daigeler, Adrien; Steinau, Hans U; Remick, Daniel; Wang, Stewart C

    2005-09-17

    Despite dramatic improvements in the management of burns, infection still remains a serious risk for the burn patient. The aim of this study was to shed light on the impact of acute burn injury with or without infection on cytokine profiles. Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 21) were randomized into three groups: 1) burn only 2) burn and infection or 3) sham burn. Weight was monitored and blood was collected for cytokine ELISA, LPS quantification, and peripheral blood analysis. Animals were sacrificed either after 6 or 12 days. Infected animals showed substantial weight loss until day 6 post-burn as compared to burn alone. Endotoxin and TNF-alpha levels were elevated early in the infected burn group within 48 hours post-burn. In contrast, significant up-regulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 occurred later in the clinical course and was associated with the recovery from weight loss. Our results suggest that in the presence of infection, you get a SIRS response possibly due to transient endotoxemia that is only seen in the infection group. In contrast, both burn and infection get a late IL-10 (CARS) response, which is then associated with a return to normal weight in the infection group.

  10. Burn wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers weight loss in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Grace

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite dramatic improvements in the management of burns, infection still remains a serious risk for the burn patient. The aim of this study was to shed light on the impact of acute burn injury with or without infection on cytokine profiles. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 21 were randomized into three groups: 1 burn only 2 burn and infection or 3 sham burn. Weight was monitored and blood was collected for cytokine ELISA, LPS quantification, and peripheral blood analysis. Animals were sacrificed either after 6 or 12 days. Results Infected animals showed substantial weight loss until day 6 post-burn as compared to burn alone. Endotoxin and TNF-α levels were elevated early in the infected burn group within 48 hours post-burn. In contrast, significant up-regulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 occurred later in the clinical course and was associated with the recovery from weight loss. Conclusion Our results suggest that in the presence of infection, you get a SIRS response possibly due to transient endotoxemia that is only seen in the infection group. In contrast, both burn and infection get a late IL-10 (CARS response, which is then associated with a return to normal weight in the infection group.

  11. Fluorescence Technology for Point of Care Wound Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Ersilia L; Falola, Reuben A; Kim, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    As the prevalence of chronic wounds continues to rise, the need for point of care wound assessment has also increased. While a variety of technologies have been developed to improve diagnostic abilities and monitoring of wounds, none have proven completely effective in all settings. Further, many of the stalwart wound management techniques remain costly, time consuming, and technically challenging. The two key pivotal events of ischemia and infection can lead to limb loss. A relatively new crop of fluorescence-based technologies, including devices that measure pathogenic auto-fluorescence, fluorescence angiography, or map cutaneous oxygenation, are increasingly being utilized for adjunct wound assessment-both clinical and operative settings can address these events. These technologies offer rapid, efficient, visual, and quantitative data that can aid the wound provider in evaluating the viability of tissues, ensuring adequate perfusion, and optimizing wound bed preparation. In the following review, pathogenic auto-fluorescence is compared to gross evaluation of wound infection and culture based diagnostics, indocyanine green fluorescence angiography is compared to various methods of visual and physical assessments of tissue perfusion by the practitioner, and cutaneous oxygenation is compared to clinical signs of ischemia. We focus on the current applications of fluorescence technologies in wound management, with emphasis placed on the evidence for clinical and operative implementation, a safety analyses, procedural limitations, and the future direction of this growing field of wound assessment.

  12. Wound Assessment: Made Easy

    OpenAIRE

    Ousey, Karen; Cook, Leanne

    2012-01-01

    A structured approach to wound assessment is required to maintain a good standard of care. This involves a thorough patient assessment, which should be carried out by skilled and competent practitioners, adhering to local and national guidelines (Harding et al, 2008). Inappropriate or inaccurate assessment can lead to delayed wound healing, pain, increased risk of infection, inappropriate use of wound dressings and a reduction in the quality of life for patients.

  13. Intervention for Postpartum Infections Following Caesarean Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  14. Telemedicine for wound management

    OpenAIRE

    Chittoria, Ravi K.

    2012-01-01

    The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a ...

  15. Effectiveness and safety of cefovecin sodium, an extended-spectrum injectable cephalosporin, in the treatment of cats with abscesses and infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, Robert; Cleaver, Dawn M; Lindeman, Cindy J; Cherni, Judith; Chesebrough, Robert; Papp, Georg; Skogerboe, Terry L; Weigel, Dan J; Boucher, Joseph F; Stegemann, Michael R

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of cefovecin sodium in the treatment of cats with naturally occurring skin infections (abscesses and infected wounds). Multicenter (26 sites), randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial. Client-owned cats of any breed with naturally occurring skin infections with associated clinical signs and confirmatory bacteriologic culture results. Cats with clinical signs of skin and soft tissue infection were randomly allocated to receive a single dose of cefovecin (8 mg/kg [3.6 mg/lb], SC) followed by placebo drops administered orally once daily for 14 days or 1 SC placebo injection followed by cefadroxil (22 mg/kg [10 mg/lb], PO, once daily for 14 days). Only one 14-day treatment course was permitted. Effectiveness of cefovecin in the treatment of cats with abscesses and infected wounds was similar to that of cefadroxil. At the final assessment on day 28, 97% (86/89) of cefovecin-treated cats and 91% (80/88) of cefadroxil-treated cats were considered treatment successes. There were no serious adverse events or deaths related to treatment. 1 SC injection of 8 mg of cefovecin/kg for the treatment of cats with naturally occurring skin infections (wounds and abscesses) was safe and as effective as cefadroxil administered orally at 22 mg/kg, once daily for 14 days.

  16. A bioactive molecule in a complex wound healing process: platelet-derived growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltalioglu, Kaan; Coskun-Cevher, Sule

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing is considered to be particularly important after surgical procedures, and the most important wounds related to surgical procedures are incisional, excisional, and punch wounds. Research is ongoing to identify methods to heal non-closed wounds or to accelerate wound healing; however, wound healing is a complex process that includes many biological and physiological events, and it is affected by various local and systemic factors, including diabetes mellitus, infection, ischemia, and aging. Different cell types (such as platelets, macrophages, and neutrophils) release growth factors during the healing process, and platelet-derived growth factor is a particularly important mediator in most stages of wound healing. This review explores the relationship between platelet-derived growth factor and wound healing. © 2014 The International Society of Dermatology.

  17. TiO2 nanocomposite for the controlled release of drugs against pathogens causing wound infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanand Venkatasubbu, G.; Nagamuthu, S.; Anusuya, T.; Kumar, J.; Chelliah, Ramachandran; Rani Ramakrishnan, Sudha; Antony, Usha; Khan, Imran; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2018-02-01

    Chitosan titanium dioxide nanocomposite has been used for wound healing. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles are synthesised and made in to nanocomposite along with chitosan. Curcumin nanoparticles are synthesised. Three different drugs with antimicrobial activity are incorporated into the chitosan/TiO2nanocomposite. Ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin and curcumin nanoparticles are incorporated within the chitosan/TiO2 nanoparticles. The nanoparticles and nanocomposite are characterized with XRD, FTIR, TEM and SEM. Drug loading was found to be around 45% for all the three drug molecules. The drug release profile shows a controlled release of drug molecules from the nanocomposite. Antibacterial studies shows a good inhibition of bacterial species by the nanocomposites.

  18. Comparison of hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of wound infection after clean surgical procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalique, M.S.; Shukr, I.; Khalique, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    To compare hydrocolloid with conventional gauze dressing in prevention of infections after clean surgical procedures. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Surgery, CMH Rawalpindi from 22 Jan 2010 to 22 Aug 2010. Patients and Methods: A total of 400 patients undergoing clean surgical procedures were randomly allocated in two equal groups, A and B by lottery method. In group A. simple gauze dressing was applied after clean surgical procedures while in group B hydrocolloid dressing was used. On 7th post operative day, patients were observed for presence of infection. Results: Mean age of sample was 42.08 +-11.112 years. In group A out of 200 Patients, 14 (7.0%) while in group B 10 (5%) developed infection postoperatively (p=0.709). Conclusion: There is no difference in the rate of infection when using a gauze dressing or a hydrocolloid dressing after clean surgical procedure. (author)

  19. Cutaneous Mucormycosis Complicating a Polymicrobial Wound Infection Following a Dog Bite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, Dalila; Chapin, Kimberly; Binns, Linda; Tashima, Karen

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of cutaneous mucormycosis and Enterobacter infection developing in a 50-year-old diabetic woman following a dog bite that showed delayed development and diagnosis in comparison with typical zygomycotic cutaneous lesions. PMID:22567468

  20. Photons for Therapy: Targeted Photodynamic Therapy for Infected and Contaminated Wounds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hamblin, Michael R; Gad, Faten; Anderson, R. R; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2004-01-01

    .... Although the development of serious infections can often be prevented by antibiotics, the rise in worldwide incidence of multiply antibiotic-resistant bacteria necessitates the discovery of alternative methods...

  1. Risk of wound infection and safety profile of amoxicillin in healthy patients which required third molar surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiordia-Espinoza, M A; Aragon-Martinez, O H; Martínez-Morales, J F; Zapata-Morales, J R

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the risk of surgical wound infection and the adverse effects of amoxicillin in healthy patients who required excision of third molars. We identified eligible reports from searches of PubMed, Medline®, the Cochrane Library, Imbiomed, LILACS, and Google Scholar. Studies that met our minimum requirements were evaluated using inclusion and exclusion criteria and the Oxford Quality Scale. Those with a score of 3 or more on this Scale were included and their data were extracted and analysed. For evaluation of the risk of infection the absolute risk reduction, number needed to treat, and 95% CI were calculated. For evaluation of the risk of an adverse effect the absolute risk increase, number needed to harm, and 95% CI were calculated using the Risk Reduction Calculator. Each meta-analysis was made with the help of the Mantel-Haenszel random effects model, and estimates of risk (OR) and 95% CI were calculated using the Review Manager 5.3, from the Cochrane Library. A significant risk was assumed when the lower limit of the 95% CI was greater than 1. Probabilities of less than 0.05 were accepted as significant. The results showed that there was no reduction in the risk of infection when amoxicillin was given before or after operation compared with an untreated group or placebo. In conclusion, this study suggests that amoxicillin given prophylactically or postoperatively does not reduce the risk of infection in healthy patients having their third molars extracted. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  3. Evaluation of Gallium Citrate Formulations against a Multidrug-Resistant Strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Murine Wound Model of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mitchell G; Truong-Le, Vu; Alamneh, Yonas A; Black, Chad C; Anderl, Jeff; Honnold, Cary L; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Abu-Taleb, Rania; Wise, Matthew C; Hall, Eric R; Wagar, Eric J; Patzer, Eric; Zurawski, Daniel V

    2015-10-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common occurrence in health care facilities with a heightened risk for immunocompromised patients. Klebsiella pneumoniae has been increasingly implicated as the bacterial agent responsible for SSTIs, and treatment can be challenging as more strains become multidrug resistant (MDR). Therefore, new treatments are needed to counter this bacterial pathogen. Gallium complexes exhibit antimicrobial activity and are currently being evaluated as potential treatment for bacterial infections. In this study, we tested a topical formulation containing gallium citrate (GaCi) for the treatment of wounds infected with K. pneumoniae. First, the MIC against K. pneumoniae ranged from 0.125 to 2.0 μg/ml GaCi. After this in vitro efficacy was established, two topical formulations with GaCi (0.1% [wt/vol] and 0.3% [wt/vol]) were tested in a murine wound model of MDR K. pneumoniae infection. Gross pathology and histopathology revealed K. pneumoniae-infected wounds appeared to close faster with GaCi treatment and were accompanied by reduced inflammation compared to those of untreated controls. Similarly, quantitative indications of infection remediation, such as reduced weight loss and wound area, suggested that treatment improved outcomes compared to those of untreated controls. Bacterial burdens were measured 1 and 3 days following inoculation, and a 0.5 to 1.5 log reduction of CFU was observed. Lastly, upon scanning electron microscopy analysis, GaCi treatment appeared to prevent biofilm formation on dressings compared to those of untreated controls. These results suggest that with more preclinical testing, a topical application of GaCi may be a promising alternative treatment strategy for K. pneumoniae SSTI. Copyright © 2015 Thompson et al.

  4. Trends in Surgical Wound Healing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, F.

    2008-01-01

    The understanding of acute and chronic wound pathophysiology has progressed considerably over the past decades. Unfortunately, improvement in clinical practice has not followed suit, although new trends and developments have improved the outcome of wound treatment in many ways. This review focuses...... on promising clinical development in major wound problems in general and on postoperative infections in particular Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  5. The Society for Vascular Surgery lower extremity threatened limb classification system based on Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) correlates with risk of major amputation and time to wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Luke X; Branco, Bernardino C; Armstrong, David G; Mills, Joseph L

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the new Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system correlates with important clinical outcomes for limb salvage and wound healing. A total of 201 consecutive patients with threatened limbs treated from 2010 to 2011 in an academic medical center were analyzed. These patients were stratified into clinical stages 1 to 4 on the basis of the SVS WIfI classification. The SVS objective performance goals of major amputation, 1-year amputation-free survival (AFS) rate, and wound healing time (WHT) according to WIfI clinical stages were compared. The mean age was 58 years (79% male, 93% with diabetes). Forty-two patients required major amputation (21%); 159 (78%) had limb salvage. The amputation group had a significantly higher prevalence of advanced stage 4 patients (P wound and ischemia grades, revascularization resulted in accelerated WHT (P = .008). These data support the underlying concept of the SVS WIfI, that an appropriate classification system correlates with important clinical outcomes for limb salvage and wound healing. As the clinical stage progresses, the risk of major amputation increases, 1-year AFS declines, and WHT is prolonged. We further demonstrated benefit of revascularization to improve WHT in selected patients, especially those in stage 3. Future efforts are warranted to incorporate the SVS WIfI classification into clinical decision-making algorithms in conjunction with a comorbidity index and anatomic classification. Copyright © 2015 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Scintigraphic imaging with technetium-99M-labelled ceftizoxime is a reliable technique for the diagnosis of deep sternal wound infection in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Henrique Nogueira; Diniz, Simone Odilia Fernandes; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento; Tarabal, Bernardo; Takenaka, Isabella; Braga, Otavio; Vidigal, Paula Vieira Teixeira; Gelape, Claudio Leo; Araujo, Ivana Duval, E-mail: phnc@uol.com.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: to evaluate whether scintigraphy with technetium-99m-labeled ceftizoxime ({sup 99m}Tc-CFT) can differentiate mediastinitis from aseptic inflammation associated with sternotomy. Methods: twenty female Wistar rats were randomly distributed into four groups: S (control) -partial upper median sternotomy with no treatment; SW (control) - sternotomy and treatment of sternal wounds with bone wax; SB - sternotomy and infection with Staphylococcus aureus; SWB - sternotomy with bone wax treatment and bacterial infection. Scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-CFT was performed eight days after surgery and images were collected 210 and 360 min after infusion of the radiopharmaceutical. Results: no animals exhibited clinical signs of wound infection at the end of the experiment, although histological data verified acute inflammatory response in those experimentally infected with bacteria. Scintigraphic images revealed that tropism of {sup 99m}Tc-CFT to infected sternums was greater than to their non-infected counterparts. Mean counts of radioactivity in bacteria-infected sternal regions (SB and SWB) were significantly higher (p = 0.0007) than those of the respective controls (S and SW).Conclusion: scintigraphy with technetium-99m-labeled ceftizoxime is a method that can potentially detect infection post sternotomy and differentiate from aseptic inflammation in animals experimentally inoculated with S. aureus (author)

  7. In Vitro Osteoblast Model for Bone Wound Infections and Antimicrobial Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    study. The 3‐D osteoblast cultures would  then be infected with clinical isolates of multidrug resistant  Acinetobacter   baumannii  (AB), Klebsiella...completed successfully to establish the model, and  infections were performed with clinical isolates of multidrug resistant  Acinetobacter   baumannii ...isolates of MDR  Acinetobacter   baumannii , Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae  were obtained from WRAMC. For infections, bacterial cultures

  8. Non-Human Primates Harbor Diverse Mammalian and Avian Astroviruses Including Those Associated with Human Infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik A Karlsson

    Full Text Available Astroviruses (AstVs are positive sense, single-stranded RNA viruses transmitted to a wide range of hosts via the fecal-oral route. The number of AstV-infected animal hosts has rapidly expanded in recent years with many more likely to be discovered because of the advances in viral surveillance and next generation sequencing. Yet no study to date has identified human AstV genotypes in animals, although diverse AstV genotypes similar to animal-origin viruses have been found in children with diarrhea and in one instance of encephalitis. Here we provide important new evidence that non-human primates (NHP can harbor a wide variety of mammalian and avian AstV genotypes, including those only associated with human infection. Serological analyses confirmed that >25% of the NHP tested had antibodies to human AstVs. Further, we identified a recombinant AstV with parental relationships to known human AstVs. Phylogenetic analysis suggests AstVs in NHP are on average evolutionarily much closer to AstVs from other animals than are AstVs from bats, a frequently proposed reservoir. Our studies not only demonstrate that human astroviruses can be detected in NHP but also suggest that NHP are unique in their ability to support diverse AstV genotypes, further challenging the paradigm that astrovirus infection is species-specific.

  9. Best practice in wound assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Maureen

    2016-03-02

    Accurate and considered wound assessment is essential to fulfil professional nursing requirements and ensure appropriate patient and wound management. This article describes the main aspects of holistic assessment of the patient and the wound, including identifying patient risk factors and comorbidities, and factors affecting wound healing to ensure optimal outcomes.

  10. Wound healing and infection in surgery: the pathophysiological impact of smoking, smoking cessation, and nicotine replacement therapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-06-01

    The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved. Smoking is a recognized risk factor for healing complications after surgery, but the pathophysiological mechanisms remain largely unknown. Pathophysiological studies addressing smoking and wound healing were identified through electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE) and by hand-search of articles' bibliography. Of the 1460 citations identified, 325 articles were retained following title and abstract reviews. In total, 177 articles were included and systematically reviewed. Smoking decreases tissue oxygenation and aerobe metabolism temporarily. The inflammatory healing response is attenuated by a reduced inflammatory cell chemotactic responsiveness, migratory function, and oxidative bactericidal mechanisms. In addition, the release of proteolytic enzymes and inhibitors is imbalanced. The proliferative response is impaired by a reduced fibroblast migration and proliferation in addition to a downregulated collagen synthesis and deposition. Smoking cessation restores tissue oxygenation and metabolism rapidly. Inflammatory cell response is reversed in part within 4 weeks, whereas the proliferative response remains impaired. Nicotine does not affect tissue microenvironment, but appears to impair inflammation and stimulate proliferation. Smoking has a transient effect on the tissue microenvironment and a prolonged effect on inflammatory and reparative cell functions leading to delayed healing and complications. Smoking cessation restores the tissue microenvironment rapidly and the inflammatory cellular functions within 4 weeks, but the proliferative response remain impaired. Nicotine and nicotine replacement drugs seem to attenuate inflammation and enhance proliferation but the effect appears to be marginal.

  11. Wound infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa due to a car accident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bibashi, E.; de Hoog, G.S.; Pavlidis, T.E.; Symeonidis, N.; Sakantamis, A.; Walther, G.

    2013-01-01

    A 32-year-old immunocompetent man sustained severe traumas contaminated with organic material due to a car accident. An infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa at the site of contamination was early diagnosed and cured by multiple surgical debridement and daily cleansing with antiseptic solution

  12. Wound infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa due to a car accident

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bibashi, Evangelia; de Hoog, G Sybren; Pavlidis, Theodoros E; Symeonidis, Nikolaos; Sakantamis, Athanasios; Walther, Grit

    2012-01-01

    A 32-year-old immunocompetent man sustained severe traumas contaminated with organic material due to a car accident. An infection caused by Lichtheimia ramosa at the site of contamination was early diagnosed and cured by multiple surgical debridement and daily cleansing with antiseptic solution

  13. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase orthopedic wound infections in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusolabomi J Idowu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Gram-negative bacteria are emerging and impacting significantly on the management of patients and hospital costs. Besides, they are not being routinely sought after in diagnostic laboratories thus contributing to treatment failure. Materials and Methods: Bacterial isolates from wounds of 45 patients were identified using commercial identification kits and antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by the Bauer-Kirby method. Screening and phenotypic confirmation of ESBL production were done as prescribed by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute. The conjugation experiment was performed by the mating assay in broth between the ESBL producers and E. coli ATCC 25922 as the recipient. Results: Out of 102 Gram-negative bacteria isolated, 36 were positive for ESBL mainly of the Enterobacteriaceae family (33 and the rest were oxidase-positive bacilli (3. The predominant bacteria were Klebsiella spp. and E. coli. Others were Serratia rubidae, Citrobacter freundii, Morganella morgannii, Proteus spp., Providencia stuartii, and Enterobacter spp. There was a significant association between treatment with third-generation cephalosporins (3GCs and isolation of ESBLs ( p=0.0020 . The ESBL producers were multiply resistant and moderately sensitive to colistin. The conjugation experiment showed that the ESBL gene was transferred horizontally and tetracycline, cotrimoxazole, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, and aztreonam resistance genes were co-transferred. No mortality was recorded but the mean length of stay in the hospital was 82 days. Conclusion: The development and spread of ESBL among Gram-negative bacteria and possible horizontal transfer calls for concern, especially in view of treatment failure, high treatment cost, and consequent discomfort to patients.

  14. Functional T lymphocytes infiltrate implanted polyvinyl alcohol foams during surgical wound closure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttefangeas, C; Eberle, M; Ruck, P; Stark, M; Müller, J E; Becker, H D; Rammensee, H G; Pinocy, J

    2001-06-01

    Vacuum-assisted closure involving the implantation of polyvinyl alcohol foam is a technique recently developed for the treatment of patients suffering from either wound infection or chronic wounds. This method has been shown to improve and accelerate wound healing. However, little is known about the cell populations that infiltrate the foam, and their potential role in resolving the infection and promoting granulation tissue formation. Our study demonstrates that wound-implanted foams are mainly infiltrated with granulocytes, but that mononuclear cells, including macrophages and minor populations of T, B and natural killer lymphocytes, are also present. We show that foam-infiltrating T cells, especially CD4(+) T cells, constitute a phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous population influenced by wound-infecting bacteria. Thus, T lymphocytes could play a role in wound cleansing. In addition, our data indicate that implanted polyvinyl alcohol foams might be suitable microenvironments for manipulating T cell-mediated immune responses in patients.

  15. Treatment of Early Post-Op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    the healing process. Thus, the overall goals of this study are to investigate the efficacy of oral (per os, (PO)) antibiotic therapy versus...or colonized at the time of injury, during the course of therapy , or both. Infection is always a possibility with any surgical intervention...reached 65.5% of our total enrollment. One hundred and sixty-three patients have completed the study. 15. SUBJECT TERMS PO, IV, Antibiotics , plate

  16. The microbiologic aspects, including diagnosis, of beta-hemolytic streptococcal and enterococcal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufhold, A; Ferrieri, P

    1993-06-01

    Basic principles concerning the collection, transport, and processing of clinical specimens for the detection of Streptococcaceae are given. Identification of beta-hemolytic streptococci (S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, Lancefield group C and G streptococci, S. anginosus) and enterococci is based on the careful observation of colony morphology and hemolytic pattern on sheep blood agar plates; subsequent genus or species confirmation is achieved by rather simple biochemical or enzymatic tests and by detection of streptococcal cell wall carbohydrate antigens (Lancefield grouping). Rapid antigen tests for the detection of group A and B streptococci directly from pharyngeal and vaginal swabs, respectively, are highly specific, thus allowing an immediate antibiotic therapy in patients with a positive test result. The reported sensitivities of these nonculture tests are too low to exclude streptococcal colonization or infection, however. The elucidation of the genetics of some major virulence factors of group A and B streptococci has contributed to knowledge of their association with disease, and molecular techniques have supplemented the traditional (mostly culture and serologic) methods for an improved understanding of the epidemiology and pathogenesis of streptococcal infections. Recently employed examples include the M protein gene typing of group A streptococci by oligonucleotide probes and the use of PCR assays for the detection of the genes encoding for the pyrogenic exotoxins. Restriction enzyme endonuclease digestions of bacterial DNA in association with DNA fragment separation by conventional or PFGE have been applied successfully to several species of Streptococcaceae (e.g., S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae). Enterococci are important pathogens in the hospital setting, exhibiting high morbidity and mortality rates in bacteremic patients with severe underlying disease. Molecular typing methods have clearly confirmed their potential to be nosocomially transmitted. E

  17. Comparison of silver nylon wound dressing and silver sulfadiazine in partial burn wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Fereydoon; Ahmadi, Abdollah; Yavari, Akram; Hosseini, Vahid; Mousavi, Sarah

    2013-10-01

    The study aims to perform a comparative assessment of two types of burn wound treatment. To do the assessment, patients with partial thickness burn wounds with total body surface area nylon wound dressing or silver sulfadiazine cream. Efficacy of treatment, use of analgesics, number of wound dressing change, wound infection and final hospitalisation cost were evaluated. The study showed silver nylon wound dressing significantly reduced length of hospital stay, analgesic use, wound infection and inflammation compared with silver sulfadiazine. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  18. Treatment of Decubitis Ulcer Stage IV in the Patient with Polytrauma and Vertical Share Pelvic Fracture, Diagnosed Entherocollitis and Deep Wound Infection withClostridium Difficilewith Combined Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) and Faecal Management System: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojmenski, Slavcho; Merdzanovski, Igor; Gavrilovski, Andrej; Pejkova, Sofija; Dzokic, Gjorge; Tudzarova, Smilja

    2017-06-15

    The aim of this paper was to present a case with the successful treatment of decubitis ulcer stage IV in the patient with polytrauma and vertical share pelvic fracture and diagnosed entherocollitis combined with deep wound infection with Clostridium difficile treated with combined Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT) and faecal management system. Patient D.S.1967 treated on Traumatology Clinic after tentamen suicide on 9.2.2015 with diagnosis: brain contusion; contusion of thoracal space; vertical share pelvic fracture; open fracture type II of the right calcaneus; fracture of the left calcaneus; fracture on the typical place of the left radius; fracture of the right radius with dislocation. As a first step during the treatment in Intensive care unit we perform transcondylar extension of the left leg, and in that time we cannot operate because of the brain contusion. Four weeks after this treatment we intent to perform stabilisation of the pelvic ring, fixation of both arms, and fixation of both calcanear bones. But at the time before performing the saurgery, the patient got an intensive enterocollitis from Escherichia colli and Clostridium difficile , and during the inadequate treatment of enterocollitis she got a big decubitus on both gluteal regia Grade IV and deep muscular necrosis. Several times we perform a necrectomy of necrotic tissue but the wound become bigger and the infection have a progressive intention. In that time we used VAK system for 6 weeks combined with faecal management system and with local necrectomy and system application of Antibiotics and Flagyl for enterocollitis in doses prescripted from specialists from Infective clinic. This new device to manage faecal deep decubital infection and enterocollitis with Clostridium difficile are considered as adequate. 8Flexi-Seal ® FMS has been also used. After two months we succeed to minimize the gluteal wound on quoter from the situation from the beginning and we used for next two months wound

  19. The contribution of interleukin-2 to effective wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelloStritto, Daniel J; Newell-Rogers, M Karen

    2016-01-01

    Ineffective skin wound healing is a significant source of morbidity and mortality. Roughly 6.5 million Americans experience chronically open wounds and the cost of treating these wounds numbers in the billions of dollars annually. In contrast, robust wound healing can lead to the development of either hypertrophic scarring or keloidosis, both of which can cause discomfort and can be cosmetically undesirable. Appropriate wound healing requires the interplay of a variety of factors, including the skin, the local microenvironment, the immune system, and the external environment. When these interactions are perturbed, wounds can be a nidus for infection, which can cause them to remain open an extended period of time, or can scar excessively. Interleukin-2, a cytokine that directs T-cell expansion and phenotypic development, appears to play an important role in wound healing. The best-studied role for Interleukin-2 is in influencing T-cell development. However, other cell types, including fibroblasts, the skin cells responsible for closing wounds, express the Interleukin-2 receptor, and therefore may respond to Interleukin-2. Studies have shown that treatment with Interleukin-2 can improve the strength of healed skin, which implicates Interleukin-2 in the wound healing process. Furthermore, diseases that involve impaired wound healing, such as diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus, have been linked to deficiencies in Interleukin-2 or defects Interleukin-2-receptor signaling. The focus of this review is to summarize the current understanding of the role of Interleukin-2 in wound healing, to highlight diseases in which Interleukin-2 and its receptor may contribute to impaired wound healing, and to assess Interleukin-2-modulating approaches as potential therapies to improve wound healing. PMID:27798123

  20. Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiang Juliann G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wounding following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury, RCI increases mortality. Wounding-induced increases in radiation mortality are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Among these factors, cytokines along with other biomarkers have been adopted for biodosimetric evaluation and assessment of radiation dose and injury. Therefore, wounding could complicate biodosimetric assessments. Results In this report, such confounding effects were addressed. Mice were given 60Co γ-photon radiation followed by skin wounding. Wound trauma exacerbated radiation-induced mortality, body-weight loss, and wound healing. Analyses of DNA damage in bone-marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, changes in hematology and cytokine profiles, and fundamental clinical signs were evaluated. Early biomarkers (1 d after RCI vs. irradiation alone included significant decreases in survivin expression in bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in γ-H2AX formation in Lin+ bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood, and concomitant decreases in γ-H2AX formation in PBMCs and decreases in numbers of splenocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Intermediate biomarkers (7 – 10 d after RCI included continuously decreased γ-H2AX formation in PBMC and enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood. The clinical signs evaluated after RCI were increased water consumption, decreased body weight, and decreased wound healing rate and survival rate. Late clinical signs (30 d after RCI included poor survival and wound healing. Conclusion Results suggest that confounding factors such as wounding alters ionizing radiation dose assessment and agents inhibiting these responses may prove therapeutic for radiation combined

  1. Microbiology aspect of wound infection: in-vitro test for efficacy of hydrophobic dressing in microorganism binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeva Rosana

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim To do in vitro test to assess the efficacy of hydrophobic dressing Cutimed® Sorbact® to bind multiresistant bacteria that caused wound infection, the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.Method This was a cross sectional study that was conducted in the Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia, on January 2009. In-vitro testing of sterile hydrophobic dressing to bind microorganisms was conducted by counting MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that were bound to 1 square centimetre of single layersterile hydrophobic dressing (Cutimed® Sorbact®. Every test was done in triplicate at 0.5, 1, 5, 10, 30 minutes, 1, 2, 3, and 4 hours. To compare the hydrophobic dressing capability to bind microorganisms, in vitro testing of sterile conventional dressing to bind microorganisms on 0.5 minutes and 2 hours was done.Result The binding capacity of sterile hydrophobic dressing began at 0.5 minutes and teached a maximum at 2 hours. Compared with conventional dressing, sterile hydrophobic dressing had more binding capability to MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.Conclusion Hydrophobic dressing (Cutimed® Sorbact® had a higher capability to bind MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to conventional dressing. (Med J Indones 2009;18:155-60Key words: hydrophobicity, MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  2. [Postoperative wound healing disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartos, Gábor; Markovics, Gabriella; Várföldi, Tamás; Buzáné Kis, Piroska

    2009-02-01

    Investigation of the incidence of wound healing disorders in operative material and that of possible commonality with the nosocomial categories of operations and with the surgical site infections registered by the authors, respectively. OPERATIVE MATERIAL AND METHOD: The data of 33,336 operations, made in their ward, are analysed by the authors. By way of introduction the question of nomenclature is discussed which is not uniform in the literature. Referring to the most accepted infection surveillance systems they state that wound healing disorders represent a different idea than surgical site infections. The method of their prospective investigation is described as follows: at the time of the emission of the patient every wound healing disorder is registered in a collective protocol and in a short case history. Then they are monthly summarised. The data were elaborated in one year, in 5 years, in 10 years and in 20 years grouping interconnected with the nosocomial categories of the operations, and with the surgical site infections observed in the same period of time. The numerical results are debated in detail. These show that the 20-year summarised rate of wound healing disorders amounts to 2.2% and that of surgical site infections to 2.7%. They point out that the rates of both wound healing disorders and surgical site infections are diminishing during the second half of observation. The former is related to the improved surgical technique and to the better operative circumstances introduced during the observed two decades. The latter can be a consequence of their prospective infection register based on the CDC ad HELICS systems. Up till now no information could be found by them in the literature concerning the interaction of wound healing disorders with the nosocomial categories of the performed operations. The author's new establishment: as proceeding from category "A" towards category "D", not only the rates of surgical site infections became greater and

  3. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    resistant organisms, and prevents the use of more specific but more limited spectrum antibiotics . The overall goal of this preclinical program is to...CHD-FA treated, 6 in vehicle (batch #2367) controls, and 6 in antibiotic ( Colistin 20 ug/ml) treatment controls (batch #SLBG4834V) at day 1, day 3...on days 3- 6. The antibiotic control group ( Colistin 20 µg/ml) had improved wound closure early in the infection with >15% closure relative to the

  4. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials Evaluating Prophylactic Intra-Operative Wound Irrigation for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Stijn W; Boldingh, Quirine J J; Solomkin, Joseph S; Allegranzi, Benedetta; Egger, Matthias; Dellinger, E Patchen; Boermeester, Marja A

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are one of the most common hospital-acquired infections. To reduce SSIs, prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (pIOWI) has been advocated, although the results to date are equivocal. To develop recommendations for the new World Health Organization (WHO) SSI prevention guidelines, a systematic literature review and a meta-analysis were conducted on the effectiveness of pIOWI using different agents as a means of reducing SSI. The PUBMED, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and WHO databases were searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing either pIOWI with no pIOWI or with pIOWI using different solutions and techniques were retrieved with SSI as the primary outcome. Meta-analyses were performed, and odds ratios (OR) and the mean difference with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were extracted and pooled with a random effects model. Twenty-one studies were suitable for analysis, and a distinction was made between intra-peritoneal, mediastinal, and incisional wound irrigation. A low quality of evidence demonstrated a statistically significant benefit for incisional wound irrigation with an aqueous povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solution in clean and clean contaminated wounds (OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.13-0.73; p = 0.007); 50 fewer SSIs per 1,000 procedures (from 19 fewer to 64 fewer)). Antibiotic irrigation had no significant effect in reducing SSIs (OR 1.16; 95% CI 0.64-2.12; p = 0.63). Low-quality evidence suggests considering the use of prophylactic incisional wound irrigation to prevent SSI with an aqueous povidone-iodine solution. Antibiotic irrigation does not show a benefit and therefore is discouraged.

  5. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Systematic review of interventions to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, among young people in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Sihvonen-Riemenschneider, Henna; Laukamm-Josten, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of interventions seeking to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, among young people in the European Union.......To examine the effectiveness of interventions seeking to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, among young people in the European Union....

  7. A case of wound dual infection with Pasteurella dagmatis and Pasteurella Canis resulting from a dog bite - limitations of Vitek-2 system in exact identification of Pasteurella species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akahane T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pasteurella species, widely known as indigenous orgganisms in the oral and gastrointestinal floras of many wild and domestic animals, are important pathogens in both animals and humans. Human infections due to Pasteurella species are in most cases associated with infected injuries following animal bites. We encountered a rare case of dual infections caused by different two Pasteurella species occurred in a previously healthy 25-year-old female sustaining injury by a dog-bite. Methodology Exudates from the open wound of her dog-bite site, together with the saliva of the dog were submitted for bacteriological examination. Predominantly appearing grayish-white smooth colonies with almost the same colonial properties but slightly different glistening grown on chocolate and sheep blood agar plates were characterized morphologically by Gram's stain, biochemically by automated instrument using Vitek 2 system using GN cards together with commercially available kit system, ID-Test HN-20 rapid panels, and genetically by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of the organism using a Taq DyeDeoxy Terminator Cycle Sequencing and a model 3100 DNA sequencer instrument. Results The causative isolates from the dog-bite site were finally identified as P. canis and P. dagmatis from the findings of the morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties together with the comparative sequences of the 16S rRNA genes. Both the isolates were highly susceptible to many antibiotics and the patient was successfully treated with the administration of so-called the first generation cephalosporin, cefazolin followed by so-called the third generation cephalosporin, cefcapene pivoxil. The isolate from the dog was subsequently identified as P. canis, the same species as the isolate from the patient. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this was the second report of a dual infection with Pasteurella species consisting of P. dagmatis and P. canis resulting from a

  8. A case of wound dual infection with Pasteurella dagmatis and Pasteurella Canis resulting from a dog bite - limitations of Vitek-2 system in exact identification of Pasteurella species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pasteurella species, widely known as indigenous orgganisms in the oral and gastrointestinal floras of many wild and domestic animals, are important pathogens in both animals and humans. Human infections due to Pasteurella species are in most cases associated with infected injuries following animal bites. We encountered a rare case of dual infections caused by different two Pasteurella species occurred in a previously healthy 25-year-old female sustaining injury by a dog-bite. Methodology Exudates from the open wound of her dog-bite site, together with the saliva of the dog were submitted for bacteriological examination. Predominantly appearing grayish-white smooth colonies with almost the same colonial properties but slightly different glistening grown on chocolate and sheep blood agar plates were characterized morphologically by Gram's stain, biochemically by automated instrument using Vitek 2 system using GN cards together with commercially available kit system, ID-Test HN-20 rapid panels, and genetically by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of the organism using a Taq DyeDeoxy Terminator Cycle Sequencing and a model 3100 DNA sequencer instrument. Results The causative isolates from the dog-bite site were finally identified as P. canis and P. dagmatis from the findings of the morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties together with the comparative sequences of the 16S rRNA genes. Both the isolates were highly susceptible to many antibiotics and the patient was successfully treated with the administration of so-called the first generation cephalosporin, cefazolin followed by so-called the third generation cephalosporin, cefcapene pivoxil. The isolate from the dog was subsequently identified as P. canis, the same species as the isolate from the patient. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this was the second report of a dual infection with Pasteurella species consisting of P. dagmatis and P. canis resulting from a dog-bite, followed by the

  9. A case of wound dual infection with Pasteurella dagmatis and Pasteurella canis resulting from a dog bite -- limitations of Vitek-2 system in exact identification of Pasteurella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahane, T; Nagata, M; Matsumoto, T; Murayama, T; Isaka, A; Kameda, T; Fujita, M; Oana, K; Kawakami, Y

    2011-12-02

    Pasteurella species, widely known as indigenous organisms in the oral and gastrointestinal floras of many wild and domestic animals, are important pathogens in both animals and humans. Human infections due to Pasteurella species are in most cases associated with infected injuries following animal bites. We encountered a rare case of dual infections caused by different two Pasteurella species occurred in a previously healthy 25-year-old female sustaining injury by a dog-bite. Exudates from the open wound of her dog-bite site, together with the saliva of the dog were submitted for bacteriological examination. Predominantly appearing grayish-white smooth colonies with almost the same colonial properties but slightly different glistening grown on chocolate and sheep blood agar plates were characterized morphologically by Gram's stain, biochemically by automated instrument using Vitek 2 system using GN cards together with commercially available kit system, ID-Test HN-20 rapid panels, and genetically by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of the organism using a Taq DyeDeoxy Terminator Cycle Sequencing and a model 3100 DNA sequencer instrument. The causative isolates from the dog-bite site were finally identified as P. canis and P. dagmatis from the findings of the morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties together with the comparative sequences of the 16S rRNA genes. Both the isolates were highly susceptible to many antibiotics and the patient was successfully treated with the administration of so-called the first generation cephalosporin, cefazolin followed by so-called the third generation cephalosporin, cefcapene pivoxil. The isolate from the dog was subsequently identified as P. canis, the same species as the isolate from the patient. To the best of our knowledge, this was the second report of a dual infection with Pasteurella species consisting of P. dagmatis and P. canis resulting from a dog-bite, followed by the first report of dual infections due to P

  10. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in the Management of Combat Wounds: A Critical Review

    OpenAIRE

    Maurya, Sanjay; Bhandari, Prem Singh

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Wounds sustained in a combat trauma often result in a composite tissue loss. Combat injuries, due to high energy transfer to tissues, lead to trauma at multiple anatomical sites. An early wound cover is associated with lower rate of infections and a faster wound healing. The concept of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in the management of combat-related wounds has evolved from the civilian trauma and the wounds from nontraumatic etiologies.

  11. Wound management in obese patients after median sternotomy using a negativ pressure wound dressing

    OpenAIRE

    Navasardyan, Artashes

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is the most commonly identified risk factor for development of wound infection after median sternotomy. In these patients in the postoperative period, due to overweight, an enormous mechanical stress is exercised on the wound. This leads to an interruption of the continuity of the skin wound and facilitates penetration of the skin flora into the deep wound layers. This increases the risk of patients developing a wound infection (Gardlund A mechanism). A new method for the preventi...

  12. An overview of nosocomial infections, including the role of the microbiology laboratory.

    OpenAIRE

    Emori, T G; Gaynes, R P

    1993-01-01

    An estimated 2 million patients develop nosocomial infections in the United States annually. The increasing number of antimicrobial agent-resistant pathogens and high-risk patients in hospitals are challenges to progress in preventing and controlling these infections. While Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus remain the most common pathogens isolated overall from nosocomial infections, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), organisms previously considered contaminants in most culture...

  13. A coordinated approach to cutaneous wound healing: vibrational microscopy and molecular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, K L Andrew; Zhang, Guojin; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Lee, Brian; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The repair of cutaneous wounds in the adult body involves a complex series of spatially and temporally organized processes to prevent infection and restore homeostasis. Three characteristic phases of wound repair (inflammation, proliferation including re-epithelialization and remodelling) overlap in time and space. We have utilized a human skin wound-healing model to correlate changes in genotype and pheno-type with infrared (IR) and confocal Raman spectroscopic images during the re-epithelia...

  14. THE UTILIZATION OF ACHATINA FULICA MUCUS IN ALGINATE MEMBRANE AS WOUND HEALING ACCELERATOR AND ANTI- INFECTION MATERIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatkhunisa Rahmawati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound should be covered with bandage that is called wound dressing. Most people use synthetic materials such as gauze dressing. Gauze has high absorption of NaCl, which is often used to cleanse the wound. However, discomfort and pain arise since the gauze becomes sticky on the wound. Therefore, we need other alternatives instead of gauze to cover wound. One such alternative is the alginate membrane. This study used alginate membrane with mixture of mucous of the snail Achatina fulica, which contain proteins such as proline, serine asparagine, glycosaminoglycan, hydroxylysine, trionin and so forth, to activate the growth factor. Alginate powder and carboxymethl cellulose (CMC was dissolved in distilled water mixed with mucus of the snail Achatina fulica in four variations (4:0; 4:1, 4:2, 4:3 through a magnetic stirrer, and casted on a baking sheet covered with sterile gauze. High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC test showed that the glycosaminoglycan content was found on the mucous of Achatina fulica. This was indicated by the appearance of peak at 325–350 second. The most optimum alginate and mucus composition was in ratio of 4:2. This ratio resulted in a wound dressing that was still able to absorb the exudate and optimally accelerated wound healing.

  15. New Is Old, and Old Is New: Recent Advances in Antibiotic-Based, Antibiotic-Free and Ethnomedical Treatments against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jian-Lin; Jiang, Yi-Wei; Xie, Jun-Qiu; Zhang, Xiao-Gang

    2016-04-25

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen of wound infections. Thus far, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has become the major causative agent in wound infections, especially for nosocomial infections. MRSA infections are seldom eradicated by routine antimicrobial therapies. More concerning, some strains have become resistant to the newest antibiotics of last resort. Furthermore, horizontal transfer of a polymyxin resistance gene, mcr-1, has been identified in Enterobacteriaceae, by which resistance to the last group of antibiotics will likely spread rapidly. The worst-case scenario, "a return to the pre-antibiotic era", is likely in sight. A perpetual goal for antibiotic research is the discovery of an antibiotic that lacks resistance potential, such as the recent discovery of teixobactin. However, when considering the issue from an ecological and evolutionary standpoint, it is evident that it is insufficient to solve the antibiotic dilemma through the use of antibiotics themselves. In this review, we summarized recent advances in antibiotic-based, antibiotic-free and ethnomedical treatments against MRSA wound infections to identify new clues to solve the antibiotic dilemma. One potential solution is to use ethnomedical drugs topically. Some ethnomedical drugs have been demonstrated to be effective antimicrobials against MRSA. A decline in antibiotic resistance can therefore be expected, as has been demonstrated when antibiotic-free treatments were used to limit the use of antibiotics. It is also anticipated that these drugs will have low resistance potential, although there is only minimal evidence to support this claim to date. More clinical trials and animal tests should be conducted on this topic.

  16. New Is Old, and Old Is New: Recent Advances in Antibiotic-Based, Antibiotic-Free and Ethnomedical Treatments against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Lin Dou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen of wound infections. Thus far, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA has become the major causative agent in wound infections, especially for nosocomial infections. MRSA infections are seldom eradicated by routine antimicrobial therapies. More concerning, some strains have become resistant to the newest antibiotics of last resort. Furthermore, horizontal transfer of a polymyxin resistance gene, mcr-1, has been identified in Enterobacteriaceae, by which resistance to the last group of antibiotics will likely spread rapidly. The worst-case scenario, “a return to the pre-antibiotic era”, is likely in sight. A perpetual goal for antibiotic research is the discovery of an antibiotic that lacks resistance potential, such as the recent discovery of teixobactin. However, when considering the issue from an ecological and evolutionary standpoint, it is evident that it is insufficient to solve the antibiotic dilemma through the use of antibiotics themselves. In this review, we summarized recent advances in antibiotic-based, antibiotic-free and ethnomedical treatments against MRSA wound infections to identify new clues to solve the antibiotic dilemma. One potential solution is to use ethnomedical drugs topically. Some ethnomedical drugs have been demonstrated to be effective antimicrobials against MRSA. A decline in antibiotic resistance can therefore be expected, as has been demonstrated when antibiotic-free treatments were used to limit the use of antibiotics. It is also anticipated that these drugs will have low resistance potential, although there is only minimal evidence to support this claim to date. More clinical trials and animal tests should be conducted on this topic.

  17. Recent advances in topical wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabahi, Sujata

    2012-05-01

    There are a wide variety of dressing techniques and materials available for management of both acute wounds and chronic non-healing wounds. The primary objective in both the cases is to achieve a healed closed wound. However, in a chronic wound the dressing may be required for preparing the wound bed for further operative procedures such as skin grafting. An ideal dressing material should not only accelerate wound healing but also reduce loss of protein, electrolytes and fluid from the wound, and help to minimize pain and infection. The present dictum is to promote the concept of moist wound healing. This is in sharp contrast to the earlier practice of exposure method of wound management wherein the wound was allowed to dry. It can be quite a challenge for any physician to choose an appropriate dressing material when faced with a wound. Since wound care is undergoing a constant change and new products are being introduced into the market frequently, one needs to keep abreast of their effect on wound healing. This article emphasizes on the importance of assessment of the wound bed, the amount of drainage, depth of damage, presence of infection and location of wound. These characteristics will help any clinician decide on which product to use and where,in order to get optimal wound healing. However, there are no 'magical dressings'. Dressings are one important aspect that promotes wound healing apart from treating the underlying cause and other supportive measures like nutrition and systemic antibiotics need to be given equal attention.

  18. Bi-Layer Wound Dressing System for Combat Casualty Care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martineau, Lucie; Shek, Pang N

    2004-01-01

    .... Biopsies taken from full-thickness, pig wounds infected with Ps. aeruginosa and Staph. epidermidis showed a 2- to 5-log reduction in the bacterial load of antiseptic-treated wounds compared to those of control wounds...

  19. Predictive ability of the Society for Vascular Surgery Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system after first-time lower extremity revascularizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Jeremy D; McCallum, John C; Soden, Peter A; Guzman, Raul J; Wyers, Mark C; Hamdan, Allen D; Verhagen, Hence J; Schermerhorn, Marc L

    2017-03-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) Wound, Ischemia and foot Infection (WIfI) classification system was proposed to predict 1-year amputation risk and potential benefit from revascularization. Our goal was to evaluate the predictive ability of this scale in a real-world selection of patients undergoing a first-time lower extremity revascularization for chronic limb-threatening ischemia (CLTI). From 2005 to 2014, 1336 limbs underwent a first-time lower extremity revascularization for CLTI, of which 992 had sufficient data to classify all three WIfI components (wound, ischemia, and foot infection). Limbs were stratified into the SVS WIfI clinical stages (from 1 to 4) for 1-year amputation risk estimation, a novel WIfI composite score from 0 to 9 (that weighs all WIfI variables equally), and a novel WIfI mean score from 0 to 3 (that can incorporate limbs missing any of the three WIfI components). Outcomes included major amputation; revascularization, major amputation, or stenosis (>3.5× step-up by duplex; RAS) events; and death. Predictors were identified using Cox regression models and Kaplan-Meier survival estimates. Of the 1336 first-time procedures performed, 992 limbs were classified in all three WIfI components (524 endovascular and 468 bypass; 26% rest pain and 74% tissue loss). Cox regression demonstrated that a one-unit increase in the WIfI clinical stage increases the risk of major amputation (hazard ratio [HR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-3.2) and RAS events in all limbs (HR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3). Separate models of the entire cohort, a bypass-only cohort, and an endovascular-only cohort showed that a one-unit increase in the WIfI mean score is associated with an increase in the risk of major amputation (all three cohorts: HR, 5.3 [95% CI, 3.6-6.8], 4.1 [2.4-6.9], and 6.6 [3.8-11.6], respectively) and RAS events (all three cohorts: HR, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.4-2.0], 1.9 [1.4-2.6], and 1.4 [1.1-1.9], respectively). The novel WIfI composite and WIf

  20. Superficial and deep sternal wound infection after more than 9000 coronary artery bypass graft (CABG: incidence, risk factors and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbasi Kyomars

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sternal wound infection (SWI is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of cardiac surgery. Predisposing factors for SWI are multiple with varied frequencies in different studies. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence, risk factors, and mortality of SWI after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG at Tehran Heart Center. Methods This study prospectively evaluated multiple risk factors for SWI in 9201 patients who underwent CABG at Tehran Heart Center between January 2002 and February 2006. Cases of SWI were confirmed based on the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Deep SWI (bone and mediastinitis was categorized according to the Oakley classification. Results In the study period, 9201 CABGs were performed with a total SWI rate of 0.47 percent (44 cases and deep SWI of 0.22 percent (21 cases. Perioperative (in-hospital mortality was 9.1% for total SWI and about 14% for deep SWI versus 1.1% for non-SWI CABG patients. Female gender, preoperative hypertension, high functional class, diabetes mellitus, obesity, prolonged intubation time (more than 48 h, and re-exploration for bleeding were significant risk factors for developing SWI (p = 0.05 in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis, hypertension (OR = 10.7, re-exploration (OR = 13.4, and female gender (OR = 2.7 were identified as significant predictors of SWI (p Conclusion Rarely reported previously, the two risk factors of hypertension and the female gender were significant risk factors in our study. Conversely, some other risk factors such as cigarette smoking and age mentioned as significant in other reports were not significant in our study. Further studies are needed for better documentation.

  1. Characterization and Expression of Drug Resistance Genes in MDROs Originating from Combat Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    organic acids like acetic acid and eventually acetyl-CoA. The acetyl-CoA produced enters fatty acid metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. It has...frames (ORFs), including genes encoding a fatty acid hydroxylase and a salicylate monooxygenase. Salicylate monooxygenase, normally ab- sent from the A...types that are uniquely regulate in the confrontations. Cellular processes- Biosynthesis of cofactors, prosthetic groups and carriers, Fatty acid and

  2. Urinary tract infections in hospital pediatrics: many previous antibiotherapy and antibiotics resistance, including fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraffo, A; Marguet, C; Checoury, A; Boyer, S; Gardrat, A; Houivet, E; Caron, F

    2014-02-01

    We studied antibiotic resistance in pediatric UTIs and we evaluated the impact of antibiotic exposure in the previous 12 months, very little French data being available for this population. We conducted a multicenter prospective study including children consulting for, or admitted in 2 hospitals. Prior antibiotic exposure was documented from their health record. One hundred and ten patients (73 girls), 11 days to 12 years of age, were included in 10 months. Ninety-six percent presented with pyelonephritis, associated to uropathy for 25%. Escherichia coli was predominant (78%), followed by Proteus spp. and Enterococcus spp. The antibiotic resistance rate of E. coli was high and close to that reported for adults with complicated UTIs: amoxicillin 60%, amoxicillin-clavulanate 35%, cefotaxim 5%, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole 26%, nalidixic acid 9%, ciprofloxacin 7%, gentamycin 1%, nitrofurantoin and fosfomycin 0%. The antibiotic exposure in the previous 12 months involved 62 children (56%) most frequently with β-lactams (89%) for a respiratory tract infection (56%). A clear relationship between exposure and resistance was observed for amoxicillin (71% vs. 46%), first generation (65% vs. 46%) and third generation (9% vs. 3%) cephalosporins, or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (36% vs. 15%). However, antibiotic exposure could not account alone for the results, as suggested by the 7% of ciprofloxacin resistance, observed without any identified previous treatment. Bacterial species and antibiotic resistance level in children are similar to those reported for adults. Antibiotic exposure in the previous 12 months increases the risk of resistance but other factors are involved (previous antibiotic therapies and fecal-oral or mother-to-child transmission). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. QMRAcatch: Microbial Quality Simulation of Water Resources including Infection Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijven, Jack; Derx, Julia; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Farnleitner, Andreas H

    2015-09-01

    Given the complex hydrologic dynamics of water catchments and conflicts between nature protection and public water supply, models may help to understand catchment dynamics and evaluate contamination scenarios and may support best environmental practices and water safety management. A catchment model can be an educative tool for investigating water quality and for communication between parties with different interests in the catchment. This article introduces an interactive computational tool, QMRAcatch, that was developed to simulate concentrations in water resources of , a human-associated microbial source tracking (MST) marker, enterovirus, norovirus, , and as target microorganisms and viruses (TMVs). The model domain encompasses a main river with wastewater discharges and a floodplain with a floodplain river. Diffuse agricultural sources of TMVs that discharge into the main river are not included in this stage of development. The floodplain river is fed by the main river and may flood the plain. Discharged TMVs in the river are subject to dilution and temperature-dependent degradation. River travel times are calculated using the Manning-Gauckler-Strickler formula. Fecal deposits from wildlife, birds, and visitors in the floodplain are resuspended in flood water, runoff to the floodplain river, or infiltrate groundwater. Fecal indicator and MST marker data facilitate calibration. Infection risks from exposure to the pathogenic TMVs by swimming or drinking water consumption are calculated, and the required pathogen removal by treatment to meet a health-based quality target can be determined. Applicability of QMRAcatch is demonstrated by calibrating the tool for a study site at the River Danube near Vienna, Austria, using field TMV data, including a sensitivity analysis and evaluation of the model outcomes. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Diabetes and Wound Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonkwo, Uzoagu A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus Type II (DM2) is a growing international health concern with no end in sight. Complications of DM2 involve a myriad of comorbidities including the serious complications of poor wound healing, chronic ulceration, and resultant limb amputation. In skin wound healing, which has definite, orderly phases, diabetes leads to improper function at all stages. While the etiology of chronic, non-healing diabetic wounds is multi-faceted, the progression to a non-healing phenotype is closely linked to poor vascular networks. This review focuses on diabetic wound healing, paying special attention to the aberrations that have been described in the proliferative, remodeling, and maturation phases of wound angiogenesis. Additionally, this review considers therapeutics that may offer promise to better wound healing outcomes. PMID:28671607

  5. Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds.

  6. Uso del agente antimicrobiano PHMB para prevenir la infección de heridas The use of the antimicrobial agent PHMB to prevent wounds infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Moore

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La infección de heridas postoperatorias puede provocar una cicatrización tardía, una estancia prolongada en el hospital y mayores costes. El aumento de bacterias resistentes a los antibióticos es un factor en contra del uso profiláctico de los antibióticos. Una alternativa eficaz es el uso de antisépticos, que presentan menos probabilidades de generar resistencia. Los apósitos AMD TM usan polihexametileno biguanida (PHMB, que tiene una baja toxicidad para las células de las heridas y es eficaz para acabar con las bacterias resistentes a los antibióticos. En este artículo, se revisan las pruebas de la eficacia y rentabilidad de los apósitos AMD en la prevención de las infecciones en la herida quirúrgica si se usan de forma rutinaria en los protocolos estándar para el cuidado de heridas.Post-operative wound infections may result in delayed healing, extended hospital stay and increased costs. The increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria mitigates against the prophylactic use of antibiotics. An effective alternative is the use of antiseptics that are less likely to generate resistance. AMD TM wound dressings use polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB which has a low toxicity for wound cells and is effective in killing antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This paper reviews the evidence for the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of AMD dressings in the prevention of surgical site infections when routinely used in standard wound care protocols.

  7. Wound Disruption Following Colorectal Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamyeghaneh, Zhobin; Hanna, Mark H; Carmichael, Joseph C; Mills, Steven; Pigazzi, Alessio; Nguyen, Ninh T; Stamos, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Postoperative wound disruption is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We sought to identify the risk factors and outcomes of wound disruption following colorectal resection. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database was used to examine the clinical data of patients who underwent colorectal resection from 2005 to 2013. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors of wound disruption. We sampled a total of 164,297 patients who underwent colorectal resection. Of these, 2073 (1.3 %) had wound disruption. Patients with wound disruption had significantly higher mortality (5.1 vs. 1.9 %, AOR: 1.46, P = 0.01). The highest risk of wound disruption was seen in patients with wound infection (4.8 vs. 0.9 %, AOR: 4.11, P disruption such as chronic steroid use (AOR: 1.71, P disruption compared to open surgery (AOR: 0.61, P disruption occurs in 1.3 % of colorectal resections, and it correlates with mortality of patients. Wound infection is the strongest predictor of wound disruption. Chronic steroid use, obesity, severe COPD, prolonged operation, non-elective admission, and serum albumin level are strongly associated with wound disruption. Utilization of the laparoscopic approach may decrease the risk of wound disruption when possible.

  8. Primary closure versus non-closure of dog bite wounds. a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschos, Nikolaos K; Makris, Eleftherios A; Gantsos, Apostolos; Georgoulis, Anastasios D

    2014-01-01

    Dog bite wounds represent a major health problem. Despite their importance, their management and especially the role of primary closure remain controversial. In this randomised controlled trial, the outcome between primary suturing and non-closure was compared. 168 consecutive patients with dog bite injuries were included in this study. The wounds were allocated randomly in two treatment approaches: Group 1, consisting of eighty-two patients, had their wound sutured, whilst Group 2, consisting of eighty-six patients, did not have their wounds sutured. All wounds were cleansed using high-pressure irrigation and povidone iodine. All patients received the same type of antibiotic treatment. Our measured outcomes included presence of infection and cosmetic appearance. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). Wound and patient characteristics, such as time of management, wound location and size, and patient age, were recorded and analysed for their potential role in the resulting outcome. The overall infection rate was 8.3%. No difference in the infection rate between primary suturing and non-suturing group was detected in the present study. The cosmetic appearance of the sutured wounds was significantly better (mean score 1.74) compared to the wounds that were left open (mean score 3.05) (p=0.0001). The infection rate was comparable among all age groups. Wounds treated within 8h of injury demonstrated an infection rate of 4.5%, which is lower compared to the 22.2% rate observed in wounds treated later than 8h. The wounds located at the head and neck exhibited better results in both infection rate and cosmetic outcome. Additionally, wounds >3 cm negatively affected the cosmetic appearance of the outcome. Primary suturing of wounds caused by dog bites resulted in similar infection rate compared to non-suturing. However, primary suturing exhibited improved cosmetic appearance. Time of management appeared to be critical, as early treatment

  9. Antibiofilm Efficacy of DispersinB Wound Spray Used in Combination with a Silver Wound Dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purushottam V. Gawande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. As the traditional methods of treatment have proven ineffective against chronic wounds involving biofilms, there is an unmet clinical need for developing products with an antibiofilm component that inhibits and/or disrupts biofilms and thus make the biofilm-embedded bacteria more susceptible to antimicrobial therapy. We developed a DispersinB® antibiofilm enzyme-based wound spray for treating chronic wounds in conjunction with an antimicrobial. Under in vitro conditions, the DispersinB® and Acticoat™ combination performed significantly better ( P < 0.05 than Acticoat™ alone, indicating the synergy between the two compounds because of DispersinB® enhancing the antimicrobial activity of Acticoat™. Furthermore, DispersinB® wound spray enhanced the antimicrobial activity of Acticoat™ in a chronic wound mouse model of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection. Thus, this novel combination of DispersinB® and Acticoat™, an antimicrobial dressing, prompts clinical evaluation for potential applications in biofilm-based chronic wound management.

  10. Polymicrobial Chronic Infection Including Acinetobacter Baumannii in a Plated Segmental Defect in the Rat Femur

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsukayama, Dean T

    2008-01-01

    .... This model could then be used to assess the combined therapy of an osteogenic agent to stimulate bone formation while local and system antibiotic therapy was being applied to control the polymicrobial infection...

  11. Wound healing in urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effectiveness of silver dressing in preventing surgical site infections in contaminated wounds = Efectividad de los apósitos de plata en la prevención de la infección del sitio operatorio en heridas contaminadas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrales, Rodolfo Adrián

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Silver gauzes are designed to treat infected wounds, but there is controversial evidence about their effectiveness in preventing surgical site infections in contaminated wounds. Objective: To evaluate the effect of silver gauzes in patients undergoing surgery with contaminated wounds at a university-based tertiary referral center. Methods: This was a prospective, controlled trial comparing a silver gauze dressing with saline gauze dressings in patients undergoing abdominal surgeries with contaminated wounds. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either silver gauze (SG dressing or saline gauze dressings (SD. The primary end point was surgical site infection occurring within 30 days of surgery. Results: 65 patients were enrolled in the review. The incidence of surgical site infection was 14% (9/65. No differences were observed among groups (15.2% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.75. Multivariate analysis revealed no relationship between the type of dressing and surgical site infection. Conclusion: Silver gauzes are safe and effective in preventing surgical site infections in surgeries with contaminated wounds. Further trials are required to find out if they have advantages over standard dressings.

  13. Annual Surveillance Summary: Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections in the Military Health System (MHS), 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    aeruginosa has a well-documented clinical history as associated with burn and wound infections; however, recent manifestations of P. aeruginosa include...common exposures linked to a P. aeruginosa outbreak. Common community-acquired infections include ulcerative keratitis, otitis externa, and skin ...hospital-acquired infections include pneumonias, UTIs, blood stream infections (BSIs), surgical site infections, and skin infections.8 Hospital-acquired

  14. Extreme Obesity and Postcesarean Wound Complications in the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Unit Cesarean Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smid, Marcela C; Kearney, Morgan S; Stamilio, David M

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the association between obesity and wound complications after cesarean delivery. A secondary cohort analysis of the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Unit Cesarean Registry. We stratified the exposure, maternal body mass index (BMI) at delivery, as not obese (BMI  45). Our primary outcome was wound complication composite of wound infection, endometritis, wound opening, seroma/hematoma, and hospital readmission. Our secondary outcomes included infection composite (wound infection and endometritis) and each individual outcome included in the primary composite. We performed unadjusted and multivariable logistic regression analyses. We included 38,229 women who underwent cesarean; 39% were not obese, 55% were obese, and 6% were extremely obese. In our cohort, 40% of women underwent repeat cesarean and 57% underwent cesarean after labor. Extremely obese women had increased risk for any wound complication (14%, adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-1.89), endometritis (8.3%, AOR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.07-1.49), wound infection (2.0%, AOR, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.60-5.46), wound opening (0.8%, AOR, 5.47; 95% CI, 2.79-10.71), and wound infection-related hospital readmission (3.6%, AOR, 2.97; 95% CI, 2.26-3.91) compared with nonobese women. Obese women had increased risk for any wound complication (9.6%, AOR, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.06-1.23) and postcesarean infection (7.7%, AOR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03-1.22) but not other outcomes. In a large multicenter cohort study, we found that extreme obesity was associated with substantial increase in maternal postcesarean complications, and the association between obesity and postcesarean complications appears dose related. These findings validate associations found in single-center studies. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  15. Telemedicine for wound management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Chittoria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The escalating physiological, psychological, social and financial burdens of wounds and wound care on patients, families and society demand the immediate attention of the health care sector. Many forces are affecting the changes in health care provision for patients with chronic wounds, including managed care, the limited number of wound care therapists, an increasingly ageing and disabled population, regulatory and malpractice issues, and compromised care. The physician is also faced with a number of difficult issues when caring for chronic wound patients because their conditions are time consuming and high risk, represent an unprofitable part of care practice and raise issues of liability. Telemedicine enhances communication with the surgical wound care specialist. Digital image for skin lesions is a safe, accurate and cost-effective referral pathway. The two basic modes of telemedicine applications, store and forward (asynchronous transfer and real-time transmission (synchronous transfer, e.g. video conference, are utilized in the wound care setting. Telemedicine technology in the hands of an experienced physician can streamline management of a problem wound. Although there is always an element of anxiety related to technical change, the evolution of wound care telemedicine technology has demonstrated a predictable maturation process.

  16. Vivax malaria in Mauritania includes infection of a Duffy-negative individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wurtz Nathalie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Duffy blood group polymorphisms are important in areas where Plasmodium vivax is present because this surface antigen is thought to act as a key receptor for this parasite. In the present study, Duffy blood group genotyping was performed in febrile uninfected and P. vivax-infected patients living in the city of Nouakchott, Mauritania. Methods Plasmodium vivax was identified by real-time PCR. The Duffy blood group genotypes were determined by standard PCR followed by sequencing of the promoter region and exon 2 of the Duffy gene in 277 febrile individuals. Fisher's exact test was performed in order to assess the significance of variables. Results In the Moorish population, a high frequency of the FYBES/FYBES genotype was observed in uninfected individuals (27.8%, whereas no P. vivax-infected patient had this genotype. This was followed by a high level of FYA/FYB, FYB/FYB, FYB/FYBES and FYA/FYBES genotype frequencies, both in the P. vivax-infected and uninfected patients. In other ethnic groups (Poular, Soninke, Wolof, only the FYBES/FYBES genotype was found in uninfected patients, whereas the FYA/FYBES genotype was observed in two P. vivax-infected patients. In addition, one patient belonging to the Wolof ethnic group presented the FYBES/FYBES genotype and was infected by P. vivax. Conclusions This study presents the Duffy blood group polymorphisms in Nouakchott City and demonstrates that in Mauritania, P. vivax is able to infect Duffy-negative patients. Further studies are necessary to identify the process that enables this Duffy-independent P. vivax invasion of human red blood cells.

  17. Vivax malaria in Mauritania includes infection of a Duffy-negative individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtz, Nathalie; Mint Lekweiry, Khadijetou; Bogreau, Hervé; Pradines, Bruno; Rogier, Christophe; Ould Mohamed Salem Boukhary, Ali; Hafid, Jamal Eddine; Ould Ahmedou Salem, Mohamed Salem; Trape, Jean-François; Basco, Leonardo K; Briolant, Sébastien

    2011-11-03

    Duffy blood group polymorphisms are important in areas where Plasmodium vivax is present because this surface antigen is thought to act as a key receptor for this parasite. In the present study, Duffy blood group genotyping was performed in febrile uninfected and P. vivax-infected patients living in the city of Nouakchott, Mauritania. Plasmodium vivax was identified by real-time PCR. The Duffy blood group genotypes were determined by standard PCR followed by sequencing of the promoter region and exon 2 of the Duffy gene in 277 febrile individuals. Fisher's exact test was performed in order to assess the significance of variables. In the Moorish population, a high frequency of the FYBES/FYBES genotype was observed in uninfected individuals (27.8%), whereas no P. vivax-infected patient had this genotype. This was followed by a high level of FYA/FYB, FYB/FYB, FYB/FYBES and FYA/FYBES genotype frequencies, both in the P. vivax-infected and uninfected patients. In other ethnic groups (Poular, Soninke, Wolof), only the FYBES/FYBES genotype was found in uninfected patients, whereas the FYA/FYBES genotype was observed in two P. vivax-infected patients. In addition, one patient belonging to the Wolof ethnic group presented the FYBES/FYBES genotype and was infected by P. vivax. This study presents the Duffy blood group polymorphisms in Nouakchott City and demonstrates that in Mauritania, P. vivax is able to infect Duffy-negative patients. Further studies are necessary to identify the process that enables this Duffy-independent P. vivax invasion of human red blood cells.

  18. Wound Care: Preventing Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or wearing your Immediate Post-op or preliminary prosthesis; keep it elevated whenever possible. The limb should be raised above the level of your heart to prevent swelling. Take care of your whole self – body, mind, and spirit. Eat well and drink plenty ...

  19. Immunization of cattle against Schistosome bovis (including pathophysiological studies on schistosome infection in bovines)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.F.

    1978-12-01

    Bovine schistosomiasis caused by S. bovis constitutes a serious veterinary problem in the Sudan, yet very little is known about the epidemiology, pathogenesis and immunology of the disease. Over the past 5 years, work on these aspects has been conducted at Khartoum and several outlying areas of the White Nile Province in Sudan. In studies involving over 1,000 cattle, it was found that almost 100% of animals are infected by 2 years of age but that the prevalence falls to less than 60% over the following 7 years. There was also a marked reduction in the intensity of infection with increasing age, indicating the development of a high degree of acquired resistance. This was confirmed experimentally by challenging animals from an endemic area with massive numbers of cercariae. These animals completely resisted the challenge whereas animals never previously exposed either died or became moribund due to the severe haemorrhagic diarrhoea resulting from the passage of schistosome eggs through the gut wall. Attempts were made to vaccinate calves using irradiated organisms. These gave 70-80% protection against a challenge infection and this was sufficient to allow these animals to gain weight and remain clinically healthy. Animals not given the vaccine deteriorated. The efficacy of the vaccine was then tested under field conditions and found to give a high level of protection against S. bovis. These animals were also less susceptible to intercurrent infections

  20. The Feasibility of a Handheld Electrospinning Device for the Application of Nanofibrous Wound Dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haik, Josef; Kornhaber, Rachel; Blal, Biader; Harats, Moti

    2017-05-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of a portable electrospinning device for the application of wound dressings. Approach: Four polymer nanofibers dressings were applied on superficial partial thickness wounds to a porcine model and compared with a traditional paraffin tulle gras dressing. The polymer nanofibrous dressings were applied using a handheld portable electrospinning device activated at a short distance from the wound. The partial thickness donor sites were evaluated on day 2, 7, and 14 when dressings were removed and tissue samples were taken for histological examination. Results: No significant difference was detected between the different electrospun nanofibrous dressings and traditional paraffin tulle gras. Desirable characteristics of the electrospun nanofiber dressing group included nontouch technique, ease of application, adherence and reduction in wound edema and inflammation. There was no delayed wound healing or signs of infection reported in both the electrospun nanofiber and traditional tulle gras dressings. Innovation: Used on partial thickness wounds, polymer electrospun nanofiber dressings provide excellent surface topography and are a nontouch, feasible, and safe method to promote wound healing with the potential to reduce wound infections. Such custom-made nanofibrous dressings have implications for the reduction of pain and trauma, number of dressing changes, scarring, and an added cost benefit. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that this portable handheld electrospinning device can be utilized for different formulations and materials and customized according to the characteristics of the target wound at the various stages of wound healing.

  1. Antimicrobial stewardship in wound care: a Position Paper from the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy and European Wound Management Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsky, Benjamin A; Dryden, Matthew; Gottrup, Finn; Nathwani, Dilip; Seaton, Ronald Andrew; Stryja, Jan

    2016-11-01

    With the growing global problem of antibiotic resistance it is crucial that clinicians use antibiotics wisely, which largely means following the principles of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS). Treatment of various types of wounds is one of the more common reasons for prescribing antibiotics. This guidance document is aimed at providing clinicians an understanding of: the basic principles of why AMS is important in caring for patients with infected wounds; who should be involved in AMS; and how to conduct AMS for patients with infected wounds. We assembled a group of experts in infectious diseases/clinical microbiology (from the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy) and wound management (from the European Wound Management Association) who, after thoroughly reviewing the available literature and holding teleconferences, jointly produced this guidance document. All open wounds will be colonized with bacteria, but antibiotic therapy is only required for those that are clinically infected. Therapy is usually empirical to start, but definitive therapy should be based on results of appropriately collected specimens for culture. When prescribed, it should be as narrowly focused, and administered for the shortest duration, as possible. AMS teams should be interdisciplinary, especially including specialists in infection and pharmacy, with input from administrative personnel, the treating clinicians and their patients. Available evidence is limited, but suggests that applying principles of AMS to the care of patients with wounds should help to reduce the unnecessary use of systemic or topical antibiotic therapy and ensure the safest and most clinically effective therapy for infected wounds. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Hypoperfusion and Wound Healing: Another Dimension of Wound Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smollock, Wendy; Montenegro, Paul; Czenis, Amy; He, Yuan

    2018-02-01

    To examine the correlation between mean arterial pressure (MAP) and wound healing indices and describe an analytical process that can be used accurately and prospectively when evaluating all types of skin ulcerations. A correlational study in a long-term-care facility.Participants (N = 230) were adults residing in a long-term-care facility with an average age of 77.8 years (range, 35-105). Assessment through both an index of wound healing and wound surface area. Signs of wound healing included a reduction of surface area and surface necrosis and increased granulation or epithelialization. Aggregate analyses for all wound locations revealed a positive correlation between the MAP and index of wound healing (r = 0.86, n = 501, P wound healing was noted for all wound locations in this data set when MAP values were 80 mm Hg or less (r = 0.95, n = 141, P wounds and MAP of less than 80 mm Hg yielded a very strong positive correlation. The data indicated that as perfusion decreased, wounds within the sample population declined (r = 0.93, n = 102, P wound healing or worsened wounds. A predictability of wounds stalling or declining related to the MAP was observed, regardless of topical treatment or standard-of-care interventions. Therefore, the data also suggest that remediating states of low perfusion should take precedence in making treatment decisions.

  3. Persistent Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus infection in domestic and wild small ruminants and camelids including the mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Darracq Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is a Pestivirus best known for causing a variety of disease syndromes in cattle, including gastrointestinal disease, reproductive insufficiency, immunosuppression, mucosal disease, and hemorrhagic syndrome. The virus can be spread by transiently infected individuals and by persistently infected animals that may be asymptomatic while shedding large amounts of virus throughout their lifetime. BVDV has been reported in over 40 domestic and free-ranging species, and persistent infection has been described in eight of those species: white-tailed deer, mule deer, eland, mousedeer, mountain goats, alpacas, sheep, and domestic swine. This paper reviews the various aspects of BVDV transmission, disease syndromes, diagnosis, control, and prevention, as well as examines BVDV infection in domestic and wild small ruminants and camelids including mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus.

  4. Persistent Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Infection in Domestic and Wild Small Ruminants and Camelids Including the Mountain Goat (Oreamnos americanus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Danielle D.; Duprau, Jennifer L.; Wolff, Peregrine L.; Evermann, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a pestivirus best known for causing a variety of disease syndromes in cattle, including gastrointestinal disease, reproductive insufficiency, immunosuppression, mucosal disease, and hemorrhagic syndrome. The virus can be spread by transiently infected individuals and by persistently infected animals that may be asymptomatic while shedding large amounts of virus throughout their lifetime. BVDV has been reported in over 40 domestic and free-ranging species, and persistent infection has been described in eight of those species: white-tailed deer, mule deer, eland, mousedeer, mountain goats, alpacas, sheep, and domestic swine. This paper reviews the various aspects of BVDV transmission, disease syndromes, diagnosis, control, and prevention, as well as examines BVDV infection in domestic and wild small ruminants and camelids including mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus). PMID:26779126

  5. Persistent Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Infection in Domestic and Wild Small Ruminants and Camelids Including the Mountain Goat (Oreamnos americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Danielle D; Duprau, Jennifer L; Wolff, Peregrine L; Evermann, James F

    2015-01-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a pestivirus best known for causing a variety of disease syndromes in cattle, including gastrointestinal disease, reproductive insufficiency, immunosuppression, mucosal disease, and hemorrhagic syndrome. The virus can be spread by transiently infected individuals and by persistently infected animals that may be asymptomatic while shedding large amounts of virus throughout their lifetime. BVDV has been reported in over 40 domestic and free-ranging species, and persistent infection has been described in eight of those species: white-tailed deer, mule deer, eland, mousedeer, mountain goats, alpacas, sheep, and domestic swine. This paper reviews the various aspects of BVDV transmission, disease syndromes, diagnosis, control, and prevention, as well as examines BVDV infection in domestic and wild small ruminants and camelids including mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus).

  6. Wound healing complications in brain tumor patients on Bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladha, Harshad; Pawar, Tushar; Gilbert, Mark R; Mandel, Jacob; O-Brien, Barbara; Conrad, Charles; Fields, Margaret; Hanna, Teresa; Loch, Carolyn; Armstrong, Terri S

    2015-09-01

    Bevacizumab (BEV) is commonly used for treating recurrent glioblastoma (GBM), and wound healing is a well-established adverse event. Retrospective analysis of GBM patients with and without wound healing complications while on BEV treatment is reported. 287 patients identified, majority were males (60 %) with median age of 52.5 years. 14 cases identified with wound healing problems, related to either craniotomy (n = 8) or other soft tissue wounds (n = 6). Median duration of BEV treatment to complication was 62 days (range 6-559). Majority received 10 mg/kg (n = 11) and nine (64.3 %) were on corticosteroids, with median daily dose of 6 mg (range 1-16 mg) for median of 473 days before starting BEV. For dehisced craniotomy wounds, median time for starting BEV from last surgery was 29 days (range 27-345). Median time from starting BEV to developing wound complication was 47 days (range 16-173). Seven (87.5 %) had infected wounds requiring antibiotics, hospitalization. Four (50 %) required plastic surgery. BEV stopped and safely resumed in 6 (75 %) patients; median delay was 70 days (range 34-346). Soft tissue wounds included decubitus ulcer, dehisced striae, herpes simplex, trauma to hand and back, and abscess. Median time from starting BEV to wound issues was 72 days (range 6-559). Five (83.3 %) were infected, requiring antibiotics. While three (50 %) required hospitalization, none required plastic surgery. Treatment stopped in five (83.3 %) and restarted in two (median delay 48 days, range 26-69). Wound healing complications are uncommon but associated with significant morbidity. Identifying those at risk and contributing factors warrants further investigation.

  7. The molecular biology in wound healing & non-healing wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Chun

    2017-08-01

    The development of molecular biology and other new biotechnologies helps us to recognize the