WorldWideScience

Sample records for included teaching students

  1. Students' Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Moeller, Martin Holdgaard; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students....... Students taught with video-based patient cases, in contrast, often referred to the patient cases when highlighting new insights, including the importance of patient perspectives when communicating with patients. CONCLUSION: The format of patient cases included in teaching may have a substantial impact...

  2. Development of Science and Mathematics Education System Including Teaching Experience of Students in Local Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kage, Hiroyuki

    New reformation project on engineering education, which is supported from 2005 to 2008FY by Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, started in Kyushu Institute of Technology. In this project, teaching experience of students is introduced into the curriculum of Faculty of Engineering. In the curriculum students try to prepare teaching materials and to teach local school pupils with them by themselves. Teaching experience is remarkably effective for them to strengthen their self-dependence and learning motivation. Science Education Center, Science Laboratory and Super Teachers College were also organized to promote the area cooperation on the education of science and mathematics.

  3. The Teaching Excellence Framework in the United Kingdom: An Opportunity to Include International Students as "Equals"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Aneta

    2017-01-01

    Research on international students in British higher education points to marginalization of their unique perspectives in university classrooms. The aim of the article is to consider how the most recent policy changes, particularly the teaching excellence framework (TEF), continue to do so. The article also argues that the TEF, being a major higher…

  4. Hybridising Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility to Include Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menendez, Jose Ignacio; Fernandez-Rio, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to explore the impact of the combination of two pedagogical models, Sport Education and Teaching for Personal and Social Responsibility, for learners with disabilities experiencing a contactless kickboxing learning unit. Twelve secondary education students agreed to participate. Five had disabilities (intellectual and…

  5. Including Overweight and Obese Students in Physical Education: An Urgent Need and Effective Teaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huanyu; Li, Weidong; Zhao, Qi; Li, Mingda

    2017-01-01

    Students who are overweight or obese generally have low physical ability and fitness levels, experience serious weight-related health implications, are teased and excluded by their peers, and suffer psycho-social and emotional damages as a result of weight stigma. Overweight and obese students have presented an unprecedented challenge for teachers…

  6. Including subjectivity in the teaching of Psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Domont de Serpa Junior

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Current psychopathology studies have often been presented in their descriptive dimension. This perspective is important for teaching because it helps the students to recognize and identify the symptomatology of each psychopathology case. However, subjectivity, the experience of suffering and interpersonal aspects are all lost in this perspective. Coming from another psychopathology tradition - existential anthropology - this paper presents practical psychopathology teaching experience which considers such dimensions as being relevant to the understanding of mental suffering. The features and limitations of such traditions are briefly reviewed to support this teaching experience. Two new modalities of practical teaching, used in the discipline of "Special Psychopathology I" offered by the Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine at the medical school of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro for students of psychology, will be presented according to descriptive case study methodology. With these activities we also expect to change the practice of teaching. Traditionally, interviewing of in-patients by a large group of students who observe passively what is happening is the center of this kind of education. We intend to develop a model of teaching which is closer to the proposal of the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform which views mental illness as a complex phenomenon, always involving the relationship that the subject establishes with the world.

  7. Student Motivation in Science Subjects in Tanzania, Including Students' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkimbili, Selina Thomas; Ødegaard, Marianne

    2017-12-01

    Fostering and maintaining students' interest in science is an important aspect of improving science learning. The focus of this paper is to listen to and reflect on students' voices regarding the sources of motivation for science subjects among students in community secondary schools with contextual challenges in Tanzania. We conducted a group-interview study of 46 Form 3 and Form 4 Tanzanian secondary school students. The study findings reveal that the major contextual challenges to student motivation for science in the studied schools are limited resources and students' insufficient competence in the language of instruction. Our results also reveal ways to enhance student motivation for science in schools with contextual challenges; these techniques include the use of questioning techniques and discourse, students' investigations and practical work using locally available materials, study tours, more integration of classroom science into students' daily lives and the use of real-life examples in science teaching. Also we noted that students' contemporary life, culture and familiar language can be utilised as a useful resource in facilitating meaningful learning in science in the school. Students suggested that, to make science interesting to a majority of students in a Tanzanian context, science education needs to be inclusive of students' experiences, culture and contemporary daily lives. Also, science teaching and learning in the classroom need to involve learners' voices.

  8. Should Student Evaluation of Teaching Play a Significant Role in the Formal Assessment of Dental Faculty? Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Formal Faculty Assessment Should Include Student Evaluation of Teaching and Viewpoint 2: Student Evaluation of Teaching Should Not Be Part of Formal Faculty Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Susan; Newness, Elmer J; Tetradis, Sotirios; Prasad, Joanne L; Ko, Ching-Chang; Sanchez, Arlene

    2017-11-01

    Student evaluation of teaching (SET) is often used in the assessment of faculty members' job performance and promotion and tenure decisions, but debate over this use of student evaluations has centered on the validity, reliability, and application of the data in assessing teaching performance. Additionally, the fear of student criticism has the potential of influencing course content delivery and testing measures. This Point/Counterpoint article reviews the potential utility of and controversy surrounding the use of SETs in the formal assessment of dental school faculty. Viewpoint 1 supports the view that SETs are reliable and should be included in those formal assessments. Proponents of this opinion contend that SETs serve to measure a school's effectiveness in support of its core mission, are valid measures based on feedback from the recipients of educational delivery, and provide formative feedback to improve faculty accountability to the institution. Viewpoint 2 argues that SETs should not be used for promotion and tenure decisions, asserting that higher SET ratings do not correlate with improved student learning. The advocates of this viewpoint contend that faculty members may be influenced to focus on student satisfaction rather than pedagogy, resulting in grade inflation. They also argue that SETs are prone to gender and racial biases and that SET results are frequently misinterpreted by administrators. Low response rates and monotonic response patterns are other factors that compromise the reliability of SETs.

  9. Teaching Asian American Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Linda H.

    2000-01-01

    Uses data from interviews with parents of Asian American students, observations, and literature reviews to identify cultural and language issues that must be considered in teaching this population. The paper discusses the history of Asian immigrants, attitudes toward education among Asians, the relationship between teaching styles and Asian…

  10. Student active teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    will give a brief introduction to meta-analyses and syntheses of educational research related to student achievement (Hattie, 2009, 2011). And then point to teaching methods that are manageable in classes of any size, are engaging to students, and qualified for increasing and developing students’ abilities......It seems unsatisfactory that much teaching practice is based on ideas with only weak or sometimes even no documentation for their effect. Many resources in terms of money and time have been lost on implementing ideas that after a short while must be dropped because they did not function well...... in practice, or had no relevant importance for student outcomes. In education we have quite often witnessed introduction of strategies and methods based on personal beliefs, habits, fancy and fads; not research findings and evidence. Fields like education that frequently are occupied with ill defined problems...

  11. Teaching English to Deaf Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kalivodová, Tereza

    2013-01-01

    This bachelor thesis focuses on the process of teaching the English language to students who are deaf. The objective of the theoretical part is to present possible differences in the process of teaching a foreign language that result from the different identity of deaf students and to illustrate the situation of teaching a foreign language to deaf students. The practical part aims to present various methods that may assist during the process of teaching. It also describes the observed lessons...

  12. Students' Evaluation of Teaching Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vevere, Nina; Kozlinskis, Vulfs

    2011-01-01

    Students' evaluations of teaching quality are one of the crucial components of the teaching quality evaluation (along with external evaluation, opinions of colleagues, etc.). According to our research and professional experience, the teaching quality has to be examined in correlation with personality traits of a lecturer. Students' surveys (aiming…

  13. Encouraging Student Interest in Teaching Through a Medical Student Teaching Competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimone, Ariadne K; Haydek, John P; Sudduth, Christopher L; LaBarbera, Vincent; Desai, Yaanik; Reinertsen, Erik; Manning, Kimberly D

    2017-08-01

    Clinician educators have realized the value not only of assigning teaching roles to medical students but also of offering explicit training in how to teach effectively. Despite this interest in the development of medical students' teaching skills, formal teaching instruction and opportunities for practice are lacking. To encourage medical student interest in teaching, the authors developed and implemented a medical student teaching competition (MSTC) at Emory University School of Medicine during the summers of 2014, 2015, and 2016. Each year, eight student finalists were each paired with a physician "teaching coach" and given one month to prepare for the MSTC. During the competition, each finalist delivered an eight-minute presentation to a panel of seven physician and resident judges. The authors describe the development, implementation, and assessment of the MSTC. Approximately 150 medical students and faculty members attended the MSTC each year. The students in attendance felt that the MSTC made them more likely to seek out opportunities to learn how to teach effectively and to practice teaching. Additionally, some students are now more interested in learning about a career in academic medicine than they were before the MSTC. Given the need for more formal initiatives dedicated to improving the teaching skills of doctors-in-training, including medical students, innovative solutions such as the MSTC may enhance a medical school's existing curriculum and encourage student interest in teaching. The MSTC model may be generalizable to other medical schools.

  14. Teaching Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The "Millennial Generation" includes students enrolled in primary grades through high school. These students are also known as Digital Natives, Generation Why, the Net Generation, Generation Me, and i-Kids. The generation includes ages ranging from approximately 7 to 30. This is the generation who have always had technology integrated into their…

  15. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-06-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution teaching can be particularly challenging for student teachers who are just beginning to gain pedagogical knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge related to evolution teaching and who seek approval from university supervisors and cooperating teachers. Science teacher educators need to know how to best support student teachers as they broach the sometimes daunting task of teaching evolution within student teaching placements. This multiple case study report documents how three student teachers approached evolution instruction and what influenced their approaches. Data sources included student teacher interviews, field note observations for 4-5 days of evolution instruction, and evolution instructional artifacts. Data were analyzed using grounded theory approaches to develop individual cases and a cross-case analysis. Seven influences (state exams and standards, cooperating teacher, ideas about teaching and learning, concerns about evolution controversy, personal commitment to evolution, knowledge and preparation for teaching evolution, and own evolution learning experiences) were identified and compared across cases. Implications for science teacher preparation and future research are provided.

  16. Teaching Engineering Students Team Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

  17. Teaching Psychology to Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, George C.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Maintains that medical students should learn more about psychology. Briefly describes why medical students have not learned more about psychology, discusses the aspects of psychology most relevant to the needs of medical students, and suggests teaching formats to accomplish this goal. (JR)

  18. Teaching Students to Overcome Frustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Offers concrete strategies for teaching students about frustration, reducing classroom stress, and integrating frustration-tolerance techniques into the regular curriculum. Discusses how to teach self-control within the curriculum with tips on relaxation, support, and acknowledging accomplishments. Claims that such steps will reduce related…

  19. Effective Teaching Circles: Support for Math Anxious Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Mary Ann; Harrington, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Teaching circles are an innovative mechanism to support faculty and improve student learning. This article describes the use of instructor teaching circles to support math-anxious students at a mid-sized urban university, including the purposes, formation, and sometimes surprising outcomes associated with using this method. Teaching circles for…

  20. Teaching Psychology to Computing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jacqui

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is two-fold. The first aim is to discuss some observations gained from teaching psychology to computing students, highlighting both the wide range of areas where psychology is relevant to computing education and the topics that are relevant at different stages of students' education. The second aim is to consider findings…

  1. How lecturers experience student-centred teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Norman Leslie

    2003-01-01

    This thesis reports the findings of an essentially phenomenographic research study into nurse teachers’ Conceptions of Student-Centred Teaching and Student-Centred Approaches to Teaching. The focus on the experience of student-centred aspects of teaching is a departure from previous research from this perspective in Higher Education that has focused upon teachers’ experience of teaching. The approach and focus of this study is also a departure from research into student-centred teaching in nu...

  2. Addressing Student Needs: Teaching on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Tom

    1998-01-01

    Describes the experiences of a university professor who has been teaching graduate courses in Florida via the Internet. Topics include course preparation, including an initial face-to-face session; Netiquette for working on the Internet; the importance of technical staff; assignments and exams; and student evaluations. (LRW)

  3. Engagement of Students Teaching Assistants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup; Brandt, Charlotte J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports from five years experiences of engaging young student teaching assistants into the continuously development of a course by involving them in research on pedagogical as well as other themes from the course. The purpose of the paper is to pave the road for a more engaged and inte......This paper reports from five years experiences of engaging young student teaching assistants into the continuously development of a course by involving them in research on pedagogical as well as other themes from the course. The purpose of the paper is to pave the road for a more engaged...

  4. Including Students with Visual Impairments: Softball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Ali; Haegele, Justin A.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that while students with visual impairments are likely to be included in general physical education programs, they may not be as active as their typically developing peers. This article provides ideas for equipment modifications and game-like progressions for one popular physical education unit, softball. The purpose of these…

  5. Student Teachers' Approaches to Teaching Biological Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgerding, Lisa A.; Klein, Vanessa A.; Ghosh, Rajlakshmi; Eibel, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Evolution is fundamental to biology and scientific literacy, but teaching high school evolution is often difficult. Evolution teachers face several challenges including limited content knowledge, personal conflicts with evolution, expectations of resistance, concerns about students' conflicts with religion, and curricular constraints. Evolution…

  6. Teaching recovery to medical students.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Feeney, Larkin

    2013-03-01

    Community mental health services are evolving toward more holistic, patient-centered, recovery-based practices. This change necessitates an attitudinal shift from mental health workers, and training in recovery principles is helpful in achieving this change. Medical students often have narrow, doctor-centered concepts of mental health care. Traditional clinical placements in psychiatry do little to address this. We evaluated a recovery-focused teaching program for medical students in psychiatry.

  7. A review of teaching skills development programmes for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Gregory E; McCullough, Brendan; Ramnanan, Christopher J

    2015-02-01

    The CanMEDS role of Scholar requires that medical trainees develop their skills as medical educators. The development of teaching skills in undergraduate medical students is therefore desirable, especially in view of the teaching obligations in residency programmes. The goal of this review was to identify the characteristics and outcomes of programmes designed to develop the teaching skills of undergraduate medical students. The authors searched medical literature databases using combinations of the search terms 'medical student', 'teacher', 'teaching skills', 'peer teaching', 'near-peer teaching' and 'student as teacher'. Twenty papers fit the predetermined search criteria, which included original characterisations of specific programmes involving undergraduate medical students. Three types of initiative were identified in the reviewed articles: peer teaching programmes; teaching workshops, and community outreach programmes. The majority of study participants were students in Years 3 and 4. Subjective self-evaluation by participants using Likert scale-based surveys was by far the most commonly used method of measuring project outcomes. Objective, quantitative teaching-related outcomes were rarely noted in the reports reviewed. Self-perceived improvements in teaching skills were noted by participants in most of the reports. Other perceived benefits included increases in organisational skills, knowledge and confidence in giving feedback. Although several types of programmes have been shown to subjectively improve the teaching skills of undergraduate medical students, characterisation of the objective outcomes of these initiatives is lacking and requires further study. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Students' perception of the teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. Plant and machinery valuation is an important aspect of valuation which is taught within the Estate Management and Valuation curriculum in Nigerian universities. This study examined the perception of students towards the teaching and learning of plant and machinery valuation in a typical Nigerian university.

  9. Teaching Students Who Stutter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Stutterer's incident in class draws national attention; Stuttering Foundation responds with tips for educators. In response to the articles in the "New York Times," Jane Fraser, president of the nonprofit Stuttering Foundation, wrote in a press release eight tips for educators regarding working with students who stutter. This article presents…

  10. Twelve tools for teaching medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Rob; Ellen, Steve

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to outline strategies for teaching psychiatry to medical students. The background is that today's medical students are tomorrow's doctors. Undergraduate psychiatry teaching provides us a unique opportunity to instil positive attitudes, knowledge and skills in the medical workforce of the future. Moreover, teaching has many positives for the individual clinician, their service and the community. We outline 12 strategies that we find makes teaching not only enjoyable for us, but engaging, memorable and relevant for students.

  11. Academically Gifted Undergraduate Students: Their Preferred Teaching Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Khayat, Majed M.; AL-Hrout, Mosa A.; Hyassat, Mizyed A.

    2017-01-01

    Much attention is being paid to the students who give evidence of high achievement capability in specific academic fields. This interest includes choosing sufficient teaching strategies that suit their characteristics. However, this study aims at identifying what teaching strategies are preferred by academically gifted students in Princess Rahma…

  12. Teaching English to Tourism Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maican M.A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims at giving an overview of the particular features of teaching English to students in tourism, a field which has seen a considerable development over the recent period. The paper is divided into four parts: the first part offers an introduction to the importance of English in this field and an overall presentation of the target population; the second part focuses on the four categories of competences that teachers should develop during the foreign language class; the third part makes reference to the teaching materials to be used with a view to enhancing students’ language proficiency; the last part presents some possible challenges language teachers and their students have to cope with to successfully accomplish the learning objectives.

  13. Student-teachers' commitment to teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moses, I.

    2017-01-01

    In this dissertation, I investigated factors related to student-teachers’ commitment to teaching and intention to enter the teaching profession after graduation. The study gives some explanations why some student-teachers are not committed to enter and stay in the teaching profession for a

  14. USEFUL TIPS FOR TEACHING INTERNATIONAL NURSING STUDENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Saras

    2016-09-01

    International students studying nursing in Australia has increased (Glew, 2013). For most of these students, English may not be their first language. The style of teaching and learning international students had previously experienced differ vastly from the Western style of teaching.

  15. Teaching STEM to Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikirk, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The "Millennial Generation" includes students enrolled in primary grades through high school. These students are also known as Digital Natives, Generation Why, the Net Generation, Generation Me, and i-Kids. The generation includes ages ranging from approximately 7 to 30. This is the generation who have always had technology integrated into their…

  16. Student peer reviewers' views on teaching innovations and imaginative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2016-04-01

    Various teaching innovations have been proven effective in promoting students' critical thinking, creativity, problem solving and active learning. However, little attention has been paid to the possibility of including students as peer reviewers to evaluate these innovations in light of imaginative learning. This study explored the perspective of senior students who played the role of the student peer reviewer on three teaching innovations, namely writing poetry, composing songs and creating role-plays in problem-based learning (PBL), specifically in relation to imaginative learning. A focus group interview. Ten senior nursing students who had experienced the conventional PBL approach but not the mentioned teaching innovations were invited to participate in reviewing a video recording of a PBL class using the above teaching innovations with a total of 18 junior year students. Five themes were identified using content analysis: (i) motivation to learn, (ii) increased empathy, (iii) information retention, (iv) development of critical thinking and creativity, and (v) drawbacks of teaching innovations. It is suggested that student peer reviewers should be considered, as they can bring an outsider-learner's views on understanding the impacts of teaching innovations on imaginative learning. A call should be made to invite student peer reviewers on teaching and learning approaches, and more effort should be devoted to promoting an understanding of how imaginative learning can be achieved via teaching innovations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Teaching audience analysis to the technical student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debs, M. B.; Brillhart, L. V.

    1981-01-01

    Teaching audience analysis, as practiced in a technical writing course for engineering students, is discussed. Audience analysis is described as the task of defining the audience for a particular piece of writing and determining those characteristics of the audience which constrain the writer and effect reception of the message. A mature technical writing style that shows the tension produced when a text is written to be read and understood is considered in terms of audience analysis. Techniques include: (1) conveying to students the concept that a reader with certain expectations exist, (2) team teaching to preserve the context of a given technical discipline, and (3) assigning a technical report that addresses a variety of readers, thus establishing the complexity of audience oriented writing.

  18. The teaching of medical ethics to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, S M

    1994-12-01

    Teaching medical ethics to medical students in a pluralistic society is a challenging task. Teachers of ethics have obligations not just to teach the subject matter but to help create an academic environment in which well motivated students have reinforcement of their inherent good qualities. Emphasis should be placed on the ethical aspects of daily medical practice and not just on the dramatic dilemmas raised by modern technology. Interdisciplinary teaching should be encouraged and teaching should span the entire duration of medical studies. Attention should be paid particularly to ethical problems faced by the students themselves, preferably at the time when the problems are most on the students' minds. A high level of academic demands, including critical examination of students' progress is recommended. Finally, personal humility on the part of teachers can help set a good example for students to follow.

  19. Teaching Introductory Statistics to Blind Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Stephen M.; Harrington, Charles F.; Walls, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The challenges of learning statistics, particularly distributions and their characteristics, can be potentially monumental for vision impaired and blind students. The authors provide some practical advice for teaching these students.

  20. Nursing Student Teachers' experiences during teaching practice:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mary

    An essential part of the nurse education programs is to facilitate the linking of theory to practice. Teaching practice experiences of ... KEYWORDS: Nursing Student, Teaching Experiences, Expectation, benefits, Teaching Practice. INTRODUCTION ... Association of Colleges of Nursing (2008a &. 2008b, America Nurses ...

  1. Nursing Student Teachers' experiences during teaching practice:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mary

    Teaching practice experiences of nursing student provide greater insight to develop effective classroom and clinical teaching ... expectations and benefits are significantly derived from teaching practice although contingent on the mode of entry into the ...... Participation in and Leadership of. Continual Improvement.

  2. Generational differences of baccalaureate nursing students' preferred teaching methods and faculty use of teaching methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahoyde, Theresa

    Nursing education is experiencing a generational phenomenon with student enrollment spanning three generations. Classrooms of the 21st century include the occasional Baby Boomer and a large number of Generation X and Generation Y students. Each of these generations has its own unique set of characteristics that have been shaped by values, trends, behaviors, and events in society. These generational characteristics create vast opportunities to learn, as well as challenges. One such challenge is the use of teaching methods that are congruent with nursing student preferences. Although there is a wide range of studies conducted on student learning styles within the nursing education field, there is little research on the preferred teaching methods of nursing students. The purpose of this quantitative, descriptive study was to compare the preferred teaching methods of multi-generational baccalaureate nursing students with faculty use of teaching methods. The research study included 367 participants; 38 nursing faculty and 329 nursing students from five different colleges within the Midwest region. The results of the two-tailed t-test found four statistically significant findings between Generation X and Y students and their preferred teaching methods including; lecture, listening to the professor lecture versus working in groups; actively participating in group discussion; and the importance of participating in group assignments. The results of the Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) found seventeen statistically significant findings between levels of students (freshmen/sophomores, juniors, & seniors) and their preferred teaching methods. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching method by students. Overall, the support for a variety of teaching methods was also found in the analysis of data.

  3. Activation of Students with Various Teaching Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2011-01-01

    A group of teaching methodes to active engineer students have been tried out. The methodes are developed based on the Pedagogical Cyclic Workflow (PCW). Comparing with earlier evaluation, positive feedback is achieved among the students.......A group of teaching methodes to active engineer students have been tried out. The methodes are developed based on the Pedagogical Cyclic Workflow (PCW). Comparing with earlier evaluation, positive feedback is achieved among the students....

  4. Teaching medical students consultation skills using e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Merete; Witt, Klaus; Fridorff-Jens, Peter Kindt

    2015-01-01

    Teaching consultation skills to medical students using e-learning. Introduction: We have been teaching Family Medicine at the University of Copenhagen for more than twenty years. We wish to develop a method to evaluate the current teaching of consultation skills and the effect of new interventions...... on-line and comparing the answers in the intervention group to the usual course? [2] Material and Method All students at the course in 2013 were included in the project (n=351), approximately half constituted the control group. For the on-line teaching we use different short video....... During the course each student works eight days as a doctor in a general practice clinic. They see real patients and video their consultations and analyse them in small group sessions at the university with their teacher and fellow students. We teach them patient centred medicine [1].The final evaluation...

  5. Science student teacher's perceptions of good teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    Data were collected by means of a semi structured questionnaire. Descriptive statistics and themes were used to establish student's perceptions. Results revealed that, amongst others, the nature of the subject and teaching strategies employed are perceived to influence what students perceived as good teaching. Results ...

  6. Teachers' Perceptions of Student Evaluations of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Cecilia K. Y.; Luk, Lillian Y. Y.; Zeng, Min

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of teaching in higher education has drawn much attention due to the need for greater accountability and improvement in student learning. Our review of literature on Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET) surveys suggests that considerable controversy and criticism have surrounded its use, fairness, and validity. Yet, many universities in…

  7. Student Evaluations of Teaching: Improving Teaching Quality in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammonds, Frank; Mariano, Gina J.; Ammons, Gracie; Chambers, Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    Student evaluations of teaching (SET) are widely used in both North America and the UK as a means of documenting and improving teaching quality. This article discusses current research on SET administration and interpretation in both regions. Sections of the article are dedicated to various problems associated with SETs and how these may be…

  8. Maximising Resource Allocation in the Teaching Laboratory: Understanding Student Evaluations of Teaching Assistants in a Team-Based Teaching Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Sasha; Suesse, Thomas F.; McCarthy, Timothy J.; Goldfinch, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Minimal research papers have investigated the use of student evaluations on the laboratory, a learning medium usually run by teaching assistants with little control of the content, delivery and equipment. Finding the right mix of teaching assistants for the laboratory can be an onerous task due to the many skills required including theoretical and…

  9. Expert Voices: What Cooperating Teachers and Teacher Candidates Say about Quality Student Teaching Placements and Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrez, Cheryl A. Franklin; Krebs, Marjori M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated characteristics and attributes of the student teaching experience to better understand what makes a quality student teaching experience. This article reflects a holistic approach by addressing the overall context of a quality student teaching experience that includes the environment, characteristics of successful…

  10. Medical students' perceptions of bedside teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David; Cozar, Octavian; Lefroy, Janet

    2017-06-01

    Bedside teaching is recognised as a valuable tool in medical education by both students and faculty members. Bedside teaching is frequently delivered by consultants; however, junior doctors are increasingly engaging in this form of clinical teaching, and their value in this respect is becoming more widely recognised. The aim of this study was to supplement work completed by previous authors who have begun to explore students' satisfaction with bedside teaching, and their perceptions of the relationship with the clinical teachers. Specifically, we aimed to identify how students perceive bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants. We aimed to identify how students perceived bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors compared with consultants METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to all third-year medical students at Keele University via e-mail. Responses were submitted anonymously. Forty-six students responded (37.4%), 73.3 per cent of whom said that they felt more comfortable having bedside teaching delivered by junior doctors than by consultants. Consultants were perceived as more challenging by 60 per cent of respondents. Students appeared to value feedback on their performance, trust the validity of taught information, and to value the overall educational experience equally, regardless of the clinical grade of the teacher. Student preference does not equate to the value that they place on their bedside teaching. Junior doctors are perceived as being more in touch with students and the curriculum, whereas consultants are perceived as having higher expectations and as being both stricter and more knowledgeable. The clinical teacher's approachable manner and enthusiasm for teaching are more important than clinical grade, as is the ability to deliver well-structured constructive feedback. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Developing clinical teaching capacities of midwifery students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rance, Sharon; Sweet, Linda

    2016-06-01

    Competency Standards in Australia articulate that the midwife must be able to contribute to the professional development of themselves and others. Few undergraduate health professional curricula currently incorporate content for the development of specific knowledge and skills required for clinical teaching. This project aimed to understand and enhance midwifery students' preparedness to assume their future clinical teaching responsibilities. Design-based research was used to implement an educational intervention aimed at developing clinical teaching skills through a peer education session between 1st and 3rd year students. The perspectives of 30 undergraduate midwifery students about their preparedness for their teaching role and the intervention were obtained through 3 focus groups. A thematic analysis of the data was undertaken. Three themes were identified encompassing the research aims and objectives; 'Co-creating a culture for learning', 'reciprocal teaching and learning' and 'developing clinical teaching capacities'. The findings indicate that the midwifery students had a holistic understanding of their responsibilities in clinical teaching in the workplace. They were able to identify ways in which their teaching capacities were being developed through their clinical experiences and the curriculum, both intended and hidden. Despite limited educational activities for clinical teaching, the midwifery students made explicit connections of the relational interdependence of workplace-based experiences and their learning. Students were clearly able to identify ways in which their own learning experiences and the culture in which this learning is embedded, assists them to develop clinical teaching skills, ready to support the next generation of midwifery students. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Teaching Calculus Students How to Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelkins, Matthew R.; Pfaff, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    Addresses the problem of poor study habits in calculus students and presents techniques to teach students how to study consistently and effectively. Concludes that many students greatly appreciate the added structure, work harder than in previous courses, and witness newfound success as a consequence. (Author/ASK)

  13. Science student teacher's perceptions of good teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    This study provides a rich narrative on a university of technology's science students' ... Good teaching is that which promotes student learning, it is not ... Learning happens when students read, talk, write, explain, make connections between ideas, try things out and observe the results, analyse, evaluate and organise their ...

  14. Physiotherapy Students Learning and Teaching Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rhman N. Alghamdi

    2017-03-01

    Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted. A total of 132 undergraduate physiotherapy students completed a questionnaire consisted of 36 questions divided into five different categories through a 5-point Likert’s scale. These categories of learning and teaching satisfaction are evaluation methods, academic advising, teaching and learning strategies, evaluation of teacher and courses, clinical training. Chi-square test was used to determine the significant level of the student degree of agreement. Results: Chi-square analysis revealed that all the items of the questionnaire were statistically significant (p < 0.05 for the choice “True sometimes” except questions related the mechanism of fraud control in the students’ duties and tests, the office hours provided by the teaching staff, and the extent of benefits gained by students through scientific help of teaching staff were statistically significant (p < 0.05 for the choice “Agree”. The degree of agreement of the five categories of questionnaire was fair. The results revealed that about 6 out of every 10 respondents were found satisfied with the five categories of learning and teaching process. Conclusion: The students’ satisfaction level was “fair” degree of agreement with learning and teaching process in the physiotherapy department that requires several strategies to improve the learning and teaching process of the physiotherapy students. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(1.000: 23-35

  15. The effect of student teaching experience on selected personality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examines changes in selected personality traits of fifty-three physical education student teachers over the course of a student teaching semester. The personality traits measured included anxiety, concentration, confidence, mental preparation, motivation, and cooperation. An adapted Psychological Skills ...

  16. Teaching effectiveness and students' performance in conventional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stakeholders in the education industry have raised questions on the relevance of these coaching centres particularly in terms of students' academic performance, teaching effectiveness, leadership and supervisory activities of super-ordinates and the availability and utilization of basic infrastructure and teaching/learning ...

  17. Interpersonal Teaching Style and Student Impression Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coldren, Jeffrey; Hively, Jodi

    2009-01-01

    Assuming that learning is an inherently social process, this research explores interpersonal variables that affect teaching. Specifically, does the interpersonal teaching style affect student impressions of the instructor? Eighty-five undergraduates viewed one of three ten-minute videos that portrayed either an authoritarian, authoritative, or…

  18. Using Constructivist Teaching Strategies to Enhance Academic Outcomes of Students with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Joseph P.; Beard, Lawrence A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades many teaching strategies have been proposed by various educators to improve education of all students including students with special needs. No single one of these proposed teaching strategies meets the needs of all students. The new Every Student Succeeds Act, successor to No Child Left behind Law, which transfers oversight…

  19. US students have wrong view of teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruesi, Liz

    2017-04-01

    Students taking science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subjects in the US have a number of misconceptions about teaching that may be leading them to choose other careers, according to a study by the American Physical Society (APS).

  20. Animals for teaching purposes: medical students' attitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, S M

    1995-01-01

    Animal rights movements have increased the scope and intensity of their activities over the past decade. While it is generally assumed that doctors and other members of the health care professions favour the use of animals for science, few data are available. Student protests in various medical schools against use of animals in teaching laboratories indicated further need for objective data. A questionnaire about attitudes to the use of animals for teaching purposes was distributed to all the medical students at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, present during classes on a given day. All students present (200) returned the questionnaire (70% of the student body). Also queried were attitudes towards related subjects. A high percentage of medical students surveyed had significant reservations about animal experimentation for teaching purposes and about the preferential priority for human life over that of animals. These attitudes, if confirmed, have serious implications for educators both in the health fields and otherwise.

  1. Student Views Based A Proposal for First Reading and Writing Teaching Course of Classroom Teaching Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nail YILDIRIM

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Reading and writing teaching is very important for a person’s life. Reading and writing teaching begins in the first class of primary education and it is delivered by classroom teachers. Classroom teachers get prepared for teaching with the “first reading and writing teaching course” given in their undergraduate education. As the content of the course is analyzed, first reading and writing teaching has three theoretical credit hours per week. It is indicated that exercises should be included in the content of the course, however, the exercises stay in the university environment and a real reading and writing exercise cannot be realized. Based on this fact, the purpose of this study is to state that reading and writing teaching course should not be theoretical, contrarily, it should be exercises based. The study conducts an action research to achieve this purpose. Descriptive method is used in the research to establish the current status. In this research, to determine the factors which affect the success of methodology in the content of first reading and writing teaching course of classroom teaching departments, one of the qualitative research methods, a semistructured interview technique is applied. Reading and writing teaching is realized in Tokat city, central district by using voice based sentence method on 40 adults who knew neither reading nor writing. The population of the research is composed of 40 junior students of classroom teaching department who taught reading and writing to 40 adults and 30 students who were enrolled to theoretical reading and writing teaching course. Students, who participated in the first reading and writing teaching exercise, indicate that they feel more comfortable about reading and writing teaching, from now on, they know what to do, and they assert that applied reading and writing teaching is more useful. Those students who are enrolled to theoretical first reading and writing course state that they

  2. Teaching crucial skills: An electrocardiogram teaching module for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudgar, Saumil M; Engle, Deborah L; Grochowski, Colleen O'Connor; Gagliardi, Jane P

    2016-01-01

    Medical student performance in electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation at our institution could be improved. Varied resources exist to teach students this essential skill. We created an ECG teaching module (ECGTM) of 75 cases representing 15 diagnoses to improve medical students' performance and confidence in ECG interpretation. Students underwent pre- and post-clerkship testing to assess ECG interpretation skills and confidence and also end-of-clinical-year testing in ECG and laboratory interpretation. Performance was compared for the years before and during ECGTM availability. Eighty-four percent of students (total n=101) reported using the ECGTM; 98% of those who used it reported it was useful. Students' performance and confidence were higher on the post-test. Students with access to the ECGTM (n=101) performed significantly better than students from the previous year (n=90) on the end-of-year ECG test. The continuous availability of an ECGTM was associated with improved confidence and ability in ECG interpretation. The ECGTM may be another available tool to help students as they learn to read ECGs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Teaching Photosynthesis with ELL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Susan; Shaw, Edward Lewis, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Although the teaching of photosynthesis occurs yearly in elementary classrooms, one thing that makes it challenging is the inclusion of English language learners (ELLs). This article presents several activities for teaching and assessing of photosynthesis in a third grade classroom. The activities incorporate the photosynthesis content, teaching…

  4. Negotiating Accountability during Student Teaching: The Influence of an Inquiry-Based Student Teaching Seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on the work of Russian literary critic, Mikhail Bakhtin, this article explores how an inquiry-based social studies student teaching seminar helped three preservice teachers negotiate the pressures of standards-based reforms during student teaching. The author first examines how initial perceptions of standardization and high-stakes testing…

  5. Are medical schools hesitant to teach undergraduate students teaching skills? A medical student's critical view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileder, Lukas Peter

    2013-11-13

    Junior medical staff provides a large proportion of undergraduate student education. However, despite increasing numbers of resident-as-teacher training programs, junior doctors may still not be sufficiently prepared to teach medical students. Hence, medical schools should consider implementing formal teaching skills training into undergraduate curricula.

  6. Student Perception of Teaching Effectiveness: Development and Validation of the Evaluation of Teaching Competencies Scale (ETCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catano, Victor M.; Harvey, Steve

    2011-01-01

    A major criticism of student evaluations of teaching is that they do not reflect student perspectives. Using critical incidents job analysis, students identified nine teaching effectiveness competencies: communication, availability, creativity, individual consideration, social awareness, feedback, professionalism, conscientiousness and…

  7. Student Attitudes toward Professors and Teaching Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, R. J.; Helsel, Diana G.

    1989-01-01

    Presented are the results of a survey of several classes in a college of agriculture to determine whether students had different attitudes about being taught by professors vs. teaching assistants. Data indicated that professionalism and course content are the most important variables to students. (CW)

  8. Teachers' Teaching Experience and Students' Learning Outcomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examined teachers' teaching experience and students' learning outcomes in the secondary schools in Ondo State Nigeria. As a correlational survey, the study population comprised all the 257 secondary schools that presented students for the year 2003 senior secondary certificate (SSC) examinations in the ...

  9. Teaching Copywriting Students about the Mature Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewniany, Bonnie

    Advertising educators have a responsibility to make students aware of the importance of the mature market (older people) and to teach them methods to reach this group. An assignment in a copywriting class asked students to write and design ads to promote blue jeans to adults over 50. The assignment accomplished three things: (1) helped students…

  10. Student teacher anxieties related to practice teaching

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    (gender, age and grade placement) on practice-teaching related factors such as evaluation and an unsuccessful lesson. The findings are discussed ..... For the secondary school student teachers group, the evaluation score decreases steadily .... British Journal of Educational Psychology,63:261-270. Hart NI 1987. Student ...

  11. Teachers' Teaching Experience and Students' Learning Outcomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Items 1 - 6 ... E-mail:toade1957@yahoo.com. Abstract. This article examined teachers' teaching experience and students' learning outcomes in the secondary schools in Ondo State Nigeria. As a correlational survey, the study population comprised all the 257 secondary schools that presented students for the year 2003 senior ...

  12. Identifying Teaching Methods that Engage Entrepreneurship Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Peter; Metcalfe, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Entrepreneurship education particularly requires student engagement because of the complexity of the entrepreneurship process. The purpose of this paper is to describe how an established measure of engagement can be used to identify relevant teaching methods that could be used to engage any group of entrepreneurship students.…

  13. International Student Teaching: Stimulus for Developing Reflective Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vall, Nancy Gerdin, Tennison, Jo M.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses how culture shock intrinsic in a cross-cultural student teaching experience necessitates that participants think critically and reflect about teaching. The article describes an international student teaching component at two Minnesota colleges. After 7 weeks of student teaching in the United States, participants spend 6 weeks in British…

  14. Teaching skills training for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariq, Omair; Alexopoulos, Anastasia-Stefania; Razik, Fathima; Currie, Jane; Salooja, Nina

    2013-06-01

      The UK General Medical Council has recommended that medical students be taught how to teach; however, the current state of teaching skills training in England has not yet been investigated.   To explore the current state of undergraduate teaching skills training at medical schools in England.   A questionnaire survey was sent to all 24 medical schools in England, enquiring about the basic structure, content areas, staffing, delivery and assessment methods of compulsory courses.   A response rate of 22/24 (92%) was achieved, and 18/22 (82%) of the responding institutions offered some form of teaching skills training. The most frequently covered content areas were small group facilitation skills, large group teaching skills and use of effective feedback. Teaching was delivered by a combination of hospital doctors, non-physician educators or general practitioner educators in the majority of courses. Six of the nine (67%) compulsory courses featured student assessments. The main barriers to implementing these courses were staffing limitations, insufficient time and lack of student engagement.   Our study demonstrates both the similarities and variation between undergraduate teaching skills courses across England. However, further research will be necessary to determine whether the long-term impact of such training will result in better educators, and ultimately in improved patient care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Integrating Research and Education: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullis, J.

    2003-12-01

    The link between research and teaching at all levels is increasingly recognized, and can be an attractive as well as an effective part of a graduate program in geoscience. At Brown we have a strong partnership between our department and the university's teaching center. The Sheridan Center for the Advancement of College Teaching provides resources and programs to help grad students improve their effectiveness as TAs and their qualifications for obtaining a teaching-related job, as well as to promote and facilitate improved teaching by faculty. Departments are encouraged to designate faculty and grad student liaisons to the Center and to take advantage of Center programs (including seminars on topics such as Persuasive Communication, Cognitive Diversity, Developing a Syllabus, Assessment, and Teaching Portfolios) and resources (such as books, tapes and videos and Individual Teaching Consultations), as well as to develop their own discipline-specific programs. The Geol. Sci. Dept. has been an active participant in Center activities from the start, but we have also developed our own activities and programs. Each year two geo faculty and two grad students serve as official liaisons to the Center, in addition to organizing and running a variety of programs within the department, including: orientation sessions for new graduate students and first-time TAs, `micro-teaching' practise sessions with constructive feedback for new TAs, mid-semester discussion and feedback sessions for current and more experienced TAs, as well as lunch meetings for all interested faculty and grad students to discuss aspects of teaching. These activities have increased the awareness and effectiveness of teaching and learning in our department, for example promoting faculty and TAs to implement syllabi with stated goals, in-class active learning exercises, small group projects, a greater number and variety of writing assignments, and greater diversity in assessment. The effectiveness of our

  16. Teaching pediatric communication skills to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Katherine A; Metcalf, Elizabeth P; Brooks, Rachel; Kinnersley, Paul; Greenwood, Stephen R; Powell, Colin Ve

    2015-01-01

    Delivering effective clinical pediatric communication skills training to undergraduate medical students is a distinct and important challenge. Pediatric-specific communication skills teaching is complex and under-researched. We report on the development of a scenario-based pediatric clinical communication skills program as well as students' assessment of this module. We designed a pediatric clinical communication skills program and delivered it five times during one academic year via small-group teaching. Students were asked to score the workshop in eight domains (learning objectives, complexity, interest, competencies, confidence, tutors, feedback, and discussion) using 5-point Likert scales, along with free text comments that were grouped and analyzed thematically, identifying both the strengths of the workshop and changes suggested to improve future delivery. Two hundred and twenty-one of 275 (80%) student feedback forms were returned. Ninety-six percent of students' comments were positive or very positive, highlighting themes such as the timing of teaching, relevance, group sizes, and the use of actors, tutors, and clinical scenarios. Scenario-based teaching of clinical communication skills is positively received by students. Studies need to demonstrate an impact on practice, performance, development, and sustainability of communications training.

  17. What motivates senior clinicians to teach medical students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Cathy

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to assess the motivations of senior medical clinicians to teach medical students. This understanding could improve the recruitment and retention of important clinical teachers. Methods The study group was 101 senior medical clinicians registered on a teaching list for a medical school teaching hospital (The Canberra Hospital, ACT, Australia. Their motivations to teach medical students were assessed applying Q methodology. Results Of the 75 participants, 18 (24% were female and 57 (76% were male. The age distribution was as follows: 30–40 years = 16 participants (21.3%, 41–55 years = 46 participants (61.3% and >55 years = 13 participants (17.3%. Most participants (n = 48, 64% were staff specialists and 27 (36% were visiting medical officers. Half of the participants were internists (n = 39, 52%, 12 (16% were surgeons, and 24 (32% were other sub-specialists. Of the 26 senior clinicians that did not participate, two were women; 15 were visiting medical officers and 11 were staff specialists; 16 were internists, 9 were surgeons and there was one other sub-specialist. The majority of these non-participating clinicians fell in the 41–55 year age group. The participating clinicians were moderately homogenous in their responses. Factor analysis produced 4 factors: one summarising positive motivations for teaching and three capturing impediments for teaching. The main factors influencing motivation to teach medical students were intrinsic issues such as altruism, intellectual satisfaction, personal skills and truth seeking. The reasons for not teaching included no strong involvement in course design, a heavy clinical load or feeling it was a waste of time. Conclusion This study provides some insights into factors that may be utilised in the design of teaching programs that meet teacher motivations and ultimately enhance the effectiveness of the medical teaching workforce.

  18. Student Perceptions of Their Biology Teacher's Interpersonal Teaching Behaviors and Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madike, Victor N.

    Inadequate student-teacher interactions in undergraduate courses have been linked to poor student performance. Researchers have noted that students' perceptions of student-teacher relationships may be an important factor related to student performance. The administration of a Mid-Atlantic community college prioritized increasing undergraduate biology student performance. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine the relationship between students' biology achievement and their perceptions of interpersonal teaching behaviors and student-teacher interactions in introductory biology courses. Leary's theory on interpersonal communication and the systems communication theory of Watzlawick, Beavin, and Jackson served as the theoretical foundation. The Wubbel's Likert-scale questionnaire on student-teacher interactions was administered to 318 undergraduate biology students. Non-parametric Spearman's rank correlations revealed a significant direct correlation between students' grades and their perceptions of teachers' interpersonal teaching behaviors. The relationship between student achievement and students' perceptions of student-teacher interactions prompted the recommendation for additional study on the importance of student-teacher interactions in undergraduate programs. A recommendation for local practice included faculty development on strategies for improving student-teacher interactions. The study's implications for positive social change include increased understanding for administrators and instructors on the importance of teacher-student interactions at the community college level.

  19. Including Exceptional Students in Your Instrumental Music Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mixon, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the method and adaptations used by the author in including students with special needs in an instrumental music program. To ensure success in the program, the author shares the method he uses to include exceptional students and enumerates some possible adaptations. There are certainly other methods and modifications that…

  20. TEACHING CAD PROGRAMMING TO ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela Caffarena CELANI

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to discuss the relevance of including the discipline of computer programming in the architectural curriculum. To do so I start by explaining how computer programming has been applied in other educational contexts with pedagogical success, describing Seymour Papert's principles. After that, I summarize the historical development of CAD and provide three historical examples of educational applications of computer programming in architecture, followed by a contemporary case that I find of particular relevance. Next, I propose a methodology for teaching programming for architects that aims at improving the quality of designs by making their concepts more explicit. This methodology is based on my own experience teaching computer programming for architecture students at undergraduate and graduate levels at the State University of Campinas, Brazil. The paper ends with a discussion about the role of programming nowadays, when most CAD software are user-friendly and do not require any knowledge of programming for improving performance. I conclude that the introduction of programming in the CAD curriculum within a proper conceptual framework may transform the concept of architectural education. Key-words: Computer programming; computer-aided design; architectural education.

  1. Does Burnout Begin with Student-Teaching? Analyzing Efficacy, Burnout, and Support during the Student-Teaching Semester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fives, Helenrose; Hamman, Doug; Olivarez, Arturo

    2007-01-01

    The burnout process may begin as early as the student-teaching experience [Gold, Y., 1985. Does teacher burnout begin with student teaching? "Education", 105, 254-257]. Data from 49 student-teachers in the southwest United States were gathered twice during their student-teaching practicum. Data assessing teacher efficacy, teacher…

  2. Student Perceptions of Learner-Centered Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeDe Wohlfarth

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The learner-centered paradigm departs from traditional teaching models by focusing on students more than teachers and learning more than teaching. Thus, classes are more egalitarian; they emphasize critical thinking, active learning, and real-world assignments. Graduate students in learner-centered classrooms were surveyed about perceptions of their experiences in relation to the key dimensions of the learner-centered paradigm and noted that the approach contributed to their feeling respected as learners, developed their critical thinking skills, and encouraged their self-directedness. Based on these findings, post-secondary instructors are encouraged to experiment with learning-centered approaches to further explore this promising model.

  3. Evaluation of medical students of teacher-based and student-based teaching methods in Infectious diseases course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemzadeh, I; Aghamolaei, T; Hosseini-Parandar, F

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In recent years, medical education has changed dramatically and many medical schools in the world have been trying for expand modern training methods. Purpose of the research is to appraise the medical students of teacher-based and student-based teaching methods in Infectious diseases course, in the Medical School of Hormozgan Medical Sciences University. Methods: In this interventional study, a total of 52 medical scholars that used Section in this Infectious diseases course were included. About 50% of this course was presented by a teacher-based teaching method (lecture) and 50% by a student-based teaching method (problem-based learning). The satisfaction of students regarding these methods was assessed by a questionnaire and a test was used to measure their learning. information are examined with using SPSS 19 and paired t-test. Results: The satisfaction of students of student-based teaching method (problem-based learning) was more positive than their satisfaction of teacher-based teaching method (lecture).The mean score of students in teacher-based teaching method was 12.03 (SD=4.08) and in the student-based teaching method it was 15.50 (SD=4.26) and where is a considerable variation among them (p<0.001). Conclusion: The use of the student-based teaching method (problem-based learning) in comparison with the teacher-based teaching method (lecture) to present the Infectious diseases course led to the student satisfaction and provided additional learning opportunities.

  4. Teaching Methodologies in Spatial Planning for Integration of International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtudes, Ana; Cavaleiro, Victor

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays, the spread of international exchanges is growing among university students, across European countries. In general, during their academic degrees, the high education students are looking for international experiences abroad. This goal has its justification not only in the reason of pursuing their studies, but also in the desire of knowing another city, a different culture, a diverse way of teaching, and at the same time having the opportunity of improving their skills speaking another language. Therefore, the scholars at the high level of educational systems have to rethink their traditional approaches in terms of teaching methodologies in order to be able to integrate these students, that every academic year are coming from abroad. Portugal is not an exception on this matter, neither the scientific domain of spatial planning. Actually, during the last years, the number of foreign students choosing to study in this country is rapidly increasing. Even though some years ago, most of the international students were originated from Portuguese speaking countries, comprising its former colonies such as Brazil, Angola, Cape Verde or Mozambique, recently the number of students from other countries is increasing, including from Syria. Characterized by a mild climate, a beautiful seashore and cities packed with historical and cultural interests, this country is a very attractive destination for international students. In this sense, this study explores the beliefs about teaching methodologies that scholars in spatial planning domain can use to guide their practice within Architecture degree, in order to promote de integration of international students. These methodologies are based on the notion that effective teaching is student-centred rather than teacher-centred, in order to achieve a knowledge-centred learning environment framework in terms of spatial planning skills. Thus, this article arises out of a spatial planning unit experience in the Master Degree in

  5. Another Perspective: Teaching Music to Millennial Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Frank

    2015-01-01

    In an increasingly connected world, our students are listening to and making music outside the school context. As music educators, we need to better understand the media they use and incorporate this technology in our daily teaching to enhance music literacy in our classrooms.

  6. Student Teachers' Perceptions towards Teaching Practice Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chireshe, R.; Chireshe, E.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the perceptions of student teachers towards teaching practice assessment. Participants N=180:90 males, 90 females were randomly drawn from three primary school teachers' colleges in Masvingo Educational Region of Zimbabwe. A questionnaire was used to gather data from the respondents. A chi-square test was used to analyse the…

  7. Teaching science students to identify entrepreneurial opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nab, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304827614

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation describes a research project on teaching science students to identify entrepreneurial opportunities, which is a core competence for entrepreneurs that should be emphasized in education. This research consists of four studies. The first case study aims at finding design strategies

  8. Teachers' Teaching Experience and Students' Learning Outcomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Items 1 - 6 ... Teachers' Teaching Experience and Students' Learning Outcomes in. Secondary Schools in Ondo State, igeria. Adeyemi, T. O.. Department of Educational Foundations & Management,. University of Ado- Ekiti, P. M. B 5363, Ado- Ekiti, Nigeria. E-mail:toade1957@yahoo.com. Abstract. This article examined ...

  9. Teaching pediatric communication skills to medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Katherine A; Metcalf, Elizabeth P; Brooks, Rachel; Kinnersley, Paul; Greenwood, Stephen R; Powell, Colin VE

    2015-01-01

    Background Delivering effective clinical pediatric communication skills training to undergraduate medical students is a distinct and important challenge. Pediatric-specific communication skills teaching is complex and under-researched. We report on the development of a scenario-based pediatric clinical communication skills program as well as students’ assessment of this module. Methods We designed a pediatric clinical communication skills program and delivered it five times during one academic year via small-group teaching. Students were asked to score the workshop in eight domains (learning objectives, complexity, interest, competencies, confidence, tutors, feedback, and discussion) using 5-point Likert scales, along with free text comments that were grouped and analyzed thematically, identifying both the strengths of the workshop and changes suggested to improve future delivery. Results Two hundred and twenty-one of 275 (80%) student feedback forms were returned. Ninety-six percent of students’ comments were positive or very positive, highlighting themes such as the timing of teaching, relevance, group sizes, and the use of actors, tutors, and clinical scenarios. Conclusion Scenario-based teaching of clinical communication skills is positively received by students. Studies need to demonstrate an impact on practice, performance, development, and sustainability of communications training. PMID:25653569

  10. Student Teachers' Conceptions of Teaching Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate prospective biology teachers' conceptions of teaching biology and identify how these conceptions revealed their strategies for helping their future students' learning of biology. The study utilized drawings, narratives and interviews to investigate the nature of the prospective biology…

  11. Teaching Ethics to High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Susan; Willingham, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Working with two teachers and thirty-four high school seniors, the authors developed procedures and assessments to teach ethics in an American high school civics class. This approach requires high school students to discover an agreement or convergence between Kantian ethics and virtue ethics. The authors also created an instrument to measure…

  12. Good Teaching: Aligning Student and Administrator Perceptions and Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Lazarus Nabaho; Joseph Oonyu; Jessica Norah Aguti

    2017-01-01

    Extant literature attests to limited systematic inquiry into students’ perceptions of good teaching in higher education. Consequently, there have been calls for engaging students in construing what makes good university teaching. This interpretivist study investigated finalyear undergraduate students’ perceptions of good teaching at Makerere University in Uganda. Results suggested that students conceived good teachers as being student centered, demonstrating strong subject and pedagogical kno...

  13. Students' and Physicians' Evaluations of Gynecologic Teaching Associate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plauche, Warren C.; Baugniet-Nebrija, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Gynecologic teaching associates taught third-year medical students to perform physical examination of the female pelvis and breasts. Evaluations by the students of this teaching method and assessment by the teaching associates of student problems were obtained from questionnaires. (Author/MLW)

  14. The Influences on Teaching Perspectives of Australian Physical Education Teacher Education Students: The First-Year Influences on Teaching Perspectives Exploratory (FIT-PE) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, Brendon P.; Pill, Shane

    2016-01-01

    There has been a paucity of literature investigating the teaching beliefs and intentions of Australian physical education teacher education (PETE) students that enter teacher training. The First-year Influences on Teaching Perspectives Exploratory (FIT-PE) study explores the teaching perspectives of first year PETE students; including teaching…

  15. Gender in the Teaching Profession: University Students' Views of Teaching as a Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tašner, Veronika; Mihelic, Mojca Žveglic; Ceplak, Metka Mencin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to gain a better insight into what encourages young adults, in particular young women, to enter the teaching profession. The empirical part of the article is based on a pilot study including 132 students, with data collection being based on a survey approach using a questionnaire. The research attempts to address the…

  16. Student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Gustafsson, Amandus; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study is to compare student teachers and clinical associate professors regarding the quality of procedural skills teaching in terms of participants' technical skills, knowledge and satisfaction with the teaching. METHODS: This is an experimental, randomized, controlled study...... comparing the teaching of student teachers and associate professors regarding participants' learning outcome and satisfaction with the teaching. Two skills are chosen for the experiment, i.v.-access and bladder catheterization. Learning outcome is assessed by a pre- and post testing of the participants......' knowledge and skills. Participants evaluate satisfaction with teaching on nine statements immediately after the teaching. RESULTS: In total 59 first year medical students are included as participants in the experiment. The students taught by student teachers perform just as well as the students taught...

  17. Teaching Business Law to Non-Law Students, Culturally and Linguistically Diverse ("CaLD") Students, and Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariyawasam, Kanchana; Low, Hang Yen

    2014-01-01

    This paper is largely based on the experience of teaching law to students with non-legal background in business schools, with a focus on internationalisation and the large class lecture format. Business schools often consist of large classes which include a significant proportion of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CaLD) students. Teaching a…

  18. Teaching Ethics to Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Joyce E.; Thompson, Henry O.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss the ethics content to be taught in nursing education and the goals of ethics education for both undergraduate and graduate students. Teacher qualifications and evaluation of learning are also considered. (CH)

  19. Nursing students' satisfaction with bilingual teaching in nursing courses in China: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chunlian; Zhang, Chunmei; Wang, Yan; Xiong, Lina; Jin, Yanfei; Jin, Changde

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis is to systematically evaluate nursing students' satisfaction with the textbooks, teachers, teaching methods and overall teaching result in nursing bilingual teaching in China. The relevant cross-sectional studies were retrieved from multiple electronic databases including PubMed, Web of Science, Chinese BioMed Database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and WanFang Database from inception to August 2015. Studies that measured students' satisfaction with textbooks, teachers, teaching methods, overall teaching result in nursing bilingual teaching in China as outcomes were included. The data were independently extracted using a standardized form and analyzed by STATA (version12.0). A total of thirty-four studies, including 3533 nursing students, were eligible for inclusion in the review. Meta-analyses revealed that nursing students' satisfaction rate of textbooks was 64%, 95%CI (46%, 82%), teachers' teaching attitude was 88%, 95%CI (84%, 92%), teachers' oral expression was 60%, 95%CI (38%, 81%), teachers' pronunciation was 90%, 95%CI (86%, 94%), teachers' teaching ability was 71%, 95%CI (60%, 82%), teaching methods was 69%, 95%CI (52%, 86%) and overall teaching result was 80%, 95%CI (68%, 92%). Our results show that nursing students' satisfaction with the textbooks, teachers, teaching methods and overall teaching result is not high in nursing bilingual teaching in China. These findings suggest that future directions for improving bilingual teaching in China include establishing suitable bilingual teaching material, training teaching faculty members and adopting proper teaching methods. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Effect of Cooperative Teaching on the Development of Reading Skills among Students with Reading Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanaat Pisheh, Etrat Alzahra; Sadeghpour, Narges; Nejatyjahromy, Yaser; Mir Nasab, Mir Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    Cooperative teaching is the result of efforts made by two educators for teaching a heterogeneous group of students, especially one including those with specific needs, due to reading disorders for instance. The present study serves as an experimental investigation focusing on the effect of cooperative teaching on the development of reading skills…

  1. Teaching baroreflex physiology to medical students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Damgaard, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Quiz-based and collaborative teaching strategies have previously been found to be efficient for the improving meaningful learning of physiology during lectures. These approaches have, however, not been investigated during laboratory exercises. In the present study, we compared the impact of solving...... quizzes individually and in groups with conventional teaching on the immediate learning during a laboratory exercise. We implemented two quizzes in a mandatory 4-h laboratory exercise on baroreflex physiology. A total of 155 second-year medical students were randomized to solve quizzes individually...

  2. Improving teaching on the basis of student evaluation: integrative teaching consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibbecke, Gerald; Kahmann, Janine; Pignotti, Tanja; Altenberger, Leander; Kadmon, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Due to the development of medical education in the past decade the role of teachers has changed and requires higher didactic competence. Student evaluation of teaching alone does not lead to considerable improvement of teaching quality. We present the concept of "Integrative Teaching Consultation", which comprises both the teacher's reflection and own objectives to improve their teaching as well as data from students ratings. Teachers in collaboration with a teaching consultant reflect on their teaching ability and set themselves improvement goals. Then the consultant himself observes a teaching session and subsequently analyses the respective student evaluation in order to give meaningful feedback to the teacher. The combination of student feedback with professional consultation elements can initiate and maintain improvements in teaching. Teaching consultation complements existing faculty development programs and increases the benefit of student evaluations.

  3. Improving teaching on the basis of student evaluation: Integrative teaching consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibbecke, Gerald

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Due to the development of medical education in the past decade the role of teachers has changed and requires higher didactic competence. Student evaluation of teaching alone does not lead to considerable improvement of teaching quality. We present the concept of "Integrative Teaching Consultation", which comprises both the teacher’s reflection and own objectives to improve their teaching as well as data from students ratings.Methods: Teachers in collaboration with a teaching consultant reflect on their teaching ability and set themselves improvement goals. Then the consultant himself observes a teaching session and subsequently analyses the respective student evaluation in order to give meaningful feedback to the teacher.Results: The combination of student feedback with professional consultation elements can initiate and maintain improvements in teaching. Conclusion: Teaching consultation complements existing faculty development programs and increases the benefit of student evaluations.

  4. Teaching English through Online Games for Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sastika Seli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Teaching language is an attractive activity both for the teacher and for the acceptor. They can interact together in this act. Teaching English is a challenge for the teachers to make the students interest in English because as we know English is not the first language for some countries in this world including Indonesia. There are various ways and ideas to teach English so that it can be fun and interest to be taught and to be learnt. But those ways and ideas also should be an up date method and also use a modern technology to be implemented. Along with the development of modern technology, the teachers should involve with it and make it as a part of English teaching tools. Two of the famous and sophisticated tools are computer and the internet. These things have a close relation to be urgent equipment for people. In this article, the writer wants to purpose the use of online games as a way to teach English for junior high school. Te article aims to give another teaching alternative in attracting the junior high school students to learn English in funny and enjoyable way. Through online games they do not only can play the various games but also indirectly they do the exercises of English skills.

  5. Teaching geometrical principles to design students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Bartneck

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method of teaching the principles of geometry to design students. The students focus on a field of design in which geometry is the design: tessellation. We review different approaches to geometry and the field of tessellation before we discuss the setup of the course. Instead of employing 2D drawing tools, such as Adobe Illustrator, the students define their tessellation in mathematical formulas, using the Mathematica software. This procedure enables them to understand the mathematical principles on which graphical tools, such as Illustrator are built upon. But we do not stop at a digital representation of their tessellation design we continue to cut their tessellations in Perspex. It moves the abstract concepts of math into the real world, so that the students can experience them directly, which provides a tremendous reward to the students.

  6. ATTITUDE OF STUDENT TEACHERS TOWARDS TEACHING PROFESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama BHARGAVA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Teaching being a dynamic activity requires a favourable attitude and certain specific competencies from its practitioners. Teachers’ proficiency depends on the attitude she possesses for the profession. The positive attitude helps teacher to develop a conductive learner friendly environment in the classroom. This also casts a fruitful effect on learning of the students. Attitude being a social construct is influenced by many factors like gender social strata ,age, stream of education and previous experience of the job .what bearing the gender and stream of education has on the attitude of student teachers towards teaching profession to throw light on this a study was conducted using a readymade tool. Study of different categories like Non-tribal male and female science stream, nontribal male and female social science stream, Tribal male and female science stream, Tribal male and female social science stream was undertaken. In a sample of hundred students ninety six students responded. The mean scores were considered and ‘ t’ value was calculated to find the difference in the attitude of different categories towards teaching profession.

  7. Teaching Students about Plagiarism: What It Looks Like and How It Is Measured

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Diana

    2013-01-01

    This case study examines how full-time faculty, adjunct instructors, and graduate teaching assistants teach students how to avoid plagiarism. Additionally, this case study includes a cross-section of teachers who encounter plagiarism in writing assignments across the curriculum. While many studies in the past have focused on students, this study…

  8. Teaching and Learning Strategies for Serving Underrepresented Students: A Collection of Resource Documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosz, Karen S., Comp.

    Designed as a resource on teaching and learning strategies geared specifically toward underrepresented community college students, this collection of articles and reports includes the following: (1) "Successful Teaching Strategies: Instruction for Black and Hispanic Students in the California Community Colleges," by Olivia Mercado, Cheryl Fong,…

  9. Predicting Academic Success from Academic Motivation and Learning Approaches in Classroom Teaching Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Baris

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to determine whether learning approaches and academic motivation together predict academic success of classroom teaching students. The sample of the study included 536 students (386 female, 150 male) studying at the Classroom Teaching Division of Canakkale 18 Mart University. Our research was designed as a prediction study. Data was…

  10. Teaching Reading Comprehension Strategies to Students with Learning Disabilities: A Review of Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersten, Russell; Fuchs, Lynn S.; Williams, Joanna P.; Baker, Scott

    2001-01-01

    Reviews research on reading comprehension for students with learning disabilities focusing on studies on instruction to improve comprehension of narrative text and expository text. Discusses emerging issues in the field, including use of socially mediated strategies, teaching multiple strategies to students, and teaching specific strategies as…

  11. Teaching emergency medicine with workshops improved medical student satisfaction in emergency medicine education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sricharoen, Pungkava; Yuksen, Chaiyaporn; Sittichanbuncha, Yuwares; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2015-01-01

    There are different teaching methods; such as traditional lectures, bedside teaching, and workshops for clinical medical clerkships. Each method has advantages and disadvantages in different situations. Emergency Medicine (EM) focuses on emergency medical conditions and deals with several emergency procedures. This study aimed to compare traditional teaching methods with teaching methods involving workshops in the EM setting for medical students. Fifth year medical students (academic year of 2010) at Ramathibodi Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand participated in the study. Half of students received traditional teaching, including lectures and bedside teaching, while the other half received traditional teaching plus three workshops, namely, airway workshop, trauma workshop, and emergency medical services workshop. Student evaluations at the end of the clerkship were recorded. The evaluation form included overall satisfaction, satisfaction in overall teaching methods, and satisfaction in each teaching method. During the academic year 2010, there were 189 students who attended the EM rotation. Of those, 77 students (40.74%) were in the traditional EM curriculum, while 112 students were in the new EM curriculum. The average satisfaction score in teaching method of the new EM curriculum group was higher than the traditional EM curriculum group (4.54 versus 4.07, P-value teaching, and emergency medical services workshop. The mean (standard deviation) satisfaction scores of those three teaching methods were 4.70 (0.50), 4.63 (0.58), and 4.60 (0.55), respectively. Teaching EM with workshops improved student satisfaction in EM education for medical students.

  12. Peculiarities of teaching students with mosaic thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Polevoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the aim of the research, the author set the task of searching for new ways of conducting educational activity when teaching Project Management at the university taking into account the dominating mosaic thinking of modern students. There is a need to teach students of the given field logical thinking, the ability to work in the financial and humanitarian spheres of current business. In order to get a result, the analysis of the existing scientific views and approaches to teaching students with dominating mosaic thinking was conducted. The existing views by both Russian and foreign authors of mosaic thinking were considered, its different educational, psychological and philosophical aspects. As a result of the synthesis of the given approaches, taking into account the author’s inventions, proposals were developed on solving the problems of mosaic thinking in teaching students. Taking a constructive approach as a basis, the mosaic thinking is suggested to be considered as a phenomenon having both advantages and disadvantages. Changing the content of the educational process is done through updating standard methods and patterns of education, wide use of innovation approaches, intensifying cooperation and online collaboration of the teacher and the student in the process of study. The basis is formed by the emotional impact on the student in the course of studies, which will allow using logic and form the intention to learn the presented fact. Teaching Project Management to students is proposed taking into account their mosaic thinking, in four stages. During the lecture students receive a chain of images structured by the lecturer in the sequence embracing basic issues of the theme under consideration and presented in such a way as to inspire them to study the given questions independently. At the second stage, the students search for the solution of the assigned tasks in the course of independent work with the opportunities available for

  13. Teaching Methods in Biology Education and Sustainability Education Including Outdoor Education for Promoting Sustainability—A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eila Jeronen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available There are very few studies concerning the importance of teaching methods in biology education and environmental education including outdoor education for promoting sustainability at the levels of primary and secondary schools and pre-service teacher education. The material was selected using special keywords from biology and sustainable education in several scientific databases. The article provides an overview of 24 selected articles published in peer-reviewed scientific journals from 2006–2016. The data was analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Altogether, 16 journals were selected and 24 articles were analyzed in detail. The foci of the analyses were teaching methods, learning environments, knowledge and thinking skills, psychomotor skills, emotions and attitudes, and evaluation methods. Additionally, features of good methods were investigated and their implications for teaching were emphasized. In total, 22 different teaching methods were found to improve sustainability education in different ways. The most emphasized teaching methods were those in which students worked in groups and participated actively in learning processes. Research points toward the value of teaching methods that provide a good introduction and supportive guidelines and include active participation and interactivity.

  14. Teaching technical skills to medical students: Beyond 'see one, do ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teaching technical skills to medical students: Beyond 'see one, do one, teach one'. Previous generation of doctors were taught psychomotor skills based on the 'see one, do one, teach one' ethos. By trial and error, medical students and residents practiced directly on frightened patients who were often powerless to resist.

  15. A decade of teaching systems engineering to Bachelor students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten; Lutters-Weustink, Ilanit F.; Jauregui Becker, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The paper treats a setup for introducing systems engineering to undergraduate (Bachelor) students. The teaching module challenges students, and provides them with ample opportunity to employ the systems engineering process, tools and thinking. Through reflection, the students make the learning

  16. Systematic, digital student feedback for differentiated teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graf, Stefan Ting; Carlsen, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    The article reports results from a qualitative study of Elevbaro, a prototype of a digital tool for student feedback developed in connection with the demonstration school project, inclusion, and differentiated teaching in digital learning environments. At the same time the study represents...... of time. There is reason to assume that the usage of Elevbaro affects teachers’ professional assessment of students as well as students’ reflections of their work and acquisition process. This requires an active approach to Elevbaro and the integration of the tool into the teacher’s usual assessment...

  17. The teaching portfolio of an education student

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandr Prutchenkov; Tat'jana Novikova; Мarina Pinskaya

    2005-01-01

    The new goals that are emerging in the course of the modernization of education demand changes in the form and content of pedagogical training. One of the tools for the professional training of an educator, very common now in Western higher education, is the teaching portfolio of a student. It enables the student to efficiently plan and evaluate the process and results of his or her studies. The portfolio is an indicator of the readiness of the future teacher to engage in independent professi...

  18. Teaching Programming to Liberal Arts Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bøgh; Bennedsen, Jens; Brandorff, Steffen

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present a new learning environment to be used in an introductory programming course for studentsthat are non-majors in computer science, more precisely formultimedia students with a liberal arts background. Media-oriented programming adds new requirements to thecraft of programming...... (e.g. aesthetic and communicative).We argue that multimedia students with a liberal arts background need programming competences because programmability is the defining characteristic of the computer medium.We compare programming with the creation of traditionalmedia products and identify two...... environment for an introductory programmingcourse for multimedia students.We have designed a learning environment called Lingoland with the new skills of media programming in mind thathopefully can help alleviate the problems we have experiencedin teaching programming to liberal arts students....

  19. Teaching Accessibility Standards to Generation Y Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klitzing, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 mandated that facilities and programs are accessible, so people with disabilities can be included in all aspects of community life including recreation (Dattilo, 2002). Understanding accessibility standards is not an easy task. Educators are faced with the challenge of teaching technical content,…

  20. Teaching Competencies of Students Practice Teaching at Elementary Schools and Kindergartens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Fatimah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to describe the teaching competencies of English Education students practising at elementary schools and kindergartens based on the teacher supervisors’ view. The teaching competencies include the students’ competence on writing the lesson plan and their competence on practice teaching. To reach the objectives of the study, the researcher collected the data by distributing a questionnaire to the supervisors at schools. There were 41 schools consisting of TK ABA, SD Muhammadiyah, SD Negeri located in Yogyakarta (24, Sleman (1 and Bantul (16. The questionnaire used was based on the official assessment form published by Indonesian government for teacher’s certification. It contains some indicators of teaching competence, it uses Likert scales ranging from 1 to 5. The criteria are as follows: 1 = very poor, 2 = poor, 3 = rather poor, 4 = good, and 5 = excellent. The data were taken from proportionally random sampling of the supervisors. From the total number of 103 teacher supervisors, the researcher distributed 61 questionnaires. The supervisors represented the ones from different educational backgrounds. The findings show the following results. The competence of English Education students in composing the lesson plan, according to the teacher supervisors, is classified good (actual mean = 3.858, SD = 0.685, ideal mean = 3, ideal SD = 0.750. Further, their competence on practice teaching is also good (actual mean = 3.867, SD = 0.688, ideal mean = 3, ideal SD = 0.966. The two aspects of composing the lesson plan to improve are teaching material organization and the completeness of assessment instrument. The other two aspects to improve in teaching practice are contextual teaching and learning and class management.

  1. Teaching communication skills and medical ethics to undergraduate medical student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SADIA AHSIN

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this study was to improve communication skills and knowledge of bioethics of last year medical students doing clerkship and to evaluate the effectiveness of using workshops for this purpose from students’ point of view, in order to continue such programs in future. Methods: After Ethical approval for the study a two-day workshop on teaching effective communication skills and principles of medical ethics was planned and conducted by the department of Medical Education through multidisciplinary faculty of Foundation University Medical College, Pakistan. A total of 102 last year medical students participated in this workshop. The students were divided into 8 groups each containing 12 students. A team of pre trained facilitators for each group conducted the group activities. Teaching strategies including interactive discussions on basic principles of doctor-patient relationship, power point presentations, day to day case scenarios, video clips and presentations involving students in role plays were used. Pre and post workshop self evaluation proformas about knowledge and skills of communication and medical ethics were rated (0=none, 1=below average, 2=average, 3=above average, 4=very good, 5=excellent by the students. Results: 89 out of 102 participants returned the proformas. A significant percentage of students (%82 showed improvement in their knowledge and skills of appreciating bioethical issues like valid informed consent, patient confidentiality, end of life issues and breaking bad news by rating as “very good” after participation in the workshop. More than %70 students recommended this activity for other students. Conclusion: Teaching through interactive workshops was found to be an effective method as reflected by students’ feedback. Therefore, the program will be continued in future.

  2. Including Students with Severe Disabilities in General Education Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Lech; Alper, Sandra

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents five systematic phases for bringing about successful regular education inclusion of students with severe disabilities. Phases include develop networks within the community, assess school and community resources, review strategies for integration, install strategies that lead to integration, and develop a system of feedback and…

  3. TOOLS TO INCLUDE BLIND STUDENTS IN SCHOOL BUILDING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Pietzschke Abate

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the design of data collection instruments that include the opinions of blind students, in accordance with the principles of Universal Design (UD. The aim of this study is to understand the importance of adapting data collection instruments for the inclusion of disabled persons in field research in Architecture and Design, among other fields. The data collection instruments developed were a play interview with a tactile map and a 3D survey with the use of tactile models. These instruments sought to assess the school environment experienced by blind students. The study involved students from the early years of a school for the blind who had not yet mastered the Braille system. The participation of these students was evaluated. A multidisciplinary team consisting of architects, designers, educators, and psychologists lent support to the study. The results showed that the data collection instruments adapted to blind students were successful in making the group of authors examine questions regarding UD. An analysis of the participatory phase showed that the limitations resulting from blindness determine the specificities in the adaptation and implementation process of the instruments in schools. Practical recommendations for future studies related to instruments in the UD thematic are presented. This approach is in line with the global trend of including disabled persons in society based on these users’ opinions concerning what was designed by architects and designers.

  4. Graduate students teaching elementary earth science through interactive classroom lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caswell, T. E.; Goudge, T. A.; Jawin, E. R.; Robinson, F.

    2014-12-01

    Since 2005, graduate students in the Brown University Department of Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Studies have volunteered to teach science to second-grade students at Vartan Gregorian Elementary School in Providence, RI. Initially developed to bring science into classrooms where it was not explicitly included in the curriculum, the graduate student-run program today incorporates the Providence Public Schools Grade 2 science curriculum into weekly, interactive sessions that engage the students in hypothesis-driven science. We will describe the program structure, its integration into the Providence Public Schools curriculum, and 3 example lessons relevant to geology. Lessons are structured to develop the students' ability to share and incorporate others' ideas through written and oral communication. The volunteers explain the basics of the topic and engage the students with introductory questions. The students use this knowledge to develop a hypothesis about the upcoming experiment, recording it in their "Science Notebooks." The students record their observations during the demonstration and discuss the results as a group. The process culminates in the students using their own words to summarize what they learned. Activities of particular interest to educators in geoscience are called "Volcanoes!", "The "Liquid Race," and "Phases of the Moon." The "Volcanoes!" lesson explores explosive vs. effusive volcanism using two simulated volcanoes: one explosive, using Mentos and Diet Coke, and one effusive, using vinegar and baking soda (in model volcanoes that the students construct in teams). In "Liquid Race," which explores viscosity and can be integrated into the "Volcanoes!" lesson, the students connect viscosity to flow speed by racing liquids down a ramp. "Phases of the Moon" teaches the students why the Moon has phases, using ball and stick models, and the terminology of the lunar phases using cream-filled cookies (e.g., Oreos). These lessons, among many others

  5. Undergraduate teaching in geriatric medicine using computer-aided learning improves student performance in examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunt, Laura A; Umeonusulu, Patience I; Gladman, John R F; Blundell, Adrian G; Conroy, Simon P; Gordon, Adam L

    2013-07-01

    computer-aided learning (CAL) is increasingly used to deliver teaching, but few studies have evaluated its impact on learning within geriatric medicine. We developed and implemented CAL packages on falls and continence, and evaluated their effect on student performance in two medical schools. traditional ward based and didactic teaching was replaced by blended learning (CAL package combined with traditional teaching methods). Examination scores were compared for cohorts of medical students receiving traditional learning and those receiving blended learning. Control questions were included to provide data on cohort differences. in both medical schools, there was a trend towards improved scores following blended learning, with a smaller number of students achieving low scores (P learning was associated with improvement in student examination performance, regardless of the setting or the methods adopted, and without increasing teaching time. Our findings support the use of CAL in teaching geriatric medicine, and this method has been adopted for teaching other topics in the undergraduate curriculum.

  6. Good Teaching: Aligning Student and Administrator Perceptions and Expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarus Nabaho

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Literature attests to limited systematic inquiry into students’ conceptions of good teaching in higher education. Resultantly, there have been calls for engaging students in construing what makes good university teaching and in developing a richer conception of teaching excellence. This interpretivist study that is based on views of final year university students from six academic disciplines investigated students’ conceptions of good teaching at Makerere University in Uganda. Students conceived good teaching as being student-centred, demonstrating strong subject and pedagogical knowledge, being approachable, being responsive, being organised, and being able to communicate well. Most of the conceptions of good teaching hinge  on what the teacher does (the means rather than affording high quality student learning (an end. It can therefore been concluded that good teaching is a multi-dimensional construct that defies a single definition and cannot be assured and assessed using a single indicator.

  7. Teaching Our Students, Our Residents and Ourselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Zeynep

    2014-02-01

    Even though postgraduate medical education has been the focus of interest in anaesthesiology education, in a broader sense the entire medical community can be considered appropriate learners of anaesthesiology. Anaesthesiologists are equipped to teach physiology, pharmacology, resuscitation, pain management, perioperative assessment, and medical technology. For residency training, an approach based on competencies, skills and professionalism should be used instead of the traditional "apprenticeship" model. When teaching ourselves as qualified anaesthesiologists, areas of continuing professional development, academic career training and continuing medical education should be taken into account. Whereas the responsibility for undergraduate medical education rests with university medical schools, postgraduate medical education is carried out by universities and/or the national health authorities/services. Establishment of partnerships between health-care services and universities should be central to the provision of postgraduate education so as not to dissociate various stages of education. When determining educational strategies, institutional preferences, target populations and their learning styles should be taken into account. To this end, especially for high risk situations simulation-based approaches, scenarios, standardized patients, research, mentoring, journal clubs, seminars, lectures, case discussions, bed-side discussions, courses, games and portfolios have been and are being used widely. Departments of anaesthesiology should establish and maintain a strong presence in undergraduate medical education. Besides being good clinicians, anaesthesiologists should understand all aspects of education and educational outcome in order to better teach students, residents and themselves. Quality of education and the teaching environment should continually be evaluated within the context of quality assurance.

  8. From Ford to Friedman: Teaching Microeconomics to Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neymotin, Florence

    2014-01-01

    Teaching microeconomics to MBA students offers a unique set of challenges and opportunities to instructors. That is, the process of teaching business students may differ considerably, but in predictable ways, when compared to the classroom experience commonly found in liberal arts programs. While it is certain that all students are consumers, most…

  9. The Effect of Student Working Group Establishment on Teaching General Embryology Course to Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozafar Khazaei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quantitative and qualitative enhancement of educational activities is an essential issue. Learners’ cooperation in the teaching process in order to increase teaching effectiveness and promotion is considered significant. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of establishment of student working group on the teaching general embryology course to medical students.Methods: Ten students (1% of medical embryology course were selected to analyze the topics to be taught before each session according to lesson plan, and observe the whole teaching process during lesson presentation. Then, having asked the other students’ viewpoints and discussing with one another, they provided the teacher with a written report on the strengths and weaknesses of the teaching and its problems. The teacher analyzed the problems proposed by the working group to improve teaching process in the next session. At the end of the semester, a questionnaire was administered to all the participants. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.Results: The mean of students’ scores was 74.26%. The most important findings obtained in this study included positive role of film projection in teaching the materials (95.34%, significance of presentation of various pictures from different books (88.4%, changing students’ attitude toward application of embryology in different diseases (86%, and repetition of previous session’s pictures (83.75%. The weak points mentioned, however, were physical problems of the classroom and deficiency of audio visual equipment.Conclusion: Student working group has a positive impact on the teaching medical general embryology.

  10. New Teaching Strategies for Engineering Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reng, Lars; Kofoed, Lise

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the challenges for university teachers when new teaching strategies are implemented. Blended learning, flipped classroom, gamification as well as a combination of traditional and new pedagogical approaches are on the agenda in engineering educations. One of the challenges...... for the teachers is to adjust to the new way of teaching. We will use two cases; one longitudinal study and one experimental study to present and discuss a process of blended learning strategy in programming classes from a teacher’s point of view: the strategy, the planning, the implementation and the learning...... outcome. The second case show that the blended learning model for programming classes works very well for another type of students. The results showed that blended learning using game elements is a successful way concerning the learning outcome, but is a challenge for the teachers involved. Finally, we...

  11. [Guidelines for blood transfusion teaching to medical laboratory technology students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncharmont, P; Tourlourat, M; Fourcade, C; Julien, E; Peyrard, T; Cabaud, J-J

    2012-02-01

    The new French law about clinical laboratory medicine, the requirements of the ISO/CEI 15189 standard, the numerous abilities expected from the medical laboratory technologists and their involvement in blood bank management has led the working group "Recherche et démarche qualité" of the French Society of Blood Transfusion to initiate an inventory of blood transfusion teaching syllabus for medical laboratory technology students and to propose transfusion medicine teaching guidelines. Seven worksheets have been established for that purpose including red blood cell antigen typing and antibody screening, blood sampling in immunohaematology, automation, clinical practices, blood products, blood delivery and haemovigilance. These guidelines aim at contributing to the harmonization of transfusion medicine teaching and at providing objective elements to the medical laboratory managers regarding the practical and theoretical skills of theirs collaborators. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Response Rate and Teaching Effectiveness in Institutional Student Evaluation of Teaching: A Multiple Linear Regression Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maamari, Faisal

    2015-01-01

    It is important to consider the question of whether teacher-, course-, and student-related factors affect student ratings of instructors in Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET) in English Language Teaching (ELT). This paper reports on a statistical analysis of SET in two large EFL programmes at a university setting in the Sultanate of Oman. I…

  13. Twelve tips for teaching brief motivational interviewing to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Elizabeth J; Bannatyne, Amy J; Stark, Ashley C

    2018-03-01

    Shifting from paternalistic to patient-centred doctor-patient relationships has seen a growing number of medical programs incorporate brief motivational interviewing training in their curriculum. Some medical educators, however, are unsure of precisely what, when, and how to incorporate such training. This article provides educators with 12 tips for teaching brief motivational interviewing to medical students, premised on evidence-based pedagogy. Tips were drawn from the literature and authors' own experiences. The 12 tips are: (1) Set clear learning objectives, (2) Select experienced educators, (3) Provide theoretical perspectives, (4) Share the evidence base, (5) Outline the "spirit", principles, and sequence, (6) Show students what it looks like, (7) Give students a scaffold to follow, (8) Provide opportunities for skill practice, (9) Involve clinical students in teaching, (10) Use varied formative and summative assessments, (11) Integrate and maintain, and (12) Reflect and evaluate. We describe what to include and why, and outline when and how to teach the essential components of brief motivational interviewing knowledge and skills in a medical curriculum.

  14. [A preliminary exploration into medical genetics teaching to international students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cao-Yi; Zhao, Xiang-Qiang; Xie, Xiao-Ling; Tan, Xiang-Ling

    2008-12-01

    Medical education to international students has become an important part of higher education in China. Medical genetics is an essential and required course for international medical students. However, the internationalization of higher education in China has challenged the traditional teaching style of medical genetics. In this article, we discussed current situation and challenges in medical genetics teaching to international students, summarized special features and problems we encountered in teaching Indian students, and proposed some practical strategies to address these challenges and to improve the teaching.

  15. Developing the continuum of dental education: including dental foundation trainers in the delivery of a community-based clinical teaching programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, C D; Ash, P J; Chadwick, B L; Herbert, R A; Cowpe, J G

    2012-11-01

    Despite advances in evidence-based dental school educational programmes, the charge is sometimes made that dental students are 'no longer as good as they used to be'. Recent modifications have meant that dental education is now a 'life-long experience', of which dental school is the initial, albeit very important, component. Contemporary dental students will normally enter dental foundation (DF) training on completion of dental school. As such there may be value in including DF trainers in dental school teaching programmes. The aim of this paper is to report the experiences, feedback and opinions of these DF trainers following their first-hand experience of the community-based clinical teaching programme at Cardiff, and assess if their perspectives of contemporary dental student education changed following this. DF trainers were invited to attend the community-based clinical teaching programme at Cardiff on an observer basis. Twenty-four DF trainers attended, following which evaluation questionnaires were completed. Information sought included opinions and attitudes to the teaching programme, the physical environment in which the teaching programme took place, knowledge and attitudes towards community-based clinical teaching and modifications that DF trainers would make to the teaching programme to further improve the knowledge, skills and attributes of dental school graduates for DF training. Responses were received from 20 DF trainers (response rate = 83%). All 20 respondents felt that the teaching provided within the community-based clinical teaching programme was appropriate, with one respondent noting that it was like 'a day in the life of a dental practice', 'where anything could present'. Sixteen respondents were satisfied with the scope and content of the community-based clinical teaching programme, with a small number recommending inclusion of teaching in relation to inlays/onlays (n = 2), simple orthodontics (n = 1) and splinting (n = 1). Eighteen

  16. Using the Big Ideas in Cosmology to Teach College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLin, K. M.; Coble, K.; Metevier, A. J.; Bailey, J. M.; Cominsky, L. R.

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the Universe have revolutionized our view of its structure, composition and evolution. However, these new ideas have not necessarily been used to improve the teaching of introductory astronomy students. In this project, we have conducted research into student understanding of cosmological ideas so as to develop effective web-based tools to teach basic concepts important to modern cosmology. The tools are intended for use at the introductory college level. Our research uses several instruments, including open-ended and multiple choice surveys conducted at multiple institutions, as well as interviews and course artifacts at one institution, to ascertain what students know regarding modern cosmological ideas, what common misunderstandings and misconceptions they entertain, and what sorts of materials can most effectively overcome students' difficulty in learning this material. These data are being used to create a suite of interactive, web-based tutorials that address the major ideas in cosmology. One common misconception that students in our introductory courses possess is that scientific explanations are “made up,” and not supported by observational data. Having students engage with real data is a powerful means to help students overcome this misconception. For this reason, the tutorials we are developing include authentic student interaction with actual data where possible. Students master the scientific concepts and reasoning processes that lead to our current understanding of the Universe through interactive tasks, prediction, reflection, experimentation, and model building. This workshop will demonstrate the use of some of the modules we have created and will allow participants to test the modules for themselves.

  17. A survey of senior medical students' attitudes and awareness toward teaching and participation in a formal clinical teaching elective: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Hughes, J D; Azzi, Elise; Rose, Gregory Walter; Ramnanan, Christopher J; Khamisa, Karima

    2017-01-01

    To prepare for careers in medicine, medical trainees must develop clinical teaching skills. It is unclear if Canadian medical students need or want to develop such skills. We sought to assess Canadian students' perceptions of clinical teaching, and their desire to pursue clinical teaching skills development via a clinical teaching elective (CTE) in their final year of medical school. We designed a descriptive cross-sectional study of Canadian senior medical students, using an online survey to gauge teaching experience, career goals, perceived areas of confidence, and interest in a CTE. Students at 13 of 17 Canadian medical schools were invited to participate in the survey (4154 students). We collected 321 responses (7.8%). Most (75%) respondents expressed confidence in giving presentations, but fewer were confident providing bedside teaching (47%), teaching sensitive issues (42%), and presenting at journal clubs (42%). A total of 240 respondents (75%) expressed interest in participating in a CTE. The majority (61%) favored a two week elective, and preferred topics included bedside teaching (85%), teaching physical examination skills (71%), moderation of small group learning (63%), and mentorship in medicine (60%). Our study demonstrates that a large number of Canadian medical students are interested in teaching in a clinical setting, but lack confidence in skills specific to clinical teaching. Our respondents signaled interest in participating in an elective in clinical teaching, particularly if it is offered in a two-week format.

  18. Teaching Graduate Students The Art of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snieder, Roel; Larner, Ken; Boyd, Tom

    2012-08-01

    Graduate students traditionally learn the trade of research by working under the supervision of an advisor, much as in the medieval practice of apprenticeship. In practice, however, this model generally falls short in teaching students the broad professional skills needed to be a well-rounded researcher. While a large majority of graduate students considers professional training to be of great relevance, most graduate programs focus exclusively on disciplinary training as opposed to skills such as written and oral communication, conflict resolution, leadership, performing literature searches, teamwork, ethics, and client-interaction. Over the past decade, we have developed and taught the graduate course "The Art of Science", which addresses such topics; we summarize the topics covered in the course here. In order to coordinate development of professional training, the Center for Professional Education has been founded at the Colorado School of Mines. After giving an overview of the Center's program, we sketch the challenges and opportunities in offering professional education to graduate students. Offering professional education helps create better-prepared graduates. We owe it to our students to provide them with such preparation.

  19. Teaching Pain Management to Student Nurses: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekatrina Wijayanti

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To provide nursing students knowledge of pain prior, during, and post- surgery, recovery and rehabilitation. Methods: Review articles published during 2005 until 2012 that focused on pain assessment and pain management. The databases used in this study were Medline and CINAHL.Results: Postoperative pains need special approach and care. It needs teach patient how to adapt pain, control pain, monitor result of treatment. Conclusion: Nursing students need to learn how to assess pain using appropriate tools for each age level and in patients with special needs. The students also need to learn about pain management including pharmacology and non-pharmacology means and consider pain as the fifth vital sign. As student nurses learn pain assessment, they should be considerate about culture, and different languages that might happen during practical rotations.

  20. Teaching child development to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brenda; Andrews, Debra; Taghaddos, Soreh; Dinu, Irina

    2012-12-01

    Several published strategies on teaching the screening of normal child development were integrated into a small group learning experience for second-year medical students to address practical and logistical problems of approaches used individually. This study examines the effectiveness of this integrated approach using student evaluations. A total of 191 second-year university medical and dental students were invited to participate. Well-described learning objectives, the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ), live parent-child dyads and video backup were used. Students rotated through three small group stations. Feedback was provided using a Likert scale (from 1, low, to 5, high) and written comments. Consent was obtained. Live parent-child dyads versus video clip groups were analysed by averaging overall scores. Generalised estimating equation (GEE) analysis in stata (Stata Corporation, College Station, Texas) was used for comparing the two groups. A total of 178 students (93%) agreed to participate and filled out the evaluation forms. The overall score on the Likert scale was 4.6 (range 4-5). On two occasions video clips were substituted for live parent-child dyad presentations in one of the three stations. These students (n=43, rating 4.61/5) rated their experience as comparable with those who had three live family stations (n=135, rating 4.56/5). Student comments were grouped into broad themes, with most being positive about their learning experience. This integrated approach is highly acceptable. Video clip usage, live dyads, clear written objectives and use of a standardised screening tool preserved the interaction and immediacy of a clinical encounter, while maintaining consistency in content. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  1. Examining Attitudes of Students Regarding the Sports Education Model and Direct Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Nevruz; Dalkiran, Oguzhan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the effects of sports education model and direct teaching model on the attitudes of the students, and the differences among the attitudes of students. The study group of the research included 29 students from 6th and 7th grade of a secondary school in the 2015-2016 academic years. The experimental group…

  2. Teaching Outside the Box: How to Grab Your Students by Their Brains, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, LouAnne

    2011-01-01

    This second edition of the bestselling book includes practical suggestions for arranging your classroom, talking to students, avoiding the misbehavior cycle, and making your school a place where students learn and teachers teach. The book also contains enlivening Q&A from teachers, letters from students, and tips for grading. This new edition has…

  3. Teaching Science to Visually Impaired Students: A Small-Scale Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Mehmet; Yorek, Nurettin

    2009-01-01

    Students have long regarded science as a difficult subject because of hard and abstract concepts. Traditional science teaching has been depended mostly on visual instruction. This makes it difficult for visually impaired (VI) or partially sighted students included in regular classrooms to learn the concepts. Blind students on the other hand, have…

  4. Reliability-Related Issues in the Context of Student Evaluations of Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalender, Ilker

    2015-01-01

    Student evaluations of teaching (SET) have been the principal instrument to elicit students' opinions in higher education institutions. Many decisions, including high-stake ones, are made based on SET scores reported by students. In this respect, reliability of SET scores is of considerable importance. This paper has an argument that there are…

  5. Uncovering Barriers to Teaching Assistants (TAs) Implementing Inquiry Teaching: Inconsistent Facilitation Techniques, Student Resistance, and Reluctance to Share Control over Learning with Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormally, Cara; Sullivan, Carol Subiño; Szeinbaum, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Inquiry-based teaching approaches are increasingly being adopted in biology laboratories. Yet teaching assistants (TAs), often novice teachers, teach the majority of laboratory courses in US research universities. This study analyzed the perspectives of TAs and their students and used classroom observations to uncover challenges faced by TAs during their first year of inquiry-based teaching. Our study revealed three insights about barriers to effective inquiry teaching practices: 1) TAs lack sufficient facilitation skills; 2) TAs struggle to share control over learning with students as they reconcile long-standing teaching beliefs with newly learned approaches, consequently undermining their fledgling ability to use inquiry approaches; and 3) student evaluations reinforce teacher-centered behaviors as TAs receive positive feedback conflicting with inquiry approaches. We make recommendations, including changing instructional feedback to focus on learner-centered teaching practices. We urge TA mentors to engage TAs in discussions to uncover teaching beliefs underlying teaching choices and support TAs through targeted feedback and practice. PMID:27158302

  6. Balancing the role of the dental school in teaching, research and patient care; including care for underserved areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, W P; Brodin, P; Balciuniene, I; Brukiene, V; Bucur, M V; Corbet, E; Dillenberg, J; Djukanovic, D; Ekanayake, K; Eriksen, H; Fisher, J; Goffin, G; Hull, P; Kumchai, T; Lumley, P; Lund, J; Mathur, V; Novaes, A; Puriene, A; Roger-Leroi, V; Saito, I; Turner, S; Mabelya, L

    2008-02-01

    Inequalities within dentistry are common and are reflected in wide differences in the levels of oral health and the standard of care available both within and between countries and communities. Furthermore there are patients, particularly those with special treatment needs, who do not have the same access to dental services as the general public. The dental school should aim to recruit students from varied backgrounds into all areas covered by the oral healthcare team and to train students to treat the full spectrum of patients including those with special needs. It is essential, however, that the dental student achieves a high standard of clinical competence and this cannot be gained by treating only those patients with low expectations for care. Balancing these aspects of clinical education is difficult. Research is an important stimulus to better teaching and better clinical care. It is recognized that dental school staff should be active in research, teaching, clinical work and frequently administration. Maintaining a balance between the commitments to clinical care, teaching and research while also taking account of underserved areas in each of these categories is a difficult challenge but one that has to be met to a high degree in a successful, modern dental school.

  7. Hybrid Simulation in Teaching Clinical Breast Examination to Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassif, Joseph; Sleiman, Abdul-Karim; Nassar, Anwar H; Naamani, Sima; Sharara-Chami, Rana

    2017-10-10

    Clinical breast examination (CBE) is traditionally taught to third-year medical students using a lecture and a tabletop breast model. The opportunity to clinically practice CBE depends on patient availability and willingness to be examined by students, especially in culturally sensitive environments. We propose the use of a hybrid simulation model consisting of a standardized patient (SP) wearing a silicone breast simulator jacket and hypothesize that this, compared to traditional teaching methods, would result in improved learning. Consenting third-year medical students (N = 82) at a university-affiliated tertiary care center were cluster-randomized into two groups: hybrid simulation (breast jacket + SP) and control (tabletop breast model). Students received the standard lecture by instructors blinded to the randomization, followed by randomization group-based learning and practice sessions. Two weeks later, participants were assessed in an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), which included three stations with SPs blinded to the intervention. The SPs graded the students on CBE completeness, and students completed a self-assessment of their performance and confidence during the examination. CBE completeness scores did not differ between the two groups (p = 0.889). Hybrid simulation improved lesion identification grades (p simulation relieved the fear of missing a lesion on CBE (p = 0.043) and increased satisfaction with the teaching method among students (p = 0.002). As a novel educational tool, hybrid simulation improves the sensitivity of CBE performed by medical students without affecting its specificity. Hybrid simulation may play a role in increasing the confidence of medical students during CBE.

  8. A Huge Responsibility: Three Keys to Teaching Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Leslie

    2014-01-01

    Based on her 20 years of teaching Spanish, Leslie Davison strives for a holistic approach to teaching and learning that is authentic and relevant to her young language learners. Herein, she shares three keys to teaching elementary level students in a way that ensures they will have a "Can Do" attitude in terms of language proficiency and…

  9. Teachers' and Students' Conceptions of Good Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Benny Hin Wai; Zhu, Yan; Wong, Siu Ling; Cheng, Man Wai; Lo, Fei Yin

    2013-01-01

    Capitalizing on the comments made by teachers on videos of exemplary science teaching, a video-based survey instrument on the topic of "Density" was developed and used to investigate the conceptions of good science teaching held by 110 teachers and 4,024 year 7 students in Hong Kong. Six dimensions of good science teaching are identified…

  10. Student Perceptions to Teaching Undergraduate Anatomy in Health Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Ryan S.; Chiu, Li Shan; Aulfrey, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Anatomy and physiology teaching has undergone significant changes to keep up with advances in technology and to cater for a wide array of student specific learning approaches. This paper examines perceptions towards a variety of teaching instruments, techniques, and innovations used in the delivery and teaching of anatomy and physiology for health…

  11. Evaluation of a High-Engagement Teaching Program for STEM Graduate Students: Outcomes of the Future Academic Scholars in Teaching (FAST) Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevost, Luanna B.; Vergara, Claudia E.; Urban-Lurain, Mark; Campa, Henry, III.

    2018-01-01

    Higher education institutions prepare future faculty members for multiple roles, including teaching. However, teaching professional development programs for graduate students vary widely. We present evaluation data from a high engagement program for STEM doctoral students. We analyzed the impact on three cohorts of participants over three academic…

  12. Characteristics of medical teachers using student-centered teaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Hwang, Jee-Young

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated characteristics of medical teachers who have adopted student-centered teaching methods into their teaching. A 24-item questionnaire consisted of respondent backgrounds, his or her use of student-centered teaching methods, and awareness of the school's educational objectives and curricular principles was administered of faculty members at a private medical school in Korea. Descriptive statistics and chi-square analysis were conducted to compare faculty use of student-centered approaches across different backgrounds and awareness of curricular principles. Overall response rate was 70% (N=140/200), approximately 25% (n=34) of whom were using student-centered teaching methods. Distributions in the faculty use of student-centered teaching methods were significantly higher among basic sciences faculty (versus clinical sciences faculty), with teaching experiences of over 10 years (versus less than 10 years), and who were aware of the school's educational objectives and curricular principles. Our study indicates differences in medical faculty's practice of student-centered teaching across disciplines, teaching experiences, and their understanding of the school's educational objectives curricular principles. These findings have implications for faculty development and institutional support to better promote faculty use of student-centered teaching approaches.

  13. Overview of teaching strategies for cultural competence in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tracey B

    2012-01-01

    Multiple curricular approaches are being used to teach cultural competency to nursing students in the United States in accordance with accrediting board standards. As nurse educators are searching for evidence based teaching practices, this article reviews the most commonly current teaching methods being used. Although a variety of methods are being implemented, little empirical evidence exists to suggest any one methodology for teaching cultural competency for nursing students produces significantly better outcomes. The use of clinical experiences, standardized patients and immersion experiences have produced the most favorable results which increase student awareness, knowledge and confidence in working with ethnically diverse patients.

  14. Student Teachers' Emotional Teaching Experiences in Relation to Different Teaching Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timoštšuk, I.; Kikas, E.; Normak, M.

    2016-01-01

    The role of emotional experiences in teacher training is acknowledged, but the role of emotions during first experiences of classroom teaching has not been examined in large samples. This study examines the teaching methods used by student teachers in early teaching practice and the relationship between these methods and emotions experienced. We…

  15. Relevance of Student Teaching Skills and Activities from the Perspective of the Student Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive survey study was to determine the extent to which student teachers deem traditional student teaching skills and activities relevant as part of the capstone student teaching experience. The study population consisted of all (N = 140) fall 2012 and spring 2013 agricultural education student teachers in the North…

  16. Teaching Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Constructivism or Behaviorism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algahtani, Faris

    2017-01-01

    Many teaching strategies have been postulated over the past years by various scholars in an effort to enhance the education system among students with intellectual disabilities. There is much debate on the application of constructivist and behaviorist perspectives for teaching students with intellectual disabilities as addressed in this paper.…

  17. Suggestopedia Based Storytelling Teaching Model for Primary Students in Salatiga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunardi; Waluyo, Herman J.; Suudi, Astini; Wardani, Nugraheni Eko

    2018-01-01

    Teaching and learning speaking skills should be able to engage students in a creative process. Students have to be able to speak in front of the class, create a dialogue, tell a story, and produce the language creatively. The teaching and learning of the speaking skill focusing on story telling ability can work well when supported by the…

  18. Student Evaluation of Teaching: Keeping in Touch with Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Student evaluation of teaching is commonplace in many universities and may be the predominant input into the performance evaluation of staff and organisational units. This article used publicly available student evaluation of teaching data to present examples of where institutional responses to evaluation processes appeared to be educationally…

  19. The development of a student rating of teaching effectiveness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of student ratings of teaching effectiveness has become the most widely used, and often the only, source of information to assess and improve teaching effectiveness. Important prerequisites for questionnaires for student ratings should, therefore, be reliability and validity. The research reported in this article presents ...

  20. Medical Student Perceptions of Radiology Use in Anatomy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin P.; Crush, Lee; O'Malley, Eoin; Daly, Fergus E.; Twomey, Maria; O'Tuathaigh, Colm M. P.; Maher, Michael M.; Cryan, John F.; O'Connor, Owen J.

    2015-01-01

    The use of radiology in the teaching of anatomy to medical students is gaining in popularity; however, there is wide variation in how and when radiology is introduced into the curriculum. The authors sought to investigate students' perceptions regarding methods used to depict and teach anatomy and effects of integrated radiology instruction on…

  1. Teaching Social Skills and Assertiveness to Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffett, Aaron; Alexander, Melissa G. F.; Dummer, Gail M.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses teaching social skills and assertiveness to students with disabilities. The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) content standards for physical education emphasize teaching responsible personal and social behaviors to students of all abilities, to help them develop an understanding of and respect for…

  2. Perceptions and preferences of medical students regarding teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: In the complex setting of a medical school it becomes essential to utilize an approach to teaching and learning that is best suited to the needs of the students. In developing countries like India, where there is an exponential increase of institutions catering to medical students, it becomes a challenge to teach to ...

  3. Senior High School Student Biology Learning in Interactive Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tan-Ni; Cowie, Bronwen; Jones, Alister

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports Grade 12 students' biology learning during interactive teaching classes in 2001 in Taiwan. The researcher as teacher, working within an interpretive framework, set out to improve her senior high school student biology teaching and learning. An intervention based on a social constructivist view of learning was designed,…

  4. Improving Student Retention in Higher Education: Improving Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosling, Glenda; Heagney, Margaret; Thomas, Liz

    2009-01-01

    As a key performance indicator in university quality assurance processes, the retention of students in their studies is an issue of concern world-wide. Implicit in the process of quality assurance is quality improvement. In this article, we examine student retention from a teaching and learning perspective, in terms of teaching and learning…

  5. Students' Views on Contextual Vocabulary Teaching: A Constructivist View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Bahadir Cahit

    2016-01-01

    The current study is a quantitative research that aims to throw light on the place of students' views on contextual vocabulary teaching in conformity with Constructivism (CVTC) in the field of foreign language teaching. Hence, the study investigates whether any significant correlation exists between the fourth year university students' attitudes…

  6. The piano teaching situation from a student perspective: A South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses a qualitative survey conducted among piano students in order to determine their needs regarding piano teaching. The empirical research underlying this article indicates that, from the perspective of the piano student, certain needs in the piano teaching situation are not satisfied, while piano lecturers ...

  7. Teaching Medical Students Basic Neurotransmitter Pharmacology Using Primary Research Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliday, Amy C.; Devonshire, Ian M.; Greenfield, Susan A.; Dommett, Eleanor J.

    2010-01-01

    Teaching pharmacology to medical students has long been seen as a challenge, and one to which a number of innovative approaches have been taken. In this article, we describe and evaluate the use of primary research articles in teaching second-year medical students both in terms of the information learned and the use of the papers themselves. We…

  8. Teaching Maori Students Business Issues: An Experiential Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapalska, Alina M.; Brozik, Dallas; Dabb, Helen; Keiha, Pare

    2002-01-01

    Effective teaching arises when each class accommodates all types of learners. Individual students have different learning styles, and an effective classroom presentation should mix different teaching methods in order to accommodate these individual differences. In order to help Maori students improve their academic performance, cooperative and…

  9. Changing the Face of Student Teaching through Coteaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacharach, Nancy; Heck, Teresa Washut; Dahlberg, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we challenge the status quo of current student-teaching practice, which has remained relatively unchanged for close to 100 years. This 4-year study identifies the differences between a coteaching and a non-coteaching model of student teaching. Quantitative and qualitative results clearly demonstrate the positive impact of…

  10. Cooperating Teachers' Perspectives of Student Teaching Skills and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, Scott W.; Retallick, Michael S.; Paulsen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which cooperating teachers deem required student teaching skills and activities relevant to the agricultural education student teaching experience. The population for this descriptive study consisted of individuals who served as cooperating teachers in Iowa and South Dakota during the last 5…

  11. Using Blended Learning in Developing Student Teachers Teaching Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin; Abanmy, Fahad AbdulAziz; Hussein, Hisham Barakat; Al Saadany, Mohammed Abdelrahman

    2012-01-01

    The research aims to determine the effectiveness of using blended learning Approach in developing student teachers teaching skills, and defining teaching skills that confront students of teachers college at King Saud University need it. The research uses the Quasi- Experimental approach, with four experimental groups (Mathematics (21)--Science…

  12. Project Teaches Students to Diagnose an Ailing Windows OS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baijan

    2007-01-01

    Troubleshooting a corrupted Windows operating system (OS) is a must-learn experience for computer technology students. To teach OS troubleshooting, the simplest approach involves introducing the available tools followed by the "how-to's." But how does a teacher teach his or her students to apply their knowledge in real-life scenarios and help them…

  13. Child Psychiatry: What Are We Teaching Medical Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The author describes child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) undergraduate teaching in American and Canadian medical schools. Methods: A survey asking for information on CAP teaching, student interest in CAP, and opinions about the CAP importance was sent to the medical student psychiatry director at 142 accredited medical schools in the…

  14. Teacher Characteristics and Students' Choice of Teaching as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study also showed a significant relationship between students' attitude to choice of teaching as a career and teachers characteristics (χ2 = 3.73, p < 0.05). There was also a significant difference between the attitude of private and public school students towards teaching as a profession with regards to teachers ...

  15. Attitudes of Nigerian Students and Teachers towards the Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... attitude towards the teaching profession but at different levels of significance. The implication of findings for school administration is that the attitude of students and student-teachers to teaching profession is a reflection of the attitudes of school personnel towards their career. Keywords: Teacher training; Career guidance; ...

  16. The effect of flipped teaching combined with modified team-based learning on student performance in physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Chaya; Klann, Megan C

    2017-09-01

    Flipped classroom is a hybrid educational format that shifts guided teaching out of class, thus allowing class time for student-centered learning. Although this innovative teaching format is gaining attention, there is limited evidence on the effectiveness of flipped teaching on student performance. We compared student performance and student attitudes toward flipped teaching with that of traditional lectures using a partial flipped study design. Flipped teaching expected students to have completed preclass material, such as assigned reading, instructor-prepared lecture video(s), and PowerPoint slides. In-class activities included the review of difficult topics, a modified team-based learning (TBL) session, and an individual assessment. In the unflipped teaching format, students were given PowerPoint slides and reading assignment before their scheduled lectures. The class time consisted of podium-style lecture, which was captured in real time and was made available for students to use as needed. Comparison of student performance between flipped and unflipped teaching showed that flipped teaching improved student performance by 17.5%. This was true of students in both the upper and lower half of the class. A survey conducted during this study indicated that 65% of the students changed the way they normally studied, and 69% of the students believed that they were more prepared for class with flipped learning than in the unflipped class. These findings suggest that flipped teaching, combined with TBL, is more effective than the traditional lecture. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Students' feedback on teaching and assessment at Nishtar Medical College, Multan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Shoaib; Rafique, Hasaan

    2013-09-01

    To obtain feedback on teaching and assessment methods in professional undergraduate medical examinations. The study was conducted at Nishtar Medical College, Multan, Pakistan, from May 21 to May 26, 2012. A written questionnaire covering topics on various teaching and assessment methods was used to get feedback from students of 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th year M.B.B.S. SPSS version 17 was used for statistical analysis. Of the 534 questionnaires distributed, 538 (99%) were returned duly filled. Overall, 382 (71%) students were satisfied with all aspects of the lectures delivered and 393 (73%) students agreed that teaching staff was punctual in delivering lectures. Although 312 (58%) students were satisfied with the teaching conducted in the wards, students felt dissatisfaction with the teaching carried out in outpatient departments and operating theatres. Multimedia was favoured by 306 (56%) students as a supporting teaching tool. Although the students agreed that questions asked in examinations were relevant and the pattern of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) / Objective Structured Practical Examination (OSPE) was satisfactory, they felt that the time allowed was insufficient. 399 (74%) students agreed that multiple modes of assessment improved their knowledge and skill. There was no consensus among the students on the best form of assessment. Number of students favouring short essay questions (SEQ's), multiple choice questions including true/false type, single best choice questions (BCQ'S) and descriptive questions were 209(38.8%), 176(32.7%), 70 (13%) and 28 (5%) respectively. There was disparity in students' satisfaction in internal assessment and university examination. Although 226 (42%) students were satisfied with internal assessment, 199 (37%) were satisfied with university assessment. Overall, the students were satisfied with the lectures and clinical teaching conducted in the wards. Preferred methods of assessment included short essay questions

  18. Veterinary students' usage and perception of video teaching resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Michael A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of our study was to use a student-centred approach to develop an online video learning resource (called 'Moo Tube' at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, UK and also to provide guidance for other academics in the School wishing to develop a similar resource in the future. Methods A focus group in the format of the nominal group technique was used to garner the opinions of 12 undergraduate students (3 from year-1, 4 from year-2 and 5 from year-3. Students generated lists of items in response to key questions, these responses were thematically analysed to generate key themes which were compared between the different year groups. The number of visits to 'Moo Tube' before and after an objective structured practical examination (OSPE was also analysed to provide data on video usage. Results Students highlighted a number of strengths of video resources which can be grouped into four overarching themes: (1 teaching enhancement, (2 accessibility, (3 technical quality and (4 video content. Of these themes, students rated teaching enhancement and accessibility most highly. Video usage was seen to significantly increase (P Conclusions The students had a positive perception of video usage in higher education. Video usage increases prior to practical examinations. Image quality was a greater concern with year-3 students than with either year-1 or 2 students but all groups highlighted the following as important issues: i good sound quality, ii accessibility, including location of videos within electronic libraries, and iii video content. Based on the findings from this study, guidelines are suggested for those developing undergraduate veterinary videos. We believe that many aspects of our list will have resonance in other areas of medicine education and higher education.

  19. Veterinary students' usage and perception of video teaching resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshier, Amanda L; Foster, Neil; Jones, Michael A

    2011-01-10

    The purpose of our study was to use a student-centred approach to develop an online video learning resource (called 'Moo Tube') at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science, University of Nottingham, UK and also to provide guidance for other academics in the School wishing to develop a similar resource in the future. A focus group in the format of the nominal group technique was used to garner the opinions of 12 undergraduate students (3 from year-1, 4 from year-2 and 5 from year-3). Students generated lists of items in response to key questions, these responses were thematically analysed to generate key themes which were compared between the different year groups. The number of visits to 'Moo Tube' before and after an objective structured practical examination (OSPE) was also analysed to provide data on video usage. Students highlighted a number of strengths of video resources which can be grouped into four overarching themes: (1) teaching enhancement, (2) accessibility, (3) technical quality and (4) video content. Of these themes, students rated teaching enhancement and accessibility most highly. Video usage was seen to significantly increase (P students had a positive perception of video usage in higher education. Video usage increases prior to practical examinations. Image quality was a greater concern with year-3 students than with either year-1 or 2 students but all groups highlighted the following as important issues: i) good sound quality, ii) accessibility, including location of videos within electronic libraries, and iii) video content. Based on the findings from this study, guidelines are suggested for those developing undergraduate veterinary videos. We believe that many aspects of our list will have resonance in other areas of medicine education and higher education.

  20. Teaching Graduate Students How To Do Informal Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Crone, W.; Dunwoody, S. L.; Zenner, G.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most important skills a student needs to develop during their graduate days is the skill of communicating their scientific work with a wide array of audiences. That facility will serve them across audiences, from scientific peers to students to neighbors and the general public. Increasingly, graduate students express a need for training in skills needed to manage diverse communicative environments. In response to that need we have created a course for graduate students in STEM-related fields which provides a structured framework and experiential learning about informal science education. This course seeks to familiarize students with concepts and processes important to communicating science successfully to a variety of audiences. A semester-long course, "Informal Science Education for Scientists: A Practicum," has been co-taught by a scientist/engineer and a social scientist/humanist over several years through the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, & Learning at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The course is project based and understanding audience is stressed throughout the class. Through development and exhibition of the group project, students experience front end, formative and summative evaluation methods. The disciplines of the participating students is broad, but includes students in the geosciences each year. After a brief description of the course and its evolution, we will present assessment and evaluation results from seven different iterations of the course showing significant gains in how informed students felt about evaluation as a tool to determine the effectiveness of their science outreach activities. Significant gains were found in the graduate students' perceptions that they were better qualified to explain a research topic to a lay audience, and in the students' confidence in using and understanding evaluation techniques to determine the effectiveness of communication strategies. There were also increases in the students

  1. The Impact of a Multifaceted Approach to Teaching Research Methods on Students' Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarocco, Natalie J.; Lewandowski, Gary W., Jr.; Van Volkom, Michele

    2013-01-01

    A multifaceted approach to teaching five experimental designs in a research methodology course was tested. Participants included 70 students enrolled in an experimental research methods course in the semester both before and after the implementation of instructional change. When using a multifaceted approach to teaching research methods that…

  2. Adapting a Problem-Solving Approach to Teaching Mathematics to Students with Mild Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salend, Spencer J.; Hofstetter, Elaine

    1996-01-01

    Guidelines for implementing a problem-solving approach to teaching mathematics concepts and skills to students with mild disabilities include: establish connections to daily life; use visual presentations; use manipulatives; use peer-mediated instruction; provide models, cues, and prompts; teach self-management techniques and learning strategies;…

  3. Why and How We Made a Problem Oriented AV Teaching Unit for Chemistry Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, T. H. M.; Verdonk, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an audiovisual teaching unit on the chemical laboratory technique of recrystallization which was developed along problem-solving lines and based on observation of student laboratory behavior. Discussion includes usual procedures for developing such units, how this unit solves problems typically associated with teaching, and its general…

  4. Effect of the inquiry-based teaching approach on students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    Also based on the research by Oliver (2007) and Prince & Felder (2007), the inquiry-based teaching style presents students with problems to be solved and it increases student's motivation. More importantly, the inquiry based learning actively involves the students in the learning process and allows the students to learn the ...

  5. Improvement on a science curriculum including experimental demonstration of environmental radioactivity for secondary school students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Kenji; Matsubara, Shizuo; Aiba, Yoshio; Eriguchi, Hiroshi; Kiyota, Saburo; Takeyama, Tetsuji.

    1988-01-01

    A science curriculum previously prepared for teaching environmental radioactivity was modified on the basis of the results of trial instructions in secondary schools. The main subject of the revised curriculum is an understanding of the natural radioactivity through the experimental demonstration about air-borne β and γ ray emitters. The other subjects included are the radioactive decay, the biological effects of radiation, the concept of risk-benefit balance (acceptable level) and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and radiation. The work sheets and reference data prepared as learning materials are in two levels corresponding to the ability of students for this curriculum. (author)

  6. "Teaching by humiliation" and mistreatment of medical students in clinical rotations: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen M; Caldwell, Patrina Hy; Barnes, Elizabeth H; Barrett, Jenny

    2015-08-17

    To generate a contemporary understanding of "teaching by humiliation" as experienced by medical students in Australia. In this pilot study, we surveyed final-stage medical students from two Australian medical schools about their experiences of teaching by humiliation during their adult and paediatric clinical rotations. The students were invited to complete the anonymous survey at the end of their paediatric rotation in Semester 2 of 2013. We used descriptive statistics to analyse quantitative data, and a grounded theory approach to analyse qualitative data. Student reports of experiencing or witnessing teaching by humiliation during their adult and paediatric clinical rotations. Of 151 students invited to participate, 146 (96.7%) completed the survey. Most students reported experiencing (108; 74.0%) or witnessing (118; 83.1%) teaching by humiliation during adult clinical rotations. Smaller but still sizeable proportions had experienced (42; 28.8%) or witnessed (64; 45.1%) it during their paediatric clinical rotation. The humiliating and intimidating behaviours students experienced were mostly more subtle than overt and included aggressive and abusive questioning techniques. The students' responses to these practices ranged from disgust and regret about entering the medical profession to endorsement of teachers' public exposure of a student's poor knowledge. Practices associated with humiliating medical students persist in contemporary medical education. These practices need to be eradicated, given the evidence that they affect students' learning and mental health and are dissonant with formal professionalism curricula. Interventions are needed to interrupt the transgenerational legacy and culture in which teaching by humiliation is perpetuated.

  7. Evaluating the Differential Impact of Teaching Assistant Training Programs on International Graduate Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Ken N.; Olsen, Karyn C.; Dimitrov, Nanda; Dawson, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we compared the effects of a traditional teaching assistant (TA) training program to those of a specialized program, with a substantial intercultural component, for international graduate students. We expected both programs to result in an increase in international graduate students' teaching self-efficacy, observed teaching…

  8. Are medical students accepted by patients in teaching hospitals?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Marwan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worldwide, patients are the cornerstone of bedside teaching of medical students. In this study, the authors aimed to assess patients’ acceptability toward medical students in teaching hospitals of the Faculty of Medicine of Kuwait University. Methods: Ninehundred and ninety five patients were approached in 14 teaching hospitals; 932 patients agreed to participate (refusal rate is 6.3%. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Results: In general, higher acceptance of students by patients was found when there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g., reading patients’ files, presenting in outpatient clinic, observing doctors performing examination or procedures compared to other situations (e.g., performing physical examination or procedures. Pediatrics patients showed higher acceptance of students compared to patients in other specialties, while Obstetrics/Gynecology patients showed the highest refusal of students. Gender of patients (especially females and students appeared to affect the degree of acceptance of medical students by patients. Majority of the patients (436; 46.8% believed that the presence of medical students in hospitals improves the quality of health care. Conclusion: Patients are an important factor of bedside teaching. Clinical tutors must take advantage of patients who accept medical students. Clinical tutors and medical students should master essential communication skills to convince patients in accepting students, thus improving bedside teaching. Also, using simulation and standardization should be considered to address scenarios that most patients are unwilling to allow students to participate.

  9. Measurements of Student and Teacher Perceptions of Co-Teaching Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Randa G.

    2015-01-01

    Co-teaching is an accepted teaching model for inclusive classrooms. This study measured the perceptions of both students and teachers regarding the five most commonly used co-teaching models (i.e., One Teach/One Assist, Station Teaching, Alternative Teaching, Parallel Teaching, and Team Teaching). Additionally, this study compared student…

  10. A Model for Teaching Electronic Commerce Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard C. Woodard

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The teaching of information technology in an ever-changing world at universities presents a challenge. Are courses taught as concepts, while ignoring hands-on courses, leaving the hands-on classes to the technical colleges or trade schools? Does this produce the best employees for industry or give students the knowledge and skills necessary to function in a high-tech world? At GeorgiaCollege & StateUniversity (GC&SU a model was developed that combines both concepts and practical hands-on skill to meet this challenge. Using this model, a program was developed that consists of classroom lecture of concepts as well as practical hands-on exercises for mastering the knowledge and developing the skills necessary to succeed in the high-tech world of electronic commerce. The students become productive day one of a new job assignment. This solves the problem of students having the "book knowledge" but not knowing how to apply what has been learned.

  11. Student evaluations of teaching tools: a qualitative examination of student perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Nena J; Rubenstein, Cynthia; Sawin, Erika M; Annan, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Student evaluations of teaching (SET) are common and controversial, yet there is limited understanding of student perceptions of these evaluation tools. The authors examined an evidence-based SET tool for content validity using BSN, RN-to-BSN, and MSN student focus groups to explore individual question items and identify themes. Through communication and relationships with students, SET can influence teaching effectiveness and student learning, although student perceptions of individual items vary greatly.

  12. Effectively Teaching Diverse Student Groups: A Reflection on Teaching and Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trees, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses facilitating student collegiality within diverse student groups. It argues that diverse student groups of international, domestic, mature age and Gen Y students often have similar difficulties and strengths although they may occur for quite different reasons and understanding this is useful when deciding on teaching and…

  13. Teaching Health Care Students the Radial Arterial Puncture Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kevin P; Russian, Christopher J; Gonzales, Joshua F

    2016-01-01

    The radial artery puncture is a frequently ordered medical procedure for patients requiring blood gas analysis. Deviating from the proper procedure increases the likelihood of error and jeopardizes patient safety. The teaching methodology for the radial artery puncture is rarely addressed in the medical literature. First-year respiratory care students enrolled in a clinical practice course participated in an expanded curriculum on arterial puncture technique. The new five-step curriculum included: 1) a face-to-face lecture, 2) radial artery localization, 3) blunt-tipped needle simulation, 4) manikin arm puncture, and 5) a peer assessment video. Students participated in an inter-rater reliability exercise for step five. The multi-step process for teaching the arterial puncture stressed process over outcome. Students were required to master each step with a satisfactory evaluation to successfully pass the unit. Students also demonstrated high inter-rater evaluation scores of a peer video of the arterial puncture. Additional research is needed to determine if widespread application of the curriculum across other respiratory care programs and other healthcare disciplines is possible. The detailed report of our new curriculum offers other academic researchers the ability to formally study its usefulness.

  14. Teaching accuracy and reliability for student projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Nick

    2002-09-01

    Physics students at Rugby School follow the Salters Horners A-level course, which involves working on a two-week practical project of their own choosing. Pupils often misunderstand the concepts of accuracy and reliability, believing, for example, that repeating readings makes them more accurate and more reliable, whereas all it does is help to check repeatability. The course emphasizes the ideas of checking anomalous points, improving accuracy and making readings more sensitive. This article describes how we teach pupils in preparation for their projects. Based on many years of running such projects, much of this material is from a short booklet that we give out to pupils, when we train them in practical project skills.

  15. Students' perceptions of lecturing approaches: traditional versus interactive teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Meguid, Eiman; Collins, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing trend toward transcending from traditional teaching to student-centered methodologies that actively engage students. We aimed to analyze students' perceptions of effective interactive teaching using PollEverywhere Audience Response System (ARS) as a worthwhile teaching methodology. It can be of great help in maintaining students' attention and in facilitating the lecturer to pick up students' misunderstandings and correct them. This system was introduced to the undergraduate dental curriculum to increase student's motivation and attention, giving immediate feedback on student understanding during an anatomy module. Computer science (CS) students who were more familiar with the use of this technology were also involved in the study for comparison and validation of the findings. The lecturer strategically inserted questions using PollEverywhere ARS. Students' perception of the effective interactive teaching using this technology was evaluated statistically using a questionnaire and focus groups. It promoted interactivity, focused attention, and provided feedback on comprehension. A total of 95% reported that it increased their participation and found that it clarified their thinking and helped to focus on key points. Another 81.7% mentioned that it increased their motivation to learn. Students regarded it as a useful method for giving real-time feedback, which stimulated their performance and participation. Data from CS students echoed the findings from the dental students. Reports from focus groups demonstrated that this strategy was helpful in focusing students' attention and in clarifying information. PollEverywhere encouraged all students to participate during the learning process. This has proven to be an effective tool for improving students' understanding and critical thinking. Students regarded PollEverywhere as an effective teaching innovation that encouraged deeper ongoing retention of information. It was found to be an effective

  16. The Matters in Teaching Reading Comprehension to EFL Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliana Natsir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find out the efforts that were being made by certified English teachers in teaching reading since reading is considered as one of the determiners of academic success. Descriptive qualitative research was used in this study; the subjects were two English teachers in Banda Aceh and the instrument was an interview guide. The interview questions were adapted from Fletcher, et al. (2012 that focused on curriculum, teacher preparation, teaching methodology, teaching instructions, authentic teaching materials, teachers’ perceptions toward reading attitudes of learners, barriers in teaching reading, and teaching strategies for helping ineffective readers. The interviews revealed that the efforts made by the teachers played a pivotal role at assisting students to achieve reading competency. The attitude of students toward reading was also important in the teaching-learning process. The strategies of the teachers towards the students who were not reading effectively were not in line with the strategies as suggested by some experts:  that the teacher should teach the students the strategies of how to read with interest, how to predict meanings, how to develop knowledge about the topic and so forth .These strategies were not implemented due to the situation and condition of the teaching environment. In brief, proper efforts by teachers to improve the learning environment could assist students to achieve better reading competency.

  17. High school students' work engagement in practical teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Milanović-Dobrota Biljana Z.; Radić-Šestić Marina N.

    2017-01-01

    The current interest in introducing the dual education system into Serbian secondary education has drawn our attention to the question of students' self-perception in the process of practical teaching. The idea that underpins this paper is the supposition that students are affectively engaged with the work activities they perform. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES) (Schaufeli et al., 2002) has been used for assessing students' work engagement in practical teaching. A study was conducted...

  18. Student Teams Achievement Divisions (Stad) Technique in Teaching Writing Narrative Text

    OpenAIRE

    Hayatunisa, Linta

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of Student Teams Achievement Divisions (STAD) technique, proposed by Slavin (2005) and his colleagues, in teaching writing Narrative text. This study also investigates students' responses to see the potential of the technique to be applied in the classroom. The study employs a qualitative case study research design. The data were obtained from several sources, including questionnaire, classroom observation (teaching process), and collection of samples...

  19. Assessment of impact of small group teaching among students in community medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranabir Pal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We conducted a study to assess the impact of small group teaching (SGT among students by feedback analysis to identify intricacy so that learning can be facilitated. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was undertaken among 182 MBBS students studying at a teaching hospital at Gangtok. Students were provided with a questionnaire following an assignment on a scheduled topic. Students were asked to provide feedback on the modes of teaching-learning practiced in community medicine with the parameters of evaluation including assessment of presentation by faculty member in reference to relevance, sequencing, depth, interaction, etc., to the overall rating of presentations in different teaching-learning methods. Results: The faculty members were on the positive evaluation by the students in the SGT, which was preferred over "lectures" as the teaching-learning methods. Among SGTs "tutorials" were graded better than "practical," "seminar" and "field posting" on the basis of longer duration at a stretch. Among the parameters for evaluation, relevance, depth, and interaction in regard to scheduled topic of presentations, the rating was significantly higher in SGT than different other teaching-learning methods. Largely the students noted that the time devoted and number of hours/sessions allotted for each topic was adequate. Conclusion: All forms of SGT were on the positive appraisal by the students on their learning experience and were considered as a comprehensive tool for in-depth teacher-student interaction.

  20. Teaching emergency medicine with workshops improved medical student satisfaction in emergency medicine education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sricharoen P

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pungkava Sricharoen,1 Chaiyaporn Yuksen,1 Yuwares Sittichanbuncha,1 Kittisak Sawanyawisuth2,3 1Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand; 3The Research Center in Back, Neck, Other Joint Pain and Human Performance (BNOJPH, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Background: There are different teaching methods; such as traditional lectures, bedside teaching, and workshops for clinical medical clerkships. Each method has advantages and disadvantages in different situations. Emergency Medicine (EM focuses on emergency medical conditions and deals with several emergency procedures. This study aimed to compare traditional teaching methods with teaching methods involving workshops in the EM setting for medical students. Methods: Fifth year medical students (academic year of 2010 at Ramathibodi Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand participated in the study. Half of students received traditional teaching, including lectures and bedside teaching, while the other half received traditional teaching plus three workshops, namely, airway workshop, trauma workshop, and emergency medical services workshop. Student evaluations at the end of the clerkship were recorded. The evaluation form included overall satisfaction, satisfaction in overall teaching methods, and satisfaction in each teaching method. Results: During the academic year 2010, there were 189 students who attended the EM rotation. Of those, 77 students (40.74% were in the traditional EM curriculum, while 112 students were in the new EM curriculum. The average satisfaction score in teaching method of the new EM curriculum group was higher than the traditional EM curriculum group (4.54 versus 4.07, P-value <0.001. The top three highest average satisfaction scores in the new EM curriculum group were trauma

  1. Preparing College Students to Teach an Environmental Problem Solving Curriculum to Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, S. E.

    2001-12-01

    An NSF-funded project-based program was implemented by Clarkson University in 2000 to increase the interest and knowledge of middle school students in science, math and technology through the solution of an environmental problem that is relevant to their local school community. Clarkson students developed curricula for 7th and 8th grade science and technology classes and then worked with the middle school students throughout the year to reduce to transform solid waste into healthy soil for plant growth. The solution to this problem provided a vehicle to teach fundamental science and math content as well as the process of doing science and solving problems. Placing college science and engineering students in the classroom proved to be a great mechanism for engaging students in science topics and providing mentoring experiences that differ greatly from those that a practicing professional can provide. It is clear, however, that the students must be well prepared for this experience to maximize the benefits of university - school district partnership programs. The objective of this presentation will be to describe the training program that has been developed to prepare Clarkson students to work effectively in middle school classrooms. The Clarkson students are trained for their classroom experiences during the summer before they enter the classroom. They receive three credits for the training, curriculum development, and teaching efforts. It is expected that the students have the necessary background in science and technology to teach themselves the content and environmental relevance of the problem they will be teaching. Lectures and workshops focus on how to transform this knowledge into a project-based curriculum that meets the needs of the teachers, while also exciting the students. Lecture/workshops include: team work; components of an effective class and teacher; project planning and management; problem solving process; inquiry based learning, deductive

  2. Impact of Faculty Development Workshops in Student-Centered Teaching Methodologies on Faculty Members' Teaching and Their Students' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricio, Jorge A; Montt, Juan E; Ormeño, Andrea P; Del Real, Alberto J; Naranjo, Claudia A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, after one year, the impact of faculty development in teaching and learning skills focused on a learner-centered approach on faculty members' perceptions of and approaches to teaching and on their students' learning experiences and approaches. Before training (2014), all 176 faculty members at a dental school in Chile were invited to complete the Approaches to Teaching Inventory (ATI) to assess their teaching approaches (student- vs. teacher-focused). In 2015, all 496 students were invited to complete the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) to assess their learning approaches (deep or surface) and the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) to measure their teaching quality perceptions. Subsequently, faculty development workshops on student-centered teaching methodologies were delivered, followed by peer observation. In March 2016, all 176 faculty members and 491 students were invited to complete a second ATI (faculty) and R-SPQ-2 and CEQ (students). Before (2014) and after (2016) the training, 114 (65%) and 116 (66%) faculty members completed the ATI, respectively, and 89 (49%) of the then-181 faculty members completed the perceptions of skills development questionnaire in September 2016. In 2015, 373 students (75%) completed the R-SPQ-2F and CEQ; 412 (83%) completed both questionnaires in 2016. In 2014, the faculty results showed that student-focused teaching was significantly higher in preclinical and clinical courses than in the basic sciences. In 2016, teacher-focused teaching fell significantly; basic science teaching improved the most. Students in both the 2015 and 2016 cohorts had lower mean scores for deep learning approaches from year 1 on, while they increased their scores for surface learning. The students' perceptions of faculty members' good teaching, appropriate assessment, clear goals, and e-learning improved significantly, but perception of appropriate workload did not. Teaching and learning skills development

  3. Reverse Teaching: Exploring Student Perceptions of "Flip Teaching"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Bang; Yu, Xiaoyu; Japutra, Arnold; Chen, Cheng-Hao Steve

    2016-01-01

    The concept of reverse teaching, considered by some as the education model of the future due to increasing technological availability in the classroom, has received great attention in education research lately. However, the focus of these studies has mainly been on the understanding of reverse teaching in terms of its application rather than…

  4. Aspects of Teaching and Learning Science: What students' diaries reveal about inquiry and traditional modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalkar, Aisha; Vijapurkar, Jyotsna

    2015-09-01

    We present an analysis of students' reflective writing (diaries) of two cohorts of Grade 8 students, one undergoing inquiry and the other traditional science teaching. Students' writing included a summary of what students had learned in class on that day and their opinions and feelings about the class. The entries were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively. This analysis of students' first-person accounts of their learning experience and their notes taken during class was useful in two ways. First, it brought out a spectrum of differences in outcomes of these two teaching modes-conceptual, affective and epistemic. Second, this analysis brought out the significance and meaning of the learning experience for students in their own words, thus adding another dimension to researchers' characterisation of the two teaching methods.

  5. Students’ Learning Experiences from Didactic Teaching Sessions Including Patient Case Examples as Either Text or Video: A Qualitative Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kamilla; Holdgaard, Martin Møller; Paltved, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to explore medical students' learning experiences from the didactic teaching formats using either text-based patient cases or video-based patient cases with similar content. The authors explored how the two different patient case formats influenced students' ...... unintended stigma and influence an authoritative approach in medical students towards managing patients in clinical psychiatry....

  6. Teaching on the spiritual dimension in care to undergraduate nursing students: the content and teaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldacchino, Donia R

    2008-07-01

    The study unit on 'The spiritual dimension in care'had a Judeo-Christian orientation. It was introduced to the Diploma nursing curriculum at the University of Malta in the academic year 2002-2003. The aim was to increase students' awareness about the essence of spirituality in care so as to enable them to implement holistic care. Spirituality may or may not incorporate religiosity. Thus, believers may have spiritual needs which may include religious needs whilst the atheists and agnostics may still have spiritual needs. While considering secularisation, the Christian culture of Malta was addressed in this study unit. This article describes the content structure of the study unit based on the ASSET model (Narayanasamy, A., 1999. ASSET: a model for actioning spirituality and spiritual care education and training in nursing. Nurse Education Today 19, 274-285) and outlines the various teaching methods used. Following feedback from the first and second cohort groups in 2003 and 2004, respectively, the reviewed study unit was delivered to the third cohort group of students (n=65) in Semester 2 in the academic year 2004-2005. Apart from the use of traditional teaching methods, such as lessons and a seminar, other methods were used constantly throughout the study unit, for example, self-reflection exercises, case-studies and small group discussions to enhance learning. Recommendations are proposed to review the content of this study unit and to introduce other teaching methods for effective learning.

  7. Using movies to teach professionalism to medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemenc-Ketis Zalika

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Professionalism topics are usually not covered as a separate lesson within formal curriculum, but in subtler and less officially recognized educational activities, which makes them difficult to teach and assess. Interactive methods (e.g. movies could be efficient teaching methods but are rarely studied. The aims of this study were: 1 to test the relevance and usefulness of movies in teaching professionalism to fourth year medical students and, 2 to assess the impact of this teaching method on students' attitudes towards some professionalism topics. Method This was an education study with qualitative data analysis in a group of eleven fourth year medical students from the Medical School of University Maribor who attended an elective four month course on professionalism. There were 8 (66.7% female students in the group. The mean age of the students was 21.9 ± 0.9 years. The authors used students' written reports and oral presentations as the basis for qualitative analysis using thematic codes. Results Students recognised the following dimensions in the movie: communication, empathy, doctors' personal interests and palliative care. It also made them think about their attitudes towards life, death and dying. Conclusions The controlled environment of movies successfully enables students to explore their values, beliefs, and attitudes towards features of professionalism without feeling that their personal integrity had been threatened. Interactive teaching methods could become an indispensible aid in teaching professionalism to new generations.

  8. Teaching Students the Verticality of Technical Documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Peter J.

    1992-01-01

    Advocates making technical writing courses more vertical in structure by including an extensive study of at least one specific form of technical documentation. Examines how students can gain experience in the vertical process by designing, writing, testing, and producing user manuals for on-campus cooperative education clients. Lists the benefits…

  9. Effective teaching behaviors in the emergency department: A qualitative study with Millennial nursing students in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinxia; Zeng, Li; Kue, Jennifer; Li, Hong; Shi, Yan; Chen, Cuiping

    2018-02-01

    Millennial nursing students are different from generations before especially with the rapid development of China's economy, their varieties of characteristics affect the clinical teaching and learning. But how their learning preference impact their learning outcomes remain unclear. The aim of this study is to explore effective teaching methods in the emergency department from the perspective of Millennial nursing students in Shanghai, China. One of the main objectives is to provide valuable information to help nursing programs in China to effectively educate Millennial students to deliver patient-centered care and to meet medical changes according to Chinese healthcare reform. Qualitative study design was used and semistructured interviews were conducted in a purposive sample of 16 nursing students from six colleges of nursing and five nursing high schools in Shanghai. They are from eight geographical areas across China and have a clinical practice in the teaching hospital. Colaizzi seven-step framework was applied for data analysis. Three themes were emerged including: demonstrating harmonious faculty-student relationship, possessing professional competence and being empathetic for teaching. The findings of this study provide valuable information for promoting the clinical teaching quality in China. It is crucial to put more emphasis on demonstrating harmonious faculty-student relationship, rendering Millennial students more caring behavior, possessing sufficient competence in both knowledge and skills, and taking full advantage of technology in clinical teaching. The results of this study are relevant to envision the future training of clinical nursing teachers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Science Teaching and Learning Activities and Students' Engagement in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampden-Thompson, Gillian; Bennett, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the variation in students' reports of engagement in science across science teaching and learning activities. In addition, this study examines student and school characteristics that may be associated with students' levels of engagement in science. Data are drawn from the Programme for International…

  11. The effect of student teaching experience on selected personality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Personality plays a significant role in teacher development. Minimal studies have investigated personality traits of student teachers in physical education. This study examines changes in selected personality traits of fifty-three physical education student teachers over the course of a student teaching semester.

  12. Teaching Sewing Machine Tension Concepts to Blind and Sighted Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Nora M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    An experimental lesson plan on sewing machine tension was developed for blind and sighted students in an attempt to teach this concept more effectively. Tactile/verbal aids were used in the experimental lesson to increase the potential for student comprehension. The experimental lesson produced better results for both groups of students even…

  13. Adult Student Preferences: Instructor Characteristics Conducive to Successful Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lindsay A.; Baltzer, Carolyn; Filoon, Lisa; Whitley, Cynthia

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined adult students' perspectives on what characteristics make for successful teaching and learning environments in the adult student classroom. Methodology: One hundred and thirty-two adult students (ranging in age from 22 to 70) participated in a mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative) survey. Findings: Adult…

  14. MOOC: Becoming a Student Assistant: Teaching and Mentoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noben, Ine; van Veen, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    Student assistants are valuable staff members at the University of Groningen. Currently, over 700 students take up teaching duties, support role functions, governing positions, and many other responsibilities. But, how to prepare for a job as a student assistant? What is professional behaviour? How

  15. The Teaching Evaluation Process: Segmentation of Marketing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Oliver H. M.; Kwan, Wayne

    1993-01-01

    A study applied the concept of market segmentation to student evaluation of college teaching, by assessing whether there exist several segments of students and how this relates to their evaluation of faculty. Subjects were 156 Australian undergraduate business administration students. Results suggest segments do exist, with different expectations…

  16. Embedded Assessment: A Measure of Student Learning and Teaching Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Maureen A.; Niederjohn, Daniel M.; Bosack, Theodore N.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence of student learning has increasingly become the focus of external constituents, yet methods of documenting student learning outcomes are considered expensive, onerous, or both. This article provides a brief review of the limitations associated with traditional student opinions or course evaluations as evidence of teaching effectiveness,…

  17. Mainstream teachers about including deaf or hard of hearing students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, J.A.; Denessen, E.J.P.G.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at teachers’ classroom practices and their beliefs and emotions regarding the inclusion of deaf or hard of hearing (d/hh) students in mainstream secondary schools. Nine teachers in two schools were interviewed about the inclusion of d/hh students. These teachers were found to

  18. Teaching practice: a make or break phase for student teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Kiggundu

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Teaching practice is an integral component of teacher training. It grants student teachers experience in the actual teaching and learning environment. We explore the experiences of student teachers in the Vaal University of Technology Post­graduate Certificate in Education (PGCE during their 10 weeks' teaching practice in the Vaal area. In this article we aim to establish the ways in which these experiences influence the student teachers' perception of the teaching profession. Semi-structured interviews with all student teachers were used to collect the data while content analysis was used to identify themes and analyse the data. We established that, despite the positive experiences during teaching practice, student teachers experienced challenges which affected their percep­tion of the teaching profession. Based on the findings of this study, measures are suggested on how to improve teaching practice in order to have a positive influence on the student teachers' perception of, and attitude towards, the tea­ching profession.

  19. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Patrick; Rai, Bhavan Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%). Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (Pbarrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the hospital wards as a supportive environment for student learning.

  20. Medical students' learning from patient-led teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Helen; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    a patient-centred approach, and acknowledged the importance of the PIs' individual perspectives and experiential knowledge. On the other hand, representing the scientific biomedical perspective and traditional step-by step teaching, students expressed unfamiliarity with the unstructured experiential......The aim of this study was to explore how medical students perceive the experience of learning from patient instructors (patients with rheumatism who teach health professionals and students) in the context of coupled faculty-led and patient-led teaching session. This was an explorative study...... learning and scepticism regarding the credibility of the patients' knowledge. This study contributes to the understanding of the complexity of involving patients as teachers in healthcare education and initiates a discussion on how to complement faculty-led teaching with patient-led teaching involving...

  1. Teaching Information Literacy for Engineering Students in a Rapidly Changing Information Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Lönneborg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The KTH Library has a long tradition of teaching information searching to technology students. Over the last years teaching information searching has become teaching information literacy, including more evaluation and source criticism. Traditionally, there have been three forms of teaching: independent credit-giving courses, integrated shorter modules in subject-specific courses and support via individual face-to-face supervision. Although evaluation and source criticism are now important parts of our teaching, much focus is still on search methodology. During this spring we, and our teaching colleagues at the KTH library, will revise and develop the content and pedagogical methodology for the courses and integrated modules in information literacy. In doing so, we need to address important questions on how to face the changing information landscape. Should the teaching be adapted to the search behaviour observed in our students or should we keep trying to change that behaviour? Do we put our effort into directing students to traditional scientific subject databases or should we put more emphasis on the importance of critically evaluating the search results, regardless of their source? How do we find the balance between these alternatives? Recently published studies have already covered these questions to some extent. The findings from a systematic literature search, together with insights collected from our development work during Spring 2016, will be used in an analysis of these questions in the context of teaching information literacy for engineering students.

  2. EARTHTIME: Teaching geochronology to high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bookhagen, Britta; Buchwaldt, Robert; McLean, Noah; Rioux, Matthew; Bowring, Samuel

    2010-05-01

    The authors taught an educational module developed as part of the EARTHTIME (www.earth-time.org) outreach initiative to 215 high school students from a Massachusetts (USA) High School as part of an "out-of-school" field trip. The workshop focuses on uranium-lead (U-Pb) dating of zircons and its application to solving a geological problem. The theme of our 2.5-hour module is the timing of the K-T boundary and a discussion of how geochronology can be used to evaluate the two main hypotheses for the cause of the concurrent extinction—the Chicxlub impact and the massive eruption of the Deccan Traps. Activities are divided into three parts: In the first part, the instructors lead hands-on activities demonstrating how rock samples are processed to isolate minerals by their physical properties. Students use different techniques, such as magnetic separation, density separation using non-toxic heavy liquids, and mineral identification with a microscope. We cover all the steps from sampling an outcrop to determining a final age. Students also discuss geologic features relevant to the K-T boundary problem and get the chance to examine basalts, impact melts and meteorites. In the second part, we use a curriculum developed for and available on the EARTHTIME website (http://www.earth-time.org/Lesson_Plan.pdf). The curriculum teaches the science behind uranium-lead dating using tables, graphs, and a geochronology kit. In this module, the students start by exploring the concepts of half-life and exponential decay and graphically solving the isotopic decay equation. Manipulating groups of double-sided chips labeled with U and Pb isotopes reinforces the concept that an age determination depends on the Pb/U ratio, not the absolute number of atoms present. Next, the technique's accuracy despite loss of parent and daughter atoms during analysis, as well as the use of isotopic ratios rather than absolute abundances, is explained with an activity on isotope dilution. Here the students

  3. Teaching MBA Students Teamwork and Team Leadership Skills: An Empirical Evaluation of a Classroom Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Charles J.; Strupeck, David; Griffin, Andrea; Szostek, Jana; Rominger, Anna S.

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive educational program for teaching behavioral teamwork and team leadership skills was rigorously evaluated with 148 MBA students enrolled at an urban regional campus of a Midwestern public university. Major program components included (1) videotaped student teams in leaderless group discussion (LGD) exercises at the course beginning…

  4. The Student Writing Toolkit: Enhancing Undergraduate Teaching of Scientific Writing in the Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirrigl, Frank J., Jr.; Noe, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Teaching scientific writing in biology classes is challenging for both students and instructors. This article offers and reviews several useful "toolkit" items that improve student writing. These include sentence and paper-length templates, funnelling and compartmentalisation, and preparing compendiums of corrections. In addition,…

  5. Teaching Gender: Australian First-Year University Student Views of "Ms."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Edgar; Tulloch, Ian; Shamsullah, Ardel

    2016-01-01

    Negative "push-back" from a group of first-year undergraduate sociology students during a class discussion of gender and feminism included rejecting personal use of the title Ms. Teaching team members asked themselves: how general is this response among other student groups in the same one-semester subject? A short in-class survey…

  6. Use of the Teaching Portfolio and Student Evaluations for Summative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centra, John A.

    The use of the teaching portfolio and student evaluations in evaluating 97 faculty members at a community college for contract renewal was studied. Two faculty peers and a dean evaluated the portfolios of each teacher. Deans also visited classrooms. Portfolios could include material about students that reflected their learning, material from the…

  7. Statistics Graduate Students' Professional Development for Teaching: A Communities of Practice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Nicola

    Graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) are responsible for instructing approximately 25% of introductory statistics courses in the United States (Blair, Kirkman, & Maxwell, 2013). Most research on GTA professional development focuses on structured activities (e.g., courses, workshops) that have been developed to improve GTAs' pedagogy and content knowledge. Few studies take into account the social contexts of GTAs' professional development. However, GTAs perceive their social interactions with other GTAs to be a vital part of their preparation and support for teaching (e.g., Staton & Darling, 1989). Communities of practice (CoPs) are one way to bring together the study of the social contexts and structured activities of GTA professional development. CoPs are defined as groups of practitioners who deepen their knowledge and expertise by interacting with each other on an ongoing basis (e.g., Lave & Wenger, 1991). Graduate students may participate in CoPs related to teaching in many ways, including attending courses or workshops, participating in weekly meetings, engaging in informal discussions about teaching, or participating in e-mail conversations related to teaching tasks. This study explored the relationship between statistics graduate students' experiences in CoPs and the extent to which they hold student-centered teaching beliefs. A framework for characterizing GTAs' experiences in CoPs was described and a theoretical model relating these characteristics to GTAs' beliefs was developed. To gather data to test the model, the Graduate Students' Experiences Teaching Statistics (GETS) Inventory was created. Items were written to collect information about GTAs' current teaching beliefs, teaching beliefs before entering their degree programs, characteristics of GTAs' experiences in CoPs, and demographic information. Using an online program, the GETS Inventory was administered to N =218 statistics graduate students representing 37 institutions in 24 different U.S. states

  8. Which peer teaching methods do medical students prefer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Nithish; Srirathan, Danushan; Shah, Rishita; Jakubowska, Agnieszka; Clarke, Andrew; Annan, David; Albasha, Dekan

    2016-01-01

    The beneficial effects of peer teaching in medical education have been well-described in the literature. However, it is unclear whether students prefer to be taught by peers in small or large group settings. This study's aim was to identify differences in medical students' preferences and perceptions of small-group versus large-group peer teaching. Questionnaires were administered to medical students in Year 3 and Year 4 (first 2 years of clinical training) at one institution in the United Kingdom to identify their experiences and perceptions of small-and large-group peer teaching. For this study, small-group peer teaching was defined as a tutorial, or similar, taught by peer tutor to a group of 5 students or less. Large-group peer teaching was defined as a lecture, or similar, taught by peer tutors to a group of more than 20 students. Seventy-three students (81% response rate) completed the questionnaires (54% males; median age of 23). Nearly 55% of respondents reported prior exposure to small-group peer teaching but a larger proportion of respondents (86%) had previously attended large-group peer teaching. Of all valid responses, 49% did not have a preference of peer teaching method while 47% preferred small-group peer teaching. The majority of Year 3 students preferred small-group peer teaching to no preference (62.5% vs 37.5%, Fisher's exact test; P = 0.035) whereas most Year 4 students did not report a particular preference. Likert-scale responses showed that the majority of students held negative perceptions about large-group peer teaching, in comparison with small-group peer teaching, with respect to (1) interactivity, (2) a comfortable environment to ask questions, and (3) feedback received. Most respondents in this study did not report a preference for small-versus large-group settings when taught by peers. More Year 3 respondents were likely to prefer small-group peer teaching as opposed to Year 4 respondents.

  9. Teaching spirituality to student midwives: a creative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mary; Hall, Jenny

    2007-11-01

    The nature of midwifery both as an art and a science requires methods of teaching students that will enhance this understanding. A philosophy of holistic care of women should underpin education of student midwives and these concepts should be put across to the students in meaningful ways. In the formal midwifery curriculum this has been a neglected aspect (Hall, 2001) [Hall, J., 2001. Midwifery Mind and spirit: emerging issues of care. Books for Midwives, Oxford]. We have developed a teaching session on 'Spirituality and the meaning of birth'. A creative approach, using mediums of video, music, aroma and storytelling, combined with an opportunity for the students to express their selves through art have been utilised (Cameron, 1993) [Cameron, J., 1993. The Artists Way--A course in discovering and recovering your creative self. Pan Macmillan, London]. Although creative approaches in teaching arts based disciplines is well established, these approaches have not been evaluated for their effectiveness within midwifery education. We conducted a study which aimed to develop an understanding of student's views on the meaning of birth by examining creative work produced by the student midwives. This aspect is reported elsewhere. Further exploration through open-ended questionnaires was made of the effectiveness and value of the activity as a teaching method. This paper will describe the innovative teaching methods used. In addition student's views of birth established through their art and their views of the teaching session elicited through our research will be explored.

  10. Tips for Teaching Math to Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpello, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Since most elementary school teachers do not hold a degree in mathematics, teaching math may be a daunting task for some. Following are a few techniques to help make teaching and learning math easier and less stressful. First, know that math is a difficult subject to teach--even for math teachers. The subject matter itself is challenging. Second,…

  11. Self-efficacy of physical education teachers in including students with cerebral palsy in their classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Barak, Sharon

    2017-09-01

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) are often mainstreamed into the general education system, but are likely to be excluded from physical education (PE) classes. A questionnaire was constructed and utilized to measure PE teachers' self-efficacy (SE) toward inclusion of students with CP in each of three mobility categories (independent, using assistive devices, using wheelchair mobility) and the impact of experience and training on teachers' SE. Participants in the study were 121 PE teachers from different parts of Israel (mean age: 41.02±9.33 years; range: 25.00-59.00 years). Exploratory factor analysis was used to determine the structure of the sub-scales' factors' structure and Cronbach's Alpha reliability was satisfactory (range 0.872-0.941). Independent t-tests were calculated in order to compare the SE of teachers with and without adapted PE experience. Repeated Analysis of Variance was performed to measure within-group differences in SE. Results revealed that the PE teachers' SE in teaching students who use mobility assistive devices or wheelchairs was significantly lower compared to teaching those who walk and run unaided (F=19.11; pteachers' SE towards including CP children who independently ambulate was influenced (pteacher's experience (elementary school practicum). SE in the mobility with assistive device group was also significantly influenced (pteachers' SE and enable greater participation of children with CP in general physical education classes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Undergraduate psychiatry students' attitudes towards teaching methods at an Irish university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar, F; Casey, P; Kelly, B D

    2016-11-01

    At University College Dublin, teaching in psychiatry includes clinical electives, lectures, small-group and problem-based teaching, consistent with international trends. To determine final-year psychiatry students' attitudes towards teaching methods. We distributed questionnaires to all final-year medical students in two classes (2008 and 2009), after final psychiatry examination (before results) and all of them participated (n = 111). Students' interest in psychiatry as a career increased during psychiatry teaching. Students rated objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) as the most useful element of teaching and examination. The most common learning style was "reflector"; the least common was "pragmatist". Two thirds believed teaching could be improved (increased patient contact) and 89 % reported that experience of psychiatry changed attitudes towards mental illness (increased understanding). Students' preference for OSCEs may reflect the closeness of OSCE as a form of learning to OSCE as a form of assessment: OSCEs both focus on specific clinical skills and help prepare for examinations. Future research could usefully examine the extent to which these findings are university-specific or instructor-dependent. Information on the consistency of various teaching, examination and modularisation methods would also be useful.

  13. Effect of four teaching strategies on senior secondary students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peer-tutoring, demonstration and project-based strategies of teaching are potent in raising students' achievement. Thus, in-service training in form of workshops, seminars and symposia should be organized for teachers regularly to update their knowledge on adoption of appropriate teaching strategies. Keywords: ...

  14. Human Anatomy: Let the Students Tell Us How to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R.; Bates, Anthony S.; Ellis, Harold; Roberts, Alice M.

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy teaching methods have evolved as the medical undergraduate curriculum has modernized. Traditional teaching methods of dissection, prosection, tutorials and lectures are now supplemented by anatomical models and e-learning. Despite these changes, the preferences of medical students and anatomy faculty towards both traditional and…

  15. Developing a Model of Teaching Reading Comprehension for EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamra, Arifuddin; Syatriana, Eny

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at designing a model of teaching reading comprehension based on the objectives of teaching reading at the senior high school and the teachers' understanding of the school curriculum and to describe the implementation of the model. The subject consisted of 24 teachers, 167 students of five SMAs (senior high schools) in South…

  16. Teaching as a Career: Perception of University Education Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study in which survey design was utilized sought to determine trainee teachers' perception of pursuing teaching as a career; and to determine those factors responsible for their perceptions. Four research questions were postulated to guide the study and a research instrument tagged 'Student Teaching Career ...

  17. Student teacher anxieties related to practice teaching | Ngidi | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... interaction effects of student teachers' biographical variables (gender, age and grade placement) on practice-teaching related factors such as evaluation and an unsuccessful lesson. The findings are discussed and improvement on practice teaching suggested. (South African Journal of Education: 2003 23 (1): 18-22) ...

  18. Teaching Character Education to College Students Using Bildungsromans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novianti, Nita

    2017-01-01

    The paper reports a study on the teaching of character education in higher education using English Bildungsroman, "Jane Eyre." The participants were 35 sixth-semester students of English Literature program in an Indonesian state university. Guided by the approach to teaching character education exemplified by Ryan & Bohlin (1999),…

  19. Enhancing Student Teachers' Teaching Skills through a Blended Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albhnsawy, Abeer Abdalhalim; Aliweh, Ahmed Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a blended learning program on student teachers' teaching skills in an undergraduate microteaching course. The blended learning program lasted for nine weeks. This program aimed at integrating social network tasks and face-to-face teaching activities. Pre- and post-tests were administered to assess student…

  20. Teaching Psychology to Medical Students: Some Practical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeldow, Peter B.; Shade-Zeldow, Yvonne

    1982-01-01

    Psychologists who teach psychology to medical students must develop relevant course content, practice lecture time management, select appropriate readings, synchronize lectures and readings, use audiovisual aids, and plan good examinations. (AM)

  1. Supporting Student Retention and Success: Including Family Areas in an Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Ian; Rutledge, Lorelei; Mowdood, Alfred; Reed, Jacob; Bigler, Scott; Soehner, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Many universities and colleges focus on student retention and completion as a measure of their success. Publications such as the "Chronicle of Higher Education" carry an increasing number of articles dealing with student retention, success, and completion. Academic libraries support this goal through a wide variety of services, teaching,…

  2. The status of bedside teaching in the United Kingdom: the student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones P

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Patrick Jones, Bhavan Prasad Rai Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, UK Purpose: Bedside teaching holds a strong tradition as a key-learning platform for clinical examination in the basic medical clerkship. There is a growing body of literature expressing concern for its witnessed decline in medical school curricula. However, the views of students toward this patient-centered cornerstone in surgical education remain under-reported. The purpose of this study was to gain a nationwide perspective on bedside teaching according to medical students in the United Kingdom. Materials and methods: An adapted Delphi method was employed to formulate the question series as part of a multi-step process including a pilot study, which was used to construct this survey. The target population was medical undergraduates in the United Kingdom and participants were recruited via social media. Outcomes assessed included exposure to bedside teaching, perceived benefits of clinical simulation, and junior doctors as clinical teachers. Barriers to clinical examination were also evaluated. Results: Overall, 368 completed surveys were received (completion rate 98.9%. Final year students were significantly more likely to report receiving insufficient bedside teaching (P<0.01. Seventy-eight percent of the study group agreed that clinical simulation is a good learning tool for clinical examination. Seventy percent of students felt junior doctors were as able as senior doctors to teach. Lack of confidence was identified as the commonest barrier to overcome when examining patients and two-thirds of students felt they burdened patients during bedside teaching. Conclusion: This prospective study confirms the exposure deficit, which medical students experience in bedside teaching. The junior doctor represents a dynamic clinical teacher in the face of working time directives. Peer learning is a novel solution to such pressures. Work is needed to re-establish the

  3. Faculty and medical students' perceptions of teaching and learning about the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egnew, Thomas R; Wilson, Hamish J

    2010-05-01

    To explore student and faculty perceptions of how students are learning doctor-patient relationship skills in their clinical medical education. Exploratory qualitative study involving data from interviews and focus groups with students and interviews with teaching faculty. Respondents reported that pre-clinical relationship skills curricula were not well-coordinated with clinical curricula. Within the clinical curriculum, respondents perceived a disparity between general practice and hospital-based attachments. Teaching of relationship skills on the wards was highly variable, rarely explicit, and primarily dependent on role-modelling. In contrast, general practice runs included explicit teaching with feedback that reinforced skills taught in the pre-clinical curriculum. Respondents recommended increased focus on and assessment of students' interpersonal skills within clinical settings. Pre-clinical and clinical relationship skills curricula were not coordinated. The tension between service commitments and student teaching in hospital-based attachments contributed to an insufficient focus on communication and relationship skills acquisition and did not reinforce teaching in pre-clinical and ambulatory clinical settings. The teaching of doctor-patient relationship skills can be augmented by coordinating pre-clinical and clinical curricula and by requiring observation and structured feedback related to explicit criteria of student skills acquisition across all clinical learning experiences. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effective pedagogies for teaching math to nursing students: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter Revell, Susan M; McCurry, Mary K

    2013-11-01

    Improving mathematical competency and problem-solving skills in undergraduate nursing students has been an enduring challenge for nurse educators. A number of teaching strategies have been used to address this problem with varying degrees of success. This paper discusses a literature review which examined undergraduate nursing student challenges to learning math, methods used to teach math and problem-solving skills, and the use of innovative pedagogies for teaching. The literature was searched using the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature and Education Resource Information Center databases. Key search terms included: math*, nurs*, nursing student, calculation, technology, medication administration, challenges, problem-solving, personal response system, clickers, computer and multi-media. Studies included in the review were published in English from 1990 to 2011. Results support four major themes which include: student challenges to learning, traditional pedagogies, curriculum strategies, and technology and integrative methods as pedagogy. The review concludes that there is a need for more innovative pedagogical strategies for teaching math to student nurses. Nurse educators in particular play a central role in helping students learn the conceptual basis, as well as practical hands-on methods, to problem solving and math competency. It is recommended that an integrated approach inclusive of technology will benefit students through better performance, increased understanding, and improved student satisfaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Student Feedback or ‘Students Hit Back’: in Search of Quality Feedback for Quality Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Rahman Abdalla Salih

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Universities and colleges often administer student feedback surveys on teaching to elicit students’ views of how a particular course is taught and learned in order to improve teaching quality by helping tutors increase opportunities for better learning. This paper reports the views of (40 English teachers and (124 General Foundation Programme (GFP students on student feedback in institutions of higher education in the Sultanate of Oman, and the implications of such perceptions on the quality of teaching and learning English language. Findings reveal variation in the views held by both teachers and students about student feedback on teaching and learning experience. The study confirms the need for consistency between the perceptions of teachers and students on student feedback, and for training students on quality feedback and reflective learning.

  6. Teaching medical students about cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iscoe, Mark; Lord, Robert; Schulz, John; Lee, David; Cayea, Danelle; Pahwa, Amit

    2018-02-01

    Rising and burdensome health care costs have driven interest in the practice of high-value care (HVC) and have inspired calls for increased HVC training across all levels of medical education, including among undergraduate medical students. Classroom-based HVC curricula targeted to medical students have not been previously described in the medical literature. We developed and evaluated a workshop comprising a lecture, a small-group exercise and a group discussion to instruct medical students on interpreting cost-effectiveness analyses (CEA), applying CEA to patient care and discussing the cost of care with patients. From January 2014 to September 2015 the workshop was administered to five cohorts, 120 students in total, in the internal medicine clerkships at two US medical schools. Pre- and post-intervention confidence in various domains was assessed with a Likert-type scale ranging from 1 to 4. The overall response rate was 87.9 per cent. The proportion of students reporting high confidence scores (3 or 4) rose significantly (p rated the overall quality of the course as 3.82 out of 5. Rising and burdensome health care costs have driven interest in the practice of high-value care IMPLICATIONS: Our experience of developing, evaluating and refining an HVC course targeted at medical students taught us that such a course is needed, can be educational and can be well-received. Future research is needed to assess the effects of curricula on clinical practice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  7. Hands on Workshop on Teaching Forensic Engineering Teaching Students Critical Thinking by Investigative mindset

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saunders, G.N.; Schuurman, M.J.; Rans, C.D.

    2016-01-01

    When teaching Engineering to students it is important that we not only teach about
    how to engineer new things but also look at the failures and performance problems
    from an engineering point-of-view. The field that studies this part of engineering is
    known as Forensic Engineering. The

  8. A Constructive Teaching Model in Learning Research Concept for English Language Teaching Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Khoirul

    2015-01-01

    This is a study to focus on analyzing the use of constructive teaching method toward the students' motivation in learning content subject of Introduction to Research of English Language Teaching. By using a mix-method of qualitative and quantitative analysis, the data are collected by using questionnaire and classroom observation. The…

  9. Too Stressed to Teach? Teaching Quality, Student Engagement, and IEP Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Venus W.; Ruble, Lisa A.; Yu, Yue; McGrew, John H.

    2017-01-01

    Teacher stress and burnout have a detrimental effect on the stability of the teaching workforce. However, the possible consequences of teacher burnout on teaching quality and on student learning outcomes are less clear, especially in special education settings. We applied Maslach and Leiter's (1999) model to understand the direct effects of…

  10. Access to Effective Teaching for Disadvantaged Students (Issue Brief)

    OpenAIRE

    Eric Isenberg; Jeffrey Max; Philip Gleason; Liz Potamites; Robert Santillano; Heinrich Hock; Michael Hansen

    2013-01-01

    Recent federal initiatives in education, such as Race to the Top, the Teacher Incentive Fund, and the flexibility policy for the Elementary and Secondary Education Act are designed in part to ensure that disadvantaged students have equal access to effective teaching. The initiatives respond to the concern that disadvantaged students may be taught by less effective teachers and that this could contribute to the achievement gap between disadvantaged students and other students. To address the n...

  11. Needs Analysis of Blind Students in Teaching Practice Program

    OpenAIRE

    *, Iswahyuni; Junining, Esti; Dewi, Dian Novita; Linta, Alies Poetri; Suwarso, Pratnyawati Nuridi

    2015-01-01

    As an inclusive university, Brawijaya University has accepted students with special needs in some differentstudy programs. Two of those are blind / visually impaired students who enrol English Language EducationStudy Program in which the program prepares the students to be English teachers. As a consequence, thestudents must be ready to do teaching practice in a public school when they are in the seventh semester. Thisstudy is going to find out the problems of the visually impaired students i...

  12. Teaching company law to business students::an effective framework

    OpenAIRE

    Madhloom, Omar; Butler, Nicolette

    2015-01-01

    Business students learning company law face a number of unique challenges. Therefore, instructors who teach company law to business students must carefully consider how their courses will meet these unique needs. This article will reflect on the challenges faced by business students studying company law before going on to consider how these challenges can be overcome. This work emphasises the importance of focusing on the learning outcomes of business students undertaking company law and the ...

  13. Teaching concept analysis to graduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Catharine J

    2018-01-12

    To provide guidance to educators who use the Wilson (1963) concept analysis method, as modified by Walker and Avant (2011), in their graduate nursing curriculum BACKGROUND: While graduate nursing curricula often include a concept analysis assignment, there is a paucity of literature to assist educators in guiding students through this challenging process. This article details one way for educators to assist graduate nursing students in learning how to undertake each step of the Wilson (1963) concept analysis method, as modified by Walker and Avant (2011). Wilson (1963) concept analysis method, as modified by Walker and Avant (2011). Using examples, this article walks the reader through the Walker and Avant (2011) concept analysis process and addresses those issues commonly encountered by educators during this process. This article presented one way of walking students through a Walker and Avant (2011) concept analysis. Having clear information about the steps involved in developing a concept analysis will make it easier for educators to incorporate it into their graduate nursing curriculum and to effectively guide students on their journey through this process. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Teaching Nursing Students the Importance of Treatment Fidelity in Intervention Research: Students as Interventionists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eymard, Amanda S; Altmiller, Gerry

    2016-05-01

    Treatment fidelity is the extent to which a study team adheres to the dictates of a study protocol. It ensures that the intervention has been implemented as intended. Including and monitoring treatment fidelity reduces threats to validity and is vital to providing reputable, sound research. This article describes specific measures taken to teach nursing students the key concepts and methodologic issues associated with treatment fidelity in intervention research studies through active learning. Twelve senior-level nursing students participated as interventionists in a study that spanned 4 months. Treatment fidelity strategies included development of a manual, proper training and supervision of interventionists, a follow-up meeting with the interventionists, checklists, and a controller. The treatment fidelity strategies implemented throughout the study provided an opportunity for students to learn firsthand how such strategies are implemented and how they strengthened the confidence that study findings are indeed related to the intervention. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(5):288-291.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Co-teaching Perspectives from Secondary Science Co-teachers and Their Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    King-Sears, Margaret E.; Brawand, Anne Eichorn; Jenkins, Melissa C.; Preston-Smith, Shantha

    2014-10-01

    An in-depth case study of one team of co-teachers' practice from multiple perspectives is described. A high school science co-teaching team and their students with disabilities completed surveys about their perceptions of co-teaching. Additionally, observations of the two co-teachers occurred to determine roles and types of interactions for each co-teacher during science instruction. Observational data revealed effective teaching behaviors demonstrated by each co-teacher. Detailed descriptions of the co-teachers' instruction are provided. The science educator was observed interacting with the large group twice as often as the special educator. The science educator also presented new content nearly three times as often as the special educator. The co-teacher surveys were consistent with the observational data. Both educators disagreed that the special educator was primarily the lead for instruction. Both educators strongly agreed they had an effective co-teaching relationship, although the science educator indicated stronger agreement for parity in roles and responsibilities than the special educator noted. Forty-three percent of the students identified the science educator as in charge of lessons, while 43% identified both educators. Most students thought teaching was divided in half, and all students enjoyed having two teachers in science. Eighty-six percent of the students indicated team teaching was the most frequently used co-teaching model, and 14% indicated one teach, one drift. Implications for co-teachers' reflections on their collaboration, including the relevance of student perceptions (i.e., Who is the "real" teacher?), and the extent to which educators are prepared at preservice and inservice levels for co-teaching are discussed.

  16. Sex Education and Student Rights: Including the Missing Actor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Paul T.

    2011-01-01

    In the West, sex education has always been a taboo subject that continues to challenge the public schools. Drawing on recent developments in some Canadian provinces, I argue that we cannot begin to address the issue of responsible sex education until we first acknowledge that students themselves have a moral and constitutional right to this kind…

  17. Teachers' Beliefs in Teaching English for Kids at a Kindergarten: A Case Study of Students from the Department of Applied English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yu-wei

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore the changes in teachers' beliefs before and after teachings among four students from the Department of Applied English at Hungkuang University, who were conducting English teaching at a kindergarten. Teacher's beliefs included four aspects in terms of English teaching, teacher-student interaction in…

  18. Generational diversity in associate degree nursing students: Teaching styles and preferences in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitko, Jennifer V.

    2011-12-01

    Nursing educators face the challenge of meeting the needs of a multi-generational classroom. The reality of having members from the Veteran and Baby Boomer generations in a classroom with Generation X and Y students provides an immediate need for faculty to examine students' teaching method preferences as well as their own use of teaching methods. Most importantly, faculty must facilitate an effective multi-generational learning environment. Research has shown that the generation to which a person belongs is likely to affect the ways in which he/she learns (Hammill, 2005). Characterized by its own attitudes, behaviors, beliefs, and motivational needs, each generation also has distinct educational expectations. It is imperative, therefore, that nurse educators be aware of these differences and develop skills through which to communicate with the different generations, thereby reducing teaching/learning problems in the classroom. This is a quantitative, descriptive study that compared the teaching methods preferred by different generations of associate degree nursing students with the teaching methods that the instructors actually use. The research study included 289 participants; 244 nursing student participants and 45 nursing faculty participants from four nursing departments in colleges in Pennsylvania. Overall, the results of the study found many statistically significant findings. The results of the ANOVA test revealed eight statistically significant findings among Generation Y, Generation X and Baby boomers. The preferred teaching methods included: lecture, self-directed learning, web-based course with no class meetings, important for faculty to know my name, classroom structure, know why I am learning what I am learning, learning for the sake of learning and grade is all that matters. Lecture was found to be the most frequently used teaching method by faculty as well as the most preferred teaching methods by students. Overall, the support for a variety of

  19. Investigating Two Teachers Teaching of Multicultural Literature to Diverse Students: Perspectives and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priestly, Nicole M.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates how two teachers teach multicultural literature to diverse students using culturally relevant teaching practices. The student demographic is becoming increasingly diverse and alternative teaching methods of students of color must be explored to increase student participation and student achievement. During a three week…

  20. Student-Instructor Communication: An Innovative Teaching Material in Support of Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai- Wen; Chen, Yu-Fen

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how the innovative teaching material "Interactive Learning Disk (ILD)" could enhance the learning effect of students taking the course of Tourist Database Management (TDM). "ILD" is a kind of teaching material that incorporate interactive concept into course and help students to learn after class. This…

  1. Student Pedagogical Teams: Students as Course Consultants Engaged in Process of Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, Lorna; Ventura, Susan; Schuldt, Hilary; Donlan, Pamela

    2018-01-01

    Faculty engage in "pedagogical solitude," in which they plan, teach, and assess their work alone. To optimize teaching environments and learning outcomes, students can serve as "student pedagogical teams" (SPT) and provide feedback on instructor performance, course structure, and content. Using self-determination theory, this…

  2. The Usability of WeChat as a Mobile and Interactive Medium in Student-Centered Medical Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Gao, Furong; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Jieping; Li, Siguang; Xu, Guo-tong; Xu, Lei; Chen, Jianjun; Lu, Lixia

    2017-01-01

    Biochemistry and cellular biology courses for medical students at Tongji University include the assessment that provides students with feedback to enhance their learning, which is a type of formative assessment. However, frequent instant feedback and guidance for students is often absent or inconsistently included in the teaching process. WeChat,…

  3. Development and appraisal of a hand hygiene teaching approach for medical students: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajneesh; Razee, Husna; Seale, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poor hand hygiene (HH) practices among medical students have previously been attributed to students not being exposed to sufficient teaching materials during their training. Aim: To develop and evaluate a teaching module directed at improving the knowledge and attitudes of undergraduate medical students towards HH. Methods: The HH teaching module was designed based on educational materials used by the World Health Organization and other patient safety organisations. The development was also informed by the findings from two previous studies including qualitative interviews with staff and students and a survey of Australian medical schools. In-depth group interviews were undertaken with 24 undergraduate medical students. Results: Favourable feedback was received from the interviewed medical students towards the developed scenario-based learning activity; however, the group interview activity was not received well by students. They suggested that the HH teaching activities should be compulsory and not optional for medical students. In order to reinforce good HH practices and to improve knowledge around HH and healthcare-associated infections, they felt that the activities should be repeated during each phase of their degree. Conclusions: There is a need to change the approach to training in education, particularly to engage students in topics such as HH which are often seen as unimportant. PMID:28989475

  4. Exploring Variability Sources in Student Evaluation of Teaching via Many-Facet Rasch Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengü BÖRKAN

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluating quality of teaching is important in nearly every higher education institute. The most common way of assessing teaching effectiveness takes place through students. Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET is used to gather information about students’ experiences with a course and instructor’s performance at some point of semester. SET can be considered as a type of rater mediated performance assessment where students are the raters and instructors are the examinees. When performance assessment becomes a rater mediated assessment process, extra measures need to be taken into consideration in order to create more reliable and fair assessment practices. The study has two main purposes; (a to examine the extent to which the facets (instructor, student, and rating items contribute to instructors’ score variance and (b to examine the students’ judging behavior in order to detect any potential source of bias in student evaluation of teaching by using the Many-Facet Rasch Model. The data set includes one thousand 235 students’ responses from 254 courses. The results show that a students greatly differ in the severity while rating instructors, b students were fairly consistent in their ratings, c students as a group and individual level are tend to display halo effect in their ratings, d students are clustered at the highest two categories of the scale and e the variation in item measures is fairly low. The findings have practical implications for the SET practices by improving the psychometric quality of measurement.

  5. Effectiveness of the students' evaluation process of teaching instructors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorta-González, Pablo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available When the college student satisfaction survey is considered in the promotion and recognition of instructors, a usual complaint is related to the impact that biased ratings have on the arithmetic mean (used as a measure of teaching effectiveness. This is especially significant when the number of students responding to the survey is small. In this work a new methodology, considering student to student perceptions, is presented. Two different estimators of student rating credibility, based on centrality properties of the student social network, are proposed. This method is established on the idea that in the case of on-site higher education, students often know which others are competent in rating the teaching and learning process.

  6. Reconceptualizing Student Evaluation of Teaching: An Ethical Framework for Changing Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Coralie

    2005-01-01

    Conversations about student evaluation of teaching are longstanding. Ethical principles in university teaching have been suggested. However, conversations that bring together the topics of ethics, teaching and student evaluation of that teaching are rare. New expectations in relation to the evaluation of teaching, for example, expectations about…

  7. Teachers' scientific knowledge, teaching practice, and students' learning activities: Cases of three elementary classroom teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Shinho

    The purposes of this dissertation study are to better understand what specific types of scientific knowledge and practice three elementary teachers exhibit, and to examine how they use their scientific knowledge in their classroom teaching practice to provide students' opportunities to learn science when teaching condensation in the context of a unit on the water cycle. By comparing and contrasting three cases of elementary classroom teaching, this study discusses what kinds of scientific knowledge and practice are fundamental for teaching elementary science for scientific understanding. The data include structured interviews (content, pre- and post- observation, and stimulated recall), videotaped classroom observations, and collections of teachers' and students' written artifacts. Data were collected prior to, during, and after the three teachers taught condensation to fifth grade students. The data were analyzed in three contexts: interviews, teaching practices, and students' classroom activities. This made it possible to clarify which characteristics of teacher's scientific knowledge influenced which aspects of their teaching practice. Data analysis shows that teachers' scientific knowledge were closely associated with their teaching practice and students' classroom activities. Two characteristics of the teachers' scientific reasoning emerged as especially important. The first concerned how teachers connected observations of condensation with patterns in those observations (e.g., condensation occurs when warm moist air cools) and with explanations for those patterns (e.g., condensation is water vapor that changes to liquid water). Two teachers were careful to connect observations with patterns in their own thinking and in their classroom teaching. One of those teachers also connected the observations and patterns to scientific explanations. In contrast, the third teacher focused on listing scientific terms with little elaboration with specific observations and

  8. Six Classroom Exercises to Teach Natural Selection to Undergraduate Biology Students

    OpenAIRE

    Kalinowski, Steven T.; Leonard, Mary J.; Andrews, Tessa M.; Litt, Andrea R.

    2013-01-01

    Students in introductory biology courses frequently have misconceptions regarding natural selection. In this paper, we describe six activities that biology instructors can use to teach undergraduate students in introductory biology courses how natural selection causes evolution. These activities begin with a lesson introducing students to natural selection and also include discussions on sexual selection, molecular evolution, evolution of complex traits, and the evolution of behavior. The set...

  9. Teaching remote sensing to elementary students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, J.

    I was asked if I could help a local elementary school to set up and operate a weather satellite receiving station. Since I am myself studying Space Engineering at the Luleå University of Technology, I accepted the task. With two fellow students I set out to investigate the receiving station. To be honest, we did not know much about satellite receiving systems ourselves, since we had only taken general engineering classes so far, but stimulated by our interest in the subject and the challenge to solve a task different from ordinary assignments, we quickly learned how to set up the equipment. After a while we could receive quite decent pictures from the NOAA polar orbiting weather satellites. The pupils, focusing on grades 5-6, did not have much previous knowledge in physics and technology, and - quite naturally - did not know much about space and satellites. At their age it is probably difficult to understand the services satellites provide us with high up in the sky, watching the earth and the weather. On the other hand, this was part of the challenge we accepted. It was intriguing to observe how the pupils adapted to the situation, initially perhaps uneasy with it, but then enthusiastic about learning how to operate the equipment. They could see what happened if they did something differently. They could compare the actual weather outside the window and the weather images on the screen in front of them. The efforts invested in understanding the system were rewarded by the results achieved. The pupils will be able to use this system in many areas in their education. As it turned out, it was easy to operate when it was once properly set up. Through this system, the students are exposed to ,,hands-on'' education and experience with meteorology, remote sensing, geography and many other areas and applications. It is our hope that we may contribute to make these young pupils aware of the vast knowledge available to them through their efforts at school, to make them

  10. An exploration of equitable science teaching practices for students with learning disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Marlene

    Teaching Science to Students with Learning Disabilities Inventory, the case study teachers demonstrated characteristics of successful teachers of diverse learners developed by Lynch (2000). Overall, the qualitative findings revealed that the case study teachers were unsure how to provide equitable science teaching practices to all students, particularly to students with learning disabilities. They provided students with a variety of learning experiences that entailed high expectations for all; however, these experiences were similar for all students. Had the teachers fully implemented equitable science teaching practices, students would have had multiple options for taking in the information and making sense of it in each lesson. Teaching that includes using a variety of validated practices that take into account students' individualized learning needs can promote aspects of equitable science teaching practices. Finally, this study provides implications for teacher education programs and professional development programs. As teachers implement science education reform efforts related to equitable science teaching practices, both teacher education programs and professional development programs should include opportunities for teachers to reflect on their beliefs about how students with learning disabilities learn and provide them with a variety of validated teaching practices that will assist them in teaching students with learning disabilities in the general education classroom while implementing science reform efforts.

  11. Developing Students' Intercultural Communication Competences in Western Etiquette Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaochi

    2010-01-01

    How to develop students' intercultural communication competences is a controversial issue in foreign language education in China. In this article, the author attempts to offer an answer to this issue by putting forward a proposition for developing students' intercultural communication competences in western etiquette teaching. First of all, the…

  12. Effect of the inquiry-based teaching approach on students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of inquiry-based teaching approach on senior high school (SHS) students' conceptual understanding of circle theorems. It utilized mixed method approach involving quasi-experimental design in which 79 home economics students in two intact SHSs classes were purposively sampled and ...

  13. The importance of oral Spanish teaching to multilingual students: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores important aspects of teaching Spanish, both spoken and written, to multilingual students, with specific reference to United Sates International University (USIU), a private institution located in Nairobi, Kenya. The beginner students of Spanish at the University speak at least 3 languages, one of which is ...

  14. Science student teacher's perceptions of good teaching | Setlalentoa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to explore the science student teachers' perceptions of good teaching at a university of technology. A descriptive survey research design was employed to derive responses from a convenience sample size of 50 senior students enrolled in the Bachelor of Education (Further Education and ...

  15. Good Mathematics Teaching from Mexican High School Students' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sierra, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a qualitative research that identifies the characteristics of good mathematics teaching from the perspective of Mexican high school students. For this purpose, the social representations of a good mathematics teacher and a good mathematics class were identified in a group of 67 students. In order to obtain information, a…

  16. Student Evaluation of Teaching from the Actors' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanken, Ingrid Maria

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses obstacles that higher education institutions may need to surmount when introducing quality assurance measures such as student evaluation of teaching. It is based on a research study of how student evaluation of one-to-one instrumental tuition is perceived, experienced and practiced by instrumental teachers and their students…

  17. Teaching Beginning College Students with Adapted Published Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, William R.

    2013-01-01

    This study used peer-reviewed published research reports to teach a seminar on learning and memory to first-semester college students. Complete reports (not summaries, reviews, or news reports) were re-written by this author to be more "student friendly" to college freshmen. These adapted published research reports (APRRs) retained…

  18. Increasing students' safety awareness in a teaching hotel | Bossema ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The following problem statement was taken to guide the research: What is the impact of safety training on the safety competences (knowledge, awareness and behaviour) of students working in the kitchen of the teaching hotel? In total, 140 students from the first, second and third years have been involved in this study, ...

  19. Teaching Strategies: Supporting EAL Students in Learning Biology Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Primani; Cooper, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides a brief introduction to teaching strategies that can be used to support English as Additional Language (EAL) students in learning biology terminology. The paper begins with an overview of EAL students and considers the difficulties that they may face in the classroom along with the challenges that mainstream teachers may have…

  20. Effect of the inquiry-based teaching approach on students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofi.mereku

    This study investigated the effect of inquiry based teaching approach on senior high school. (SHS) students' conceptual understanding of circle theorems. It utilized mixed method approach involving quasi-experimental design in which 79 home economics students in two intact SHSs classes were purposively sampled and ...

  1. Using Ultrasound to Teach Medical Students Cardiac Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Floyd E., III; Wilson, L. Britt; Hoppmann, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is being incorporated more into undergraduate medical education. Studies have shown that medical students have positive perceptions about the value of ultrasound in teaching courses like anatomy and physiology. The purpose of the present study was to provide objective evidence of whether ultrasound helps students learn cardiac…

  2. Teaching Social Studies to Middle School Students with Learning Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Marcee M.

    2008-01-01

    Because of recent legislation, students with mild disabilities frequently receive social studies instruction in the general education classroom. Therefore, middle school teachers have the challenge of teaching social studies to students with a wide range of abilities. Emphasis in the general education social studies curriculum is on high-level…

  3. Teaching Electromagnetism to High-School Students Using Particle Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinflorio, D. A.; Fonseca, P.; Coelho, L. F. S.; Santos, A. C. F.

    2006-01-01

    In this article we describe two simple experiments using an ion accelerator as an aid to the teaching of electromagnetism to high-school students. This is part of a programme developed by a Brazilian State funding agency (FAPERJ) which aims to help scientifically minded students take their first steps in research.

  4. Effects of Team Teaching on Students Performance in Introductory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This pre-test post-test non randomized experimental study investigated the effects of team teaching on students' performance in Introductory Technology. A total 316 Junior Secondary School Two students were randomly selected from four schools in Akwa Ibom State for the study. Data for the study was collected using ...

  5. Effect of Team Teaching on Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of team teaching on students' achievement in Secondary School Business Studies in Onitsha North Local Government area of Anambra State. A population of one hundred and eighty students from the local Government Area were randomly selected for the study and it was a ...

  6. Just in Time Teaching: A Strategy to Encourage Students' Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Cupita, Lorena Andrea

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative research study was carried out with two groups of students at a beginner English level; the students were in the fourth semester of psychology at a Colombian university. The overall aim of this action research study was to analyze learners' perceptions of the strategy "Just in Time Teaching" in a web 2.0. The data were…

  7. Impact of the Three-Phase Teaching Technique on Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of one hundred and sixty four secondary school physics students took part in the study. The t-test was used to analyze the data. The results of the study showed that there exist a significant difference in the achievement between students taught with the three phase teaching method and those taught without the ...

  8. Effect of Team Teaching on Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Girls College, Onitsha. E-mail: ozonneson@yahoo.com. Abstract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of team teaching on students' achievement in Secondary School Business Studies in Onitsha. North Local Government area of Anambra State. A population of one hundred and eighty students from the local ...

  9. Student-Faculty Team Teaching--A Collaborative Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Mach, Calvin; Mo, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aim to gage students' satisfaction, learning outcomes, and experiences with student-faculty team-teaching in an undergraduate quantitative-research-methods course. Three peer tutors co-taught with a faculty instructor each year, receiving pedagogical-placement credits. Data were collected via bi-weekly journals, a focus group,…

  10. Does Student Quality Matter in the Teaching of Economic Principles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreopoulos, Giuliana Campanelli; Panayides, Alexandros

    2010-01-01

    Economics is usually perceived as a difficult subject among undergraduate students and the literature suggests that the student's problems with principles of economics are mainly related to the chalk and talk type of teaching, the simplicity of economic models, limited discussions on current economic issues, and on race, gender, and other types of…

  11. Perceptions and preferences of medical students regarding teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... India. 2. Student, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Mangalore- 575001, India. Abstract. Introduction: In the complex setting of a medical school it becomes essential to utilize an approach to teaching and learning that is best suited to the needs of the students. In developing countries like India, ...

  12. Using Graffiti to Teach Students How to Think Like Historians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Eric V.

    2010-01-01

    "Thinking Like a Historian" (TLH) is a tool for framing the past to teach students the elements of historical thinking while, at the same time, grounding students' knowledge of the past through inquiry and evidentiary support. The framework's design allows for a separation of the ways historians study the past from the ways historians organize…

  13. Teaching Chinese Students: Understanding Their Public Sector Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Cynthia; Coleman, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Teaching Chinese students in an American university can be both challenging and rewarding. Cultural and language differences can lead to some superficial confusion and interpretational problems. However, the vast differences in the ways Chinese students view the role of the public sector, as compared to the US, can mean that the instructors and…

  14. Effect of Team Teaching on Secondary School Students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FIRST LADY

    Abstract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of team teaching on students' achievement in Secondary School Business Studies in Onitsha. North Local Government area of Anambra State. A population of one hundred and eighty students from the local Government Area were randomly selected for the study ...

  15. Influence of Teachers' Teaching Experience on Students' Learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examined teachers' teaching experience and students' learning outcomes in the secondary schools in Ondo State Nigeria. As a correlational survey, the study population comprised all the 257 secondary schools that presented students for the year 2003 senior secondary certificate (SSC) examinations in the ...

  16. A Student-Centered Framework for Teaching Undergraduate Parasitology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Andrew A

    2017-06-01

    Many biology subdisciplines are re-evaluating their undergraduate curriculum amid changing student attitudes towards education. However, a modern framework for undergraduate parasitology has yet to be formally outlined. We present a student-centered approach to teaching parasitology, which diminishes the power of the lectern and emphasizes the use of active learning techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pedagogic Voice: Student Voice in Teaching and Engagement Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroutsis, Aspa; McGregor, Glenda; Mills, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we are concerned with the notion of "pedagogic voice" as it relates to the presence of student "voice" in teaching, learning and curriculum matters at an alternative, or second chance, school in Australia. This school draws upon many of the principles of democratic schooling via its utilisation of student voice…

  18. Examining Student Perceptions of Flipping an Agricultural Teaching Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Nathan W.; Rubenstein, Eric D.; DiBenedetto, Cathy A.; Stripling, Christopher T.; Roberts, T. Grady; Stedman, Nicole L. P.

    2014-01-01

    To meet the needs of the 21st century student, college instructors have been challenged to transform their classrooms from passive to active, "minds-on" learning environments. This qualitative study examined an active learning approach known as a flipped classroom and sought to explore student perceptions of flipping a teaching methods…

  19. Attitude of Postgraduate Students towards the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinodh Kumar, R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate postgraduate students' attitude towards the teaching profession according to their gender, locality of residence, locality of educational institution, stream of study, and annual income of the parents. A descriptive survey design was adopted with a sample of 207 postgraduate students selected…

  20. Teaching practice: a make or break phase for student teachers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article we aim to establish the ways in which these experiences influence the student teachers' perception of the teaching profession. Semi-structured interviews with all student teachers were used to collect the data while content analysis was used to identify themes and analyse the data. We established that, despite ...

  1. Teaching Note-Teaching Student Interviewing Competencies through Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandy, Cynthia; Vernon, Robert; Lynch, Darlene

    2017-01-01

    A prototype standardized client was created and programmed to respond to students in the 3D virtual world of Second Life. This automaton, called a "chatbot," was repeatedly interviewed by beginning MSW students in a practice course as a learning exercise. Initial results were positive and suggest the use of simulated clients in virtual…

  2. Lecturer and Student Perspective Regarding Teaching Public Aministration in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Georgiana PROFIROIU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available considerable progress in developing public administration teaching. However the need to increase student interest and involvement in the learning process is a largely widespread issue in all Romanian universities, which impacts on both teaching/learning methodology and student assessment methods. The present study aims to analyze (1 teaching practices, (2 students’ preferences and perceptions regarding these practices, and (3 the relationship between these preferences and real practices. I focused on teaching of public administration (or administrative sciences as a discipline and the possible variations in students’ preferences as opposed to teachers’ beliefs and real practices. Moreover, I was concerned with educational effectiveness in terms of acquired competencies and aspects that could increase the effectiveness of students’ learning. In respect of these objectives I designed two questionnaires: one for students in public administration enrolled in undergraduate programs and another for the teaching staff. The two questionnaires addressed comparable research questions. Some questions were similar in order to allow the comparison of responses for both categories of respondents. Seven public universities were selected through a convenience sampling method from more than 32 Romanian universities which have developed accredited public administration programs. I have chosen the seven most important programs according to student numbers, from all geographic areas of the country. The last part shows that the three hypotheses were not fully validated and for a further research, I should investigate the problem of poor results of my students by a qualitative research among the students with poor attendance and lower thanaverage academic performance.

  3. Personality and professional commitment of students in nursing, social work, and teaching: A comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are often portrayed as possessing specific traits and dispositions associated with care and empathy. The assumption has been that possessing these traits makes nurses competent, engaged, and well suited to their job. This proposition has been mostly normative, and few studies have investigated how this plays out empirically. The aims of this study were to investigate (a) whether possessing a personality trait related to empathy and care was more common among nursing students than students in teaching and social work programs and (b) whether nursing students possessing an affirming personality trait judged themselves to be more suited to their future work - understood as commitment to the profession - than students in teaching and social work. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All first-year students attending seven Norwegian universities and university colleges were invited to participate in the study. Of the 1675 students who participated in the survey, 527 were nursing students, 668 were students in teaching, and 480 were social work students. A response rate of 65 percent was achieved. The survey was conducted by Oslo and Akershus University College in the autumn of 2012. Data collection methods included both a paper-and-pencil questionnaire and an online survey. Instruments used included Blau's Career Commitment Scale and Orlinsky and Rønnestad's Interpersonal Adjective Scale. Analysis of variance and regression analysis were performed on the data. Nursing students did not differ from students in teaching and social work programs in terms of the degree of affirming personality trait. Furthermore, the regression analysis revealed an equally strong association between having an affirming personality trait and being committed to the profession among all these student groups. The results of this study indicate that the narrative of nursing students as individuals who possess a special personality characteristic does not entirely reflect reality

  4. Doing Philosophy Effectively: Student Learning in Classroom Teaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natascha Kienstra

    Full Text Available An important aim of teaching philosophy in Dutch secondary schools is to learn about philosophy (i.e., the great philosophers by doing philosophy. We examined doing philosophy and focused specifically on the relationship between student learning activities and teacher behavior; in doing so, a qualitative cross-case analysis of eight philosophy lessons was performed. The effectiveness of doing philosophy was operationalized into five learning activities comprising rationalizing, analyzing, testing, producing criticism, and reflecting, and scored by means of qualitative graphical time registration. Using CA we find a quantitative one-dimensional scale for the lessons that contrasts lessons that are more and less effective in terms of learning and teaching. A relationship was found between teaching by teachers and doing philosophy by students. In particular we found students to produce a higher level of doing philosophy with teachers who chose to organize a philosophical discussion with shared guidance by the teacher together with the students.

  5. Doing Philosophy Effectively: Student Learning in Classroom Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienstra, Natascha; Imants, Jeroen; Karskens, Machiel; van der Heijden, Peter G M

    2015-01-01

    An important aim of teaching philosophy in Dutch secondary schools is to learn about philosophy (i.e., the great philosophers) by doing philosophy. We examined doing philosophy and focused specifically on the relationship between student learning activities and teacher behavior; in doing so, a qualitative cross-case analysis of eight philosophy lessons was performed. The effectiveness of doing philosophy was operationalized into five learning activities comprising rationalizing, analyzing, testing, producing criticism, and reflecting, and scored by means of qualitative graphical time registration. Using CA we find a quantitative one-dimensional scale for the lessons that contrasts lessons that are more and less effective in terms of learning and teaching. A relationship was found between teaching by teachers and doing philosophy by students. In particular we found students to produce a higher level of doing philosophy with teachers who chose to organize a philosophical discussion with shared guidance by the teacher together with the students.

  6. Doing Philosophy Effectively: Student Learning in Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    An important aim of teaching philosophy in Dutch secondary schools is to learn about philosophy (i.e., the great philosophers) by doing philosophy. We examined doing philosophy and focused specifically on the relationship between student learning activities and teacher behavior; in doing so, a qualitative cross-case analysis of eight philosophy lessons was performed. The effectiveness of doing philosophy was operationalized into five learning activities comprising rationalizing, analyzing, testing, producing criticism, and reflecting, and scored by means of qualitative graphical time registration. Using CA we find a quantitative one-dimensional scale for the lessons that contrasts lessons that are more and less effective in terms of learning and teaching. A relationship was found between teaching by teachers and doing philosophy by students. In particular we found students to produce a higher level of doing philosophy with teachers who chose to organize a philosophical discussion with shared guidance by the teacher together with the students. PMID:26379267

  7. Teaching science for conceptual change: Toward a proposed taxonomy of diagnostic teaching strategies to gauge students' personal science conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, Richard Edwin, III

    Science instruction aims to ensure that students properly construct scientific knowledge so that each individual may play a role as a science literate citizen or as part of the science workforce (National Research Council, 1996, 2000). Students enter the classroom with a wide range of personal conceptions regarding science phenomena, often at variance with prevailing scientific views (Duschl, Hamilton, & Grandy, 1992; Hewson, 1992). The extensive misconceptions research literature emphasizes the importance of diagnosing students' initial understandings in order to gauge the accuracy and depth of what each student knows prior to instruction and then to use that information to adapt the teaching to address student needs. (Ausubel, 1968; Carey, 2000; Driver et al., 1985; Karplus & Thier, 1967; Mintzes, Wandersee, & Novak, 1998; Osborne & Freyberg, 1985; Project 2061, 1993; Strike & Posner, 1982, 1992; Vygotsky, 1934/1987). To gain such insight, teachers diagnose not only the content of the students' personal conceptions but also the thinking processes that produced them (Strike and Posner, 1992). Indeed, when teachers design opportunities for students to express their understanding, there is strong evidence that such diagnostic assessment also enhances science teaching and learning (Black & William, 1998). The functional knowledge of effective science teaching practice resides in the professional practitioners at the front lines---the science teachers in the classroom. Nevertheless, how teachers actually engage in the practice of diagnosis is not well documented. To help fill this gap, the researcher conducted a study of 16 sixth grade science classrooms in four Los Angeles area middle schools. Diagnostic teaching strategies were observed in action and then followed up by interviews with each teacher. Results showed that teachers use strategies that vary by the complexity of active student involvement, including pretests, strategic questions, interactive discussion

  8. Teaching English to a Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder in Regular Classroom in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Nyoman Padmadewi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The recognition of students with special needs has been increasing significantly in Indonesia recently and the better understanding as well as supportive school programs is urgently needed. It was found out that schools and teachers in Indonesia had very limited preparedness either in teaching skills or material development to meet the actual needs of the students. This study then aimed at investigating appropriate strategies of teaching English to a student with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD included in a regular classroom. This research was in the form of a case study conducted in North Bali Bilingual School. The data were collected through observations and interviews. The findings show that the Individual Education Plan (IEP provided with visual media through co-teaching, differentiated instruction and also through a “buddy program” are found appropriate to help the student learn English as a foreign language. These strategies are effective to be implemented in an inclusive classroom program.

  9. Librarians Flip for Students: Teaching Searching Skills to Medical Students Using a Flipped Classroom Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minuti, Aurelia; Sorensen, Karen; Schwartz, Rachel; King, Winifred S; Glassman, Nancy R; Habousha, Racheline G

    2018-01-01

    This article describes the development of a flipped classroom instructional module designed by librarians to teach first- and second-year medical students how to search the literature and find evidence-based articles. The pre-class module consists of an online component that includes reading, videos, and exercises relating to a clinical case. The in-class sessions, designed to reinforce important concepts, include various interactive activities. The specifics of designing both components are included for other health sciences librarians interested in presenting similar instruction. Challenges encountered, particularly in the live sessions, are detailed, as are the results of evaluations submitted by the students, who largely enjoyed the online component. Future plans are contingent on solving technical problems encountered during the in-class sessions.

  10. The Examination of Physical Education Teachers' Perceptions of Their Teacher Training to Include Students with Disabilities in General Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Despite legislative mandates, only 32% of states require specific licensure in adapted physical education (APE); consequently, general physical educators are challenged with including students with disabilities into regular classrooms. Although physical education teachers are considered qualified personnel to teach students with disabilities in…

  11. Teaching Mathematics Bilingually for Kindergarten Students with Teaching Aids Based on Local Wisdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarini, Ririn; Setyaji, Arso; Suneki, Sri

    2018-01-01

    Language and Mathematics are both skills and knowledge that need to master well so that it can be the provision for students' future life when mingling with the community or society. Because of that the integration of teaching both language and Mathematics in bilingual Math learning will give many benefits to the students. They will learn not only…

  12. Development and Validation of Teaching Practice Evaluation Instrument for Assessing Chemistry Students' Teaching Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeudu, F. O.; Chiaha, G. T. U.; Eze, J. U.

    2013-01-01

    The study was designed to develop and factorially validate an instrument for measuring teaching practice skills of chemistry student-teachers in University of Nigeria, Nsukka. Two research questions guided the study. The design of the study was instrumentation. All the chemistry student-teachers in the Department of Science Education, University…

  13. A New Autonomy-Supportive Way of Teaching That Increases Conceptual Learning: Teaching in Students' Preferred Ways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyungshim; Reeve, Johnmarshall; Halusic, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We tested the educational utility of "teaching in students' preferred ways" as a new autonomy-supportive way of teaching to enhance students' autonomy and conceptual learning. A pilot test first differentiated preferred versus nonpreferred ways of teaching. In the main study, a hired teacher who was blind to the purpose of the study…

  14. Teaching consumer theory to business students: an integrative approach

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsen, Dan; Snarr, Hal W.; Friesner, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Economists teaching principles of microeconomics courses in business schools face a difficult pedagogical dilemma. Because the vast majority of students in these courses are business majors or minors who will not study economics beyond the principles level, these students need a different set of skills than what is taught in a traditional (liberal arts) setting, which is focused primarily towards economics majors and/or minors. In particular, business students need relatively less emphasis ...

  15. A questionnaire based evaluation of teaching methods amongst MBBS students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muneshwar JN, Mirza Shiraz Baig, Zingade US, Khan ST

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical education and health care in India are facing serious challenges in content and competencies. Heightened focus on the quality of teaching in medical college has led to increased use of student surveys as a means of evaluating teaching. Objectives: A questionnaire based evaluation of 200 students (I MBBS & II MBBS about teaching methods was conducted at a Govt Medical College & Hospital, Aurangabad (MS with intake capacity of 150 students &established since 50 last years. Methods: 200 medical students of I MBBS & II MBBS voluntarily participated in the study. Based on teaching methods, an objective questionnaire paper was given to the participants to be solved in 1 hour. Results: As a teaching mode 59% of the students favored group discussion versus didactic lectures (14%. Almost 48% felt that those didactic lectures fail to create interest & motivation. Around 66% were aware of learning objectives. Conclusion: Strategies and futuristic plans need to be implemented so that medical education in India is innovative & creates motivation.

  16. Student Teachers' Team Teaching: How Do Learners in the Classroom Experience Team-Taught Lessons by Student Teachers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Marlies; Simons, Mathea

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on student teachers' team teaching. Two team teaching models (sequential and parallel teaching) were applied by 14 student teachers in a quasi-experimental design. When implementing new teaching models, it is important to take into account the perspectives of all actors involved. Although learners are key actors in the teaching…

  17. Teaching High School Students about Political Terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lucien

    1982-01-01

    Examines several generalizations concerning political terrorism that have been inferred from research and suggests methods and materials social studies teachers can use to teach a basic understanding of terrorism. (FL)

  18. A nationwide, resident-led teaching programme for medical students in Singapore: SingHealth Student Internship Programme Bootcamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Daniel Sw; Lee, Jill Cs; Loo, Benny Kg; Baisa, Katherine; Koo, Wen Hsin; Cook, Sandy; Lim, Boon Leng

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the planning, development and evaluation of the success of the first nationwide, resident-led, large-group teaching programme for medical students - the Singapore Health Services Student Internship Programme (SIP) Bootcamp. This was an initial feasibility study evaluating a half-day teaching boot camp initiated, developed and conducted by the resident educators. A three-month preparation period was required to set up an education subcommittee, liaise with medical student leaders, recruit resident educators, meet all the stakeholders and conduct the boot camp. During the SIP Bootcamp, resident educators conducted clinical case presentations using a question-and-answer format. Audience participation was strongly encouraged. A 15-item questionnaire was distributed to assess the participants' learning experience and the resident educators' teaching performance using a five-point Likert scale. Overall, 94.8% (n = 110) of the 116 respondents agreed that the teaching sessions were of high quality and content was relevant to their training. The resident educators appeared well-informed (96.6%, n = 112) and enthusiastic about their respective topics (98.3%, n = 114). However, a few students (9.5%, n = 11) felt that the audio-visual aids and handouts could be improved to better aid their learning process. This teaching boot camp for medical students was the first of its kind in Singapore and feedback from medical students showed that it was well-received. Further research using different teaching methods, including small-group discussions and surgical practical sessions by resident educators from different specialties, would be of great value to students. Copyright: © Singapore Medical Association.

  19. Understanding the racial perspectives of White student teachers who teach Black students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Trinna S.

    Statement of the problem. Most student teachers successfully complete their educational programs; however, some continue to express concern about becoming an actual practicing teacher. One of these concerns deals with White teachers interactions with Black students. This study investigated White student teachers' perceptions of teaching Black students. In particular, the study examined the racial perceptions student teachers expressed about being a White person in a racially diverse school and examined the student teachers' perceptions on race. The following questions guided the study: (1) What are the perceptions of White student teachers concerning being White? (2) What are the perceptions of White student teachers on teaching science to Black students in a racially diverse secondary school? (3) What recommendations can White student teachers give to teacher education programs concerning the teaching of Black students? Methods. Semi-structured interviews, personal profiles and reflective journals were used as the means for collecting data. All three sources of data were used to understand the racial perceptions of each student teacher. Analysis of the data began with the identification of codes and categories that later developed into themes. Cross analyses between the data sources, and cross analysis between participants' individual data were conducted. The use of semi-structured interview, personal profiles, and reflective journals provided in-depth descriptions of the participants' racial perceptions. These data sources were used to confirm data and to show how student teaching experiences helped to shape their racial perceptions. Results. Data analysis revealed three themes, various life experiences, variety of opinions related to teaching Black students, and limited recommendations to teacher education programs. Although all teachers remained at the contact stage of the White racial identity model (Helms, 1990), they were open to dialogue about race. The

  20. Culturally diverse health care students' experiences with teaching strategies in Finland: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkajarvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Pitkala, Kaisu

    2013-06-01

    All over the world, current health care students come from a variety of cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds. Their expectations and learning needs vary, yet little is known about how our current education system meets their needs. The purpose of this study was to explore culturally diverse health care students' experiences of teaching strategies in polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland. Specifically, we aimed to compare how international students and Finnish students experience the same curriculum. A cross sectional survey. Ten polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland offering English-Language-Taught Degree Programmess (ELTDPs). 283 students studying nursing, public health nursing, or physiotherapy in English. Of these, 166 were international students and 112 were Finnish students. The data were collected using a questionnaire designed specifically for this study. The survey included items grouped into seven dimensions: 1. concreteness of theoretical instruction, 2. encouragement of student activity, 3. use of skills labs, 4. variation among teaching strategies, 5. assessment, 6. interaction in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes, and 7. approach to diversity in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes. The most positive experiences for all students were with the approach to cultural diversity and the concreteness of theoretical instruction, whereas the most negative experiences were with assessment. International students' experiences were more positive than Finnish students' in the following dimensions: encouragement of student activity (p=0.005), variation among teaching strategies (p<0.001), and assessment (p<0.001). Compared to the Finnish students, more than double the number of international students were dissatisfied with their lives (p<0.001). The implications for education include the strengthening teachers' leadership role in small group activities, providing individual and detailed feedback, and ensuring

  1. The Application of Cards in Teaching Grammar to Improve Students Writing Skill: a Teaching Strategy Development

    OpenAIRE

    Muniroh, Eroh

    2016-01-01

    This research was done to overcome the students's problem in understanding grammar. The purpose of the research was to investigated how teaching grammar by using cards could improve students writing skill. The method of the research was classroom action research. The validity of the research used triangulation method. It lead to seek the validity of the research by collecting data from tests, observations, interview and study documents. The subject of the research was students of 7B of SMPN S...

  2. Integrated neuroscience program: an alternative approach to teaching neurosciences to chiropractic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaohua; La Rose, James; Zhang, Niu

    2009-01-01

    Most chiropractic colleges do not offer independent neuroscience courses because of an already crowded curriculum. The Palmer College of Chiropractic Florida has developed and implemented an integrated neuroscience program that incorporates neurosciences into different courses. The goals of the program have been to bring neurosciences to students, excite students about the interrelationship of neuroscience and chiropractic, improve students' understanding of neuroscience, and help the students understand the mechanisms underpinning the chiropractic practice. This study provides a descriptive analysis on how the integrated neuroscience program is taught via students' attitudes toward neuroscience and the comparison of students' perceptions of neuroscience content knowledge at different points in the program. A questionnaire consisting of 58 questions regarding the neuroscience courses was conducted among 339 students. The questionnaire was developed by faculty members who were involved in teaching neuroscience and administered in the classroom by faculty members who were not involved in the study. Student perceptions of their neuroscience knowledge, self-confidence, learning strategies, and knowledge application increased considerably through the quarters, especially among the 2nd-year students. The integrated neuroscience program achieved several of its goals, including an increase in students' confidence, positive attitude, ability to learn, and perception of neuroscience content knowledge. The authors believe that such gains can expand student ability to interpret clinical cases and inspire students to become excited about chiropractic research. The survey provides valuable information for teaching faculty to make the course content more relevant to chiropractic students.

  3. CONCEPT MAPPING IN TEACHING SCIENCE AMONG IX STD STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    R. Sangeetha; Mrs. T. Sangeetha

    2017-01-01

    Concept Map is a graphic device in which the concepts are linked by propositions leading to the precision and enhancement of meaning of the concept.” It is a schematic device for representing a set of concept meanings embedded in a hierarchy from most general concept to specific concepts of a learning unit. The study aimed to examine the concept mapping in teaching science among IX std students. The investigator adopted experimental method to study the concept mapping in teaching science amon...

  4. Correlating students performance with social networks use in teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado Ortega, Olga

    2013-01-01

    This paper concerns the effectiveness of the use of social networks in attitudinal training courses such as “Leadership”. It is aimed at: 1)comparing the participation of students in study discussions when using or not social networks, and correlating students’ performance with the use of social networking in teaching; 2) analysing the impact of using social networks in teambuilding within a group. It draws on data collected during two years teaching the course “Leadership”. Findings indi...

  5. Information for Teachers (Including Classroom Activities), Skylab Student Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This program is intended to directly involve the educational community in space experiments, many of which can be related to existing curricula. Included in this first packet are: 1) a brief description of the Skylab Program and the National Science Teachers Association-National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NSTA-NASA) Skylab Student…

  6. Reaching teachers: The first step in teaching students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, G.

    1991-12-31

    A 1984 American Association of the Academy of Sciences study of more than 150 successful science in-service programs developed a list of their characteristics, which included: Strong academic component in mathematics, science, and communications, focused on enrichment rather than remediation; academic subjects taught by teachers who are highly competent in the subject matter and believe that students can learn the materials; heavy emphasis on the applications of science and mathematics and careers in these fields; integrative approach to teaching that incorporates all subject areas, hands-on opportunities, and computers; multiyear involvement with students; recruitment of participants from all relevant target populations; opportunities for in-school and out-of-school learning experiences; parental involvement and development of base of community support; specific attention to removing educational inequalities related to race and gender; involvement of professionals and staff who look like the target population; development of peer support systems (involvement of a critical mass of any kind of student); evaluation, long-term follow-up, and careful data collection; and, ``mainstreaming`` -- integration of program elements supportive of women and minorities into the institutional support programs. I shall illustrate these points with ongoing teacher-support programs in progress in the Chicago area.

  7. Reaching teachers: The first step in teaching students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, G.

    1991-01-01

    A 1984 American Association of the Academy of Sciences study of more than 150 successful science in-service programs developed a list of their characteristics, which included: Strong academic component in mathematics, science, and communications, focused on enrichment rather than remediation; academic subjects taught by teachers who are highly competent in the subject matter and believe that students can learn the materials; heavy emphasis on the applications of science and mathematics and careers in these fields; integrative approach to teaching that incorporates all subject areas, hands-on opportunities, and computers; multiyear involvement with students; recruitment of participants from all relevant target populations; opportunities for in-school and out-of-school learning experiences; parental involvement and development of base of community support; specific attention to removing educational inequalities related to race and gender; involvement of professionals and staff who look like the target population; development of peer support systems (involvement of a critical mass of any kind of student); evaluation, long-term follow-up, and careful data collection; and, mainstreaming'' -- integration of program elements supportive of women and minorities into the institutional support programs. I shall illustrate these points with ongoing teacher-support programs in progress in the Chicago area.

  8. Teaching menstrual care skills to intellectually disabled female students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundağ, Sebahat; Çalbayram, Nazan Çakırer

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to teach pad replacement skills to intellectually disabled adolescent female students during their menstruation periods by demonstrating on a dummy. It may be difficult to make intellectually disabled adolescents achieve self-care during menstruation. In addition, there are difficulties experienced in explaining menstruation, such as physical changes and the practice of cleaning during this period. The study used a 'One group pretest and post-test model'. The study was performed in a special educational institution. The population consisted of 77 female students in the high school section. Calculation of a sample size was not attempted, and 54 students with no attendance issues agreed to take part in the study and were included. In this work, we found that pad replacement training significantly changed the scores of mentally disabled adolescents before and after training. Our training yielded positive results, and the population improved their skills at all stages of skill building. Training adolescents with mental disabilities helped them gain hygiene habits. Performance of these trainings occurs at the beginning of menstrual hygiene education. To achieve improved success in life, it is important that adolescents assume the responsibility of self-care and manage sustained care activity on their own. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. [Michigan Technological University Pre-Service Teacher Enhancement Program]. [Includes a copy of the Student Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.S.; Yarroch, W.L.

    1993-04-27

    The Michigan Technological University Teacher Education Program received funding from the US Department of Energy for the purpose of providing capable and suitably inclined, MTU Engineering and Science students a chance to explore high school level science and mathematics teaching as a career option. Ten undergraduate students were selected from nominations and were paired with mentor teachers for the study. This report covers the experience of the first ten nominees and their participation in the program.

  10. The Effectiveness of Traditional and 21st Century Teaching Tools on Students' Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellflower, Julie V.

    Any student seeking a high school diploma from the public school system in one U.S. state must pass the state's high school graduation test. In 2009, only 88% of students at one high school in the state met the basic proficiency requirements on the science portion of the test. Because improved science education has been identified as an explicit national goal, the purpose of this mixed methods study was to determine whether traditional teaching tools (notes, lecture, and textbook) or 21st century teaching tools (online tutorials, video games, YouTube, and virtual labs) lead to greater gains in students' science learning. Bruner's constructivist and Bandura's social cognitive theories served as the foundations for the study. Quantitative research questions were used to investigate the relationship between the type of teaching tools used and student learning gains. Quantitative data from students' pre and posttests were collected and analyzed using a dependent samples t-test. Qualitative data were collected through a focus group interview and participant journals. Analysis of the qualitative data included coding the data and writing a descriptive narrative to convey the findings. Results showed no statistically significant differences in students' science achievement: both types of teaching tools led to student learning gains. As a result, an action plan was developed to assist science educators in the implementation of traditional and 21st century teaching tools that can be used to improve students' science learning. Implications for positive social change included providing science educators with a specific plan of action that will enhance students' science learning, thereby increasing science scores on the state and other high stakes tests.

  11. Teacher and Learner Views on Effective English Teaching in the Thai Context: The Case of Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meksophawannagul, Mantana

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at investigating the characteristics of effective English teachers and students as perceived by 35 teachers and 613 students, as well as according to the surveys regarding the English-teaching problems in Thailand. The instruments included two questionnaires on the characteristics of effective teachers and students as perceived by…

  12. Teaching evidence based practice to undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Mo-Kyung; Bliquez, Rebecca

    Considering the heightened importance of evidence-based practice in healthcare settings, incorporating evidence-based practice into the nursing curriculum, especially in baccalaureate programs is essential because this is a first step to prepare students for their professional role as an RN, and the undergraduate nursing students are the ones who will spend the most time with patients at their bedside providing direct care. Teaching evidence-based practice at the undergraduate level, however, can be challenging. Creative and enjoyable teaching strategies are instrumental in order to promote students' engagement and learning about evidence-based practice. This paper describes useful strategies for teaching evidence-based practice in an undergraduate nursing research course. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gaming, texting, learning? Teaching engineering ethics through students' lived experiences with technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Georgina

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines how young peoples' lived experiences with personal technologies can be used to teach engineering ethics in a way which facilitates greater engagement with the subject. Engineering ethics can be challenging to teach: as a form of practical ethics, it is framed around future workplace experience in a professional setting which students are assumed to have no prior experience of. Yet the current generations of engineering students, who have been described as 'digital natives', do however have immersive personal experience with digital technologies; and experiential learning theory describes how students learn ethics more successfully when they can draw on personal experience which give context and meaning to abstract theories. This paper reviews current teaching practices in engineering ethics; and examines young people's engagement with technologies including cell phones, social networking sites, digital music and computer games to identify social and ethical elements of these practices which have relevance for the engineering ethics curricula. From this analysis three case studies are developed to illustrate how facets of the use of these technologies can be drawn on to teach topics including group work and communication; risk and safety; and engineering as social experimentation. Means for bridging personal experience and professional ethics when teaching these cases are discussed. The paper contributes to research and curriculum development in engineering ethics education, and to wider education research about methods of teaching 'the net generation'.

  14. General Education Pre-Service Teachers Perceptions of Including Students with Disabilities in Their Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, Paul M.; Lechtenberger, DeAnn; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Sokolosky, Stephanie; Zhou, Li; Mullins, Frank E.

    2012-01-01

    In this empirical study, the authors compare the perceptions of future general educators on two dichotomous scales (hostility/receptivity and anxiety/calmness) regarding the teaching of students with exceptionalities in their classrooms. A total of 116 teacher candidates from one southwestern and two Midwestern universities in the United States…

  15. Body Awareness and Movement for Students with Multiple Disabilities Including Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePountis, Vicki; Cady, Deborah; Hallak, Tracy

    2013-01-01

    This conference presentation examines concept development for congenitally blind students. It presents current research on best-practice for teaching this population. Examples of strategies to reinforce understanding of body concepts, spatial awareness, and positional language, while promoting mirroring, self regulation, and purposeful movement to…

  16. Twenty Careers and Classroom Experiences for Teaching Science. Includes: Job Descriptions, Teaching Suggestions and Answers, Work Sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrake, Greg

    Part 1 of this teacher's guide contains job descriptions, teaching suggestions/answers, and worksheets for twenty careers and classroom experiences which are designed to be used in teaching science. The following twenty careers are covered: meteorologist, geologist, musical instrument maker/repairman, opthalmologist, astronomer, paint chemist,…

  17. Innovative strategies for teaching anatomy to dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Lone, Mutahira

    2018-01-01

    Anatomy education is an integral component of the undergraduate and postgraduate dental curriculum. A detailed understanding of anatomy is a pre-requisite before examination, diagnosis and clinical treatment of patients in all aspects of the healthcare systems. Anatomy teaching is undergoing pioneering changes. Traditional Vesalius’ dissection-based teaching has evolved to include didactic lectures and nowadays incorporates digital teaching, e-learning and a wide range of 3D images and models...

  18. What motivates surgeons to teach dissection anatomy to medical students and surgical trainees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Ramsey-Stewart, George

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although a fading tradition in some institutions, having clinicians teach anatomy by whole-body dissection provides a clinical context to undergraduate and postgraduate medical students, increasing their depth of learning. The reasons for a clinician’s motivation to teach may be articulated in accordance with self-determination theory (SDT). SDT proposes that for individuals to be intrinsically motivated, three key elements are needed: 1) autonomy, 2) competence, and 3) relatedness. Materials and methods Data were collected through semistructured interviews with eight surgeons who were supervisors/facilitators in the anatomy by whole-body dissection course for undergraduate students in the Bachelor of Medicine, Bachelor of Surgery program and postgraduate students in the Master of Surgery program at the University of Sydney. Qualitative analysis methods were used to code and categorize data into themes. Results Our study used SDT as a conceptual framework to explore surgeons’ motivation to supervise students in the anatomy by whole-body dissection courses. Elements that facilitated their desire to teach included satisfaction derived from teaching, a sense of achievement in providing students with a clinical context, a strong sense of community within the dissection courses, and a sense of duty to the medical/surgical profession and to patient welfare. Conclusion The surgeons’ motivation for teaching was largely related to their desire to contribute to the training of the next generation of doctors and surgeons, and ultimately to future patient welfare. PMID:25565913

  19. Preparing Vietnamese student teachers for teaching with a student-centered approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.T.; Dekker, R.; Goedhart, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    The Vietnamese curriculum reform which trends toward a student-centered approach requires Vietnamese teacher educators to prepare student teachers for teaching using this approach. In this article, we present a case study of three Vietnamese student teachers working in groups in a methods course to

  20. Recognizing the needs – Student teachers´ learning to teach from teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Nilsson

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on an exploration of the ways in which primary science student teachers recognize and learn about issues that shape their own professional learning. The paper discusses different perspectives of “knowledgebase needed for teaching” and Shulman’s concept of pedagogical content knowledge, and explores how elements of knowledge are to be recognized and further developed within primary teacher education. Primary science student teacher participants (n = 25 were stimulated to use portfolios as a tool to reflect upon situations within their six weeks teaching practice in pre- and primary schools in order to facilitate recognizing their knowledge needs. The results give an insight into what situations within the teaching practice that student teachers consider as important for their own learning to teach primary maths and science.

  1. What Is the Efficacy of Teaching Psychotherapy to Psychiatry Residents and Medical Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Anh; Wu, Peter; Diez-Barroso, Ramon; Coverdale, John

    2015-10-01

    Because there are no formal reviews, the authors set out to identify and evaluate studies on teaching psychotherapy to psychiatry residents and medical students. PubMed, Embase, and PsycINFO were searched for papers with outcomes on teaching psychotherapy. Search terms included psychotherapy, teaching, residents, medical students, supportive, psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, learning, training, skills, competency, and mentalization. Nine studies were found that met inclusion criteria. There were seven studies of psychiatry residents and two of medical students. Only two of the research designs had comparison groups, and these were both randomized controlled trials, while seven of the other designs were pretest and posttest. Teaching methods, course content, and outcome measures varied widely across studies. Common methodological problems included a lack of control, low numbers of subjects as learners, and a lack of validity of the outcome measures. Only one of the studies was judged to be methodologically rigorous. These findings establish a priority for undertaking additional rigorously designed studies in evaluating the teaching of psychotherapy to psychiatry residents and medical students.

  2. Near-peer teaching programme for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Zoe; Epstein, Samantha; Richards, Jeremy

    2017-06-01

    Near-peer teaching (NPT) is increasingly recognised as an effective method for teaching and learning within medical education. We describe a student-as-teacher programme developed for fourth-year students (MS4s) helping to deliver the second-year Respiratory Pathophysiology course at our medical school. Twelve MS4s were paired with faculty members to co-teach one or two small group case-based sessions for second-year students (MS2s). Beforehand, MS4s attended an orientation session and workshop, reviewing skills and strategies for teaching effectively. Following each teaching session co-taught by MS4s, both MS4s and MS2s completed multiple-choice surveys evaluating the MS4's teaching skills and the experience overall. MS4s also wrote reflection essays describing their experiences. Faculty member co-teachers completed a 12-question feedback form for MS4s during the session. We received 114 post-session MS2 surveys, 13 post-session MS4 surveys and 13 post-session faculty staff evaluations. The majority of MS2s reported that MS4s enhanced their understanding of the material, and considered the quality of MS4 teaching to be 'good' or 'outstanding'. Nearly all of the MS4s enjoyed their experiences and believed that the programme improved their teaching skills. Time management was the most common challenge cited by both MS4s and faculty member co-teachers. These data demonstrate that NPT is valuable for both MS2s and MS4s: MS2s benefited from the social and cognitive congruence afforded by near-peer teachers, whereas MS4s used this experience to build and enhance their skills as educators. These results support the continued involvement of MS4s in this second-year course, as well as broadening the scope of and opportunities for student teaching at our medical school and beyond. Near-peer teaching is recognised as an effective method for teaching and learning within medical education. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  3. Phenomenological analysis of patient experiences of medical student teaching encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Emma; King, Nigel; Wenger, Etienne; Dornan, Tim

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know how patients are affected by becoming opportunistically involved in medical student education. In previous studies, researchers rather than patients set the research agenda and expert patients or people well known to teachers were more often involved than ordinary people. This study aimed to explore how ordinary patients experience undergraduate medical teaching when they become involved in it opportunistically and to derive practical insights from the lived experiences of these patients. The research was conducted in line with a conceptual orientation towards communities of practice theory and used phenomenology as a way of exploring patients' lived experiences in depth. Minimally structured interviews were carried out with 10 patients following ordinary out-patient or general practice appointments in which students were being taught. Template analysis was used to generate provisional themes and a process of phenomenological reduction was used to distil individual respondents' lived experiences to their essence. The presence of students in ambulatory consultations was normal. Nine respondents described transactional relationships in which they remained outside the community of practice of which the doctor and student were members. Only an intimate problem would engage them deeply enough for a student's presence to 'bother' them. One patient's personal and professional background led her to regard doctors' handling of consultation dynamics as factors contributing to whether teaching consultations were negative or positive experiences. When doctors' sensitive and inclusive behaviour drew her into a triadic relationship with the student and doctor, she experienced mutual benefits with students. When it did not, she felt objectified and alienated. Provided they receive the clinical care for which they are attending a consultation and are treated respectfully, patients may sometimes willingly become 'objects' from which students learn. They may

  4. Anatomy teaching assistants: facilitating teaching skills for medical students through apprenticeship and mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachman, Nirusha; Christensen, Kevin N; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    Significant increase in the literature regarding "residents as teachers" highlights the importance of providing opportunities and implementing guidelines for continuing medical education and professional growth. While most medical students are enthusiastic about their future role as resident-educators, both students and residents feel uncomfortable teaching their peers due to the lack of necessary skills. However, whilst limited and perhaps only available to select individuals, opportunities for developing good teaching practice do exist and may be identified in courses that offer basic sciences. The Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic offers a teaching assistant (TA) elective experience to third- and fourth-year medical students through integrated apprenticeship and mentoring during the human structure didactic block. This article, aims to describe a curriculum for a TA elective within the framework of a basic science course through mentoring and apprenticeship. Opportunities for medical students to become TAs, process of TAs' recruitment, mentoring and facilitation of teaching and education research skills, a method for providing feedback and debriefing are described. Developing teaching practice based on apprenticeship and mentoring lends to more accountability to both TA's and course faculty by incorporating universal competencies to facilitate the TA experience.

  5. High school students' work engagement in practical teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović-Dobrota Biljana Z.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The current interest in introducing the dual education system into Serbian secondary education has drawn our attention to the question of students' self-perception in the process of practical teaching. The idea that underpins this paper is the supposition that students are affectively engaged with the work activities they perform. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES (Schaufeli et al., 2002 has been used for assessing students' work engagement in practical teaching. A study was conducted to examine the differences between high school students with mild intellectual disabilities and those with typical development with regard to aspects of work engagement defined as Energy, Commitment and Absorption. The sample was comprised of 248 students of vocational high schools in Serbia of both genders, of whom 111 with intellectual disabilities and 137 with typical development. The findings indicate that students with mild intellectual disabilities tend to rate their engagement in practical teaching more positively (t=7,457; p=0,001 than students with typical development. The paper provides a detailed analysis of the pedagogical implications of these findings and also outlines the limitations of the study, thus pointing the way for future research on this or related issues.

  6. Experiences Teaching Stoichiometry to Students in Grades 10 and 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Cynthia Denise

    Many students have problems learning stoichiometry, a complex mathematical chemistry concept used to determine how much product will be produced or formed from a given quantity of reactants. The problem addressed in this study was teachers' lack of understanding of how to teach stoichiometry in a Midwestern urban school district. The conceptual framework of the study was based upon constructivist theory. A qualitative narrative approach was used to obtain the perceptions of 5 high school chemistry instructors related to their experiences, successful or unsuccessful, in teaching stoichiometry to students in Grades 10 and 11. Data were gathered through face-to-face interviews, which were analyzed via an inductive approach to reveal 6 themes: a difficult subject to teach, presentation of stoichiometry, relevancy, students' reactions, barriers, and gender differences. Findings suggested the need for teachers to be knowledgeable, creative, and resourceful in their subject areas to help their students to learn stoichiometry. Findings also revealed the need for teachers to adapt their instructional strategies and modes of delivery to reflect their students' individual learning styles. Understanding how the participating teachers explained stoichiometry to their students might help other chemistry teachers to examine and adapt their own instructional styles and delivery methods of the concept. This understanding might, in term, help to improve student achievement in stoichiometry in particular and chemistry in general.

  7. Attitude of Student Teachers towards Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Anupama; Pathy, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    Teaching being a dynamic activity requires a favourable attitude and certain specific competencies from its practitioners. Teachers' proficiency depends on the attitude she possesses for the profession. The positive attitude helps teacher to develop a conductive learner friendly environment in the classroom. This also casts a fruitful effect on…

  8. Teaching Critical Reflection to Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Gavan Peter Longley; Kenny, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Critical reflection is a highly valued and widely applied learning approach in higher education. There are many benefits associated with engaging in critical reflection, and it is often integrated into the design of graduate level courses on university teaching as a life-long learning strategy to help ensure that learners build their capacity as…

  9. Should we involve terminally ill patients in teaching medical students? A systematic review of patient's views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dylan Gareth; Coles, Bernadette; Willoughby, Hannah May

    2015-12-01

    To review available published research that has explored how terminally ill patients feel about being involved in undergraduate medical teaching. A systematic review using narrative synthesis. Qualitative or quantitative publications were included if they directly explored the views of adult patients, with a terminal diagnosis, about their involvement in undergraduate clinical teaching. Seven publications met the inclusion criteria: one case report, one qualitative study and five questionnaire-based studies. A total of 269 patients were included across all studies. Patients were predominantly studied in a hospice or hospice day care setting. Both patients who had, and who had not, previously been involved in student teaching were captured by the included publications. In general, the views of patients were highly positive: overall 85%-100% were in favour of involvement in teaching. There were also some negative aspects, such as: concerns about being physically examined by a student; finding involvement in teaching tiring; feeling unable to decline consent to participate. An assumption that clinical undergraduate medical teaching involving terminally ill patients may be too burdensome is not reflected overall in studies that have sought the views of the patients themselves. Understanding the patient's perspective provides a number of practical points in relation to how clinical teaching should be adapted in this patient group; for example, using smaller student group sizes; direct supervision if physical examination performed; short encounters with multiple patients rather than a longer encounter with one patient; adequate informed consent beforehand and without the students automatically being present. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  10. School health approach to teaching and learning of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.S. Lukianova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: disclosure of health-ways for teaching and learning of students. Material: analysis of the publications of domestic and foreign authors. Results: The article is devoted to the implementation of healthy way approach to the educational process, namely, the rational organization of training aimed at keeping the dynamics of human health, the prevention of mental fatigue and overload, increase adaptive reserves of the body of the person; intensification of teaching and learning of students (application-is controversial dialogue, training, game forms and methods of training, participation in project activities, the work of pedagogical workshops that stimulates emotional accommodation and understanding of knowledge, helps students acquire personal-relevant knowledge and experience; use of health effect of artistic and practical (music, painting activities of students. Conclusions: highlights the key towards the implementation of health-promoting approach to the educational process.

  11. Examining student rating of teaching effectiveness using FACETS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Daud, Nuraihan; Abu Kassim, Noor Lide

    2011-01-01

    Students' evaluations of teaching staff can be considered high-stakes, as they are often used to determine promotion, reappointment, and merit pay to academics. Using Facets, the reliability and validity of one student rating questionnaire is analyzed. A total of 13,940 respondents of the Human Science Division of International Islamic University Malaysia were involved in the study. The analysis shows that the student rating questionnaire used was valid and reliable, and it allows identification of staff for the institution's prestigious teaching excellence awards, and those needing in-service training. It was found that there was no significant difference in terms of rank, age and gender of the staff. The study also shows that the majority of staff have problems keeping the class interested and getting students to participate in class activities. Faculty also hardly discussed common errors in assignments and tests.

  12. Mathematics teaching experiences of elementary preservice teachers with high and low mathematics anxiety during student teaching: A multiple case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisbet, Leslie Deanna

    This study investigated the teaching experiences of six elementary preservice teachers (EPTs), three with high mathematics anxiety and three with low mathematics anxiety, during their student teaching semester. The EPTs were selected from an initial pool of 121 EPTs who took the Abbreviated Mathematics Anxiety Scale. The cases were compared in a cross case analysis to highlight mathematics teaching experiences among EPTs. Data sources included EPT and researcher journal entries, interview transcripts, pre-lesson surveys, field notes, lesson plans, and artifacts of observed lessons. Data were coded using Shulman's content knowledge, Graeber's mathematics pedagogical content knowledge, and mathematics anxiety characteristics. Findings revealed both similarities and differences across EPTs as related to four major categories: (a) planning and resources used, (b) role of the cooperating teacher, (c) content knowledge, and (d) pedagogical content knowledge. All EPTs used mostly direct instruction and relied on the course textbook and their respective cooperating teacher as their primary resources for planning. Additionally, across participants, the cooperating teacher influenced EPTs' perceptions of students and teaching. Also, EPTs with high mathematics anxiety were weaker with respect to content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge. Findings suggest a need to re-design methods courses to address improving the pedagogical content knowledge of EPTs with mathematics anxiety. Findings also suggest a need to develop content specific mathematics courses for EPTs to improve their content knowledge. Future studies could include a longitudinal study to follow highly anxious EPTs who take content specific elementary mathematics courses to observe their content knowledge and mathematics anxiety.

  13. A Revalidation of the SET37 Questionnaire for Student Evaluations of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortelmans, Dimitri; Spooren, Pieter

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors report on the validity and reliability of a paper-and-pencil instrument called SET37 used for Student Evaluation of Teaching (SET) in higher education. Using confirmatory factor analysis on 2525 questionnaires, a revalidation of the SET37 shows construct and discriminant validity of the 12 dimensions included in the…

  14. Using the Ultimatum Game to Teach Economic Theories of Relationship Maintenance to A-Level Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Simon

    2011-01-01

    When teaching at A-level, educators often present a model of psychology that does not extend beyond the confines of the specification. However, sometimes not only is it possible to provide insight into other areas of psychology, it provides a novel way of understanding a concept included in the specification itself. By extending student's…

  15. Instructional Internships: Improving the Teaching and Learning Experience for Students, Interns, and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerich, Abby L.; Hoepner, Jerry K.; Samelson, Vicki M.

    2015-01-01

    Students training for clinical careers must acquire skills for teaching clients, their families, and fellow professionals. Guidelines for training programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders (Speech-Language Pathology), however, do not currently include standards for pedagogy. The aim of this study was to measure changes in undergraduate…

  16. Students' Cognitive Processes While Learning from Teaching. Final Report: Appendices. (Volume Two).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winne, Philip H.; Marx, Ronald W.

    These appendices present the protocols used in research (reported in Volume 1) on the cognitive processes of students while learning from teaching. Curriculum outlines are given for the videotaped lessons used in the second and third studies: lessons in sleep and elementary psychology. Included in the appendices are: (1) the illustrative script…

  17. Some Hints on the Teaching of the Present Perfect to Iranian Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyvani, M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how, through the use of two diagrams, one can teach the English present-perfect to Iranian students. One diagram consists of a time-line divided into "past" and "non-past." The other uses an oval to indicate a time-span including the present. Both facilitate comprehension of present-perfect meaning. (PJM)

  18. Teaching Kindergarten Students about the Water Cycle through Arts and Invention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Latisha L.; Samarakoon, Deepanee

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence for the benefits of arts integration is mounting. The purpose of this study was to determine if integration of the arts was an effective strategy for teaching the water cycle to kindergarten students. The study included lessons that supported both a science and an engineering standard of the Next Generation Science Standards and…

  19. Faculty-Student Engagement in Teaching Observation and Assessment: A Hong Kong Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pounder, James S.; Ho Hung-lam, Elizabeth; Groves, Julie May

    2016-01-01

    There is now a worldwide focus on the quality of university teaching and yet there is general dissatisfaction in universities with the student evaluation of teaching system. Peer observation of teaching seems to hold much promise in the assessment of teaching quality, but such observation pays little attention to the quality of teaching as…

  20. Simulation in computer forensics teaching: the student experience

    OpenAIRE

    Crellin, Jonathan; Adda, Mo; Duke-Williams, Emma; Chandler, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The use of simulation in teaching computing is well established, with digital forensic investigation being a subject area where the range of simulation required is both wide and varied demanding a corresponding breadth of fidelity. Each type of simulation can be complex and expensive to set up resulting in students having only limited opportunities to participate and learn from the simulation. For example students' participation in mock trials in the University mock courtroom or in simulation...

  1. The Study of Teaching Effective Strategies on Student's Math Achievements

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad-Hassan Behzadi; Farhad Hosseinzadeh Lotfi; Nasrin Mahboudi

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important factors in student's learning weakness and academic failure, is their unfamilarity or low awareness of the learning strategies and studying in mathematics. This study is performed to examine the students' math and reading skills and their study skills that impact on their academic progress. The main objective of the research is to study with emphasis on training study strategies versus ususal method (teaching without emphasis on training study strategies) to increase...

  2. Teaching students about informatics and astronomy using real data for detection of asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldea, A. L.; Vaduvescu, O.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper we approach the astronomy teaching process for students in computer sciences through a controlled investigation method using real astronomical data, including data reduction and quality control of the astrometry of near-Earth asteroids. The method used data collected on the Isaac Newton Telescope located at the ORM observatory on the island of La Palma in the Spanish Canary Islands and was successfully tested with a group of students in their second year of study.

  3. THE PERCEPTION AND PROFILE OF STUDENTS NOT COUNT ON TEACHING METHODS OF DISCIPLINE OF COSTS

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, Márcia; Costa, César Henrique; Raimundini, Simone Leticia; Rocha, João Marcos Leão da

    2013-01-01

    The professionals working in corporate governance include a broad knowledge of their area and similar areas, so the not accountant students, as administrators and economists, must have knowledge and understanding of accounting information to assist in the management and decision making. The discipline of Cost Methodology (CM) aims to contribute to this knowledge. The objective of this study is to identify perception and profile of the not accountant students about the teaching of the discipli...

  4. Creating a Student-centered Learning Environment: Implementation of Problem-based Learning to Teach Microbiology to Undergraduate Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandi, Venkataramana; Basireddy, Parimala Reddy

    2018-01-05

    Introduction Medical education involves training necessary to become a physician or a surgeon. This includes various levels of training like undergraduate, internship, and postgraduate training. Medical education can be quite complex, since it involves training in pre-clinical subjects (anatomy, physiology, biochemistry), the para-clinical subjects (microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and forensic medicine), and a discrete group of clinical subjects that include general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynaecology, ear, nose and throat specialization, paediatrics, cardiology, pulmonology, dermatology, ophthalmology, and orthopaedics, and many other clinical specializations and super specialities (cardio-thoracic surgery, neurosurgery, etc.). Training medical students involves both classroom teaching and practical applications. Classroom teaching is usually confined to didactic lectures, where the teacher unilaterally disseminates the information. This kind of teaching was recently noted to be not very effective in producing better quality medical graduates. The present study aims to introduce problem-based learning (PBL) to teach microbiology to undergraduate medical students and evaluate their perception towards such type of learning. Methods A total of 159 students were included in the study. An informed and oral consent was obtained from each participant, and the study was approved by the institutional ethical committee. All the students included in the study were grouped into 14 groups of 11-13 students. Students were carefully grouped ensuring that each group had a good mix that included different levels of achievers. Students were given a detailed introduction to the exercise before they started it. A questionnaire that consisted of 11 points was given to the students and they were asked to give feedback (strongly disagree, disagree, agree to some extent, agree, strongly agree) both on the functioning of PBL and the tutor performance during PBL

  5. Teaching Students of Today: The Buddha's Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ong Puay; Tee, Ong Puay

    2014-01-01

    21st century students are living on the highway of rapid information technology, residing in homes equipped with modern gadgets that allow them to stay connected through virtual media. The fact that students' mind-sets are changing means that there is a need for corresponding changes in pedagogy. The Buddha is known as "Teacher of gods and…

  6. Teaching Engineering students to "Think thief"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, Pieter H.; Junger, Marianne

    We report on an educational experiment where information technology students were encouraged to think out of the box about the dark side of information technology. Instead of taking the usual point of view of the engineer we challenged the students to take the point of view of the motivated

  7. Teaching Information Security Students to "Think thief"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartel, Pieter H.; Junger, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We report on an educational experiment where information security master students were encouraged to think out of the box. Instead of taking the usual point of view of the security engineer we challenged the students to take the point of view of the motivated offender. We report on the exciting

  8. Lecturing style teaching and student performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Klaveren, C.

    2011-01-01

    Teachers in the Netherlands tend to spend less time in front of the class, and often adopt a more personal approach. This allows them to better adjust their lecturing style to the needs of the individual student with the aim of increasing student performance. However, a more personal approach is

  9. Teaching Geographical Thought Through Student Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Denis

    1981-01-01

    Outlines advantages and disadvantages of a history of postwar geographical thought course, focusing on student-led interviews of geography staff. Students examine geographical career of a lecturer, discuss courses s/he has taken, character of departments s/he has experienced, his/her awareness at different stages of philosophical and…

  10. Teaching Teachers: Assessing Students as Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, Rosemary S.; Conlin, Luke

    2017-01-01

    Most elementary science teachers would like to give their students opportunities to do science. The "Next Generation Science Standards" and "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" (NGSS Lead States 2013; NRC 2012) make this goal explicit by requiring that students learn how to engage in the practices of science. Consequently,…

  11. Lecturing style teaching and student performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Klaveren, Chris

    Teachers in the Netherlands tend to spend less time in front of the class, and often adopt a more personal approach. This allows them to better adjust their lecturing style to the needs of the individual student with the aim of increasing student performance. However, a more personal approach is

  12. University Students' Attitudes toward Physical Education Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fengjuan; Chen, Junjun; Baker, Miles

    2014-01-01

    While there have been many studies into students' attitudes toward Physical Education at the school level, far fewer studies have been conducted at the university level, especially in China. This study explored 949 students' attitudes toward their university Physical Education experiences in four Chinese universities. An intercorrelated model of…

  13. Teaching to What Students Have in Common

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willingham, Daniel; Daniel, David

    2012-01-01

    Although students vary in their abilities and interests, "hyper-individualizing" the curriculum in an attempt to accommodate these differences is not the best way to help each student excel, write Willingham and Daniel. Drawing on educational research, the authors give examples of several cognitive must haves (things that the cognitive system…

  14. Students' Experiences with Live Video-Streamed Teaching Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Vibe Alopaeus; Buus, Lillian; Thorsen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Students' Experiences with Live Video-Streamed Classes The bachelor programme in biomedical laboratory technology at VIA Faculty of Health Sciences offers a combination of live video-streamed and traditional teaching. It is the student’s individual choice whether to attend classes on......-site or to attend classes from home via live video-stream. Our previous studies revealed that interaction and dialog between attendants were reduced in the live-streamed sessions compared to on-site teaching, and that the main reasons were technological issues and the teacher’s choice of teaching methods. One......-site and live video-streamed teaching. The results document a continuous progress in technological transparency, as the live video-streamed classes increasingly support the student’s flexibility in ways of attending and interacting in classes. Interaction is facilitated through teacher driven support, resulting...

  15. The "Near-Peer" Approach to Teaching Musculoskeletal Physical Examination Skills Benefits Residents and Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Casandra J; Nanos, Katherine N; Newcomer, Karen L

    2017-03-01

    The musculoskeletal physical examination (MSK PE) is an essential part of medical student training, and it is best taught in a hands-on, longitudinal fashion. A barrier to this approach is faculty instructor availability. "Near-peer" teaching refers to physicians-in-training teaching their junior colleagues. It is unknown whether near-peer teaching is effective in teaching this important physical examination skill. To investigate attitudes of medical students and physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R) residents regarding near-peer teaching in an MSK PE curriculum. Qualitative, anonymous paper and online surveys. Tertiary academic center with a medical school and PM&R training program. Ninety-nine second- and third-year medical students and 13 PM&R residents in their third or fourth postgraduate year. Attitudes of second- and third-year medical students were measured immediately after their MSK PE course. Resident attitudes were measured in a single cross-sectional sample. Student attitudes were assessed via a questionnaire with 5-point Likert scales and a free-text comment section. The resident questionnaire included a combination of multiple-choice questions, rankings, free-text responses, and Likert scales. All 99 students completed the questionnaire. The majority of students (n = 79 [80%]) reported that resident involvement as hands-on instructors of examination skills was "very useful," and 87 (88%) indicated that resident-led small discussion groups were "very helpful" or "somewhat helpful." Fifty-seven of 99 students (58%) reported that the resident-facilitated course was "much better" than courses without resident involvement. Twelve of 13 eligible residents completed the survey, and of those, 8 found teaching "very helpful" to their MSK knowledge, and 11 became "somewhat" or "much more confident" in clinical examination skills. Our study supports educational benefits to medical students and resident instructors in our MSK PE program. We recommend

  16. Student perceptions of their biology teacher's interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Wade Clay, Jr.

    The primary goals of this dissertation were to determine the relationships between interpersonal teaching behaviors and student achievement and affective learning outcomes. The instrument used to collect student perceptions of teacher interpersonal teaching behaviors was the Questionnaire on Teacher Interactions (QTI). The instrument used to assess student affective learning outcomes was the Biology Student Affective Instrument (BSAI). The interpersonal teaching behavior data were collected using students as the observers. 111 students in an urban influenced, rural high school answered the QTI and BSAI in September 1997 and again in April 1998. At the same time students were pre and post tested using the Biology End of Course Examination (BECE). The QTI has been used primarily in European and Oceanic areas. The instrument was also primarily used in educational stratified environment. This was the first time the BSAI was used to assess student affective learning outcomes. The BECE is a Texas normed cognitive assessment test and it is used by Texas schools districts as the end of course examination in biology. The interpersonal teaching behaviors model was tested to ascertain if predictive power in the USA and in a non-stratified educational environment. Findings indicate that the QTI is an adequate predictor of student achievement in biology. The results were not congruent with the non-USA data and results, this indicates that the QTI is a society/culturally sensitive instrument and the instrument needs to be normed to a particular society/culture before it is used to affect teachers' and students' educational environments.

  17. Teaching Soil Morphology to Introductory Soil Science Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vepraskas, M. J.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses procedures for teaching basic soil morphological concepts using soil cores collected along a toposequence. Describes materials and methods for collecting, laboratory use of cores, and student evaluation results. Shows a table of criteria used to describe soils for profile descriptions. (RT)

  18. Blog Attack: New Teaching Strategies to Engage Today's College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Denise

    2012-01-01

    The growing need to match pedagogy with the evolving needs of a new generation of learners has stirred and interest in Web 2.0 Blogging can bring a surprisingly rich experience to class projects by increasing collaboration between students and teacher. As a teaching tool, blogging can bring greater complexity to learning that would have otherwise…

  19. Use Jazz to Teach Your String Students Improvisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Charles R.

    2006-01-01

    Standards 3 and 9 of the National Standards for Music Education charge teachers to teach improvisation as well as music of diverse cultures. Jazz is a musical style that is perfect to cover both content areas. Until now, however, jazz repertoire and improvisation have not played a major role in the education of string students. One reason is that…

  20. teacher characteristics and students' choice of teaching as a career

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Engr E. Egbochukwu

    as a career. The study also showed a significant relationship between students' attitude to choice of teaching as a career and teachers characteristics (χ2 = 3.73, p < 0.05). There was ... Akomolafe (2003) pointed out that the individual's vocation or career ... for a profession based on one's interest, one's aptitude or the values.

  1. "Content" versus "Style": Acquiescence in Student Evaluation of Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooren, Pieter; Mortelmans, Dimitri; Thijssen, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Structural equation modelling is used to measure the existence of a response style (in particular, acquiescence) behind three balanced Likert scales measuring different concepts in a questionnaire for student evaluation of teaching in higher education. Exploration with one sample (n = 1125) and confirmation in a second sample (n = 710) from a…

  2. Educational Attitude Changes During Year-Long Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, James M.; Lacefield, Warren

    1978-01-01

    A year-long, clustered student teaching program is examined over a two-year period for influence upon pre-service teacher attitudes toward education. The Educational Preference Scale is used in a pre- and post-design, and results are interpreted with reference to the theory of cognitive dissonance. Discusses the relationship between educational…

  3. Short Report: Students' perception of different teaching aids in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Short Report: Students' perception of different teaching aids in a medical college. ... African Journal of Health Professions Education ... Critics of multimedia feel that it is expensive, too time consuming, and isn't worth the time and effort.1 A learner's learning style, whether visual, auditory or kinesthetic, is usually resistant to ...

  4. Teaching Controversial Issues in the JLL Classroom for Chinese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimojimai, Yasuko

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses how teachers explore teaching controversial issues in the Japanese language classroom to Japanese language learner (JLL) or culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) students who have different cultural and political backgrounds. Assuring educational opportunities with consideration of JLLs' background is important…

  5. Primary Student Teachers' Perspectives of the Teaching of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas Basturk

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate primary student teachers' perspectives of the teaching of fractions, i.e. their PCK of fractions. The research design used for the study was a descriptive survey method. As data collection instrument, we conducted a questionnaire composing of 14 open and closed-ended questions. The questionnaire was…

  6. Using Astrology to Teach Research Methods to Introductory Psychology Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Roger A.; Grasha, Anthony F.

    1986-01-01

    Provides a classroom demonstration designed to test an astrological hypothesis and help teach introductory psychology students about research design and data interpretation. Illustrates differences between science and nonscience, the role of theory in developing and testing hypotheses, making comparisons among groups, probability and statistical…

  7. What Can Jesus Teach Us about Student Engagement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Glenn; Martinez, Elda; Herbers, Sherry

    2015-01-01

    This article examines Jesus's teaching methods as described in the four Gospels, highlighting the ways in which He led listeners to participate actively in their learning. We identify similarities between many of Jesus's techniques and current practices in the field of student engagement, with a focus on applications for instructors in higher…

  8. Students' perceptions on teacher - centred methods in teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was the study on students' perception on teacher -centered methods in teaching classification in library schools: the case of Benue State University, Makurdi. The instrument used for this study was questionnaire. Mean and standard deviation were used in data analysis. The z -test was used to test the ...

  9. Teaching Strategies to Increase Cultural Awareness in Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonneman, William

    2015-01-01

    Cultural competence education is essential for all nurses to better prepare them to address the underlying social environment of patients, families, and communities. This article describes a study with second degree nursing students that tested 6 teaching strategies for their effectiveness in raising cultural awareness, a key aspect of cultural competence. The results demonstrated that the interventions had a positive effect.

  10. Teaching Law to Online Law Students at RMIT University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babacan, Alperhan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the online Juris Doctor Program (JD Program) at RMIT University. The first part of the paper provides a brief overview of the JD Program, the graduate capabilities of the Program and key principles associated with the teaching of law to online postgraduate students. In line with the literature in the area of online teaching…

  11. First-year Medical students' perception of the conventional teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First-year Medical students' perception of the conventional teaching methods and Problem-based learning curriculum at Walter Sisulu University in Mthatha South ... Journal of African Association of Physiological Sciences ... Medical schools throughout the world have adopted a PBL learning approach in their curriculum.

  12. Teaching Math to My Scholars: Inner City Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ranjani; Pitts, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Teaching in an inner city school requires classroom management, resilience, and most importantly strategies to promote learning and growth. There is a constant need for acceleration in student growth in core subjects, especially Math. A blended learning model can be an effective option for schools to personalize learning experiences for students…

  13. Medical Students\\' View On The Methods Of Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was aimed at determining the perception of the medical students of a relatively new medical school in Nigeria about the teaching of Pharmacology, the best way of learning and retaining the subject. Suggestions on the ways of making pharmacology more interesting to them were also sought. Methods: ...

  14. Teaching Culturally Different Students: Growing Pine Trees or Bonsai Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Don C.

    1988-01-01

    This article reviews educational inequalities based on cultural heritage and proposes a model for teachers to become more effective in teaching culturally diverse students. The cross-cultural awareness continuum is described and the stages through which a teacher must pass to achieve such awareness are discussed. (JL)

  15. Students' Perception of the Teaching and Learning of Plant and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant and machinery valuation is an important aspect of valuation which is taught within the Estate Management and Valuation curriculum in Nigerian universities. This study examined the perception of students towards the teaching and learning of plant and machinery valuation in a typical Nigerian university. Data for the ...

  16. Teaching Learning Concepts to Graduate Students through Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coberly-Holt, Patricia G.; Walton, S. Taylor

    2017-01-01

    Over a period of four years, the instructor of History and Theory of Adult Education monitored and recorded graduate students' reactions to the experiences of learning through writing assignments that incorporate diverse methods associated with stringent pedagogical and andragogical methods. After experiencing the two divergent teaching styles and…

  17. Teacher Preparation for the Global Stage: International Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Jacob B.; Lin, Miranda

    2015-01-01

    As globalization lessens the distance between peoples and diversifies the common classroom, teacher education programs lag behind in producing globally-minded educators. One approach used by some teacher education programs to remedy this issue is to offer international student teaching experiences. While the literature related to these programs is…

  18. Influence of Teachers' Teaching Experience on Students' Learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cce

    Items 1 - 6 ... should encourage experienced teachers to stay on the job through the provision of incentives .... sampling technique. The instrument used to collect data was an inventory titled 'secondary schools teachers' teaching experience and students' learning .... Source: Statistics Division, Ministry of Education, Akure.

  19. Student Evaluation of Teaching: A Case Study from School of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This paper presents a case study of an academic department's experience with evaluation. The purpose is to review the impact of student evaluation of teaching. The paper also introduces a new evaluation scoring method: the University of Zambia Staff Appraisal System (UNZASAS) method. Method: Anonymous ...

  20. OK, Let's Teach Graduate Students Differently. But How?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassuto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    What should graduate teaching look like when it aims to prepare students for a range of careers? That's a welcome question, but it is not an easy one. The author takes up the problem in two parts, this month from the individual faculty member's perspective, and next month on the curricular level (that is, from the point of view of departments and…

  1. Impact of Engaging Teaching Model (ETM) on Students' Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukoye, Oyegoke Teslim; Shegunshi, Anjali

    2016-01-01

    Non-attendance in Higher Education is not a new concept. In recent years with the exponential growth in digital learning, physical attendance has become a more complex issue. Educators are continually advocating an engaging teaching approach for students as a means of enhancing learning. This on-going study focuses on exploring the existing issues…

  2. Student Perceptions in Teaching Principles of Management Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Mohammad A.; Etnyre, Vance

    2015-01-01

    Teaching concepts of information systems to general business students through a course such as management information systems (MIS) can be challenging in today's fast-changing environment of information technology (IT). Such a course must provide not only an understanding of the development, applications, and management of information systems, but…

  3. Does Gender Impact Business Students' Perceptions of Teaching Effectiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, Leon; Lavin, Angeline; Davies, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    While there are certainly differences of opinion regarding teaching effectiveness, the goal of this study is to investigate whether there is consistency or differences in opinion based on the gender of the student doing the evaluation of the instructor or the gender of the instructor being evaluated. This paper summarizes the gender-based findings…

  4. A Dual Placement Approach to Online Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Kevin J.; Feher, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Many school districts across the United States now offer online K-12 education, and the proportion of all students in higher education taking at least one online course is at an all-time high of 32% (Allen & Seaman, 2013). With the evolution of online teaching and learning, teacher preparation programs must establish and offer online student…

  5. Teaching Physical Education to Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menear, Kristi Sayers; Smith, Shannon C.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2007) estimates that one in every 110 children is affected by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The prevalence of ASDs makes it very likely that every physical education teacher is teaching at least one student with an ASD. This article will provide physical educators with a brief overview of…

  6. Teaching the Soft Skills: Three Students Break It Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Teaching soft skills (i.e., grit, empathy, collaboration, perseverance, communication, ethics, self-management) is a task that might seem overwhelming to new teachers, but this article offers practical advice from students about how to incorporate the lessons into the classroom.

  7. Doing Philosophy Effectively: Student Learning in Classroom Teaching.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienstra, Natascha; Imants, Jeroen; Karskens, Machiel; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.

    2015-01-01

    An important aim of teaching philosophy in Dutch secondary schools is to learn about philosophy (i.e., the great philosophers) by doing philosophy. We examined doing philosophy and focused specifically on the relationship between student learning activities and teacher behavior; in doing so, a

  8. Doing Philosophy Effectively : Student Learning in Classroom Teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienstra, Natascha; Imants, Jeroen; Karskens, Machiel; van der Heijden, Peter G. M.

    2015-01-01

    An important aim of teaching philosophy in Dutch secondary schools is to learn about philosophy (i.e., the great philosophers) by doing philosophy. We examined doing philosophy and focused specifically on the relationship between student learning activities and teacher behavior; in doing so, a

  9. Students' Entrepreneurial Self-Efficacy: Does the Teaching Method Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaho, Ernest; Olomi, Donath R.; Urassa, Goodluck Charles

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the various entrepreneurship teaching methods in Uganda and how these methods relate to entrepreneurial self-efficacy (ESE). Design/methodology/approach: A sample of 522 final year students from selected universities and study programs was surveyed using self-reported questionnaires. Findings: There…

  10. Perceptions of Education Faculty Students on Teaching Methods and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmer, Elif; Güven, Gülçin; Aydin, Oktay; Özden, Bülent; Efe, Kadriye; Sener, Nurcan

    2016-01-01

    Individual differences have an influence on a wide range of education fields. These differences can range from organizing teaching environments to the techniques and strategies that the teacher uses. This study focused on individual differences of pre-service teachers and aimed to investigate the perceptions of Education Faculty students on…

  11. Attitude of student-teachers toward teaching practice in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    practice exercise in Nigerian Colleges of Education. The study employed expofacto method. A total number of 600 students from three colleges of education drawn from Western, Eastern and Northern parts of Nigeria served as the sample for this study. An instrument titled “Attitudes Toward Teaching Practice Questionnaire ...

  12. Metaphorical Perceptions of the Concepts "Teaching Profession" and "Raising Students"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezen, Sevim; Aykutlu, Isil; Secken, Nilgun; Bayrak, Celai

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Study: This study aims to reveal, via metaphors, pre-service biology teachers' perceptions of "teaching profession" and "raising students." Research Methods: In accordance with the aim of the study, phenomenology, one of the qualitative paradigm patterns, is used. The study group consists of 80 pre-service biology…

  13. Who Wants to Become a Teacher? Typology of Student-Teachers' Commitment to Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Ikupa; Berry, Amanda; Saab, Nadira; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2017-01-01

    Understanding student-teachers' decisions to enter and stay in the teaching profession after graduation could help teacher educators to find appropriate procedures to enhance commitment to teaching. This study classified student-teachers based on their levels of commitment to teaching, and described these types based on student-teachers'…

  14. Student evaluations of teaching: teaching quantitative courses can be hazardous to one’s career

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Uttl

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Anonymous student evaluations of teaching (SETs are used by colleges and universities to measure teaching effectiveness and to make decisions about faculty hiring, firing, re-appointment, promotion, tenure, and merit pay. Although numerous studies have found that SETs correlate with various teaching effectiveness irrelevant factors (TEIFs such as subject, class size, and grading standards, it has been argued that such correlations are small and do not undermine the validity of SETs as measures of professors’ teaching effectiveness. However, previous research has generally used inappropriate parametric statistics and effect sizes to examine and to evaluate the significance of TEIFs on personnel decisions. Accordingly, we examined the influence of quantitative vs. non-quantitative courses on SET ratings and SET based personnel decisions using 14,872 publicly posted class evaluations where each evaluation represents a summary of SET ratings provided by individual students responding in each class. In total, 325,538 individual student evaluations from a US mid-size university contributed to theses class evaluations. The results demonstrate that class subject (math vs. English is strongly associated with SET ratings, has a substantial impact on professors being labeled satisfactory vs. unsatisfactory and excellent vs. non-excellent, and the impact varies substantially depending on the criteria used to classify professors as satisfactory vs. unsatisfactory. Professors teaching quantitative courses are far more likely not to receive tenure, promotion, and/or merit pay when their performance is evaluated against common standards.

  15. Teaching ethical aptitude to graduate student researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyrich, Laura S; Harvill, Eric T

    2013-01-01

    Limited time dedicated to each training areas, irrelevant case-studies, and ethics "checklists" have resulted in bare-bones Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR) training for present biomedical graduate student researchers. Here, we argue that science graduate students be taught classical ethical theory, such as virtue ethics, consequentialist theory, and deontological theory, to provide a basic framework to guide researchers through ethically complex situations and examine the applicability, implications, and societal ramifications of their research. Using a relevant biomedical research example to illustrate this point, we argue that proper ethics training for graduate student researchers not only will enhance current RCR training, but train more creative, responsible scientists.

  16. Students' gender bias in teaching evaluations

    OpenAIRE

    Punyanunt-Carter, Narissra; Carter, Stacy L.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate if there is gender bias in student evaluations. Researchers administered a modified version of the teacher evaluation forms to 58 students (male=30; female=28) in a basic introductory communications class. Half the class was instructed to fill out the survey about a male professor, and the other half a female professor. Researchers broke down the evaluation results question by question in order to give a detailed account of the findings. Results revea...

  17. Engineering Pedagogy Students Attitudes on Teaching Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobrovská Dana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current survey was to make the outcomes of an analysis of mature-age student essays available in a convenient form to those who might be interested – engineering teachers and faculty management. Results of this survey are compared with a similar one conducted 8 years ago. Students presumed high expertise of their teachers, but also underlined importance of the real-world engineering examples.

  18. Student Teaching Enhancement Program (STEP and Preservice Teachers’ Teaching Efficacy in Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl Roy T. Montebon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper discusses the effect of the Student Teaching Enhancement Program (STEP provided to science preservice teachers in a teacher education institute on their teaching efficacy. The STEP is a program that is designed to impact the areas that influence preservice teachers’ teaching efficacy. Teaching efficacy is an important construct that should be enriched among teachers since the teachers’ belief on their ability to teach significantly affects their performance in the classroom. The STEP has been conducted for a semester and a program evaluation came after. To determine the level of teaching efficacy of the participants they were asked to answer a teaching efficacy survey adopted from the Ohio State Teacher Efficacy Scale developed by Moran and Hoy (2001. The data collected has been subjected to descriptive statistical measures to determine the effect of STEP. Also, an inferential measure was done to compare if the said effects vary by gender and major. Implications of STEP on teacher education program were also discussed.

  19. Strategies for Teaching Elementary and Junior High Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consuegra, Gerard F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the applications of Piaget's theory of cognitive development to elementary and junior high school science teaching. Topics include planning concrete experiences, inductive and hypothetical deductive reasoning, measurement concepts, combinatorial logic, scientific experimentation and reflexive thinking. (SA)

  20. Considering Teaching History and Calculating Confidence Intervals in Student Evaluations of Teaching Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraile, Rubén; Bosch-Morell, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Lecturer promotion and tenure decisions are critical both for university management and for the affected lecturers. Therefore, they should be made cautiously and based on reliable information. Student evaluations of teaching quality are among the most used and analysed sources of such information. However, to date little attention has been paid in…

  1. How Do Teachers Teach? Insights from Teachers and Students. Teaching in Focus No. 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing, 2017

    2017-01-01

    Educational quality is defined and shaped by the classroom practices implemented by teachers in our schools. The Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS)-PISA link presents a unique opportunity to explore what takes place in the classroom by listening to the voices of teachers and students. Teachers, with their professional training and…

  2. Nursing students and teaching of codes of ethics: an empirical research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numminen, O H; Leino-Kilpi, H; van der Arend, A; Katajisto, J

    2009-12-01

    To explore graduating nursing students' perception of nurse educators' teaching of codes of ethics in polytechnics providing basic nursing education in Finland. Codes of ethics are regarded as an essential content in most nursing ethics curricula. However, little is known about how their teaching is implemented. Descriptive, cross-sectional design was used in this study. A total of 214 nursing students responded to a structured questionnaire with one open-ended question. The data was analysed statistically by SPSS and content analysis. Students perceived teaching of the codes as fairly extensive. The emphasis was on the nurse-patient relationship. Less attention was paid to nursing in wider social contexts. Educators' use of teaching and evaluation methods was narrow. Students whose teaching had been integrated into clinical training perceived that teaching had been more extensive. However, students did not perceive integration to clinical training as a much used teaching format. Students assessed their own knowledge and ability to apply the codes as mediocre. Those educators, whose knowledge about the codes students had assessed as adequate, were also perceived to teach the codes more extensively. Regardless of the responding students' positive description of the teaching, the findings should be interpreted with caution, due to the students' limited interest to respond. In teaching ethics, particular attention should be paid to more versatile use of teaching and evaluation methods, organization of integrated teaching, educators' competence in ethics, and student outcomes so that the importance of ethics would come across to all nursing students.

  3. Six classroom exercises to teach natural selection to undergraduate biology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, Steven T; Leonard, Mary J; Andrews, Tessa M; Litt, Andrea R

    2013-01-01

    Students in introductory biology courses frequently have misconceptions regarding natural selection. In this paper, we describe six activities that biology instructors can use to teach undergraduate students in introductory biology courses how natural selection causes evolution. These activities begin with a lesson introducing students to natural selection and also include discussions on sexual selection, molecular evolution, evolution of complex traits, and the evolution of behavior. The set of six topics gives students the opportunity to see how natural selection operates in a variety of contexts. Pre- and postinstruction testing showed students' understanding of natural selection increased substantially after completing this series of learning activities. Testing throughout this unit showed steadily increasing student understanding, and surveys indicated students enjoyed the activities.

  4. Impact of clinical teaching on students knowledge acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Shabih

    2003-08-01

    We are in the process of curriculum revision and for that we need to know the strengths and weaknesses of the current teaching program and the venue that may need more attention. To proceed with this aim, we conducted this study. The study was conducted on 2 groups of students rotating through nursery as a part of Pediatrics clerkship at King Faisal University, Dammam, KSA, during a 2 month study, April through to May 2001. A 15 item questionnaire was developed for testing. By using a pre-test post-test model, we looked at the scores achieved by the students on the questionnaire before and after 2 weeks of intensive clinical teaching. In the first group of students, the mean percentage of correctly answered questions were higher in the post-test (78%) as compared to pre-test (64%), which was statistically significant, p=0.02. A similar trend was noted in the second group, the mean percentage of correctly answered questions were higher in the post-test (64%) as compared to pre-test (78%), which was also statistically significant, p=0.004. We concluded that our method of clinical teaching followed during nursery rotation was effective in increasing students knowledge. However, attention is needed on some topics in which students are noted to be relatively weak.

  5. Student-centered learning approach in teaching basic grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Buditama

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study determined the effect of student-centered learning approach in teaching basic grammar of the tenth-grade students. Specifically, this study sought answers to following questions: 1. How does the result of the pre-test compare to that of post-test of the control and experimental groups? 2. Is there any significant difference in the results of the test between the control and experimental groups? 3. What is student-centered teaching guide in basic grammar that can be developed based on the findings of the study? It was applied an experimental research design in this study. The result in the post-test of the control and experimental groups showed that the computed the T value of 3.03 was higher than the tabular value of 2.03, at the degree of freedom of 34, at 5% level of significance. This condition rejects the null hypothesis that there is no significant difference in the mean scores in the post-test of the control and experimental groups. The student-centered teaching guide enhanced the students’ writing skill in the basic grammar of the tenth-grade students in the experimental group.

  6. The Study of Teaching Effective Strategies on Student's Math Achievements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Hassan Behzadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important factors in student's learning weakness and academic failure, is their unfamilarity or low awareness of the learning strategies and studying in mathematics. This study is performed to examine the students' math and reading skills and their study skills that impact on their academic progress. The main objective of the research is to study with emphasis on training study strategies versus ususal method (teaching without emphasis on training study strategies to increase the learning of mathematical concepts. The present method is quasi-experimental that via quasi-cluster sampling to adopt 17 guidance girly schools in grade 3th, to gauge effects of teaching reading skills on math learning of the students.The results of T-test showed that students who were taught with emphasis on study skills versus students who have been traditionally trained, had better math performance and higher academic achievement.Therefore it seems that teaching reading stratefies such as cognitive and meta-cognitive will ease mathematical learning process.

  7. Student Responses to an ICT-Based E-Assessment Application for the Teaching Practicum/Teaching Practice MODULE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, M. Noor

    2017-01-01

    Situated within the context of Initial Teacher Education (ITE) in South Africa, this study introduces the notion of an interactive Teaching Practicum E- Assessment application: e-assessment application for the teaching practicum/Teaching Practice module to replace the current model of assessment. At present students enrolled for an Initial Teacher…

  8. Student-Centered Teaching and Creative Teaching Methods as They Relate to Enhancing Student Creativity in Advertising Copywriting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaman, Ronda

    The issue of whether teaching methods can influence creativity in the advertising copy writing classroom can best be examined by breaking it into three areas of knowledge access (perceptual, action, and conceptual). One of the perceptions of creativity is that creativity ceases to develop once a student is of college age, and that college itself…

  9. Student Teaching Changed Me: A Look at Kolb's Learning Style Inventory Scores before and after the Student Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kasee L.; Rayfield, John

    2017-01-01

    Student teaching as the culminating experience of a teacher preparation program has been shown to be of great importance in the preparation of pre-service agricultural educators (Harlin, Roberts, Mowen, Edgar, & Briers, 2007; Roberts, Mowen, Edgar, Harlin, & Briers, 2007; Kitchel & Torres, 2006, 2007; Myers & Dyer, 2004). Kolb's…

  10. Generation Y Health Professional Students ’ Preferred Teaching and Learning Approaches: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Mary Hills

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Generation Y or Millennials are descriptors for those born between 1982 and 2000. This cohort has grown up in the digital age and is purported to have different learning preferences from previous generations. Students are important stakeholders in identifying their preferred teaching and learning approaches in health professional programs. This study aimed to identify, appraise, and synthesize the best available evidence regarding the teaching and learning preferences of Generation Y health professional students. The review considered any objectively measured or self-reported outcomes of teaching and learning reported from Generation Y health professional student perspectives. In accordance with a previously published Joanna Briggs Institute Protocol, a three-step search strategy was completed. Two research articles (nursing and dental hygiene students and three dissertations (nursing were critically appraised. All studies were cross-sectional descriptive studies. A range of pedagogical approaches was reported, including lecture, group work, and teaching clinical skills. Based on the Joanna Briggs Institute levels of evidence, reviewers deemed the evidence as Level 3. Some generational differences were reported, but these were inconsistent across the studies reviewed. There is, therefore, insufficient evidence to provide specific recommendations for the preferred educational approaches of health professional students and further research is warranted.

  11. Evaluating the effect of three teaching strategies on student nurses' moral sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiao Lu; Huang, Shu-He; Huang, Chiu-Mieh

    2017-09-01

    The Taiwan Nursing Accreditation Council has proposed eight core professional nursing qualities including ethical literacy. Consequently, nursing ethics education is a required course for student nurses. These courses are intended to improve the ethical literacy. Moral sensitivity is the cornerstone of ethical literacy, and learning moral sensitivity is the initial step towards developing ethical literacy. To explore the effect of nursing ethics educational interventions based on multiple teaching strategies on student nurses moral sensitivity. Based on the visual, auditory and kinaesthetic model, three strategies were developed for determining the programme components and corresponding learning styles. This was a quasi-experimental study. A total of 234 junior-college student nurses participated in this study. All participants were aged 18-19 years. Ethical considerations: The study protocol was approved by the institutional review boards of Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital. Only the participants who signed an informed consent form took part in the study. The participants were permitted to withdraw from the study at any point if they wished to do so without affecting their academic score. The scores of Modified Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire for Student Nurses were significantly improved after the intervention of integrating multiple teaching strategies ( p = .042). Significant relationships were observed between the satisfaction scores of two teaching strategies and moral sensitivity. The results indicated that using multiple teaching strategies is effective for promoting nursing ethics learning. This strategy was consistent with the student nurses' preferred learning style and was used to correct their erroneous ethical conceptions, assisting in developing their ethical knowledge.

  12. The Effect of Rubric-Guided, Focused, Personalized Coaching Sessions and Video-Recorded Presentations on Teaching Skills Among Fourth-Year Medical Students: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchekmedyian, Vatche; Shields, Helen M; Pelletier, Stephen R; Pazo, Valeria C

    2017-11-01

    As medical students become residents, teaching becomes an expected and integral responsibility. Yet, training-for-teaching opportunities are lacking. In 2014, the authors designed a pilot study using rubric-guided, focused, personalized coaching sessions and video-recorded presentations to improve student teaching skills among fourth-year students at Harvard Medical School. In 2014-2015, the authors recruited students from an elective on how to tutor preclinical students for the pilot, which consisted of four phases: a precoaching teaching presentation, a 30- to 45-minute coaching session, a postcoaching teaching presentation, and blinded reviewer ratings. Students' pre- and postcoaching presentations were video recorded. Using a scoring rubric for 15 teaching skills, students rated their pre- and postcoaching videos. Blinded reviewers also rated the pre- and postcoaching presentations using the same rubric with an additional category to gauge their overall impression. Fourteen students completed all four phases of the pilot. Students' ratings demonstrated statistically significant improvement in several teaching skills, including presentation content (P teaching skills, including opening statement and learning objectives (P teaching settings, addressing the interventions' generalizability, training coaches, and performing additional evaluations.

  13. Teaching statistics to nursing students: an expert panel consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Matthew J; Eckardt, Patricia; Higgins, Melinda; Kim, MyoungJin; Schmiege, Sarah J

    2013-06-01

    Statistics education is a necessary element of nursing education, and its inclusion is recommended in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing guidelines for nurse training at all levels. This article presents a cohesive summary of an expert panel discussion, "Teaching Statistics to Nursing Students," held at the 2012 Joint Statistical Meetings. All panelists were statistics experts, had extensive teaching and consulting experience, and held faculty appointments in a U.S.-based nursing college or school. The panel discussed degree-specific curriculum requirements, course content, how to ensure nursing students understand the relevance of statistics, approaches to integrating statistics consulting knowledge, experience with classroom instruction, use of knowledge from the statistics education research field to make improvements in statistics education for nursing students, and classroom pedagogy and instruction on the use of statistical software. Panelists also discussed the need for evidence to make data-informed decisions about statistics education and training for nurses. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. EVALUATION OF THE USE OF IPAD IN TEACHING GENERAL CHEMISTRY LAB TO FRESHMEN STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. EID

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the use of iPad enhances students’ engagement in the classroom. However, assessing the benefits of using iPad in teaching laboratory sessions have seen less attention, due to the hands-on nature of these courses. To do this assessment, iPad was applied in teaching two pilot sessions of the General Chemistry Lab, and students’ evaluation was compared to that of other students in sections taught by conventional teaching techniques. The evaluation was based on the students’ assessment of their achievements in meeting the main course outcomes, which indicated that the students in the classes taught using iPad showed more satisfaction with the course, and believed that they have better achieved the outcomes of the course compared to the conventional classes. Furthermore, the comparison process included the overall students’ quantitative performance, which showed insignificant difference between the two classes, with slightly better performance of students in normal classes in quizzes, whereas final exam marks were almost the same for both the iPad piloted students and conventional class students. The differences in quizzes results were attributed to the normal variation in the students’ academic merits. In addition, the piloted students were asked about their experience of using iPad in class and their satisfaction by using different iPad Apps. The feedback was collected and analysed, and the results showed that the students generally enjoyed using iPad in the class and appreciated all Apps.

  15. Students' Experiences with Live Video-Streamed Teaching Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsbak, Vibe Alopaeus; Buus, Lillian; Thorsen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Students' Experiences with Live Video-Streamed Classes The bachelor programme in biomedical laboratory technology at VIA Faculty of Health Sciences offers a combination of live video-streamed and traditional teaching. It is the student’s individual choice whether to attend classes on-site or to a......Students' Experiences with Live Video-Streamed Classes The bachelor programme in biomedical laboratory technology at VIA Faculty of Health Sciences offers a combination of live video-streamed and traditional teaching. It is the student’s individual choice whether to attend classes on......-site or to attend classes from home via live video-stream. Our previous studies revealed that interaction and dialog between attendants were reduced in the live-streamed sessions compared to on-site teaching, and that the main reasons were technological issues and the teacher’s choice of teaching methods. One......-site and live video-streamed teaching. The results document a continuous progress in technological transparency, as the live video-streamed classes increasingly support the student’s flexibility in ways of attending and interacting in classes. Interaction is facilitated through teacher driven support, resulting...

  16. Learning clinical skills in the simulation suite: the lived experiences of student nurses involved in peer teaching and peer assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramm, Dianne; Thomson, Anna; Jackson, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    The benefits of peer teaching and assessment are well documented within nurse education literature. However, research to date has predominantly focused on the advantages and disadvantages for the inexperienced learner, with a dearth of knowledge relating to the perceptions of senior nursing students involved in teaching their peers. This study sought to investigate the student experience of taking part in a peer teaching and assessment initiative to include the perceptions of both first year nursing students and second/third year participants. Data were collected via open-ended questionnaires and analysed with qualitative 'Framework' analysis. This initiative received a generally positive response both from students being taught and also from those acting as facilitators. Perceived benefits included the social learning experience, development of teaching skills, self-awareness and the opportunity to communicate both good and bad news. Suggestions for improvement included additional time working in small groups, specific supplementary learning materials and the introduction of peer teaching and assessment into other areas of the Adult Nursing Programme. Peer teaching and assessment principles represent valuable strategies which can be utilised in nurse education to develop clinical skills and prepare nurses for real-life scenarios. Further research needs to investigate how to enhance the student learning experience and to fully exploit the potential for simulated experience to prepare students for their future role as registered nurses in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Peer teaching among physical therapy students during human gross anatomy: perceptions of peer teachers and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdas, James W; Hoffarth, Brianna L; Kohlwey, Scott R; Kramer, Christine M; Petro, Jaime L

    2008-01-01

    Despite nearly 200 accredited entry-level physical therapist education programs in the United States that culminate in a doctoral degree, only a paucity of reports have been published regarding the efficacy of peer teaching in gross anatomy. No one has described the usefulness of peer teaching from the viewpoint of the peer teacher. An organized peer teaching method provided by four second-year doctors of physical therapy (DPT) students in a semester course in gross anatomy had a positive impact on the academic performance in gross anatomy of first-year DPT students. The unique feature of the weekly peer teaching sessions was a packet assembled by the second-year peer teachers, which contained diagrams, fill-in-the blank questions, and helpful mnemonic devices. This study surveyed perceptions of first-year DPT students in response to a peer teaching method, using a structured 10-item questionnaire and a five-point Likert scale. Second-year DPT peer teachers provided written reflections about the benefits and challenges of serving as a peer teacher. Results revealed that 13 planned peer-teaching experiences provided by four second-year DPT students were valuable and promoted a firm understanding of anatomical relationships important for the clinical competence of physical therapist students. Moreover, peer teachers acknowledged acquiring clinically desirable teaching, academic, organizational, and time management skills from the experience. As a result, physical therapist educators may wish to consider this model of peer teaching to augment their teaching strategies for a class in gross human anatomy.

  18. Methodological Approaches to Experimental Teaching of Mathematics to University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay I.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article imparts authors’ thoughtson a new teaching methodology for mathematical education in universities. The aim of the study is to substantiate the efficiency of the comprehensive usage of mathematical electronic courses, computer tests, original textbooks and methodologies when teaching mathematics to future agrarian engineers. The authors consider this implementation a unified educational process. Materials and Methods: the synthesis of international and domestic pedagogical experience of teaching students in university and the following methods of empirical research were used: pedagogical experiment, pedagogical measurementsand experimental teaching of mathematics. The authors applied the methodology of revealing interdisciplinary links on the continuum of mathematical problems using the key examples and exercises. Results: the online course “Mathematics” was designed and developed on the platform of Learning Management System Moodle. The article presents the results of test assignments assessing students’ intellectual abilities and analysis of solutions of various types of mathematical problems by students. The pedagogical experiment substantiated the integrated selection of textbooks, online course and online tests using the methodology of determination of the key examples and exercises. Discussion and Conclusions: the analysis of the experimental work suggested that the new methodology is able to have positive effect on the learning process. The learning programme determined the problem points for each student. The findings of this study have a number of important implications for future educational practice.

  19. The effect of constructivist teaching strategies on science test scores of middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca, James L., Jr.

    International studies show that the United States is lagging behind other industrialized countries in science proficiency. The studies revealed how American students showed little significant gain on standardized tests in science between 1995 and 2005. Little information is available regarding how reform in American teaching strategies in science could improve student performance on standardized testing. The purpose of this quasi-experimental quantitative study using a pretest/posttest control group design was to examine how the use of a hands-on, constructivist teaching approach with low achieving eighth grade science students affected student achievement on the 2007 Ohio Eighth Grade Science Achievement Test posttest (N = 76). The research question asked how using constructivist teaching strategies in the science classroom affected student performance on standardized tests. Two independent samples of 38 students each consisting of low achieving science students as identified by seventh grade science scores and scores on the Ohio Eighth Grade Science Half-Length Practice Test pretest were used. Four comparisons were made between the control group receiving traditional classroom instruction and the experimental group receiving constructivist instruction including: (a) pretest/posttest standard comparison, (b) comparison of the number of students who passed the posttest, (c) comparison of the six standards covered on the posttest, (d) posttest's sample means comparison. A Mann-Whitney U Test revealed that there was no significant difference between the independent sample distributions for the control group and the experimental group. These findings contribute to positive social change by investigating science teaching strategies that could be used in eighth grade science classes to improve student achievement in science.

  20. Elementary Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching Science to Improve Student Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Robert L.

    The majority of Grade 5 students demonstrate limited science knowledge on state assessments. This trend has been documented since 2010 with no evidence of improvement. Because state accountability formulas include proficiency scores and carry sanctions against districts that fail to meet proficiency thresholds, improved student performance in science is an important issue to school districts. The purpose of this study was to explore elementary teachers' perceptions about their students' science knowledge, the strategies used to teach science, the barriers affecting science teaching, and the self-efficacy beliefs teachers maintain for teaching science. This study, guided by Vygotsky's social constructivist theory and Bandura's concept of self-efficacy, was a bounded instrumental case study in which 15 participants, required to be teaching K-5 elementary science in the county, were interviewed. An analytic technique was used to review the qualitative interview data through open coding, clustering, and analytical coding resulting in identified categorical themes that addressed the research questions. Key findings reflect students' limited content knowledge in earth and physical science. Teachers identified barriers including limited science instructional time, poor curricular resources, few professional learning opportunities, concern about new state standards, and a lack of teaching confidence. To improve student content knowledge, teachers identified the need for professional development. The project is a professional development series provided by a regional education service agency for K-5 teachers to experience science and engineering 3-dimensional learning. Area students will demonstrate deeper science content knowledge and benefit from improved science instructional practice and learning opportunities to become science problem solvers and innovative contributors to society.

  1. Students' gender bias in teaching evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narissra Punyanunt-Carter

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate if there is gender bias in student evaluations. Researchers administered a modified version of the teacher evaluation forms to 58 students (male=30; female=28 in a basic introductory communications class. Half the class was instructed to fill out the survey about a male professor, and the other half a female professor. Researchers broke down the evaluation results question by question in order to give a detailed account of the findings. Results revealed that there is certainly some gender bias at work when students evaluate their instructors. It was also found that gender bias does not significantly affect the evaluations. The results align with other findings in the available literature, which point to some sort of pattern regarding gender bias in evaluations, but it still seems to be inconsequential.  DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v5i3.234

  2. Teaching clinical reasoning to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amey, Lisa; Donald, Kenneth J; Teodorczuk, Andrew

    2017-07-02

    Clinical reasoning is often not explicitly addressed in the early medical school curriculum. As a result, students observe the process while on clinical placements with little or no understanding of the complex processes underlying it. Clinical reasoning has significant implications for patient safety. Medical errors as a consequence of faulty reasoning contribute to patient morbidity and mortality. Educating medical students at an early stage about the processes of clinical reasoning and strategies to avoid associated errors can have positive impacts upon patient safety. The authors propose that clinical reasoning should be taught as early as the first year of medical school, using frameworks, anatomical knowledge and mnemonics. Using this approach with simulated cases during the pre-clinical years, students will be equipped with an understanding of the clinical reasoning process as it unfolds before them while on clinical placements, enhancing their overall learning experience.

  3. Project-Based Teaching: Helping Students Make Project Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Heather Jo Pusich

    Project-based curriculum materials are designed to support students in engaging with scientific content and practices in meaningful ways, with the goal of improving students' science learning. However, students need to understand the connections between what they are doing on a day-to-day basis with respect to the goals of the overall project for students to get the motivational and cognitive benefits of a project-based approach. In this dissertation, I looked at the challenges that four ninth grade science teachers faced as they helped students to make these connections using a project-based environmental science curriculum. The analysis revealed that in general when the curriculum materials made connections explicit, teachers were better able to articulate the relationship between the lesson and the project during enactment. However, whether the connections were explicit or implicit in the materials, enactments of the same lesson across teachers revealed that teachers leveraged different aspects of the project context in different ways depending on their knowledge, beliefs, and goals about project-based teaching. The quantitative analysis of student data indicated that when teacher enactments supported project goals explicitly, students made stronger connections between a lesson and the project goal. Therefore, a teacher's ability to make clear connections during classroom instruction is essential. Furthermore, when students made connections between each lesson and the larger project goals their attitudes toward the lesson were more positive and they performed better on the final assessment. These findings suggest that connections between individual lessons and the goals of the project are critical to the effectiveness of project-based learning. This study highlights that while some teachers were able to forge these connections successfully as a result of leveraging cognitive resources, teachers' beliefs, knowledge and goals about project-based teaching are

  4. Teaching Behaviour and Well-Being in Students: Development and Concurrent Validity of an Instrument to Measure Student-Reported Teaching Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Pössel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Teaching behavior has important implications for students’ emotional well-being. Multiple models suggest students’ perceptions of teaching behaviors are more critical than other measures for predicting well-being, yet student-report instruments that measure concrete and specific teaching behavior are limited. The purpose of the present studies is to develop an instrument to assess students’ perceptions of concrete and specific teaching behavior and to test which teaching behavior is associated students’ well-being. Construct validity and internal consistency for the 37-item Teaching Behavior Questionnaire (TBQ-S, composed of instructional, negative teaching, socioemotional, and organizational behavior were examined using data from two independent samples (Study 1: n = 703; Study 2: n = 822. The factor structure was stable across both samples and internal consistencies ranged from .77 to .97. Results indicated student-ratings of teaching behavior were associated with positive and negative affect in students.

  5. Teaching leadership: the medical student society model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Jacob H; Morley, Gabriella L; Crossley, Eleanor; Bhanderi, Shivam

    2018-04-01

    All health care professionals in the UK are expected to have the medical leadership and management (MLM) skills necessary for improving patient care, as stipulated by the UK General Medical Council (GMC). Newly graduated doctors reported insufficient knowledge about leadership and quality improvement skills, despite all UK medical schools reporting that MLM is taught within their curriculum. A medical student society organised a series of extracurricular educational events focusing on leadership topics. The society recognised that the events needed to be useful and interesting to attract audiences. Therefore, clinical leaders in exciting fields were invited to talk about their experiences and case studies of personal leadership challenges. The emphasis on personal stories, from respected leaders, was a deliberate strategy to attract students and enhance learning. Evaluation data were collected from the audiences to improve the quality of the events and to support a business case for an intercalated degree in MLM. When leadership and management concepts are taught through personal stories, students find it interesting and are prepared to give up their leisure time to engage with the subject. Students appear to recognise the importance of MLM knowledge to their future careers, and are able to organise their own, and their peers', learning and development. Organising these events and collecting feedback can provide students with opportunities to practise leadership, management and quality improvement skills. These extracurricular events, delivered through a student society, allow for subjects to be discussed in more depth and can complement an already crowded undergraduate curriculum. Newly graduated doctors reported insufficient knowledge about leadership and quality improvement skills. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  6. Teaching IR to Medical Students: A Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aoife M; Lee, Michael J

    2018-02-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) has grown rapidly over the last 20 years and is now an essential component of modern medicine. Despite IR's increasing penetration and reputation in healthcare systems, IR is poorly taught, if taught at all, in most medical schools. Medical students are the referrers of tomorrow and potential IR recruits and deserve to be taught IR by expert IRs. The lack of formal IR teaching curricula in many medical schools needs to be addressed urgently for the continued development and dissemination of, particularly acute, IR services throughout Europe. We call on IRs to take up the baton to teach IR to the next generation of doctors.

  7. Mathematics Teachers' and Students' Perceptions of Transmissionist Teaching and Its Association with Students' Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaka, Maria; Williams, Julian

    2016-01-01

    This article builds on previous results of the Transmaths studies concerning transmissionist teaching practices--and especially adds the significance of students' perceptions of these practices--in their association with students' declining dispositions for studying mathematics. It addresses a gap in this work, and the literature in general,…

  8. The Effects of Portfolio Use in Teaching Report Writing: EFL Students' Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Taha Assaggaf

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Portfolio has widely been used in various areas including second language writing. The purpose of this study is to investigate the views of students in using portfolio in teaching technical report-writing. The participants are computer science students enrolled in a report writing course at a university in Yemen. For data collection, the study used three techniques; namely, group discussions, written reflections and a short questionnaire. The findings showed participants' positive views towards the use of portfolio in teaching writing in general and report writing in particular. The main views concerning the use of portfolio in teaching writing in general are: improving writing learning, making writing more fun and monitoring one's writing. The main findings regarding report writing were improving areas such as elements of writing, getting better feedback and report writing elements. The study concluded with a number of recommendations pertaining to both the practice of portfolio in EFL writing settings, as well as the future research.

  9. A Comparison between the Effect of Cooperative Learning Teaching Method and Lecture Teaching Method on Students' Learning and Satisfaction Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadjani, Farzad; Tonkaboni, Forouzan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to investigate a comparison between the effect of cooperative learning teaching method and lecture teaching method on students' learning and satisfaction level. The research population consisted of all the fourth grade elementary school students of educational district 4 in Shiraz. The statistical population…

  10. Teaching Advanced Data Analysis Tools to High School Astronomy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David V.; Herring, Julie; Hintz, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    A major barrier to becoming an astronomer is learning how to analyze astronomical data, such as using photometry to compare the brightness of stars. Most fledgling astronomers learn observation, data reduction, and analysis skills through an upper division college class. If the same skills could be taught in an introductory high school astronomy class, then more students would have an opportunity to do authentic science earlier, with implications for how many choose to become astronomers. Several software tools have been developed that can analyze astronomical data ranging from fairly straightforward (AstroImageJ and DS9) to very complex (IRAF and DAOphot). During the summer of 2014, a study was undertaken at Brigham Young University through a Research Experience for Teachers (RET) program to evaluate the effectiveness and ease-of-use of these four software packages. Standard tasks tested included creating a false-color IR image using WISE data in DS9, Adobe Photoshop, and The Gimp; a multi-aperture analyses of variable stars over time using AstroImageJ; creating Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs) of stars using photometry at multiple wavelengths in AstroImageJ and DS9; and color-magnitude and hydrogen alpha index diagrams for open star clusters using IRAF and DAOphot. Tutorials were then written and combined with screen captures to teach high school astronomy students at Walden School of Liberal Arts in Provo, UT how to perform these same tasks. They analyzed image data using the four software packages, imported it into Microsoft Excel, and created charts using images from BYU's 36-inch telescope at their West Mountain Observatory. The students' attempts to complete these tasks were observed, mentoring was provided, and the students then reported on their experience through a self-reflection essay and concept test. Results indicate that high school astronomy students can successfully complete professional-level astronomy data analyses when given detailed

  11. Teach Students about Civics through Schoolwide Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasof, Marc; Spector, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Building democracies in K-8 schools is a promising approach to increasing young people and educators' civic knowledge, skills and dispositions. The Rendell Center for Civics and Civics Engagement leveraged strategies and concepts from the fields of civic education, student voice, and distributed leadership to build a youth-adult school governance…

  12. Emotional Responsibility and Teaching Ethics: Student Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretz, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    "This class is so [insert expletive] depressing." I overheard a student communicating this to a friend upon exiting one of my ethics courses and I wondered how my classes could generate a sense of empowerment rather than depression, a sense of hope rather than despair. Drawing from David Hume's and Martin Hoffman's work on the…

  13. Using Students' Favorite Collectibles To Teach Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Cynthia; Meyer, Dan

    2000-01-01

    Provides two economics lessons that each deal with a type of collectible (beanbag toys and Pokemon cards) that interests students. Reinforces such concepts as markets, scarcity, equilibrium, supply and demand, monopolies, and government regulation. Provides a sample quiz and a glossary of terms with examples. (CMK)

  14. Student Identities and World History Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Peter N.

    2000-01-01

    Explores what assumptions, specifically cultural memories and identity components, students bring with them into a world history course. Focuses on such topics as "Western" values and the two possible candidates of memory issues in world history (gender and idea of "modern"). (CMK)

  15. Teaching College Students about the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Timothy J., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Proposes that college students and instructors become more future oriented by studying classical utopian thinkers, futurists, and science fiction based on societal projections and fantasized future technology. Contends that futurism raises philosophical questions of determinism and freedom, ethics, theology, and the nature of man. (DMM)

  16. Teaching Geometry to Visually Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Christine K.; Lamb, John H.

    2012-01-01

    NCTM (2000) described geometry as "a means of describing, analyzing, and understanding the world and seeing beauty in its structures" (p. 309). Dossey et al. (2002) captured the essence of this aspect of visualization by stating that geometry fosters in students an ability to "visualize and mentally manipulate geometric objects." (p. 200).…

  17. Student Teachers' Experiences of Relation Building in Teaching Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Maj; Laursen, Per Fibæk

    The study explores how 22 student teachers in a Danish college of education experience and interpret their own becoming a teacher and the implied attitudes to pupils. The student teachers attending mainstream teacher education and a course in mindful awareness and relational competencies have – t...... – to a larger extend than the mainstream educated student teachers - learned a reflexive attitude to their state of being in teaching practice and to their relational interaction with children in class.......The study explores how 22 student teachers in a Danish college of education experience and interpret their own becoming a teacher and the implied attitudes to pupils. The student teachers attending mainstream teacher education and a course in mindful awareness and relational competencies have...

  18. Student's perception about innovative teaching learning practices in Forensic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sanjay; Parekh, Utsav N; Ganjiwale, Jaishree D

    2017-11-01

    Since decades, Forensic Medicine is mainly taught by didactic methods but in last couple of years some other teachinglearning and assessment methods are also introduced at some places which also lacks uniformity. Feedback from learners is most fundamental aspect to assess effectiveness of applied methods, but is not implemented in practice at most medical schools in India. Unfortunately, medical students are deprived of this practical empowerment and thus may not be efficient enough to contribute potentially to the justice system during their professional life. In order to improve their efficiency in the field, we introduced few innovative teaching-learning methods and documented their perceptions. This pilot study was carried out with students who had completed their second professional year (5th semester) of medical curriculum. Students were exposed to few innovative teaching-learning and assessment approaches in addition to conventional methods during their Forensic Medicine term. These approaches were interactivity in large group lecturing, small group activities, student led objective tutorial, court visit in real scenario, practical records book, surprise tests, structured theory question papers, model answers, objective structured practical examinations and structured oral viva. Their perceptions were documented later through structured questionnaire. Students reported all methods as 'interesting' except 'surprise tests'. Court visits were rated highest for generating interest (98%). Clarity of concept was experienced through all methods (range of 71-95%). Interactive large group lectures reported highest (by 95%students) for clarifying concepts, although this is not a typical characteristic of large group teaching. Enhanced learning experience was reported in 75-92.5% for different methods. Student Led Objective Tutorials seemed to facilitate enhance learning most (92.5%). Innovations in teaching-learning are need of hour especially in subject like Forensic

  19. Critical incidents, including cardiac arrest, associated with pediatric anesthesia at a tertiary teaching children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Song, In-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Kim, Hee-Soo; Kim, Chong-Sung; Kim, Jin-Tae

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of critical incidents provides valuable information to improve the quality and safety of patient care. This study identified and analyzed pediatric anesthesia-related critical incidents including cardiac arrests in a tertiary teaching children's hospital. All pediatric anesthesia-related critical incidents reported in a voluntary departmental reporting system between January 2008 and August 2013 were included in the analysis. A critical incident was defined as (i) any incident that altered patients' vital signs and affected the management of patients while they were under the care of an anesthesiologist, and (ii) human factor: where patient injury or accidents were as a result of human error. Changes in vital signs that recovered spontaneously were excluded. During the 6-year study period, a total of 229 critical incidents were reported from 49,373 anesthetic procedures. The most frequently reported incidents were associated with the respiratory system (55%), with tracheal tube-related events accounting for 40.9% of respiratory incidents followed by laryngospasm (17.3% of respiratory incidents). Cardiac arrest occurred in 42 cases in this study (8.5 cases per 10,000 anesthetics). Cardiovascular problems were the major causes of cardiac arrest (66.7%), and incidents of cardiogenic shock and hemorrhage/hypotension contributed equally to the cardiac arrest induced by cardiovascular problems (each 16.7%). Human factor-related events accounted for 58.5% of all critical incidents of which 53.7% were respiratory events. Despite recent improvements in safety of pediatric anesthesia, many preventable factors still remain that can lead to critical incidents. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The usability of WeChat as a mobile and interactive medium in student-centered medical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Gao, Furong; Li, Jiao; Zhang, Jieping; Li, Siguang; Xu, Guo-Tong; Xu, Lei; Chen, Jianjun; Lu, Lixia

    2017-09-01

    Biochemistry and cellular biology courses for medical students at Tongji University include the assessment that provides students with feedback to enhance their learning, which is a type of formative assessment. However, frequent instant feedback and guidance for students is often absent or inconsistently included in the teaching process. WeChat, the most popular Chinese social media, was introduced in biochemistry and cellular biology course. A WeChat official account (OA) was set up as an instant interactive platform. Over a period of two semesters, OA sent 73 push notifications. The components included course notices, preclass thought questions, after-class study materials, answer questions and feedback, simulation exercises, teacher-student interaction, and research progress relevant to the course. WeChat OA served as an active-learning teaching tool, provided more frequent feedback and guidance to students, and facilitated better student-centered communication in the teaching process. Using the WeChat OA in medical teaching emphasized interactive, interoperable, effective, engaging, adaptable, and more participatory teaching styles. As a new platform, WeChat OA was free, Internet-reliant, and easily managed. Using this new medium as a communication tool accelerated further advancement of instant feedback and improvement in teaching activities. Notifications and interactive feedback via the mobile social medium WeChat OA anytime and anywhere facilitated a student-centered teaching mode. Use of WeChat OA significantly increased the proportion of students interactively participating and resulted in a high degree of student satisfaction. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):421-425, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. The effects of kinesthetic teaching strategies on student academic achievement in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Rita L.

    The purposes of this research study were to (a) compare the effectiveness of years of traditional textbook instruction with the effectiveness of kinesthetic-based instruction in science on student test scores on the IOWA: Test of Basic Skills (ITBS), (b) compare the effectiveness of traditional and kinesthetic science teaching on teacher and student experiences in science through interviews with teachers and students, and (c) assess the opinions of students receiving kinesthetic-based and text-based book instruction in science. The study group involved students in fifth grade who had experienced kinesthetic-based instruction for 4 years, two classroom teachers per grade level who provided textbook-based instruction in science, and one classroom teacher per grade level who provided kinesthetic-based instruction in science. The same science curriculum was studied in all classrooms. The IOWA Test of Basic Skills (ITBS) scores from 1999 and 2000 for second and third grade were analyzed to compare the effects of kinesthetic-based and textbook-based instruction on student academic achievement in science. No significant differences were found between study and control groups. In addition, interviews were conducted with students and teachers. Themes that emerged from the data were (a) kinesthetic teaching of science is more fun for teachers and students than traditionally taught science, (b) there are differences in learning styles for students and teachers, and (c) experiences in science class can be rewarding. One recommendation for practice would include using a larger sample.

  2. Observations of Undergraduate Geoscience Instruction in the US: Measuring Student Centered Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, R.; Manduca, C. A.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Bartley, J. K.; Bruckner, M. Z.; Farthing, D.; Iverson, E. A. R.; Viskupic, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol (RTOP; Swada, et al., 2002) has been used by a trained team of On the Cutting Edge (CE) observers to characterize the degree of student-centered teaching in US college and university geoscience classrooms. Total RTOP scores are derived from scores on 25 rubric items used to characterize teaching practices in categories of lesson design, content delivery, student-instructor and student-student interactions. More than 200 classroom observations have been completed by the RTOP team in undergraduate courses at a variety of US institution types (e.g., community colleges, research universities). A balanced mix of early career, mid-career, and veteran faculty are included, and the study examines class sizes ranging from small (80 students). Observations are limited to one class session and do not include laboratories or field activities. Data include RTOP scores determined by a trained observer during the classroom observation and an online survey in which the observed instructors report on their teaching practices. RTOP scores indicate that the observed geoscience classes feature varying degrees of student-centered teaching, with 30% of observed classes categorized as teacher-centered (RTOP scores ≤30), 45% of observed classes categorized as transitional classrooms (RTOP scores 31-49) and 25% are student-centered (RTOP scores ≥ 50). Instructor self-report survey data and RTOP scores indicate that geoscience faculty who have participated in one or more CE professional development event and use the CE website have an average RTOP score of 49, which is significantly higher (> 15 points) than the average score of faculty who have not participated in CE events and have not used the website. Approximately 60% of student-centered classes (those with high RTOP scores) use some traditional lecture nearly every day, but are also are likely to include an in-class activity or group discussion (e.g. Think-Pair-Share). More than 50% of

  3. Including students with moderate and severe intellectual disabilities in school extracurricular and community recreation activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, Harold L; Miracle, Sally; Sheppard-Jones, Kathy

    2007-02-01

    We conducted an online statewide survey of teachers of students with moderate and severe intellectual disabilities to determine the extent to which their students were included in school extracurricular and community recreation activities. For the 252 teacher respondents who indicated that their primary caseload consisted of students with significant intellectual disabilities, we report the numbers of students participating in school and community activities and the primary type of support students required to participate in each activity. Finally, we identify implications for practitioners who want to increase the participation of students with significant disabilities in school and community activities.

  4. Focusing Teaching on Students: Examining Student Perceptions of Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Angela; Achen, Rebecca; Dodd, Regan

    2015-01-01

    This study examined undergraduate and graduate students' perceptions of the impact of in-class learning activities, out-of-class learning activities, and instructional materials on their learning. Using survey methodology, students anonymously assessed their perceptions of in-class activities, out-of-class activities, and instructional materials…

  5. Features of Microbiology Teaching for the Foreign Students in Ukrainian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Gumenna

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article the experience of microbiology teaching for foreign students in Ukrainian at the Department of Microbiology and Virology in Bucovinean State Medical University. During training foreign students face a number of problems: insufficient knowledge of Ukrainian, often poor preparation in profession-related and special disciplines, lack of individual work, absence of algorithm for using theoretical material in workshops and significant difference between the forms and methods of education in Ukrainian universities and in high school in native country of a student. The organization and practical classes with foreigners are based on the principle of individual approach to each student, provided by the use of class tasks of different complexity. Individual work of the students is provided by the presence of schoolbooks, with the ability to receive teacher’s advice and using technology in education. The teachers choose thoroughly the optimal form of material delivery as charts, handwriting structures, pictures, training slides, videos and multimedia presentations in order the students to take a lecture. Comprehensive control of knowledge by verbal questioning, assessment of practical work and the ability to analyze the results of research and conclusions promote best learning of a lesson. In order to standardize assessment of student’s learning tests in the form of license examination Krok‑1 are used. Continual improving of professional skills, use of various time-proved and new forms and methods of teaching allow solve current tasks of training among foreign nationals.

  6. Relationship between Students' Perception toward the Teaching and Learning Methods of Mathematics' Lecturer and Their Achievement in Pre-University Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nor Amalina; Azizan, Farah Liyana; Rahim, Nur Fazliana; Jaya, Nor Hayati; Shaipullah, Norhunaini Mohd; Siaw, Emmerline Shelda

    2017-01-01

    The academic performance of students is affected by many factors, including effectiveness in teaching, the subjects taught and the environment as well as the facilities provided. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between students' perceptions of the teaching and learning towards the lecturers with their achievements in…

  7. Teaching with comics: a course for fourth-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Though graphic narratives (or comics) now permeate popular culture, address every conceivable topic including illness and dying, and are used in educational settings from grade school through university, they have not typically been integrated into the medical school curriculum. This paper describes a popular and innovative course on comics and medicine for 4th-year medical students. In this course, students learn to critically read book length comics as well as create their own stories using the comics format. The rationale for the course, its general content and format, and methods for teaching are described. Finally, the author offers some reflections on why this medium resonates so powerfully with medical student learners.

  8. To the point: teaching the obstetrics and gynecology medical student in the operating room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Brittany S; Craig, LaTasha B; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hopkins, Laura; McKenzie, Margaret L; Page-Ramsey, Sarah M; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Graziano, Scott C

    2015-10-01

    This article, from the "To the Point" series that is prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, is a review of considerations for teaching the medical student in the operating room during the obstetrics/gynecology clerkship. The importance of the medical student operating room experience and barriers to learning in the operating room are discussed. Specific considerations for the improvement of medical student learning and operating room experience, which include the development of operating room objectives and specific curricula, an increasing awareness regarding role modeling, and faculty development, are reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Creative teaching method as a learning strategy for student midwives: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Jean; Brown, Val

    2016-03-01

    Traditional ways of teaching in Higher Education are enhanced with adult-based approaches to learning within the curriculum. Adult-based learning enables students to take ownership of their own learning, working in independence using a holistic approach. Introducing creative activities promotes students to think in alternative ways to the traditional learning models. The study aimed to explore student midwives perceptions of a creative teaching method as a learning strategy. A qualitative design was used adopting a phenomenological approach to gain the lived experience of students within this learning culture. Purposive sampling was used to recruit student midwives (n=30). Individual interviews were conducted using semi-structured interviews with open-ended questions to gain subjective information. Data were transcribed and analyzed into useful and meaningful themes and emerging themes using Colaizzi's framework for analyzing qualitative data in a logical and systematic way. Over 500 meaningful statements were identified from the transcripts. Three key themes strongly emerged from the transcriptions. These included'meaningful learning','inspired to learn and achieve', and 'being connected'. A deep meaningful learning experience was found to be authentic in the context of theory and practice. Students were inspired to learn and achieve and positively highlighted the safe learning environment. The abilities of the facilitators were viewed positively in supporting student learning. This approach strengthened the relationships and social engagement with others in the peer group and the facilitators. On a less positive note, tensions and conflict were noted in group work and indirect negative comments about the approach from the teaching team. Incorporating creative teaching activities is a positive addition to the healthcare curriculum. Creativity is clearly an asset to the range of contemporary learning strategies. In doing so, higher education will continue to keep

  10. Beliefs about Chemistry Teaching and Learning--A Comparison of Teachers' and Student Teachers' Beliefs from Jordan, Turkey and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amoush, Siham; Markic, Silvija; Usak, Muhammet; Erdogan, Mehmet; Eilks, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses beliefs about teaching and learning chemistry. The sample includes chemistry student teachers and in-service teachers from Jordan, Turkey, and Germany. Two test instruments were used to investigate (student) teachers' beliefs. A qualitative instrument was used to explore Beliefs about Classroom Organization, Beliefs about…

  11. Primary School Puberty/Sexuality Education: Student-Teachers' Past Learning, Present Professional Education, and Intention to Teach These Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.; Coleman, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    Primary school teachers are often tasked with puberty/sexuality education for students who are undergoing sexual maturation at ever-earlier ages. This study explores the changing trajectories of the pre-service learning and teaching of primary school puberty/sexuality education at an urban university, including student-teachers' childhood…

  12. Including sustainability issues in nurse education: A comparative study of first year student nurses' attitudes in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Janet; Heidenreich, Thomas; Álvarez-Nieto, Carmen; Fasseur, Fabienne; Grose, Jane; Huss, Norma; Huynen, Maud; López-Medina, Isabel M; Schweizer, Angélick

    2016-02-01

    Education in sustainable development is a goal recognised by a large number of countries and a vital concept in healthcare. It is therefore important that nurse education incorporates elements of sustainable development into nursing education curricula. However, there is limited research on student nurses' attitudes towards sustainability and no comparison of attitudes towards sustainability and its inclusion in the nursing curriculum across Europe. This project aims to assess student nurses' attitudes towards sustainability, its relevance to nursing and its inclusion in the nursing curricula. 1. To assess base-line attitudes at the start of nursing and midwifery training; 2. To compare sustainability awareness between students participating in training in a number of European universities. A comparative survey design using the Sustainability Attitudes in Nursing Survey (SANS_2) questionnaire. Nursing classes of Universities and Nursing Schools in four European countries were investigated using a questionnaire consisting of five sustainability-related items. 916 nursing students (UK: 450, Germany: 196, Spain: 124, Switzerland: 146). Standard descriptive and inferential statistical methods were used to establish psychometric quality (Principal Components Analysis, Cronbach's alpha, Pearson correlations) and compare student nurses from the four countries. The reliability of SANS_2 was good (Cronbach's alpha=.82) and the five items loaded on a single factor which explained 58% of variance. ANOVA of the SANS_2 total score showed significant differences between countries with German nursing students showing more sustainability awareness than students from the UK and Spain. SANS_2 is a reliable instrument to assess nursing students' sustainability awareness; there are significant differences in sustainability awareness of students of different European countries. Limitations of the study include non-random sampling, possible method effects and social desirability effects

  13. Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Building Strengths, Creating Hope. Programming for Students with Special Needs. Book 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarren, Sandra G. Bernstein

    2004-01-01

    "Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder: Building Strengths, Creating Hope" is Book 10 in the Programming for Students with Special Needs series; a revision and expansion of the 1997 Alberta Learning teacher resource, "Teaching Students with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Possible Prenatal Alcohol-Related Effects."…

  14. [Exploration for effective teaching methods to promote students' learning interest in genetics experiment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jianfu; Shi, Chunhai

    2014-02-01

    The students' interest in genetic experiments was promoted effectively by adding more genetic projects with research or autonomous selections, adopting the vivid and interesting case and problem-based teaching methods, using the teaching philosophy of diversity to design experimental teaching tools, and taking other comprehensive teaching methods.

  15. Gender and Gender Role Differences in Student-Teachers' Commitment to Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Ikupa; Admiraal, Wilfried F.; Berry, Amanda K.

    2016-01-01

    Low commitment to teaching amongst teachers is a problem facing the teaching profession in many countries. Gender might be an important factor in explaining what kinds of prospective teachers are attracted to teaching. This empirical study examined the relationship between student-teachers' gender, gender roles and commitment to teaching within…

  16. Quality improvement teaching at medical school: a student perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Pooja; Barai, Ishani; Prasad, Sunila; Gadhvi, Karishma

    2016-01-01

    Pooja Nair, Ishani Barai, Sunila Prasad, Karishma Gadhvi Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Guidelines in the UK require all doctors to actively take part in quality improvement. To ease future doctors into the process, formal quality improvement teaching can be delivered during medical school. Keywords: quality improvement, medical school, patient safety, patient satisfaction, medical student, clinical audit

  17. Quality improvement teaching at medical school: a student perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair P

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pooja Nair, Ishani Barai, Sunila Prasad, Karishma Gadhvi Department of Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK Abstract: Guidelines in the UK require all doctors to actively take part in quality improvement. To ease future doctors into the process, formal quality improvement teaching can be delivered during medical school. Keywords: quality improvement, medical school, patient safety, patient satisfaction, medical student, clinical audit

  18. Student evaluation of teaching enhances faculty professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty McDonald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the role of Web 2.0 technologies in sourcing ongoing information from university students in an effort to assist faculty in their continuous professional development (PD, with the ultimate goal of incrementally improving teaching and learning. On a semester basis, students use an online program called CoursEvals to provide their opinions about the course and its instructor. The collected data are used to inform the content and delivery of faculty PD workshops. The interactive nature of CoursEvals, with Web features that facilitate information sharing and interoperatibility with Blackboard, a learning/course management system, make it ideal for impacting higher education. Students can complete student evaluation of teaching (SEOT online from any location (university, home, mobile, or overseas. This paper underscores the interactive nature of the feedback process that allows faculty, administration, policy makers, and other stakeholders to participate in the ongoing improvement of teaching and learning. We see how Web 2.0 technologies can impact the teaching/learning nexus in higher education, how online forums and Blackboard bulletin boards have helped popularize Web 2.0 technologies, how online social interactions have escalated through wikis, blogs, emails, instant messaging, and audio and video clips, and how faculty can retrieve their personal SEOT at any time and use the information to self- or peer-evaluate at their convenience. Faculty can compare their SEOT over time to determine stability and monitor their classroom effectiveness. They can also address reliability and validity issues and use the information judiciously without making unnecessary generalizations. Researchers will find useful information supporting the impact of Web 2.0 technologies in higher education.

  19. Student and Teacher Perceptions of Learning and Teaching: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Kylie; Cowlishaw, Keith

    2012-01-01

    Exploring student and teacher perspectives on approaches to learning and teaching reveals interesting insights and new understandings for practice by involving the two key groups of participants in the learning and teaching story. Do students understand and experience learning and teaching similarly or differently from the way teachers intend them…

  20. The Effects of Survey Timing on Student Evaluation of Teaching Measures Obtained Using Online Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelami, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Teaching evaluations are an important measurement tool used by business schools in gauging the level of student satisfaction with the educational services delivered by faculty. The growing use of online teaching evaluations has enabled educational administrators to expand the time period during which student evaluation of teaching (SET) surveys…

  1. A Comparison of Two Methods of Teaching Research to Master of Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Christine Ann; Hewson, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    While various curriculum strategies have been presented for teaching research, little is known about the effectiveness of different teaching approaches. This study compared two models for teaching research to MSW students: a mentorship model (TM1) and a more structured, didactic model (TM2). Students (n = 23) self-completed the Research Self…

  2. Instructional Reasoning about Interpretations of Student Thinking That Supports Responsive Teaching in Secondary Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Elizabeth B.; Sherin, Miriam Gamoran

    2016-01-01

    Basing instruction on the substance of student thinking, or responsive teaching, is a critical strategy for supporting student learning. Previous research has documented responsive teaching by identifying observable teaching practices in a broad range of disciplines and classrooms. However, this research has not provided access to the teacher…

  3. Enhancing Student Learning of Research Methods through the Use of Undergraduate Teaching Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Jessica; Ceresola, Ryan; Silva, Tony

    2014-01-01

    By using a quasi-experimental design, in this study, we test the effect of undergraduate teaching assistants on student learning. Data were collected from 170 students enrolled in four sections of a quantitative research methods course, two sections without undergraduate teaching assistants and two sections with undergraduate teaching assistants,…

  4. Teaching successful intelligence to gifted and talented students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Sternberg

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the theory of successful intelligence as a strategy to meet the educational needs of gifted and talented students. First, we present the theory of successful intelligence as an alternative that allows for an in-depth study of the cognitive complexity of high ability from a broader perspective of intelligence. Second, we analyze the roles of students and teachers in the learning-teaching process. Third, we indicate some learning strategies aimed at promoting the management of resources in the classroom related to the analytical, synthetic or creative and practical intelligence. Finally, some conclusions are drawn.

  5. A systemic approach in teaching the students social competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontni, Randi Kristine; Jensen, Ellen Bye

    in nursing: 1st order: Qualifications Factual Nursing knowledge as topics 2nd order: Competences Situated Nursing knowledge as practice 3rd order: Creativity Systemic Nursing knowledge as perspectives 4th order: World knowledge Metasystemic Nursing culture as a condition for nursing Model inspired......Our education aims to qualify students to improve health in all strata of the Danish population. A systemic approach in teaching the students social competence has proved itself efficient. In this approach we discuss four orders of knowledge: Knowledge categories: Knowledge Forms: Designation...... and critical sense is needed to secure action competence. Study visits gives them insight about health risks and how focusing at different factors cause different strategies. By selecting institutions they find interesting themselves, the students become engaged. The students reflect, analyse and discuss...

  6. Communication course for midwives teaching students in clinical practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Annegrethe; Pedersen, Pernille Mølholt

    taking place in clinical practice and try to align the educational efforts in school and clinical settings for the benefit of the students PERSPECTIVES It is known that students in medical education find that clinical learning experiences do not reinforce the communication skills they learn pre......-clinically (Rosenbaum et al. 2013) and our own experience teaching Danish midwifery students indicates the same problem in our program. Providing an opportunity for the clinical teachers to learn, discuss and practice communication issues with each other and with theoretical teachers can represent an important......BACKGROUND The course was initiated by the midwifery department at University College North Denmark in cooperation with the leaders of the maternity units where the affiliated students have their clinical education. The purpose of the course was to enhance the quality of communication education...

  7. Innovation in teaching deaf students physics and astronomy in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamfirov, Milen; Saeva, Svetoslava; Popov, Tsviatko

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new strategy to be implemented in Bulgarian schools in teaching physics and astronomy to students with impaired hearing at grades 7 (13-year-old students) and 8 (14-year-old students). The strategy provides effective education for students with hearing disabilities in mainstream schools as well as for those attending specialized schools. A multimedia CD has been developed, which offers a large number of basic terms from the corresponding fields of physics and astronomy, accompanied by textual explanation and various illustrations. The terms are explained in Bulgarian, Bulgarian Sign Language and English. This multimedia product can be used by children with hearing disabilities, as well as by children without disorders.

  8. Medical student responses to clinical procedure teaching in the anatomy lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donald R; Nava, Pedro B

    2010-03-01

    the teaching of gross anatomy to first-year medical students has progressed from a 'stand-alone' discipline to one with much clinical emphasis. The curriculum at Loma Linda University School of Medicine has had increasing clinical correlates in recent years. We decided to supplement this with procedure demonstrations early in the course, and measure the student response. clinical procedures were performed on cadavers in the anatomy lab. For example, pleural and pericardial effusions were simulated by placing bags of intravenous fluid in the pleural and pericardial cavities; pneumothorax and tension pneumothorax were simulated using an inflatable rubber bladder. Videos were made and then presented in sequence with gross anatomy lectures. The student response was evaluated with a survey sheet. the Student response was overwhelmingly positive, with all students stating that the presentations made anatomy more relevant, and most indicating that anatomy also became easier to learn. Feedback confirmed that first-year medical students have a strong clinical orientation, which can facilitate both the teaching and learning of gross anatomy. advantages of having clinicians present simulated procedures in the anatomy lab include: heightened student interest; mentoring and modelling for students; introduction to clinical concepts now encountered in basic science examinations; supplementation of the thinning ranks of qualified gross anatomy teachers. The use of intravenous fluid bags and distensible bladders to simulate abnormal collections of fluid and air in body cavities is simple, inexpensive, and can be replicated in any anatomy lab. Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2010.

  9. Medical students can teach communication skills - a mixed methods study of cross-year peer tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Osamu; Onishi, Hirotaka; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-15

    Cross-year peer tutoring (CYPT) of medical students is recognized as an effective learning tool. The aim of this study is to investigate the non-inferiority of the objective outcome of medical interview training with CYPT compared with the results of faculty-led training (FLT), and to explore qualitatively the educational benefits of CYPT. We conducted a convergent mixed methods study including a randomized controlled non-inferiority trial and two focus groups. For the CYPT group, teaching was led by six student tutors from year 5. In the FLT group, students were taught by six physicians. Focus groups for student learners (four tutees) and student teachers (six tutors) were conducted following the training session. One hundred sixteen students agreed to participate. The OSCE scores of the CYPT group and FLT group were 91.4 and 91.2, respectively. The difference in the mean score was 0.2 with a 95% CI of -1.8 to 2.2 within the predetermined non-inferiority margin of 3.0. By analyzing the focus groups, we extracted 13 subordinate concepts and formed three categories including 'Benefits of CYPT', 'Reflections of tutees and tutors' and 'Comparison with faculty', which affected the interactions among tutees, tutors, and faculty. CYPT is effective for teaching communication skills to medical students and for enhancing reflective learning among both tutors and tutees.

  10. Exploring medical student learning in the large group teaching environment: examining current practice to inform curricular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luscombe, Ciara; Montgomery, Julia

    2016-07-19

    Lectures continue to be an efficient and standardised way to deliver information to large groups of students. It has been well documented that students prefer interactive lectures, based on active learning principles, to didactic teaching in the large group setting. Despite this, it is often the case than many students do not engage with active learning tasks and attempts at interaction. By exploring student experiences, expectations and how they use lectures in their learning we will provide recommendations for faculty to support student learning both in the lecture theatre and during personal study time. This research employed a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Three focus groups, consisting of 19 students in total, were used to explore the experiences of second year medical students in large group teaching sessions. Using generic thematic data analysis, these accounts have been developed into a meaningful account of experience. This study found there to be a well-established learning culture amongst students and with it, expectations as to the format of teaching sessions. Furthermore, there were set perceptions about the student role within the learning environment which had many implications, including the way that innovative teaching methods were received. Student learning was perceived to take place outside the lecture theatre, with a large emphasis placed on creating resources that can be taken away to use in personal study time. Presented here is a constructive review of reasons for student participation, interaction and engagement in large group teaching sessions. Based on this are recommendations constructed with the view to aid educators in engaging students within this setting. Short term, educators can implement strategies that monopolise on the established learning culture of students to encourage engagement with active learning strategies. Long term, it would be beneficial for educators to consider ways to shift the current student learning

  11. Impact of teaching students to use evaluation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron R. Warren

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Students often make mistakes in physics courses and are expected to identify, correct, and learn from their mistakes, usually with some assistance from an instructor, textbook, or fellow students. This aid may come in many forms, such as problem solutions that are given to a class, tutoring to an individual student, or a peer discussion among several students. However, in each case a student relies upon an external agent in order to determine whether, and how, her work is mistaken. Consequently, the student’s learning process is largely contingent upon the availability and quality of external evaluating agents. One may suspect that if a student developed the ability to evaluate her own work, her dependence on external agents could be moderated and result in an enhancement of her learning. This paper presents the results of a study investigating the impact of novel activities that aim to teach students when, why, and how to use the strategies of unit analysis and special-case analysis. The data indicate that it is possible to help students dramatically improve their understanding of each strategy, and that this has a significant impact on problem-solving performance.

  12. Pharmacy students' performance and perceptions in a flipped teaching pilot on cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terri H; Ip, Eric J; Lopes, Ingrid; Rajagopalan, Vanishree

    2014-12-15

    To implement the flipped teaching method in a 3-class pilot on cardiac arrhythmias and to assess the impact of the intervention on academic performance and student perceptions. An intervention group of 101 first-year pharmacy students, who took the class with the flipped teaching method, were supplied with prerecorded lectures prior to their 3 classes (1 class in each of the following subjects: basic sciences, pharmacology, and therapeutics) on cardiac arrhythmias. Class time was focused on active-learning and case-based exercises. Students then took a final examination that included questions on cardiac arrhythmias. The examination scores of the intervention group were compared to scores of the Spring 2011 control group of 105 first-year students who took the class with traditional teaching methods. An online survey was conducted to assess student feedback from the intervention group. The mean examination scores of the intervention group were significantly higher than the mean examination scores of the control group for the cardiac arrhythmia classes in pharmacology (with 89.6 ± 2.0% vs 56.8 ± 2.2%, respectively) and therapeutics (89.2 ± 1.4% vs 73.7 ± 2.1%, respectively). The survey indicated higher student satisfaction for flipped classes with highly rated learning objectives, recordings, and in-class activities. Use of the flipped teaching method in a 3-class pilot on cardiac arrhythmias improved examination scores for 2 of the 3 classes (pharmacology and therapeutics). Student satisfaction was influenced by the quality of the learning objectives, prerecorded lectures, and inclass active-learning activities.

  13. Educational strategies for teaching evidence-based practice to undergraduate health students: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakoulis, Konstantinos; Patelarou, Athina; Laliotis, Aggelos; Wan, Andrew C; Matalliotakis, Michail; Tsiou, Chrysoula; Patelarou, Evridiki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to find best teaching strategies for teaching evidence-based practice (EBP) to undergraduate health students that have been adopted over the last years in healthcare institutions worldwide. The authors carried out a systematic, comprehensive bibliographic search using Medline database for the years 2005 to March 2015 (updated in March 2016). Search terms used were chosen from the USNLM Institutes of Health list of MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and free text key terms were used as well. Selected articles were measured based on the inclusion criteria of this study and initially compared in terms of titles or abstracts. Finally, articles relevant to the subject of this review were retrieved in full text. Critical appraisal was done to determine the effects of strategy of teaching evidence-based medicine (EBM). Twenty articles were included in the review. The majority of the studies sampled medical students (n=13) and only few conducted among nursing (n=2), pharmacy (n=2), physiotherapy/therapy (n=1), dentistry (n=1), or mixed disciplines (n=1) students. Studies evaluated a variety of educational interventions of varying duration, frequency and format (lectures, tutorials, workshops, conferences, journal clubs, and online sessions), or combination of these to teach EBP. We categorized interventions into single interventions covering a workshop, conference, lecture, journal club, or e-learning and multifaceted interventions where a combination of strategies had been assessed. Seven studies reported an overall increase to all EBP domains indicating a higher EBP competence and two studies focused on the searching databases skill. Followings were deduced from above analysis: multifaceted approach may be best suited when teaching EBM to health students; the use of technology to promote EBP through mobile devices, simulation, and the web is on the rise; and the duration of the interventions varying form some hours to even months was

  14. APPLYING PROFESSIONALLY ORIENTED PROBLEMS OF MATHEMATICAL MODELING IN TEACHING STUDENTS OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENTS

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    Natal’ya Yur’evna Gorbunova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We described several aspects of organizing student research work, as well as solving a number of mathematical modeling problems: professionally-oriented, multi-stage, etc. We underlined the importance of their economic content. Samples of using such problems in teaching Mathematics at agricultural university were given. Several questions connected with information material selection and peculiarities of research problems application were described. Purpose. The author aims to show the possibility and necessity of using professionally-oriented problems of mathematical modeling in teaching Mathematics at agricultural university. The subject of analysis is including such problems into educational process. Methodology. The main research method is dialectical method of obtaining knowledge of finding approaches to selection, writing and using mathematical modeling and professionally-oriented problems in educational process; the methodology is study of these methods of obtaining knowledge. Results. As a result of analysis of literature, students opinions, observation of students work, and taking into account personal teaching experience, it is possible to make conclusion about importance of using mathematical modeling problems, as it helps to systemize theoretical knowledge, apply it to practice, raise students study motivation in engineering sphere. Practical implications. Results of the research can be of interest for teachers of Mathematics in preparing Bachelor and Master students of engineering departments of agricultural university both for theoretical research and for modernization of study courses.

  15. Creating a Student-centered Learning Environment: Implementation of Problem-based Learning to Teach Microbiology to Undergraduate Medical Students

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    Basireddy, Parimala Reddy

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Medical education involves training necessary to become a physician or a surgeon. This includes various levels of training like undergraduate, internship, and postgraduate training. Medical education can be quite complex, since it involves training in pre-clinical subjects (anatomy, physiology, biochemistry), the para-clinical subjects (microbiology, pathology, pharmacology, and forensic medicine), and a discrete group of clinical subjects that include general medicine, surgery, obstetrics and gynaecology, ear, nose and throat specialization, paediatrics, cardiology, pulmonology, dermatology, ophthalmology, and orthopaedics, and many other clinical specializations and super specialities (cardio-thoracic surgery, neurosurgery, etc.). Training medical students involves both classroom teaching and practical applications. Classroom teaching is usually confined to didactic lectures, where the teacher unilaterally disseminates the information. This kind of teaching was recently noted to be not very effective in producing better quality medical graduates. The present study aims to introduce problem-based learning (PBL) to teach microbiology to undergraduate medical students and evaluate their perception towards such type of learning. Methods A total of 159 students were included in the study. An informed and oral consent was obtained from each participant, and the study was approved by the institutional ethical committee. All the students included in the study were grouped into 14 groups of 11-13 students. Students were carefully grouped ensuring that each group had a good mix that included different levels of achievers. Students were given a detailed introduction to the exercise before they started it. A questionnaire that consisted of 11 points was given to the students and they were asked to give feedback (strongly disagree, disagree, agree to some extent, agree, strongly agree) both on the functioning of PBL and the tutor performance during PBL

  16. Strengthening STEM performance and persistence: Influence of undergraduate teaching assistants on entry-level STEM students

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    Philipp, Stephanie B.

    Increasing retention of students in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics (STEM) programs of study is a priority for many colleges and universities. This study examines an undergraduate teaching assistant (UTA) program implemented in a general chemistry course for STEM majors to provide peer learning assistance to entrylevel students. This study measured the content knowledge growth of UTAs compared to traditional graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) over the semester, and described the development of peer learning assistance skills of the UTAs as an outcome of semesterlong training and support from both science education and STEM faculty. Impact of the UTA program on final exam grades, persistence of students to enroll in the next chemistry course required by their intended major, and STEM identity of students were estimated. The study sample comprised 284 students in 14 general chemistry recitation sections led by six UTAs and 310 students in 15 general chemistry recitation sections led by three traditional GTAs for comparison. Results suggested that both UTAs and GTAs made significant learning gains in general chemistry content knowledge, and there was no significant difference in content knowledge between UTA and GTA groups. Student evaluations, researcher observations, and chemistry faculty comments confirm UTAs were using the learning strategies discussed in the semester-long training program. UTA-led students rated their TAs significantly higher in teaching quality and student care and encouragement, which correlated with stronger STEM recognition by those students. The results of hierarchical linear model (HLM) analysis showed little variance in final exam grades explained by section-level variables; most variance was explained by student-level variables: mathematics ACT score, college GPA, and intention to enroll in the next general chemistry course. Students having higher college GPAs were helped more by having a UTA. Results from logistic

  17. Influence of Planning on Students' Language Performance in Task-Based Language Teaching

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    Wang, Yingli

    2008-01-01

    Task-based language teaching (TBLT) is an important second language teaching method. Planning is one of the significant factors in the studies of TBLT. This paper will mainly discuss the influence of planning on students' language performance in TBLT.

  18. Methods and Techniques. Student Involvement in the Production of Teaching Aids.

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    Fernau, C.

    1984-01-01

    Indicates that teaching materials used in industrialized countries are not appropriate and often cannot be adapted for the use in developing countries. Having students help with production of teaching aids increases their motivation for using them. (JOW)

  19. Learning to care: medical students' reported value and evaluation of palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing.

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    Borgstrom, Erica; Morris, Rachel; Wood, Diana; Cohn, Simon; Barclay, Stephen

    2016-11-25

    Over recent years there has been an increase in teaching of both palliative care and reflective practice in UK medical schools. The palliative care teaching at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine is multi-faceted and involves students writing reflective essays after individually meeting patients approaching the end of life during their final year general practice and hospital medicine placements. This paper draws on two studies examining this teaching element to analyse what the students found valuable about it and to comment on the practice of meeting patients and subsequent reflective writing. Two studies have explored students' perceptions of these course components. The first was a thematic analysis of 234 reflective essays from 123 students written in 2007-2008, including examining what students wrote about the exercise itself. The second project involved a semi-structured questionnaire that students completed anonymously; this paper reports on the free text elements of that study [sample size =107]. Since similar themes were found in both studies, the coding structures from each project were compared and combined, enabling triangulation of the findings around what the students found valuable from the palliative care teaching involving meeting patients and reflective writing. Overall, students reported that these components of the palliative care teaching are valuable. Four main themes were identified as aspects that students valued: (1) dedicated time with patients, (2) learning about wider elements of treatment and holistic care, (3) practicing communication skills, and (4) learning about themselves through reflective writing. Some students expressed a dislike for having to formally write a reflective essay. It is possible to arrange for all of the medical students to individually meet at least two patients receiving palliative or end of life care. Students found these encounters valuable and many wrote about the benefit of formally

  20. Bedside Teaching: Is it Effective Methods in Clinical Nursing Students Learning?

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    Fatikhu Yatuni Asmara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical learning is the centre of medical students education. Students not only learn about practical skills but also communication with patient and other health care givers which both competencies are useful for students when they come into working world (Spencer, 2003. There are variations of methods applied in clinical learning process; one of them is bedside teaching. The aim of this study was to observe the bedside teaching process which is held in group of students, teacher, and patient. Another aim was to know responses of students, teacher, and patients to the bedside teaching process. Method: The method which was applied in this study is observation in which bedside teaching process was observed related to the roles and function of each component of bedside teaching: students, teacher, and patient in each phase: preparation, process, and evaluation. Then it was continued by interview to know the responses of students, teacher, and patient related to bedside teaching process. Result: The result showed that both students and teacher felt that bedside teaching is an effective method since it helped students to achieve their competences in clinical setting and develop their communication skill. Furthermore teacher stated that bedside teaching facilitated her to be a good role model for students. As well as students and teacher, patient got advantage from the bedside teaching process that she got information related to her case; however the time to discuss was limited. During the observation, each component of bedside teaching did their roles and function, such as: during the preparation teacher asked inform consent from patient, and patient gave inform consent as well while students prepared the material. Discussions: Suggestion for next research is conducting a deeper study about perception of students, teacher, and patient about bedside teaching process and the strategies to develop it to be better method. Keywords: bedside