WorldWideScience

Sample records for included sloping fencing

  1. fences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available After the Public Spaces (PB 35, it is the right time to speak about fences. Space and fencing. We, the members of the editorial board, probably suffer from an acute form of agoraphilia – the love for an open space, a wide and open world made us talk about it (82. Our cities suffer from agoraphobia, a fear of open spaces, and its complication – fencephilia.Chekhov’s claustrophobia brought him to Sakhalin and gave widely cited descriptions to many Siberian cities. Irkutsk, unlike Tomsk, for example, was called “a cultured city… Almost Europe!” But not every Irkutsk citizen knows that this quotation is cut short. When using the word ‘cultured’, the writer meant the absence of “nasty fences, absurd advertisements and wastelands where signs prohibit stopping”.However, after 100 some odd years, “the cultural layer has grown, and the cultural level has dropped”.Why? Let’s return to education. Alexander Rappaport opens discussion about a school of the future (30.This issue comprises international and Siberian architectural events (14. And many good and different fences. Good fences are represented in the collection of articles on fences of all times and nations. The hot times of fencing are analyzed in the article by psychologist Konstantin Lidin (72.

  2. Reprint of: Assessment of the use of sediment fences for control of erosion and sediment phosphorus loss after potato harvesting on sloping land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinten, A J A; Loades, K; Addy, S; Richards, S; Stutter, M; Cook, Y; Watson, H; Taylor, C; Abel, C; Baggaley, N; Ritchie, R; Jeffrey, W

    2014-01-15

    In humid temperate areas, after harvest of potatoes, it is difficult to prevent soil erosion and diffuse pollution. In some autumn weather conditions, in-field mitigation such as cultivation or sowing are not possible, while edge of field measures can be costly and inflexible. We have assessed the potential of modified sediment fences, widely used on building sites, for erosion mitigation post-harvest of potato crops. Field scale assessments were conducted on fields in the Lunan catchment, eastern Scotland. Sediment retention was estimated by two methods: a topographic survey method using a hand held Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK-GPS), and direct measurement of sediment depth using a graduated cane. In the 2010/11 trial the main fence comprised 70 m of entrenched fine mesh (0.25 mm) and coarser mesh (4mm) fabric pinned to a contour fence near the base of the field. This retained an estimated 50.9 m(3) (80.2 tonnes) of sediment, with weighted mean total P (TP) content of 0.09 % in the<2mm soil fraction. In the 2011/12 trial, the main 146 m fence was of intermediate mesh size (1.2mm). The fence was partitioned into nine upslope plots, with 3 replicates of each of 3 cultivation methods: T1 (full grubbing--a light, tined cultivator), T2 (partial grubbing) and T3 (no grubbing). Average plot slopes ranged from 9.9 to 11.0 %. The amounts of TP accumulating as sediment at the fences were: 9.3 (sd=7.8), 11.8 (sd=10.2) and 25.7 (sd=5.8)kg P/ha of upslope plot for the T1, T2 and T3 treatments respectively.

  3. Assessment of the use of sediment fences for control of erosion and sediment phosphorus loss after potato harvesting on sloping land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinten, A J A; Loades, K; Addy, S; Richards, S; Stutter, M; Cook, Y; Watson, H; Taylor, C; Abel, C; Baggaley, N; Ritchie, R; Jeffrey, W

    2014-01-15

    In humid temperate areas, after harvest of potatoes, it is difficult to prevent soil erosion and diffuse pollution. In some autumn weather conditions, in-field mitigation such as cultivation or sowing are not possible, while edge of field measures can be costly and inflexible. We have assessed the potential of modified sediment fences, widely used on building sites, for erosion mitigation post-harvest of potato crops. Field scale assessments were conducted on fields in the Lunan catchment, eastern Scotland. Sediment retention was estimated by two methods: a topographic survey method using a hand held Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK-GPS), and direct measurement of sediment depth using a graduated cane. In the 2010/11 trial the main fence comprised 70 m of entrenched fine mesh (0.25 mm) and coarser mesh (4mm) fabric pinned to a contour fence near the base of the field. This retained an estimated 50.9 m(3) (80.2 tonnes) of sediment, with weighted mean total P (TP) content of 0.09 % in the<2mm soil fraction. In the 2011/12 trial, the main 146 m fence was of intermediate mesh size (1.2mm). The fence was partitioned into nine upslope plots, with 3 replicates of each of 3 cultivation methods: T1 (full grubbing--a light, tined cultivator), T2 (partial grubbing) and T3 (no grubbing). Average plot slopes ranged from 9.9 to 11.0 %. The amounts of TP accumulating as sediment at the fences were: 9.3 (sd = 7.8), 11.8 (sd = 10.2) and 25.7 (sd = 5.8)kg P/ha of upslope plot for the T1, T2 and T3 treatments respectively. Crown Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved.

  4. Fences and grazing management in northern Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudat, Brice; Bloemertz, Lena; Kuhn, Nikolaus J.

    2016-04-01

    Since Namibian independence, many fences have been erected in the communal land of the Ohangwena region in northern Namibia. Most fencing issues discussed so far in the region concern large-scale fencing of communal land by the new Namibian elite. Rarely discussed are the fences erected around small-scale farmers' parcels. This paper will discuss the impact of such increased small-scale fencing activities in northern Namibia. Fencing of land has different functions, including protection of fields against livestock and securing property rights. However, not all community members can afford the monetary and labor costs involved. In the annual agricultural cycle of the study area, livestock is left un-herded after the harvest of most crops. They can then feed on available crop remains and grass on the fields. The livestock then freely utilizes unfenced and unprotected land. This system has the advantage to accelerate crop degradation and fertilize the soils. However, by erecting efficient fences, the new middle-class community members concentrate fertility in their own field, thereby degrading agricultural soils of poorer farmers. Potentially, such small-scale fencing of land has therefore an impact on sol quality and thus fosters degradation of unfenced cropland. By using fences as features to determine the limits of the new land rights, the ongoing Communal Land Reform may not only promote the erection of fences, but may also have a negative impact on soil quality and potentially food security of small-scale farmers without cattle.

  5. Performance Evaluations of Three Silt Fence Practices Using a Full-Scale Testing Apparatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Alan Bugg

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Erosion and sediment controls on construction sites minimize environmental impacts from sediment-laden stormwater runoff. Silt fence, a widely specified perimeter control practice on construction projects used to retain sediment on-site, has limited performance-based testing data. Silt fence failures and resultant sediment losses are often the result of structural failure. To better understand silt fence performance, researchers at the Auburn University-Erosion and Sediment Control Testing Facility (AU-ESCTF have evaluated three silt fence options to determine possible shortcomings using standardized full-scale testing methods. These methods subject silt fence practices to simulated, in-field conditions typically experienced on-site without the variability of field testing or the limited application of small-scale testing. Three different silt fence practices were tested to evaluate performance, which included: (1 Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT Trenched Silt Fence, (2 ALDOT Sliced Silt Fence, and (3 Alabama Soil and Water Conservation Committee (AL-SWCC Trenched Silt Fence. This study indicates that the structural performance of a silt fence perimeter control is the most important performance factor in retaining sediment. The sediment retention performance of these silt fence practices was 82.7%, 66.9% and 90.5%, respectively. When exposed to large impoundment conditions, both ALDOT Trench and Sliced Silt Fence practices failed structurally, while the AL-SWCC Trenched Silt Fence did not experience structural failure.

  6. Fence Posts for Southern Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. H. Muntz

    1950-01-01

    Of the more common woods native to the South, the heartwood of osageorange (bois d'arc), black locust, red mulberry, cedar, and baldcypress is most desirable and makes good fence posts without any preservative treatment. The heartwood of other southern tree species, and all sapwood is much less durable and will give only a few years of service when used for fence...

  7. Detusking fence-breaker elephants as an approach in human-elephant conflict mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutinda, Matthew; Chenge, Geoffrey; Gakuya, Francis; Otiende, Moses; Omondi, Patrick; Kasiki, Samuel; Soriguer, Ramón C; Alasaad, Samer

    2014-01-01

    Human-elephant conflict (HEC) is a recurring problem that appears wherever the range of elephants and humans overlap. Different methods including the use of electric fences are used worldwide to mitigate this conflict. Nonetheless, elephants learn quickly that their tusks do not conduct electricity and use them to break down fences (fence-breakers). In Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya, destructive elephants (Loxodonta africana) were monitored between 2010 and 2013. The fence-breaking rate reached four incidents (fence-breaking) per elephant per 100 days. Ten bull males and 57 females were identified as fence-breakers. The bulls were involved in 85.07% and the females in 14.93% of incidents. The Kenya Wildlife Service approved detusking (partial cutting of tusks) in four of the 10 fence-breakers as a way of preventing them from breaking down fences, thereby mitigating HEC in the Conservancy. The result of the detusking was a drastic six-fold reduction in damage to fences (range: 1.67 to 14.5 times less fence-breaking) by the four worst fence-breaker elephants, because with trimmed tusks elephants lack the tools to break down fences. Detusking could not totally eliminate fence destruction because, despite lacking their tools, elephants can still destroy fences using their heads, bodies and trunks, albeit less effectively. On the other hand, apart from inherent aesthetic considerations, the detusking of elephants may have certain negative effects on factors such as elephants' social hierarchies, breeding, mate selection and their access to essential minerals and food. Elephant detusking seems to be effective in drastically reducing fence-breaking incidents, nonetheless its negative effects on behaviour, access to food and its aesthetical consequences still need to be further studied and investigated.

  8. NAGWS Bowling-Fencing Guide, January 1977-January 1979.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Helen

    This manual is designed for use by coaches of bowling and fencing. Rules and regulations are outlined, and game strategies and teaching techniques are discussed. A bibliography for each sport is included. (JD)

  9. Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-06-02

    Fencing data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including a specification of data communications parameters for a thread of execution on a compute node, including specifications of a client, a context, and a task; the compute nodes coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through data communications resources including at least one segment of shared random access memory; including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active SEND instructions for SEND data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic SEND data transfers through a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for SEND data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all SEND instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for SEND data transfers between the two endpoints.

  10. Fencing direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2013-09-03

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to segments of shared random access memory through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and a segment of shared memory; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  11. Residential fencing in a metropolitan area and three small towns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwin Kallio; Jerry A. Sesco

    1967-01-01

    Many types of fences were found on residential lots in the metropolitan-suburban area of St. Louis County, Missouri, and three small towns in southern Illinois. Wire fences predominated. More wooden fences were found on village lots than on city lots. In general, the more expensive homes had the most wooden fencing. Homes over 5 years old had more fencing of all...

  12. Energy potential of a tidal fence deployed near a coastal headland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, S; Borthwick, A G L; Houlsby, G T

    2013-02-28

    Enhanced tidal streams close to coastal headlands appear to present ideal locations for the deployment of tidal energy devices. In this paper, the power potential of tidal streams near an idealized coastal headland with a sloping seabed is investigated using a near-field approximation to represent a tidal fence, i.e. a row of tidal devices, in a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model. Simulations indicate that the power extracted by the tidal fence is limited because the flow will bypass the fence, predominantly on the ocean side, as the thrust applied by the devices increases. For the dynamic conditions, fence placements and headland aspect ratios considered, the maximum power extracted at the fence is not related in any obvious way to the local undisturbed kinetic flux or the natural rate of energy dissipation due to bed friction (although both of these have been used in the past to predict the amount of power that may be extracted). The available power (equal to the extracted power net of vertical mixing losses in the immediate wake of devices) is optimized for devices with large area and small centre-to-centre spacing within the fence. The influence of energy extraction on the natural flow field is assessed relative to changes in the M2 component of elevation and velocity, and residual bed shear stress and tidal dispersion.

  13. On Fences, Forms and Mathematical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lege, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    The white picket fence is an integral component of the iconic American townscape. But, for mathematics students, it can be a mathematical challenge. Picket fences in a variety of styles serve as excellent sources to model constant, step, absolute value, and sinusoidal functions. "Principles and Standards for School Mathematics" (NCTM 2000)…

  14. Endurance of rockfall protection fences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, W.; Meyer, M.

    2009-04-01

    Research on rockfall protection systems usually focuses on the performance of flexible barriers regarding their limit or design energy retention capacity. This research increased the maximum retention by a factor 15 within the last 15-20 years. Today rockfall energies up to 5'000 kJ can be retained. But this is relevant only for actual projects and newly erected barriers. However, the majority of all barriers installed in the alpine area were built many years ago and there is little knowledge on their long-term performance. Among others this includes not only the consideration of maintenance works such as man and machine power as well as yearly costs, but also the endurance of such barriers over the years. Such information normally stays at the authority or institution that initiated the construction of a protection system and/or is responsible for the maintenance of the object. But even if an institution maintains a large number of barriers, there mostly does not exist a general inventory because the barriers were installed over a time period of sometimes more than 30 years enduring many changes in the inventory procedures, drawings and documentations. Therefore, an actual investigation of all rockfall barriers protecting a sector of the Swiss railways (SBB) was performed in order to obtain an overview of their conditions. This project delivers both a detailed analysis of more than 100 single barriers and a statistically evaluable overview. It also allows a comparison between different generations of barrier types, independently from the different producers of the barriers. In a first step existing catalogues and data belonging to the relevant barriers were evaluated, summarized and mapped into topographic maps using GIS allowing a proper planning of the field trip, optimised regarding route, time consumption and possibly necessary closures of rail tracks. During the field investigations each barrier was inspected and all details regarding structural system

  15. Does small-perimeter fencing inhibit mule deer or pronghorn use of water developments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, R.T.; Bissonette, J.A.; Flinders, J.T.; Robinson, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Wildlife water development can be an important habitat management strategy in western North America for many species, including both pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In many areas, water developments are fenced (often with small-perimeter fencing) to exclude domestic livestock and feral horses. Small-perimeter exclosures could limit wild ungulate use of fenced water sources, as exclosures present a barrier pronghorn and mule deer must negotiate to gain access to fenced drinking water. To evaluate the hypothesis that exclosures limit wild ungulate access to water sources, we compared use (photo counts) of fenced versus unfenced water sources for both pronghorn and mule deer between June and October 2002-2008 in western Utah. We used model selection to identify an adequate distribution and best approximating model. We selected a zero-inflated negative binomial distribution for both pronghorn and mule deer photo counts. Both pronghorn and mule deer photo counts were positively associated with sampling time and average daily maximum temperature in top models. A fence effect was present in top models for both pronghorn and mule deer, but mule deer response to small-perimeter fencing was much more pronounced than pronghorn response. For mule deer, we estimated that presence of a fence around water developments reduced photo counts by a factor of 0.25. We suggest eliminating fencing of water developments whenever possible or fencing a big enough area around water sources to avoid inhibiting mule deer. More generally, our results provide additional evidence that water development design and placement influence wildlife use. Failure to account for species-specific preferences will limit effectiveness of management actions and could compromise research results. Copyright ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  16. IB-LBM simulation on blood cell sorting with a micro-fence structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Xu, Yuan-Qing; Tian, Fang-bao; Gao, Tian-xin; Tang, Xiao-ying; Zu, Wen-Hong

    2014-01-01

    A size-based blood cell sorting model with a micro-fence structure is proposed in the frame of immersed boundary and lattice Boltzmann method (IB-LBM). The fluid dynamics is obtained by solving the discrete lattice Boltzmann equation, and the cells motion and deformation are handled by the immersed boundary method. A micro-fence consists of two parallel slope post rows which are adopted to separate red blood cells (RBCs) from white blood cells (WBCs), in which the cells to be separated are transported one after another by the flow into the passageway between the two post rows. Effected by the cross flow, RBCs are schemed to get through the pores of the nether post row since they are smaller and more deformable compared with WBCs. WBCs are required to move along the nether post row till they get out the micro-fence. Simulation results indicate that for a fix width of pores, the slope angle of the post row plays an important role in cell sorting. The cells mixture can not be separated properly in a small slope angle, while obvious blockages by WBCs will take place to disturb the continuous cell sorting in a big slope angle. As an optimal result, an adaptive slope angle is found to sort RBCs form WBCs correctly and continuously.

  17. Failure Analysis of Fencing Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibaroglu, D.; Baydogan, M.; Cimenoglu, H.; Bas, B.; Yagsi, C.; Aliyeva, N.

    2017-05-01

    This study deals with the failure analysis of broken fencing blades (one épée and one foil). For the characterization of the broken blades, metallographic examinations, chemical analysis, hardness measurements, fracture surface examinations and tensile tests were performed. Maximum stress occurred at the outer fibres of the blades was estimated as high as 1456 MPa and 1298 MPa for épée and foil, respectively. Results showed that failure of the blades was initiated from a notch, which has been formed as the result of an impact action during training, or from the groove machined along the blade for inserting an electrical wire. In order to increase resistance of the blades against such failures, alternative blade material, modified blade geometry and a surface hardening treatment were proposed.

  18. Turbine blade squealer tip rail with fence members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, David A

    2012-11-20

    A turbine blade includes an airfoil, a blade tip section, a squealer tip rail, and a plurality of chordally spaced fence members. The blade tip section includes a blade tip floor located at an end of the airfoil distal from the root. The blade tip floor includes a pressure side and a suction side joined together at chordally spaced apart leading and trailing edges of the airfoil. The squealer tip rail extends radially outwardly from the blade tip floor adjacent to the suction side and extends from a first location adjacent to the airfoil trailing edge to a second location adjacent to the airfoil leading edge. The fence members are located between the airfoil leading and trailing edges and extend radially outwardly from the blade tip floor and axially from the squealer tip rail toward the pressure side.

  19. Evaluation of predator-proof fenced biodiversity projects

    OpenAIRE

    Doelle, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    There has been recent debate over the role of predator-proof fences in the management of New Zealand’s biodiversity. The debate has arisen due to concern that investments in fenced sanctuaries are less productive than are alternative ways to manage biodiversity. Predator-proof fences are costly and budget constraints limit the area of habitat that can be fenced. The area of habitat enclosed within fences, and number of individuals of species supported, determines project’s ability to contribu...

  20. Fencing network direct memory access data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface of a parallel computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Mamidala, Amith R.

    2015-07-07

    Fencing direct memory access (`DMA`) data transfers in a parallel active messaging interface (`PAMI`) of a parallel computer, the PAMI including data communications endpoints, each endpoint including specifications of a client, a context, and a task, the endpoints coupled for data communications through the PAMI and through DMA controllers operatively coupled to a deterministic data communications network through which the DMA controllers deliver data communications deterministically, including initiating execution through the PAMI of an ordered sequence of active DMA instructions for DMA data transfers between two endpoints, effecting deterministic DMA data transfers through a DMA controller and the deterministic data communications network; and executing through the PAMI, with no FENCE accounting for DMA data transfers, an active FENCE instruction, the FENCE instruction completing execution only after completion of all DMA instructions initiated prior to execution of the FENCE instruction for DMA data transfers between the two endpoints.

  1. Using Snow Fences to Augument Fresh Water Supplies in Shallow Arctic Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuefer, Svetlana

    2013-03-31

    , 2010, and 2011), we selected and monitored two lakes with similar hydrological regimes. Both lakes are located 30 miles south of Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, near Franklin Bluffs. One is an experimental lake, where we installed a snow fence; the other is a control lake, where the natural regime was preserved. The general approach was to compare the hydrologic response of the lake to the snowdrift during the summers of 2010 and 2011 against the baseline conditions in 2009. Highlights of the project included new data on snow transport rates on the Alaska North Slope, an evaluation of the experimental lake's hydrological response to snowdrift melt, and cost assessment of snowdrift‐generated water. High snow transport rates (0.49 kg/s/m) ensured that the snowdrift reached its equilibrium profile by winter's end. Generally, natural snowpack disappeared by the beginning of June in this area. In contrast, snow in the drift lasted through early July, supplying the experimental lake with snowmelt when water in other tundra lakes was decreasing. The experimental lake retained elevated water levels during the entire open‐water season. Comparison of lake water volumes during the experiment against the baseline year showed that, by the end of summer, the drift generated by the snow fence had increased lake water volume by at least 21-29%. We estimated water cost at 1.9 cents per gallon during the first year and 0.8 cents per gallon during the second year. This estimate depends on the cost of snow fence construction in remote arctic locations, which we assumed to be at $7.66 per square foot of snow fence frontal area. The snow fence technique was effective in augmenting the supply of lake water during summers 2010 and 2011 despite low rainfall during both summers. Snow fences are a simple, yet an effective, way to replenish tundra lakes with freshwater and increase water availability in winter. This research project was synergetic with the NETL project, "North Slope Decision

  2. Beehive fences as a multidimensional conflict-mitigation tool for farmers coexisting with elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Lucy E; Lala, Fredrick; Nzumu, Hesron; Mwambingu, Emmanuel; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain

    2017-08-01

    Increasing habitat fragmentation and human population growth in Africa has resulted in an escalation in human-elephant conflict between small-scale farmers and free-ranging African elephants (Loxodonta Africana). In 2012 Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) implemented the national 10-year Conservation and Management Strategy for the Elephant in Kenya, which includes an action aimed at testing whether beehive fences can be used to mitigate human-elephant conflict. From 2012 to 2015, we field-tested the efficacy of beehive fences to protect 10 0.4-ha farms next to Tsavo East National Park from elephants. We hung a series of beehives every 10 m around the boundary of each farm plot. The hives were linked with strong wire. After an initial pilot test with 2 farms, the remaining 8 of 10 beehive fences also contained 2-dimensional dummy hives between real beehives to help reduce the cost of the fence. Each trial plot had a neighboring control plot of the same size within the same farm. Of the 131 beehives deployed 88% were occupied at least once during the 3.5-year trial. Two hundred and fifty-three elephants, predominantly 20-45 years old entered the community farming area, typically during the crop- ripening season. Eighty percent of the elephants that approached the trial farms were kept out of the areas protected by the beehive fences, and elephants that broke a fence were in smaller than average groups. Beehive fences not only kept large groups of elephants from invading the farmland plots but the farmers also benefited socially and financially from the sale of 228 kg of elephant-friendly honey. As news of the success of the trial spread, a further 12 farmers requested to join the project, bringing the number of beehive fence protected farms to 22 and beehives to 297. This demonstrates positive adoption of beehive fences as a community mitigation tool. Understanding the response of elephants to the beehive fences, the seasonality of crop raiding and fence breaking, and the

  3. Lines around fragments: effects of fencing on large herbivores ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lines around fragments: effects of fencing on large herbivores. Randall B Boone, N Thompson Hobbs. Abstract. People construct fences to delineate land ownership and to control access to land. Fences accomplish several purposes, notable among these are containing livestock or wildlife raised for profit or subsistence, ...

  4. Game fence presence and permeability influences the local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fences are utilised throughout the world to restrict the movements of wildlife, protecting them from threats and reducing human–wildlife conflict. In South Africa the number of privately-owned fenced game reserves has greatly increased in recent years, but little is known about how fencing affects the distribution and ...

  5. Assessment and placement of living snow fences to reduce highway maintenance costs and improve safety (living snow fences).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Living snow fences (LSF) are designed plantings of trees and/or shrubs and native grasses along highways, roads : and ditches that create a vegetative buffer that traps and controls blowing and drifting snow. These strategically : placed fences have ...

  6. Dairy farm impacts of fencing riparian land: pasture production and farm productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Sharon R; Melland, Alice R; Dorling, Lianne

    2013-11-30

    Dairy farmers are encouraged to restrict stock access by fencing riparian zones to reduce stream pollution and improve biodiversity. Many farmers are reluctant to create fenced riparian zones because of the perceived loss of productive pasture. Anecdotal reports indicate that pasture production in fenced areas is especially valued during summer months when water stress is likely to limit pasture growth in other areas of the farm. We measured pasture production, botanical composition, soil moisture, and fertility in Riparian (within 20 m of the riverbank), Flat (greater than 20 but less than 50 m from the riverbank), and Hill (elevated) areas on three commercial dairy farms from October 2006 to November 2007 in south eastern Australia. Riparian and Flat areas produced significantly more pasture, with on average approximately 25% more dry matter per ha grown in these areas compared with Hill paddocks. Percentage ryegrass was 14% lower on Hill slopes compared with Riparian and Flat areas and was compensated for by only a 5% increase in other grass species. Significant seasonal effects were observed with the difference in pasture production between Hill, and Riparian and Flat areas most pronounced in summer, due to soil moisture limitations on Hill paddocks. To examine potential productivity impacts of this lost pasture, we used a questionnaire-based survey to interview the farmers regarding their farm and riparian management activities. The additional pasture that would have been available if the riverbanks were not fenced to their current widths ranged from 6.2 to 27.2 t DM for the 2006/2007 year and would have been grown on 0.4-3.4% of their milking area. If this pasture was harvested instead of grazed, the farmers could have saved between $2000 and $8000 of their purchased fodder costs in that year. By fencing their riparian areas to 20 m for biodiversity benefits, between 2.2% and 9.8% of their milking area would be out of production amounting to about $16

  7. South Fence Road -- Phase 1 field operations summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, J.P.; Neel, D.

    1996-03-01

    The South Fence Road (SFR) project is part of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization (SWHC) task. The SWHC task has as its objective the reduction of uncertainty about the rate and direction of groundwater flow in the SNL/NM/Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) area. The SFR project area is located along the southern boundary of SNL/KAFB. This project area was selected to provide site-specific information related to geology and groundwater hydrology within the Hubbell Spring/Tijeras/Sandia fault complex. Specific objectives included determining the depth to the Santa Fe Group/bedrock contact, the depth to the water table, and the hydrogeologic complexities related to faulting. This report is a basic data report from the first phase of field operations associated with the drilling, logging, completion, and development of South Fence Road Wells SFR-1D and SFR-1S, SFR-2, SFR-3D and SFR-3S, and SFR-4. These test/monitoring wells were installed as part of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Restoration Project

  8. Fenced and Fragmented: Conservation Value of Managed Metapopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Susan M; Harper, Cindy K; Bloomer, Paulette; Hofmeyr, Jennifer; Funston, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Population fragmentation is threatening biodiversity worldwide. Species that once roamed vast areas are increasingly being conserved in small, isolated areas. Modern management approaches must adapt to ensure the continued survival and conservation value of these populations. In South Africa, a managed metapopulation approach has been adopted for several large carnivore species, all protected in isolated, relatively small, reserves that are fenced. As far as possible these approaches are based on natural metapopulation structures. In this network, over the past 25 years, African lions (Panthera leo) were reintroduced into 44 fenced reserves with little attention given to maintaining genetic diversity. To examine the situation, we investigated the current genetic provenance and diversity of these lions. We found that overall genetic diversity was similar to that in a large national park, and included a mixture of four different southern African evolutionarily significant units (ESUs). This mixing of ESUs, while not ideal, provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of mixing ESUs over the long term. We propose a strategic managed metapopulation plan to ensure the maintenance of genetic diversity and improve the long-term conservation value of these lions. This managed metapopulation approach could be applied to other species under similar ecological constraints around the globe.

  9. Fenced and Fragmented: Conservation Value of Managed Metapopulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M Miller

    Full Text Available Population fragmentation is threatening biodiversity worldwide. Species that once roamed vast areas are increasingly being conserved in small, isolated areas. Modern management approaches must adapt to ensure the continued survival and conservation value of these populations. In South Africa, a managed metapopulation approach has been adopted for several large carnivore species, all protected in isolated, relatively small, reserves that are fenced. As far as possible these approaches are based on natural metapopulation structures. In this network, over the past 25 years, African lions (Panthera leo were reintroduced into 44 fenced reserves with little attention given to maintaining genetic diversity. To examine the situation, we investigated the current genetic provenance and diversity of these lions. We found that overall genetic diversity was similar to that in a large national park, and included a mixture of four different southern African evolutionarily significant units (ESUs. This mixing of ESUs, while not ideal, provides a unique opportunity to study the impact of mixing ESUs over the long term. We propose a strategic managed metapopulation plan to ensure the maintenance of genetic diversity and improve the long-term conservation value of these lions. This managed metapopulation approach could be applied to other species under similar ecological constraints around the globe.

  10. South Fence Road -- Phase 1 field operations summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCord, J.P. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Neel, D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The South Fence Road (SFR) project is part of the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization (SWHC) task. The SWHC task has as its objective the reduction of uncertainty about the rate and direction of groundwater flow in the SNL/NM/Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) area. The SFR project area is located along the southern boundary of SNL/KAFB. This project area was selected to provide site-specific information related to geology and groundwater hydrology within the Hubbell Spring/Tijeras/Sandia fault complex. Specific objectives included determining the depth to the Santa Fe Group/bedrock contact, the depth to the water table, and the hydrogeologic complexities related to faulting. This report is a basic data report from the first phase of field operations associated with the drilling, logging, completion, and development of South Fence Road Wells SFR-1D and SFR-1S, SFR-2, SFR-3D and SFR-3S, and SFR-4. These test/monitoring wells were installed as part of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Restoration Project.

  11. The effects of fences and lions on the ecology of African wild dogs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Movement patters and den site locations suggested that dogs avoided the presence of lions. Major prey species were kudu (50 %), impala (32 %) and waterbuck (14 %). Large prey, including adult male kudu (250 kg) and waterbuck (260 kg) were taken regularly through use of the boundary fence as an aid to capture.

  12. Techniques to construct New Zealand elk-proof fence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larry D. Bryant; Jack W. Thomas; Mary M. Rowland

    1993-01-01

    An elk-proof fence was built in 1987 at the Starkey Experimental Forest and Range in northeast Oregon. The 25,000-acre research enclosure holds several hundred Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni V. Bailey) and Rocky Mountain mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus hemionus Rafinesque) year round. The fence, constructed with high...

  13. Fencing predators: Hunters and prey on South African game farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierenburg, M.J.; Wels, H.

    2016-01-01

    The wildlife industry in South Africa is thriving, with increasing numbers of game farms. Large parts of the South African countryside are enclosed with fences. Fences have always been strategically important in wildlife production and conservation, both to protect wildlife, but also to keep local

  14. 47 CFR 73.49 - AM transmission system fencing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM transmission system fencing requirements. 73.49 Section 73.49 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.49 AM transmission system fencing requirements...

  15. The good shepherd: remedying the fencing syndrome | Salomon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper the use of fenced grazing camps to manage the rangeland commons is challenged. A historical perspective is presented on fencing and rotational grazing in South Africa. Two case studies in KwaZulu-Natal and the Northern Cape illustrate the factors that influence the management of rangelands under ...

  16. Slippery Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The wheel tracks in this image are an artifact of the difficult terrain faced recently by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity deep inside 'Endurance Crater.' Opportunity took the picture with its navigation camera on the rover's 205th martian day, or sol (Aug. 21, 2004). On the preceding sol, to avoid a potentially hazardous rock target, the rover team changed routes. Steep slopes and lack of traction when driving in this terrain caused the rover to experience up to 50 percent slip during parts of its traverse. Opportunity ended up more than 50 centimeters (about 20 inches) downslope from the planned final position. Another shift in objective on sol 205 had Opportunity on the move again toward safer terrain. Analysis of the final drive showed the rover's traction increasing during its latest moves.

  17. Physical Characteristics Underpinning Repetitive Lunging in Fencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anthony N; Marshall, Geoff; Phillips, James; Noto, Angelo; Buttigieg, Conor; Chavda, Shyam; Downing, William; Atlay, Nathan; Dimitriou, Lygeri; Kilduff, Laim

    2016-11-01

    Turner, AN, Marshall, G, Phillips, J, Noto, A, Buttigieg, C, Chavda, S, Downing, W, Atlay, N, Dimitriou, L, and Kilduff, L. Physical characteristics underpinning repetitive lunging in fencing. J Strength Cond Res 30(11): 3134-3139, 2016-Given the repetitive demand to execute lunging and changes in direction within fencing, the ability to sustain these at maximal capacity is fundamental to performance. The aim of this study was threefold. First, to provide normative values for this variable referred to as repeat lunge ability (RLA) and second to identify the physical characteristics that underpin it. Third, was to establish if a cause and effect relationship existed by training the associated characteristics. Assessment of lower-body power, reactive strength, speed, change of direction speed (CODS), and a sport-specific RLA were conducted on senior and junior elite male fencers (n = 36). Fencers were on average (±SD) 18.9 ± 3.2 years of age, 174.35 ± 10.42 cm tall, 70.67 ± 7.35 kg in mass, and 8.5 ± 4.2 years fencing experience. The RLA test had average work times of 16.03 ± 1.40 seconds and demonstrated "large" to "very large" associations with all tested variables, but in particular CODS (r = 0.70) and standing broad jump (SBJ; r = -0.68). Through linear regression analysis, these also provided a 2-predictor model accounting for 61% of the common variance associated with RLA. A cause and effect relationship with SBJ and CODS was confirmed by the training group, where RLA performance in these fencers improved from 15.80 ± 1.07 to 14.90 ± 0.86 seconds, with the magnitude of change reported as "moderate" (effect size (ES) = 0.93). Concurrent improvements were also noted in both SBJ (216.86 ± 17.15 vs. 221.71 ± 17.59 cm) and CODS (4.44 ± 0.29 vs. 4.31 ± 0.09 seconds) and while differences were only significant in SBJ, magnitudes of change were classed as "small" (ES = 0.28) and "moderate" (ES = 0.61), respectively. In conclusion, to improve RLA strength

  18. An armored-cable-based fiber Bragg grating sensor array for perimeter fence intrusion detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jianzhong; Dong, Bo; Varghese, Paulose; Phua, Jiliang; Foo, Siang Fook

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an armored-cable-based optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor array, for perimeter fence intrusion detection, is demonstrated and some of the field trial results are reported. The field trial was conducted at a critical local installation in Singapore in December 2010. The sensor array was put through a series of both simulated and live intrusion scenarios to test the stability and suitability of operation in the local environmental conditions and to determine its capabilities in detecting and reporting these intrusions accurately to the control station. Such a sensor array can provide perimeter intrusion detection with fine granularity and preset pin-pointing accuracy. The various types of intrusions included aided or unaided climbs, tampering and cutting of the fence, etc. The unique sensor packaging structure provides high sensitivity, crush resistance and protection against rodents. It is also capable of resolving nuisance events such as rain, birds sitting on the fence or seismic vibrations. These sensors are extremely sensitive with a response time of a few seconds. They can be customized for a desired spatial resolution and pre-determined sensitivity. Furthermore, it is easy to cascade a series of such sensors to monitor and detect intrusion events over a long stretch of fence line. Such sensors can be applied to real-time intrusion detection for perimeter security, pipeline security and communications link security.

  19. Minimizing species extinctions through strategic planning for conservation fencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringma, Jeremy L; Wintle, Brendan; Fuller, Richard A; Fisher, Diana; Bode, Michael

    2017-10-01

    Conservation fences are an increasingly common management action, particularly for species threatened by invasive predators. However, unlike many conservation actions, fence networks are expanding in an unsystematic manner, generally as a reaction to local funding opportunities or threats. We conducted a gap analysis of Australia's large predator-exclusion fence network by examining translocation of Australian mammals relative to their extinction risk. To address gaps identified in species representation, we devised a systematic prioritization method for expanding the conservation fence network that explicitly incorporated population viability analysis and minimized expected species' extinctions. The approach was applied to New South Wales, Australia, where the state government intends to expand the existing conservation fence network. Existing protection of species in fenced areas was highly uneven; 67% of predator-sensitive species were unrepresented in the fence network. Our systematic prioritization yielded substantial efficiencies in that it reduced expected number of species extinctions up to 17 times more effectively than ad hoc approaches. The outcome illustrates the importance of governance in coordinating management action when multiple projects have similar objectives and rely on systematic methods rather than expanding networks opportunistically. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  20. Mitigating reptile road mortality: fence failures compromise ecopassage effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H Baxter-Gilbert

    Full Text Available Roadways pose serious threats to animal populations. The installation of roadway mitigation measures is becoming increasingly common, yet studies that rigorously evaluate the effectiveness of these conservation tools remain rare. A highway expansion project in Ontario, Canada included exclusion fencing and ecopassages as mitigation measures designed to offset detrimental effects to one of the most imperial groups of vertebrates, reptiles. Taking a multispecies approach, we used a Before-After-Control-Impact study design to compare reptile abundance on the highway before and after mitigation at an Impact site and a Control site from 1 May to 31 August in 2012 and 2013. During this time, radio telemetry, wildlife cameras, and an automated PIT-tag reading system were used to monitor reptile movements and use of ecopassages. Additionally, a willingness to utilize experiment was conducted to quantify turtle behavioral responses to ecopassages. We found no difference in abundance of turtles on the road between the un-mitigated and mitigated highways, and an increase in the percentage of both snakes and turtles detected dead on the road post-mitigation, suggesting that the fencing was not effective. Although ecopassages were used by reptiles, the number of crossings through ecopassages was lower than road-surface crossings. Furthermore, turtle willingness to use ecopassages was lower than that reported in previous arena studies, suggesting that effectiveness of ecopassages may be compromised when alternative crossing options are available (e.g., through holes in exclusion structures. Our rigorous evaluation of reptile roadway mitigation demonstrated that when exclusion structures fail, the effectiveness of population connectivity structures is compromised. Our project emphasizes the need to design mitigation measures with the biology and behavior of the target species in mind, to implement mitigation designs in a rigorous fashion, and quantitatively

  1. Evaluation of filter fabrics for use in silt fences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The study reported was initiated to develop tests simulating field conditions that could be used to develop information for the formulation of specifications for use in purchasing filter fabrics to be used to construct silt fences. Fifteen fabrics we...

  2. Historical fencing and scientific research medieval weapons: common ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. V. Hrynchyshyn

    2015-07-01

    We considered various approaches to the reconstruction of the historical fencing. It is proved that the activities of such societies has a positive effect on the process research of features of medieval weapons, fighting tactics of different periods The various approaches to the reconstruction of the historical fencing. Proved that the activities of such societies has a positive effect on the process research of features of medieval weapons, fighting tactics of different periods.

  3. Slope failure simulations with MPM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardon, P.J.; Wang, B.; Hicks, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The simulation of slope failures, including both failure initiation and development, has been modelled using the material point method (MPM). Numerical case studies involving various slope angles, heterogeneity and rainfall infiltration are presented. It is demonstrated that, by utilising a

  4. Slope Failure Simulations with MPM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vardon, P.J.; Wang, B.; Hicks, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The simulation of slope failures, including both failure initiation and development, has been modelled using the material point method. By utilising a constitutive model which encompasses, in a simplified manner, both pre- and post-failure behaviour, the majority of types of geotechnical slope

  5. Foot loading characteristics during three fencing-specific movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Caroline; Martinelli, Nicolo; Rosenbaum, Dieter

    2011-12-01

    Plantar pressure characteristics during fencing movements may provide more specific information about the influence of foot loading on overload injury patterns. Twenty-nine experienced fencers participated in the study. Three fencing-specific movements (lunge, advance, retreat) and normal running were performed with three different shoe models: Ballestra (Nike, USA), Adistar Fencing Lo (Adidas, Germany), and the fencers' own shoes. The Pedar system (Novel, Munich, Germany) was used to collect plantar pressures at 50 Hz. Peak pressures, force-time integrals and contact times for five foot regions were compared between four athletic tasks in the lunge leg and supporting leg. Plantar pressure analysis revealed characteristic pressure distribution patterns for the fencing movements. For the lunge leg, during the lunge and advance movements the heel is predominantly loaded; during retreat, it is the hallux. For the supporting leg, during the lunge and advance movements the forefoot is predominantly loaded; during retreat, it is the hallux. Fencing-specific movements load the plantar surface in a distinct way compared with running. An effective cushioning in the heel and hallux region would help to minimize foot loading during fencing-specific movements.

  6. GPS and Electronic Fence Data Fusion for Positioning within Railway Worksite Scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueiras, Joao; Grønbæk, Lars Jesper; Ceccarelli, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Context-dependent decisions in safety-critical applications require careful consideration of accuracy and timeliness of the underlying context information. Relevant examples include location-dependent actions in mobile distributed systems. This paper considers localization functions for personali......Context-dependent decisions in safety-critical applications require careful consideration of accuracy and timeliness of the underlying context information. Relevant examples include location-dependent actions in mobile distributed systems. This paper considers localization functions...... for personalized warning systems for railway workers, where the safety aspects require timely and precise identification whether a worker is located in a dangerous (red) or safe (green) zone within the worksite. The paper proposes and analyzes a data fusion approach based on low-cost GPS receivers integrated...... with information from the electronic fences is developed and analyzed. Different accuracy metrics are proposed and the benefit obtained from the fusion with electronic fences is quantitatively analyzed in the scenarios of a single mobile entity: By having fence information, the correct zone estimation can increase...

  7. Fencing as a Part of the Urban Context of the District Blasewitz in Dresden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Potapova

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Every city has its unique urban context including the objects that form the historical environment of the city; the material elements represented by buildings, constructions, sculptural and architectural forms, elements of spatial surroundings of monuments and terraced houses; the atmosphere, the landscape elements, and the visage as an element expressing the real nature of the visual object, that is the city space (the open space “enclosed” by material elements.The city of Dresden is not an exception. In its district Blasewitz, one of the most important aspects of urban context is expressed by the fences of the Gründer Epoch. These pompous and fine constructions separating the street space from the park villas have remained since the middle of the XIX century.The article explores the origin of villas as an urban ensemble of the Italian architecture, the development of this type of architecture in the 18-19th centuries and the methods of preservation of all the elements of this structure, including fences. It describes the fences remained in the district Blasewitz and their unique features.

  8. Assisted Natural Regeneration with Fencing in the Central and Northern Zones of Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belem, B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite their socio-economic importance, forests and other woodland vegetation are declining rapidly in Africa. In the Sahel, climate change and desertification intensify this problem and the local population is lacking woodland resources for daily life. Therefore, there is a need for improved and long-term restoration of degraded ecosystems. The present article investigates an approach of sustainable forest restoration by Assisted Natural Regeneration (ANR with fencing, a technique adopted by newTree, a Swiss NGO, since 2003 in the Central and Northern zones of Burkina Faso. The present article investigates the effects of ANR on vegetation restoration and on population's livelihood. Methods include vegetation inventories, literature review, analysis of newTree technical reports from 2003 to 2012, stakeholders' interviews and cost-benefit examination. Results show a striking development of vegetation within only nine years of protection. Inventories of trees inside and outside fences show that variety of tree species and number of trees is much higher inside the protected areas than outside fencing. Moreover, the approach of newTree contributes to farmers' livelihood improvement by the valorization of non-wood forest products (NWFP and sustainable agriculture. Costs for fencing are relatively high but on the other hand the approach is very effective by involving the population in a participatory way. The double objective – biodiversity conservation and poverty reduction - can be effectively achieved by the whole approach of newTree using ANR technique. ANR could be applied in areas where tree planting is made difficult by the poverty and the lack of water for the creation of nurseries.

  9. Improving Pool Fencing Legislation in Queensland, Australia: Attitudes and Impact on Child Drowning Fatalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard C. Franklin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Four-sided, non-climbable pool fencing is an effective strategy for preventing children from drowning in home swimming pools. In 2009, the Queensland Government introduced legislation to improve the effectiveness of pool fencing. This study explores community attitudes towards the effectiveness of these legislative changes and examines child (<5 years drowning deaths in pools. Data from the 2011 Queensland Computer-Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI Social Survey include results from questions related to pool ownership and pool fencing legislation. Fatal child drowning cases between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2015 were sourced from coronial data. Of the 1263 respondents, 26/100 households had a pool. A total of 58% believed tightening legislation would be effective in reducing child drowning deaths. Pool owners were more likely to doubt the effectiveness of legislation (p < 0.001 when compared to non-pool owners. Perceptions of effectiveness did not differ by presence of children under the age of five. There were 46 children who drowned in Queensland home pools (7.8/100,000 pools with children residing in the residence/annum between 2005 and 2015. While pool owners were less likely to think that tightening the legislation would be effective, the number of children drowning in home swimming pools declined over the study period. Drowning prevention agencies have more work to do to ensure that the most vulnerable (young children in houses with swimming pools are protected.

  10. Effect of defence response time during lunge in foil fencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Cruz, Carmen; Rojas, F Javier; Gutiérrez-Davila, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of stimulus change timing on reaction response time parameters, horizontal velocity of the centre of mass (CM) and precision during offensive actions in fencing. Twelve fencers from the Spanish National Foil Team were included in the study. Two 500 Hz force plates were used to register the horizontal component of the reaction force while a 3D video camera set at 250 Hz recorded the spatial position of 11 body markers and a projector connected to a programmed stopwatch projected a moving target (stimulus) on a screen. When the circle (target) appeared in the centre of the plastron, fencers had to execute a step-forward-lunge as fast as possible, trying to touch the circle with the tip of the foil. During the lunge, the position of the target could randomly shift or not to three different positions. The stimulus change was performed randomly at four different times with a progressive delay. The results show that target changes did not have any effect when they occurred at the beginning of the movement sequence. However, when the target change was delayed, reaction and movement times increased and the technical execution of the lunge changed, leading to more errors.

  11. FenceBook a Geofencing based Advertisements Application Using Android

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owais Qayum

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Geo-fencing (geofencing is a great feature in a software program that uses Global Positioning System (GPS or radio frequency identification (RFID to define the geographical boundaries feature. Actually geofence is a virtual barrier. Geofencing is an innovative technology, an online marketplace for proactive contextual services that allows users to easily find interesting services, can easily subscribe to it and to allow providers offer their services for a variety of applications such as electronic toll collection, contextual advertising or tourist information systems, even without additional infrastructure. The main objective of this research was to understand how the use of spatial data can improve advertising performance for customers. Tracking systems and monitoring, based on global navigation services by satellite, and include geofencing function, could also contribute to the exact location of an institution or company and increase sales and business perspective efficiently. Instead of large billboards they can now advertise on smartphones which is economically and accurately tested. Therefore, we have developed a concept for a market that offers geofence, which can be applied by all and increase the use and integration of proactive services based on location in everyday life.

  12. The Failure of the American Dream in August Wilson's Fences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peyman Amanolahi Baharvand

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper traces the impossibility of the fulfillment of the American dream for AfricanAmericans in August Wilson‟s Fences. It examines why Troy Maxon, as the protagonist of the play, is not able to fulfill his dreams of freedom, and economic achievements in an environment of oppression where he finds himself surrounded by hostile whites who hinder his development. It indicates that the racial discrimination, manifested in various forms including racial segregation prevalent in the white-dominated American society, impedes Troy‟s progress. A large number of African-Americans migrated from southern states to the north in 1920s and 1930s in order to find jobs in industrial northern states. They had been told that the United States was the promised land of equal chances wherein everyone regardless of race and gender was able to progress from rags to riches. They left the South, in which racism was still pervasive despite the abolition of slavery, and moved to the North for the fulfillment of the dreams they had been promised. The advocates of the American Dream claimed that hard diligence and intelligence could lead a man to material prosperity. Nevertheless, this paper demonstrates that since African-Americans are considered to be „„others‟‟ in the white dominated society, financial progress and other aspects of the American Dream remain impossible dreams for them.

  13. Shelter effect efficacy of sand fences: A comparison of systems in a wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Qu, Jianjun; Ling, Yuquan; Liu, Benli; Xiao, Jianhua

    2018-02-01

    The Lanzhou-Xinjiang High-speed Railway runs through an expansive wind area in the Gobi Desert and blown-sand disasters are a critical issue affecting its operation. To strengthen the blown-sand disaster shelter systems along the railway, the shelter effects of punching plate and wire mesh fences with approximately equal porosity (48%) were simulated in a wind tunnel. The experimental results showed that the wind velocity was reduced to a higher extent by the punching plate fence than by the wire mesh fence. When a single row of sand fencing was used, the wind velocity reduction coefficient (Rcz) values downwind of the punching plate fence and wire mesh fence reached 71.77% and 39.37%, respectively. When double rows of sand fencing were used, the Rcz values downwind of the punching plate and wire mesh fences were approximately 87.48% and 60.81%, respectively. For the flow field structure on the leeward side of the fencing, the deceleration zone behind the punching plate fence was more pronounced than that behind the wire mesh fence. The vortex zone was not obvious and the reverse flow disappeared for both types of fences, which indicates that the turbulent intensity was small. The sand-trapping efficiency of the wire mesh fence was close to that of punching plate fence. When a single row of sand fencing was set up, the total mass flux density decreased, on average, by 65.85% downwind of the wire mesh fence, and 75.06% downwind of the punching plate fence; when double rows of sand fencing were present, the total mass flux density decreased, on average, by 84.53% downwind of the wire mesh fence and 84.51% downwind of the punching plate fence. In addition, the wind-proof efficiency and the sand-proof efficiency of the punching plate fence and the wire mesh fence decreased with increasing wind velocities. Consequently, punching plate and wire mesh fences may effectively control the sand hazard in the expansive wind area of the Gobi Desert.

  14. The Neapolitan School of Fencing: Its Origins and Early Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair Charles

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Neapolitan school of fencing, which received official sanction after the reunification of Italy in the nineteenth century, originated in the seventeenth century. It was originally best known as a system of sword and dagger fencing. It is documented as such in both Italian and Spanish sources during the reign of Carlos II and the War of the Spanish Succession (1665-1714. This article discusses the evidence from both sets of sources during this period, comparing and contrasting the Neapolitan approach to previous, contemporary and subsequent approaches in order to provide the necessary historical context for its origin and development.

  15. 25 CFR 171.410 - Can I install a fence on a BIA irrigation project?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Can I install a fence on a BIA irrigation project? 171... IRRIGATION OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE Irrigation Facilities § 171.410 Can I install a fence on a BIA irrigation project? Yes. Fences are considered structures and may be installed in compliance with § 171.405. ...

  16. Conserving large populations of lions - the argument for fences has holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, S; Becker, M S; Durant, S M; M'Soka, J; Matandiko, W; Dickman, A J; Christianson, D; Dröge, E; Mweetwa, T; Pettorelli, N; Rosenblatt, E; Schuette, P; Woodroffe, R; Bashir, S; Beudels-Jamar, R C; Blake, S; Borner, M; Breitenmoser, C; Broekhuis, F; Cozzi, G; Davenport, T R B; Deutsch, J; Dollar, L; Dolrenry, S; Douglas-Hamilton, I; Fitzherbert, E; Foley, C; Hazzah, L; Henschel, P; Hilborn, R; Hopcraft, J G C; Ikanda, D; Jacobson, A; Joubert, B; Joubert, D; Kelly, M S; Lichtenfeld, L; Mace, G M; Milanzi, J; Mitchell, N; Msuha, M; Muir, R; Nyahongo, J; Pimm, S; Purchase, G; Schenck, C; Sillero-Zubiri, C; Sinclair, A R E; Songorwa, A N; Stanley-Price, M; Tehou, C A; Trout, C; Wall, J; Wittemyer, G; Zimmermann, A

    2013-11-01

    Packer et al. reported that fenced lion populations attain densities closer to carrying capacity than unfenced populations. However, fenced populations are often maintained above carrying capacity, and most are small. Many more lions are conserved per dollar invested in unfenced ecosystems, which avoid the ecological and economic costs of fencing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Effectiveness of electric deer fences to protect planted seedlings in Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.W. George; T.W. Bowersox; L.H. McCormick

    1991-01-01

    Electric fences are used in Pennsylvania following a timber harvest to reduce deer browse on natural regeneration. In 1984, five-strand electric deer fences were constructed around two central Pennsylvania clearcuts. Northern red oak, white ash, white pine, and yellow-poplar seedlings were planted inside each fenced clearcut area in 1984 and 1985. One-half of the 1280...

  18. Effect of fence height on joint angles of agility dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Emily; Leśniak, Kirsty

    2013-12-01

    The Kennel Club (KC) and United Kingdom Agility (UKA) govern major dog agility competitions in the UK. Dogs are categorised into different jump heights depending on their height at the withers, with fence heights ranging from 300 to 650 mm for both organisations. Dogs fall into one of three height categories when competing under KC rules and one of four height categories under UKA rules. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of an additional height category for agility dogs measuring over 430 mm at the withers. Jump heights were selected that related to the percentage of body height that dogs of 430 mm (7% lower) and 431 mm (51% higher) height at the withers would be encouraged to jump under UKA regulations without the addition of their fourth ('standard height') category. Joint angles were determined from anatomical markers placed on the forelimb and hind limb joints, and at six points along the vertebral column. As fence height increased, flexion of the scapulohumeral joint increased significantly for both the take-off and bascule (arc) phases of the jump. The increase in flexion as a consequence of the increase in fence height is likely to result in intensified stretching of the biceps brachii and supraspinatus muscles. In addition, increasing fence high resulted in an increase in the sacroiliac joint angle during take-off. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effectiveness of electro-fencing for restricting the ranging behaviour ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We found decreasing densities of zebra (Equus quagga) and decreasing encounter frequencies of waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus), stagnant encounter frequencies in the case of topi (Damaliscus lunatus jimela) and stagnant densities of impala (Aepyceros melampus). The latter species can jump fences, and we argue ...

  20. Teaching Electric Fences: The Physics behind the Brainiac Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In many states, electric fences are used to prevent animals from leaving a designated area, for example for grazing. They are quite well known by most students and can therefore serve as daily-life examples of electric circuits. Besides helping to grasp the ideas of Kirchhoff's laws for voltages and currents in circuits according to loop and…

  1. Silt fences: An economical technique for measuring hillslope soil erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter R. Robichaud; Robert E. Brown

    2002-01-01

    Measuring hillslope erosion has historically been a costly, time-consuming practice. An easy to install low-cost technique using silt fences (geotextile fabric) and tipping bucket rain gauges to measure onsite hillslope erosion was developed and tested. Equipment requirements, installation procedures, statistical design, and analysis methods for measuring hillslope...

  2. Aspen fencing in northern Arizona: A 15-year perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Rolf

    2001-01-01

    Aspen clearcuts in the 1960s and 1970s on the Peaks Ranger District of the Coconino National Forest in northern Arizona failed to regenerate successfully because of browsing primarily by elk. Since 1985, over 400 acres have been successfully regenerated using fencing of various designs to exclude elk. The expense and visual impact of establishing and maintaining over...

  3. Developing an ethically acceptable virtual fencing system for sheep

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marini, Danila; Meuleman, M.D.; Belson, Sue; Rodenburg, T.B.; Llewellyn, Rick; Lee, Caroline

    2018-01-01

    To ensure animal welfare isn’t compromised when using virtual fencing, animals must be able to associate a benign conditioned stimulus with an aversive stimulus. This study used an associative learning test to train 30, four-year-old, Merino x Suffolk ewes, to associate an audio cue with an electric

  4. The fence experiment - a first evaluation of shelter models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Bechmann, Andreas; Conti, Davide

    2016-01-01

    We present a preliminary evaluation of shelter models of different degrees of complexity using full-scale lidar measurements of the shelter on a vertical plane behind and orthogonal to a fence. Model results accounting for the distribution of the relative wind direction within the observed direct...

  5. Lesser prairie-chicken fence collision risk across its northern distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Samantha G.; Haukos, David A.; Plumb, Reid T.; Hagen, Christian A.; Pitman, James C.; Lautenbach, Joseph M.; Sullins, Daniel S.; Kraft, John D.; Lautenbach, Jonathan D.

    2016-01-01

    Livestock fences have been hypothesized to significantly contribute to mortality of lesser prairie-chickens (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus); however, quantification of mortality due to fence collisions is lacking across their current distribution. Variation in fence density, landscape composition and configuration, and land use could influence collision risk of lesser prairie-chickens. We monitored fences within 3 km of known leks during spring and fall and surveyed for signs of collision occurrence within 20 m of fences in 6 study sites in Kansas and Colorado, USA during 2013 and 2014. We assessed mortality locations of radio-tagged birds (n = 286) for evidence of fence collisions and compared distance to fence relative to random points. Additionally, we quantified locations, propensity, and frequency of fences crossed by lesser prairie-chickens. We tested for landscape and vegetative characteristics that influenced fence-cross propensity and frequency of global positioning system (GPS)-marked birds. A minimum of 12,706 fence crossings occurred by GPS-marked lesser prairie-chickens. We found 3 carcasses and 12 additional possible instances of evidence of collision during >2,800 km of surveyed fences. We found evidence for a single suspected collision based on carcass evidence for 148 mortalities of transmittered birds. Mortality locations of transmittered birds were located at distances from fences 15% farther than expected at random. Our data suggested minimal biological significance and indicated that propensity and frequency of fence crossings were random processes. Lesser prairie-chickens do not appear to be experiencing significant mortality risk due to fence collisions in Kansas and Colorado. Focusing resources on other limiting factors (i.e., habitat quality) has greater potential for impact on population demography than fence marking and removal.

  6. A Look over the Fence - The Psychology of Religion

    OpenAIRE

    Böhmer, Annegret

    2010-01-01

    Psychological Theories in the Discussion on Instruction in Ethics A Look over the Fence - The Psychology of Religion Annegret Böhmer Children and adolescents are supposed to be given the opportunity in school not only to acquire knowledge and skills, but also to develop their identity and receive assistance in leading a successful life. In the Federal Republic of Germany it long remained an undisputed fact that religious instruction was responsible for the latter. According to Ar...

  7. Effects of inorganic lead on Western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salice, Christopher J., E-mail: chris.salice@ttu.ed [US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); Suski, Jamie G., E-mail: jamie.suski@ttu.ed [US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); Bazar, Matthew A., E-mail: matthew.bazar@us.army.mi [US Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); Talent, Larry G., E-mail: larry.talent@okstate.ed [Oklahoma State University, Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Although anthropogenic pollutants are thought to threaten reptilian species, there are few toxicity studies on reptiles. We evaluated the toxicity of Pb as lead acetate to the Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis). The acute lethal dose and sub-acute (14-day) toxicity studies were used to narrow exposure concentrations for a sub-chronic (60-day) study. In the sub-chronic study, adult and juvenile male lizards were dosed via gavage with 0, 1, 10 and 20 mg Pb/kg-bw/day. Mortality was limited and occurred only at the highest dose (20 mg Pb/kg-bw/d). There were statistically significant sub-lethal effects of 10 and 20 mg Pb/kg-bw/d on body weight, cricket consumption, organ weight, hematological parameters and post-dose behaviors. Of these, Pb-induced changes in body weight are most useful for ecological risk assessment because it is linked to fitness in wild lizard populations. The Western fence lizard is a useful model for reptilian toxicity studies. - The Western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis, is sensitive to Pb and is a useful laboratory model for ecotoxicological testing of reptiles.

  8. Effects of inorganic lead on Western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salice, Christopher J.; Suski, Jamie G.; Bazar, Matthew A.; Talent, Larry G.

    2009-01-01

    Although anthropogenic pollutants are thought to threaten reptilian species, there are few toxicity studies on reptiles. We evaluated the toxicity of Pb as lead acetate to the Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis). The acute lethal dose and sub-acute (14-day) toxicity studies were used to narrow exposure concentrations for a sub-chronic (60-day) study. In the sub-chronic study, adult and juvenile male lizards were dosed via gavage with 0, 1, 10 and 20 mg Pb/kg-bw/day. Mortality was limited and occurred only at the highest dose (20 mg Pb/kg-bw/d). There were statistically significant sub-lethal effects of 10 and 20 mg Pb/kg-bw/d on body weight, cricket consumption, organ weight, hematological parameters and post-dose behaviors. Of these, Pb-induced changes in body weight are most useful for ecological risk assessment because it is linked to fitness in wild lizard populations. The Western fence lizard is a useful model for reptilian toxicity studies. - The Western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis, is sensitive to Pb and is a useful laboratory model for ecotoxicological testing of reptiles.

  9. Poor construction, not time, takes its toll on subsidised fences designed to deter large carnivores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Frank

    Full Text Available Large carnivore conservation may be considered as successful in Sweden, as wolf (Canis lupus, lynx (Lynx lynx, brown bear (Ursus arctos, golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos, and wolverine (Gulo gulo populations have recovered from extinction or near extinction to viable populations during the last three decades. Particularly the wolf and lynx populations have returned at the cost of an increasing number of carnivore attacks on domestic livestock. To support coexistence between carnivores and livestock production, the Swedish authorities subsidise interventions to prevent or reduce the number of carnivore attacks. The most commonly used intervention is carnivore deterring fencing, and all livestock owners can apply for subsidies to build a fence. To receive reimbursement the fence must be approved by the authorities according to predefined criteria. An important part of any management aiming to be adaptive is evaluating interventions. In this paper we evaluate to what extent previously subsidised fences still meet the criteria 1-15 years after their approval. Of 296 fences that had received subsidies in the county of Värmland, 100 randomly selected fences were revisited in 2016. From this subsample 14% of the fences still met the initial criteria for subsidies. None of the fences that still fulfilled the criteria were more than 8 years old, whereas fences with identified failures occurred in all age groups. Of the 86 fences that failed to meet the criteria, construction failures were the most commonly occurring problem. Maintenance failures, wear and tear, only explain a minor part of the failures. To improve the quality of fencing, as well as the quality and longevity of the subsidies programme, there is a need for improved communication between authorities, and improved communication and support from the authorities to livestock producers before and during construction of fences, as well as more rigorous inspection when the fences are built.

  10. Getting to the point: injury patterns and medical care in competitive fencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmer, Peter A

    2008-01-01

    Modern competitive fencing, consisting of the three disciplines of foil, epee, and sabre, has experienced a rapid growth in participation across all age groups in the USA in the past decade. Unfortunately, because of media sensationalism and a lack of well-designed epidemiological studies, there are significant misconceptions regarding both the incidence and types of injuries presented in fencing. Recent research has indicated that the rate of time-loss injuries in competitive fencing is very low and the majority of these injuries are lower extremity sprains and strains, typical of ballistic, change-of-direction sports. However, most medical assistance in fencing is for minor (nontime-loss) soft tissue injuries (blisters, contusions, abrasions). Although extremely rare, significant fencing-specific injuries, such as lacerations and punctures, occur. Medical personnel dealing with fencing competitions need to be aware of the potential for catastrophic or fatal wounds.

  11. Effect of upstream fencing on shelter zone behind solid models simulating sand formations and dunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Hassan

    2013-04-01

    Moreover, results indicate that some dune/fence combinations may cause shifting of the dune upwind (instead of downwind in the absence of fence. This effect means that, with such combinations, a dune would eventually disappear. The distance between the model downwind base line and the location of reattachment (length of shelter zone was plotted against the distance of fence from upwind base line of model to determine the best possible dune/fence combination. Solid fencing (constructed from masonry bricks or stones to shelter isolated sand humps and dunes is effective in alleviating dangers on nearby structures (dune shifting upwind and to less sand drift and saltation downwind. Also, the results indicated that, it is recommended to start by dune fencing and give enough time for the project zone to widen and be effectively protected before starting the construction.

  12. Preliminary Slope Stability Study Using Slope/ W

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazran Harun; Mohd Abd Wahab Yusof; Kamarudin Samuding; Mohd Muzamil Mohd Hashim; Nurul Fairuz Diyana Bahrudin

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the stability of earth structures is the oldest type of numerical analysis in geotechnical engineering. Limit equilibrium types of analyses for assessing the stability of earth slopes have been in use in geotechnical engineering for many decades. Modern limit equilibrium software is making it possible to handle ever-increasing complexity within an analysis. It is being considered as the potential method in dealing with complex stratigraphy, highly irregular pore-water pressure conditions, various linear and nonlinear shear strength models and almost any kind of slip surface shape. It allows rapid decision making by providing an early indication of the potential suitability of sites based on slope stability analysis. Hence, a preliminary slope stability study has been developed to improve the capacity of Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) in assessing potential sites for Borehole Disposal for Disused Sealed Radioactive Sources. The results showed that geometry of cross section A-A ' , B-B ' , C-C ' and D-D ' achieved the factor of safety not less than 1.4 and these are deemed acceptable. (author)

  13. Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) - Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) entitled "Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site", approved by the Director-General following discussion in the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 24 September 2015, is now available via this link.   This revised circular cancels and replaces Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 2) also entitled "Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site", of September 2014. The circular was revised predominantly in order to specify that access to the CERN site is granted to CERN Pension Fund beneficiaries only provided that they are actually in receipt of payments from the Fund; and to allow the Director-General to permit special types of vehicles on site, such as trailers. It also includes a certain number of text improvements and an updated version of the implementation measures, in particular with regard to vehicle identification, road traffic and parking.  

  14. Parasite infection rates of impala (Aepyceros melampus) in fenced game reserves in relation to reserve characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezenwa, V.O.

    2004-01-01

    Under certain conditions reserves can pose a threat to wildlife conservation by increasing the transmission of parasites and pathogens. In this study, I investigated associations between reserve characteristics including area, density and species richness and parasite infection rates in impala (Aepyceros melampus). Using coprological methods to measure gastrointestinal parasitism rates of impala inhabiting five fully or partially fenced game reserves in central Kenya, I found that bovid species richness was correlated with parasite taxa richness across reserves, and that prevalence rates of multi-host strongyle nematodes were higher in reserves with more species. In addition, reserve size was also implicated as a potential predictor of infection risk. Overall, these results suggest that wildlife inhabiting highly diverse and small reserves may suffer from higher than normal rates of infection. Given the potential debilitating effects increases in parasitism can have on wildlife, these results underscore the importance of considering parasite transmission dynamics in the management of small, fenced protected areas. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Experimental Study of the Jet Engine Exhaust Flow Field of Aircraft and Blast Fences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifu Wang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A combined blast fence is introduced in this paper to improve the solid blast fences and louvered ones. Experiments of the jet engine exhaust flow (hereinafter jet flow for short field and tests of three kinds of blast fences in two positions were carried out. The results show that the pressure and temperature at the centre of the jet flow decrease gradually as the flow moves farther away from the nozzle. The pressure falls fast with the maximum rate of 41.7%. The dynamic pressure 150 m away from the nozzle could reach 58.8 Pa, with a corresponding wind velocity of 10 m/s. The temperature affected range of 40°C is 113.5×20 m. The combined blast fence not only reduces the pressure of the flow in front of it but also solves the problems that the turbulence is too strong behind the solid blast fences and the pressure is too high behind the louvered blast fences. And the pressure behind combined blast fence is less than 10 Pa. The height of the fence is related to the distance from the jet nozzle. The nearer the fence is to the nozzle, the higher it is. When it is farther from the nozzle, its height can be lowered.

  16. Rock Slope Design Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Based on the stratigraphy and the type of slope stability problems, the flat lying, Paleozoic age, sedimentary : rocks of Ohio were divided into three design units: 1) competent rock design unit consisting of sandstones, limestones, : and siltstones ...

  17. Dark Slope Streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    13 March 2004 Martian slope streaks occur in the regions most heavily mantled by fine, dry dust, particularly Tharsis, Arabia, and the knobby areas between Amazonis and Cerberus. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some examples of dark slope streaks off of buttes, mesas, and massifs in a dust-mantled crater in central Arabia Terra. New slope streaks form from time to time in the modern martian environment; the streaks in this image probably formed within the past decade. To create them, dust slid or avalanched down the slopes in an almost liquid-like manner. The image is located near 6.8oN, 321.7oW. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  18. Unstable slope management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    This Rapid Response Project gathered information on existing unstable slope management programs, with a : focus on asset management practices in the United States and overseas. On the basis of this study, the research : team summarized and recommende...

  19. Rock slope design guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    This Manual is intended to provide guidance for the design of rock cut slopes, rockfall catchment, and : rockfall controls. Recommendations presented in this manual are based on research presented in Shakoor : and Admassu (2010) entitled Rock Slop...

  20. Different kinds of 'under-water-fences' in the Baltic from various periods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baittinger, Claudia

    an entire Stone Age landscape. Studies of fishing fences from different localities have shown that mainly hazel (Corylus avellana) was used for the wickerwork, but also ash and about five other deciduous tree species were found. In one of the fishing fences the horizontal material was mostly made of lime...

  1. Improving Pool Fencing Legislation in Queensland, Australia: Attitudes and Impact on Child Drowning Fatalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Richard C; Peden, Amy E

    2017-11-24

    Four-sided, non-climbable pool fencing is an effective strategy for preventing children from drowning in home swimming pools. In 2009, the Queensland Government introduced legislation to improve the effectiveness of pool fencing. This study explores community attitudes towards the effectiveness of these legislative changes and examines child (houses with swimming pools) are protected.

  2. Training dairy bull calves to stay within light-built electric fences (Research Note

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. MARTISKAINEN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Training cattle to avoid electric fences before turnout to grazing reduces the risk of the animals breaking out from their paddock. We investigated the time needed for dairy bull calves to learn to avoid a light-built electric fence. Nineteen dairy bull calves were trained to an electric fence in a training yard during seven days. The number of electric shocks the animals received from the training fence was recorded continuously. After the training period, the calves were turned to pasture. Nine of the animals were also grazed the following summer as yearlings, and observed before turnout in a smaller enclosure. The calves got more shocks from the fence during training hour 1 than during any of the following seven hours. The number of shocks the calves received from the fence also declined from training day 1 to 2 and from training day 3 to 4. The results indicate that the dairy bull calves learned to avoid an electric fence quickly, even within an hour from release into the training yard. A simple training procedure was sufficient to ensure that the animals could be grazed in and would avoid a light-built electric fencing system as calves and, even after a winter-housing period, as bulls.;

  3. [Application of electronic fence technology based on GIS in Oncomelania hupensis snail monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi-Hua, Chen; Yi-Sheng, Zhu; Zhi-Qiang, Xue; Xue-Bing, Li; Yi-Min, Ding; Li-Jun, Bi; Kai-Min, Gao; You, Zhang

    2017-07-27

    To study the application of Geographic Information System (GIS) electronic fence technique in Oncomelania hupensis snail monitoring. The electronic fence was set around the history and existing snail environments in the electronic map, the information about snail monitoring and controlling was linked to the electronic fence, and the snail monitoring information system was established on these bases. The monitoring information was input through the computer and smart phone. The electronic fence around the history and existing snail environments was set in the electronic map (Baidu map), and the snail monitoring information system and smart phone APP were established. The monitoring information was input and upload real-time, and the snail monitoring information was demonstrated in real time on Baidu map. By using the electronic fence technology based on GIS, the unique "environment electronic archives" for each snail monitoring environment can be established in the electronic map, and real-time, dynamic monitoring and visual management can be realized.

  4. Factors affecting seismic response of submarine slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Biscontin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of submerged slopes on the continental shelf to seismic or storm loading has become an important element in the risk assessment for offshore structures and 'local' tsunami hazards worldwide. The geological profile of these slopes typically includes normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated soft cohesive soils with layer thickness ranging from a few meters to hundreds of meters. The factor of safety obtained from pseudo-static analyses is not always a useful measure for evaluating the slope response, since values less than one do not necessarily imply slope failure with large movements of the soil mass. This paper addresses the relative importance of different factors affecting the response of submerged slopes during seismic loading. The analyses use a dynamic finite element code which includes a constitutive law describing the anisotropic stress-strain-strength behavior of normally consolidated to lightly overconsolidated clays. The model also incorporates anisotropic hardening to describe the effect of different shear strain and stress histories as well as bounding surface principles to provide realistic descriptions of the accumulation of the plastic strains and excess pore pressure during successive loading cycles. The paper presents results from parametric site response analyses on slope geometry and layering, soil material parameters, and input ground motion characteristics. The predicted maximum shear strains, permanent deformations, displacement time histories and maximum excess pore pressure development provide insight of slope performance during a seismic event.

  5. Conceptual principles of fencing development in children’s sports schools in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Driukov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out conceptual principles for successful and dynamic development of fencing in children’s sports schools in Ukraine. Material: the researches were conducted on material of children’s sports school Dynamo in Kiev. In this work we used SWOT analysis - method of strategic planning, which implies determination of external and internal factors of organization and their dividing into four categories: strengths (strong sides, weaknesses (weak sides, opportunities and threats. For determination of experts’ opinion concordance in SWOT analysis we used concordance coefficient. Results: we worked out conception of fencing development in children’s sports schools in Ukraine in modern conditions. The specificity of this conception implies determination of strategic approaches to further fencing progressing in children’s sports schools in Ukraine. The conception can serve as bench mark for development and realization of program documents in sphere of fencing progressing or its different branches. Conclusions: we have worked out conception of fencing progressing in children’s sports schools in Ukraine, which is based on achievements and traditions of fencing in Ukraine and in the world. Its development is based on systemic analysis of internal and external factors, which influence on development of fencing in sports schools and on choice of its progressing strategy in new social economical conditions.

  6. Tech-Savvy Beef Cattle? How Heifers Respond to Moving Virtual Fence Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana L.M. Campbell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Global Positioning System (GPS-based virtual fences offer the potential to improve the management of grazing animals. Prototype collar devices utilising patented virtual fencing algorithms were placed on six Angus heifers in a 6.15 hectare paddock. After a “no fence” period, sequential, shifting virtual fences restricted the animals to 40%, 60%, and 80% of the paddock area widthways and 50% lengthways across 22 days. Audio cues signaled the virtual boundary, and were paired with electrical stimuli if the animals continued forward into the boundary. Within approximately 48 h, the cattle learned the 40% fence and were henceforth restricted to the subsequent inclusion zones a minimum of 96.70% (±standard error 0.01% of the time. Over time, the animals increasingly stayed within the inclusion zones using audio cues alone, and on average, approached the new fence within 4.25 h. The animals were thus attentive to the audio cue, not the fence location. The time spent standing and lying and the number of steps were similar between inclusion zones (all p ≥ 0.42. More lying bouts occurred at the 80% and lengthways inclusion zones relative to “no fence” (p = 0.04. Further research should test different cattle groups in variable paddock settings and measure physiological welfare responses to the virtual fencing stimuli.

  7. Slope earthquake stability

    CERN Document Server

    Changwei, Yang; Jing, Lian; Wenying, Yu; Jianjing, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    This book begins with the dynamic characteristics of the covering layerbedrock type slope, containing monitoring data of the seismic array, shaking table tests, numerical analysis and theoretical derivation. Then it focuses on the landslide mechanism and assessment method. It also proposes a model that assessing the hazard area based on the field investigations. Many questions, exercises and solutions are given. Researchers and engineers in the field of Geotechnical Engineering and Anti-seismic Engineering can benefit from it.

  8. Border Security Fencing and Wildlife: The End of the Transboundary Paradigm in Eurasia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linnell, John D. C.; Trouwborst, Arie; Boitani, Luigi; Kaczensky, Petra; Kusak, Josip; Skrbinsek, Tomaz; Buuveibaatar, Bayarbaatar; Bischof, Richard; Breitenmoser, Urs

    2016-01-01

    The ongoing refugee crisis in Europe has seen many countries rush to construct border security fencing to divert or control the flow of people. This follows a trend of border fence construction across Eurasia during the post-9/11 era. This development has gone largely unnoticed by conservation biologists during an era in which, ironically, transboundary cooperation has emerged as a conservation paradigm. These fences represent a major threat to wildlife because they can cause mortality, obstruct access to seasonally important resources, and reduce effective population size. We summarise the extent of the issue and propose concrete mitigation measures. PMID:27331878

  9. The Q-Slope Method for Rock Slope Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Neil; Barton, Nick

    2017-12-01

    Q-slope is an empirical rock slope engineering method for assessing the stability of excavated rock slopes in the field. Intended for use in reinforcement-free road or railway cuttings or in opencast mines, Q-slope allows geotechnical engineers to make potential adjustments to slope angles as rock mass conditions become apparent during construction. Through case studies across Asia, Australia, Central America, and Europe, a simple correlation between Q-slope and long-term stable slopes was established. Q-slope is designed such that it suggests stable, maintenance-free bench-face slope angles of, for instance, 40°-45°, 60°-65°, and 80°-85° with respective Q-slope values of approximately 0.1, 1.0, and 10. Q-slope was developed by supplementing the Q-system which has been extensively used for characterizing rock exposures, drill-core, and tunnels under construction for the last 40 years. The Q' parameters (RQD, J n, J a, and J r) remain unchanged in Q-slope. However, a new method for applying J r/ J a ratios to both sides of potential wedges is used, with relative orientation weightings for each side. The term J w, which is now termed J wice, takes into account long-term exposure to various climatic and environmental conditions such as intense erosive rainfall and ice-wedging effects. Slope-relevant SRF categories for slope surface conditions, stress-strength ratios, and major discontinuities such as faults, weakness zones, or joint swarms have also been incorporated. This paper discusses the applicability of the Q-slope method to slopes ranging from less than 5 m to more than 250 m in height in both civil and mining engineering projects.

  10. Designing, developing and implementing a living snow fence program for New York state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Living snow fences (LSF) are a form of passive snow control designed to mitigate blowing and drifting snow problems : on roadways. Blowing and drifting snow can increase the cost of highway maintenance and create hazardous driving : conditions when s...

  11. A Different Pitch to Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolbert, William

    2017-01-01

    The query "When are we ever going to use this?" is easily answered when discussing the slope of a line. The pitch of a roof, the grade of a road, and stair stringers are three applications of slope that are used extensively. The concept of slope, which is introduced fairly early in the mathematics curriculum has hands-on applications…

  12. Characterization of Plated Via Hole Fences for Isolation Between Stripline Circuits in LTCC Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Chen, Donghoon; Yook, Jong-Gwan; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1998-01-01

    Reduced coupling between adjacent striplines in LTCC packages is commonly accomplished by walls made of plated via holes. In this paper, a 3D-FEM electromagnetic simulation of stripline with filled via fences on both sides is presented. It is shown that the radiation loss of the stripline and the coupling between striplines increases if the fence is placed too close to the stripline.

  13. Plant Diversity in Live Fences and Pastures, Two Examples from the Mexican Humid Tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Guerra, Betsabé; Rosas, Noé Velázquez; López-Acosta, Juan Carlos

    2014-09-01

    This study analyzes the potential uses of live fences and pastures as reservoirs of plant diversity for two regions with different management histories, Los Tuxtlas (LT) and Uxpanapa (UX), Veracruz, México. We studied two habitats, live fences and pastures, analyzed their species richness, diversity, structure and plant composition and classified species according to plant regeneration modes (light-demanding and shade tolerant), seed dispersal syndrome and their local uses. We recorded 62 species of trees at LT and 48 at UX. Live fences were more diverse than pastures in both regions. The LT site showed to analyze the relationship a higher diversity of plants in regeneration stages than the one at UX. However, UX had higher diversity of adult plants in the pastures than LT. Composition and structure of live fences were different between regions, as well as within live fences and pastures, 53 % of species were light-demanding and 40 % were shade tolerant; 70 % of the species were dispersed by birds. Differences between sites are associated with the modifications in live fences structure, which changed according to managerial practices and the use of local species; this may influence plant regeneration modes as well as the visits of avian dispersal agents. In LT, all species found in live fences were useful to humans, whereas in UX, less than half were used by the local population. Our results underline the importance of live fences and isolated trees in pasture habitats as potential sites to host native and useful species from tropical rain forests in livestock landscapes.

  14. Utilization of solar electric fence for containment of caprine in familiar production of the Pernambuco semi-arid region; Utilizacao de cerca eletrica solar para confinamento de caprinos na producao familiar do semi-arido pernambucano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Heitor Scalambrini; Costa Neto, Guilherme [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Nucleo de Apoio a Projetos de Energias Renovaveis], Email: naper@ufpe.br; Araujo, Kassia; Silva, Gerson Flavio da; Raquel, Karine [ONG NAPER SOLAR, Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Estudos e Projetos], Email: nsolar@terra.com.br

    2006-07-01

    The Center for Studies and Projects - Naper Solar is an NGO, which works for the dissemination of use of alternative energies resources in the semi-arid Brazilian Northeast in collaboration with the Federal University of Pernambuco. It has implemented caprine raising systems in the back lands of Pajeu in the State of Pernambuco making use of electrified fences energized by solar energy.This project was executed in a joint effort with the City Halls of Afogados da Ingazeira e Sao Jose do Egito and the NGOs Diaconia and the Northeast Woman House and has benefited 20 families of farmers from 9 rural communities. It is funded by a Technical Cooperation Program established between the National Fund for the Environment - Ministry for the Environment and the Netherlands Government. The implemented system, in opposition to the traditional extensive production system, allow for a more animal sanitary control - minimizing the risks of contamination; a more controlled and balanced feeding system - taking into account the weight gaining factor together with pasture management, leading the a guarantee of food supply for the animals. Other advantages of this system include the reduction of fence cost and less deforesting. Electrical fences used in the contention of caprine are built with only 4 straight wires, fixed with isolators on wood posts spaced 10 m from each other, while the conventional fences use 9 barbed-wire lines fixed with clamps on posts spaced 1 m from each other. Therefore, the use of electrical fences instead of the conventional one represent a cost reduction, which can go as high as 40 % of the total cost. Besides that the electrical fences have low maintenance cost, easier and faster installation and relocation. The fenced areas vary from 0.5 ha to 4 ha for the raising of 5 to 50 animals. In the electrification of a fence one needs one photovoltaic module, one electrifier, a battery, isolators (passage and corner), electric ground rods and a thunderbolt

  15. Developing an Ethically Acceptable Virtual Fencing System for Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Marini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To ensure animal welfare isn’t compromised when using virtual fencing, animals must be able to associate a benign conditioned stimulus with an aversive stimulus. This study used an associative learning test to train 30, four-year-old, Merino x Suffolk ewes, to associate an audio cue with an electric stimulus. Collars manually controlled by a GPS hand-held unit were used to deliver the audio and electric stimuli cues. For the associative learning, when sheep approached an attractant at a distance of three m from the trough, an audio cue was applied for one s. If the sheep stopped or changed direction, the audio cue ceased immediately and no electrical stimulus was applied. If the sheep did not respond to the audio cue it was followed by a low-level electrical stimulus. Approaches to the attractant significantly decreased from day one to day two. It took a mean of three pairings of the audio cue and electrical stimulus for a change in behaviour to occur, after which sheep that approached the attractant had a 52% probability of avoiding the electrical stimulus and responding to the audio cue alone. Further research is required to determine whether sheep can be trained to associate an audio cue with a negative stimulus for use in group grazing situations.

  16. Re-introduction of globally threatened Arabian Gazelles Gazella Arabica (Pallas, 1766 (Mammalia: Bovidae in fenced protected area in central Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. Islam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Arabian Gazelle is a globally threatened antelope (Vulnerable in Saudi Arabia. Small relict populations remain in limited areas, while historically Arabian Gazelles occurred in Mahazat as-Sayd protected area in central Saudi Arabia but were exterminated by anthropogenic and other pressures, including habitat loss and hunting. Important habitat has been lost to agricultural developments, fencing of pasture for livestock and the construction of human settlements and roads. The reintroduction of Arabian Gazelles was undertaken in Mahazat during 2011-2014 to bring back this locally extinct species study its ecology and biology in a fenced protected area. We released a total of 49 (12 males, 37 females animals. A year after release animals started breeding and six calves have been recorded so far with more to come. The gazelles prefer to use more rocky areas where shrubs and acacia trees occur in the reserve, and do not move long distances except for one individual that moved more than 50km. Mahazat is fenced, which prevents local people from entering the reserve to poach or otherwise disturb animals. Management lessons include the need for continued monitor-ing of reintroduced populations. Interactions between Arabian and Sand Gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa marica and Arabian Oryx (Oryx leucoryx were also studied.

  17. Mycorrhizal aspects in slope stabilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Frank

    2016-04-01

    appendiculata with ecto, arbuscular, and the combination of the two mycorrhizal types revealed different effects in respect of aggregate stabilisation as well as above and below ground biomass production of the host plant. Only the ecto-mycorrhized plants significantly increased soil aggregate stability compared to non-inoculated willows. Significantly higher production of host plant biomass was restricted to roots and the inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhiza. Additionally, there are successional processes in mycorrhizal communities in the way that perennial plants do have other fungal partners in their juvenile, prime, and senescent living phase, respectively. It was found that, particularly, in the initial phase of the re-colonisation and development of a protective vegetation cover, the lack of relevant (ecto-) mycorrhizal fungi considerably decelerate or even stop succession processes. Conclusively, with regard to support and accelerate plant growth and the re-colonisation and stabilisation of slopes within the scope of eco-engineering measures it is necessary to select the fungal species based on sound information. This may include ecology and sociology as well as the potential for aggregate formation depending on the plant species used.

  18. AMPLITUDE, TRAJECTORY AND AFFERENT PARAMETERS ANALYSIS OF THE JUMP OVER A VERTICAL FENCE IN SPORT HORSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLAVIA BOCHIS

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available There are a lot of obstacles type used in jumping competitions. Normally, for every kind of fence, there is a different type of approaching and cross over. The most used obstacles are the vertical fence and the oxer fence. For crossing over the vertical, which is a high fence, the horse must jump only in report to the height of the bar. In the oxer case, which is a large obstacle, the horse must jump related to the height and the largeness of it indeed. In the present study we obtained for the vertical fence, situated at five different levels. The purpose was to measure four parameters for every jump: the taking-off distance, the landing distance, and the distance between bar and legs for the front limbs and for the hind limbs. Based on these, were calculated in report to the type of the show arena the amplitude of the jumps, was assign the trajectory curve and placed the balance point.

  19. Topological optimization of opening fence brackets on ring-stiffened cylindrical shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SONG Xiaofei

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available [Objectives] Stress concentration is prone to take place at connections between the opening fence and ring ribs of a ring-stiffened cylindrical shell under external pressure. [Methods] In this paper, a topological optimization method for the brackets that connect the fence to the ring ribs is proposed in order to effectively reduce the local high stress in the brackets. The sub-model technique is used to analyze the stress of the connecting brackets. In the design, the connection brackets are used as design variables and the stress of the shell, fence and ribs are used as constraints. The maximum stress of the bracket is minimized as the objective function. The topology optimization results are engineered to obtain the final form of the brackets. [Results] The calculation results show that brackets of which the panel is partially widened can effectively reduce the stress concentration position of the opening fence transverse offset if the side of the bracket away from the longitudinal section is longer; the opening fence is offset relative to the brackets, and the symmetrical design of the brackets is feasible. [Conclusions] This research provides a reference for similar structural design.

  20. Tibial shock measured during the fencing lunge: the influence of footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Bottoms, Lindsay; Taylor, Katrina; Greenhalgh, Andrew

    2010-06-01

    Fencing is a high-intensity sport involving dynamic movements such as the lunge exposing the musculoskeletal system to high impact forces, which emphasises the importance of the shock attenuating properties of footwear as a factor in the prevention of injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the magnitudes of the transient axial impact shock experienced at the tibia between traditional fencing shoes and standard athletic footwear during the impact phase of the fencing lunge. Peak tibial shock was measured in 19 male fencers in 4 different footwear conditions using an accelerometer placed on the distal aspect of the tibia. The standard footwear (11.08 g and 8.75 g for squash and running shoe, respectively) resulted in significant (p Adidas and Hi-Tec shoe, respectively). No significant differences were found between the running and squash shoes (p = 0.09) or between the fencing shoes (p = 0.48). The documented reduction in impact shock found suggests that running or squash specific footwear may reduce overuse injury occurrence, indicating that there is justification for a re-design of fencing shoes.

  1. AN/FSY-3 Space Fence System – Sensor Site One/Operations Center Integration Status and Sensor Site Two Planned Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonder, G. P.; Hack, P. J.; Hughes, M. R.

    This paper covers two topics related to Space Fence System development: Sensor Site One / Operations Center construction and integration status including risk reduction integration and test efforts at the Moorestown, NJ Integrated Test Bed (ITB); and the planned capability of Sensor Site Two. The AN/FSY-3 Space Fence System is a ground-based system of S-band radars integrated with an Operations Center designed to greatly enhance the Air Force Space Surveillance network. The radar architecture is based on Digital Beam-forming. This capability permits tremendous user-defined flexibility to customize volume surveillance and track sectors instantaneously without impacting routine surveillance functions. Space Fence provides unprecedented sensitivity, coverage and tracking accuracy, and contributes to key mission threads with the ability to detect, track and catalog small objects in LEO, MEO and GEO. The system is net-centric and will seamlessly integrate into the existing Space Surveillance Network, providing services to external users—such as JSpOC—and coordinating handoffs to other SSN sites. Sensor Site One construction on the Kwajalein Atoll is in progress and nearing completion. The Operations Center in Huntsville, Alabama has been configured and will be integrated with Sensor Site One in the coming months. System hardware, firmware, and software is undergoing integration testing at the Mooretown, NJ ITB and will be deployed at Sensor Site One and the Operations Center. The preliminary design for Sensor Site Two is complete and will provide critical coverage, timeliness, and operational flexibility to the overall system.

  2. An Efficient Bifunctional Electrocatalyst for a Zinc-Air Battery Derived from Fe/N/C and Bimetallic Metal-Organic Framework Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mengfan; Qian, Tao; Zhou, Jinqiu; Yan, Chenglin

    2017-02-15

    Efficient bifunctional electrocatalysts with desirable oxygen activities are closely related to practical applications of renewable energy systems including metal-air batteries, fuel cells, and water splitting. Here a composite material derived from a combination of bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (denoted as BMZIFs) and Fe/N/C framework was reported as an efficient bifunctional catalyst. Although BMZIF or Fe/N/C alone exhibits undesirable oxygen reaction activity, a combination of these materials shows unprecedented ORR (half-wave potential of 0.85 V as well as comparatively superior OER activities (potential@10 mA cm -2 of 1.64 V), outperforming not only a commercial Pt/C electrocatalyst but also most reported bifunctional electrocatalysts. We then tested its practical application in Zn-air batteries. The primary batteries exhibit a high peak power density of 235 mW cm -2 , and the batteries are able to be operated smoothly for 100 cycles at a curent density of 10 mA cm -2 . The unprecedented catalytic activity can be attritued to chemical coupling effects between Fe/N/C and BMZIF and will aid the development of highly active electrocatalysts and applications for electrochemical energy devices.

  3. [Peculiarities of digital dermatoglyphics and the somatic status in female athletes engaged in fencing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Val'kovich, E I; Oleĭnik, E A

    2013-01-01

    The article presents the morphogenetic performance of 31 female athlete aged 18-23 years specializing in fencing, compared to women of the same age group not involved in professional sports. The research program included: evaluation of a complex of anthropometric parameters (longitudinal, transverse, circumferential body sizes), somatotype diagnostics using of Heath-Carter method, evaluation of body composition, qualitative and quantitative characteristics of digital dermatoglyphics (pattern type, ridge count, delta index, a combination of phenotypic patterns), determination of sex chromatin content in the epithelial cells of the oral cavity mucous membrane. The study demonstrated that the somatic status of female fencers could be defined as a balanced mesomorphic somatotype with the prevailing mesomorphic vector. The proportion of muscular component in female athletes was higher, while that of the fat mass was lower than the similar parameters in the control group. The athletes were characterized by the peculiarities of dermatoglyphic constitution: high values of delta index and the total ridge count, higher proportion of complex patterns and minimal amount of simple patterns. In female athletes, significantly lower amounts of sex chromatin were demonstrated as compared to those not engaged in sports.

  4. Testing the effects of perimeter fencing and elephant exclosures on lion predation patterns in a Kenyan wildlife conservancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Dupuis-Desormeaux

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of fences to segregate wildlife can change predator and prey behaviour. Predators can learn to incorporate fencing into their hunting strategies and prey can learn to avoid foraging near fences. A twelve-strand electric predator-proof fence surrounds our study site. There are also porous one-strand electric fences used to create exclosures where elephant (and giraffe cannot enter in order to protect blocs of browse vegetation for two critically endangered species, the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis and the Grevy’s zebra (Equus grevyi. The denser vegetation in these exclosures attracts both browsing prey and ambush predators. In this study we examined if lion predation patterns differed near the perimeter fencing and inside the elephant exclosures by mapping the location of kills. We used a spatial analysis to compare the predation patterns near the perimeter fencing and inside the exclosures to predation in the rest of the conservancy. Predation was not over-represented near the perimeter fence but the pattern of predation near the fence suggests that fences may be a contributing factor to predation success. Overall, we found that predation was over-represented inside and within 50 m of the exclosures. However, by examining individual exclosures in greater detail using a hot spot analysis, we found that only a few exclosures contained lion predation hot spots. Although some exclosures provide good hunting grounds for lions, we concluded that exclosures did not necessarily create prey-traps per se and that managers could continue to use this type of exclusionary fencing to protect stands of dense vegetation.

  5. Testing the effects of perimeter fencing and elephant exclosures on lion predation patterns in a Kenyan wildlife conservancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis-Desormeaux, Marc; Davidson, Zeke; Pratt, Laura; Mwololo, Mary; MacDonald, Suzanne E

    2016-01-01

    The use of fences to segregate wildlife can change predator and prey behaviour. Predators can learn to incorporate fencing into their hunting strategies and prey can learn to avoid foraging near fences. A twelve-strand electric predator-proof fence surrounds our study site. There are also porous one-strand electric fences used to create exclosures where elephant (and giraffe) cannot enter in order to protect blocs of browse vegetation for two critically endangered species, the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) and the Grevy's zebra (Equus grevyi). The denser vegetation in these exclosures attracts both browsing prey and ambush predators. In this study we examined if lion predation patterns differed near the perimeter fencing and inside the elephant exclosures by mapping the location of kills. We used a spatial analysis to compare the predation patterns near the perimeter fencing and inside the exclosures to predation in the rest of the conservancy. Predation was not over-represented near the perimeter fence but the pattern of predation near the fence suggests that fences may be a contributing factor to predation success. Overall, we found that predation was over-represented inside and within 50 m of the exclosures. However, by examining individual exclosures in greater detail using a hot spot analysis, we found that only a few exclosures contained lion predation hot spots. Although some exclosures provide good hunting grounds for lions, we concluded that exclosures did not necessarily create prey-traps per se and that managers could continue to use this type of exclusionary fencing to protect stands of dense vegetation.

  6. Determinants of olympic fencing performance and implications for strength and conditioning training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Anthony; James, Nic; Dimitriou, Lygeri; Greenhalgh, Andy; Moody, Jeremy; Fulcher, David; Mias, Eduard; Kilduff, Liam

    2014-10-01

    Fencing is one of only a few sports that have featured at every modern Olympic games. Despite this, there is still much the sport science team does not know regarding competition demands and athlete physical characteristics. This review aims to undertake an analysis of the current literature to identify what is known, and questions that must be answered to optimize athlete support in this context. In summary, fencing is an explosive sport requiring energy production predominately from anaerobic sources. Lunging and change-of-direction speed seem vital to performance, and strength and power qualities underpin this. In the elimination rounds, fencers are likely to accumulate high levels of blood lactate, and so high-intensity interval training is recommended to reduce the intolerance to and the accumulation of hydrogen ions. Injury data report the hamstrings as a muscle group that should be strengthened and address imbalances caused by continuous fencing in an asymmetrical stance.

  7. Development of a GIS-based failure investigation system for highway soil slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Raghav; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Tanyu, Burak F.

    2015-06-01

    A framework for preparation of an early warning system was developed for Maryland, using a GIS database and a collective overlay of maps that highlight highway slopes susceptible to soil slides or slope failures in advance through spatial and statistical analysis. Data for existing soil slope failures was collected from geotechnical reports and field visits. A total of 48 slope failures were recorded and analyzed. Six factors, including event precipitation, geological formation, land cover, slope history, slope angle, and elevation were considered to affect highway soil slope stability. The observed trends indicate that precipitation and poor surface or subsurface drainage conditions are principal factors causing slope failures. 96% of the failed slopes have an open drainage section. A majority of the failed slopes lie in regions with relatively high event precipitation ( P>200 mm). 90% of the existing failures are surficial erosion type failures, and only 1 out of the 42 slope failures is deep rotational type failure. More than half of the analyzed slope failures have occurred in regions having low density land cover. 46% of failures are on slopes with slope angles between 20° and 30°. Influx of more data relating to failed slopes should give rise to more trends, and thus the developed slope management system will aid the state highway engineers in prudential budget allocation and prioritizing different remediation projects based on the literature reviewed on the principles, concepts, techniques, and methodology for slope instability evaluation (Leshchinsky et al., 2015).

  8. The ability of ewes with lambs to learn a virtual fencing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunberg, E I; Bergslid, I K; Bøe, K E; Sørheim, K M

    2017-11-01

    The Nofence technology is a GPS-based virtual fencing system designed to keep sheep within predefined borders, without using physical fences. Sheep wearing a Nofence collar receive a sound signal when crossing the virtual border and a weak electric shock if continuing to walk out from the virtual enclosure. Two experiments testing the functionality of the Nofence system and a new learning protocol is described. In Experiment 1, nine ewes with their lambs were divided into groups of three and placed in an experimental enclosure with one Nofence border. During 2 days, there was a physical fence outside the border, during Day 3 the physical fence was removed and on Day 4, the border was moved to the other end of the enclosure. The sheep received between 6 and 20 shocks with an average of 10.9±2.0 (mean±SE) per ewe during all 4 days. The number of shocks decreased from 4.38±0.63 on Day 3 (when the physical fence was removed) to 1.5±0.71 on Day 4 (when the border was moved). The ewes spent on average 3%, 6%, 46% and 9% of their time outside the border on Days 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. In Experiment 2, 32 ewes, with and without lambs, were divided into groups of eight and placed in an experimental enclosure. On Day 1, the enclosure was fenced with three physical fences and one virtual border, which was then increased to two virtual borders on Day 2. To continue to Day 3, when there was supposed to be three virtual borders on the enclosure, at least 50% of the ewes in a group should have received a maximum of four shocks on Day 2. None of the groups reached this learning criterion and the experiment ended after Day 2. The sheep received 4.1±0.32 shocks on Day 1 and 4.7±0.28 shocks on Day 2. In total, 71% of the ewes received the maximum number of five shocks on Day 1 and 77% on Day 2. The individual ewes spent between 0% and 69.5% of Day 1 in the exclusion zone and between 0% and 64% on Day 2. In conclusion, it is too challenging to ensure an efficient learning

  9. Analysis of Rainfall Infiltration Law in Unsaturated Soil Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gui-rong; Qian, Ya-jun; Wang, Zhang-chun; Zhao, Bo

    2014-01-01

    In the study of unsaturated soil slope stability under rainfall infiltration, it is worth continuing to explore how much rainfall infiltrates into the slope in a rain process, and the amount of rainfall infiltrating into slope is the important factor influencing the stability. Therefore, rainfall infiltration capacity is an important issue of unsaturated seepage analysis for slope. On the basis of previous studies, rainfall infiltration law of unsaturated soil slope is analyzed. Considering the characteristics of slope and rainfall, the key factors affecting rainfall infiltration of slope, including hydraulic properties, water storage capacity (θ s - θ r), soil types, rainfall intensities, and antecedent and subsequent infiltration rates on unsaturated soil slope, are discussed by using theory analysis and numerical simulation technology. Based on critical factors changing, this paper presents three calculation models of rainfall infiltrability for unsaturated slope, including (1) infiltration model considering rainfall intensity; (2) effective rainfall model considering antecedent rainfall; (3) infiltration model considering comprehensive factors. Based on the technology of system response, the relationship of rainfall and infiltration is described, and the prototype of regression model of rainfall infiltration is given, in order to determine the amount of rain penetration during a rain process. PMID:24672332

  10. Slope failure investigation management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Highway slopes are exposed to a variety of environmental and climatic conditions, such as deforestation, cycles of : freezing and thawing weather, and heavy storms. Over time, these climatic conditions, in combination with other : factors such as geo...

  11. Light and Dark Slope Streaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    21 July 2004 Dark slope streaks are a common feature on slopes thickly-mantled by dust, especially in the Tharsis, Arabia, and western Amazonis regions of Mars. Less common are light-toned slope streaks, which often occur in the same area as dark streaks. They are most common in Arabia Terra, and some are shown in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. Slope streaks are probably the result of sudden avalanches of extremely dry dust. The behavior of the avalanching dust is somewhat fluid-like, and new streaks have been observed to form over intervals of a few months to a Mars year. This image is located near 13.4oN, 340.3oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  12. Compost for steep slope erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    This study was initiated to develop guidelines for maintenance erosion control measures for steep slopes. The study focused on evaluating and monitoring KY-31 fescue germination rates using two media treatments 1) 100 percent by weight compost and 2)...

  13. Trans-nasal-trans-sphenoidal brain injury by a fencing foil: an unusual case report and brief literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özay, Rafet; Balkan, Mehmet S; Tönge, Çağhan; Şekerci, Zeki

    2017-11-01

    In this report, the authors present an unusual case of a 10-year-old child who suffered a severe headache and rhinorrhea that occurred as a result of fencing foil sports injury via trans-nasal-trans-sphenoidal (TNTS) pathway. Following trauma, the child had shown neurological symptoms such a pupil dilatation, change in consciousness and mild hemiparesia. Imaging demonstrated destruction of bone structures including posterior wall of sphenoid sinus and antero-superior part of sella turcica, and also a contusion at right thalamic region. For treatment of rhinorrhea lumbar drainage system (LDS) had planted in order to relieve cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. After the treatment, the patient had fully recovered without any need of further surgical intervention. CSF leakage had prevented and neurological symptoms were completely treated. This case represents the first report of brain injury via TNTS pathway in a sports practice. Diagnosis, clinic follow-up and treatment options of this rare accidental sports injury are discussed.

  14. Constructive Solutions of Energy-Active Fences for Solar Radiation Utilization and Methodological Arguments for Their Economic Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheps, R. A.; Shchukina, T. V.; Akulova, I. I.

    2017-11-01

    The design of an external wall is proposed, it allows for efficient utilization of solar energy to reduce the load on buildings heating. A special feature of the technical solution is the location of thermal insulation from the inside of the energy-active fence with air space formation relative to the accumulating layer. The given design makes it possible to avoid accommodations overcooling in case of adverse weather conditions during the cold season and overheating during warm weather. It was proposed to base costs increase for energy-saving buildings construction including those with integrated solar radiation conversion systems and to use the methodology for estimating additional technical solutions based on the calculation of economic efficiency.

  15. Environmental Assessment for the Air Force Research Laboratory Security Fence Project, Edwards Air Force Base, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    Ridge is composed of dacite, a Tertiary volcanic rock. The bedrock types are relatively homogenous in mineral composition , varying only in relative...desert tomato (Lycium andersonii). Saltbush scrub communities are found along approximately 30 percent of the linear area of the proposed fence project

  16. Bridging the divide: Middle Eastern walls and fences and the spatial governance of problem populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallister-Wilkins, P.

    2015-01-01

    Building on a long history of spatial control through walling in the region, walls and fences have been built in the Middle East in recent years to undertake a range of practices. Gated communities, residential and security compounds, anti-migrant walls, separation barriers and counter-insurgency

  17. Decision making in fencing training and its relationship with reaction time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ó Martínez de Quel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In fencing, certain tasks are designed to develop the mechanism of perception, decision and/ or execution. One way to know the effect to one or another is to measure the Reaction Time, making inferences about the effect of the manipulated variables in the research about the mechanisms. On the other hand, Reaction Time can help us to determine the level of perceptual ability and decision making of a fencer. The objectives of this study were, test the differences in perception and decision making depending on the weapon, and determine what actions are more difficult to perception and decision making in fencing. The subjects were 18 members of the spanish national fencing team. Fencers were placed facing a screen in which videos were projecting appearing the coach of each weapon launching actions to which the fencers had to react quickly. The results showed significant differences between the epeeists and the foil and sabre fencers. On the other hand, it was found more time is required to make the decision is to distinguish if the opponent´s attack had a good or bad execution. Key words: Combat Sports, Fencing, Decision Making, Reaction Time

  18. Super-resolution image de-fencing using a nonlocal nonconvex prior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonna, Sankaraganesh; Satapathy, Sukla; Sahay, Rajiv R

    2018-01-10

    Today's smartphones/phablets/tablets are equipped with cameras that have enabled people to capture their favorite moments. However, images or videos taken at public places using inexpensive low-resolution cameras are often degraded by the presence of occlusions such as fences/barricades. In order to reconstruct a fence-free high-resolution image, we use a video of a scene captured by panning a hand-held camera and model the effects of various degradations. Initially, we obtain the spatial locations of fences by semantic segmentation and subsequently estimate the subpixel motion between the degraded low-resolution frames. The unknown high-resolution de-fenced image is modeled as a nonlocal discontinuity-adaptive Markov random field (NL-DAMRF) and its maximum a posteriori estimate is obtained by minimizing an appropriate objective function. We propose a nonlocal extension of DAMRF prior to preserve high-frequency information in the reconstruction process. Specifically, we use the graduated nonconvexity algorithm to minimize the proposed nonconvex energy function. Experiments with both synthetic and real-world data demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Stress Reduction and Mood Enhancement in Four Exercise Modes: Swimming, Body Conditioning, Hatha Yoga, and Fencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Bonnie G.; Owen, David R.

    1988-01-01

    Differences in mood before and after class of college students taking different courses (swimming, body conditioning, hatha yoga, fencing exercise, and lecture) were analyzed using the Profile Mood States and the State Anxiety Inventory. Results suggest that courses which meet four requirements involving aerobics, noncompetitiveness,…

  20. 14 CFR 151.95 - Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... landing aids; and offsite work. 151.95 Section 151.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Standards § 151.95 Fences; distance markers; navigational and landing aids; and offsite work. (a) Boundary... navigational aids is eligible for inclusion in a proj- ect whenever necessitated by development on the airport...

  1. The Chain-Link Fence Model: A Framework for Creating Security Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    A long standing problem in information technology security is how to help reduce the security footprint. Many specific proposals exist to address specific problems in information technology security. Most information technology solutions need to be repeatable throughout the course of an information systems lifecycle. The Chain-Link Fence Model is…

  2. Exploring Postcolonial and Feminist Issues: "Rabbit-Proof Fence" in a Teaching Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Charlotte

    2010-01-01

    The discussion in this article focuses on representations in Doris Pilkington's "Rabbit-Proof Fence" of trauma and reparation, and reflects on processes and strategies involved in teaching undergraduate students about these issues within literary contexts. The article discusses the practice of introducing students to new texts and areas…

  3. Effect of insecticide treated nets fence in protect- ing cattle against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field trial was carried out to assess the effect of insecticide treated net in pro- tecting cattle from tsetse and other flies. A total of 35 pens were constructed, out of which 30 of them were fenced with insecticide treated net which served as treatment group and the remaining 5 pens were untreated controls. The fly populations ...

  4. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi 2 (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives

  5. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  6. On Front Slope Stability of Berm Breakwaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.

    2013-01-01

    The short communication presents application of the conventional Van der Meer stability formula for low-crested breakwaters for the prediction of front slope erosion of statically stable berm breakwaters with relatively high berms. The method is verified (Burcharth, 2008) by comparison with the r......The short communication presents application of the conventional Van der Meer stability formula for low-crested breakwaters for the prediction of front slope erosion of statically stable berm breakwaters with relatively high berms. The method is verified (Burcharth, 2008) by comparison...... with the reshaping of a large Norwegian breakwater exposed to the North Sea waves. As a motivation for applying the Van der Meer formula a discussion of design parameters related to berm breakwater stability formulae is given. Comparisons of front erosion predicted by the use of the Van der Meer formula with model...... test results including tests presented in Sigurdarson and Van der Meer (2011) are discussed. A proposal is presented for performance of new model tests with the purpose of developing more accurate formulae for the prediction of front slope erosion as a function of front slope, relative berm height...

  7. Slope constrained Topology Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, J.; Sigmund, Ole

    1998-01-01

    The problem of minimum compliance topology optimization of an elastic continuum is considered. A general continuous density-energy relation is assumed, including variable thickness sheet models and artificial power laws. To ensure existence of solutions, the design set is restricted by enforcing...

  8. Wildlife response on the Alaska North Slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costanzo, D.; McKenzie, B.

    1992-01-01

    Recognizing the need for a comprehensive plan to deal with potentially oiled wildlife on the Alaskan North Slope, a multifaceted wildlife protection strategy was developed and implemented during 1991. The strategy incorporated all aspects of wildlife response including protection of critical habitat, hazing, capture and stabilization, long term rehabilitation, and release. The primary wildlife response strategy emphasizes controlling of the release and spreading of spilled oil at the source to prevent or reduce contamination of potentially affected species and/or their habitat. A secondary response strategy concentrates on keeping potentially affected wildlife away from an oiled area through the use of deterrent techniques. Tertiary response involves the capture and treatment of oiled wildlife. Implementation of the strategy included the development of specialized training, the procurement of equipment, and the construction of a bird stabilization center. The result of this initiative is a comprehensive wildlife response capability on the Alaskan North Slope. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Establishment of Ulmus pumila seedlings on steppe slopes of the northern Mongolian mountain taiga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Hauck, Markus; Nyambayar, Suran; Osokhjargal, Dalaikhuu; Leuschner, Christoph

    2009-09-01

    The potential of Siberian elm ( Ulmus pumila) to regenerate from seeds was experimentally studied on south-facing slopes in the northern Mongolian mountain taiga. These slopes are covered with a vegetation mosaic of different steppe communities and small, savanna-like, U. pumila open woodlands. The hypothesis is tested that the xeric microclimate and high herbivore densities limit the success of seedling establishment in U. pumila and thereby prevent elm from complete encroachment of the grassland-dominated slopes. Seeds were sown and 2-yr-old seedlings were planted prior to the growing season. The water supply was manipulated by irrigation, as was the feeding pressure by caterpillars with an insecticide. Large herbivores were excluded by fencing. Seeds germinated throughout the summer, but the emerged seedlings did not survive for more than 2 or 3 weeks. Germination rates increased with increasing soil water content and decreasing soil temperatures. Many seeds were consumed by granivores. Most planted 2-yr-old seedlings survived the two growing seasons covered by the study. However, the seedlings suffered from feeding damage by insects (gypsy moth, grasshoppers) and small mammals, from nitrogen deficiency and, to a lesser degree, from drought. The results suggest that high susceptibility of newly emerged seedlings to environmental stresses is a serious bottle neck for U. pumila that prevents them from the formation of closed forests on northern Mongolia's steppe slopes, whereas the probability for seedling survival after this early stage is high.

  10. Hydrologic behavior of model slopes with synthetic water repellent soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuang; Lourenço, Sérgio D. N.; Cleall, Peter J.; Chui, Ting Fong May; Ng, Angel K. Y.; Millis, Stuart W.

    2017-11-01

    In the natural environment, soil water repellency decreases infiltration, increases runoff, and increases erosion in slopes. In the built environment, soil water repellency offers the opportunity to develop granular materials with controllable wettability for slope stabilization. In this paper, the influence of soil water repellency on the hydrological response of slopes is investigated. Twenty-four flume tests were carried out in model slopes under artificial rainfall; soils with various wettability levels were tested, including wettable (Contact Angle, CA 90°). Various rainfall intensities (30 mm/h and 70 mm/h), slope angles (20° and 40°) and relative compactions (70% and 90%) were applied to model the response of natural and man-made slopes to rainfall. To quantitatively assess the hydrological response, a number of measurements were made: runoff rate, effective rainfall rate, time to ponding, time to steady state, runoff acceleration, total water storage and wetting front rate. Overall, an increase in soil water repellency reduces infiltration and shortens the time for runoff generation, with the effects amplified for high rainfall intensity. Comparatively, the slope angle and relative compaction had only a minor contribution to the slope hydrology. The subcritical water repellent soils sustained infiltration for longer than both the wettable and water repellent soils, which presents an added advantage if they are to be used in the built environment as barriers. This study revealed substantial impacts of man-made or synthetically induced soil water repellency on the hydrological behavior of model slopes in controlled conditions. The results shed light on our understanding of hydrological processes in environments where the occurrence of natural soil water repellency is likely, such as slopes subjected to wildfires and in agricultural and forested slopes.

  11. BPA riparian fencing and alternative water development projects completed within Asotin Creek Watershed ; 2000 and 2001 Asotin Creek fencing final report of accomplishments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.J.Bradley J.

    2002-01-01

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on both private and public lands within the Asotin Creek watershed. The watershed covers approximately 325 square miles in the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington in Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 35. According to Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Priority WRIA's by ''At-Risk Stock Significance Map'', it is the highest priority WRIA in southeastern Washington. Summer steelhead, bull trout, and Snake River spring chinook salmon which are listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), are present in the watershed. WDFW manages it as a Wild Steelhead Reserve; no hatchery fish have been released here since 1997. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe, Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. Local students, volunteers and Salmon Corps members from the Nez Perce Tribe have been instrumental in the success of the Model Watershed Program on Asotin Creek. ACCD began coordinating habitat projects in 1995 with the help of BPA funding. Approximately two hundred and seventy-six projects have been implemented as of 1999. The Washington State Legislature was successful in securing funding for endangered salmon and steelhead recovery throughout the State in 1998. While these issues were new to most of the State, the ACCD has been securing and administering funding for endangered salmonids since 1994. The ''Asotin Creek Riparian Planting 2000-053-00 and Asotin Creek Riparian Fencing 2000-054-00'' teamed BPA and the Governor's Salmon Recovery Funding to plant approximately 84

  12. Morphologic, Topographic, and Thermal Analysis of Slope Streaks on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonson, O.; Schorghofer, N.; Khatiwala, S.; Richardson, M. I.

    2002-12-01

    Surfaces containing features known as slope streaks are common on Mars in regions where thermal-inertia is low and steep slopes are frequent. We have recently compiled a catalog of slope streak images and identified previously unrecognized correlations with surface properties. Building on this work, we analyze data from Mars Orbiter Camera, from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter, and from the Thermal Emission Imaging System instrument on board Mars Odyssey, to constrain the physical properties and thermal conditions at the specific sites where slope streaks are forming. A number of proposed theories explaining the formation mechanism of slope streaks can be tested using new data, including an exciting possibility of the potential role of a water phase-transition.

  13. 16 determination of posterior tibia slope and slope deterioration with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Orth (SA), FCS (ECSA), Consultant Orthopaedic Surgeon, P.O. Box. 84074, Mombasa, Kenya. Email: michenimuthuuri@yahoo.com. ABSTRACT. Background: The posterior inclination of the tibia plateaux relative to the longitudinal axis of the tibia is referred to as the Posterior Tibia Slope (PTS). Fore knowledge of the mean ...

  14. Inclusive Training in Fencing as a Means of Changing Attitude to People with Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Р. Ю. Свічкар

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to develop and improve the training of fencers using inclusive training in order to increase sport results and shape a positive attitude to people with disabilities. Methods. The co-training of the “Unifekht” Sports Club fencers and wheelchair fencers lasted for three months.  The athletes underwent the preliminary and the final testing on the target that showed a number of hits. Besides, during the individual lesson, the coach tested the athlete for the quality of performing attacking and defensive techniques. The preliminary and the final questionnaires revealed the opinions of the coaches, instructors of the Department of Fencing, fencers and wheelchair fencers and the students of the School of Physical Education and Sports of H. S. Skovoroda Kharkiv National Pedagogical University as to the attitude of the athletes of both categories to sports and “Invasport” in Ukraine. There were 40 respondents taking the questionnaires: 3rd-year students (10 people, fencers (10 people, instructors of the Department of Fencing (5 persons, wheelchair fencers (8 people, fencing coaches (5 persons, wheelchair fencing coaches (2 persons. Results. The study shows that, despite the high results of the athletes with disabilities, there exist certain problems in Ukraine that affect the willingness of people with disabilities to go in for sports. The main causes thereof are the low level of financial support and the low quality of medical care. By the research results, the respondents indicate the main criterion motivating people with special needs to do wheelchair fencing to be: self-expression and self-realization (68%, an opportunity to communicate (21%, and financial support (11%. The factors of low interest in wheelchair fencing are: lack of motivation to training people with special needs (26%; social policy of the state (23%; poor facilities and resources in the specialized institutions (20% of the respondents. At the same time

  15. Evolution of steep Martian slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Robert John, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The physical properties and evolution of steep slopes on the planet Mars are examined. Where martian slopes are steepest and of greatest relief, the slope morphology is distinctive and characterized by regular, alternating spurs and gullies. Previous workers identified these martian gullies as dry debris avalanche chutes, partially because a nonspecific 'dry mass-wasting' explanation seemed compatible, initially, with current surface conditions. An evacuated avalanche chute provides the opportunity to back analyze the stability of the mobile layer of the chute at the time of its failure. For the martian slope problem a new stability back-analysis technique was developed which incorporates the third dimension (chute width) into the back-analysis calculation, allowing unambiguous determination of the average cohesion and angle of internal friction of the mobile layer. A series of trials was performed to investigate the effects of gravitational acceleration, average slope angle, and average mobile layer density, cohesion, and angle of internal friction on the size and shape of the transverse chute cross-section. Results indicate that: (1) variations in density, gravitational acceleration, and cohesion affect the overall size of the cross-section but not its width:depth ratio, and (2) the contrast between average slope angle and angle of internal friction is most influential on the width:depth ratio of the cross-section. The difference between these two parameters is inversely proportional to the width:depth ratio. Application of the three-dimensional back-analysis technique to proposed martian avalanche chutes yields values of cohesion and angle of internal friction of the mobile layers that are similar mechanically (without genetic implications) to those of terrestrial glacial till, a poorly sorted material with moderate inter-grain cohesion, or lunar soils under normal stresses representative of (lunar) depths of between ten and twenty meters. Material of these

  16. From incipient slope instability through slope deformation to catastrophic failure - Different stages of failure development on the Ivasnasen and Vollan rock slopes (western Norway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppikofer, T.; Saintot, A.; Hermanns, R. L.; Böhme, M.; Scheiber, T.; Gosse, J.; Dreiås, G. M.

    2017-07-01

    The long-term evolution of rock slope failures involves different stages, from incipience of slope instability to catastrophic failure, through a more or less long-lasting slope deformation phase that also involves creeping or sliding. Topography, lithology, and structural inheritance are the main intrinsic factors that influence this evolution. Here, we investigate the role of these intrinsic factors on the rock slope failure development of the Ivasnasen and Vollan rock slopes (Sunndal Valley, western Norway) using a multitechnique approach that includes geomorphologic and structural field mapping, kinematic analysis, terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide exposure dating, topographic reconstruction, and deformation quantification. Ivasnasen is a rock slope failure complex with several past rock slope failures and a present unstable rock slope, located on a cataclinal NW-facing slope and developed in augen gneiss. Vollan on the opposite valley side is a deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DSGSD) affecting the whole mountainside, developed in quartzite in the upper part and micaschist in the lower part. These different lithologies belong to different nappe complexes that were emplaced and folded into a series of syn- and anticlines during the Caledonian orogeny. These folds lead to different lithologies being exposed in different structural orientations on the opposite valley flanks, which in turn leads to different types and evolution of rock slope failures. At Ivasnasen the 45°-55° NW-dipping ductile foliation allowed for a fairly simple planar sliding mechanism for the 1.2 million m3 post-glacial rock slope failure. Failure occurred ca. 3.3 ka ago after a short period of prefailure deformation. For the present 2.2 million m3 unstable rock slope at Ivasnasen, a steepening of the foliation at the toe impedes such a mechanism and up to 10 m of displacement has not lead to a catastrophic failure yet. The Vollan DSGSD is characterized by a steep major back scarp

  17. A critical review of rock slope failure mechanisms: The importance of structural geology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Doug; Wolter, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Geological structures such as folds, faults, and discontinuities play a critical role in the stability and behaviour of both natural and engineered rock slopes. Although engineering geologists have long recognised the importance of structural geology in slopes, it remains a significant challenge to integrate structural geological mapping and theory into all stages of engineering projects. We emphasise the importance of structural geology to slope stability assessments, reviewing how structures control slope failure mechanisms, how engineering geologists measure structures and include them in slope stability analyses, and how numerical simulations of slopes incorporate geological structures and processes.

  18. A cost effective FBG-based security fence with fire alarm function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H. J.; Li, S. S.; Lu, X. L.; Wu, Y.; Rao, Y. J.

    2012-02-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) is sensitive to the temperature as well when it is measuring the strain change, which is always avoided in most measurement applications. However, in this paper strain/temperature dual sensitivity is utilized to construct a special security fence with a second function of fire threat prediction. In an FBG-based fiber fence configuration, only by characteristics analysis and identification method, it can intelligently distinguish the different effects of personal threats and fires from their different trends of the wavelength drifts. Thus without any additional temperature sensing fittings or other fire alarm systems integrated, a normal perimeter security system can possess a second function of fire prediction, which can not only monitor the intrusion induced by personal actions but also predict fire threats in advance. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the method.

  19. Promotional effect of phosphorus doping on the activity of the Fe-N/C catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Zhu, Jianbin; Lv, Qing

    2015-01-01

    -nitrogen complexes, i.e., M-N/C catalysts, are the most promising candidate. Herein, by comparing the ORR activities of standard Fe-N/C catalysts synthesized with or without the doped phosphorus species, the promotional effect of phosphorus doping is discerned. Such phosphorus doping is achieved by using an acidic...... to that for the undoped Fe-N/C catalyst. The activity and durability of the catalysts are demonstrated in direct methanol fuel cells....

  20. The Chain-Link Fence Model: A Framework for Creating Security Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Houghton, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    A long standing problem in information technology security is how to help reduce the security footprint. Many specific proposals exist to address specific problems in information technology security. Most information technology solutions need to be repeatable throughout the course of an information systems lifecycle. The Chain-Link Fence Model is a new model for creating and implementing information technology procedures. This model was validated by two different methods: the first being int...

  1. Highly Active and Stable Fe-N-C Catalyst for Oxygen Depolarized Cathode Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingkun; Jia, Qingying; Ghoshal, Shraboni; Liang, Wentao; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2017-09-19

    Anion immunity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has tremendous implications in electrocatalysis with applications for fuel cells, metal-air batteries, and oxygen depolarized cathodes (ODCs) in the anodic evolution of chlorine. The necessity of exploring ORR catalysts with immunity to anion adsorption is particularly significant considering that platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts are costly and highly vulnerable to impurities such as halides. Herein, we report a metal organic framework (MOF)-derived Fe-N-C catalyst that exhibits a dramatically improved half-wave potential of 240 mV compared to the state-of-the-art Rh x S y /C catalyst in a rotating disk electrode in the presence of Cl - . The Fe-N 4 active sites in Fe-N-C are intrinsically immune to Cl - poisoning, in contrast to Pt/C, which is severely susceptible to Cl - poisoning. As a result, the activity of Fe-N-C decreases only marginally in the presence of Cl - , far exceeding that of Pt/C. The viability of this catalyst as ODCs is further demonstrated in real-life hydrochloric acid electrolyzers using highly concentrated HCl solution saturated with Cl 2 gas as the electrolyte. The introduction of Fe-N-C materials as ODC catalysts here overcomes the limitations of (i) the low intrinsic ORR activity of Rh x S y /C as the state-of-the-art ODC catalyst; (ii) the vulnerability to Cl - poisoning of Pt/C as the state-of-the-art ORR catalyst; and (iii) the high cost of precious metals in these two materials, resulting in a cost-effective ODC catalyst with the overall performance exceeding that of all previously reported materials.

  2. Relationship between road vehicle traffic and noise pollution of Khojir National Park in the viewpoint of feasibility of fencing and soundproofing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoo Moshtaghie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The main aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the amount of noise pollution and traffic rates in Khojir National park and regarding that finding a suitable distance for installing fencing according to the standard level of noise pollution. Materials and Methods: Eight stations located exactly above channels have been selected. In each station, three different substations including near the road, 25, and 50 m from the road were chosen. For determining the essentiality of soundproof installation, noise levels were measured at the opening and in the middle of the channel. Traffic rates have been measured daily from 6 AM to 6 PM for two continuous weeks and noise levels were then determined in three different days according to the traffic peak. Results: Results obtained showed a significant relationship between traffic rates and noise levels in near-road stations (R 2 linear = 0.341. The relationship between interval and noise level was also significant (R 2 quadratic = 0.701, P < 0.05. Furthermore, a distance with 55 dB (A (i.e., 50 m in this study was achieved as a proper site for fencing. Conclusion: Although the amount of noise levels in the middle of channels were less than the standard level, this amount in some channel throats were higher and need to be considered for soundproof installation as well. In addition to finding an area for fencing, using solution(s for reducing either noise pollution or its impact at this area should be taken into consideration.

  3. Semi-automated camera trap image processing for the detection of ungulate fence crossing events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Michael; Visser, Kaitlyn; Visscher, Darcy; MacLeod, Ian; Vujnovic, Dragomir; Vujnovic, Ksenija

    2017-09-27

    Remote cameras are an increasingly important tool for ecological research. While remote camera traps collect field data with minimal human attention, the images they collect require post-processing and characterization before it can be ecologically and statistically analyzed, requiring the input of substantial time and money from researchers. The need for post-processing is due, in part, to a high incidence of non-target images. We developed a stand-alone semi-automated computer program to aid in image processing, categorization, and data reduction by employing background subtraction and histogram rules. Unlike previous work that uses video as input, our program uses still camera trap images. The program was developed for an ungulate fence crossing project and tested against an image dataset which had been previously processed by a human operator. Our program placed images into categories representing the confidence of a particular sequence of images containing a fence crossing event. This resulted in a reduction of 54.8% of images that required further human operator characterization while retaining 72.6% of the known fence crossing events. This program can provide researchers using remote camera data the ability to reduce the time and cost required for image post-processing and characterization. Further, we discuss how this procedure might be generalized to situations not specifically related to animal use of linear features.

  4. Interrill soil erosion processes on steep slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X. C. (John); Wang, Z. L.

    2017-05-01

    To date interrill erosion processes are not fully understood under different rainfall and soil conditions. The objectives are to 1) identify the interrill erosion regime and limiting process under the study condition, 2) characterize the interactive effects of rainfall intensity and flow depth on sediment transport competency and mode, and 3) develop a lumped interrill erosion model. A loess loam soil with 39% sand and 45% silt was packed to flumes and exposed to simulated rainfall. A complete factorial design with three factors was used, which included rainfall intensity (48, 62, 102, 149, and 170 mm h-1), slope gradient (17.6, 26.8, 36.4, 46.6, and 57.7%), and slope length (0.4, 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 m). Rain splash, sediment discharge in runoff, and flow velocity were measured. Results showed that rainfall intensity played a dual role not only in detaching soil materials but also in enhancing sediment transport. Sediment transport was the process limiting interrill erosion rate under the study condition. Two major sediment transport modes were identified: rainfall-driven rolling/creeping and flow-driven rolling/sliding. The relative importance of each mode was largely determined by flow depth. The competence of the flow in transporting sediment decreased downslope as flow depth increased due to increased dissipation of raindrop energy. The optimal mean flow depth for the maximal interrill erosion rates was erosion rate. The negative correlation seemed stronger for heavier rains, indicating the cushioning effects of flow depth. Lumped interrill erosion models, developed from short slopes, are likely to overestimate erosion rates. Given transport as the limiting process, the so called erodibility value, estimated with those models, is indeed sediment transportability under the study condition. The effects of slope length on interrill erosion regimes need to be studied further under a wider range of conditions.

  5. Study on the response of unsaturated soil slope based on the effects of rainfall intensity and slope angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Mohd Ashraf Mohamad; Hamzah, Nur Hasliza

    2017-07-01

    Rainfall has been considered as the major cause of the slope failure. The mechanism leading to slope failures included the infiltration process, surface runoff, volumetric water content and pore-water pressure of the soil. This paper describes a study in which simulated rainfall events were used with 2-dimensional soil column to study the response of unsaturated soil behavior based on different slope angle. The 2-dimensional soil column is used in order to demonstrate the mechanism of the slope failure. These unsaturated soil were tested with four different slope (15°, 25°, 35° and 45°) and subjected to three different rainfall intensities (maximum, mean and minimum). The following key results were obtained: (1) the stability of unsaturated soil decrease as the rainwater infiltrates into the soil. Soil that initially in unsaturated state will start to reach saturated state when rainwater seeps into the soil. Infiltration of rainwater will reduce the matric suction in the soil. Matric suction acts in controlling soil shear strength. Reduction in matric suction affects the decrease in effective normal stress, which in turn diminishes the available shear strength to a point where equilibrium can no longer be sustained in the slope. (2) The infiltration rate of rainwater decreases while surface runoff increase when the soil nearly achieve saturated state. These situations cause the soil erosion and lead to slope failure. (3) The steepness of the soil is not a major factor but also contribute to slope failures. For steep slopes, rainwater that fall on the soil surface will become surface runoff within a short time compare to the water that infiltrate into the soil. While for gentle slopes, water that becomes surface runoff will move slowly and these increase the water that infiltrate into the soil.

  6. Impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachshon, Uri

    2017-04-01

    Field measurements indicated on high variability in salt accumulation along natural and cultivated slopes, even for relatively homogeneous soil conditions. It was hypothesised that slope inclination has an impact on the location of salt accumulation along the slope. A set of laboratory experiments and numerical models were used to explore the impact of slope inclination on salt accumulation. It was shown, experimentally, that for conditions of saline water source at the lower boundary of the slope - salt accumulates in low concentrations and homogeneously along the entire slope, for moderate slopes. However, as inclination increases high salt concentrations were observed at the upper parts of the slope, leaving the lower parts of the slope relatively free of salt. The traditional flow and transport models did not predict the experimental observations as they indicated also for the moderate slopes on salt accumulation in the elevated parts of the slope, away of the saline water source. Consequently - a conceptual model was raised to explain the laboratory observations. It was suggested that the interactions between slope angle, evaporation rates, hydraulic conductivity of the medium and distribution of wetness along the slope affect the saline water flow path through the medium. This lead to preferential flow path close to the soil-atmosphere interface for the steep slopes, which leads to constant wash of the salts from the evaporation front upward towards the slope upper parts, whereas for the moderate slopes, flow path is below the soil-atmosphere interface, therefore salt that accumulates at the evaporation front is not being transported upward. Understanding of salt dynamics along slopes is important for agricultural and natural environments, as well as for civil engineering purposes. Better understanding of the salt transport processes along slopes will improve our ability to minimize and to cope with soil salinization processes. The laboratory experiments and

  7. Effects of streambank fencing of pasture land on benthic macroinvertebrates and the quality of surface water and shallow ground water in the Big Spring Run basin of Mill Creek watershed, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 1993-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeone, Daniel G.; Brightbill, Robin A.; Low, Dennis J.; O'Brien, David L.

    2006-01-01

    Streambank fencing along stream channels in pastured areas and the exclusion of pasture animals from the channel are best-management practices designed to reduce nutrient and suspended-sediment yields from drainage basins. Establishment of vegetation in the fenced area helps to stabilize streambanks and provides better habitat for wildlife in and near the stream. This study documented the effectiveness of a 5- to 12-foot-wide buffer strip on the quality of surface water and near-stream ground water in a 1.42-mi2 treatment basin in Lancaster County, Pa. Two miles of stream were fenced in the basin in 1997 following a 3- to 4-year pre-treatment period of monitoring surface- and ground-water variables in the treatment and control basins. Changes in surface- and ground-water quality were monitored for about 4 years after fence installation. To alleviate problems in result interpretation associated with climatic and hydrologic variation over the study period, a nested experimental design including paired-basin and upstream/downstream components was used to study the effects of fencing on surface-water quality and benthic-macroinvertebrate communities. Five surface-water sites, one at the outlet of a 1.77-mi2 control basin (C-1), two sites in the treatment basin (T-3 and T-4) that were above any fence installation, and two sites (one at an upstream tributary site (T-2) and one at the outlet (T-1)) that were treated, were sampled intensively. Low-flow samples were collected at each site (approximately 25-30 per year at each site), and stormflow was sampled with automatic samplers at all sites except T-3. For each site where stormflow was sampled, from 35 to 60 percent of the storm events were sampled over the entire study period. Surface-water sites were sampled for analyses of nutrients, suspended sediment, and fecal streptococcus (only low-flow samples), with field parameters (only low-flow samples) measured during sample collection. Benthic-macroinvertebrate samples

  8. Is there a distinct continental slope fauna in the Antarctic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Stefanie; Griffiths, Huw J.; Barnes, David K. A.; Brandão, Simone N.; Brandt, Angelika; O'Brien, Philip E.

    2011-02-01

    The Antarctic continental slope spans the depths from the shelf break (usually between 500 and 1000 m) to ˜3000 m, is very steep, overlain by 'warm' (2-2.5 °C) Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW), and life there is poorly studied. This study investigates whether life on Antarctica's continental slope is essentially an extension of the shelf or the abyssal fauna, a transition zone between these or clearly distinct in its own right. Using data from several cruises to the Weddell Sea and Scotia Sea, including the ANDEEP (ANtarctic benthic DEEP-sea biodiversity, colonisation history and recent community patterns) I-III, BIOPEARL (BIOdiversity, Phylogeny, Evolution and Adaptive Radiation of Life in Antarctica) 1 and EASIZ (Ecology of the Antarctic Sea Ice Zone) II cruises as well as current databases (SOMBASE, SCAR-MarBIN), four different taxa were selected (i.e. cheilostome bryozoans, isopod and ostracod crustaceans and echinoid echinoderms) and two areas, the Weddell Sea and the Scotia Sea, to examine faunal composition, richness and affinities. The answer has important ramifications to the link between physical oceanography and ecology, and the potential of the slope to act as a refuge and resupply zone to the shelf during glaciations. Benthic samples were collected using Agassiz trawl, epibenthic sledge and Rauschert sled. By bathymetric definition, these data suggest that despite eurybathy in some of the groups examined and apparent similarity of physical conditions in the Antarctic, the shelf, slope and abyssal faunas were clearly separated in the Weddell Sea. However, no such separation of faunas was apparent in the Scotia Sea (except in echinoids). Using a geomorphological definition of the slope, shelf-slope-abyss similarity only changed significantly in the bryozoans. Our results did not support the presence of a homogenous and unique Antarctic slope fauna despite a high number of species being restricted to the slope. However, it remains the case that there may be

  9. Engineering Favorable Morphology and Structure of Fe-N-C Oxygen-Reduction Catalysts through Tuning of Nitrogen/Carbon Precursors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shiva; Zhao, Shuai; Ogoke, Ogechi; Lin, Ye; Xu, Hui; Wu, Gang

    2017-02-22

    Structures and morphologies of Fe-N-C catalysts are believed to be crucial because of the number of active sites and local bonding structures governing the overall catalyst performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). However, the knowledge how to rationally design catalysts is still lacking. By combining different nitrogen/carbon precursors, including polyaniline (PANI), dicyandiamide (DCDA), and melamine (MLMN), we aim to tune catalyst morphology and structure to facilitate the ORR. Instead of the commonly studied single precursors, multiple precursors were used during the synthesis; this provides a new opportunity to promote catalyst activity and stability through a likely synergistic effect. The best-performing Fe-N-C catalyst derived from PANI+DCDA is superior to the individual PANI or DCDA-derived ones. In particular, when compared to the extensively explored PANI-derived catalysts, the binary precursors have an increased half-wave potential of 0.83 V and an enhanced electrochemical stability in challenging acidic media, indicating a significantly increased number of active sites and strengthened local bonding structures. Multiple key factors associated with the observed promotion are elucidated, including the optimal pore size distribution, highest electrochemically active surface area, presence of dominant amorphous carbon, and thick graphitic carbon layers with more pyridinic nitrogen edge sites likely bonded with active atomic iron. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. The influence of slope on Spartium junceum root system: morphological, anatomical and biomechanical adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Fabio; Scippa, G S; Lasserre, B; Montagnoli, A; Tognetti, R; Marchetti, M; Chiatante, D

    2017-05-01

    Root systems have a pivotal role in plant anchorage and their mechanical interactions with the soil may contribute to soil reinforcement and stabilization of slide-prone slopes. In order to understand the responses of root system to mechanical stress induced by slope, samples of Spartium junceum L., growing in slope and in plane natural conditions, were compared in their morphology, biomechanical properties and anatomical features. Soils sampled in slope and plane revealed similar characteristics, with the exception of organic matter content and penetrometer resistance, both higher in slope. Slope significantly influenced root morphology and in particular the distribution of lateral roots along the soil depth. Indeed, first-order lateral roots of plants growing on slope condition showed an asymmetric distribution between up- and down-slope. Contrarily, this asymmetric distribution was not observed in plants growing in plane. The tensile strength was higher in lateral roots growing up-slope and in plane conditions than in those growing down-slope. Anatomical investigations revealed that, while roots grown up-slope had higher area covered by xylem fibers, the ratio of xylem and phloem fibers to root diameter did not differ among the three conditions, as also, no differences were found for xylem fiber cell wall thickness. Roots growing up-slope were the main contributors to anchorage properties, which included higher strength and higher number of fibers in the xylematic tissues. Results suggested that a combination of root-specific morphological, anatomical and biomechanical traits, determines anchorage functions in slope conditions.

  11. Effects of Streambank Fencing of Near-Stream Pasture Land on a Small Watershed in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeone, Daniel G.; Low, Dennis J.; Brightbill, Robin A.

    2006-01-01

    This study indicated that a small buffer width along a stream in pasture land can have a positive influence on surface-water quality, benthic macroinvertebrates, and near-stream shallow ground-water quality. Overland runoff processes that move suspended sediment to the stream were controlled (or reduced) to some extent by the vegetative buffer established. Results indicated streambank fencing resulted in decreases in N-species, total-P, and suspended-sediment concentrations and yields at the outlet of the treatment basin relative to untreated sites; however, dissolved-P concentrations and yields increased. These results indicate that nutrient management, in conjunction with streambank fencing, is important in helping to control nutrient loadings to streams in this agricultural setting. An upstream site (T-2) in the treatment basin showed post-treatment reductions in suspended-sediment yields and increases in N and P yields. The different results for these treated sites indicates the effects of streambank fencing should be studied at as large a scale as possible because field-scale influences on water quality as drainage area decreases can mute the effects of fencing. Benthic-macroinvertebrate data indicated streambank fencing had a positive influence on benthic macroinvertebrates and their habitat. More improvement was detected at the outlet of the treatment basin than the upstream sites. Probably the most important biological metric, taxa richness, indicated a greater number of benthic-macroinvertebrate taxa at treated relative to control sites after fencing. Results indicated fencing improved shallow ground-water quality (for the well nest in a stream-gaining area), as noted by decreased concentrations of N species and fecal-streptococcus counts. This improvement only occurred at the well nest where the stream was gaining water from the shallow ground-water system.

  12. VT Lidar Slope (1 meter) - 2005 - Essex

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) This metadata applies to the following collection area(s): Essex County 2005 1m and related SLOPE datasets. Created using ArcGIS "SLOPE" command...

  13. Gravity-induced stresses in finite slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, W.Z.

    1994-01-01

    An exact solution for gravity-induced stresses in finite elastic slopes is presented. This solution, which is applied for gravity-induced stresses in 15, 30, 45 and 90?? finite slopes, has application in pit-slope design, compares favorably with published finite element results for this problem and satisfies the conditions that shear and normal stresses vanish on the ground surface. The solution predicts that horizontal stresses are compressive along the top of the slopes (zero in the case of the 90?? slope) and tensile away from the bottom of the slopes, effects which are caused by downward movement and near-surface horizontal extension in front of the slope in response to gravity loading caused by the additional material associated with the finite slope. ?? 1994.

  14. Slope protection for artificial island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerniak, M.T.; Collins, J.I.; Shak, A.T.

    1981-08-01

    The technology under development to protect artificial-island production platforms from Arctic sea and ice damage involves three major considerations: (1) sea conditions during the ice-free season, (2) ice conditions during winter, and (3) construction constraints imposed by material availability, transportation problems, and length of the construction season. So far, researchers have evaluated 15 different slope-protection systems on the basis of reliability, construction-cost, and maintenance-cost factors, choosing 8 candidates for wave and ice model testing. The cases of interest involve exploration and production islands in shallow and deeper water applications.

  15. Endwall shape modification using vortex generators and fences to improve gas turbine cooling and effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokce, Zeki Ozgur

    The gas turbine is one of the most important parts of the air-breathing jet engine. Hence, improving its efficiency and rendering it operable under high temperatures are constant goals for the aerospace industry. Two types of flow within the gas turbine are of critical relevance: The flow around the first row of stator blades (also known as the nozzle guide vane blade - NGV) and the cooling flow inside the turbine blade cooling channel. The subject of this thesis work was to search for methods that could improve the characteristics of these two types of flows, thus enabling superior engine performance. The innovative aspect of our work was to apply an endwall shape modification previously employed by non-aerospace industries for cooling applications, to the gas turbine cooling flow which is vital to aerospace propulsion. Since the costs of investigating the possible benefits of any idea via extensive experiments could be quite high, we decided to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) followed by experimentation as our methodology. We decided to analyze the potential benefits of using vortex generators (VGs) as well as the rectangular endwall fence. Since the pin-fins used in cooling flow are circular cylinders, and since the boundary layer flow is mainly characterized by the leading edge diameter of the NGV blade, we modeled both the pin-fins and the NGV blade as vertical circular cylinders. The baseline case consisted of the cylinder(s) being subjected to cross flow and a certain amount of freestream turbulence. The modifications we made on the endwall consisted of rectangular fences. In the case of the cooling flow, we used triangular shaped, common flow up oriented, delta winglet type vortex generators as well as rectangular endwall fences. The channel contained singular cylinders as well as staggered rows of multiple cylinders. For the NGV flow, a rectangular endwall fence and a singular cylinder were utilized. Using extensive CFD modeling and analysis, we

  16. Potential effects of the United States-Mexico border fence on wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Aaron D; Epps, Clinton W; Cain, James W; Clark, Matt; Krausman, Paul R; Morgart, John R

    2010-02-01

    Security infrastructure along international boundaries threatens to degrade connectivity for wildlife. To explore potential effects of a fence under construction along the U.S.-Mexico border on wildlife, we assessed movement behavior of two species with different life histories whose regional persistence may depend on transboundary movements. We used radiotelemetry to assess how vegetation and landscape structure affect flight and natal dispersal behaviors of Ferruginous Pygmy-Owls (Glaucidium brasilianum), and satellite telemetry, gene-flow estimates, and least-cost path models to assess movement behavior and interpopulation connectivity of desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana). Flight height of Pygmy-Owls averaged only 1.4 m (SE 0.1) above ground, and only 23% of flights exceeded 4 m. Juvenile Pygmy-Owls dispersed at slower speeds, changed direction more, and had lower colonization success in landscapes with larger vegetation openings or higher levels of disturbance (p vegetation gaps coupled with tall fences may limit transboundary movements. Female bighorn sheep crossed valleys up to 4.9 km wide, and microsatellite analyses indicated relatively high levels of gene flow and migration (95% CI for F(ST)=0.010-0.115, Nm = 1.9-24.8, M =10.4-15.4) between populations divided by an 11-km valley. Models of gene flow based on regional topography and movement barriers suggested that nine populations of bighorn sheep in northwestern Sonora are linked by dispersal with those in neighboring Arizona. Disruption of transboundary movement corridors by impermeable fencing would isolate some populations on the Arizona side. Connectivity for other species with similar movement abilities and spatial distributions may be affected by border development, yet mitigation strategies could address needs of wildlife and humans.

  17. The Influence of Shales on Slope Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Doug

    2016-02-01

    Shales play a major role in the stability of slopes, both natural and engineered. This paper attempts to provide a review of the state-of-the-art in shale slope stability. The complexities of shale terminology and classification are first reviewed followed by a brief discussion of the important physical and mechanical properties of relevance to shale slope stability. The varied mechanisms of shale slope stability are outlined and their importance highlighted by reference to international shale slope failures. Stability analysis and modelling of anisotropic rock slope masses are briefly discussed and the potential role of brittle rock fracture and damage highlighted. A short review of shale slopes in open pits is presented.

  18. Western Ross Sea continental slope gravity currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Arnold L.; Orsi, Alejandro H.; Muench, Robin; Huber, Bruce A.; Zambianchi, Enrico; Visbeck, Martin

    2009-06-01

    Antarctic Bottom Water of the world ocean is derived from dense Shelf Water that is carried downslope by gravity currents at specific sites along the Antarctic margins. Data gathered by the AnSlope and CLIMA programs reveal the presence of energetic gravity currents that are formed over the western continental slope of the Ross Sea when High Salinity Shelf Water exits the shelf through Drygalski Trough. Joides Trough, immediately to the east, offers an additional escape route for less saline Shelf Water, while the Glomar Challenger Trough still farther east is a major pathway for export of the once supercooled low-salinity Ice Shelf Water that forms under the Ross Ice Shelf. The Drygalski Trough gravity currents increase in thickness from ˜100 to ˜400 m on proceeding downslope from ˜600 m (the shelf break) to 1200 m (upper slope) sea floor depth, while turning sharply to the west in response to the Coriolis force during their descent. The mean current pathway trends ˜35° downslope from isobaths. Benthic-layer current and thickness are correlated with the bottom water salinity, which exerts the primary control over the benthic-layer density. A 1-year time series of bottom-water current and hydrographic properties obtained on the slope near the 1000 m isobath indicates episodic pulses of Shelf Water export through Drygalski Trough. These cold (34.75) pulses correlate with strong downslope bottom flow. Extreme examples occurred during austral summer/fall 2003, comprising concentrated High Salinity Shelf Water (-1.9 °C; 34.79) and approaching 1.5 m s -1 at descent angles as large as ˜60° relative to the isobaths. Such events were most common during November-May, consistent with a northward shift in position of the dense Shelf Water during austral summer. The coldest, saltiest bottom water was measured from mid-April to mid-May 2003. The summer/fall export of High Salinity Shelf Water observed in 2004 was less than that seen in 2003. This difference, if real

  19. Improved electrochemical performance of Fe-N-C catalysts through ionic liquid modification in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinaiou, Ioanna; Wolker, Thomas; Shahraei, Ali; Zhang, Gui-Rong; Janßen, Arne; Wagner, Stephan; Weidler, Natascha; Stark, Robert W.; Etzold, Bastian J. M.; Kramm, Ulrike I.

    2018-01-01

    It is well known that Fe-N-C catalysts reach a significantly better ORR activity in alkaline compared to acidic electrolyte. This advantage makes the material of interest for application in alkaline fuel cells. Beside this, for Pt/C catalyst it is known that the performance in acid can be significantly enhanced through ionic liquid modification following the Solid Catalysts with Ionic Liquid Layer (SCILL) concept. In our current study we combine both advantages and investigate for two Fe-N-C catalysts prepared either with or without sulfur in the precursor mixture the effect of IL modification. The unmodified catalysts are characterized using X-ray induced photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), 57Fe Mößbauer and Raman spectroscopy as well as N2 sorption. The electrochemical behavior of the unmodified catalyst and with different pore-filling degrees of ionic liquid (IL) is analysed with respect to double layer capacitance, ORR activity and stability in accelerated stress tests mimicking the load-cycle conditions.

  20. Small Forms of Wooden Architecture of the Russian North: Fences, Gates, Wicket Doors and Retaining Walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Sevan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article studies historical and modern aspects of design and building of small architectural forms (fences, gates, wicket doors, retaining walls and partially – bridge fences in many regions of the Russian North and other regions of Russia. This work is based on the author’s investigations of the great number of monuments of wooden architecture during the visit to several regions of Russia in connection with preparation of the Collection of Monuments and the building of open-air museums in the Vologda and Arkhangelsk regions (“Malye Korely”. The author suggests her own systematization of the above-mentioned constructions, most of which have eventually become monuments of folk architecture. The majority of the discovered and measured small architectural forms are reconstructed in the museums. They can be also easily built in the real environment of rural settlements, small towns, country estates and dacha communities of the mentioned regions.

  1. Recent Progress on Fe/N/C Electrocatalysts for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the overall system cost, the development of inexpensive, high-performance and durable oxygen reduction reaction (ORRN, Fe-codoped carbon-based (Fe/N/C electrocatalysts to replace currently used Pt-based catalysts has become one of the major topics in research on fuel cells. This review paper lays the emphasis on introducing the progress made over the recent five years with a detailed discussion of recent work in the area of Fe/N/C electrocatalysts for ORR and the possible Fe-based active sites. Fe-based materials prepared by simple pyrolysis of transition metal salt, carbon support, and nitrogen-rich small molecule or polymeric compound are mainly reviewed due to their low cost, high performance, long stability and because they are the most promising for replacing currently used Pt-based catalysts in the progress of fuel cell commercialization. Additionally, Fe-base catalysts with small amount of Fe or new structure of Fe/Fe3C encased in carbon layers are presented to analyze the effect of loading and existence form of Fe on the ORR catalytic activity in Fe-base catalyst. The proposed catalytically Fe-centered active sites and reaction mechanisms from various authors are also discussed in detail, which may be useful for the rational design of high-performance, inexpensive, and practical Fe-base ORR catalysts in future development of fuel cells.

  2. Fences Impede Long-distance Mongolian Gazelle ( Procapra gutturosa Movements in Drought-stricken Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk A. Olson

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Human-generated landscape barriers are especially problematic for species whose life histories entail long-distance movements. In May 2008, hundreds of Mongolian gazelles ( Procapra gutturosa became entangled in border fences as thousands attempted to move from Mongolia into Russia. Typically, the root cause of such (non-migratory mass animal movements can only be super fi cially described. Here we draw upon satellite imagery and a fortuitously timed fi eld study to investigate a likely hypothesis. At the same time that gazelles were attempting to cross from Mongolia into Russia, gazelles equipped with satellite-linked collars repeatedly attempted to emigrate from Mongolia into China. Satellite-derived estimates of vegetation productivity demonstrate that a decade-long decline in available green biomass in Mongolia’s steppes underlies the gazelles’ attempted mass emigrations. Given the potential that this trans-boundary movement event will occur within these drought-stricken landscapes in the future, modest fence modi fi cations suitable for other similar open habitat ungulates may be suf fi cient to allow the gazelles to maintain their nomadic movements.

  3. Effects of slope smoothing in river channel modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyungmin; Liu, Frank; Hodges, Ben R.

    2017-04-01

    In extending dynamic river modeling with the 1D Saint-Venant equations from a single reach to a large watershed there are critical questions as to how much bathymetric knowledge is necessary and how it should be represented parsimoniously. The ideal model will include the detail necessary to provide realism, but not include extraneous detail that should not exert a control on a 1D (cross-section averaged) solution. In a Saint-Venant model, the overall complexity of the river channel morphometry is typically abstracted into metrics for the channel slope, cross-sectional area, hydraulic radius, and roughness. In stream segments where cross-section surveys are closely spaced, it is not uncommon to have sharp changes in slope or even negative values (where a positive slope is the downstream direction). However, solving river flow with the Saint-Venant equations requires a degree of smoothness in the equation parameters or the equation set with the directly measured channel slopes may not be Lipschitz continuous. The results of non-smoothness are typically extended computational time to converge solutions (or complete failure to converge) and/or numerical instabilities under transient conditions. We have investigated using cubic splines to smooth the bottom slope and ensure always positive reference slopes within a 1D model. This method has been implemented in the Simulation Program for River Networks (SPRNT) and is compared to the standard HEC-RAS river solver. It is shown that the reformulation of the reference slope is both in keeping with the underlying derivation of the Saint-Venant equations and provides practical numerical stability without altering the realism of the simulation. This research was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under grant number CCF-1331610.

  4. Comparison of carbon sequestration ability and effect of elevation in fenced wetland communities of the Xilin River floodplains: a model case study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, L.; Liu, H.; Wang, W.; Liang, C.; Yang, J.; Verhoeven, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Floodplain habitats of the Xilin River in Inner Mongolia, China, were overgrazed by sheep and cattle until fencing of the floodplains was implemented in 2000. Carbon cycling of three plant communities of differing floodplain elevation after fencing showed that biomass in low-elevation wetlands

  5. The Hydromechanics of Vegetation for Slope Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulyono, A.; Subardja, A.; Ekasari, I.; Lailati, M.; Sudirja, R.; Ningrum, W.

    2018-02-01

    Vegetation is one of the alternative technologies in the prevention of shallow landslide prevention that occurs mostly during the rainy season. The application of plant for slope stabilization is known as bioengineering. Knowledge of the vegetative contribution that can be considered in bioengineering was the hydrological and mechanical aspects (hydromechanical). Hydrological effect of the plant on slope stability is to reduce soil water content through transpiration, interception, and evapotranspiration. The mechanical impact of vegetation on slope stability is to stabilize the slope with mechanical reinforcement of soils through roots. Vegetation water consumption varies depending on the age and density, rainfall factors and soil types. Vegetation with high ability to absorb water from the soil and release into the atmosphere through a transpiration process will reduce the pore water stress and increase slope stability, and vegetation with deep root anchoring and strong root binding was potentially more significant to maintain the stability of the slope.

  6. Slope Estimation from ICESat/GLAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Mahoney

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a novel technique to infer ground slope angle from waveform LiDAR, known as the independent slope method (ISM. The technique is applied to large footprint waveforms (\\(\\sim\\ mean diameter from the Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite (ICESat Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS to produce a slope dataset of near-global coverage at \\(0.5^{\\circ} \\times 0.5^{\\circ}\\ resolution. ISM slope estimates are compared against high resolution airborne LiDAR slope measurements for nine sites across three continents. ISM slope estimates compare better with the aircraft data (R\\(^{2}=0.87\\ and RMSE\\(=5.16^{\\circ}\\ than the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission Digital Elevation Model (SRTM DEM inferred slopes (R\\(^{2}=0.71\\ and RMSE\\(=8.69^{\\circ}\\ ISM slope estimates are concurrent with GLAS waveforms and can be used to correct biophysical parameters, such as tree height and biomass. They can also be fused with other DEMs, such as SRTM, to improve slope estimates.

  7. Slope of the Slope Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope of slope was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell by applying the ArcGIS Spatial Analyst 'Slope' Tool to a previously created slope...

  8. Characterization of Unstable Rock Slopes Through Passive Seismic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinbrod, U.; Burjanek, J.; Fäh, D.

    2014-12-01

    Catastrophic rock slope failures have high social impact, causing significant damage to infrastructure and many casualties throughout the world each year. Both detection and characterization of rock instabilities are therefore of key importance. An analysis of ambient vibrations of unstable rock slopes might be a new alternative to the already existing methods, e.g. geotechnical displacement measurements. Systematic measurements have been performed recently in Switzerland to study the seismic response of potential rockslides concerning a broad class of slope failure mechanisms and material conditions. Small aperture seismic arrays were deployed at sites of interest for a short period of time (several hours) in order to record ambient vibrations. Each measurement setup included a reference station, which was installed on a stable part close to the instability. Recorded ground motion is highly directional in the unstable parts of the rock slope, and significantly amplified with respect to stable areas. These effects are strongest at certain frequencies, which were identified as eigenfrequencies of the unstable rock mass. In most cases the directions of maximum amplification are perpendicular to open cracks and in good agreement with the deformation directions obtained by geodetic measurements. Such unique signatures might improve our understanding of slope structure and stability. Thus we link observed vibration characteristics with available results of detailed geological characterization. This is supported by numerical modeling of seismic wave propagation in fractured media with complex topography.For example, a potential relation between eigenfrequencies and unstable rock mass volume is investigated.

  9. Control and perception of balance at elevated and sloped surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Peter I; Hsiao, Hongwei; Dotson, Brian W; Ammons, Douglas E

    2003-01-01

    Understanding roof-work-related risk of falls and developing low-cost, practical engineering controls for reducing this risk remain in high demand in the construction industry. This study investigated the effects of the roof work environment characteristics of surface slope, height, and visual reference on standing balance in construction workers. The 24 participants were tested in a laboratory setting at 4 slopes (0 degrees, 18 degrees, 26 degrees, and 34 degrees), 2 heights (0, 3 m), and 2 visual conditions (with and without visual references). Postural sway characteristics were calculated using center of pressure recordings from a force platform. Workers' perceptions of postural sway and instability were also evaluated. The results indicated that slope and height synergistically increased workers' standing postural instability. Workers recognized the individual destabilizing effects of slope and height but did not recognize the synergistic effect of the two. Visual references significantly reduced the destabilizing effects of height and slope. Actual and potential applications of this research include the use of temporary level work surfaces and proximal vertical reference structures as postural instability control measures during roofing work.

  10. Compliance with Operational Circular No. 2 on conditions of access to the fenced CERN sites

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of Operational Circular No. 2 is to contribute to the protection of people and property by defining the conditions of access to the Organization's fenced sites. However, recently, the services concerned have noted a significant increase in the instances of non-compliance with those conditions that cannot be tolerated, for example: use of CERN access cards by people, other than the cardholders themselves, in order to gain access to facilities without having attended the required safety course; speeding, particularly on Route Gregory and Route Weisskopf; driving in and out of the site on the wrong side of the road; parking on spaces set aside for the disabled; nuisance parking, especially in the proximity of the Restaurants; the dumping of wrecked vehicles. As the aforementioned instances of non-compliance can lead to dangerous situations, the Organization reserves the right to apply the penalties provided for under paragraph 26 of Operational Circular No. 2, namely to refuse access to the site...

  11. REMINDER - Compliance with Operational Circular No. 2 on conditions of access to the fenced CERN sites

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of Operational Circular No. 2 is to contribute to the protection of people and property by defining the conditions of access to the Organization's fenced sites. However, recently, the services concerned have noted a significant increase in the instances of non-compliance with those conditions that cannot be tolerated, for example: use of CERN access cards by people, other than the cardholders themselves, in order to gain access to facilities without having attended the required safety course; speeding, particularly on Route Gregory and Route Weisskopf; driving in and out of the site on the wrong side of the road; parking on spaces set aside for the disabled; nuisance parking, especially in the proximity of the Restaurants; the dumping of wrecked vehicles. As the aforementioned instances of non-compliance can lead to dangerous situations, the Organization reserves the right to apply the penalties provided for under paragraph 26 of Operational Circular No. 2, namely to refuse access to the site ...

  12. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Takacs, Peter Z.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-09-16

    A collaboration, including all DOE synchrotron labs, industrial vendors of x-ray optics, and with active participation of the HBZ-BESSY-II optics group has been established to work together on a new slope measuring profiler -- the optical slope measuring system (OSMS). The slope measurement accuracy of the instrument is expected to be<50 nrad for the current and future metrology of x-ray optics for the next generation of light sources. The goals were to solidify a design that meets the needs of mirror specifications and also be affordable; and to create a common specification for fabrication of a multi-functional translation/scanning (MFTS) system for the OSMS. This was accomplished by two collaborative meetings at the ALS (March 26, 2010) and at the APS (May 6, 2010).

  13. How Fencing Affects the Soil Quality and Plant Biomass in the Grassland of the Loess Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Quanchao; Liu, Yang; Xiao, Li; Huang, Yimei

    2017-09-25

    Overgrazing is a severe problem in several regions in Northwestern China and has caused serious land degradation. Secondary natural succession plays an important role in the accumulation of soil carbon and nitrogen contents. Estimating the effects of grazing exclusion on soil quality and plant diversity will improve our understanding of the succession process after overgrazing and promote judicious management of degraded pastures. This experiment was designed to measure soil properties and plant diversity following an age chronosequence of grasslands (ages ranged from one year, 12 years, 20 years, and 30 years) in Northwestern China. The results showed that continuous fencing resulted in a considerable increase in plant coverage, plant biomass (above- and below-ground biomass), and plant diversity, which can directly or indirectly improve the accumulation of soil organic carbon and total nitrogen content. The plant coverage and the above- and below-ground biomass linearly increased along the succession time, whereas soil organic C and N contents showed a significant decline in the first 12 years and, subsequently, a significant increase. The increased plant biomass caused an increase in soil organic carbon and soil total nitrogen. These results suggested that soil restoration and plant cover were an incongruous process. Generally, soil restoration is a slow process and falls behind vegetation recovery after grazing exclusion. Although the accumulation of soil C and N stocks needed a long term, vegetation restoration was a considerable option for the degraded grassland due to the significant increase of plant biomass, diversity, and soil C and N stocks. Therefore, fencing with natural succession should be considered in the design of future degraded pastures.

  14. Flow characteristics and scaling past highly porous wall-mounted fences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, Eduardo; Bruce, Paul J. K.; Buxton, Oliver R. H.

    2017-07-01

    An extensive characterization of the flow past wall-mounted highly porous fences based on single- and multi-scale geometries has been performed using hot-wire anemometry in a low-speed wind tunnel. Whilst drag properties (estimated from the time-averaged momentum equation) seem to be mostly dependent on the grids' blockage ratio; wakes of different size and orientation bars seem to generate distinct behaviours regarding turbulence properties. Far from the near-grid region, the flow is dominated by the presence of two well-differentiated layers: one close to the wall dominated by the near-wall behaviour and another one corresponding to the grid's wake and shear layer, originating from between this and the freestream. It is proposed that the effective thickness of the wall layer can be inferred from the wall-normal profile of root-mean-square streamwise velocity or, alternatively, from the wall-normal profile of streamwise velocity correlation. Using these definitions of wall-layer thickness enables us to collapse different trends of the turbulence behaviour inside this layer. In particular, the root-mean-square level of the wall shear stress fluctuations, longitudinal integral length scale, and spanwise turbulent structure is shown to display a satisfactory scaling with this thickness rather than with the whole thickness of the grid's wake. Moreover, it is shown that certain grids destroy the spanwise arrangement of large turbulence structures in the logarithmic region, which are then re-formed after a particular streamwise extent. It is finally shown that for fences subject to a boundary layer of thickness comparable to their height, the effective thickness of the wall layer scales with the incoming boundary layer thickness. Analogously, it is hypothesized that the growth rate of the internal layer is also partly dependent on the incoming boundary layer thickness.

  15. The Sloping Land Conversion Program in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen

    By overcoming the barriers that limit access to financial liquidity and human resource, the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) can promote rural livelihood diversification. This paper examines this effect using a household survey data set spanning the 1999 implementation of the Sloping land c...

  16. Lattice calculus of the morphological slope transform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.A.M. Heijmans (Henk); P. Maragos

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThis paper presents a study of the morphological slope transform in the complete lattice framework. It discusses in detail the interrelationships between the slope transform at one hand and the (Young-Fenchel) conjugate and Legendre transform, two well-known concepts from convex

  17. Internal waves and temperature fronts on slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Thorpe

    Full Text Available Time series measurements from an array of temperature miniloggers in a line at constant depth along the sloping boundary of a lake are used to describe the `internal surf zone' where internal waves interact with the sloping boundary. More small positive temperature time derivatives are recorded than negative, but there are more large negative values than positive, giving the overall distribution of temperature time derivatives a small negative skewness. This is consistent with the internal wave dynamics; fronts form during the up-slope phase of the motion, bringing cold water up the slope, and the return flow may become unstable, leading to small advecting billows and weak warm fronts. The data are analysed to detect `events', periods in which the temperature derivatives exceed a set threshold. The speed and distance travelled by `events' are described. The motion along the slope may be a consequence of (a instabilities advected by the flow (b internal waves propagating along-slope or (c internal waves approaching the slope from oblique directions. The propagation of several of the observed 'events' can only be explained by (c, evidence that the internal surf zone has some, but possibly not all, the characteristics of the conventional 'surface wave' surf zone, with waves steepening as they approach the slope at oblique angles.

    Key words. Oceanography: general (benthic boundary layers; limnology, Oceanography: physical (internal and inertial waves

  18. Determination of slope failure using 2-D resistivity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; Saad, Rosli; Ismail, Nur Azwin; Bery, Andy Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Landslides and slope failure may give negative economic effects including the cost to repair structures, loss of property value and medical costs in the event of injury. To avoid landslide, slope failure and disturbance of the ecosystem, good and detailed planning must be done when developing hilly area. Slope failure classification and various factors contributing to the instability using 2-D resistivity survey conducted in Selangor, Malaysia are described. The study on landslide and slope failure was conducted at Site A and Site B, Selangor using 2-D resistivity method. The implications of the anticipated ground conditions as well as the field observation of the actual conditions are discussed. Nine 2-D resistivity survey lines were conducted in Site A and six 2-D resistivity survey lines with 5 m minimum electrode spacing using Pole-dipole array were performed in Site B. The data were processed using Res2Dinv and Surfer10 software to evaluate the subsurface characteristics. 2-D resistivity results from both locations show that the study areas consist of two main zones. The first zone is alluvium or highly weathered with the resistivity of 100-1000 Ωm at 20-70 m depth. This zone consists of saturated area (1-100 Ωm) and boulders with resistivity value of 1200-3000 Ωm. The second zone with resistivity values of > 3000 Ωm was interpreted as granitic bedrock. The study area was characterized by saturated zones, highly weathered zone, highly contain of sand and boulders that will trigger slope failure in the survey area. Based on the results obtained from the study findings, it can be concluded that 2-D resistivity method is useful method in determination of slope failure.

  19. Records of two bat species (Chiroptera: Molossidae found dead in barbed-wire fences in the northwestern São Paulo state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crasso Paulo Bosco Breviglieri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, there are descriptions of cases in which bats are found dead due to human actions. The main records are related to the influence of barbed-wire fences, electrical nets, pesticides, and wind turbines. In Brazil, these data are poorly explored and deserve more attention from researchers and government agencies. This note aims to describe two records of bats (Molossus molossus and Molossus rufus found dead in barbed-wire fences, in the northwestern São Paulo state, Brazil. Furthermore, it briefly discusses the possible relation between this kind of accident and closeness of barbed-wire fences to foraging or shelter areas for these species.

  20. Wave run-up on sandbag slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamnoon Rasmeemasmuang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available On occasions, sandbag revetments are temporarily applied to armour sandy beaches from erosion. Nevertheless, an empirical formula to determine the wave run -up height on sandbag slopes has not been available heretofore. In this study a wave run-up formula which considers the roughness of slope surfaces is proposed for the case of sandbag slopes. A series of laboratory experiments on the wave run -up on smooth slopes and sandbag slopes were conducted in a regular-wave flume, leading to the finding of empirical parameters for the formula. The proposed empirical formula is applicable to wave steepness ranging from 0.01 to 0.14 and to the thickness of placed sandbags relative to the wave height ranging from 0.17 to 3.0. The study shows that the wave run-up height computed by the formula for the sandbag slopes is 26-40% lower than that computed by the formula for the smooth slopes.

  1. MECHANICAL HARVESTING OF COFFEE IN HIGH SLOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIPE SANTINATO

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brazilian coffee farming is carried out both on flat and steep lands. In flat areas, mechanized operations are intensive; however, in steep slope areas, certain mechanized operations cannot be performed, such as harvesting. Based on this, the industry has developed machinery to harvest coffee in areas with up to 30% slope. However, harvesters have their efficiency and operational performance influenced by land slope. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the operational performance and harvesting efficiency of a steep-slope harvester under different situations, using different speed settings. The experiment was carried out in the county of Santo Antônio do Amparo, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, using five coffee stands with 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30% slope. Evaluations were performed with a self-propelled harvester (Electron, TDI®, Araguari, MG, Brazil at three rotation speeds (600, 800 and 1.000 rpm and two ground speeds (800 and 1.000 m h-1. The results showed the lower speed (800 m h-1 was suitable for 10% slope areas since the amount of fallen coffee berries. For areas of 20% slope, harvesting time was 21.6% longer than in flatter areas. Downtime varied from 10.66 to 29.18% total harvest due to a higher number of maneuvers.

  2. A more general model for the analysis of the rock slope stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Because of the numerous problems related to the rock slope stability the above assumption is satisfied and the shear strength characteristics of intact rock have taken part in the analysis. The analysis presented here gives a better concept, view, and idea of understanding the physical nature of rock slopes and includes ...

  3. Techniques for establishing vegetation for long-term erosion control on disturbed slopes in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Dougherty; A. Baharanyi; B. Guertal; J. Grace

    2010-01-01

    One year results from 21 outdoor erosion and sediment control plots constructed in 2008 on a 4:1 slope are presented. The study objectives were to evaluate; 1) the effects of incorporating lime and fertilizer on establishment of bermudagrass on steep slopes, 2) the differences in bermudagrass establishment as a function of temporary covers including wheat straw,...

  4. Canyon morphology on a modern carbonate slope of the Bahamas: Evidence of regional tectonic tilting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, T.; Ducassou, E.; Gillet, H.; Hanquiez, V.; Tournadour, E.; Combes, J.; Eberli, G.P.; Kindler, P.; Gonthier, E.; Conesa, G.; Robin, C.; Sianipar, R.; Reijmer, J.J.G.; François, A.

    2012-01-01

    New high-quality multibeam data presented here depict the northern slope of the Little Bahama Bank (Bahamas). The survey reveals the details of large- and small-scale morphologies that look like siliciclastic systems at a smaller scale, including large-scale slope failure scars and canyon

  5. A more general model for the analysis of the rock slope stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    characteristics of intact rock have taken part in the analysis. The analysis presented here gives a better concept, view, and idea of understanding the physical nature of rock slopes and includes more parameters governing the stability of the potential failure zone. Keywords. Wedge failure; slope stability; trace length; joint set; ...

  6. 76 FR 69736 - Primus Solutions, Inc., and Arctic Slope Regional Corp.; Transfer of Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... AGENCY Primus Solutions, Inc., and Arctic Slope Regional Corp.; Transfer of Data AGENCY: Environmental... Rodenticide Act (FIFRA) and the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), including information that may... Primus Solutions, Inc., and its subcontractor, Arctic Slope Regional Corporation (ASRC) in ] accordance...

  7. A new GTD slope diffraction coefficient for plane wave illumination of a wedge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumholt, Michael; Breinbjerg, Olav

    1997-01-01

    Two wedge problems including slope diffraction are solved: one in which the incident field is a non-uniform plane wave, and one in which it is an inhomogeneous plane wave. The two solutions lead to the same GTD slope diffraction coefficient. This coefficient reveals the existence of a coupling...

  8. Rock Slope Design Criteria : Executive Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Based on the stratigraphy and the type of slope stability problems, the flat lying, Paleozoic age, sedimentary rocks of Ohio were divided into three design units: 1) competent rock design unit consisting of sandstones, limestones, and siltstones that...

  9. Slope activity in Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundas, Colin M.; McEwen, Alfred S.

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution repeat imaging of Aeolis Mons, the central mound in Gale crater, reveals active slope processes within tens of kilometers of the Curiosity rover. At one location near the base of northeastern Aeolis Mons, dozens of transient narrow lineae were observed, resembling features (Recurring Slope Lineae) that are potentially due to liquid water. However, the lineae faded and have not recurred in subsequent Mars years. Other small-scale slope activity is common, but has different spatial and temporal characteristics. We have not identified confirmed RSL, which Rummel et al. (Rummel, J.D. et al. [2014]. Astrobiology 14, 887–968) recommended be treated as potential special regions for planetary protection. Repeat images acquired as Curiosity approaches the base of Aeolis Mons could detect changes due to active slope processes, which could enable the rover to examine recently exposed material.

  10. Slope failure investigation management system : [research summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Highway slopes are exposed to a variety of environmental and climatic conditions, : such as deforestation, cycles of freezing and thawing weather, and heavy storms. : Over time, these climatic conditions, in combination with other factors such as : g...

  11. Percent Agricultural Land Cover on Steep Slopes

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Clearing land for agriculture tends to increase soil erosion. The amount of erosion is related to the steepness of the slope, farming methods used and soil type....

  12. North Slope, Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for diving birds, gulls and terns, seabirds, shorebirds, and waterfowl for the North Slope of Alaska....

  13. Green technologies for reducing slope erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    As climate change alters precipitation patterns, departments of transportation will increasingly face the problem of : slope failures, which already cost California millions of dollars in repair work annually. Caltrans hopes to prevent : these failur...

  14. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector...

  15. 3D geodetic monitoring slope deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Gabriel

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available For plenty of slope failures that can be found in Slovakia is necessary and very important their geodetic monitoring (because of their activity, reactivisations, checks. The paper gives new methodologies for these works, using 3D terrestrial survey technologies for measurements in convenient deformation networks. The design of an optimal type of deformation model for various kinds of landslides and their exact processing with an efficient testing procedure to determine the kinematics of the slope deformations are presented too.

  16. The Contribution of Particle Swarm Optimization to Three-Dimensional Slope Stability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roohollah Kalatehjari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last few years, particle swarm optimization (PSO has been extensively applied in various geotechnical engineering including slope stability analysis. However, this contribution was limited to two-dimensional (2D slope stability analysis. This paper applied PSO in three-dimensional (3D slope stability problem to determine the critical slip surface (CSS of soil slopes. A detailed description of adopted PSO was presented to provide a good basis for more contribution of this technique to the field of 3D slope stability problems. A general rotating ellipsoid shape was introduced as the specific particle for 3D slope stability analysis. A detailed sensitivity analysis was designed and performed to find the optimum values of parameters of PSO. Example problems were used to evaluate the applicability of PSO in determining the CSS of 3D slopes. The first example presented a comparison between the results of PSO and PLAXI-3D finite element software and the second example compared the ability of PSO to determine the CSS of 3D slopes with other optimization methods from the literature. The results demonstrated the efficiency and effectiveness of PSO in determining the CSS of 3D soil slopes.

  17. The Tibial Slope in Patients With Achondroplasia: Its Characterization and Possible Role in Genu Recurvatum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jaysson T; Bernholt, David L; Tran, Kevin V; Ain, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Genu recurvatum, a posterior resting position of the knee, is a common lower extremity deformity in patients with achondroplasia and has been thought to be secondary to ligamentous laxity. To the best of our knowledge, the role of the tibial slope has not been investigated, and no studies describe the tibial slope in patients with achondroplasia. Our goals were to characterize the tibial slope in children and adults with achondroplasia, explore its possible role in the development of genu recurvatum, and compare the tibial slope in patients with achondroplasia to that in the general population. We reviewed 252 lateral knee radiographs of 130 patients with achondroplasia seen at our clinic from November 2007 through September 2013. Patients were excluded if they had previous lower extremity surgery or radiographs with extreme rotation. We analyzed patient demographics and, on all radiographs, the tibial slope. We then compared the mean tibial slope to norms in the literature. Tibial slopes >90 degrees had an anterior tibial slope and received a positive prefix. Statistical analysis included intraclass and interclass reliability, Pearson correlation coefficient, and the Student t tests (significance, Pachondroplasia than in the general population; however, this difference diminishes as patients' age. An anterior tibial slope may predispose to a more posterior resting knee position, also known as genu recurvatum. Level IV-retrospective case series.

  18. The Contribution of Particle Swarm Optimization to Three-Dimensional Slope Stability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Rashid, Ahmad Safuan; Ali, Nazri

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, particle swarm optimization (PSO) has been extensively applied in various geotechnical engineering including slope stability analysis. However, this contribution was limited to two-dimensional (2D) slope stability analysis. This paper applied PSO in three-dimensional (3D) slope stability problem to determine the critical slip surface (CSS) of soil slopes. A detailed description of adopted PSO was presented to provide a good basis for more contribution of this technique to the field of 3D slope stability problems. A general rotating ellipsoid shape was introduced as the specific particle for 3D slope stability analysis. A detailed sensitivity analysis was designed and performed to find the optimum values of parameters of PSO. Example problems were used to evaluate the applicability of PSO in determining the CSS of 3D slopes. The first example presented a comparison between the results of PSO and PLAXI-3D finite element software and the second example compared the ability of PSO to determine the CSS of 3D slopes with other optimization methods from the literature. The results demonstrated the efficiency and effectiveness of PSO in determining the CSS of 3D soil slopes. PMID:24991652

  19. Numerical Computation of Homogeneous Slope Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangshuang Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To simplify the computational process of homogeneous slope stability, improve computational accuracy, and find multiple potential slip surfaces of a complex geometric slope, this study utilized the limit equilibrium method to derive expression equations of overall and partial factors of safety. This study transformed the solution of the minimum factor of safety (FOS to solving of a constrained nonlinear programming problem and applied an exhaustive method (EM and particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO to this problem. In simple slope examples, the computational results using an EM and PSO were close to those obtained using other methods. Compared to the EM, the PSO had a small computation error and a significantly shorter computation time. As a result, the PSO could precisely calculate the slope FOS with high efficiency. The example of the multistage slope analysis indicated that this slope had two potential slip surfaces. The factors of safety were 1.1182 and 1.1560, respectively. The differences between these and the minimum FOS (1.0759 were small, but the positions of the slip surfaces were completely different than the critical slip surface (CSS.

  20. Seasonal slope surface deformation measured with TLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, L; Smethurst, J; Powrie, W; Sellaiya, A

    2014-01-01

    In temperate European climates, soil water removal due to vegetation transpiration peaks in summer and soil rewetting from higher levels of precipitation occurs in winter. In clays of high plasticity, the seasonal cycles of drying and wetting cause the soil to experience a volumetric change, resulting in seasonal shrinking and swelling. For a clay slope exhibiting volume change, such behaviour can lead to excessive deformation and could contribute to strain-softening and progressive slope failure. This can in turn cause traffic disruption and loss of life if roads and railways are founded on or surrounded by such slopes. This paper discusses the driving forces of seasonal surface movement, in particular the role of vegetation, and presents the use of Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) to measure the surface movement of a lightly vegetated London Clay slope near Newbury, UK. Two TLS scans were carried out in early and late summer respectively, representing relative wet and dry conditions of the slope. Continuous field measurements of soil water content in upper layers of the slope were obtained from TDR ThetaProbes already installed at the site. The water content data are used to support the results obtained from TLS by indicating the likely volumetric change in the soil due to loss of water

  1. Automatic approach to deriving fuzzy slope positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liang-Jun; Zhu, A.-Xing; Qin, Cheng-Zhi; Liu, Jun-Zhi

    2018-03-01

    Fuzzy characterization of slope positions is important for geographic modeling. Most of the existing fuzzy classification-based methods for fuzzy characterization require extensive user intervention in data preparation and parameter setting, which is tedious and time-consuming. This paper presents an automatic approach to overcoming these limitations in the prototype-based inference method for deriving fuzzy membership value (or similarity) to slope positions. The key contribution is a procedure for finding the typical locations and setting the fuzzy inference parameters for each slope position type. Instead of being determined totally by users in the prototype-based inference method, in the proposed approach the typical locations and fuzzy inference parameters for each slope position type are automatically determined by a rule set based on prior domain knowledge and the frequency distributions of topographic attributes. Furthermore, the preparation of topographic attributes (e.g., slope gradient, curvature, and relative position index) is automated, so the proposed automatic approach has only one necessary input, i.e., the gridded digital elevation model of the study area. All compute-intensive algorithms in the proposed approach were speeded up by parallel computing. Two study cases were provided to demonstrate that this approach can properly, conveniently and quickly derive the fuzzy slope positions.

  2. New approaches to the organization of prestart preparation of qualified athletes in single combats (on an example of fencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.O. Lopatenko

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to develop and investigate the effectiveness of complex extra-training means to enhance the prelaunch qualified athletes in fencing. Material : the study involved 12 qualified male fencers. Measurements were made of the latent period of simple and complex visual-motor response. Results: recommended set of proposed actions prelaunch 45 minutes before the start of the competition. The maximum stimulating effect of the experimental complex extra-training means in terms of neural properties of the organism is observed from the tenth to thirty minutes after the impact. Conclusions : We have reached the stimulatory effects of reduced overall duration of the workout to twenty minutes, allowing you to more efficiently organize the process of prelaunch qualified athletes in fencing as opposed to using traditional means.

  3. Operational Circular No.2 (Rev. 2) - Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 2) entitled “Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site” and its “implementation measures”, approved by the Director-General following discussion at the Standing Concertation Committee meeting on 20 May 2014 and entering into force on 1 September 2014, are available on the intranet site of the Human Resources Department (see here).   This circular is applicable to members of the personnel and other persons concerned. It cancels and replaces Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 1) entitled “Conditions of access to the fenced parts of the CERN site”, of April 1998. In particular, the revised circular provides for the possibility of mandating a person responsible for the proper implementation of the circular, specifies the rules relating to vehicles allowed on the site and the respective responsibilities of their owners, and relaxes certain administrative formalities in case of loss, theft or di...

  4. Thermal Properties of Alaskan North Slope Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overduin, P. P.; Kane, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    Climatic processes important to permafrost formation, maintenance and degradation have an annual to millennial timescale. The thin active layer, vegetation and snow above the permafrost can exert considerable influence on permafrost stability and react more rapidly than permafrost to climatic shifts. The thermal properties of this layer are thus important for the interpretation of permafrost data. We seek to predict bulk properties of a porous multiphase media based on state variables, bulk material properties and spatial phase densities. In this study, our objectives are: 1) to test thermal diffusivity probes in the field for the assessment of phase density, in particular of volumetric ice content and 2) to corroborate field studies with laboratory determinations of phase density and thermal diffusivity. We measure thermal properties and phase densities of a range of soils from the Alaskan North Slope, including high organic content and fine-grained mineral soils. Liquid water content is measured using time domain reflectometry to constrain the composition of the multiphase soil. Additional measurements of the soil's state are made using thermistors, heat flux plates and radial heat dissipation probes. The latter are thin films with embedded heat pulse wire and thermopiles to measure the radial thermal gradient response to temperature change. We report changes in thermal conductivity and diffusivity during freezing and thawing, and at different moisture contents and temperatures. The results for thermal conductivity and diffusivity as a function of phase density under field conditions are compared to those measured in the lab and to those calculated using empirical models.

  5. Parameterization experiments performed via synthetic mass movements prototypes generated by 3D slope stability simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Antonio C.

    2010-05-01

    The central purpose of this work is to perform a reverse procedure in the mass movement conventional parameterization approach. The idea is to generate a number of synthetic mass movements by means of the "slope stability simulator" (Colangelo, 2007), and compeer their morphological and physical properties with "real" conditions of effective mass movements. This device is an integrated part of "relief unity emulator" (rue), that permits generate synthetic mass movements in a synthetic slope environment. The "rue" was build upon fundamental geomorphological concepts. These devices operate with an integrated set of mechanical, geomorphic and hydrological models. The "slope stability simulator" device (sss) permits to perform a detailed slope stability analysis in a theoretical three dimensional space, by means of evaluation the spatial behavior of critical depths, gradients and saturation levels in the "potential rupture surfaces" inferred along a set of slope profiles, that compounds a synthetic slope unity. It's a meta-stable 4-dimensional object generated by means of "rue", that represents a sequence evolution of a generator profile applied here, was adapted the infinite slope model for slope. Any slope profiles were sliced by means of finite element solution like in Bishop method. For the synthetic slope systems generated, we assume that the potential rupture surface occurs at soil-regolith or soil-rock boundary in slope material. Sixteen variables were included in the "rue-sss" device that operates in an integrated manner. For each cell, the factor of safety was calculated considering the value of shear strength (cohesion and friction) of material, soil-regolith boundary depth, soil moisture level content, potential rupture surface gradient, slope surface gradient, top of subsurface flow gradient, apparent soil bulk density and vegetation surcharge. The slope soil was considered as cohesive material. The 16 variables incorporated in the models were analyzed for

  6. Minimal role of eastern fence lizards in Borrelia burgdorferi transmission in central New Jersey oak/pine woodlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulison, Eric L.; Kerr, Kaetlyn T; Dyer, Megan C; Han, Seungeun; Burke, Russell L.; Tsao, Jean I.; Ginsberg, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    The Eastern fence lizard, Sceloporus undulatus, is widely distributed in eastern and central North America, ranging through areas with high levels of Lyme disease, as well as areas where Lyme disease is rare or absent. We studied the potential role of S. undulatus in transmission dynamics of Lyme spirochetes by sampling ticks from a variety of natural hosts at field sites in central New Jersey, and by testing the reservoir competence of S. undulatus for Borrelia burgdorferi in the laboratory. The infestation rate of ticks on fence lizards was extremely low (proportion infested = 0.087, n = 23) compared to that on white footed mice and other small mammals (proportion infested = 0.53, n = 140). Of 159 nymphs that had fed as larvae on lizards that had previously been exposed to infected nymphs, none was infected with B. burgdorferi, compared with 79.9% of 209 nymphs that had fed as larvae on infected control mice. Simulations suggest that changes in the numbers of fence lizards in a natural habitat would have little effect on the infection rate of nymphal ticks with Lyme spirochetes. We conclude that in central New Jersey S. undulatus plays a minimal role in the enzootic transmission cycle of Lyme spirochetes.

  7. A genetic discontinuity in moose (Alces alces) in Alaska corresponds with fenced transportation infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert E.; Farley, Sean D.; McDonough, Thomas J.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Barboza, Perry S.

    2015-01-01

    The strength and arrangement of movement barriers can impact the connectivity among habitat patches. Anthropogenic barriers (e.g. roads) are a source of habitat fragmentation that can disrupt these resource networks and can have an influence on the spatial genetic structure of populations. Using microsatellite data, we evaluated whether observed genetic structure of moose (Alces alces) populations were associated with human activities (e.g. roads) in the urban habitat of Anchorage and rural habitat on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. We found evidence of a recent genetic subdivision among moose in Anchorage that corresponds to a major highway and associated infrastructure. This subdivision is most likely due to restrictions in gene flow due to alterations to the highway (e.g. moose-resistant fencing with one-way gates) and a significant increase in traffic volume over the past 30 years; genetic subdivision was not detected on the Kenai Peninsula in an area not bisected by a major highway. This study illustrates that anthropogenic barriers can substructure wildlife populations within a few generations and highlights the value of genetic assessments to determine the effects on connectivity among habitat patches in conjunction with behavioral and ecological data..

  8. Refractoriness of the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) to the Lyme disease group spirochete Borrelia bissettii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, R S; Mun, J; Eisen, L; Eisen, R J

    2006-08-01

    The western fence lizard, Sceloporus occidentalis, is refractory to experimental infection with Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, one of several Lyme disease spirochetes pathogenic for humans. Another member of the Lyme disease spirochete complex, Borrelia bissettii, is distributed widely throughout North America and a similar, if not identical, spirochete has been implicated as a human pathogen in southern Europe. To determine the susceptibility of S. occidentalis to B. bissettii, 6 naïve lizards were exposed to the feeding activities of Ixodes pacificus nymphs experimentally infected with this spirochete. None of the lizards developed spirochetemias detectable by polymerase chain reaction for up to 8 wk post-tick feeding, infected nymphs apparently lost their B. bissettii infections within 1-2 wk after engorgement, and xenodiagnostic L. pacificus larvae that co-fed alongside infected nymphs did not acquire and maintain spirochetes. In contrast, 3 of 4 naïve deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) exposed similarly to feeding by 1 or more B. bissettii-infected nymphs developed patent infections within 4 wk. These and previous findings suggest that the complement system of S. occidentalis typically destroys B. burgdorferi sensu lato spirochetes present in tissues of attached and feeding I. pacificus nymphs, thereby potentially reducing the probability of transmission of these bacteria to humans or other animals by the resultant adult ticks.

  9. A Strong Contractile Actin Fence and Large Adhesions Direct Human Pluripotent Colony Morphology and Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Närvä

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cell-type-specific functions and identity are tightly regulated by interactions between the cell cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix (ECM. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs have ultimate differentiation capacity and exceptionally low-strength ECM contact, yet the organization and function of adhesion sites and associated actin cytoskeleton remain poorly defined. We imaged hPSCs at the cell-ECM interface with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy and discovered that adhesions at the colony edge were exceptionally large and connected by thick ventral stress fibers. The actin fence encircling the colony was found to exert extensive Rho-ROCK-myosin-dependent mechanical stress to enforce colony morphology, compaction, and pluripotency and to define mitotic spindle orientation. Remarkably, differentiation altered adhesion organization and signaling characterized by a switch from ventral to dorsal stress fibers, reduced mechanical stress, and increased integrin activity and cell-ECM adhesion strength. Thus, pluripotency appears to be linked to unique colony organization and adhesion structure.

  10. [Nutritional habits in children and adolescents practicing fencing. Part II. Characteristics of eating between meals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalcarz, Wojciech; Radzimirska-Graczyk, Monika

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the longest interval between meals, eating until the feeling of satiety and eating between meals in children and adolescents who attended sports schools. The questionnaires on were filled in by 141 children and adolescents who practised fencing and attended sports classes in primary and secondary schools. The days with training and the days free of training were analysed separately. The influence of gender and age on the longest interval between meals, eating until the feeling of satiety and eating between meals on the days with training and the days free of training was analysed by means of the SPSS 12.0 PL for Windows computer programme. Gender and age had statistically significant influence on the longest interval between meals, eating until the feeling of satiety and eating vegetables, cured meat, sweets and energy drinks between meals. Eating between main meals was prevalent in the studied population. Higher percentage of girls ate fruit and vegetables between main meals, while higher percentage of boys ate sandwiches, irrespectively of the type of the day--with training or free of training.

  11. Sloping fan travertine, Belen, New Mexico, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Megan; Chafetz, Henry S.

    2017-05-01

    Pliocene to Quaternary age travertines are very well-exposed in quarries near Belen, New Mexico, U.S.A., on the western edge of the Rio Grande Rift system. A series of hillside springs produced travertine tongues tens of meters thick and hundreds of meters long. The accumulations represent deposits from individual springs as well as the amalgamation of deposits. The overall architecture is predominantly composed of sloping fans with a smaller component of terrace mounds. The sloping fan deposits commonly have a dip of step morphology. As a consequence of vertical accretion in the pools, terrace mounds morphed into sloping fans. The travertine is composed of a variety of commonly reported constituents, i.e., centimeter thick laminae of bacterial shrubs and oncoids, foam rock, sheets and rafts, and finely crystalline crusts that occur throughout the sloping fan and terrace mound accumulations. Sheets and rafts formed as precipitates in pools on the surfaces of the fans and terraces as well as spelean deposits on the water surfaces of pools within cavities in the overall accumulation. Thus, the spelean rafts provide valuable indicators of original horizontality in the sloping fan strata. In addition, intraformational breccias, composed of locally torn-up travertine intraclastic boulders and deposited in with other travertine, and extraformational breccias, composed of torn-up travertine intraclasts mixed with siliciclastic fines and sand and Paleozoic limestone clasts transported downslope from higher on the hillside, are a common constituent in the sloping fan accumulation. The Belen travertines provide a very well-exposed example of sloping fan travertines and may provide relevant data with regard to the subsurface Aptian Pre-Salt deposits, offshore Brazil.

  12. ROAD SLOPE HAZARD ASSESSMENT OF HIDA REGION IN GIFU PREFECTURE, JAPAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, Yusuke; Machida, Hiroki; Moriguchi, Shuji; Hara, Takashi; Sawada, Kazuhide; Yashima, Atsushi

    The road slope hazard, which is the occurrence rate of rock falls along the major road, in Hida region, consists of Takayama, Furukawa and Gero areas, is evaluated in this paper. This rock fall rate is estimated in two folds. First, the relative rate of lock falls is estimated by the Logit regression analysis based on the inventory data of slops along the major roads in the region which includes about 3000 slopes. The inventory data include topological, geological and geotechnical characteristics of each slope evaluated by the experts in 1996. The slopes are also classified into three categories by the experts as "measures required', "continuous observation" and "no measures required". Based on this classification, the logit regression analyses are carried out to rank the hazard of the slopes by their attributed characteristics as the explanatory variables. Once relative rate of lock falls are estimated for each slope, this rate is calibrated to the absolute rate by using the actual rock fall event records between 2004 and 2008. By these two folds estimation procedure, the absolute rate of rock fall for each slope along the roads are finally esti-mated. This study is a part of the infrastructure asset management strategy decision making program based on risk, and the information gained in this study is combined with other evaluation data for damage to propose the strategy for repair and maintenance plan of the road slopes in this region.

  13. Decision Guide for Roof Slope Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    This decision guide has been written for personnel who are responsible for the design, construction, and replacement of Air Force roofs. It provides the necessary information and analytical tools for making prudent and cost-effective decisions regarding the amount of slope to provide in various roofing situations. Because the expertise and experience of the decision makers will vary, the guide contains both basic slope-related concepts as well as more sophisticated technical data. This breadth of information enables the less experienced user to develop an understanding of roof slope issues before applying the more sophisticated analytical tools, while the experienced user can proceed directly to the technical sections. Although much of this guide is devoted to the analysis of costs, it is not a cost-estimating document. It does, however, provide the reader with the relative costs of a variety of roof slope options; and it shows how to determine the relative cost-effectiveness of different options. The selection of the proper roof slope coupled with good roof design, a quality installation, periodic inspection, and appropriate maintenance and repair will achieve the Air Force's objective of obtaining the best possible roofing value for its buildings.

  14. Role of slope on infiltration: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidelli, Renato; Saltalippi, Carla; Flammini, Alessia; Govindaraju, Rao S.

    2018-02-01

    Partitioning of rainfall at the soil-atmosphere interface is important for both surface and subsurface hydrology, and influences many events of major hydrologic interest such as runoff generation, aquifer recharge, and transport of pollutants in surface waters as well as the vadose zone. This partitioning is achieved through the process of infiltration that has been widely investigated at the local scale, and more recently also at the field scale, by models that were designed for horizontal surfaces. However, infiltration, overland flows, and deep flows in most real situations are generated by rainfall over sloping surfaces that bring in additional effects. Therefore, existing models for local infiltration into homogeneous and layered soils and those as for field-scale infiltration, have to be adapted to account for the effects of surface slope. Various studies have investigated the role of surface slope on infiltration based on a theoretical formulations for the dynamics of infiltration, extensions of the Green-Ampt approach, and from laboratory and field experiments. However, conflicting results have been reported in the scientific literature on the role of surface slope on infiltration. We summarize the salient points from previous studies and provide plausible reasons for discrepancies in conclusions of previous authors, thus leading to a critical assessment of the current state of our understanding on this subject. We offer suggestions for future efforts to advance our knowledge of infiltration over sloping surfaces.

  15. Winter chemistry of North Slope lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, M. K.; White, D. M.; Lilly, M. R.; Hinzman, L. D.; Hilton, K. M.; Busey, R.

    2006-12-01

    Lakes are important water resources on the North Slope of Alaska. Oilfield exploration and production requires water for facility use as well as transportation. Ice road construction requires winter extraction of fresh water. Since most North Slope lakes are relatively shallow, the quantity and quality of the water remaining under the ice by the end of the winter are important environmental management issues. Currently permits are based on the presence of overwintering fish populations and their sensitivity to low oxygen. Sampling during the winter of 2004 2005 sheds light on the winter chemistry of several pumped lakes and one unpumped lake on the North Slope. Dissolved oxygen, conductivity, pH, and temperature profiles were taken along with ice thickness and water depth measurements. Water samples were extracted and analyzed for Na, Ca, K, Mg, Fe, DOC, and alkalinity in the laboratory. Lake properties, rather than pumping activities, were the best predictors of oxygen depletion, with the highest levels of dissolved oxygen maintained in the lake with the least dissolved constituents. As would be expected, specific conductance increased with depth in the lake while dissolved oxygen decreased with depth. Dissolved oxygen and specific conductance data suggested that the lakes began to refresh in May. The summarized data provides a view of North Slope lake chemistry trends, while continued studies investigate the chemical impacts of pumping North Slope lakes through continued sampling and modeling efforts.

  16. A new vision of carbonate slopes: the Little Bahama Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Thierry; Gillet, Hervé; Hanquiez, Vincent; Reijmer, John J.; Tournadour, Elsa; Chabaud, Ludivine; Principaud, Mélanie; Schnyder, Jara; Borgomano, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Recent data collected in November 2014 (RV Walton Smith) on the upper slope of the Little Bahama Bank (LBB) between 30 and 400 m water depth allowed to characterize the uppermost slope (Rankey et al., 2012) over a surface of 170 km2. The new data set includes multibeam bathymetry and acoustic imagery, 3.5 kHz very-high resolution (VHR) seismic reflection lines, 21 gravity cores and 11 Van Veen grabs. The upper slope of the LBB does not show a steep submarine cliff as known from western Great Bahama Bank. The carbonate bank progressively deepens towards the basin through a slighty inclined plateau. The slope value is reef rests on paleo-reefs that outcrop at a water depth of about 40 m. These paleo-reef structures could represent reefs that established themselves during past periods of sea-level stagnation. Below this water depth, the slope steepens up to 30° to form the marginal escarpment (Rankey et al., 2012), which is succeeded by the open margin realm (Rankey et al., 2012). The slope inclination value decreases at about 180-200 m water depth. Between 20 and 200 m of water depth, the VHR seismic shows no seafloor sub-bottom reflector. Between 180 and 320 m water depth, the seafloor smoothens. The VHR seismic shows an onlapping sediment wedge, which starts in this water depth and shows a blind or very crudely stratified echo facies. The sediment thickness of this Holocene unit may exceed 20 m. It fills small depressions in the substratum and thickens in front of gullies that cut the carbonate platform edge. Sediment samples show the abundancy of carbonate mud on the present Bahamian seafloor. In gullies, coarser sediment can be found. In some case, soft sediments are absent suggesting by-passing. At water depth between 40 and 100 m, the present-day seafloor is covered with bioclastic sediments. The main carbonate producer seems to be the alga genus Halimeda. Sediments collected in the deeper part of the basin (water depth = 1080 m) on the distal lobe consist of

  17. Geomorphological research of large-scale slope instability at Machu Picchu, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilímek, Vít; Zvelebil, Jiří; Klimeš, Jan; Patzelt, Zdeněk; Astete, Fernando; Kachlík, Václav; Hartvich, Filip

    2007-09-01

    A multidisciplinary approach has been adopted to study the slope movements and landscape evolution at the archaeological site of Machu Picchu and its immediate surroundings. The basic event in the paleogeomorphological evolution of the area was the large-scale slope movement, which destroyed the originally higher ridge between Mt. Machupicchu and Mt. Huaynapicchu. Within remnants of that primary deformation, several younger generations of slope movements occurred. The laboratory analyses of granitoids revealed highly-strained zones on the slopes of Mt. Machupicchu, which strongly affect the largest slope deformation. The borders of the largest slope deformation are structurally predisposed by the existence of fault zones. The majority of various types of slope movements on the so-called Front Slope (E facing) and Back Slope (W facing) are influenced by the alignment between topography and joints. Along with slope movements, fluvial erosion and tectonic disturbance of the rocks have been affecting the evolution of the landscape. A monitoring network for dilatometric and extensometric measurements was used to detect the present-day activity of rock displacements within the archaeological site. In addition to standard mapping of surface hydrogeological phenomena, eleven express slug tests were conducted to verify the infiltration potential of precipitation. The results of these surveys indicate that recent large-scale slope movement as suggested by some previous studies is doubtful, and the detected movements can be explained by individual movements of rock blocks or several other mechanisms including sinking of archaeological structures, subsurface erosion and annual changes in the water content of the soils.

  18. The effect of plant root system on the stability of road cutting slope in seasonal frozen regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, W.; Guo, Y.

    2009-04-01

    When highway is built in seasonally frozen regions of Northeast China, it is inevitable to excavate the mountain slope in order to meet the route requirement. During highway construction, a mass of extraction damage the surface vegetation and cut off the runoff passage of groundwater, cause the outcrop of underground water on the cutting slope and affect the intrinsic ground stress equilibrium of the slope body, lead to the redistribution of ground stress and the heat balance change in near-surface of the cutting slope. Under influence of rainfall in autumn and the cold climate in winter, the moisture transfer to frozen zone of cutting slope and lead to the frost heave in shallow depth of the slope. During the thawing period in spring, with effect of integrated factors including rainfall and increasing temperature, ice kernels both on the surface and near the surface of cut slope thaw quickly. The water melting from frozen soil, will hampered by frozen layer in process of infiltration. As a result, the water content of the intersection between the freezing and melting layer is high enough to be saturation or even over-saturation, and accordingly cause the intrinsic effective stress on the slope body decreased. Under the function of gravity, near-surface slope collapses partially or entirely. Adopted the method combined field test and lab test, this article analyzed the mechanism of slope landslide, studied quantitatively the effect of root system of slope plant on the slope stability. The results showed that the mechanical indicators of the soil changed obviously after the first freeze-thaw cycle, but changed little in later freeze-thaw cycles. The shear strength of root-soil systems is 2 times of soil system. Compared with masonry body, protecting the slope by the plant, such as Amorpha, Lespedeza could reduce the slope load and was more stability. Key words: road slope, seasonal frozen regions, plant protection, stability, landslide

  19. Centrifuge model test of rock slope failure caused by seismic excitation. Plane failure of dip slope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimaru, Makoto; Kawai, Tadashi

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it is necessary to assess quantitatively seismic safety of critical facilities against the earthquake induced rock slope failure from the viewpoint of seismic PSA. Under these circumstances, it is essential to evaluate more accurately the possibilities of rock slope failure and the potential failure boundary, which are triggered by earthquake ground motions. The purpose of this study is to analyze dynamic failure characteristics of rock slopes by centrifuge model tests for verification and improvement of the analytical methods. We conducted a centrifuge model test using a dip slope model with discontinuities limitated by Teflon sheets. The centrifugal acceleration was 50G, and the acceleration amplitude of input sin waves increased gradually at every step. The test results were compared with safety factors of the stability analysis based on the limit equilibrium concept. Resultant conclusions are mainly as follows: (1) The slope model collapsed when it was excited by the sine wave of 400gal, which was converted to real field scale, (2) Artificial discontinuities were considerably concerned in the collapse, and the type of collapse was plane failure, (3) From response acceleration records observed at the slope model, we can say that tension cracks were generated near the top of the slope model during excitation, and that might be cause of the collapse, (4) By considering generation of the tension cracks in the stability analysis, correspondence of the analytical results and the experimental results improved. From the obtained results, we need to consider progressive failure in evaluating earthquake induced rock slope failure. (author)

  20. Developing restoration planting mixes for active ski slopes: a multi-site reference community approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Jennifer Williamson

    2012-03-01

    Downhill ski areas occupy large expanses of mountainous lands where restoration of ecosystem function is of increasing importance and interest. Establishing diverse native plant communities on ski runs should enhance sediment and water retention, wildlife habitat, biodiversity and aesthetics. Because ski slopes are managed for recreation, ski slope revegetation mixes must consist of low-stature or herbaceous plants that can tolerate typical environmental conditions on ski slopes (high elevation, disturbed soils, open, steep slopes). The most appropriate reference communities for selecting ski slope revegetation species are thus successional, or seral plant communities in similar environments (i.e., other ski slopes). Using results from a broad-scale reference community analysis, I evaluated plant communities naturally occurring on ski slopes from 21 active and abandoned ski areas throughout the northern Sierra Nevada to identify native plant species suitable for use in ski slope restoration. I constructed a baseline planting palette of regionally appropriate plant species (for restoration of either newly created or already existing ski runs) that is functionally diverse and is likely to succeed across a broad range of environments. I also identify a more comprehensive list of species for more specialized planting mixes based on site-specific goals and particular environmental settings. Establishing seral plant communities may be an appropriate restoration goal for many other types of managed lands, including roadsides, firebreaks and utility rights-of-way. This study describes an ecological (and potentially cost-effective) approach to developing restoration planting palettes for such managed lands.

  1. Developing Restoration Planting Mixes for Active Ski Slopes: A Multi-Site Reference Community Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Jennifer Williamson

    2012-03-01

    Downhill ski areas occupy large expanses of mountainous lands where restoration of ecosystem function is of increasing importance and interest. Establishing diverse native plant communities on ski runs should enhance sediment and water retention, wildlife habitat, biodiversity and aesthetics. Because ski slopes are managed for recreation, ski slope revegetation mixes must consist of low-stature or herbaceous plants that can tolerate typical environmental conditions on ski slopes (high elevation, disturbed soils, open, steep slopes). The most appropriate reference communities for selecting ski slope revegetation species are thus successional, or seral plant communities in similar environments (i.e., other ski slopes). Using results from a broad-scale reference community analysis, I evaluated plant communities naturally occurring on ski slopes from 21 active and abandoned ski areas throughout the northern Sierra Nevada to identify native plant species suitable for use in ski slope restoration. I constructed a baseline planting palette of regionally appropriate plant species (for restoration of either newly created or already existing ski runs) that is functionally diverse and is likely to succeed across a broad range of environments. I also identify a more comprehensive list of species for more specialized planting mixes based on site-specific goals and particular environmental settings. Establishing seral plant communities may be an appropriate restoration goal for many other types of managed lands, including roadsides, firebreaks and utility rights-of-way. This study describes an ecological (and potentially cost-effective) approach to developing restoration planting palettes for such managed lands.

  2. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Sheng; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Celestre, Rich; Church, Matthew; McKinney, Wayne R.; Morrison, Greg; Warwick, Tony

    2010-01-01

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situ visible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  3. Surface Slope Metrology on Deformable Soft X-ray Mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, S.; Yashchuk, V.V.; Goldberg, K.A.; Celestre, R.; Church, M.; McKinney, W.R.; Morrison, G.; Warwick, T.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the current state of surface slope metrology on deformable mirrors for soft x-rays at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). While we are developing techniques for in situ at-wavelength tuning, we are refining methods of ex situvisible-light optical metrology to achieve sub-100-nrad accuracy. This paper reports on laboratory studies, measurements and tuning of a deformable test-KB mirror prior to its use. The test mirror was bent to a much different optical configuration than its original design, achieving a 0.38 micro-radian residual slope error. Modeling shows that in some cases, by including the image conjugate distance as an additional free parameter in the alignment, along with the two force couples, fourth-order tangential shape errors (the so-called bird shape) can be reduced or eliminated.

  4. Modern Slope Processes on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, V. V.; Pine, P. K.; Shevrel, S. D.; Dadu, I.; Lu, Y.; Skobeleva, T. P.; Kvaratskhelia, O.; Rosemberg, K.

    2012-01-01

    Slope movements of material in lunar craters are investigated based on remote spectral studies carried out on board the Clementine spacecraft, and data obtained during the large-scale survey on board the LRO (Lunar Reconnaissance Orbit) spacecraft. The morphological analysis of crater forms based on large-scale images and spectral and spectropolarized assessments of the exposition age (or maturity) of the slope material has led to the conclusion that the formation process of observed outcrops probably is a modern feature. The lower age limit of these structures is estimated at 40-80 years. Thus, slope movements of surface materials can continue at the present time, regardless of the age of the crater studied. Slope movements of crushed granular material lead to fresh outcrops of subsurface layers of marine or continental landscapes and, therefore, extend our capabilities to research the deep material of the Moon. To analyze this phenomenon, craters of 16 and 30 km have been selected. The length of fresh outcrops, while depending strongly on the dimensions of the craters, can be up to several kilometers. In connection with this, the prospect appears of remote analysis of rocks that came to the surface from depths of at least several hundred meters. In this case, there are openings for the contact analysis of subsurface material without the use of labor-intensive operations associated with the delivery of equipment for deep drilling to the lunar surface.

  5. Interrill soil erosion processes on steep slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    To date interrill erosion processes and regimes are not fully understood. The objectives are to 1) identify the erosion regimes and limiting processes between detachment and transport on steep slopes, 2) characterize the interactive effects between rainfall intensity and flow depth on sediment trans...

  6. Mathematics, Physics and Computer Sciences Dual slope ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mathematics, Physics and Computer Sciences Dual slope integration technique to design a digital thermometer. S. F. AKANDE, E. D. DADOEM. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gjpas.v7i2.16256 · AJOL African Journals Online.

  7. VT USGS NED Slope (10 meter) - statewide

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) Used ElevationDEM_DEM10M and the Arc/Info SLOPE command with the "PERCENT_RISE" and ".3048" Z_unit options to create this data layer. Input source...

  8. A Worthwhile Task to Teach Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Lauren L.

    2009-01-01

    Since mathematics is found in every aspect of life, it is important for teachers to provide experiences that help students find connections and develop an appreciation for math and its use in their lives outside school. Slope is an excellent example of a math concept that is usually taught without context or connection. In this article, the…

  9. Fractal Rock Slope Dynamics Anticipating a Collapse

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Paluš, Milan; Novotná, Dagmar; Zvelebil, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70 (2004), 036212 ISSN 1063-651X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/00/1055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : fractal * scaling * unstable rock slope * collapse prediction * engineering geology Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 2.352, year: 2004

  10. A Novel Way To Practice Slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jane B.

    1997-01-01

    Presents examples of using a tic-tac-toe format to practice finding the slope and identifying parallel and perpendicular lines from various equation formats. Reports the successful use of this format as a review in both precalculus and calculus classes before students work with applications of analytic geometry. (JRH)

  11. Advance in prediction of soil slope instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigarán-Loría, C.; Hack, R.; Nieuwenhuis, J. D.

    2012-04-01

    Six generic soils (clays and sands) were systematically modeled with plane-strain finite elements (FE) at varying heights and inclinations. A dataset was generated in order to develop predictive relations of soil slope instabilities, in terms of co-seismic displacements (u), under strong motions with a linear multiple regression. For simplicity, the seismic loads are monochromatic artificial sinusoidal functions at four frequencies: 1, 2, 4, and 6 Hz, and the slope failure criterion used corresponds to near 10% Cartesian shear strains along a continuous region comparable to a slip surface. The generated dataset comprises variables from the slope geometry and site conditions: height, H, inclination, i, shear wave velocity from the upper 30 m, vs30, site period, Ts; as well as the input strong motion: yield acceleration, ay (equal to peak ground acceleration, PGA in this research), frequency, f; and in some cases moment magnitude, M, and Arias intensity, Ia, assumed from empirical correlations. Different datasets or scenarios were created: "Magnitude-independent", "Magnitude-dependent", and "Soil-dependent", and the data was statistically explored and analyzed with varying mathematical forms. Qualitative relations show that the permanent deformations are highly related to the soil class for the clay slopes, but not for the sand slopes. Furthermore, the slope height does not constrain the variability in the co-seismic displacements. The input frequency decreases the variability of the co-seismic displacements for the "Magnitude-dependent" and "Soil-dependent" datasets. The empirical models were developed with two and three predictors. For the sands it was not possible because they could not satisfy the constrains from the statistical method. For the clays, the best models with the smallest errors coincided with the simple general form of multiple regression with three predictors (e.g. near 0.16 and 0.21 standard error, S.E. and 0.75 and 0.55 R2 for the "M

  12. Model slope infiltration experiments for shallow landslides early warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, E.; Greco, R.; Guida, A.; Olivares, L.; Picarelli, L.

    2009-04-01

    Occurrence of fast landslides has become more and more dangerous during the last decades, due to the increased density of settlements, industrial plants and infrastructures. Such problem is particularly worrying in Campania (Southern Italy), where the fast population growth led a diffuse building activity without planning: indeed, recent flowslides caused hundreds of victims and heavy damages to buildings, roads and other infrastructures. Large mountainous areas in Campania are mantled by loose pyroclastic granular soils up to a depth of a few meters from top soil surface. These soils have usually a grain size that falls in the domain of silty sands, including pumice interbeds (gravelly sands), with saturated hydraulic conductivities up to the order of 10-1 cm/min. Such deposits often cover steep slopes, which stability is guaranteed by the apparent cohesion due to suction under unsaturated conditions, that are the most common conditions for these slopes [Olivares and Picarelli, 2001]. Whereas rainfall infiltration causes soil to approach saturation, suction vanishes and slope failure may occur. Besides soil physical properties, landslide triggering is influenced by several factors, such as rainfall intensity, soil initial moisture and suction, slope inclination, boundary conditions. Whereas slope failure occurs with soil close to being saturated, landslide may develop in form of fast and destructive flowslide. Calibration of reliable mathematical models of such a complex phenomenon requires availability of experimental observations of the major variables of interest, such as soil moisture and suction, soil deformation and displacements, pore water pressure, during the entire process of infiltration until slope failure. Due to the sudden trigger and extremely rapid propagation of such type of landslides, such data sets are rarely available for natural slopes where flowslides occurred. As a consequence landslide risk assessment and early warning in Campania rely on

  13. Diurnal cortisol slopes and mental and physical health outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Emma K; Quinn, Meghan E; Tavernier, Royette; McQuillan, Mollie T; Dahlke, Katie A; Gilbert, Kirsten E

    2017-09-01

    Changes in levels of the stress-sensitive hormone cortisol from morning to evening are referred to as diurnal cortisol slopes. Flatter diurnal cortisol slopes have been proposed as a mediator between chronic psychosocial stress and poor mental and physical health outcomes in past theory and research. Surprisingly, neither a systematic nor a meta-analytic review of associations between diurnal cortisol slopes and health has been conducted to date, despite extensive literature on the topic. The current systematic review and meta-analysis examined associations between diurnal cortisol slopes and physical and mental health outcomes. Analyses were based on 179 associations from 80 studies for the time period up to January 31, 2015. Results indicated a significant association between flatter diurnal cortisol slopes and poorer health across all studies (average effect size, r=0.147). Further, flatter diurnal cortisol slopes were associated with poorer health in 10 out of 12 subtypes of emotional and physical health outcomes examined. Among these subtypes, the effect size was largest for immune/inflammation outcomes (r=0.288). Potential moderators of the associations between diurnal cortisol slopes and health outcomes were examined, including type of slope measure and study quality indices. The possible roles of flatter slopes as either a marker or a mechanism for disease etiology are discussed. We argue that flatter diurnal cortisol slopes may both reflect and contribute to stress-related dysregulation of central and peripheral circadian mechanisms, with corresponding downstream effects on multiple aspects of biology, behavior, and health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Relationships between a new slope morphometric index and calanchi erosion in northern Sicily, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccolini, Marcello; Coco, Laura; Cappadonia, Chiara; Rotigliano, Edoardo

    2012-05-01

    The Italian badlands, or "calanchi", are common landforms in Mediterranean areas including central and southern Italy. Calanchi landforms may be compared to small hydrographic basins. These landforms are characterised by dense, hierarchical and rapidly evolving drainage systems carved into steep clayey slopes and by a sharply alternating pattern of furrows and narrow, generally sharp crests. This work presents a study of morphometric characteristics and a statistical analysis for two sites in northern Sicily (Italy), on outcrops of silty-clay deposits affected by active erosion processes, which give this area a typical calanchi landscape. In particular, factors closely linked to the characteristics of the hydrographic network and slope morphometry were considered and analysed. The initial geometry of the slopes was reconstructed and statistically compared with that of the current calanchi slopes including the drainage network. A new morphometric index (Morphometric Slope Index, MSI) was defined to represent the initial slope geometry as a whole. This index was found to be effective in defining the structure of hydrographic networks, summarising the characteristics and type of slope evolution, and quantifying the rate of soil erosion. The rate was determined based on both linear (gully erosion) and areal (landslides, sheet and rill erosion) morphogenetic processes, and our analysis based on MSI indicates the dominance of areal erosion. MSI could also be used for basins larger than calanchi to represent the characteristics of geomorphic processes.

  15. Un texto de esgrima española del siglo XVI = Text of fencing XVI century spanish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Jesús Valle Ortiz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A finales del siglo XVI y comienzos del XVII se consolida en España un sistema de esgrima que se conoce como Destreza Verdadera, reflejado en las obras de Jerónimo Sánchez de Carranza y Luis Pacheco de Narváez. Estos autores hacen referencia a un estilo contemporáneo denominado Destreza Vulgar; aunque poco de éste ha llegado a nosotros. Se conoce la existencia de autores españoles que publicaron sus obras antes de Carranza y Pacheco, aunque todavía no se han localizado sus obras. Presentamos un pequeño texto de esgrima que podría datarse en la última mitad del siglo XVI, y probablemente sea uno de los textos de esgrima en español más antiguos existentes en la actualidad-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------At the end of the sixteenth century and the beginning of the seventeenth in Spain a new fencing system is emerging, called “Destreza Verdadera” (literally, True Skill. Jerónimo Sanchez de Carranza and Luis Pacheco de Narvaez are the foremost defenders of this new system. Both writers made reference to a contemporary style called “Destreza Vulgar,” but very little about this style has reached our times. We also know of some Spanish authors who published their works before Carranza and Pacheco, although extant works have not yet been located. We present a small fencing text that could be dated at the second half of the XVIth Century and probably is one of the oldest extant Spanish fencing texts.

  16. Influence of Different Slope Aspects on Some Soil Properties and Forest Soils Evolution (Case Study: Rostam Abad Region, Guilan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zarinibahador

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Spatial variation of soil properties is significantly influenced by numerous environmental factors such as landscape features, including position, topography, slope gradient and aspect, parent material, climate and vegetation. Soil properties vary spatially in south- and north-facing hill slopes. This factor (different slope aspects can affect the distribution of soil organic matter, the presence or absence of a layer, pH, nutrient levels, soil mineralogical and micromorphological properties. Topographic factors such as the orientation of the hill slope and the steepness of the slope affect microclimate, vegetation establishment, water movement and erosion. Aspect and slope control the movement of water and materials in a hill slope and contribute to differences in soil properties. Temperature, precipitation and climate vary with elevation and influence pedogenic processes. Accelerated rates of weathering and soil development were found to occur in soils on south-facing slopes. Slopes with a south aspect are dominated by stone and bare soil patches, while slopes with a north aspect are dominated by biotic components. Northern slopes have higher productivity and species diversity compared to Southern slopes. Slope aspect has a significant effect on the composition, species richness, structure and density of plant communities, differed significantly between North- and South- facing slopes. Materials and Methods: In the present study, the effects of two slope aspects on some soil properties and soil evolution was investigated in Northern Rostam Abad region in the Guilan Province. Five profiles in Southern hill slope(South-facing hill slopes and five profiles in Northern hill slopes(North-facing hill slopes with 40% slope and same parent material (basaltic andesite and same plant cover were dug. The elevation of two slope aspects was 240 meters from the sea level. Average annual temperatures and precipitation are16 degrees centigrade

  17. Large slope failures in the La Paz basin, Bolivian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, N. J.; Hermanns, R. L.; Rabus, B.; Guzmán, M. A.; Minaya, E.; Clague, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The La Paz basin in the eastern Bolivian Andes has been a hotspot for large-scale, deep-seated gravitational slope deformation during the Holocene. In less than 2 Ma, a network of steep-sided valleys up to 800 m deep formed in sediments of the Altiplano Plateau and underlying basement rocks. We characterize the distribution, extent, mechanisms, and modern activity of large-scale failures within this landscape using optical image interpretation, existing geologic maps, synthetic RADAR interferometry (InSAR), and field investigation. Deposits of nearly 20 landslides larger than 100 Mm3 occur within the basin. Most failures have occurred in weakly lithified Late Miocene to Pliocene sedimentary rocks and include earth flows, translational and rotational landslides, and plug flows. Failures in underlying tectonized Paleozoic sedimentary rocks include bedding-parallel rockslides. The largest failure is the 3 km3 Achcocalla earth flow (ca. 11 ka BP), which ran out ~20 km. Other dated events span the period from the early Holocene to nearly the Colonial historic period. InSAR results show that many large slope failures, including the Achocalla earth flow, are currently moving at rates of a few centimeters to a few decimeters per year. Rapid deposition, shallow burial, and rapid incision of the basin fills produced steep slopes in weak geologic materials that, coupled with groundwater discharge from the valley walls, are the primary controls on instability. In contrast, the Altiplano surface has changed little in 2 Ma and the adjacent slopes of the Cordilleran Real, although steep, are relatively stable. Of the over 100 landslides that have occurred in the city of La Paz since the early twentieth century, most are at the margins of large, deep-seated prehistoric failures, and two of the most damaging historic landslides (Hanko-Hanko, 1582; Pampahasi, 2011) were large-scale reactivations of previously failed slopes. Improved understanding of large, deep-seated landslides in

  18. Landscape structure and live fences in Andes Colombian agrosystems: upper basin of the Cane-Iguaque River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Otero

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Changes in land use have generated a new landscape configuration in the Andino orobiome (mountain range of the tropical Andes, resulting in a mosaic of cultivation and pastures interrupted by small fragments of forest and live fences. This has resulted in an ongoing decrease in the biodiversity of this biome. In the upper basin of the Cane-Iguaque River (Villa de Levya-Boyacá, Colombia, located 2 600-3 000 m above the Cordillera Oriental, over three time periods in 1960, 1984, and 2004, we characterized the structure, patterns, and evolution of the overall landscape and of the live fences (used as tools in biodiversity conservation and considered to be desirable alternatives to nonlive fences in farming production systems within an agricultural landscape. To do this, we interpreted high- resolution satellite images using a landscape ecology approach and applied landscape map metrics. We found that the natural forests have been transformed by pastures and cultivation, and that although live fences cover only a small portion of the total landscape (4.6%, they have an important effect on landscape structure and biodiversity. There has been an increase in live fences, especially between 1960 and 1984, as well as an increase in their density. However, there has been a reduction in the average length of live fences over the periods that we studied. This could be due in part to changes in the types of agricultural products that have been cultivated in recent years, with an increase in potatoes and a decrease in other vegetables, and also by resource extraction of timber and fuel wood. In the studied area, agricultural production was sustained while biodiversity conservation was improved by the use of live fences. Therefore, live fences should be considered not only as part of an agriculturally productive area, but also as an important element of a multi-functional landscape that contributes to the maintenance of biodiversity and provides resources of

  19. Desirable plant root traits for protecting unstable slopes against landslides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, A.; Atger, C.; Bengough, G.; Fourcaud, T.; Sidle, R. C.

    2009-04-01

    determine slope stability. Rooting depth is species dependent when soil conditions are not limiting and the number of horizontal lateral roots borne on the vertical roots usually changes with depth. Therefore, the number and orientation of roots that the shear surface intersects will change significantly with rooting depth for the same plant, even for magnitudes of only several cm. Similarly, depending on the geometry of the root system, the angle at which a root crosses the shear surface can also have an influence on its resistance to pullout and breakage. The angle at which a root emerges from the parent root is dependent on root type, depth and species (when soil conditions are not limiting). Due to the physiology of roots, a root branch can be initiated at any point along a parent root, but not necessarily emerge fully from the parent root. These traits, along with others including size, relative growth rate, regeneration strategies, wood structure and strength will be discussed with regard to their influence on slope stability. How each of these traits is influenced by soil conditions and plantation techniques is also of extreme importance to the landslide engineer. The presence of obstacles in the soil, as well as compaction, affects root length and branching pattern. Roots of many species of woody plants on shallow soils also tend to grow along fractures deep into the underlying bedrock which allows roots to locate supplies of nutrient and water rich pockets. Rooting depths of herbaceous species in water-limited environments are highly correlated with infiltration depth, but waterlogged soils can asphyxiate tree roots, resulting in shallow root systems. The need to understand and integrate each of these traits for a species is not easy. Therefore, we suggest a hierarchy whereby traits are considered in order of importance, along with how external factors influence their expression over time.

  20. The effects of slope length and slope gradient on the size distributions of loess slides: Field observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haijun; Cui, Peng; Regmi, Amar Deep; Hu, Sheng; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yuzhu

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we characterize and consider the effects of slope length and slope gradient on the size distributions of loess slides. To carry out this study, we employ data on 275 loess slides within Zhidan County, Central Loess Plateau, China. These data were collected in the field and supplemented by the interpretation of remote sensing images. Both the field observations and slope stability analysis show that loess slide size increases with the slope length. Slide sizes is significantly correlated with slope length, showing a power law relationship in both cases. However, the simulation results show that slope gradient is not associated with loess slide size. The main part of the link between slope gradient and slide size seen in the observations is only apparent, as indicated by the strong connection between slope gradient and length. Statistical analysis of the field observations reveals that slope gradient decreases with increasing slope length, and this correlation interferes with the potential relationship between landslide sizes and slope gradient seen in the field observations. In addition, the probability densities of the areas of loess slides occurring on slopes of different slope lengths are determined using kernel density estimation. This analysis shows that slope length controls the rollover of the frequency-size distribution of loess slides. The scaling exponent increases with slope length.

  1. The Solid-Phase Synthesis of an Fe-N-C Electrocatalyst for High-Power Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingtao; Liu, Xiaofang; Zheng, Lirong; Shui, Jianglan

    2018-01-26

    The environmentally friendly synthesis of highly active Fe-N-C electrocatalysts for proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is desirable but remains challenging. A simple and scalable method is presented to fabricate Fe II -doped ZIF-8, which can be further pyrolyzed into Fe-N-C with 3 wt % of Fe exclusively in Fe-N 4 active moieties. Significantly, this Fe-N-C derived acidic PEMFC exhibits an unprecedented current density of 1.65 A cm -2 at 0.6 V and the highest power density of 1.14 W cm -2 compared with previously reported NPMCs. The excellent PEMFC performance can be attributed to the densely and atomically dispersed Fe-N 4 active moieties on the small and uniform catalyst nanoparticles. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. POSTERIOR TIBIAL SLOPE AS A RISK FACTOR FOR ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT RUPTURE IN SOCCER PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seçkin Şenışık

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL is the primary stabilizer of the knee. An impairment of any of the dynamic or static stability providing factors can lead to overload on the other factors and ultimately to deterioration of knee stability. This can result in anterior tibial translation and rupture of the ACL. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of tibial slope on ACL injury risk on soccer players. A total of 64 elite soccer players and 45 sedentary controls were included in this longitudinal and controlled study. The angle between the tibial mid-diaphysis line and the line between the anterior and posterior edges of the medial tibial plateau was measured as the tibial slope via lateral radiographs. Individual player exposure, and injuries sustained by the participants were prospectively recorded. Eleven ACL injuries were documented during the study period. Tibial slope was not different between soccer players and sedentary controls. Tibial slope in the dominant and non-dominant legs was greater for the injured players compared to the uninjured players. The difference reached a significant level only for the dominant legs (p 0.05, a higher tibial slope was observed in dominant legs of injured players (p < 0.05. Higher tibial slope on injured soccer players compared to the uninjured ones supports the idea that the tibial slope degree might be an important risk factor for ACL injury.

  3. Editorial: Introduction to the Special Issue ;Slope Tectonics: Inherited Structures, Morphology of Deformation and Catastrophic Failure;

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanns, R. L.; Oppikofer, T.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Clague, J. J.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, G.

    2017-07-01

    The "Conference on Slope Tectonics" has become an international scientific meeting point to present and discuss a variety of topics related to slope deformation and the deposits of related failures. The first conference took place on February 15-16, 2008 at University of Lausanne (Switzerland). It was followed by a second conference on September 6-10, 2011, in Austria (organized by the Geological Survey of Austria) and a third on September 8-12, 2014, in Norway (organized by the Geological Survey of Norway). The two later events included field trips. It has become a tradition that selected papers from these conference are published - papers from the first conference were published by the Geological Society as Special Publication 351 (Jaboyedoff, 2011), and those from the second conference were published in a special issue of Tectonophysics (Baron and Jaboyedoff, 2013). This special issue of Geomorphology is a collection of papers presented at the Norwegian Conference on Slope Tectonics. This collection of papers focuses on the role of tectonics in gravitationally induced rock-slope instabilities. The slopes either deform over long periods as deep-seated gravitational slope deformation (DSGSD) or more rapidly as rockslides or rock avalanches. The reconstruction of slope deformation is an integral part of the studies captured in this special issue.

  4. Slope parameters of ππ-system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, P.S.; Osipov, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    The slope parameters of the ππ-system are calculated in the framework of the superconductor-tupe quark model. The analogous calculations are made for πK-system. The amplitudes are obtained by using the box quark diagrams and tree diagrams with the intermediate scalar epsilon(700), Ssup(x)(975), K tilde (1350) mesons and vector rho(770), K* (892) mesons

  5. The sloping land conversion program in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen; Lan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Through addressing the motivations behind rural households’ livelihood diversification, this paper examines the effect of the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP) on livelihood diversification using a longitudinal household survey data set spanning the overall implementation of the SLCP. Our...... results show that the SLCP works as a valid external policy intervention to increase rural livelihood diversification. In addition, the findings demonstrate that the implementation of the SLCP has had heterogeneous effects on livelihood diversification across different rural income groups. The lower...

  6. Ocean processes at the Antarctic continental slope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, Karen J; Schmidtko, Sunke; Heuzé, Céline; Kaiser, Jan; Jickells, Timothy D; Queste, Bastien Y; Stevens, David P; Wadley, Martin; Thompson, Andrew F; Fielding, Sophie; Guihen, Damien; Creed, Elizabeth; Ridley, Jeff K; Smith, Walker

    2014-07-13

    The Antarctic continental shelves and slopes occupy relatively small areas, but, nevertheless, are important for global climate, biogeochemical cycling and ecosystem functioning. Processes of water mass transformation through sea ice formation/melting and ocean-atmosphere interaction are key to the formation of deep and bottom waters as well as determining the heat flux beneath ice shelves. Climate models, however, struggle to capture these physical processes and are unable to reproduce water mass properties of the region. Dynamics at the continental slope are key for correctly modelling climate, yet their small spatial scale presents challenges both for ocean modelling and for observational studies. Cross-slope exchange processes are also vital for the flux of nutrients such as iron from the continental shelf into the mixed layer of the Southern Ocean. An iron-cycling model embedded in an eddy-permitting ocean model reveals the importance of sedimentary iron in fertilizing parts of the Southern Ocean. Ocean gliders play a key role in improving our ability to observe and understand these small-scale processes at the continental shelf break. The Gliders: Excellent New Tools for Observing the Ocean (GENTOO) project deployed three Seagliders for up to two months in early 2012 to sample the water to the east of the Antarctic Peninsula in unprecedented temporal and spatial detail. The glider data resolve small-scale exchange processes across the shelf-break front (the Antarctic Slope Front) and the front's biogeochemical signature. GENTOO demonstrated the capability of ocean gliders to play a key role in a future multi-disciplinary Southern Ocean observing system.

  7. Slope and curvature of microbreaking wind waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulliez, G.

    2009-04-01

    Microscale breaking is commonly observed at sea for steep waves less than 30 cm in wavelength. This phenomenon generates high surface slope and curvature roughness at the water surface, which has numerous implications for air-sea exchange and remote-sensing studies. In particular, microbreaking affects momentum transfer from wind to waves, leads to formation of vortices in water, and plays a key role in scattering of electromagnetic and acoustic waves by the air-sea interface. The geometric properties of the parasitic capillaries generated upon steep steady gravity-capillary waves have been well studied over the last decades, both experimentally and numerically. However, owing to their variability, the basic features of naturally occurring wind wave breakers as observed at sea or even in laboratory are far from being identified up to now. To this end, an experimental investigation of microbreaking wind waves was made in a large wind wave tank which combined visualizations of wave breaker profiles with single-point wave elevation and slope measurements. We show that microscale breakers exhibit a characteristic signature in slope and curvature suggesting formation of a bulge on the forward face of the wave crest. Parasitic ripples however are not necessarily generated ahead the bulge. Such breakers are observed for a wide range of wave steepness and wave slope skewness, their structure being only weakly dependent on wavelength and wind forcing. The geometric properties of microbreakers are analysed statistically and compared with the results of the recent numerical simulations by Hung and Tsai (J. Phys. Oceanogr., 2009).

  8. Transhumanism, medical technology and slippery slopes

    OpenAIRE

    McNamee, M J; Edwards, S D

    2006-01-01

    In this article, transhumanism is considered to be a quasi‐medical ideology that seeks to promote a variety of therapeutic and human‐enhancing aims. Moderate conceptions are distinguished from strong conceptions of transhumanism and the strong conceptions were found to be more problematic than the moderate ones. A particular critique of Boström's defence of transhumanism is presented. Various forms of slippery slope arguments that may be used for and against transhumanism are discussed and on...

  9. Modelling Progressive Failure in Rock-slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, M. Güell I.; Jaboyedoff, M.

    2009-04-01

    Rock failures are common in Alpine mountain chains and pose a threat to life and infrastructures. In general, rock slope stability is an interplay between existing discontinuities and development of new ones in intact material. In this work, we study progressive failure by means of numerical methods at multiple scales and using distinct element methods (DEM). Distinct element methods are of advantage because they account for discontinuities and are able to simulate the development of failure in time. The use of micro-parameters instead of constitutive laws allows studying the influence of heterogeneities present in the rock mass. In the first case, the code PFC-2D is used at the slope scale to test the influence of the slope geometry, the joint sets distribution and the joint set persistence in the case of toppling failures under various triggering mechanisms. Heterogeneity properties (cohesion and friction angle) are distributed randomly to simulate natural rock variability. In the second case, a cellular automata model, which is based on concepts of progressive failure in disordered systems, is used to explain the role of heterogeneities in the fracture process at a small scale. The results provide a link to time-to-failure predictions observed in some field cases. This study aims to be a base for the development of a model which permits to understand why some rock masses accelerate until global failure while other are capable to stabilize under the same conditions.

  10. Progress in Predicting Rock-Slope Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korup, O.

    2015-12-01

    Recent research on predicting landslides has seen a massive increase in statistical and computational methods that are largely adapted from the fields of machine learning and data mining. Judging from a sample of some 150 recent scientific papers, the gross majority of the reported success rates of these statistical methods are overwhelmingly high and promising at between 71% and 98%. Perhaps surprisingly, though, the death toll and damage from landslides has remained elevated in the early 21st century, so that reliably predicting the occurrence of rock-slope failures without overfitting our models remains challenging. Here I review some of the recent advances in this field, and show how novel results from landslide seismology and landslide sedimentology have promoted our ability of detecting large rock-slope failures in mountainous terrain. Several new detailed investigations of the internal nature of large rockslide deposits, for example, help to reduce the confusion potential with macroscopically similar moraine debris, or microscopically similar fault breccia. I further outline some of the limitations of empirical models that use rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for landslide early warning, and of multivariate methods concerned with mapping landslide susceptibility at the regional scale. I conclude by discussing the occurrence of 'black swans' such as long-runout rock-ice avalanches in size distributions of rock-slope failures, and their implications for quantitative hazard appraisals.

  11. Statistics of the slope-method estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocadenbosch, F; Comerón, A; Albiol, L

    2000-11-20

    The slope method has customarily been used and is still used for inversion of atmospheric optical parameters, extinction, and backscatter in homogeneous atmospheres from lidar returns. Our aim is to study the underlying statistics of the old slope method and ultimately to compare its inversion performance with that of the present-day nonlinear least-squares solution (the so-called exponential-curve fitting). The contents are twofold: First, an analytical study is conducted to characterize the bias and the mean-square-estimation error of the regression operator, which permits estimation of the optical parameters from the logarithm of the range-compensated lidar return. Second, universal plots for most short- and far-range tropospheric backscatter lidars are presented as a rule of thumb for obtaining the optimum regression interval length that yields unbiased estimates. As a result, the simple graphic basis of the slope method is still maintained, and its inversion performance improves up to that of the present-day computer-oriented exponential-curve fitting, which ends the controversy between these two algorithms.

  12. Effects of repeated exposure to malathion on growth, food consumption, and locomotor performance of the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holem, Ryan R.; Hopkins, William A.; Talent, Larry G.

    2008-01-01

    Effects of repeated pollutant exposure on growth, locomotor performance, and behavior have rarely been evaluated in reptiles. We administered three doses of malathion (2.0, 20, or 100 mg/kg body weight) to western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) over an 81 day period. Eight and 23% mortality occurred at 20 and 100 mg/kg (p = 0.079) and 85% of lizards in the 100 mg/kg group exhibited clinical symptoms of poisoning. Growth, food consumption, body condition index, and terrestrial locomotor performance were not significantly influenced by malathion. However, arboreal sprint velocity was significantly reduced in lizards receiving 100 mg/kg. Fifty percent of lizards in the 100 mg/kg group also refused to sprint in the arboreal setting (p = 0.085). Based on these results, arboreal locomotor performance was the most sensitive metric of exposure we evaluated. Further study of compounds such as malathion is warranted due to highly variable application rates and exposure scenarios. - Repeated exposure of western fence lizards to malathion caused reduced arboreal performance and some mortality but growth, food consumption, and terrestrial performance were not affected

  13. Toxic effects of oral 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene in the Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, Craig A., E-mail: craig.a.mcfarland@us.army.mi [US Army Public Health Command (Prov), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); Quinn, Michael J. [US Army Public Health Command (Prov), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); Boyce, John [Biotechnics, LLC, Hillsborough, NC 27278 (United States); LaFiandra, Emily M.; Bazar, Matthew A. [US Army Public Health Command (Prov), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States); Talent, Larry G. [Oklahoma State University, Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Johnson, Mark S. [US Army Public Health Command (Prov), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21010 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The compound 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2A-DNT) was evaluated under laboratory conditions in the Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) to assess the potential for reptile toxicity. Oral LD{sub 50} values were 1406 and 1867 mg/kg for male and female lizards, respectively. Based on responses from a 14-day subacute study, a 60-day subchronic experiment followed where lizards were orally dosed at 0, 5, 15, 20, 25, 30 mg/kg-d. At day 60, number of days and survivors, food consumption, and change in body weight were inversely related to dose. Signs of toxicity were characterized by anorexia and generalized cachexia. Significant adverse histopathology was observed in hepatic tissue at {>=}15 mg/kg-d, consistent with hepatocellular transdifferentiation. Based on survival, loss of body weight, diminished food intake, changes in liver, kidney, and testes, and increased blood urea nitrogen, these data suggest a LOAEL of 15 mg/kg-d and a NOAEL of 5 mg/kg-d in S. occidentalis. - Research highlights: Oral LD{sub 50} (mg/kg) values were 1406 for male and 1867 for female lizards. Dose-dependent hepatocellular transdifferentiation was observed at {>=}5 mg/kg-d. Chromaturia in 2A-DNT and the parent TNT suggest biomarkers of exposure and effect. Health effects of metabolites support comprehensive ecological risk assessments. - The Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) is a suitable reptile model for assessing the toxicity of energetic compounds and their metabolites.

  14. Toxic effects of oral 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene in the Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, Craig A.; Quinn, Michael J.; Boyce, John; LaFiandra, Emily M.; Bazar, Matthew A.; Talent, Larry G.; Johnson, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    The compound 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2A-DNT) was evaluated under laboratory conditions in the Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) to assess the potential for reptile toxicity. Oral LD 50 values were 1406 and 1867 mg/kg for male and female lizards, respectively. Based on responses from a 14-day subacute study, a 60-day subchronic experiment followed where lizards were orally dosed at 0, 5, 15, 20, 25, 30 mg/kg-d. At day 60, number of days and survivors, food consumption, and change in body weight were inversely related to dose. Signs of toxicity were characterized by anorexia and generalized cachexia. Significant adverse histopathology was observed in hepatic tissue at ≥15 mg/kg-d, consistent with hepatocellular transdifferentiation. Based on survival, loss of body weight, diminished food intake, changes in liver, kidney, and testes, and increased blood urea nitrogen, these data suggest a LOAEL of 15 mg/kg-d and a NOAEL of 5 mg/kg-d in S. occidentalis. - Research highlights: → Oral LD 50 (mg/kg) values were 1406 for male and 1867 for female lizards. → Dose-dependent hepatocellular transdifferentiation was observed at ≥5 mg/kg-d. → Chromaturia in 2A-DNT and the parent TNT suggest biomarkers of exposure and effect. → Health effects of metabolites support comprehensive ecological risk assessments. - The Western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) is a suitable reptile model for assessing the toxicity of energetic compounds and their metabolites.

  15. Original research papers. Kinematic Characterisation of the Lunge and the Fleche in Epee Fencing: Two Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bober Tadeusz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to characterise the whole body dynamics and upper and lower joint kinematics during two common fencing steps: the lunge and the fleche. Material and methods. Two male competitive epee fencers were studied. Kinematics data were collected at 120 Hz (BTS Smart system and ground reaction forces were measured at 120 Hz (Kistler platform. The resultant centre of gravity and end segment velocities were calculated. Temporal events were referenced to the horizontal ground reaction force. Time domain linear joint velocities were extracted. Results. At the whole-body level, the resultant centre of gravity velocity was higher during the fleche (2.64 and 2.89 m/s than during the lunge (1.94 and 2.21 m/s. At the joint level, the wrist and elbow attained their peak velocities earlier than the proximal joint for both the lunge and the fleche for both athletes. Conclusions. The sequence of peak segmental velocities followed a distal to proximal sequence for both fencing steps.

  16. On the structure and reactivity of small iron clusters with benzene, [Fen-C6H6]0,+,-, n ⩽ 7: A theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Israel

    2016-09-01

    The structural, energetic, electronic, vibrational, and magnetic properties of iron-benzene clusters, Fen-C6H6, n ⩽ 7, were calculated using an all-electron density functional theory, DFT, with the generalized gradient approximation and the 6-311++G(2d,2p) basis set. A proposal regarding the mechanism of the adsorption of benzene on iron clusters related to the charge transfer model is described. A direct relation between the calculated electron affinity, EA, of the Fen-C6H6 clusters and their reactivity were also determined.

  17. Fiber Bragg grating-based performance monitoring of a slope model subjected to seepage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Hu; Shi, Bin; Yan, Jun-Fan; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Cheng-Cheng; Wang, Bao-Jun

    2014-09-01

    In the past few years, fiber optic sensing technologies have played an increasingly important role in the health monitoring of civil infrastructures. These innovative sensing technologies have recently been successfully applied to the performance monitoring of a series of geotechnical structures. Fiber optic sensors have shown many unique advantages in comparison with conventional sensors, including immunity to electrical noise, higher precision and improved durability and embedding capabilities; fiber optic sensors are also smaller in size and lighter in weight. In order to explore the mechanism of seepage-induced slope instability, a small-scale 1 g model test of the soil slope has been performed in the laboratory. During the model’s construction, specially fabricated sensing fibers containing nine fiber Bragg grating (FBG) strain sensors connected in a series were horizontally and vertically embedded into the soil mass. The surcharge load was applied on the slope crest, and the groundwater level inside of the slope was subsequently varied using two water chambers installed besides the slope model. The fiber optic sensing data of the vertical and horizontal strains within the slope model were automatically recorded by an FBG interrogator and a computer during the test. The test results are presented and interpreted in detail. It is found that the gradually accumulated deformation of the slope model subjected to seepage can be accurately captured by the quasi-distributed FBG strain sensors. The test results also demonstrate that the slope stability is significantly affected by ground water seepage, which fits well with the results that were calculated using finite element and limit equilibrium methods. The relationship between the strain measurements and the safety factors is further analyzed, together with a discussion on the residual strains. The performance evaluation of a soil slope using fiber optic strain sensors is proved to be a potentially effective

  18. Slope stabilization guide for Minnesota local government engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    This user guide provides simple, costeffective methods for stabilizing locally maintained slopes along roadways in Minnesota. Eight slope stabilization techniques are presented that local government engineers can undertake using locally available ...

  19. Stabilization of erodible slopes with geofibers and nontraditional liquid additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Instability of erodible slopes due to extreme climate events and of permafrost slopes due degradation and thawing is a significant : engineering problem for northern transportation infrastructure. Engineers continually look for mitigation alternative...

  20. Turbulent Mechanical Energy Budget in Stably Stratified Baroclinic Flows over Sloping Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łobocki, Lech

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of second-moment budget equations in a slope-oriented coordinate frame exhibits the pathways of exchange between the potential energy of mean flow and the total turbulent mechanical energy. It is shown that this process is controlled by the inclination of the potential temperature gradient. Hence, this parameter should be considered in studies of turbulence in slope flows as well as the slope inclination. The concept of turbulent potential energy is generalized to include baroclinicity, and is used to explain the role of along-slope turbulent heat flux in energy conversions. A generalization of static stability criteria for baroclinic conditions is also proposed. In addition, the presence of feedback between the turbulent heat flux and the temperature variance in stably-stratified flows is identified, which implies the existence of oscillatory modes characterized by the Brunt-Väisäla frequency.

  1. Impact of the steepness of the slope on the biomechanics of World Cup slalom skiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supej, Matej; Hébert-Losier, Kim; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2015-04-01

    Numerous environmental factors can affect alpine-ski-racing performance, including the steepness of the slope. However, little research has focused on this factor. Accordingly, the authors' aim was to determine the impact of the steepness of the slope on the biomechanics of World Cup slalom ski racers. The authors collected 3-dimensional kinematic data during a World Cup race from 10 male slalom skiers throughout turns performed on a relatively flat (19.8°) and steep (25.2°) slope under otherwise similar course conditions. Kinematic data revealed differences between the 2 slopes regarding the turn radii of the skis and center of gravity, velocity, acceleration, and differential specific mechanical energy (all P skiing variables. The findings suggest that specific considerations during training and preparation would benefit the race performance of slalom skiers on courses involving sections of varying steepness.

  2. Thermomechanical forcing of deep rock slope deformation: 1. Conceptual study of a simplified slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gischig, Valentin S.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Evans, Keith F.; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Thermo-elastic rock slope deformation is often considered to be of relatively minor importance and limited to shallow depths subject to seasonal warming and cooling. In this study, we demonstrate how thermomechanical (TM) effects can drive rock slope deformation at greater depths below the annual thermal active layer. Here in Part 1 of two companion papers, we present 2D numerical models of a simplified slope subject to annual surface temperature cycles. The slope geometry and discontinuity sets are loosely based on the Randa instability considered in detail in Part 2. Results show that near-surface thermo-elastic stresses can propagate to depths of 100 m and more as a result of topography and elasticity of the rock mass. Shear dislocation along discontinuities can have both a reversible component controlled by discontinuity compliance and, provided that the stress state is sufficiently close to the strength limit, an irreversible component (i.e., slip). Induced slip increments are followed by stress redistribution resulting in the propagation of slip fronts. Thus, deformation and progressive rock slope failure can be driven solely by thermomechanical forcing. The influence of TM-induced stress changes becomes stronger for increasing numbers of critically stressed discontinuities and is enhanced if failure of discontinuities involves slip-weakening. The net TM effect acts as a meso-scale fatigue process, involving incremental discontinuity slip and hysteresis driven by periodic loading.

  3. Understanding slope behavior through microseismic monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Diego; Boccolari, Mauro; Longoni, Laura; Papini, Monica; Zanzi, Luigi

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that microseismic activity originates as an elastic stress wave at locations where the material is mechanically unstable. Monitoring techniques focusing on this phenomenon have been studied for over seventy years and are now employed in a wide range of applications. As far as the study of unstable slope is concerned, microseismic monitoring can provide real-time information about fracture formation, propagation and coalescence and may be an appropriate solution to reduce the risk for human settlements when structural mitigation interventions (e.g., rock fall nets and ditches) cannot cope with large rock volumes and high kinetic energies. In this work we present the datasets collected in a 4-year period with a microseismic monitoring network deployed on an unstable rock face in Northern Italy. We mainly focus on the classification and the interpretation of collected signals with the final aim of identifying microseismic events related to the kinematic and dynamic behavior of the slope. We have analyzed signal parameters both in time and frequency domains, spectrograms, polarization of 3-component recordings supported by principal component analysis. Clustering methodologies have been tested in order to develop an automatic classification routine capable to isolate a cluster with most of the events related to slope behavior and to discard all disturbances. The network features both geophones and meteorological sensors so that we could also explore the correlation between microseismic events and meteorological datasets, although no significant relationships emerged. On the contrary, it was found that the majority of the events collected by the network are short-time high-frequency signals generated by electromagnetic activity caused by near and far thunderstorms. Finally, we attempted a preliminary localization of the most promising events according to an oversimplified homogeneous velocity model to get a rough indication about the regions of the

  4. Transhumanism, medical technology and slippery slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, M J; Edwards, S D

    2006-09-01

    In this article, transhumanism is considered to be a quasi-medical ideology that seeks to promote a variety of therapeutic and human-enhancing aims. Moderate conceptions are distinguished from strong conceptions of transhumanism and the strong conceptions were found to be more problematic than the moderate ones. A particular critique of Boström's defence of transhumanism is presented. Various forms of slippery slope arguments that may be used for and against transhumanism are discussed and one particular criticism, moral arbitrariness, that undermines both weak and strong transhumanism is highlighted.

  5. Clustering Moving Objects Using Segments Slopes

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed E. El-Sharkawi; Hoda M. O. Mokhtar; Omnia Ossama

    2011-01-01

    Given a set of moving object trajectories, we show how to cluster them using k-meansclustering approach. Our proposed clustering algorithm is competitive with the k-means clusteringbecause it specifies the value of “k” based on the segment’s slope of the moving object trajectories. Theadvantage of this approach is that it overcomes the known drawbacks of the k-means algorithm, namely,the dependence on the number of clusters (k), and the dependence on the initial choice of the clusters’centroi...

  6. Intertidal beach slope predictions compared to field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madsen, A.J.; Plant, N.G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a test of a very simple model for predicting beach slope changes. The model assumes that these changes are a function of both the incident wave conditions and the beach slope itself. Following other studies, we hypothesized that the beach slope evolves towards an equilibrium

  7. [Characteristics of Soil Respiration along Eroded Sloping Land with Different SOC Background on the Hilly Loess Plateau].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gai; Xu, Ming-xiang; Zhang, Ya-feng; Wang, Chao-hua; Fan, Hui-min; Wang, Shan-shan

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to characterize soil respiration along eroded sloping land at erosion and deposition area under different soil organic carbon(SOC) levels, and linked the relationship between soil respiration and soil temperature, soil moisture, SOC and slope position. Experiments were carried out in the plots of S type slopes include five different soil organic carbon levels in the Loess Hilly Region. The S type slopes were divided into control area at the top of the slope, erosion area at the middle of the slope and deposition area at the toe of the slope. We found that soil temperature had a greater impact on soil respiration in the deposition area, whereas soil moisture had a greater impact on soil respiration in the erosion area compared among control area, erosion area and deposition area. In addition, SOC was the most important factor affecting soil respiration, which can explain soil respiration variation 54. 72%, followed by soil moisture, slope position and soil temperature, which explain soil respiration variation 18. 86% , 16. 13% and 10. 29%, respectively. Soil respiration response to erosion showed obvious on-site and off-site effects along the eroded sloping land. Soil respiration in the erosion area was reduced by 21. 14% compared with control area, and soil respiration in the deposition area was increased by 21. 93% compared with control area. Erosion effect on source and sink of carbon emission was correlated with SOC content of the eroded sloping land. When SOC content was higher than 6. 82 g.kg-1, the slope. erosion tended to be a carbon sequestration process, and when SOC content was lower than 3.03 g.kg-1, the slope erosion tended to be a process of the carbon emission source. The model could reflect the relationship between soil respiration and independent variables of soil organic carbon content, soil temperature and moisture.

  8. Analysis of slope slip surface case study landslide road segment Purwantoro-Nawangan/Bts Jatim Km 89+400

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purnomo, Joko Sidik; Purwana, Yusep Muslih; Surjandari, Niken Silmi

    2017-01-01

    Wonogiri is a region of south eastern part of Central Java province which borders with East Java and Yogyakarta Province. In Physiographic its mostly undulating hills so that the frequent occurrence of landslides, especially during the rainy season. Landslide disaster that just happened that on the road segment Purwantoro-Nawangan / Bts Jatim Km 89 + 400 were included in the authority of the Highways Department of Central Java Province. During this time, Error analysis of slope stability is not caused by a lot of presumption shape of slip surface, but by an error in determining the location of the critical slip surface. This study aims to find the shape and location slip surface landslide on segment Purwantoro - Nawangan Km 89 + 400 with the interpretation of soil test results. This research method is with the interpretation of CPT test and Bore Hole as well as modeling use limit equilibrium method and finite element method. Processing contours of the slopes in the landslide area resulted in three cross section that slopes A-A, B-B and C-C which will be modeling the slopes. Modeling slopes with dry and wet conditions at the third cross section slope. It was found that the form of the slope slip surface are known to be composite depth 1.5-2 m with safety factor values more than 1.2 (stable) when conditions are dry slopes. But its became failure with factor of safety < 0.44 when conditions are wet slopes. (paper)

  9. Microseismic Monitoring and 3D Finite Element Analysis of the Right Bank Slope, Dagangshan Hydropower Station, during Reservoir Impounding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingzong; Tang, Chun'an; Li, Lianchong; Lv, Pengfei; Liu, Hongyuan

    2017-07-01

    The right bank slope of Dagangshan hydropower station in China has complex geological conditions and is subjected to high in situ stress. Notably, microseismic activities in the right bank slope occurred during reservoir impounding. This paper describes the microseismic monitoring technology, and three-dimensional (3D) finite element analysis is used to explore the microseismic activities and damage mechanisms in the right bank slope during reservoir impounding. Based on data obtained from microseismic monitoring, a progressive microseismic damage model is proposed and implemented for 3D finite element analysis. The safety factor for the right bank slope after reservoir impoundment obtained from the 3D finite element analysis, which included the effects of progressive microseismic damage, was 1.10, indicating that the slope is stable. The microseismic monitoring system is able to capture the slope disturbance during reservoir impounding in real time and is a powerful tool for qualitatively assessing changes in slope stability over time. The proposed progressive microseismic damage model adequately simulates the changes in the slope during the impoundment process and provides a valuable tool for evaluating slope stability.

  10. Multiphase Model of Semisolid Slurry Generation and Isothermal Holding During Cooling Slope Rheoprocessing of A356 Al Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prosenjit; Samanta, Sudip K.; Mondal, Biswanath; Dutta, Pradip

    2018-04-01

    In the present paper, we present an experimentally validated 3D multiphase and multiscale solidification model to understand the transport processes involved during slurry generation with a cooling slope. In this process, superheated liquid alloy is poured at the top of the cooling slope and allowed to flow along the slope under the influence of gravity. As the melt flows down the slope, it progressively loses its superheat, starts solidifying at the melt/slope interface with formation of solid crystals, and eventually exits the slope as semisolid slurry. In the present simulation, the three phases considered are the parent melt as the primary phase, and the solid grains and air as secondary phases. The air phase forms a definable air/liquid melt interface as the free surface. After exiting the slope, the slurry fills an isothermal holding bath maintained at the slope exit temperature, which promotes further globularization of microstructure. The outcomes of the present model include prediction of volume fractions of the three different phases considered, grain evolution, grain growth, size, sphericity and distribution of solid grains, temperature field, velocity field, macrosegregation and microsegregation. In addition, the model is found to be capable of making predictions of morphological evolution of primary grains at the onset of isothermal coarsening. The results obtained from the present simulations are validated by performing quantitative image analysis of micrographs of the rapidly oil-quenched semisolid slurry samples, collected from strategic locations along the slope and from the isothermal slurry holding bath.

  11. Cost estimation for slope stability improvement in Muara Enim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliantina, Ika; Sutejo, Yulindasari; Adhitya, Bimo Brata; Sari, Nurul Permata; Kurniawan, Reffanda

    2017-11-01

    Case study area of SP. Sugihwaras-Baturaja is typologically specified in the C-zone type because the area is included in the foot of the mountain with a slope of 0 % to 20 %. Generally, the factors that cause landslide in Muara Enim Regency due to the influence of soil/rock, water factor, geological factors, and human activities. Slope improvement on KM.273 + 642-KM.273 + 774 along 132 m using soil nailing with 19 mm diameter tendon iron and an angle of 20o and a 75 mm shotcrete thickness, a K-250 concrete grouting material. Cost modeling (y) soil nailing based on 4 variables are X1 = length, X2 = horizontal distance, X3 = safety factor (SF), and X4 = time. Nine variations were used as multiple linear regression equations and analyzed with SPSS.16.0 program. Based on the SPSS output, then attempt the classical assumption and feasibility test model which produced the model that is Cost = (1,512,062 + 194,354 length-1,649,135 distance + 187,831 SF + 54,864 time) million Rupiah. The budget plan includes preparatory work, drainage system, soil nailing, and shotcrete. An efficient cost estimate of 8 m length nail, 1.5 m installation distance, safety factor (SF) = 1.742 and a 30 day processing time resulted in a fee of Rp. 2,566,313,000.00 (Two billion five hundred sixty six million three hundred thirteen thousand rupiah).

  12. A Comparison of Herpetofaunal Sampling Effectiveness of Pitfall, Single-ended, and Double-ended Funnel Traps Used with Drift Fences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathryn H. Greenberg; Daniel G. Neary; Larry D. Harris

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the relative effectiveness of pitfalls, single-ended, and double-ended funnel traps at 12 replicate sites in sand pine scrub using drift fence arrays. Pitfalls captured fewer species but yielded more individuals of many species and higher average species richness than funnel traps. Pitfalls and funnel traps exhibited differential capture bias probably due...

  13. Habitat relationships of reptiles in pine beetle disturbed forests of Alabama, U.S.A., with guidelines for a modified drift-fence sampling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    William B. Sutton; Yong Wang; Callie J. Schweitzer

    2010-01-01

    Understanding vertebrate habitat relationships is important to promote management strategies for the longterm conservation of many species. Using a modified drift fence method, we sampled reptiles and compared habitat variables within the William B. Bankhead National Forest (BNF) in Alabama, U.S.A from April 2005 to June 2006. We captured 226 individual reptiles...

  14. Assessment of radar altimetry correction slopes for marine gravity recovery: A case study of Jason-1 GM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengjun; Li, Jiancheng; Jin, Taoyong; Che, Defu

    2018-04-01

    Marine gravity anomaly derived from satellite altimetry can be computed using either sea surface height or sea surface slope measurements. Here we consider the slope method and evaluate the errors in the slope of the corrections supplied with the Jason-1 geodetic mission data. The slope corrections are divided into three groups based on whether they are small, comparable, or large with respect to the 1 microradian error in the current sea surface slope models. (1) The small and thus negligible corrections include dry tropospheric correction, inverted barometer correction, solid earth tide and geocentric pole tide. (2) The moderately important corrections include wet tropospheric correction, dual-frequency ionospheric correction and sea state bias. The radiometer measurements are more preferred than model values in the geophysical data records for constraining wet tropospheric effect owing to the highly variable water-vapor structure in atmosphere. The items of dual-frequency ionospheric correction and sea state bias should better not be directly added to range observations for obtaining sea surface slopes since their inherent errors may cause abnormal sea surface slopes and along-track smoothing with uniform distribution weight in certain width is an effective strategy for avoiding introducing extra noises. The slopes calculated from radiometer wet tropospheric corrections, and along-track smoothed dual-frequency ionospheric corrections, sea state bias are generally within ±0.5 microradians and no larger than 1 microradians. (3) Ocean tide has the largest influence on obtaining sea surface slopes while most of ocean tide slopes distribute within ±3 microradians. Larger ocean tide slopes mostly occur over marginal and island-surrounding seas, and extra tidal models with better precision or with extending process (e.g. Got-e) are strongly recommended for updating corrections in geophysical data records.

  15. Cyclic settlement behavior of strip footings resting on reinforced layered sand slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa A. El Sawwaf

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a study of the behavior of model strip footings supported on a loose sandy slope and subjected to both monotonic and cyclic loads. The effects of the partial replacement of a compacted sand layer and the inclusion of geosynthetic reinforcement were investigated. Different combinations of the initial monotonic loads and the amplitude of cyclic loads were chosen to simulate structures in which loads change cyclically such as machine foundations. The affecting factors including the location of footing relative to the slope crest, the frequency of the cyclic load and the number of load cycles were studied. The cumulative cyclic settlement of the model footing supported on a loose sandy slope, un-reinforced and reinforced replaced sand deposits overlying the loose slope were obtained and compared. Test results indicate that the inclusion of soil reinforcement in the replaced sand not only significantly increases the stability of the sandy slope itself but also decreases much both the monotonic and cumulative cyclic settlements leading to an economic design of the footings. However, the efficiency of the sand–geogrid systems depends on the properties of the cyclic load and the location of the footing relative to the slope crest. Based on the test results, the variation of cumulative settlements with different parameters is presented and discussed.

  16. Experimental Verification of the Use of Metal Filled Via Hole Fences for Crosstalk Control of Microstrip Lines in LTCC Packages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, George E.; Chun, Donghoon; Yook, Jong-Gwan; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    2001-01-01

    Coupling between microstrip lines in dense RF packages is a common problem that degrades circuit performance. Prior three-dimensional-finite element method (3-D-FEM) electromagnetic simulations have shown that metal filled via hole fences between two adjacent microstrip lines actually Increases coupling between the lines: however, if the top of the via posts are connected by a metal strip, coupling is reduced. In this paper, experimental verification of the 3-D-FEM simulations is demonstrated for commercially fabricated low temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) packages. In addition, measured attenuation of microstrip lines surrounded by the shielding structures is presented and shows that shielding structures do not change the attenuation characteristics of the line.

  17. Assessment and mapping of slope stability based on slope units: A ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    4) 1153–1171. Muntohar A S and Liao H J 2010 Rainfall infiltration: Infi- nite slope model for landslides triggering by rainstorm;. Nat. Hazards 54(3) 967–984. Muthu K, Petrou M, Tarantino C and Blonda P 2008 Land- slide possibility mapping ...

  18. Effects of slope gradient on hydro-erosional processes on an aeolian sand-covered loess slope under simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. B.; Yang, M. Y.; Li, B. B.; Li, Z. B.; Shi, W. Y.

    2017-10-01

    The aeolian sand-covered loess slope of the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region of the Loess Plateau in China may play a key role in contributing excessive sediment to the Yellow River. Understanding its hydro-erosional processes is crucial to assessing, controlling and predicting soil and water losses in this region and maintaining the ecological sustainability of the Yellow River. Simulated rainfall (intensity 90 mm h-1) was used to investigate the runoff and soil loss from loess slopes with different slope gradients (18%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%) and overlying sand layer thicknesses (0, 5 and 10 cm). As compared with uncovered loess slopes, an overlying sand layer delayed runoff production, reduced cumulative runoff and increased cumulative soil loss, as well as enhancing variations among slope gradients. Cumulative runoff and soil loss from the sand-covered loess slopes increased with increasing slope gradients and then slightly decreased, with a peak at about 47% gradient; they both were greater from the 10-cm sand-covered loess slope than from the 5-cm except for with 18% slope gradient. In general, differences in cumulative runoff between sand layer thicknesses became smaller, while those in cumulative soil loss became larger, with increasing slope gradient. Runoff and soil loss rates on the sand-covered loess slopes exhibited unimodal distributions during the rainstorms. Maximum values tended to occur at the same rain duration, and increased considerably with increasing slope gradient and sand layer thickness on slopes that were less than 47%. Liquefaction process might occur on the lower loess slopes covered with thinner sand layers but failures similar to shallow landslides might occur when the sand layer was thicker on steeper slopes. The presence of an overlying sand layer changed the relationship between runoff and soil loss rates during intense rainstorms and this change varied with different slope gradients. Our results demonstrated that the effects

  19. Bioengineering case studies sustainable stream bank and slope stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Goldsmith, Wendi; McCullah, John

    2014-01-01

    This unique volume describes and evaluates 30 projects from across the United States where bio-stabilization was employed to address a detrimental naturally occurring process or byproduct of the built environment. Bio-stabilization (or soil bioengineering) refers to the use of plant materials, primarily live cuttings, arranged in the ground in different arrays to reinforce soils and protect upland slopes and/or stream banks against surficial erosion and shallow slope failures. Examples included in the collection represent different regions of the country and their specific conditions and challenges. Each project is illustrated with a number of distinctive photographs to support the reader's understanding and showcase the wide scope of projects and techniques presented. This book also: ·         Presents a range of well-documented case studies on key techniques and best practices for bio-stabilization projects ·         Emphasizes evaluation and comparison of different techniques and challeng...

  20. Methodologies for risk analysis in slope instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernabeu Garcia, M.; Diaz Torres, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is an approach to the different methodologies used in conducting landslide risk maps so that the reader can get a basic knowledge about how to proceed in its development. The landslide hazard maps are increasingly demanded by governments. This is because due to climate change, deforestation and the pressure exerted by the growth of urban centers, damage caused by natural phenomena is increasing each year, making this area of work a field of study with increasing importance. To explain the process of mapping a journey through each of the phases of which it is composed is made: from the study of the types of slope movements and the necessary management of geographic information systems (GIS) inventories and landslide susceptibility analysis, threat, vulnerability and risk. (Author)

  1. Positive Surge Propagation in Sloping Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Pietro Viero

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A simplified model for the upstream propagation of a positive surge in a sloping, rectangular channel is presented. The model is based on the assumptions of a flat water surface and negligible energy dissipation downstream of the surge, which is generated by the instantaneous closure of a downstream gate. Under these hypotheses, a set of equations that depends only on time accurately describes the surge wave propagation. When the Froude number of the incoming flow is relatively small, an approximate analytical solution is also proposed. The predictive ability of the model is validated by comparing the model results with the results of an experimental investigation and with the results of a numerical model that solves the full shallow water equations.

  2. Development of kenaf mat for slope stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, M. M.; Manaf, M. B. H. Ab; Zainol, N. Z.

    2017-09-01

    This study focusing on the ability of kenaf mat to act as reinforcement to laterite compared to the conventional geosynthetic in term of stabilizing the slope. Kenaf mat specimens studied in this paper are made up from natural kenaf fiber with 3mm thickness, 150mm length and 20mm width. With the same size of specimens, geosynthetic that obtain from the industry are being tested for both direct shear and tensile tests. Plasticity index of the soil sample used is equal to 13 which indicate that the soil is slightly plastic. Result shows that the friction angle of kenaf mat is higher compared to friction between soil particles itself. In term of resistance to tensile load, the tensile strength of kenaf mat is 0.033N/mm2 which is lower than the tensile strength of geosynthetic.

  3. Alaskan North Slope Oil & Gas Transportation Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilly, Michael Russell [Geo-Watersheds Scientific LLC, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2017-03-31

    North Slope oil and gas resources are a critical part of US energy supplies and their development is facing a period of new growth to meet increasing national energy needs. While this growth is taking place in areas active in development for more than 20 years, there are many increasing environmental challenges facing industry and management agencies. A majority of all exploration and development activities, pipeline maintenance and other field support activities take place in the middle of winter, when the fragile tundra surface is more stable. The window for the critical oil and gas winter operational season has been steadily decreasing over the last 25 years. The number of companies working on the North Slope is increasing. Many of these companies are smaller and working with fewer resources than the current major companies. The winter operations season starts with the tundra-travel opening, which requires 15 cm of snow on the land surface in the coastal management areas and 23 cm in the foothills management areas. All state managed areas require -5°C soil temperatures at a soil depth of 30 cm. Currently there are no methods to forecast this opening date, so field mobilization efforts are dependent on agency personnel visiting field sites to measure snow and soil temperature conditions. Weeks can be easily lost in the winter operating season due to delays in field verification of tundra conditions and the resulting mobilization. After the season is open, a significant percentage of exploration, construction, and maintenance do not proceed until ice roads and pads can be built. This effort is dependent on access to lake ice and under-ice water. Ice chipping is a common ice-road construction technique used to build faster and stronger ice roads. Seasonal variability in water availability and permitting approaches are a constant constraint to industry. At the end of the winter season, projects reliant on ice-road networks are often faced with ending operations

  4. ASPECTS OF DRIP IRRIGATION ON SLOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oprea Radu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, water and its supply raise problems of strategic importance, of great complexity, being considered one of the keys to sustainable human development. Drip irrigation consists in the slow and controlled administration of water in the area of the root system of the plants for the purposes of fulfilling their physiological needs and is considered to be one of the variants of localized irrigation. Water is distributed in a uniform and slow manner, drop by drop, in a quantity and with a frequency that depend on the needs of the plant, thanks to the exact regulation of the water flow rate and pressure, as well as to the activation of the irrigation based on the information recorded by the tensiometer with regard to soil humidity. This method enables the exact dosage of the water quantity necessary in the various evolution stages of the plant, thus eliminating losses. By applying the irrigation with 5 liters of water per linear meter, at a 7 days interval, in the month of august, for a vine cultivated on a slope, in layers covered with black film and irrigated via dropping, soil humidity immediately after irrigation reaches its highest level, but within the limits of active humidity, on the line of the irrigation band. Three days later, the water content of the soil in the layer is relatively uniform, and, after this interval, it is higher in the points situated at the basis of the film. This technology of cultivation on slopes favors the accumulation, in the soil, of the water resulted from heavy rains and reduces soil losses as a result of erosion.

  5. Microseismic monitoring and numerical simulation on the stability of high-steep rock slopes in hydropower engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun'an Tang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available For high-steep slopes in hydropower engineering, damage can be induced or accumulated due to a series of human or natural activities, including excavation, dam construction, earthquake, rainstorm, rapid rise or drop of water level in the service lifetime of slopes. According to the concept that the progressive damage (microseismicity of rock slope is the essence of the precursor of slope instability, a microseismic monitoring system for high-steep rock slopes is established. Positioning accuracy of the monitoring system is tested by fixed-position blasting method. Based on waveform and cluster analyses of microseismic events recorded during test, the tempo-spatial distribution of microseismic events is analyzed. The deformation zone in the deep rock masses induced by the microseismic events is preliminarily delimited. Based on the physical information measured by in situ microseismic monitoring, an evaluation method for the dynamic stability of rock slopes is proposed and preliminarily implemented by combining microseismic monitoring and numerical modeling. Based on the rock mass damage model obtained by back analysis of microseismic information, the rock mass elements within the microseismic damage zone are automatically searched by finite element program. Then the stiffness and strength reductions are performed on these damaged elements accordingly. Attempts are made to establish the correlation between microseismic event, strength deterioration and slope dynamic instability, so as to quantitatively evaluate the dynamic stability of slope. The case studies about two practical slopes indicate that the proposed method can reflect the factor of safety of rock slope more objectively. Numerical analysis can help to understand the characteristics and modes of the monitored microseismic events in rock slopes. Microseismic monitoring data and simulation results can be used to mutually modify the sensitive rock parameters and calibrate the model

  6. An alternative soil nailing system for slope stabilization: Akarpiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chun-Lan; Chan, Chee-Ming

    2017-11-01

    This research proposes an innovative solution for slope stabilization with less environmental footprint: AKARPILES. In Malaysia, landslide has become common civil and environmental problems that cause impacts to the economy, safety and environment. Therefore, effective slope stabilization method helps to improve the safety of public and protect the environment. This study focused on stabilizing surfacial slope failure. The idea of AKARPILES was generated from the tree roots system in slope stabilization. After the piles are installed in the slope and intercepting the slip plane, grout was pumped in and discharged through holes on the piles. The grout then filled the pores in the soil with random flow within the slip zone. SKW mixture was used to simulate the soil slope. There were two designs being proposed in this study and the prototypes were produced by a 3D printer. Trial mix of the grout was carried out to obtain the optimum mixing ratio of bentonite: cement: water. A series of tests were conducted on the single-pile-reinforced slope under vertical slope crest loading condition considering different slope gradients and nail designs. Parameters such as ultimate load, failure time and failure strain were recorded and compared. As comparison with the unreinforced slope, both designs of AKARPILES showed better but different performances in the model tests.

  7. Model tests of geosynthetic reinforced slopes in a geotechnical centrifuge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aklik, P.

    2012-01-01

    Geosynthetic-reinforced slopes and walls became very popular in recent years because of their financial, technical, and ecological advantages. Centrifuge modelling is a powerful tool for physical modelling of reinforced slopes and offers the advantage to observe the failure mechanisms of the slopes. In order to replicate the gravity induced stresses of a prototype structure in a geometrically 1/N reduced model, it is necessary to test the model in a gravitational field N times larger than that of the prototype structure. In this dissertation, geotextile-reinforced slope models were tested in a geotechnical centrifuge to identify the possible failure mechanisms. Slope models were tested by varying slope inclination, tensile strengths of the geotextiles, and overlapping lengths. Photographs of the geotextile reinforced slope models in flight were taken with a digital camera and the soil deformations of geotextile reinforced slopes were evaluated with Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The experimental results showed that failure of the centrifuge models initiated at midheight of the slope, and occurred due to geotextile breakage instead of pullout. The location of the shear surface is independent of the tensile strength of the geotextile; it is dependent on the shear strength of the soil. It is logical to see that the required acceleration of the centrifuge at slope failure was decreased with increasing slope inclination. An important contribution to the stability of the slope models was provided by the overlapping of the geotextile layers. It has a secondary reinforcement effect when it was prolonged and passed through the shear surface. Moreover, the location of the shear surface observed with PIV analysis exactly matches the tears of the retrieved geotextiles measured carefully after the centrifuge testing. It is concluded that PIV is an efficient tool to instrument the slope failures in a geotechnical centrifuge.(author) [de

  8. Preliminary effects of streambank fencing of pasture land on the quality of surface water in a small watershed in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeone, Daniel G.

    2000-01-01

    The use of fencing to exclude pastured animals from streams has been recognized as an agricultural best-management practice. Streambank fencing was installed in a small basin within the Mill Creek Watershed of Lancaster County, Pa., during summer 1997 to evaluate the effectiveness of fencing on surface-water quality. A preliminary review of data collected during a pre-treatment, or calibration period (October 1993 through June 1997), and part of the post-treatment period (July 1997 through November 1998) has identified a varied instream nutrient response to streambank fencing.Concentrations of total nitrogen (N) during low-flow periods were significantly reduced by 20 to 31 percent at treated relative to untreated sites, but the yield of total N during low-flow conditions did not change significantly. Low-flow concentrations and yields of total phosphorus (P) did not change significantly at the outlet of the treatment basin, but data from a tributary site (T-2) in the treatment basin showed a 19- to 79-percent increase in the concentration and yield of total P relative to those at untreated sites. The total-P increase was due to increased concentrations of dissolved P. The processes causing the decrease in the concentration of total N and an increase in the concentration of total P were related to stream discharge, which declined after fencing to about one-third lower than the period-of-record mean. Declines in stream discharge after fence installation were caused by lower than normal precipitation. As concentrations of dissolved oxygen decreased in the stream channel as flows decreased, there was increased potential for instream denitrification and solubilization of P from sediments in the stream channel. Vegetative uptake of nitrate could also have contributed to decreased N concentrations. There were few significant changes in concentrations and yields of nutrients during stormflow except for significant reductions of 16 percent for total-N concentrations and 26

  9. Slope grid derived from gridded bathymetry of Farallon de Medinilla (FDM), Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana (CNMI), USA.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope is derived from gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry for Farallon de medinilla (FDM). The bathymetry grid includes multibeam bathymetry from the Reson 8101...

  10. Simulating the seismic behaviour of soil slopes and embankments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zania, Varvara; Tsompanakis, Yiannis; Psarropoulos, Prodromos

    2010-01-01

    In the current study the clarification of the main assumptions, related to the two most commonly used methods of seismic slope stability analysis (pseudostatic and permanent deformation) is attempted. The seismic permanent displacements and the corresponding seismic coefficients were determined via...... parametric dynamic numerical analyses taking into account not only the main parameters dominating the seismic slope stability, but also the inherent assumptions of the applied approaches that affect the obtained results. The investigation conclude to a realistic procedure for seismic slope stability...

  11. Overpressure, Flow Focusing, Compaction and Slope Stability on the continental slope: Insights from IODP Expedition 308

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemings, P. B.

    2010-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expepedition 308 used direct measurements of pore pressure, analysis of hydromechanical properties, and geological analysis to illuminate how sedimentation, flow focusing, overpressure, and slope stability couple beneath the seafloor on the deepwater continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico. We used pore pressure penetrometers to measure severe overpressures (60% of the difference between lithostatic stress and hydrostatic pressure) that extend from the seafloor for 100’s of meters. We ran uniaxial consolidation experiments on whole core and found that although permeability is relatively high near the seafloor, the sediments are highly compressible. As a result, the coefficient of consolidation (the hydraulic diffusivity) is remarkably constant over a large range of effective stresses. This behavior accounts for the high overpressure that begins near the seafloor and extends to depth. Forward modeling suggests that flow is driven laterally along a permeable unit called the Blue Unit. Calculations suggest that soon after deposition, lateral flow lowered the effective stress and triggered the submarine landslides that we observe. Later in the evolution of this system, overpressure may have pre-conditioned the slope to failure by earthquakes. Results from IODP Expedition 308 illustrate how pore pressure and sedimentation control the large-scale form of continental margins, how submarine landslides form, and provide strategies for designing stable drilling programs.

  12. A Hybrid FEM-ANN Approach for Slope Instability Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, A. K.; Singh, T. N.; Chauhan, Nikhil Kumar; Sarkar, K.

    2016-09-01

    Assessment of slope stability is one of the most critical aspects for the life of a slope. In any slope vulnerability appraisal, Factor Of Safety (FOS) is the widely accepted index to understand, how close or far a slope from the failure. In this work, an attempt has been made to simulate a road cut slope in a landslide prone area in Rudrapryag, Uttarakhand, India which lies near Himalayan geodynamic mountain belt. A combination of Finite Element Method (FEM) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) has been adopted to predict FOS of the slope. In ANN, a three layer, feed- forward back-propagation neural network with one input layer and one hidden layer with three neurons and one output layer has been considered and trained using datasets generated from numerical analysis of the slope and validated with new set of field slope data. Mean absolute percentage error estimated as 1.04 with coefficient of correlation between the FOS of FEM and ANN as 0.973, which indicates that the system is very vigorous and fast to predict FOS for any slope.

  13. [Analysis of related factors of slope plant hyperspectral remote sensing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Qi; Zhao, Yun-Sheng; Tu, Lin-Ling

    2014-09-01

    In the present paper, the slope gradient, aspect, detection zenith angle and plant types were analyzed. In order to strengthen the theoretical discussion, the research was under laboratory condition, and modeled uniform slope for slope plant. Through experiments we found that these factors indeed have influence on plant hyperspectral remote sensing. When choosing slope gradient as the variate, the blade reflection first increases and then decreases as the slope gradient changes from 0° to 36°; When keeping other factors constant, and only detection zenith angle increasing from 0° to 60°, the spectral characteristic of slope plants do not change significantly in visible light band, but decreases gradually in near infrared band; With only slope aspect changing, when the dome meets the light direction, the blade reflectance gets maximum, and when the dome meets the backlit direction, the blade reflectance gets minimum, furthermore, setting the line of vertical intersection of incidence plane and the dome as an axis, the reflectance on the axis's both sides shows symmetric distribution; In addition, spectral curves of different plant types have a lot differences between each other, which means that the plant types also affect hyperspectral remote sensing results of slope plants. This research breaks through the limitations of the traditional vertical remote sensing data collection and uses the multi-angle and hyperspectral information to analyze spectral characteristics of slope plants. So this research has theoretical significance to the development of quantitative remote sensing, and has application value to the plant remote sensing monitoring.

  14. Climate change influence on the internal structure of talus slopes in the Arctic - A case study from the southern Spitsbergen, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senderak, K.; Kondracka, M.; Gądek, B.

    2017-12-01

    Talus slopes are present in all geographical altitudes, but the most active and dynamic slopes occur in high-mountain and polar areas. Spitsbergen, Norwegian archipelago in the Arctic, combines these two environments, therefore, the talus slopes develop in specific environmental conditions that have changed since the beginning of deglaciation. On Spitsbergen, which is 60% glaciated, talus slope evolution depends frequently on the interaction with glaciers, as well as the size of sediment supply area, the lithology, and the intensive of rock weathering. The warming of climate in the Arctic cause the identifiable changes in the internal structures of talus slopes associated with i.e. the melting of glaciers and the high activity of many morphogenetic processes on slope surface. The identification of these changes is a key to understanding of climate change influence (direct and indirect influence) on talus slope evolution. Our work presents the results of research, mainly based on the measurements using electrical resistivity tomography method (ERT) and ground-penetrating radar method (GPR), which were made on the talus slopes of southern Spitsbergen in the vicinity of Polish Polar Station in Hornsund. The geophysical surveys and geomorphological observations show that the climatic factor plays the significant role in the development of slopes, what is clearly visible when analyzing the whole slope systems in the selected glacial valleys (partly glaciated). The differences in the internal structure can depend on distance from the glacier and age of form. This mainly concerns the volume of buried glacial ice in slope material, the thickness of talus slopes, the depth of permafrost and active layer, the stored sedimentological structures including e.g. the traces of fresh material supply. New data on the internal structure of talus slopes developing in the present glaciated area allow for discussions on the talus slope evolution, which, according to the authors, needs

  15. GPS and GIS study of the western slope of the Chiquihuite hill in Mexico City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martínez–Yáñez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The demographic explosion of the City of Mexico has forced the anarchical growth of urban development in its mountain slopes. The geologic risk conditions that prevail in such areas are rock falls and down slope creep. The topographic slope analysis shows that these some areas pose a high risk condition for the housing developments located down slope. A geodetic net work was thus developed for the establishment of a reference frame to detect medium and long term slope movement. The location of these benchmarks included rock out crops, structural containment civil structures and street sidewalks. This network was designed to be occupied using GPS fast static methods, with times of occupation no greater to 45 minutes per station. In order to keep short baselines to the reference station and its position errors within low levels we installed a reference GPS site (U CHI on the Southern part of Cerro del Chiquihuite. The Chiquihuite GPS network was monitored for 5 years. The GPS solutions were obtained by differential techniques with ambiguity solution and precise or bits, and using UCHI stations as a reference. The Chiquihuite GPS network does not show significant variations, except for the vertical component at station CH55. This site is likely to be affected by regional subsidence.

  16. Relict slope rings and talus flatirons in the Colorado Piedmont: Origin, chronology and paleoenvironmental implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Francisco; Morgan, Matthew L.; Matthews, Vincent; Gutiérrez, Mateo; Jiménez-Moreno, Gonzalo

    2015-02-01

    In the Colorado Piedmont, talus flatiron chronosequences are associated with buttes that consist of erodible arkosic sandstone and resistant caprock. Following the removal of the caprock, some buttes evolve into crater-like relict slope rings resulting from the differential erosion of the soft bedrock in the core of the hills. These unique landforms are only documented in the Colorado Piedmont. Their development is attributed to the unusually high erodibility contrast between the low-cohesion sandy bedrock and the bouldery colluvial armor. The talus flatiron sequences and relict slope rings mapped in the three studied areas record alternating periods of accumulation and incision in the slopes that are likely controlled by changes in moisture availability and vegetation cover density. The obtained OSL dates place slope accumulation phases at > 124 ka, and ca. 73 ka, 50-40 ka, 15 ka, and 10-6 ka. A comparison of these geochronological data with paleoclimatic records from the region suggests that colluvium deposition occurred during periods of denser vegetation cover, which are controlled by climate changes. Further investigations, including additional and more accurate geochrological data from the relict slopes, will help to better understand the paleoclimatic significance of these largely unknown morphostratigraphic features.

  17. Slope Stability Estimation of the Kościuszko Mound in Cracow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrana Bogumił

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the slope stability problem of the Kościuszko Mound in Cracow, Poland is considered. The slope stability analysis was performed using Plaxis FEM program. The outer surface of the mound has complex geometry. The slope of the cone is not uniform in all directions, on the surface of the cone are pedestrian paths. Due to its complicated geometry it was impossible to do computing by Plaxis input pre-procesor. The initial element mesh was generated using Autodesk Autocad 3D and next it was updated by Plaxis program. The soil parameters were adopted in accordance with the detailed geological soil testing performed in 2012. Calculating model includes geogrids. The upper part was covered by MacMat geogrid, while the lower part of the Mound was reinforced using Terramesh Matt geogrid. The slope analysis was performed by successives reduction of φ /c parameters. The total multiplayer ΣMsf is used to define the value of the soil strength parameters. The article presents the results of slope stability before and after the rainfall during 33 days of precipitation in flood of 2010.

  18. Strategies for rock slope failure early warning using acoustic emission monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codeglia, D.; Dixon, N.; Fowmes, G. J.; Marcato, G.

    2015-09-01

    Research over the last two decades has led to development of a system for soil slopes monitoring based on the concept of measuring Acoustic Emission (AE). A feature of the system is the use of waveguides installed within unstable soil slopes. It has been demonstrated that the AE measured through this technique are proportional to soil displacement rate. Attention has now been focused on the prospect of using the system within rock materials. The different nature of the slope material to be monitored and its setting means that different acoustic trends are measured, and development of new approaches for their interpretation are required. A total of six sensors have been installed in two pilot sites, firstly in Italy, for monitoring of a stratified limestone slope which can threaten a nationally important road, and secondly in Austria, for monitoring of a conglomerate slope that can endanger a section of the local railway. In this paper an outline of the two trial sites is given and AE data collected are compared with other physical measurements (i.e. rainfall and temperature) and traditional geotechnical instrumentation, to give an overview of recurring AE trends. These include clear AE signatures generated by stress changes linked to increased ground water levels and high energy events generated by freeze-thaw of the rock mass.

  19. Seismic Bearing Capacity of Strip Footings on Pile-Stabilized Slopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Haghbin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops an analytical method to calculate seismic bearing capacity of a strip footing, which is located on a slope reinforced with rows of pile. The resistance of passive pile is determined based on normal and shear stress of the soil around the pile, which is then compared to other analytical methods. This comparison indicates an acceptable agreement. The variants of the study include location of pile rows, location of footing with respect to the slope crest, foundation depth, and horizontal seismic coefficient. The footing seismic bearing capacity is calculated based on seismic slope stability with limit analysis method (yield acceleration coefficient of reinforced slope with pile row as well as soil stability beneath the footing by means of virtual retaining wall method. The main objective is to determine and establish the relation between various parameters and seismic bearing capacities of the footing, and to find the best location of the pile row that gives the best improvement in the footing seismic bearing capacity. Results indicate that stabilizing the earth slope with rows of piles has a significant effect on the improvement of seismic bearing capacity of the footing. In addition, the results of the present method are compared with those, reported by others, to demonstrate a reasonable agreement.

  20. Evidence of rock slope breathing using ground-based InSAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouyet, Line; Kristensen, Lene; Derron, Marc-Henri; Michoud, Clément; Blikra, Lars Harald; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Lauknes, Tom Rune

    2017-07-01

    Ground-Based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (GB-InSAR) campaigns were performed in summer 2011 and 2012 in the Romsdalen valley (Møre & Romsdal county, western Norway) in order to assess displacements on Mannen/Børa rock slope. Located 1 km northwest, a second GB-InSAR system continuously monitors the large Mannen rockslide. The availability of two GB-InSAR positions creates a wide coverage of the rock slope, including a slight dataset overlap valuable for validation. A phenomenon of rock slope breathing is detected in a remote and hard-to-access area in mid-slope. Millimetric upward displacements are recorded in August 2011. Analysis of 2012 GB-InSAR campaign, combined with the large dataset from the continuous station, shows that the slope is affected by inflation/deflation phenomenon between 5 and 10 mm along the line-of-sight. The pattern is not homogenous in time and inversions of movement have a seasonal recurrence. These seasonal changes are confirmed by satellite InSAR observations and can possibly be caused by hydrogeological variations. In addition, combination of GB-InSAR results, in situ measurements and satellite InSAR analyses contributes to a better overview of movement distribution over the whole area.

  1. Slope Stability Estimation of the Kościuszko Mound in Cracow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrana, Bogumił; Pietrzak, Natalia

    2015-06-01

    In the paper, the slope stability problem of the Kościuszko Mound in Cracow, Poland is considered. The slope stability analysis was performed using Plaxis FEM program. The outer surface of the mound has complex geometry. The slope of the cone is not uniform in all directions, on the surface of the cone are pedestrian paths. Due to its complicated geometry it was impossible to do computing by Plaxis input pre-procesor. The initial element mesh was generated using Autodesk Autocad 3D and next it was updated by Plaxis program. The soil parameters were adopted in accordance with the detailed geological soil testing performed in 2012. Calculating model includes geogrids. The upper part was covered by MacMat geogrid, while the lower part of the Mound was reinforced using Terramesh Matt geogrid. The slope analysis was performed by successives reduction of φ /c parameters. The total multiplayer ΣMsf is used to define the value of the soil strength parameters. The article presents the results of slope stability before and after the rainfall during 33 days of precipitation in flood of 2010.

  2. Nitrogen isotopic composition of plants and soil in an arid mountainous terrain: south slope versus north slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen cycling is tightly associated with environment. The south slope of a given mountain could significantly differ from north slope in environment. Thus, N cycling should also be different between the two slopes. Since leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and Δδ15Nleaf-soil (Δδ15Nleaf-soil =  leaf δ15N − soil δ15N could reflect the N cycling characteristics, we put forward a hypothesis that leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and Δδ15Nleaf-soil should differ between the two slopes. However, such a comparative study between two slopes has never been conducted. In addition, environmental effects on leaf and soil δ15N derived from studies at global scale were often found to be different from those on a regional scale. This led to our argument that environmental effects on leaf and soil δ15N could depend on local environment. To confirm our hypothesis and argument, we measured leaf and soil δ15N on the south and north slopes of Tian Shan. Remarkable environmental differences between the two slopes provided an ideal opportunity for our test. The study showed that leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and δ15Nleaf-soil on the south slope were greater than those on the north slope, although the difference in soil δ15N was not significant. The result confirmed our hypothesis and suggested that the south slope has higher soil N transformation rates and soil N availability than the north slope. In addition, in this study it was observed that the significant influential factors of leaf δ15N were temperature, precipitation, leaf N, leaf C ∕ N, soil moisture and silt ∕ clay ratio on the north slope, whereas on the south slope only leaf C ∕ N was related to leaf δ15N. The significant influential factors of soil δ15N were temperature, precipitation, soil moisture and silt ∕ clay ratio on the north slope, whereas on the south slope, mean annual precipitation and soil moisture exerted significant effects. Precipitation exerted contrary effects on soil

  3. IMPROVED LARGE-SCALE SLOPE ANALYSIS ON MARS BASED ON CORRELATION OF SLOPES DERIVED WITH DIFFERENT BASELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The surface slopes of planetary bodies are important factors for exploration missions, such as landing site selection and rover manoeuvre. Generally, high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs such as those generated from the HiRISE images on Mars are preferred to generate detailed slopes with a better fidelity of terrain features. Unfortunately, high-resolution datasets normally only cover small area and are not always available. While lower resolution datasets, such as MOLA, provide global coverage of the Martian surface. Slopes generated from the low-resolution DEM will be based on a large baseline and be smoothed from the real situation. In order to carry out slope analysis at large scale on Martian surface based low-resolution data such as MOLA data, while alleviating the smoothness problem of slopes due to its low resolution, this paper presents an amplifying function of slopes derived from low-resolution DEMs based on the relationships between DEM resolutions and slopes. First, slope maps are derived from the HiRISE DEM (meter-level resolution DEM generated from HiRISE images and a series of down-sampled HiRISE DEMs. The latter are used to simulate low-resolution DEMs. Then the high-resolution slope map is down- sampled to the same resolution with the slope map from the lower-resolution DEMs. Thus, a comparison can be conducted pixel-wise. For each pixel on the slope map derived from the lower-resolution DEM, it can reach the same value with the down-sampled HiRISE slope by multiplying an amplifying factor. Seven sets of HiRISE images with representative terrain types are used for correlation analysis. It shows that the relationship between the amplifying factors and the original MOLA slopes can be described by the exponential function. Verifications using other datasets show that after applying the proposed amplifying function, the updated slope maps give better representations of slopes on Martian surface compared with the original

  4. Nitrogen isotopic composition of plants and soil in an arid mountainous terrain: south slope versus north slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chongjuan; Jia, Yufu; Chen, Yuzhen; Mehmood, Imran; Fang, Yunting; Wang, Guoan

    2018-01-01

    Nitrogen cycling is tightly associated with environment. The south slope of a given mountain could significantly differ from north slope in environment. Thus, N cycling should also be different between the two slopes. Since leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and Δδ15Nleaf-soil (Δδ15Nleaf-soil = leaf δ15N - soil δ15N) could reflect the N cycling characteristics, we put forward a hypothesis that leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and Δδ15Nleaf-soil should differ between the two slopes. However, such a comparative study between two slopes has never been conducted. In addition, environmental effects on leaf and soil δ15N derived from studies at global scale were often found to be different from those on a regional scale. This led to our argument that environmental effects on leaf and soil δ15N could depend on local environment. To confirm our hypothesis and argument, we measured leaf and soil δ15N on the south and north slopes of Tian Shan. Remarkable environmental differences between the two slopes provided an ideal opportunity for our test. The study showed that leaf δ15N, soil δ15N and δ15Nleaf-soil on the south slope were greater than those on the north slope, although the difference in soil δ15N was not significant. The result confirmed our hypothesis and suggested that the south slope has higher soil N transformation rates and soil N availability than the north slope. In addition, in this study it was observed that the significant influential factors of leaf δ15N were temperature, precipitation, leaf N, leaf C / N, soil moisture and silt / clay ratio on the north slope, whereas on the south slope only leaf C / N was related to leaf δ15N. The significant influential factors of soil δ15N were temperature, precipitation, soil moisture and silt / clay ratio on the north slope, whereas on the south slope, mean annual precipitation and soil moisture exerted significant effects. Precipitation exerted contrary effects on soil δ15N between the two slopes. Thus, this study

  5. The impact of male contraception on dominance hierarchy and herd association patterns of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in a fenced game reserve

    OpenAIRE

    L.S. Doughty; K. Slater; H. Zitzer; Tomos Avent; S. Thompson

    2014-01-01

    Overpopulation of African elephants (Loxodonta africana) in fenced reserves in South Africa is becoming increasingly problematic to wildlife managers. With growing opposition to culling and the high cost of translocation, alternative management strategies focusing on male elephants are being investigated. In this study, hormonal treatment via Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) suppression, and surgical treatment via vasectomy were trialled. Focusing on behavioural responses, we tested the ...

  6. Degradation of terraced slopes in Mediterranean conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsermegas, I.; DłuŻewski, M.; Biejat, K.; Szynkiewicz, A.

    2012-04-01

    Agricultural terraces with dry-stone walls take the largest area of all man-made landforms in Mediterranean mountain regions. Despite on that their contemporary morphodynamics have not been the subject of many studies. It is a significant problem both from a scientific and a practical point of view. The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of relief, lithology, climatic conditions, methods of wall construction and actual agricultural practice on the degradation of agricultural terraces. A field study was conducted in Greece on 7 plots with the overall area of over 42 000 m2 - on the east Crete and on two Aegean islands - Ikaria and Thera. The analysis was conducted on terraced slopes with gradient of 8-23o, built of granitoids, gneisses, crystalline schists, limestones, crystalline dolomites and volcanic tuffs. There was identified the types of terrace walls. Metrical features of terrace systems were ascertained on the basis of GPS RTK measurement. Terrace material petrography and grain size distribution was identified for regolith an soil samples taken from the selected outcrops which were recognized as being representative for 239 georadar profiles of the joint length of over 2500 m. On that basis the volume of each terrace material was defined. The rills cutting the fields and the walls were measured. The infiltration rate was also taken in 130 points. Reasearch showed that regardless of metrical features of terraces, soil grain size distribution and thickness of the terrace material, the most important reason for the destruction of terrace walls is the abandonment of cultivated areas. Changes in cultivation methods and the introduction of pasturage visibly accelerate the degradation processes. On areas unused for 30 years terrace walls are destroyed on over 25% of their length. It concerns both the areas on which filtration coefficient (k) reaches about 10-5m•s-1 as well as the ones where it is a 100 times lower. The least varied values (10-6-10-5m

  7. Dead space and slope indices from the expiratory carbon dioxide tension-volume curve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Kars (Alice); J.M. Bogaard (Jan); Th. Stijnen (Theo); J. de Vries; A.F.M. Verbraak (Anton); C. Hilvering

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe slope of phase 3 and three noninvasively determined dead space estimates derived from the expiratory carbon dioxide tension (PCO2) versus volume curve, including the Bohr dead space (VD,Bohr), the Fowler dead space (VD,Fowler) and pre-interface expirate

  8. Water availability for winter wheat affected by summer fallow tillage practices in sloping dryland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, X.B.; Cai, D.X.; Jin, K.; Wu, H.J.; Bai, Z.G.; Zhang, C.J.; Yao, Y.Q.; Lu, J.J.; Wang, Y.H.; Yang, B.; Hartman, R.; Gabriels, D.

    2003-01-01

    The tillage experiments for winter wheat were conducted on the slope farmland in Luoyang,Henan Province in the semihumid to arid loess plateau areas of North China. Different tillage methods inclu-ding reduced tillage (RT), no-till (NT), 2 crops/year (2C), subsoiling(SS), and conventional tillage

  9. Ecological types of the eastern slope of the Wind River Range, Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron F. Wells; Janis L. Boettinger; Kent E. Houston; David W. Roberts

    2015-01-01

    This guide presents a classification of the Ecological Types of the eastern slope of the Wind River Range (WRR) on the Shoshone National Forest in west-central Wyoming. Ecological Types integrate vegetation and environmental characteristics, including climate, geology, landform, and soils, into a comprehensive ecosystem classification. The three objectives are: (1)...

  10. Slope stability problems associated with timber harvesting in mountainous regions of the western United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.N. Swanston

    1974-01-01

    Natural soil-mass-movements on forested slopes in the Western United States can be divided into two major groups of closely related landslide types. These include, in order of decreasing importance and regional frequency of occurrence: (1) debris slides, debris avalanches, debris flows, and debris torrents; and (2) creep, slumps, and earth flows. Each type requires the...

  11. Fire behavior, weather, and burn severity of the 2007 Anaktuvuk River tundra fire, North Slope, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin M. Jones; Crystal A. Kolden; Randi Jandt; John T. Abatzoglu; Frank Urban; Christopher D. Arp

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the Anaktuvuk River Fire (ARF) became the largest recorded tundra fire on the North Slope of Alaska. The ARF burned for nearly three months, consuming more than 100,000 ha. At its peak in early September, the ARF burned at a rate of 7000 ha d-1. The conditions potentially responsible for this large tundra fire include modeled record high...

  12. Effects of Rainfall Intensity and Slope Angle on Splash Erosion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences ... Soil erosion is a critical global environmental problem, especially in the developing countries including Nigeria. In the humid and ... Factors of slope angle, rainfall amount, and intensity, and total kinetic energy were regressed against directional components of splash.

  13. "A Comparison of Several Methods in a Rock Slope Stability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This researchuses the mentioned methods and principles in the stability analysis of some rock slopes in an open pit mine in Syria, that is Khneifees phosphate mine. The importance of this researchis that it shows the role of kinematical analysis in minimizing efforts when verifying the safety of rock slopes in site, and when ...

  14. After the Slippery Slope: Dutch Experiences on Regulating Active Euthanasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Th.A.

    2003-01-01

    “When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward.” If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery-slope argument, however, is by

  15. assessment of slope stability around gilgel gibe-ii hydroelectric

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    ... are steep and valleys are deep with low vegetation cover. Along the road from Fofa town to powerhouse II, the slope cuts are steep, which overhang at places. Thus, an attempt has been made to analyze the stability condition of potential unstable slopes along the road between Fofa town and Gilgel-Gibe Hydro- power II.

  16. Preliminary Analysis of Slope Stability in Kuok and Surrounding Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewandra Bagus Eka Putra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The level of slope influenced by the condition of the rocks beneath the surface. On high level of slopes, amount of surface runoff and water transport energy is also enlarged. This caused by greater gravity, in line with the surface tilt from the horizontal plane. In other words, topsoil eroded more and more. When the slope becomes twice as steep, then the amount of erosion per unit area be 2.0 - 2.5 times more. Kuok and surrounding area is the road access between the West Sumatra and Riau which plays an important role economies of both provinces. The purpose of this study is to map the locations that have fairly steep slopes and potential mode of landslides. Based on SRTM data obtained,  the roads in Kuok area has a minimum elevation of + 33 m and a maximum  + 217.329 m. Rugged road conditions with slope ranging from 24.08 ° to 44.68 ° causing this area having frequent landslides. The result of slope stability analysis in a slope near the Water Power Plant Koto Panjang, indicated that mode of active failure is toppling failure or rock fall and the potential zone of failure is in the center part of the slope.

  17. RMS slope of exponentially correlated surface roughness for radar applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dierking, Wolfgang

    2000-01-01

    In radar signature analysis, the root mean square (RMS) surface slope is utilized to assess the relative contribution of multiple scattering effects. For an exponentially correlated surface, an effective RMS slope can be determined by truncating the high frequency tail of the roughness spectrum...

  18. Slope Monitoring using Total Station: What are the Challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... survey perspective on the typical problems that can be expected during slope monitoring using total station (also known as prism monitoring) and second, to suggest ways of mitigating such problems. The aim is to create awareness of the implications of incorrect use or negligence during slope monitoring surveys utilising ...

  19. Effects of slope position and fertilization on the performance of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FARO 45 (ITA 257) early maturing upland variety of rice was used as the test crop at each slope level. The experiment was a 3 x 2 factorial combination of three slopes (upper, middle and hydromorphic fringe) and two fertilizations (without fertilizer and with fertilizer) in a Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD), ...

  20. Assessment of slope stability and remedial measures around Gilgel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (1995) technique, whereas the slope having wedge mode of failure was analyzed by 'SASW' computer program. The stability analysis was carried out for the existing and anticipated worst conditions. The results indicate that all critical slopes in the study area are stable for the existing conditions, represented by dry static ...

  1. Assessment of rock mass decay in artificial slopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, M.

    2006-01-01

    This research investigates the decay of rock masses underlying slopes, and seeks to quantify the relations of such decay with time and geotechnical parameters of the slope and rock mass. Decay can greatly affect the geotechnical properties of rocks within engineering timescales, and may induce a

  2. Analysis of Covariance and Randomized Block Design with Heterogeneous Slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockars, Alan J.; Beretvas, S. Natasha

    2001-01-01

    Compared the Type I error rate and the power to detect differences in slopes and additive treatment effects of analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) and randomized block designs through a Monte Carlo simulation. Results show that the more powerful option in almost all simulations for tests of both slope and means was ANCOVA. (SLD)

  3. Slope Monitoring using Total Station: What are the Challenges and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Afeni

    implications of incorrect use or negligence during slope monitoring surveys utilising a total station. 1. Introduction ... monitoring frequency depends on the nature of the rock type, operations around the slope and the objectives of ... to do with correct design, legal compliance, monitoring requirements and systems design that.

  4. Tsunami-hazard assessment based on subaquatic slope-failure susceptibility and tsunami-inundation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmetti, Flavio; Hilbe, Michael; Strupler, Michael; Baumgartner, Christoph; Bolz, Markus; Braschler, Urs; Eberli, Josef; Liniger, Markus; Scheiwiller, Peter; Strasser, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Due to their smaller dimensions and confined bathymetry, lakes act as model oceans that may be used as analogues for the much larger oceans and their margins. Numerous studies in the perialpine lakes of Central Europe have shown that their shores were repeatedly struck by several-meters-high tsunami waves, which were caused by subaquatic slides usually triggered by earthquake shaking. A profound knowledge of these hazards, their intensities and recurrence rates is needed in order to perform thorough tsunami-hazard assessment for the usually densely populated lake shores. In this context, we present results of a study combining i) basinwide slope-stability analysis of subaquatic sediment-charged slopes with ii) identification of scenarios for subaquatic slides triggered by seismic shaking, iii) forward modeling of resulting tsunami waves and iv) mapping of intensity of onshore inundation in populated areas. Sedimentological, stratigraphical and geotechnical knowledge of the potentially unstable sediment drape on the slopes is required for slope-stability assessment. Together with critical ground accelerations calculated from already failed slopes and paleoseismic recurrence rates, scenarios for subaquatic sediment slides are established. Following a previously used approach, the slides are modeled as a Bingham plastic on a 2D grid. The effect on the water column and wave propagation are simulated using the shallow-water equations (GeoClaw code), which also provide data for tsunami inundation, including flow depth, flow velocity and momentum as key variables. Combining these parameters leads to so called «intensity maps» for flooding that provide a link to the established hazard mapping framework, which so far does not include these phenomena. The current versions of these maps consider a 'worst case' deterministic earthquake scenario, however, similar maps can be calculated using probabilistic earthquake recurrence rates, which are expressed in variable amounts of

  5. REMINDER: Compliance with Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 1) on “Conditions of access to the fenced CERN site”

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 1) is to contribute to the protection of people and property by defining the conditions of access to the Organization's fenced sites. The behaviours that cannot be tolerated under any circumstances are: use of CERN access cards by people, other than the cardholders themselves, in order to gain access to facilities without having attended the required safety course; speeding, particularly on Route Gregory and Route Weisskopf; driving in and out of the site on the wrong side of the road; parking on spaces set aside for the disabled; nuisance parking, especially in the proximity of the restaurants; dumping of wrecked vehicles. As the aforementioned instances of non-compliance can lead to dangerous situations, the Organization reserves the right to apply the penalties provided for under paragraph 26 of Operational Circular No. 2 (Rev. 1), namely to refuse access to the site to people and/or their vehicles deemed to be in infringement of the circu...

  6. Variation of oxo-transfer reactivity of (nitro)cobalt picket fence porphyrin with oxygen-donating ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, John; Kurtikyan, Tigran; Standard, Jean; Walsh, Rosa; Zheng, Bin; Parmley, Diedre; Howard, James; Green, Shaun; Mardyukov, Arthur; Przybyla, David E

    2005-04-04

    Derivatives of (nitro)cobalt picket fence porphyrin with oxygen-donating ligands have been prepared in solution and in the solid state. Crystal structures of two of these derivatives, (H2O)CoTpivPP(NO2) and (CH3OH)CoTpivPP(NO2), have been determined. The ethanol complex (C2H5OH)Co(TPP)(NO2) has been obtained and spectrally characterized using sublimed layers methodology. The formation constant and the DeltaH degrees value of the association reaction with ethanol have been determined by FTIR measurements in CCl4 solution. Catalytic oxygen activation and oxo-transfer reactions of these derivatives have been assessed in solution. Correlations between the oxo-transfer reactivity, thermodynamics, and characteristics of the nitro ligand show that although calculated and observed ONO vibrational spectra and bond lengths suggest activation of the NO2 ligand and enhanced oxo-transfer reactions as seen in the analogous five-coordinate complexes, density functional theory calculations support that thermodynamics limits oxo-atom transfer reactions in these six-coordinate systems.

  7. Durability of template-free Fe-N-C foams for electrochemical oxygen reduction in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mufundirwa, Albert; Harrington, George F.; Smid, Břetislav; Cunning, Benjamin V.; Sasaki, Kazunari; Lyth, Stephen M.

    2018-01-01

    Due to the high cost and limited availability of platinum, the development of non-platinum-group metals (non-PGM) catalysts is of paramount importance. A promising alternative to Pt are Fe-N-C-based materials. Here we present the synthesis, characterization and electrochemistry of a template-free nitrogen-doped carbon foam, impregnated with iron. This low-cost and gram-scale method results in materials with micron-scale pore size and large surface area (1600 m2g-1). When applied as an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalyst in alkaline solution, the Fe-N-C foams display extremely high initial activity, slightly out-performing commercially available non-PGM catalysts (NCP-2000, Pajarito Powder). The load-cycle durability in alkaline solution is investigated, and the performance steadily degrades over 60,000 potential cycles, whilst the commercial catalyst is remarkably stable. The post-operation catalyst microstructure is elucidated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to provide insight into the degradation processes. The resulting images suggest that potential cycling leads to leaching of atomically dispersed Fe-N2/4 sites in all the catalysts, whereas encapsulated iron nanoparticles are protected.

  8. US North Slope gas and Asian LNG markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasi, E.D.

    1994-01-01

    Prospects for export of liquified natural gas (LNG) from Alaska's North Slope are assessed. Projected market conditions to 2010 show that new LNG capacity beyond announced expansions will be needed to meet regional demand and that supplies will probably come from outside the region. The estimated delivered costs of likely suppliers show that Alaska North Slope gas will not be competitive. The alternative North Slope gas development strategies of transport and sale to the lower 48 states and use on the North Slope for either enhanced oil recovery or conversion to liquids are examined. The alternative options require delaying development until US gas prices increase, exhaustion of certain North Slope oil fields, or advances occur in gas to liquid fuels conversion technology. ?? 1995.

  9. Determination Of Slope Instability Using Spatially Integrated Mapping Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharuddin, I. N. Z.; Omar, R. C.; Roslan, R.; Khalid, N. H. N.; Hanifah, M. I. M.

    2016-11-01

    The determination and identification of slope instability are often rely on data obtained from in-situ soil investigation work where it involves the logistic of machineries and manpower, thus these aspects may increase the cost especially for remote locations. Therefore a method, which is able to identify possible slope instability without frequent ground walkabout survey, is needed. This paper presents the method used in prediction of slope instability using spatial integrated mapping framework which applicable for remote areas such as tropical forest and natural hilly terrain. Spatial data such as geology, topography, land use map, slope angle and elevation were used in regional analysis during desktop study. Through this framework, the occurrence of slope instability was able to be identified and was validate using a confirmatory site- specific analysis.

  10. [Trunk sap flow dynamic changes in response to the slopes of plantation of Toona ciliata var. pubescens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Chen, Wen-Rong; Xu, Jin-Liang; Zou, Jun; Jiang, Jing-Min; Li, Yan-Jie; Diao, Song-Feng

    2014-08-01

    The sap flow and environmental factors, including temperature, water content and water potential of soil, were continuously measured by using an auto-data collection system at the upper and lower slopes of Toona ciliata var. pubescens plantation in July to October, 2012 to investigate the relationships between the sap flow and environmental factors. The results showed that, the trunk sap flow velocity of the two positions both presented a typical single-peak curve, with high values in the daytime and low values in the nighttime. The average sap flow of the lower slope was significantly higher than that of the upper slope. Soil temperature of the upper slope was significantly higher than that of the lower slope, and soil water content and water potential were vice versa. Soil water content and water potential were the leading environmental factors affecting the trunk sap flow velocity at the lower slope, while soil temperature and water potential were the main environmental factors at the upper slope.

  11. Slope mass rating and kinematic analysis of slopes along the national highway-58 near Jonk, Rishikesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Siddique

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The road network in the Himalayan terrain, connecting remote areas either in the valleys or on the hill slopes, plays a pivotal role in socio-economic development of India. The planning, development and even maintenance of road and rail networks in such precarious terrains are always a challenging task because of complexities posed by topography, geological structures, varied lithology and neotectonics. Increasing population and construction of roads have led to destabilisation of slopes, thus leading to mass wasting and movement, further aggravation due to recent events of cloud bursts and unprecedented flash floods. Vulnerability analysis of slopes is an important component for the “Landslide Hazard Assessment” and “Slope Mass Characterisation” guide planners to predict and choose suitable ways for construction of roads and other engineering structures. The problem of landslides along the national highway-58 (NH-58 from Rishikesh to Devprayag is a common scene. The slopes along the NH-58 between Jonk and Rishikesh were investigated, which experienced very heavy traffic especially from March to August due to pilgrimage to Kedarnath shrine. On the basis of slope mass rating (SMR investigation, the area falls in stable class, and landslide susceptibility score (LSS values also indicate that the slopes under investigation fall in low to moderate vulnerability to landslide. More attentions should be paid to the slopes to achieve greater safe and economic benefits along the highway.

  12. Effect of slope height and horizontal forces on the bearing capacity of strip footings near slopes in cohesionless soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Sven; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    The problem of determining the bearing capacity of a strip foundation located near a slope of infinite height has been dealt with by several authors. Very often in practical problems the slope is of limited height, and furthermore the resulting load may be inclined at an angle to the horizontal, ...

  13. Are Icelandic rock-slope failures paraglacial? Age evaluation of seventeen rock-slope failures in the Skagafjörður area, based on geomorphological stacking, radiocarbon dating and tephrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Denis; Coquin, Julien; Feuillet, Thierry; Decaulne, Armelle; Cossart, Etienne; Jónsson, Helgi Pall; Sæmundsson, Þorstein

    2017-11-01

    In Iceland there are numerous rock-slope failures, especially in the Tertiary basaltic formations of the northern, eastern and northwestern regions. The temporal pattern of rock-slope failures is fundamental for understanding post-glacial events. In the Skagafjörður district, central northern Iceland, 17 rock-slope failures were investigated to determine the age of their occurrence. A geomorphic survey was carried out to identify and characterize landform units, both on the rock-slope failures and in their immediate vicinity. In this coastal area, we used geomorphological stacking which included the relationship between rock-slope failures and raised beaches caused by glacial isostatic rebounds, the chronology of which was established in previous studies. We searched for depressions on the rock-slope failures to then excavate a series of pits and map the stratigraphy. The resulting stratigraphic framework was then validated using (i) radiocarbon dating of wood remains, and (ii) tephrochronology, both of which were complemented by age-depth model calibration. The results confirm that all the rock-slope failures potentially occurred before the Boreal (8 ka), while 94% occurred before the Preboreal (10 ka). They all potentially occurred after the glacial retreat following the maximal ice extent and the Preboreal. More precisely, 11 of them potentially occurred between the Preboreal and the first half of the Holocene. This study demonstrates the relationship between the deglaciation and destabilization of slopes during the paraglacial phase (debuttressing, decompression, glacial isostatic rebound, seismic activity, etc.), which are also controlling factors favouring landsliding, but are difficult to identify for each individual rock-slope failure.

  14. Slope stability and rockfall assessment of volcanic tuffs using RPAS with 2-D FEM slope modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, Ákos; Barsi, Árpád; Bögöly, Gyula; Lovas, Tamás; Somogyi, Árpád; Görög, Péter

    2018-02-01

    Steep, hardly accessible cliffs of rhyolite tuff in NE Hungary are prone to rockfalls, endangering visitors of a castle. Remote sensing techniques were employed to obtain data on terrain morphology and to provide slope geometry for assessing the stability of these rock walls. A RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System) was used to collect images which were processed by Pix4D mapper (structure from motion technology) to generate a point cloud and mesh. The georeferencing was made by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) with the use of seven ground control points. The obtained digital surface model (DSM) was processed (vegetation removal) and the derived digital terrain model (DTM) allowed cross sections to be drawn and a joint system to be detected. Joint and discontinuity system was also verified by field measurements. On-site tests as well as laboratory tests provided additional engineering geological data for slope modelling. Stability of cliffs was assessed by 2-D FEM (finite element method). Global analyses of cross sections show that weak intercalating tuff layers may serve as potential slip surfaces. However, at present the greatest hazard is related to planar failure along ENE-WSW joints and to wedge failure. The paper demonstrates that RPAS is a rapid and useful tool for generating a reliable terrain model of hardly accessible cliff faces. It also emphasizes the efficiency of RPAS in rockfall hazard assessment in comparison with other remote sensing techniques such as terrestrial laser scanning (TLS).

  15. Slope stability and rockfall assessment of volcanic tuffs using RPAS with 2-D FEM slope modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Á. Török

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Steep, hardly accessible cliffs of rhyolite tuff in NE Hungary are prone to rockfalls, endangering visitors of a castle. Remote sensing techniques were employed to obtain data on terrain morphology and to provide slope geometry for assessing the stability of these rock walls. A RPAS (Remotely Piloted Aircraft System was used to collect images which were processed by Pix4D mapper (structure from motion technology to generate a point cloud and mesh. The georeferencing was made by Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS with the use of seven ground control points. The obtained digital surface model (DSM was processed (vegetation removal and the derived digital terrain model (DTM allowed cross sections to be drawn and a joint system to be detected. Joint and discontinuity system was also verified by field measurements. On-site tests as well as laboratory tests provided additional engineering geological data for slope modelling. Stability of cliffs was assessed by 2-D FEM (finite element method. Global analyses of cross sections show that weak intercalating tuff layers may serve as potential slip surfaces. However, at present the greatest hazard is related to planar failure along ENE–WSW joints and to wedge failure. The paper demonstrates that RPAS is a rapid and useful tool for generating a reliable terrain model of hardly accessible cliff faces. It also emphasizes the efficiency of RPAS in rockfall hazard assessment in comparison with other remote sensing techniques such as terrestrial laser scanning (TLS.

  16. Small-Maturity Asymptotics for the At-The-Money Implied Volatility Slope in Lévy Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Stefan; Gülüm, I Cetin; Pinter, Arpad

    2016-03-03

    We consider the at-the-money (ATM) strike derivative of implied volatility as the maturity tends to zero. Our main results quantify the behaviour of the slope for infinite activity exponential Lévy models including a Brownian component. As auxiliary results, we obtain asymptotic expansions of short maturity ATM digital call options, using Mellin transform asymptotics. Finally, we discuss when the ATM slope is consistent with the steepness of the smile wings, as given by Lee's moment formula.

  17. Constructing development and integrated coastal zone management in the conditions of the landslide slopes of Cheboksary water reservoir (Volga River)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonorova, I. V.

    2018-01-01

    Uncontrolled construction and insufficient accounting of engineering-geological and hydro-geological conditions of the coastal zone, intensified technogenic impact on sloping surfaces and active urbanization led to the emergence of serious problems and emergency situations on the coasts of many Volga reservoirs, including the Cheboksary reservoir, within Cheboksary urban district and adjacent territories of Chuvashia. This article is devoted to substantiation of the possibility of rational construction development of landslide slopes of the Cheboksary water reservoir.

  18. Research of geotechnical properties of slope covers from Jamne and Jaszcze stream valleys in Gorce Mts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tymoteusz Adam Zydroń

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The test results pertaining to geotechnical parameters of slope covers from valleys of two mountainous streams from Gorce Mts. are presented in the paper. The tests were carried out in the context of slope stability estimation of the analyzed watersheds. The field studies included determination of basic physical properties of soil at several sites within the studied area, laboratory tests involved determination of particle size distribution, consistency limits, permeability coefficients and shear strengths, which were carried out at direct shear box and CIU tests in triaxial apparatus. The test results revealed that the tested slope covers can be described as coarse-grained soils with low content of clay fraction, characterized by low plasticity. The values of the internal friction angle of the average bad land were high and ranged from 28 to 38 degrees, whereas cohesion varied from 0 to 7 kPa. Generally, the higher values of angle of internal friction and lower cohesion were obtained from triaxial tests. The values of permeability coefficients determined using the infiltration method allow to characterize tested soils as a semi-permeable medium. The stability calculations using the SINMAP model have shown that a significant part of the analyzed area is prone to mass movements, giving a more conservative assessment of landslide vulnerability than the results of the SOPO report. The probabilistic slope stability calculation results indicate that the likelihood of slope failure increases significantly on the slopes with the inclination exceeding 20 degrees, and the results of the calculations providing a more detailed information of the mass movements susceptibility of the area than were obtained using the SINMAP model.

  19. DETECTION OF SLOPE MOVEMENT BY COMPARING POINT CLOUDS CREATED BY SFM SOFTWARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Oda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes movement detection method between point clouds created by SFM software, without setting any onsite georeferenced points. SfM software, like Smart3DCaputure, PhotoScan, and Pix4D, are convenient for non-professional operator of photogrammetry, because these systems require simply specification of sequence of photos and output point clouds with colour index which corresponds to the colour of original image pixel where the point is projected. SfM software can execute aerial triangulation and create dense point clouds fully automatically. This is useful when monitoring motion of unstable slopes, or loos rocks in slopes along roads or railroads. Most of existing method, however, uses mesh-based DSM for comparing point clouds before/after movement and it cannot be applied in such cases that part of slopes forms overhangs. And in some cases movement is smaller than precision of ground control points and registering two point clouds with GCP is not appropriate. Change detection method in this paper adopts CCICP (Classification and Combined ICP algorithm for registering point clouds before / after movement. The CCICP algorithm is a type of ICP (Iterative Closest Points which minimizes point-to-plane, and point-to-point distances, simultaneously, and also reject incorrect correspondences based on point classification by PCA (Principle Component Analysis. Precision test shows that CCICP method can register two point clouds up to the 1 pixel size order in original images. Ground control points set in site are useful for initial setting of two point clouds. If there are no GCPs in site of slopes, initial setting is achieved by measuring feature points as ground control points in the point clouds before movement, and creating point clouds after movement with these ground control points. When the motion is rigid transformation, in case that a loose Rock is moving in slope, motion including rotation can be analysed by executing CCICP for a

  20. Slope processes and related risk appearance within the Icelandic Westfjords during the twentieth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Decaulne

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In North-western Iceland, records of slope processes were increasing during the twentieth century. Few dramatic events during the last decades highlighted the danger due to slope dynamics, leaving local populations in a risk situation that was merely unknown before 1970. The recent snow-avalanche, debris-flow and rock-fall activity underlined that the most frequent processes are not these with the largest human impact. In fact, the most catastrophic events were the extreme ones, following directly from a low frequency and a high magnitude. The purpose of this paper is to draw a parallel history of natural hazard and residence spatial extension, for an accurate understanding of the present-day risk situation, as the population growth markedly increased during the same time. Different quantitative and qualitative methods are applied. Geomorphological investigations locate the main threaten areas, in the path of slope processes release evidences, i.e. suitable slope morphology and/or inherited/actual forms. By a collection of dating data, as historic records and lichenometrical analysis, the frequency of given magnitude events is known. Climatic analysis clarifies the triggering meteorological conditions of slope processes and offers an overview of climate fluctuation during the investigated period; wind speed and direction is critical to hazardous snow-avalanche departure and snowmelt is crucial for debris-flow release. The findings clearly indicate that a combination of spatial expansion of inhabited areas and a lack of slope processes knowledge at the expansion time led to a recent and progressive risk appearance due to snow avalanches (including slush flows, debris flows and rock fall in most towns and villages of North-western Iceland.

  1. Effect of slope and depth on soil chemical properties of a typical alfisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnenne Bassey Anwanane

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Management options proffered with respect to the chemical properties along a toposequence are a key to sustainable crop and soil productivity since nutrient status and soil properties are related to topography of the land area. A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of slope and depth on selected soil chemical properties at the University of Ilorin Teaching and Research Farm in 2013. Three points: upper, middle and bottom slope, along a toposequence with an average distance of 200 m apart were delineated and sampled for soil analysis at depths of 0–30 cm, 30–60 cm and 60–90 cm using core sampler and auger. Soil chemical properties which included pH in water, pH in KCl, electrical conductivity, organic matter, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, exchangeable bases (Ca, Mg, K, Na, exchangeable acidity, effective cation exchange capacity, base saturation, exchangeable sodium percentage and sodium adsorption ratio were determined in the laboratory/ computed afterwards. Data from the analysis were subjected to ANOVA using 2x3 factorial combinations of factors slope and depth - in randomized complete block design (RCBD with five replicates. Results on the effects of slope and soil depth on soil chemical properties showed that soil depth affected all the measured soil chemical properties except exchangeable sodium. The pH (both in water and KCl, electrical conductivity, available phosphorus and exchangeable potassium were not affected by slope. Also, pH, exchangeable magnesium and sodium were not affected by the interaction between the effect of slope and soil depth.

  2. Aeolian Dust Transportation on Fine Days over the Slopes in Mountainous Areas around the Taklimakan Desert, China(ADEC-Aeolian Dust Experiment on Climate Impact-)

    OpenAIRE

    Osamu, ABE; Kenji, KOSUGI; Takeshi, SATO; Shigeto, MOCHIZUKI; Junrong, XU; Mingzhe, LIU; Satoru, YAMAGUCHI; Wenshou, WEI; Snow and Ice Research Group, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention; Snow and Ice Research Group, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention; Snow and Ice Research Group, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention; Snow and Ice Research Group, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention; Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences; Snow and Ice Research Group, National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention

    2005-01-01

    To observe aeolian dust in high mountainous areas, two sets of automatic weather station including visibility meters have been installed on the slopes of the Tianshan Mountains and the Kunlun Mountains. The two observation sites are at a height of about 2500m above sea level, and those slopes face to the Taklimakan Desert. The aeolian dust climbs the slopes with anabatic wind in daytime. Horizontal mass transportation of dust over the slopes on a fine day was estimated using the data set of v...

  3. Martian slope streaks as plausible indicators of transient water activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anshuman; Sam, Lydia; Martín-Torres, F Javier; Zorzano, María-Paz; Fonseca, Ricardo M

    2017-08-01

    Slope streaks have been frequently observed in the equatorial, low thermal inertia and dusty regions of Mars. The reason behind their formation remains unclear with proposed hypotheses for both dry and wet mechanisms. Here, we report an up-to-date distribution and morphometric investigation of Martian slope streaks. We find: (i) a remarkable coexistence of the slope streak distribution with the regions on Mars with high abundances of water-equivalent hydrogen, chlorine, and iron; (ii) favourable thermodynamic conditions for transient deliquescence and brine development in the slope streak regions; (iii) a significant concurrence of slope streak distribution with the regions of enhanced atmospheric water vapour concentration, thus suggestive of a present-day regolith-atmosphere water cycle; and (iv) terrain preferences and flow patterns supporting a wet mechanism for slope streaks. These results suggest a strong local regolith-atmosphere water coupling in the slope streak regions that leads to the formation of these fluidised features. Our conclusions can have profound astrobiological, habitability, environmental, and planetary protection implications.

  4. Soil erosion processes on sloping land using REE tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Zhenzhou; Liu Puling; Yang Mingyi; Lian Zhenlong; Ju Tongjun; Yao Wenyi; Li Mian

    2007-01-01

    Sheet erosion is the main performance in the slope soil erosion process at the primary stage of natural rainfall. For three times of rainfall during experiment, the ratios of sheet erosion to total erosion account for 71%, 48% and 49% respectively, which showed that the sloping erosion was still at the primary stage from sheet erosion to rill erosion. With the rainfall going, the rill erosion amount increase. It showed that soil erosion was changing from sheet erosion to rill erosion. The sources of sediment from different sections of the plot were analyzed, and the results indicated that whatever the sheet erosion changed, the ratio erosion of upper part of surface soil was always lower than 10%. Sheet erosion came mainly from the lower section of surface soil. With the ratios to the amount of total rill erosion changes, the rill erosion amount of each section regularly changes too. The general conclusion is that when the rainfall ends, relative erosion of different slope element to the foot of slope is: 1 meter away accounts for 16%, 2-4 meters away is 6% and 5-9 meters away is 3%. The ratio of rill erosion amount of these three slope element is 5:2:1, which shows the rill erosion amount are mainly from the slope element of 4 meters from the foot of slope. (authors)

  5. Good Fences Make Bad Neighbors--A Community-Oriented Course in Psychology and Criminal Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenwick, David S.

    1978-01-01

    A multidisciplinary undergraduate course in correctional psychology is described, noteworthy features of which include field work experiences in criminal justice agencies, discussions with criminal justice personnel from a variety of disciplines and professions, and in-class role-playing exercises, as well as more traditional coursework. (Author)

  6. Electronic Fences or Free-Range Students? Should Schools Use Internet Filtering Software?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pownell, David; Bailey, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    Discusses whether schools should somehow filter the information available to students via the Internet. Highlights include censorship versus an individual's right to information; fear for children's safety as motivation; filtering legislation; deciding what to block; rating Internet sites; filtering options for schools; and recommendations. (LRW)

  7. 77 FR 12588 - Long Fence & Home, LLLP; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ... Social Security number, date of birth, driver's license number or other state ] identification number or... homeowners can realize by replacing their windows, including the home's geographic location, size, insulation... window of a specific composition in a building having a specific level of insulation in a specific region...

  8. Slope Deformation Prediction Based on Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei JIA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper principally studies the prediction of slope deformation based on Support Vector Machine (SVM. In the prediction process,explore how to reconstruct the phase space. The geological body’s displacement data obtained from chaotic time series are used as SVM’s training samples. Slope displacement caused by multivariable coupling is predicted by means of single variable. Results show that this model is of high fitting accuracy and generalization, and provides reference for deformation prediction in slope engineering.

  9. Experimental Study of Solitary Waves Run-up on Rough Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kang-wei; Wu, Yun-Ta; Hwung, Hwung-Hweng; Yang, Ray-Yeng

    2017-04-01

    Long waves close to the shore caused damage were a crucial issue for coastal engineering community. There is a classic issue of long-wave run-up on smooth beaches, which has been extensively studied in literature, using different research methodologies, but in reality, coastal beaches should have surface roughness instead of being hydraulically smooth. Run-up of roughness effect is rarely discussed. In this study, new experiment has been carried out in a laboratory tank (21m x 0.7m x 0.5m) to investigate the physical process of long-wave on a 1:20 slope. Long-wave is with infinite wavelength and wave period. Solitary-wave is employed to represent the characteristic. There are four slopes including smooth, sandpaper, marble, and carpet, the water depths are 16cm (on marble slope), 15cm, 14cm, 12cm and 10cm. The nonlinearity (H/ho) are from 0.04 to 0.451. Firstly, the run-up of long-wave was observed on different slopes. From the comparison in terms of maximum run-up height (R) with different wave-height-to-water-depth ratios were generally categorized into two groups, marble and carpet slopes led to the similar run-up trend. The run up values were by using image processing method to compare average interval 0.05cm and the point at the maximum run-up to find out the sidewall effect. Also using run-up values describe the roughness effect of the run-up reduction. Secondly, the effect of slope roughness was limited on the free surface elevations. The last result, through using a state-of-the-art measuring technique Bubble Image Velocimetry, which features non-intrusive and image-based measurement, the wave kinematics in the highly aerated region with different roughness slopes due to solitary-wave shoaling, breaking and uprush can be quantitated. In order to observe more detail, the high speed camera is used capture the run-up and rundown process. This study can give a reference to the long-wave run-up at the shoreline. It is hoped that more run-up studies will be

  10. Probabilistic stability evaluation and seismic triggering scenarios of submerged slopes in Lake Zurich (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strupler, M.; Hilbe, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Kopf, A. J.; Fleischmann, T.; Strasser, M.

    2017-06-01

    the assessment of the present slope stability and for a back analysis of past landslides in the study area, both for static and earthquake-triggered scenarios. The results show that the location of failure initiation in the model is consistent with stratigraphic analysis and failure-plane identification from sediment cores. Furthermore, today's sediment-charged slopes are failure-prone, even for a static case. This approach of including an adaptable sediment-mechanical stratigraphy into a limit-equilibrium slope stability analysis may be applied as well to the marine realm.

  11. Comparison of diet consumption, body composition and lipoprotein lipid values of Kuwaiti fencing players with international norms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajji Salman

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No published data is currently available that describes the dietary patterns or physiological profiles of athletes participating on the Kuwaiti national fencing team and its potential impact on health and physical performance. The purpose of this investigation was to: 1 collect baseline data on nutrient intake 2 collect, analyze and report baseline for body composition, plasma lipid and lipoprotein concentrations during the competitive season, 3 compare the results with the international norms, 4 and provide necessary health and nutritional information in order to enhance the athletes' performance and skills. Methods Fifteen national-class fencers 21.5 ± 2.6 years of age participated in this study. Food intake was measured using a 3-day food record. Body composition was estimated using both the BOD POD and Body Mass Index (BMI. Total blood lipid profiles and maximum oxygen consumption was measured for each of the subjects during the competitive season. Results The results of the present study showed significant differences in dietary consumption in comparison with the recommended dietary allowances (RDA. The blood lipids profile and body composition (BMI and % body fat were in normal range in comparison with international norms However, the average VO2 max value was less than the value of the other fencers. Conclusion Due to the results of the research study, a dietary regimen can be designed that would better enhance athletic performance and minimize any health risks associated with nutrition. Percent body fat and BMI will also be categorized for all players. In addition, the plasma blood tests will help to determine if any of the players have an excessive level of lipids or any blood abnormalities. The outcomes of present study will have a direct impact on the players health and therefore their skills and athletic performance.

  12. Thermomechanical forcing of deep rock slope deformation: 2. The Randa rock slope instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gischig, Valentin S.; Moore, Jeffrey R.; Evans, Keith F.; Amann, Florian; Loew, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Deformation monitoring between 2004 and 2011 at the rock slope instability above Randa (Switzerland) has revealed an intriguing seasonal trend. Relative dislocation rates across active fractures increase when near-surface rock temperatures drop in the fall and decrease after snowmelt as temperatures rise. This temporal pattern was observed with different monitoring systems at the ground surface and at depths up to 68 m, and represents the behavior of the entire instability. In this paper, the second of two companion pieces, we interpret this seasonal deformation trend as being controlled by thermomechanical (TM) effects driven by near-surface temperature cycles. While Part 1 of this work demonstrated in a conceptual manner how TM effects can drive deep rock slope deformation and progressive failure, we present here in Part 2 a case study where temperature-controlled deformation trends were observed in a natural setting. A 2D discrete-element numerical model is employed, which allows failure along discontinuities and successfully reproduces the observed kinematics of the Randa instability. By implementing simplified ground surface temperature forcing, model results were able to reproduce the observed deformation pattern, and TM-induced displacement rates and seasonal amplitudes in the model are of the same order of magnitude as measured values. Model results, however, exhibit spatial variation in displacement onset times while field measurements show more synchronous change. Additional heat transfer mechanisms, such as fracture ventilation, likely create deviations from the purely transient-conductive temperature field modeled. We suggest that TM effects are especially important at Randa due to the absence of significant groundwater within the unstable rock mass.

  13. Carbonate slope morphology revealing bank-to-slope sediment transfer in Little Bahama Bank, Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Thierry; Gillet, Hervé; Hanquiez, Vincent; Ducassou, Emmanuelle; Fauquembergue, Kelly; Conesa, Gilles; Principaud, Mélanie; Le Goff, Johan; Ragusa, Jérémy; Bujan, Stephane; Bashah, Sara

    2017-04-01

    New high-quality multibeam data depict the area located between Little Bahama Bank (LBB, Bahamas) and Blake Plateau. The survey details the morphology of a giant 135-km-long canyon, the Great Abaco Canyon (GAC) and its main characteristics. The canyon main axis runs parallel to the margin. The pathway shows several knickpoints and plunge pools. The most important knickpoint is underlined by an abrupt change in slope of the canyon thalweg. The last one leads to the opening towards the Blake Basin. Its morphologic head forms a vast receptacle but does not represent the main source of material at present. The material supplied through the LBB canyon systems does not reach this area which only shows lineaments related to the pathway of the Antilles current and restricted failure scars. Most of the supply comes from the canyon flanks. In the north, tributary canyons drain the contourite deposits forming large flat plateaus above the drowned carbonate platform of the Blake Plateau. In addition, these contourite plateaus are subjected to translational slides moving towards the northern edge of the canyon forming a dissymmetric debris accumulation along the toe of the north canyon edge. Another source of sediment are two large tributaries connecting the GAC directly to the LBB upper slope. Sub bottom profiles suggest the presence of a turbiditic levee on the tributary canyon sides and inferred turbiditic activity. Little Abaco Canyon (LAC) shows morphologic similarities with GAC but at a smaller size. However, the canyon seems more active in terms of sediment transport. Canyons draining the eastern part of LBB show fresh sedimentary structures (sediment waves) suggesting active sedimentary processes. These structures are made of clean sand with shallow water organisms suggesting a direct supply from the carbonate platform edge. In term of size and morphology, the GAC compares to the largest canyons in siliciclastic environments. Its originality comes from the fact it is

  14. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  15. Submarine slope failures due to pipe structure formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elger, Judith; Berndt, Christian; Rüpke, Lars; Krastel, Sebastian; Gross, Felix; Geissler, Wolfram H

    2018-02-19

    There is a strong spatial correlation between submarine slope failures and the occurrence of gas hydrates. This has been attributed to the dynamic nature of gas hydrate systems and the potential reduction of slope stability due to bottom water warming or sea level drop. However, 30 years of research into this process found no solid supporting evidence. Here we present new reflection seismic data from the Arctic Ocean and numerical modelling results supporting a different link between hydrates and slope stability. Hydrates reduce sediment permeability and cause build-up of overpressure at the base of the gas hydrate stability zone. Resulting hydro-fracturing forms pipe structures as pathways for overpressured fluids to migrate upward. Where these pipe structures reach shallow permeable beds, this overpressure transfers laterally and destabilises the slope. This process reconciles the spatial correlation of submarine landslides and gas hydrate, and it is independent of environmental change and water depth.

  16. Percent Agricultural Land Cover on Steep Slopes (Future)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Clearing land for agriculture tends to increase soil erosion. The amount of erosion is related to the steepness of the slope, farming methods used and soil type....

  17. Adaptive slope compensation for high bandwidth digital current mode controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taeed, Fazel; Nymand, Morten

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive slope compensation method for digital current mode control of dc-dc converters is proposed in this paper. The compensation slope is used for stabilizing the inner current loop in peak current mode control. In this method, the compensation slope is adapted with the variations...... in converter duty cycle. The adaptive slope compensation provides optimum controller operation in term of bandwidth over wide range of operating points. In this paper operation principle of the controller is discussed. The proposed controller is implemented in an FPGA to control a 100 W buck converter....... The experimental results of measured loop-gain at different operating points are presented to validate the theoretical performance of the controller....

  18. Slope movements in Callejón de Huyalas, Peru

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vilímek, V.; Zapata, M. L.; Stemberk, Josef

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 35, supplementum (2003), s. 39-51 ISSN 0300-5402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : slope movements * natural hazards * Cordillera Blanca Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  19. Clay mineral distribution on the Kerala continental shelf and slope

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, V.P.; Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    minerals are quartz and feldspar. Kaolinite and gibbsite have low values on the outer shelf and high values on the inner shelf and slope, while illite increases in the offshore direction. However, montmorillonite behaves differently from others in having...

  20. Slope Stabilization Using Recycled Plastic Pins, Phase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for stabilizing surficial slope failures using recycled plastic reinforcing members has been developed. The : objective of the project described in this report has been to develop, evaluate, and document a technique for stabilization ...

  1. Probabilistic analysis algorithm for UA slope software program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    A reliability-based computational algorithm for using a single row and equally spaced drilled shafts to : stabilize an unstable slope has been developed in this research. The Monte-Carlo simulation (MCS) : technique was used in the previously develop...

  2. North Slope, Alaska ESI: T_MAMMAL (Terrestrial Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for brown bears, caribou, and muskoxen for the North Slope, Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set...

  3. North Slope, Alaska ESI: M_MAMMAL (Marine Mammal Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for whales, seals, walruses, and polar bears for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector polygons in this data...

  4. Landslide hazard on the slopes of Dabicho Ridge, Wondo Genet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1996-06-18

    Landslide hazard on the slopes of Dabicho Ridge, Wondo Genet area: the case of June 18, 1996 event. Berhanu Temesgen, Mohammed Umer, Asfawossen Asrat, Ogbaghebriel Berakhi, Abayneh Ayele, Dramis Francesco, Metasebia Demissie ...

  5. Systems of pillarless working of adjacent, sloped and inclined seams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batmanov, Yu.K.; Bakhtin, A.F.; Bulavka, E.I.

    1979-01-01

    An analysis is made (advantages and disadvantages) of existing and recommended (pillarless) systems of working adjacent, sloped, and inclined seams. The economic benefits, area and extent of those systems are indicated. 8 references, 4 figures.

  6. Effect of slope height and horizontal forces on the bearing capacity of strip footings near slopes in cohesionless soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbenhøft, Sven; Damkilde, Lars; Krabbenhøft, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    The problem of determining the bearing capacity of a strip foundation located near a slope of infinite height has been dealt with by several authors. Very often in practical problems the slope is of limited height, and furthermore the resulting load may be inclined at an angle to the horizontal......, and in such cases the bearing capacity of the footing cannot be found using the existing methods. The present work comprises finite element based upper- and lower-bound calculations, using the geotechnical software OptumG2 to investigate the effect of the slope height and horizontal forces on the total bearing...

  7. Slope Impacts on Concentrated Flow Hydraulics in Rangeland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamdan, O. Z.; Pierson, F. B.; Williams, C. J.; Kormos, P. R.; Nearing, M. A.; Boll, J.

    2009-12-01

    Several studies have been conducted to describe rill or concentrated flow hydraulics. However, most of these studies used data obtained from either laboratory experiments or field sites located on gently sloping crop lands. The data sets in the few rangeland field studies conducted did not cover a variety of hillslope angles and generally focused on slope gradients less than 20%. The lack of studies with steeper slopes resulted in misinterpreting the slope gradient impact on concentrated flow hydraulics, as sites with different slopes have different soil and vegetation cover characteristics. This study examines the characteristics of rangeland concentrated flow hydraulics as a function of vegetation and ground cover using field experimental data from diverse vegetated rangeland sites of the western United States. These data span a wide range of slope angles (5.6%-65.8%), soil types, and vegetative cover. Many of the sites exhibit some degree of disturbance, such as wild fire, prescribed fire, tree mastication, and/or tree cutting. The data were divided into two sets, gently sloping (20%). Analyses were performed on each data set separately as well as on the combined data set. For the complete data set, concentrated flow occurred on less than 26% of the gently sloping plots and on more than 70% of the steep plots. The results showed that the Darcy-Weisbach roughness coefficient (f) had no significant correlation with vegetation and ground cover variables on the gently sloping sites. However, roughness coefficient f was positively correlated with vegetation and ground cover on steep rangelands (R2=0.53, n=439). The power relation relating the flow width (w) to the discharge (Q) was statistically different on the gentle and the steep sites. A multi regression equation for estimating the width of the concentrated flow as a function of flow discharge, slope, and vegetation cover was developed (R2=0.62, n=360), where the variation of slope alone explained 39% of the

  8. Mass movement hazard assessment model in the slope profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, A. C.

    2003-04-01

    The central aim of this work is to assess the spatial behaviour of critical depths for slope stability and the behaviour of their correlated variables in the soil-regolith transition along slope profiles over granite, migmatite and mica-schist parent materials in an humid tropical environment. In this way, we had making measures of shear strength for residual soils and regolith materials with soil "Cohron Sheargraph" apparatus and evaluated the shear stress tension behaviour at soil-regolith boundary along slope profiles, in each referred lithology. In the limit equilibrium approach applied here we adapt the infinite slope model for slope analysis in whole slope profile by means of finite element solution like in Fellenius or Bishop methods. In our case, we assume that the potential rupture surface occurs at soil-regolith or soil-rock boundary in slope material. For each slice, the factor of safety was calculated considering the value of shear strength (cohesion and friction) of material, soil-regolith boundary depth, soil moisture level content, slope gradient, top of subsurface flow gradient, apparent soil bulk density. The correlations showed the relative weight of cohesion, internal friction angle, apparent bulk density of soil materials and slope gradient variables with respect to the evaluation of critical depth behaviour for different simulated soil moisture content levels at slope profile scale. Some important results refer to the central role of behaviour of soil bulk-density variable along slope profile during soil evolution and in present day, because the intense clay production, mainly Kaolinite and Gibbsite at B and C-horizons, in the humid tropical environment. A increase in soil clay content produce a fall of friction angle and bulk density of material, specially when some montmorillonite or illite clay are present. We have observed too at threshold conditions, that a slight change in soil bulk-density value may disturb drastically the equilibrium of

  9. Effect of cement injection on sandy soil slope stability, case study: slope in Petang district, Badung regency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, I. W.; Wiraga, I. W.; GAG Suryanegara, I.

    2018-01-01

    Slope is a part of soil topography formed due to elevation difference from two soil surface. Landslides is frequently occur in natural slope, it is because shear force is greater than shear strength in the soil. There are some factor that influence slope stability such as: rain dissipation, vibration from earthquake, construction and crack in the soil. Slope instability can cause risk in human activity or even threaten human lives. Every years in rainy season, landslides always occur in Indonesia. In 2016, there was some landslide occurred in Bali. One of the most damaging is landslide in Petang district, Badung regency. This landslide caused main road closed entirely. In order to overcome and prevent landslide, a lot of method have been practiced and still looking for more sophisticated method for forecasting slope stability. One of the method to strengthen soil stability is filling the soil pores with some certain material. Cement is one of the material that can be used to fill the soil pores because when it is in liquid form, it can infiltrate into soil pores and fill the gap between soil particles. And after it dry, it can formed a bond with soil particle so that soil become stronger and the slope as well. In this study, it will use experimental method, slope model in laboratory to simulate a real slope behavior in the field. The first model is the slope without any addition of cement. This model will be become a benchmark for the other models. The second model is a slope with improved soil that injects the slope with cement. Injection of cement is done with varying interval distance of injection point is 5 cm and 10 cm. Each slope model will be given a load until the slope collapses. The slope model will also be analyzed with slope stability program. The test results on the improved slope models will be compared with unimproved slope. In the initial test will consist of 3 model. First model is soil without improvement or cement injection, second model is soil

  10. NRL Glider Data Report for the Shelf-Slope Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    Transformation and Transport in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Platform Proof of Concept for the Ocean Observing System in the Northern Gulf of Mexico...glider SL083 was deployed for the Shelf-Slope experiment: “Shelf-Slope Interactions and Carbon Transformation and Transport in the Northern Gulf of... Digital Environmental Model (GDEM) climatology profiles. Optics QC generates flags to indicate that manual examination of profiles is required. Both

  11. Digital analysis of the slopes of Rab Island

    OpenAIRE

    Mladen Pahernik

    2007-01-01

    The paper analyzes morphometric features of the slopes of Rab Island. Based on the digital elevation model, raster layers were calculated for the values of slope angle, aspect and curvature, as well as valley network, which was grouped using the Strahler method. A comparative analysis of the calculated values of morphometric parameters was conducted in the GIS environment. Spatial distribution of the values of each of the morphometric parameters was correlated to the structural and morphogene...

  12. Modelling the influence of tree removal on embankment slope hydrology

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Kevin; Smethurst, Joel; Powrie, William

    2014-01-01

    Trees cover the slopes of many railway earthworks supporting the UK’s transport network. Root water uptake by trees can cause seasonal shrinkage and swelling of the embankment soil, affecting the line and level of the railway track. This requires continual maintenance to maintain the serviceability of the track and reduce train speed restrictions. However, the removal of trees from railway embankment slopes and the loss of soil suctions generated by root water uptake may negatively impact emb...

  13. Effects of surface slope on erosion rates of quartz particles

    OpenAIRE

    Lodge, Phillip.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling sediment erosion is important in a wide range of environmental problems. The effects of various environmental factors on erosion rates have been studied, but the effects of surface slope on erosion rates of a wide range of sediments have not been quantified. The effects of surface slope, both in the direction of flow (pitch) and perpendicular to the flow (roll), on erosion rates of quartz particles were investigated using the Sediment Erosion at Depth Flume (Sedflume). US Navy (US...

  14. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  15. Slope, Scarp and Sea Cliff Instability Susceptibility Mapping for Planning Regulations in Almada County, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Fernando; Queiroz, Sónia; Gouveia, Luís; Vasconcelos, Manuel

    2017-12-01

    In Portugal, the modifications introduced in 2008 and 2012 in the National Ecological Reserve law (REN) included the mandatory study of slope instability, including slopes, natural scarps, and sea cliffs, at municipal or regional scale, with the purpose of avoiding the use of hazardous zones with buildings and other structures. The law also indicates specific methods to perform these studies, with different approaches for slope instability, natural scarps and sea cliffs. The methods used to produce the maps required by REN law, with modifications and improvements to the law specified methods, were applied to the 71 km2 territory of Almada County, and included: 1) Slope instability mapping using the statistically based Information Value method validated with the landslide inventory using ROC curves, which provided an AAC=0.964, with the higher susceptibility zones which cover at least 80% of the landslides of the inventory to be included in REN map. The map was object of a generalization process to overcome the inconveniences of the use of a pixel based approach. 2) Natural scarp mapping including setback areas near the top, defined according to the law and setback areas near the toe defined by the application of the shadow angle calibrated with the major rockfalls which occurred in the study area; 3) Sea cliffs mapping including two levels of setback zones near the top, and one setback zone at the cliffs toe, which were based on systematic inventories of cliff failures occurred between 1947 and 2010 in a large scale regional littoral monitoring project. In the paper are described the methods used and the results obtained in this study, which correspond to the final maps of areas to include in REN. The results obtained in this study may be considered as an example of good practice of the municipal authorities in terms of solid, technical and scientifically supported regulation definitions, hazard prevention and safe and sustainable land use management.

  16. Spatial position influences perception of slope from graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Stacey; Guzman-Martinez, Emmanuel; Ortega, Laura; Grabowecky, Marcia; Huntington, Mark D; Suzuki, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We routinely examine linear trends from bar graphs and scatterplots while taking a science class, attending a business presentation, or reading a magazine article. Graphs are placed in different positions on a page or a presentation slide for aesthetic considerations. However, because left and right positions tend to be associated with lower and higher values in the conventional depiction of numerical values, we hypothesized that the perception of positive and negative slopes may be influenced by the placement of a graph. Using a visual search task, with each display containing four bar graphs or scatterplots (one per quadrant), we have demonstrated that the detection of a negative slope is selectively slowed in the upper-right quadrant (for both bar graphs and scatterplots), whereas the detection of a positive slope is selectively slowed in the upper-left quadrant (for bar graphs only). These results suggest that an upper-right position is incompatible with perceiving negative slopes and an upper-left position is incompatible with perceiving positive slopes. Although the origin of these specific associations is unclear, our results have implications for where to place a graph depending on the slope it displays.

  17. Effect of Slope Positions on Physicochemical Properties of Soils Located on a Toposequence in Deilaman Area of Guilan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mohajeri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Topography is one of the most important factors of soil formation and evolution. Soil properties vary spatially and are influenced by some environmental factors such as landscape features, including topography, slope aspect and position, elevation, climate, parent material and vegetation. Variations in landscape features can influence many phenomena and ecological processes including soil nutrients and water interactions. This factor affects soil properties by changing the altitude, steepness and slope direction of lands. In spite of the importance of understanding the variability of soils for better management, few studies have been done to assess the quality of soils located on a toposequence and most of these studies include just pedological properties. The aim of this study was to investigate physical and chemical properties of soils located on different slope positions and different depths of a toposequence in Deilaman area of Gilan province, that located in north of Iran. Materials and Methods: The lands on toposequence that were same in climate, parent material, vegetation and time factors but topographical factor was different, were divided into five sections including steep peak, shoulder slope, back slope, foot slope and toe slope. In order to topsoil sampling, transverse sections of this toposequence were divided into three parts lengthways, each forming one replicate or block. 10*10 square was selected and after removing a layer of undecomposed organic residues such as leaf litter, three depths of 0 to 20, 20 to 40 and 40 to60 cm soil samples were collected. physical and chemical characteristics such as soil texture, bulk density, aggregate stability, percent of organic matter, cation exchange capacity, available phosphorous and total nitrogen were measured. Results and Discussion: The results showed that, because of high organic matter content and fine textured soils on the lower slope positions including foot slope

  18. Effects of erosion in the fate of soil organic carbon and soil aggregation in a burned Mediterranean hill-slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Julian; Cammeraat, Erik; Gimeno-García, Eugenia; Andreu, Vicente

    2016-04-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change indicated a higher degree of confidence that meteorological conditions associated to climate change will be propitious to increasing extreme events manifested, among others, in bigger and more frequent wildfires (IPCC, 2014). Wildfires contribute to shaping the landscape, and also the geomorphological and hydrological processes that operate on soil are affected (Bento-Gonçalves et al., 2012). Whereas, it is well documented that wildfires produce significant changes on erosion processes, the associated fate of soil organic carbon (SOC) has received less attention. This research assesses this gap by studying the loss, redistribution, and stabilization of SOC in a Mediterranean forest hill-slope burned the 28-08-2014, with high severity fire, at the Natural Park of Sierra de Espadán, Spain (39°50'45.11"N, 0°22'20.52"W). To this end, soil was sampled (19-9-2014) in the foot's slope (depositional), middle part (transport) and top (eroding) at two depths (146 drops). Significant differences (ANOVA, pBS) and soil depths (topsoil>subsoil). However, no significant differences were observed among eroding (58.8+20.8 gC kg-1), transport (67.3+34.4 gC kg-1), and depositional zones (62.0+31.3 gC kg-1), which is not in agreement with other SOC redistribution studies (Wang et al., 2014). Significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis, pBS) but not between soil depths or hill-slope positions. In the first post-fire erosive rains occurred in the area (29-11-14), closest pluviometer (Sot de Ferrer: 4.5 km) registered a total daily rain up to 64.2 l m-2. In this event a total of 12.7 kg of sediment were collected (contributing area ≈0.25 ha), with a content of 252.6 gC kg-1 the total SOC transported or stored in the depositional zone can reach up to 3.2 kg. In the second erosive event (23-3-15: 103.2 l m-2), total sediment in the fences was 143.6 kg, with content of 112.2 gC kg-1, made a total SOC eroded of up to 16.1 kg. It is hypothesized

  19. Slump structures in quaternary slope sediments of the northern Derbent Basin (Caspian Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzhbitskii, V. E.; Lobkovskii, L. I.; Roslyakov, A. G.; Merklin, L. R.; Polyakov, A. S.; Levchenko, O. V.; Kovachev, S. A.; Zverev, A. S.; Garagash, I. A.; Mar, G. N.; Mutovkin, A. D.; Putans, V. A.; Libina, N. V.; Soltanovskii, I. I.; Slobodyan, V. Yu.; Gontarev, S. V.

    2009-06-01

    During Cruise 20-3 of the R/V Rift (April, 2006), the area that includes the shelf and slope of the Derbent Basin in the northern Middle Caspian was studied using the continuous seismoacoustic profiling method. In accordance with the previous standpoint, two Pleistocene deltaic complexes formed in the Enotaevian and Mangyshlakian time are defined in this area. The seismoacoustic records obtained for the northern slope of the Derbent Basin demonstrate the development of specific rootless exogenic-gravitational fold structures in the upper (˜150-200 m) Quaternary part of the sedimentary sequence. The Quaternary section encloses angular unconformities indicating the pulsating mode of gravitational processes in the northern slope of the basin. South-dipping gravitational normal faults (and/or normal fault-related flexures) displacing the bottom surface and uppermost sedimentary layers (with vertical amplitudes up to 5-6 m) were defined in the southern part of the study area. Several impulses of the submarine slump structures predated and accompanied the deposition of the upper deltaic sequence (Mangyshlakian), although their most intense formation took place later during the Novocaspian (Holocene) time. Thus, the structural analysis of the seismoacoustic data revealed intense development of different-origin and different-age gravitational structures within the Quaternary sediments in the northern slope of the Derbent Basin. These results should be taken into consideration when designing, building, and operating submarine constructions in order to prevent potential natural hazards and reduce their consequences.

  20. Green infrastructure in high-rise residential development on steep slopes in city of Vladivostok

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kopeva Alla

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to identify the facilities of green infrastructure that are able to improve living conditions in an urban environment in high-rise residential apartments buildings on steep slopes in the city of Vladivostok. Based on the analysis of theoretical sources and practices that can be observed in the world, green infrastructure facilities have been identified. These facilities meet the criteria of the sustainable development concept, and can be used in the city of Vladivostok. They include green roofs, green walls, and greening of disturbed slopes. All the existing high-rise apartments buildings situated on steep slopes in the city of Vladivostok, have been studied. It is concluded that green infrastructure is necessary to be used in new projects connected with designing and constructing of residential apartments buildings on steep slopes, as well as when upgrading the projects that have already been implemented. That will help to regulate the ecological characteristics of the sites. The results of the research can become a basis for increasing the sustainability of the habitat, and will facilitate the adoption of decisions in the field of urban design and planning.

  1. Methods for assessing the stability of slopes during earthquakes-A retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibson, R.W.

    2011-01-01

    During the twentieth century, several methods to assess the stability of slopes during earthquakes were developed. Pseudostatic analysis was the earliest method; it involved simply adding a permanent body force representing the earthquake shaking to a static limit-equilibrium analysis. Stress-deformation analysis, a later development, involved much more complex modeling of slopes using a mesh in which the internal stresses and strains within elements are computed based on the applied external loads, including gravity and seismic loads. Stress-deformation analysis provided the most realistic model of slope behavior, but it is very complex and requires a high density of high-quality soil-property data as well as an accurate model of soil behavior. In 1965, Newmark developed a method that effectively bridges the gap between these two types of analysis. His sliding-block model is easy to apply and provides a useful index of co-seismic slope performance. Subsequent modifications to sliding-block analysis have made it applicable to a wider range of landslide types. Sliding-block analysis provides perhaps the greatest utility of all the types of analysis. It is far easier to apply than stress-deformation analysis, and it yields much more useful information than does pseudostatic analysis. ?? 2010.

  2. Measurements and Slope Analyses of Quaternary Cinder Cones, Camargo Volcanic Field, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, M. I.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Camargo volcanic field (CVF) covers ~3000 km2 and is located in the southeast part of the state of Chihuahua, within the Basin and Range province. The CVF represents the largest mafic alkali volcanic field in northern Mexico. Over a 300 cinder cones have been recognized in the Camargo volcanic field. Volcanic activity ranges from 4.7 to 0.09 Ma revealed by 40Ar/39Ar dating methods. Previous studies say that there is a close relationship between the cinder cone slope angle, due to mechanical weathering, and age. This technique is considered a reliable age indicator, especially in arid climates, such as occur in the CVF. Data were acquired with digital topographic maps (DRG) and digital elevation models (DEM) overlapped in the Global Mapper software. For each cone, the average radius (r) was calculated from six measurements, the height (h) is the difference between peak elevation and the altitude of the contour used to close the radius, and the slope angle was calculated using the equation Θ = tan-1(h/r). The slope angles of 30 cinder cones were calculated showing angles ranging from 4 to 15 degrees. A diffusion model, displayed by an exponential relationship between slope angle and age, places the ages of these 30 cones from 215 to 82 ka, within the range marked by radiometric methods. Future work include the analysis of more cinder cones to cover the whole CVF, and contribute to the validation of this technique.

  3. Closing the Mass Budget between Bering Strait and the Arctic Basin: The Chukchi Slope Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlett, W. B.; Pickart, R. S.

    2016-02-01

    After passing through Bering Strait, Pacific-origin water flows across the Chukchi Sea in different branches that ultimately exit the shelf and provide heat, freshwater, and nutrients to the interior basin. It is important, therefore, to understand where and by what mechanisms the water is fluxed offshore. We have compiled all known shipboard hydrographic sections occupied across the Chukchi shelfbreak and slope that include direct velocity measurements (shipboard ADCP or lowered ADCP). In all, there are 46 sections occupied during the months of May-October from 2002 to 2014, spanning the region from Barrow Canyon to approximately 168°W. The data reveal the presence of a surface-intensified, westward-flowing current over the continental slope, situated offshore of the eastward-flowing shelfbreak jet. We call this feature the Chukchi slope current, which exists under all wind conditions. Using these data plus previously published transport values in Bering Strait and the Beaufort shelfbreak jet, we attempt to close the mass budget of the Chukchi shelf. The mean heat transport of the Chukchi slope current during the summer months is estimated, which has the potential to melt a substantial amount of pack-ice in the Canada Basin and influence the geographical distribution of the ice melt.

  4. Slope excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation in hydraulic projects based on laser scanning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slope excavation is one of the most crucial steps in the construction of a hydraulic project. Excavation project quality assessment and excavated volume calculation are critical in construction management. The positioning of excavation projects using traditional instruments is inefficient and may cause error. To improve the efficiency and precision of calculation and assessment, three-dimensional laser scanning technology was used for slope excavation quality assessment. An efficient data acquisition, processing, and management workflow was presented in this study. Based on the quality control indices, including the average gradient, slope toe elevation, and overbreak and underbreak, cross-sectional quality assessment and holistic quality assessment methods were proposed to assess the slope excavation quality with laser-scanned data. An algorithm was also presented to calculate the excavated volume with laser-scanned data. A field application and a laboratory experiment were carried out to verify the feasibility of these methods for excavation quality assessment and excavated volume calculation. The results show that the quality assessment indices can be obtained rapidly and accurately with design parameters and scanned data, and the results of holistic quality assessment are consistent with those of cross-sectional quality assessment. In addition, the time consumption in excavation quality assessment with the laser scanning technology can be reduced by 70%–90%, as compared with the traditional method. The excavated volume calculated with the scanned data only slightly differs from measured data, demonstrating the applicability of the excavated volume calculation method presented in this study.

  5. Green infrastructure in high-rise residential development on steep slopes in city of Vladivostok

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeva, Alla; Ivanova, Olga; Khrapko, Olga

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the facilities of green infrastructure that are able to improve living conditions in an urban environment in high-rise residential apartments buildings on steep slopes in the city of Vladivostok. Based on the analysis of theoretical sources and practices that can be observed in the world, green infrastructure facilities have been identified. These facilities meet the criteria of the sustainable development concept, and can be used in the city of Vladivostok. They include green roofs, green walls, and greening of disturbed slopes. All the existing high-rise apartments buildings situated on steep slopes in the city of Vladivostok, have been studied. It is concluded that green infrastructure is necessary to be used in new projects connected with designing and constructing of residential apartments buildings on steep slopes, as well as when upgrading the projects that have already been implemented. That will help to regulate the ecological characteristics of the sites. The results of the research can become a basis for increasing the sustainability of the habitat, and will facilitate the adoption of decisions in the field of urban design and planning.

  6. Structure, stability, and tsunami hazard associated with a rock slope in Knight Inlet, British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeyl, D. P.; Stead, D.; Sturzenegger, M.; Bornhold, B. D.; Clague, J. J.

    2015-06-01

    Rockfalls and rockslides during the past 12 000 years have deposited bouldery debris cones on the seafloor beneath massive rock slopes throughout the inner part of Knight Inlet. The 885 m high rock slope, located across from a former First Nations village destroyed in the late 1500s by a slide-induced wave, exposes the contact between a Late Cretaceous dioritic pluton and metamorphic rocks of the Upper Triassic Karmutsen Formation. The pluton margin is strongly foliated parallel to primary and secondary fabrics in the metamorphic rocks, resulting in highly persistent brittle structures. Other important structures include a set of sheeting joints and highly persistent mafic dykes and faults. Stability analysis indicates that planar and wedge rock slope failures up to about 500 000 m3 in volume could occur. We suspect that failures of this size in this setting would have the potential to generate locally hazardous waves. As several similar rock slopes fronted by large submarine debris cones exist in the inner part of Knight Inlet, it is clear that tsunami hazards should be considered in coastal infrastructure development and land-use planning in this area.

  7. Quantifying the Behavior of Recurring Slope Lineae (RSL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, E. I.; McEwen, A. S.; Mattson, S.; Ojha, L.

    2014-12-01

    Is liquid water flowing near the surface of Mars today? If recurring slope lineae (RSL) on Mars are effectively ephemeral trickles of water, consistent with observational evidence, where is this water coming from, what is its volume, what is its salinity, is it flowing on the surface or just beneath, and when does it flow during the course of the day? Without an in situ or hovering platform or new orbital instruments, these questions cannot be answered directly, but quantification of RSL behavior seen by Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter coupled with physical modeling can be leveraged to infer answers. As a first step, we are mapping all 100+ lineae in Tivat crater (45.93° S, 9.53° E, in Noachis Terra) across 14 images spanning three active seasons (Mars Years 29-31) at the ~25 cm pixel scale of the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). We are simultaneously quantifying these RSL and their evolution using a suite of measurements including length, area, sinuosity, concavity index, etc. By tracking each linea across each season, we are capturing the "life cycle" of each flow rather than merely the general evolution of the population, as has been the focus of previous studies. It is this life cycle, and its variability, that physical models must reproduce. Because so little is known about RSL, we are careful in our analyses to manage the bias caused by assuming a specific mechanism. For example, observed gaps in dark lineae could be interpreted as either separating distinct, aligned surface flows or merely reflecting a patchy expression of a single continuous subsurface flow, so we allow for both interpretations. Preliminary results at Tivat suggest that RSL decelerate over the course of each season, and that the concavity of crater slopes is only a secondary factor in this deceleration. RSL also do not always appear to flow strictly down-gradient, but may be controlled by topography below the resolution of HiRISE terrain models. There may also be a change

  8. Catastrophic die-off of globally threatened Arabian Oryx and Sand Gazelle in the fenced protected area of the arid central Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. Islam

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A large number of die-off of globally threatened Arabian Oryx (Oryx leucoryx, and Arabian Sand Gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa marica were recorded from 1999 to 2008 in fenced Mahazat as-Sayd Protected Area (PA in western-central Saudi Arabia. Mortalities of animals have been recorded during summer months when the rainfall is negligible or insignificant. Deaths were due to starvation because of reduced availability, accessibility and quality of food plants in the area. In total, 560 oryx and 2815 sand gazelle deaths were recorded since the reintroduction projects began till the end of 2008. Mortalities of animals were higher in 1999-2001, 2006, 2007 and 2008. Grazing of oryx habitat depends on rainfall and animals move over great distances in response to rain. The fence around Mahazat as-Sayd PA prevents natural movements of animals, and artificially concentrates the ungulate populations into possibly unfavourable habitat. The sand gazelle is a highly gregarious and migratory species, moving long distances in search of good quality pastures. Populations of sand gazelle in Central Asia are also known to migrate over large distances, covering several hundred kilometers. It is therefore likely that by preventing natural movements of sand gazelles and oryx, fencing may have reinforced the effects of stressful conditions such as drought. To reduce the catastrophic effects, a Strategy and Action Plan was developed in August 2008 to manage oryx and gazelle within the reserve and with provision for food and water at the five camps in the reserve as emergency plan to minimize mortalities.

  9. Soil properties in high-elevation ski slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippa, Gianluca; Freppaz, Michele; Letey, Stéphanie; Corti, Giuseppe; Cocco, Stefania; Zanini, Ermanno

    2010-05-01

    The development of winter sports determines an increasing impact on the high altitude ecosystems, as a consequence of increased participation and an increasing demand of high quality standards for skiable areas. The construction of a ski slope is associated with a certain impact on soil, which varies as a function of the degree of human-induced disturbance to the native substrata. In this work, we provide a description of the characteristics of alpine tundra ski-slope soils and their nutrient status, contrasted with undisturbed areas. The study site is located in the Monterosaski Resort, Aosta Valley, NW Italy (45°51' N; 7°48' E). We chose 5 sites along an altitudinal gradient between 2700 and 2200 m a.s.l.. Per each site, one plot was established on the ski slope, while a control plot was chosen under comparable topographic conditions a few meters apart. Soils were described and samples were collected and analysed for main chemical-physical properties. In addition an evaluation of N forms, organic matter fractionation and microbial biomass was carried out. Soil depth ranged between 10 to more than 70 cm, both on the ski slope and in the undisturbed areas. A true organo-mineral (A) horizon was firstly identified at 2500 m a.s.l., while a weathering horizon (Bw) was detected at 2400 m a.s.l.. However, a Bw horizon thick enough to be recognised as diagnostic for shifting soil classification order from Entisols to Inceptisols (USDA-Soil Taxonomy) was detected only below 2400 m a.s.l.. Lithic Cryorthents were predominant in the upper part of the sequence (above 2500 m a.s.l.), both in the ski slope and the undisturbed areas; Typic Cryorthents were identified between 2500 and 2400 m a.s.l., while Inceptisols were predominant between 2400 and 2200 m a.s.l.. Chemical-physical properties will be discussed focusing on the main differences between ski slope and undisturbed soils, as determined by the ski slope construction. Pedogenetic processes at high altitude are

  10. Slope Derivative Surface used to characterize the complexity of the seafloor around St. John, USVI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Slope was calculated from the bathymetry surface for each raster cell using ArcGIS's Spatial Analyst 'Slope' Tool. Slope describes the maximum steepness of a terrain...

  11. Ecological and Bioengineering Studies for Stabilizing the Wad Medani-Sennar Roadside Slope Linking the Gezira and Sennar States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaeb Mohammed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The erosion of the highway embankment slope's soil along the Wad Medani-Sennar road is a significant issue, as there are many traffic accidents on this road, with an average of 15 to 25 fatalities per annum. It was thus decided to investigate this issue to find a method to protect slope from erosion on this road and to provide new approaches to slope erosion knowledge gap in Sudan. An engineering survey was carried out, followed by geotechnical studies, experimental work and interviews with academic experts regarding native vegetation in the survey area. These include measuring the eroded parts of the road; studying cross- sections of the road; soil experiments to check the strength, compaction and particle size distribution; and a native vegetation survey to check for suitable plants that could be used to control the slope erosion. It was found that an appropriate bio-engineering method to stabilize the slope soil against erosion due to rainfall was to cultivate the grasses Cynodon Dactylon and Vetiver on the slopes. In conclusion, that using native vegetation for eco -protection, was an excellent solution to the problem based on the climate, native vegetation, and type of soil in Sudan and it reduces the accidents.

  12. Research-informed design, management and maintenance of infrastructure slopes: development of a multi-scalar approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, S.; Helm, P. R.; Rouainia, M.; Stirling, R. A.; Asquith, J. D.; Hughes, P. N.; Toll, D. G.; Clarke, D.; Powrie, W.; Smethurst, J.; Hughes, D.; Harley, R.; Karim, R.; Dixon, N.; Crosby, C.; Chambers, J.; Dijkstra, T.; Gunn, D.; Briggs, K.; Muddle, D.

    2015-09-01

    The UK's transport infrastructure is one of the most heavily used in the world. The performance of these networks is critically dependent on the performance of cutting and embankment slopes which make up £20B of the £60B asset value of major highway infrastructure alone. The rail network in particular is also one of the oldest in the world: many of these slopes are suffering high incidents of instability (increasing with time). This paper describes the development of a fundamental understanding of earthwork material and system behaviour, through the systematic integration of research across a range of spatial and temporal scales. Spatially these range from microscopic studies of soil fabric, through elemental materials behaviour to whole slope modelling and monitoring and scaling up to transport networks. Temporally, historical and current weather event sequences are being used to understand and model soil deterioration processes, and climate change scenarios to examine their potential effects on slope performance in futures up to and including the 2080s. The outputs of this research are being mapped onto the different spatial and temporal scales of infrastructure slope asset management to inform the design of new slopes through to changing the way in which investment is made into aging assets. The aim ultimately is to help create a more reliable, cost effective, safer and more resilient transport system.

  13. 2000 Yukon North Slope conference : The challenge of change : Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The proclamation of the Inuvialuit Final Agreement (IFA) took place in 1984, and the protection of the environment of the Yukon North Slope was ensured through new mechanisms provided in the Agreement. The creation of Ivvavik National Park and Herschel Island Territorial Park resulted from section 12 of the Agreement, as well as the Wildlife Management Advisory Council (North Slope). Designated as having a special conservation regime with protection of wildlife, habitat and traditional native use, the entire Yukon North Slope is of paramount importance. Promoting discussion among native organizations, government and the private sector is one of the mandates of the new management regime, under section 12(57) of the IFA. These discussions must deal with management coordination for the North Slope. The sixth Yukon North Slope Conference was held in September 2000, and this document summarizes the proceedings. The document was based on transcripts and reports from workshops held during the conference. In some instances, the material was edited for clarification. Approximately 100 delegates represented various interests ranging from academia to wildlife conservation organizations, from government to native organizations and others. The discussions included topics as varied as oil and gas development, climate change, ecological monitoring, wildlife populations, tourism development, implementation of the IFA, environmental assessment, and protected areas. Some of the recommendations emanating from the conference touched information dissemination on climate change and ecological monitoring, the establishment of a roundtable representing all stakeholders concerning environmental assessments for oil and gas development, and continued support for natives to maintain their cultural values and traditional uses among others. figs., 5 appendices

  14. Slope failures and timing of turbidity flows north of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Brink, Uri S.; Chaytor, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    The submerged carbonate platform north of Puerto Rico terminates in a high (3,000–4,000 m) and in places steep (>45°) slope characterized by numerous landslide scarps including two 30–50 km-wide amphitheater-shaped features. The origin of the steep platform edge and the amphitheaters has been attributed to: (1) catastrophic failure, or (2) localized failures and progressive erosion. Determining which of the two mechanisms has shaped the platform edge is critically important in understanding landslide-generated tsunami hazards in the region. Multibeam bathymetry, seismic reflection profiles, and a suite sediment cores from the Puerto Rico Trench and the slope between the trench and the platform edge were used to test these two hypotheses. Deposits within trench axis and at the base of the slope are predominantly composed of sandy carbonate turbidites and pelagic sediment with inter-fingering of chaotic debris units. Regionally-correlated turbidites within the upper 10 m of the trench sediments were dated between ∼25 and 22 kyrs and ∼18–19 kyrs for the penultimate and most recent events, respectively. Deposits on the slope are laterally discontinuous and vary from thin layers of fragmented carbonate platform material to thick pelagic layers. Large debris blocks or lobes are absent within the near-surface deposits at the trench axis and the base of slope basins. Progressive small-scale scalloping and self-erosion of the carbonate platform and underlying stratigraphy appears to be the most likely mechanism for recent development of the amphitheaters. These smaller scale failures may lead to the generation of tsunamis with local, rather than regional, impact.

  15. Direct Strain and Slope and Slope Measurement Using 2D DSPSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandach, W.; Molimard, J.; Picart, P.

    2011-01-01

    Large variety of optical full-field measurement techniques are being developed and applied to solve mechanical problems. Since each technique possesses its own merits, it is important to know the capabilities and limitations of such techniques. Among these optical full-field methods, interferometry techniques take an important place. They are based on illumination with coherent light (laser). In shearing interferometry the difference of the out of-plane displacement in two neighboring object points is directly measured. Since object displacement does not result in interferometry fringes, the method is suited for localization of strain concentrations and is indeed used in industry for this purpose. DSPSI possesses the advantage over conventional out-of-plane displacement-sensitive interferometry, that only a single difference of the unwrapped phase map is required to obtain flexural strains, thereby relieving problems with noise and reduction in the field of view. A first work in this domain (DSPSI) [1] was made in 1973, later recent studies emerged to provide a quantitative system of measurements [2]. This work aims to present the results of strain and slope measurements using digital speckle pattern shearing interferometry (DSPSI). (author)

  16. Wildlife-livestock interface, veterinary cordon fence damage, lack of protection zones, livestock theft and owner apathy: Complex socio-ecological dynamics in Foot and Mouth disease control in southern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabo Mogotsi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Current efforts to control and possibly eradicate the highly contagious and economically important Foot and Mouth disease (FMD in Botswana are hampered by numerous inextricably linked constraints. These constraints were unveiled using a questionnaire-based approach among 94 communal area livestock owners in eastern Botswana’s Zone 6 (FMD-free zone without vaccination, straddling part of the Central and North East Districts, sharing a common border with Zimbabwe to the east. The area has a history of FMD, with the last outbreaks recorded in 2002 and 2003 prior to the study. Some of the most outstanding constraints in FMD control were (1 rampant cross-border livestock theft, (2 veterinary cordon fence damage attributed to illegal immigrants and an ever-increasing elephant population, (3 livestock interaction with FMD-susceptible wild ungulates on the same rangelands, and (4 an absence of a protection zone (formerly ‘buffer zone’ along the Botswana/Zimbabwean border as well as (5 general apathy towards daily livestock management demonstrated by some owners/herders. The paper further discusses these complex socio-ecological constraints as perceived by livestock owners and offers possible policy considerations including targeted FMD awareness campaigns, strengthening of FMD risk analysis capacity and synchronization of surveillance and control strategies among neighbouring countries as well as adoption of approaches such as compartmentalization and commodity-based trade to enable greater access of Botswana’s beef to high-value international markets.

  17. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  18. Physical Analysis Work for Slope Stability at Shah Alam, Selangor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishak, M. F.; Zaini, M. S. I.

    2018-04-01

    Slope stability analysis is performed to assess the equilibrium conditions and the safe design of a human-made or natural slope to find the endangered areas. Investigation of potential failure and determination of the slope sensitivity with regard to safety, reliability and economics were parts of this study. Ground anchor is designed to support a structure in this study. Ground anchor were implemented at the Mechanically Stabilized Earth (MSE) wall along Anak Persiaran Jubli Perak to overcome the further cracking of pavement parking, concrete deck and building of the Apartments. A result from the laboratory testing of soil sample such as index test and shear strength test were applied to the Slope/W software with regard to the ground anchors that were implemented. The ground anchors were implemented to increase the value of the factor of safety (FOS) of the MSE Wall. The value of the factor of safety (FOS) before implementing the ground anchor was 0.800 and after the ground anchor was implemented the value increase to 1.555. The increase percentage of factor of safety by implementing on stability of slope was 94.38%.

  19. Landform Degradation and Slope Processes on Io: The Galileo View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; Sullivan, Robert J.; Chuang, Frank C.; Head, James W., III; McEwen, Alfred S.; Milazzo, Moses P.; Nixon, Brian E.; Pappalardo, Robert T.; Schenk, Paul M.; Turtle, Elizabeth P.; hide

    2001-01-01

    The Galileo mission has revealed remarkable evidence of mass movement and landform degradation on Io. We recognize four major slope types observed on a number of intermediate resolution (250 m/pixel) images and several additional textures on very high resolution (10 m/pixel) images. Slopes and scarps on Io often show evidence of erosion, seen in the simplest form as alcove-carving slumps and slides at all scales. Many of the mass movement deposits on Io are probably mostly the consequence of block release and brittle slope failure. Sputtering plays no significant role. Sapping as envisioned by McCauley et al. remains viable. We speculate that alcove-lined canyons seen in one observation and lobed deposits seen along the bases of scarps in several locations may reflect the plastic deformation and 'glacial' flow of interstitial volatiles (e.g., SO2) heated by locally high geothermal energy to mobilize the volatile. The appearance of some slopes and near-slope surface textures seen in very high resolution images is consistent with erosion from sublimation-degradation. However, a suitable volatile (e.g., H2S) that can sublimate fast enough to alter Io's youthful surface has not been identified. Disaggregation from chemical decomposition of solid S2O and other polysulfur oxides may conceivably operate on Io. This mechanism could degrade landforms in a manner that resembles degradation from sublimation, and at a rate that can compete with resurfacing.

  20. Surface drainage in leveled land: Implication of slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoniony S. Winkler

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the lowlands of Rio Grande do Sul, land leveling is mostly carried out with no slope for the purpose of rice production. In this environment, soils with a low hydraulic conductivity are predominant owing to the presence of a practically impermeable B-horizon near the surface. Land leveling leads to soil accommodation resulting in the formation of depressions where water accumulates after heavy rainfalls, subsequently leading to problems with crops implanted in succession to rice, such as soybeans. The objective of this research was to quantify the areas and volumes of water accumulation in soil as a function of the slope of land leveling. Five typical leveled lowland areas were studied as a part of this research. The original areas presented slopes of 0, 0.20, 0.25, 0.28 and 0.40%, which were used to generate new digital elevation models with slopes between 0 and 0.5%. These newly generated digital models were used to map the depressions with surface water storage. In conclusion, land leveling with slopes higher than 0.1% is recommended to minimize problems with superficial water storage in rice fields.

  1. The Influence of Slope Breaks on Lava Flow Surface Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Lori S.; Baloga, Stephen M.; Fagents, Sarah A.; Wright, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Changes in the underlying slope of a lava flow impart a significant fraction of rotational energy beyond the slope break. The eddies, circulation and vortices caused by this rotational energy can disrupt the flow surface, having a significant impact on heat loss and thus the distance the flow can travel. A basic mechanics model is used to compute the rotational energy caused by a slope change. The gain in rotational energy is deposited into an eddy of radius R whose energy is dissipated as it travels downstream. A model of eddy friction with the ambient lava is used to compute the time-rate of energy dissipation. The key parameter of the dissipation rate is shown to be rho R(sup 2/)mu, where ? is the lava density and mu is the viscosity, which can vary by orders of magnitude for different flows. The potential spatial disruption of the lava flow surface is investigated by introducing steady-state models for the main flow beyond the steepening slope break. One model applies to slow-moving flows with both gravity and pressure as the driving forces. The other model applies to fast-moving, low-viscosity, turbulent flows. These models provide the flow velocity that establishes the downstream transport distance of disrupting eddies before they dissipate. The potential influence of slope breaks is discussed in connection with field studies of lava flows from the 1801 Hualalai and 1823 Keaiwa Kilauea, Hawaii, and 2004 Etna eruptions.

  2. Hyperstereopsis in helmet-mounted NVDs: slope perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Geoffrey W.; Flanagan, Patrick; Gibbs, Peter

    2007-04-01

    Modern helmet-mounted night vision devices, such as the Thales TopOwl helmet, project imagery from intensifiers mounted on the sides of the helmet onto the helmet faceplate. This produces a situation of hyperstereopsis in which binocular disparities are magnified. This has the potential to distort the perception of slope in depth (an important cue to landing), because the slope cue provided by binocular disparity conflicts with veridical cues to slope, such as texture gradients and motion parallax. In the experiments, eight observers viewed sparse and dense textured surfaces tilted in depth under three viewing conditions: normal stereo hyper-stereo (4 times magnification), and hypostereo (1/4 magnification). The surfaces were either stationary, or rotated slowly around a central vertical axis. Stimuli were projected at 6 metres to minimise conflict between accommodation and convergence, and stereo viewing was provided by a Z-screen and passive polarised glasses. Observers matched perceived visual slope using a small tilt table set by hand. We found that slope estimates were distorted by hyperstereopsis, but to a much lesser degree than predicted by disparity magnification. The distortion was almost completely eliminated when motion parallax was present.

  3. Toolbox for Electric Fences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Gregg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An affective dimension is often at work in constructions of political ‘reality’. Such a recognition might be seen to reinforce the value of certain legacies in cultural studies, particularly the role of articulation in public debate, and the renewed importance of such work in framing responses to volatile issues like the mandatory detention of asylum seekers. Revisiting the work of Stuart Hall on Thatcherism, and taking note of Judith Brett’s recent history of the Australian Liberal Party, I want to contemplate the prominent role language plays in political life, and, alongside Watson and others, question the priority the Left accords this key element of contemporary politics. In doing so, I use Hall as an example of what might be called scholarly affect: a voice of intervention that catalyses the Left in moments of crisis, and a voice that deploys cultural theory to make sense of concrete political problems.

  4. On Lines and Fences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elling, Rasmus Christian

    2015-01-01

    In December 1942, unrest broke out in Abadan, arguably Iran’s first modern industrial city and home to the world’s biggest oil refinery. Two scuffles in the bazaar provoked Iranians from the Ahmadabad neighbourhood to attack Indian labourers in the ‘Indian Lines’ of the Bahma(n)shir neighbourhood...

  5. Persian fencing techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manouchehr Moshtagh Khorasani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous manuscripts, poems and stories that describe, specifically and in detail, the different techniques used in Persian swordsmanship. The present article explains the origins and the techniques of Persian swordsmanship. The article also describes the traditional code of conduct for Persian warriors. Additionally, it describes an array of techniques that were deployed in actual combat in Iran’s history. Some of these techniques are represented via the miniatures that are reproduced herein. This is the first article on Persian swordsmanship published in any periodical.

  6. Solar Radiation Received by Slopes Using COMS Imagery, a Physically Based Radiation Model, and GLOBE

    OpenAIRE

    Yeom, Jong-Min; Seo, You-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Su; Han, Kyung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    This study mapped the solar radiation received by slopes for all of Korea, including areas that are not measured by ground station measurements, through using satellites and topographical data. When estimating insolation with satellite, we used a physical model to measure the amount of hourly based solar surface insolation. Furthermore, we also considered the effects of topography using the Global Land One-Kilometer Base Elevation (GLOBE) digital elevation model (DEM) for the actual amount of...

  7. Storm-driven delivery of sediment to the continental slope: Numerical modeling for the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, C. K.; Kniskern, T. A.; Arango, H.

    2016-02-01

    The supply of sediment from the continental shelf to deeper waters is of critical importance for building continental margin repositories of sediment, and may also factor into episodic events on the continental slope such as turbidity currents and slope failures. While numerical sediment transport models have been developed for coastal and continental shelf areas, they have not often been used to infer sediment delivery to deeper waters. A three-dimensional coupled hydrodynamic - suspended sediment transport model for the northern Gulf of Mexico has been developed and run to evaluate the types of conditions that are associated with delivery of suspended sediment to the continental slope. Accounting for sediment delivery by riverine plumes and for sediment resuspension by energetic waves and currents, the sediment transport calculations were implemented within the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The model domain represents the northern Gulf of Mexico shelf and slope including the Mississippi birdfoot delta and the Mississippi and DeSoto Canyons. To investigate the role of storms in driving down-slope sediment fluxes, model runs that encompassed fall, 2007 through late summer, 2008 the summer and fall of 2008 were analyzed. This time period included several winter storms, and the passage of two hurricanes (Ike and Gustav) over the study area. Preliminary results indicated that sediment delivery to the continental slope was triggered by the passage of these storm events, and focused at certain locations, such as submarine canyons. Additionally, a climatological analysis indicates that storm track influences both the wind-driven currents and wave energy on the shelf, and as such plays an important role in determining which storms trigger delivery of suspended continental shelf sediment to the adjacent slope.

  8. Probabilistic approaches for geotechnical site characterization and slope stability analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Zijun; Li, Dianqing

    2017-01-01

    This is the first book to revisit geotechnical site characterization from a probabilistic point of view and provide rational tools to probabilistically characterize geotechnical properties and underground stratigraphy using limited information obtained from a specific site. This book not only provides new probabilistic approaches for geotechnical site characterization and slope stability analysis, but also tackles the difficulties in practical implementation of these approaches. In addition, this book also develops efficient Monte Carlo simulation approaches for slope stability analysis and implements these approaches in a commonly available spreadsheet environment. These approaches and the software package are readily available to geotechnical practitioners and alleviate them from reliability computational algorithms. The readers will find useful information for a non-specialist to determine project-specific statistics of geotechnical properties and to perform probabilistic analysis of slope stability.

  9. Rock mass characterisation and stability analyses of excavated slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangerl, Christian; Lechner, Heidrun

    2016-04-01

    Excavated slopes in fractured rock masses are frequently designed for open pit mining, quarries, buildings, highways, railway lines, and canals. These slopes can reach heights of several hundreds of metres and in cases concerning open pit mines slopes larger than 1000 m are not uncommon. Given that deep-seated slope failures can cause large damage or even loss of life, the slope design needs to incorporate sufficient stability. Thus, slope design methods based on comprehensive approaches need to be applied. Excavation changes slope angle, groundwater flow, and blasting increases the degree of rock mass fracturing as well as rock mass disturbance. As such, excavation leads to considerable stress changes in the slopes. Generally, slope design rely on the concept of factor of safety (FOS), often a requirement by international or national standards. A limitation of the factor of safety is that time dependent failure processes, stress-strain relationships, and the impact of rock mass strain and displacement are not considered. Usually, there is a difficulty to estimate the strength of the rock mass, which in turn is controlled by an interaction of intact rock and discontinuity strength. In addition, knowledge about in-situ stresses for the failure criterion is essential. Thus, the estimation of the state of stress of the slope and the strength parameters of the rock mass is still challenging. Given that, large-scale in-situ testing is difficult and costly, back-calculations of case studies in similar rock types or rock mass classification systems are usually the methods of choice. Concerning back-calculations, often a detailed and standardised documentation is missing, and a direct applicability to new projects is not always given. Concerning rock mass classification systems, it is difficult to consider rock mass anisotropy and thus the empirical estimation of the strength properties possesses high uncertainty. In the framework of this study an approach based on

  10. Some Limits Using Random Slope Models to Measure Academic Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel B. Wright

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Academic growth is often estimated using a random slope multilevel model with several years of data. However, if there are few time points, the estimates can be unreliable. While using random slope multilevel models can lower the variance of the estimates, these procedures can produce more highly erroneous estimates—zero and negative correlations with the true underlying growth—than using ordinary least squares estimates calculated for each student or school individually. An example is provided where schools with increasing graduation rates are estimated to have negative growth and vice versa. The estimation is worse when the underlying data are skewed. It is recommended that there are at least six time points for estimating growth if using a random slope model. A combination of methods can be used to avoid some of the aberrant results if it is not possible to have six or more time points.

  11. Mars Climate History: Insights From Impact Crater Wall Slope Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreslavsky, Mikhail A.; Head, James W.

    2018-02-01

    We use the global distribution of the steepest slopes on crater walls derived from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter profile data to assess the magnitudes of degradational processes with latitude, altitude, and time. We independently confirm that Amazonian polar/high-latitude crater slope modification is substantial, but that craters in the low latitudes have essentially escaped significant slope modification since the Early Hesperian. We find that the total amount of crater wall degradation in the Late Noachian is very small in comparison to the circumpolar regions in the Late Amazonian, an observation that we interpret to mean that the Late Noachian climate was not characterized by persistent and continuous warm and wet conditions. A confirmed elevational zonality in degradation in the Early Hesperian is interpreted to mean that the atmosphere was denser than today.

  12. The Socioeconomic Assessment of Sloping Land Conversion Program in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Zhen

    with the aim to combat deforestation, ecological degradation, over cultivation of sloping land and soil erosion. However, we also believe it brings changes to the rural economic structure and household livelihood strategy. Applying and developing some empirical and theoretical methods with a large amount......Abstract This thesis mainly focuses on the socioeconomic impact of the largest Ecological Recovery Program ― the Sloping Land Conversion Program (SLCP), also called Grain for Green Program (GFG) in China. The central government initiated this program in 1999 and it was launched nationwide in 2002...... that there exist heterogeneous effects of SLCP implementation on livelihood diversification across different rural income groups. The lower income group was more affected by the program in terms of income diversification. The Second paper ― The Effects of Sloping Land Conversion Program on Agricultural Households...

  13. Porous carbon supported Fe-N-C composite as an efficient electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline and acidic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baichen; Huang, Binbin; Lin, Cheng; Ye, Jianshan; Ouyang, Liuzhang

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) have attracted tremendous attention due to their high catalytic activity, long-term stability and excellent methanol tolerance. Herein, the porous carbon supported Fe-N-C catalysts for ORR were synthesized by direct pyrolysis of ferric chloride, 6-Chloropyridazin-3-amine and carbon black. Variation of pyrolysis temperature during the synthesis process leads to the difference in ORR catalytic activity. High pyrolysis temperature is beneficial to the formation of the "N-Fe" active sites and high electrical conductivity, but the excessive temperature will cause the decomposition of nitrogen-containing active sites, which are revealed by Raman, TGA and XPS. A series of synthesis and characterization experiments with/without nitrogen or iron in carbon black indicate that the coordination of iron and nitrogen plays a crucial role in achieving excellent ORR performances. Electrochemical test results show that the catalyst pyrolyzed at 800 °C (Fe-N-C-800) exhibits excellent ORR catalytic activity, better methanol tolerance and higher stability compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst in both alkaline and acidic conditions.

  14. Impaired terrestrial and arboreal locomotor performance in the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis) after exposure to an AChE-inhibiting pesticide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuRant, Sarah E.; Hopkins, William A.; Talent, Larry G.

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of a commonly used AChE-inhibiting pesticide on terrestrial and arboreal sprint performance, important traits for predator avoidance and prey capture, in the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis). Lizards were exposed to carbaryl (2.5, 25, and 250 μg/g) and were raced before and 4, 24, and 96 h after dosing. In the terrestrial setting, exposure to low concentrations of carbaryl had stimulatory effects on performance, but exposure to the highest concentration was inhibitory. No stimulatory effects of carbaryl were noted in the arboreal environment and performance in lizards was reduced after exposure to both the medium and highest dose of carbaryl. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to high concentrations of carbaryl can have important sublethal consequences on fitness-related traits in reptiles and that arboreal locomotor performance is a more sensitive indicator of AChE-inhibiting pesticide poisoning than terrestrial locomotor performance. - Exposure to an acetylcholinesterase-inhibiting pesticide alters locomotor performance in western fence lizards

  15. Evidence of slope instability in the Southwestern Adriatic Margin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Minisini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Southwestern Adriatic Margin (SAM shows evidence of widespread failure events that generated slide scars up to 10 km wide and extensive slide deposits with run out distances greater than 50 km. Chirp-sonar profiles, side-scan sonar mosaics, multibeam bathymetry and sediment cores document that the entire slope area underwent repeated failures along a stretch of 150 km and that mass-transport deposits, covering an area of 3320 km2, are highly variable ranging from blocky slides to turbidites, and lay on the lower slope and in the basin. The SAM slope between 300–700 m is impacted by southward bottom currents shaping sediment drifts (partly affected by failure and areas of dominant erosion of the seafloor. When slide deposits occur in areas swept by bottom currents their fresh appearence and their location at seafloor may give the misleading impression of a very young age. Seismic-stratigraphic correlation of these deposits to the basin floor, however, allow a more reliable age estimate through sediment coring of the post-slide unit. Multiple buried failed masses overlap each other in the lower slope and below the basin floor; the most widespread of these mass-transport deposits occurred during the MIS 2-glacial interval on a combined area of 2670 km2. Displacements affecting Holocene deposits suggest recent failure events during or after the last phases of the last post-glacial eustatic rise. Differences in sediment accumulation rates at the base or within the sediment drifts and presence of downlap surfaces along the slope and further in the basin may provide one or multiple potential weak layers above which widespread collapses take place. Neotectonic activity and seismicity, together with the presence of a steep slope, represent additional elements conducive to sediment instability and failure along the SAM. Evidence of large areas still prone to failure provides elements of tsunamogenic hazard.

  16. Fe/N/C hollow nanospheres by Fe(iii)-dopamine complexation-assisted one-pot doping as nonprecious-metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dan; Yang, Liping; Yu, Linghui; Kong, Junhua; Yao, Xiayin; Liu, Wanshuang; Xu, Zhichuan; Lu, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a series of hollow carbon nanospheres simultaneously doped with N and Fe-containing species are prepared by Fe3+-mediated polymerization of dopamine on SiO2 nanospheres, carbonization and subsequent KOH etching of the SiO2 template. The electrochemical properties of the hollow nanospheres as nonprecious-metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are characterized. The results show that the hollow nanospheres with mesoporous N-doped carbon shells of ~10 nm thickness and well-dispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles prepared by annealing at 750 °C (Fe/N/C HNSs-750) exhibit remarkable ORR catalytic activity comparable to that of a commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst, and high selectivity towards 4-electron reduction of O2 to H2O. Moreover, it displays better electrochemical durability and tolerance to methanol crossover effect in an alkaline medium than the Pt/C. The excellent catalytic performance of Fe/N/C HNSs-750 towards ORR can be ascribed to their high specific surface area, mesoporous morphology, homogeneous distribution of abundant active sites, high pyridinic nitrogen content, graphitic nitrogen and graphitic carbon, as well as the synergistic effect of nitrogen and iron species for catalyzing ORR.In this work, a series of hollow carbon nanospheres simultaneously doped with N and Fe-containing species are prepared by Fe3+-mediated polymerization of dopamine on SiO2 nanospheres, carbonization and subsequent KOH etching of the SiO2 template. The electrochemical properties of the hollow nanospheres as nonprecious-metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are characterized. The results show that the hollow nanospheres with mesoporous N-doped carbon shells of ~10 nm thickness and well-dispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles prepared by annealing at 750 °C (Fe/N/C HNSs-750) exhibit remarkable ORR catalytic activity comparable to that of a commercial 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst, and high selectivity towards 4-electron reduction of O2 to H2O

  17. Measurement of the π0 electromagnetic transition form factor slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeroni, C.; Lurkin, N.; Romano, A.; Blazek, T.; Koval, M.; Ceccucci, A.; Danielsson, H.; Falaleev, V.; Gatignon, L.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hallgren, B.; Maier, A.; Peters, A.; Piccini, M.; Riedler, P.; Frabetti, P. L.; Gersabeck, E.; Kekelidze, V.; Madigozhin, D.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Movchan, S.; Potrebenikov, Yu.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Rubin, P.; Baldini, W.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fiorini, M.; Gianoli, A.; Norton, A.; Petrucci, F.; Savrié, M.; Wahl, H.; Bizzeti, A.; Bucci, F.; Iacopini, E.; Lenti, M.; Veltri, M.; Antonelli, A.; Moulson, M.; Raggi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Eppard, K.; Hita-Hochgesand, M.; Kleinknecht, K.; Renk, B.; Wanke, R.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Bolotov, V.; Duk, V.; Gushchin, E.; Ambrosino, F.; Di Filippo, D.; Massarotti, P.; Napolitano, M.; Palladino, V.; Saracino, G.; Anzivino, G.; Imbergamo, E.; Piandani, R.; Sergi, A.; Cenci, P.; Pepe, M.; Costantini, F.; Doble, N.; Giudici, S.; Pierazzini, G.; Sozzi, M.; Venditti, S.; Balev, S.; Collazuol, G.; DiLella, L.; Gallorini, S.; Goudzovski, E.; Lamanna, G.; Mannelli, I.; Ruggiero, G.; Cerri, C.; Fantechi, R.; Kholodenko, S.; Kurshetsov, V.; Obraztsov, V.; Semenov, V.; Yushchenko, O.; D'Agostini, G.; Leonardi, E.; Serra, M.; Valente, P.; Fucci, A.; Salamon, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Peyaud, B.; Engelfried, J.; Coward, D.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Arcidiacono, R.; Bifani, S.; Biino, C.; Dellacasa, G.; Marchetto, F.; Numao, T.; Retière, F.; NA62 Collaboration

    2017-05-01

    The NA62 experiment collected a large sample of charged kaon decays in 2007 with a highly efficient trigger for decays into electrons. A measurement of the π0 electromagnetic transition form factor slope parameter from 1.11 ×106 fully reconstructed K± →π± πD0, πD0 →e+e- γ events is reported. The measured value a = (3.68 ± 0.57) ×10-2 is in good agreement with theoretical expectations and previous measurements, and represents the most precise experimental determination of the slope in the time-like momentum transfer region.

  18. Wave Run-Up on Sloping Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouck, J. De; Troch, P.; Ronde, J. De

    2001-01-01

    Wave run-up is one of the main physical processes which are taken into account in the design of the crest level of sloping coastal structures. The crest level design of these structures is mainly based on physical scale model results.......Wave run-up is one of the main physical processes which are taken into account in the design of the crest level of sloping coastal structures. The crest level design of these structures is mainly based on physical scale model results....

  19. After the Slippery Slope: Dutch Experiences on Regulating Active Euthanasia

    OpenAIRE

    Boer, Th.A.

    2003-01-01

    “When a country legalizes active euthanasia, it puts itself on a slippery slope from where it may well go further downward.” If true, this is a forceful argument in the battle of those who try to prevent euthanasia from becoming legal. The force of any slippery-slope argument, however, is by definition limited by its reference to future developments which cannot empirically be sustained. Experience in the Netherlands—where a law regulating active euthanasia was accepted in April 2001—may shed...

  20. Newton slopes for Artin-Schreier-Witt towers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher; Wan, Daqing; Xiao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We fix a monic polynomial f(x)∈Fq[x] over a finite field and consider the Artin-Schreier-Witt tower defined by f(x); this is a tower of curves ⋯→Cm→Cm−1→⋯→C0=A1, with total Galois group Zp. We study the Newton slopes of zeta functions of this tower of curves. This reduces to the study of the Newton...... a result on the behavior of the slopes of the eigencurve associated to the Artin-Schreier-Witt tower, analogous to the result of Buzzard and Kilford....

  1. EFFECT OF GROUND VIBRATION TO SLOPE STABILITY, CASE STUDY LANDSLIDE ON THE MOUTH OF RAILWAY TUNNEL, GUNUNG GAJAH VILLAGE, LAHAT DISTRICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moamar Aprilian Ghadafi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Slope stability around railway tunnel in Gunung Gajah Village, Lahat District needs to be analysed due to landslide which occurred on January, 23th 2016. That analysis needs to be done so that the railway transportation system can run safely. The purposes of this research are: to find out the factors that cause slope instability, to find out peak acceleration caused by railway traffic and earthquakes and its effects to the safety factor of slope, and determine stabilization method in order to prevent the occurrence of further landslide. The research activities include surveying, sampling, laboratory testing and analyzing slope stability using pseudo-static approach. Based on research result, the main factors that cause slope instability are morphology, structural geology, and ground vibration caused by earthquakes. Ground vibration are correlated to the slope instability. It shows that the higher of peak acceleration the lower of safety factor of slope. To prevent the occurrence of further landslide around research area, stabilization method should be applied in accordance with the conditions in that area such as building a retaining wall to increase safety factor of slope, building draining channels to reduce run off and performing shotcrete in the wall of landslide in order to avoid weathering.

  2. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

  3. Risk assessment of debris flow hazards in natural slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Junghae; Chae, Byung-gon; Liu, Kofei; Wu, Yinghsin

    2016-04-01

    The study area is located at north-east part of South Korea. Referring to the map of landslide sus-ceptibility (KIGAM, 2009) from Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM for short), there are large areas of potential landslide in high probability on slope land of mountain near the study area. Besides, recently some severe landslide-induced debris flow hazards occurred in this area. So this site is convinced to be prone to debris flow haz-ards. In order to mitigate the influence of hazards, the assessment of potential debris flow hazards is very important and essential. In this assessment, we use Debris-2D, debris flow numerical program, to assess the potential debris flow hazards. The worst scenario is considered for simulation. The input mass sources are determined using landslide susceptibility map. The water input is referred to the daily accumulative rainfall in the past debris flow event in study area. The only one input material property, i.e. yield stress, is obtained using calibration test. The simulation results show that the study area has po-tential to be impacted by debris flow. Therefore, based on simulation results, to mitigate debris flow hazards, we can propose countermeasures, including building check dams, constructing a protection wall in study area, and installing instruments for active monitoring of debris flow hazards. Acknowledgements:This research was supported by the Public Welfare & Safety Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT & Future Planning (NRF-2012M3A2A1050983)

  4. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

    1996-08-01

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

  5. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits

  6. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

    1996-08-01

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables

  7. Research/Evaluate Restoration of NE Oregon Streams: Effects of Livestock Exclosures (Corridor Fencing) on Riparian Vegetation, Stream Geomorphic Features and Fish Populations; Final Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffman, J. Boone

    2002-09-17

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 indicated ''The council shall properly develop and adopt a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries.'' As a result, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has spent millions of dollars on various instream projects throughout the Columbia Basin with the goal of increasing system-wide production of anadromous fisheries through a combination of habitat restoration and enhancement measures. For two decades, numerous BPA-funded projects have been initiated in the upper Columbia River Basin for the express intent of improving the aquatic habitats of anadromous salmonids. Largely missing from most of these projects has been any rigorous evaluation of project success or failure. Some field reviews of some habitat projects have been undertaken (e.g., Beschta et al. 1991, Kauffman et al. 1993) and provide an overview of major problems and opportunities associated with selected projects. However, there continues to be a lack of quantifiable information, collected in a systematic manner that could be used as the basis for scientifically assessing the effects of individual projects on riparian/aquatic habitats, functions, or processes. Recent publications (e.g., NRC 1992, ISG 1996, NRC 1996, Beschta 1997, and Kauffman et al. 1997) have identified and summarized important concepts associated with the restoration and improvement of aquatic ecosystems. While such conceptual approaches provide an important structure for those undertaking restoration efforts, there remains a paucity of basic information throughout the upper Columbia Basin on the hydrologic, geomorphic, and biologic responses that occur from various enhancement approaches. Basic data on the spatial and temporal responses of restoration approaches would provide: (1) a better understanding of project effects upon

  8. Nano-metrology: The art of measuring X-ray mirrors with slope errors <100 nrad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcock, Simon G., E-mail: simon.alcock@diamond.ac.uk; Nistea, Ioana; Sawhney, Kawal [Diamond Light Source Ltd., Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-15

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the systematic and random errors of the nano-metrology instruments used to characterize synchrotron X-ray optics at Diamond Light Source. With experimental skill and careful analysis, we show that these instruments used in combination are capable of measuring state-of-the-art X-ray mirrors. Examples are provided of how Diamond metrology data have helped to achieve slope errors of <100 nrad for optical systems installed on synchrotron beamlines, including: iterative correction of substrates using ion beam figuring and optimal clamping of monochromator grating blanks in their holders. Simulations demonstrate how random noise from the Diamond-NOM’s autocollimator adds into the overall measured value of the mirror’s slope error, and thus predict how many averaged scans are required to accurately characterize different grades of mirror.

  9. Nano-metrology: The art of measuring X-ray mirrors with slope errors <100 nrad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcock, Simon G.; Nistea, Ioana; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the systematic and random errors of the nano-metrology instruments used to characterize synchrotron X-ray optics at Diamond Light Source. With experimental skill and careful analysis, we show that these instruments used in combination are capable of measuring state-of-the-art X-ray mirrors. Examples are provided of how Diamond metrology data have helped to achieve slope errors of <100 nrad for optical systems installed on synchrotron beamlines, including: iterative correction of substrates using ion beam figuring and optimal clamping of monochromator grating blanks in their holders. Simulations demonstrate how random noise from the Diamond-NOM’s autocollimator adds into the overall measured value of the mirror’s slope error, and thus predict how many averaged scans are required to accurately characterize different grades of mirror.

  10. Nano-metrology: The art of measuring X-ray mirrors with slope errors <100 nrad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcock, Simon G; Nistea, Ioana; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-05-01

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the systematic and random errors of the nano-metrology instruments used to characterize synchrotron X-ray optics at Diamond Light Source. With experimental skill and careful analysis, we show that these instruments used in combination are capable of measuring state-of-the-art X-ray mirrors. Examples are provided of how Diamond metrology data have helped to achieve slope errors of <100 nrad for optical systems installed on synchrotron beamlines, including: iterative correction of substrates using ion beam figuring and optimal clamping of monochromator grating blanks in their holders. Simulations demonstrate how random noise from the Diamond-NOM's autocollimator adds into the overall measured value of the mirror's slope error, and thus predict how many averaged scans are required to accurately characterize different grades of mirror.

  11. Experimental Studies of Low-Frequency Reverberation on the Continental Slope in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzhavina, D. V.; Gulin, É. P.

    2001-07-01

    Experimental data obtained on the continental slope near the Kamchatka peninsula for the reverberation at the frequencies 230, 600, and 850 Hz in the cases of coincident and spaced source and receiver of sound are presented. The data include the dependences of the reverberation level on time for both directional and omnidirectional receiving systems, as well as the dependences of the reverberation level on the duration of the probing pulses and on the sea depth at the source site. It is shown that, at the frequency 230 Hz, a substantial contribution to the reverberation is made by the reflection and scattering on the shelf near the coastline and in the region of the “depth drop.” At the frequencies 600 and 850 Hz, the predominant mechanism is bottom and surface scattering in the region of the continental slope.

  12. Submarine canyons as coral and sponge habitat on the eastern Bering Sea slope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Miller

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Submarine canyons have been shown to positively influence pelagic and benthic biodiversity and ecosystem function. In the eastern Bering Sea, several immense canyons lie under the highly productive “green belt” along the continental slope. Two of these, Pribilof and Zhemchug canyons, are the focus of current conservation interest. We used a maximum entropy modeling approach to evaluate the importance of these two canyons, as well as canyons in general, as habitat for gorgonian (alcyonacean corals, pennatulacean corals, and sponges, in an area comprising most of the eastern Bering Sea slope and outer shelf. These invertebrates create physical structure that is a preferred habitat for many mobile species, including commercially important fish and invertebrates. We show that Pribilof canyon is a hotspot of structure-forming invertebrate habitat, containing over 50% of estimated high-quality gorgonian habitat and 45% of sponge habitat, despite making up only 1.7% of the total study area. The amount of quality habitat for gorgonians and sponges varied in other canyons, but canyons overall contained more high-quality habitat for structure-forming invertebrates compared to other slope areas. Bottom trawling effort was not well correlated with habitat quality for structure-forming invertebrates, and bottom-contact fishing effort in general, including longlining and trawling, was not particularly concentrated in the canyons examined. These results suggest that if conserving gorgonian coral habitat is a management goal, canyons, particularly Pribilof Canyon, may be a prime location to do this without excessive impact on fisheries.

  13. Development of the springbok skin - colour pattern, hair slope and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S.-Afr. Tydskr. Dierk. 1989,24(1). Development of the springbok skin - colour pattern, hair slope and horn rudiments in Antidorcas marsupialis. G.H. Findlay. Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, 0001 Republic of South Africa·. Received 19 May 1988; accepted 8 September 1988.

  14. Stability analysis of sandy slope considering anisotropy effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper aims to investigate the effect of anisotropy of shear strength parameter on the stability of a sandy slope by performing the limit equilibrium analysis. Because of scarcity of mathematical equation for anisotropic friction angle of sand, at first, all results of principal stress rotation tests are processed by artificial neural ...

  15. Experimental research on stability of covering blocks for sloping banks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, Toshihiko

    1988-01-01

    In the case of constructing thermal and nuclear power stations facing open seas, usually the harbors for unloading fuel and others are constructed. In Japan, breakwaters are installed in the places of relatively shallow depth less than 20 m, and in such case, the sloping banks having the covering material of wave-controlling blocks made of concrete are mostly adopted as those are excellent in their function and economical efficiency, and are advantageous in the maintenance and management. Sloping banks are of such type that wave-controlling blocks cover the vertical front face of nonpermeating caissons, and the same type was adopted for breakwaters and others in Onagawa Nuclear Power Station, Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc. As for the wave-controlling blocks, tetrapods and shake blocks were used. One of the most important problems in the design of sloping banks is how to estimate the stability of wave controlling blocks. In this paper, the results of the examination by hydraulic model experiment on the stability of covering blocks are reported, which are useful as the basic data for the rational and economical design of sloping banks. The experimental setup and a model bank, the generation of experimental waves and their characteristics, the experimental conditions and experimental method, and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  16. Wave Run-Up on Sloping Coastal Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouck, J. De; Troch, P.; Ronde, J. De

    Wave run-up is one of the main physical processes which is taken into account in the design of the crest level of sloping coastal structures. Until recently, solely physical model results were used for the crest level design. However, prototype measurements have indicated that scale models...

  17. Nonlinear assessment of time series from rock slope monitoring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvelebil, J.; Paluš, Milan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 9 (2007), A-05649 ISSN 1029-7006. [General Asembly of the European Geophysical Society. 15.04.2007-20.04.2007, Vienna] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : fractal * scaling * unstable rock slope * collapse prediction * engineering geology Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  18. the Modeling of Hydraulic Jump Generated Partially on Sloping Apron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaker Abdulatif Jalil

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Modeling aims to characterize system behavior and achieve simulation close as possible of the reality. The rapid energy exchange in supercritical flow to generate quiet or subcritical flow in hydraulic jump phenomenon is important in design of hydraulic structures. Experimental and numerical modeling is done on type B hydraulic jump which starts first on sloping bed and its end on horizontal bed.  Four different apron slopes are used, for each one of these slopes the jump is generated on different locations by controlling the tail water depth.  Modelling validation is based on 120 experimental runs which they show that there is reliability. The air volume fraction which creates in through hydraulic jump varied between 0.18 and 0.28. While the energy exchanges process take place within 6.6, 6.1, 5.8, 5.5 of the average relative jump height for apron slopes of 0.18, 0.14, 0.10, 0.07 respectively. Within the limitations of this study, mathematical prediction model for relative hydraulic jump height is suggested.The model having an acceptable coefficient of determination.

  19. Soil erosion and management activities on forested slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert R. Ziemer

    1986-01-01

    Some of the most productive forests in the Western United States grow on marginally stable mountainous slopes, where disturbance increases the likelihood of erosion. Much of the public's concern about, and, consequently, most of the research on, erosion from these forested areas is related more to the degradation of stream resources by eroded material than to the...

  20. Erosion protection for soil slopes along Virginia's highways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    A survey of the state of practice for designing slope erosion control measures within VDOT's nine districts has been conducted. On the basis of the survey, it is clear that there are no specific design procedures currently in use within VDOT for deal...

  1. Effect of Angle of Attack on Slope Climbing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, Colin M.; Jones, Lucas; Smith, Lauren M.

    2017-01-01

    Ascending steep slopes is often a very difficult challenge for off-road vehicles, whether on Earth or on extraterrestrial bodies. This challenge is even greater if the surface consists of loose granular soil that does not provide much shear strength. This study investigated how the path at which a vehicle traverses a slope, specifically the angle that it is commanded to drive relative to the base of the hill (the angle of attack), can affect its performance. A vehicle was driven in loose sand at slope angles up to 15 degrees and angles of attack ranging from 10 to 90 degrees. A novel photogrammetry technique was implemented to both track vehicle motion and create a three-dimensional profile of the terrain. This allowed for true wheel sinkage measurements. The study showed that though low angles of attack result in lower wheel slip and sinkage, the efficiency of the vehicles uphill motion increased at higher angles of attack. For slopes up to 15 degrees, a 90 degree angle of attack provided the greatest likelihood of successful ascent.

  2. End depth in steeply sloping rough rectangular channels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Conte S D, de Boor C 1987 Elementary numerical analysis: An algorithmic approach (New York: McGraw-Hill). Davis A C, Ellett B G S, Jacob R P 1998 Flow measurement in sloping channels with rectangular free overfall. J. Hydraul. Eng., Am. Soc. Civ. Eng. 124: 760±763. Davis A C, Jacob R P, Ellett B G S 1999 Estimating ...

  3. Title Qualitative stability assessment of cut slopes along the national ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    64

    Monitoring: ISRM Suggested Methods. Pergamon Press, London. Kundu J, Sarkar K, Singh AK (2016) Integrating structural and numerical solutions for road cut slope stability analysis-A case study, India. Rock Dynamics: From Research to. Engineering: Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Rock Dynamics ...

  4. Spider (Araneae) communities of scree slopes in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Růžička, Vlastimil; Klimeš, Leoš

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 2 (2005), s. 280-289 ISSN 0161-8202 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6007401 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508; CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : scree slopes * environmental factors * ice formation Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.557, year: 2005

  5. Data compression by a decreasing slope-threshold test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinrock, L.

    1973-01-01

    Resolution can be obtained at large compression ratios with method for selecting data points for transmission by telemetry in television compressed-data system. Test slope of raw data stream and compare it to symmetric pair of decreasing thresholds. When either threshold is exceeded, data are sampled and transmitted; thresholds are reset, and test begins again.

  6. Oscillating Nocturnal Slope Flow in a Coastal Valley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gryning, Sven-Erik; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Mahrt, Larry

    1985-01-01

    Observations of slope flows in a coastal valley are analyzed. The diurnal variation of upslope and downslope flows depends on season in a systematic way which appears to be related to the high latitude of the observational site and the presence of a nearby layer of marine air. Summer nocturnal flow...

  7. Air quality in bedded mono-slope beef barns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedded mono-slope barns are becoming more common in the upper Midwest. Because these are new facilities, little research has been published regarding environmental quality, building management and animal performance in these facilities. A team of researchers from South Dakota State University, USDA ...

  8. How the spatial variation of tree roots affects slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Zhun; Stokes, A.; Jourdan, C.; Rey, H.; Courbaud, B.; Saint-André, L.

    2010-05-01

    It is now widely recognized that plant roots can reinforce soil against shallow mass movement. Although studies on the interactions between vegetation and slope stability have significantly augmented in recent years, a clear understanding of the spatial dynamics of root reinforcement (through additional cohesion by roots) in subalpine forest is still limited, especially with regard to the roles of different forest management strategies or ecological landscapes. The architecture of root systems is important for soil cohesion, but in reality it is not possible to measure the orientation of each root in a system. Therefore, knowledge on the effect of root orientation and anisotropy on root cohesion on the basis of in situ data is scanty. To determine the effect of root orientation in root cohesion models, we investigated root anisotropy in two mixed, mature, naturally regenerated, subalpine forests of Norway spruce (Picea abies), and Silver fir (Abies alba). Trees were clustered into islands, with open spaces between each group, resulting in strong mosaic heterogeneity within the forest stand. Trenches within and between clusters of trees were dug and root distribution was measured in three dimensions. We then simulated the influence of different values for a root anisotropy correction factor in forests with different ecological structures and soil depths. Using these data, we have carried out simulations of slope stability by calculating the slope factor of safety depending on stand structure. Results should enable us to better estimate the risk of shallow slope failure depending on the type of forest and species.

  9. Slope Stability Analysis Using Slice-Wise Factor of Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of slice-wise factor of safety is introduced to investigate the state of both the whole slope and each slice. The assumption that the interslice force ratio is the same between any two slices is made and the eccentric moment of slice weight is also taken into account. Then four variables equations are formulated based on the equilibrium of forces and moment and the assumption of interslice forces, and then the slice-wise factor of safety along the slip surface can be obtained. The active and passive sections of the slope can be determined based on the distribution of factor of safety. The factor of safety of the whole slope is also defined as the ratio of the sum of antisliding force to the sum of sliding force on the slip surface. Two examples with different slip surface shapes are analysed to demonstrate the usage of the proposed method. The slice-wise factor of safety enables us to determine the sliding mechanism and pattern of a slope. The reliability is verified by comparing the overall factor of safety with that calculated by conventional methods.

  10. Slope histogram distribution-based parametrisation of Martian geomorphic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, Zita; Székely, Balázs; Kovács, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    The application of geomorphometric methods on the large Martian digital topographic datasets paves the way to analyse the Martian areomorphic processes in more detail. One of the numerous methods is the analysis is to analyse local slope distributions. To this implementation a visualization program code was developed that allows to calculate the local slope histograms and to compare them based on Kolmogorov distance criterion. As input data we used the digital elevation models (DTMs) derived from HRSC high-resolution stereo camera image from various Martian regions. The Kolmogorov-criterion based discrimination produces classes of slope histograms that displayed using coloration obtaining an image map. In this image map the distribution can be visualized by their different colours representing the various classes. Our goal is to create a local slope histogram based classification for large Martian areas in order to obtain information about general morphological characteristics of the region. This is a contribution of the TMIS.ascrea project, financed by the Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG). The present research is partly realized in the frames of TÁMOP 4.2.4.A/2-11-1-2012-0001 high priority "National Excellence Program - Elaborating and Operating an Inland Student and Researcher Personal Support System convergence program" project's scholarship support, using Hungarian state and European Union funds and cofinances from the European Social Fund.

  11. Late Holocene Radiocarbon Variability in Northwest Atlantic Slope Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherwood, O; Edinger, E; Guilderson, T P; Ghaleb, B; Risk, M J; Scott, D B

    2008-08-15

    Deep-sea gorgonian corals secrete a 2-part skeleton of calcite, derived from dissolved inorganic carbon at depth, and gorgonin, derived from recently fixed and exported particulate organic matter. Radiocarbon contents of the calcite and gorgonin provide direct measures of seawater radiocarbon at depth and in the overlying surface waters, respectively. Using specimens collected from Northwest Atlantic slope waters, we generated radiocarbon records for surface and upper intermediate water layers spanning the pre- and post bomb-{sup 14}C eras. In Labrador Slope Water (LSW), convective mixing homogenizes the pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C signature (-67 {+-} 4{per_thousand}) to at least 1000 m depth. Surface water bomb-{sup 14}C signals were lagged and damped (peaking at {approx} +45{per_thousand} in the early 1980s) relative to other regions of the northwest Atlantic, and intermediate water signals were damped further. Off southwest Nova Scotia, the vertical gradient in {Delta}{sup 14}C is much stronger. In surface water, pre-bomb {Delta}{sup 14}C averaged -75 {+-} 5{per_thousand}. At 250-475 m depth, prebomb {Delta}{sup 14}C oscillated quasi-decadally between -80 and -100{per_thousand}, likely reflecting interannual variability in the presence of Labrador Slope Water vs. Warm Slope Water (WSW). Finally, subfossil corals reveal no systematic changes in vertical {Delta}{sup 14}C gradients over the last 1200 years.

  12. 30 CFR 716.2 - Steep-slope mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... original contour restoration requirements. (1) This section applies to surface coal mining operations on... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Steep-slope mining. 716.2 Section 716.2 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR INITIAL PROGRAM...

  13. Stability analysis of sandy slope considering anisotropy effect in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Faculty of Engineering, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, ... 2School of Civil Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, ..... material. 4.3 Stability analysis result. For each analysis case with specified geometrical configuration for slope, a wide range of slip surfaces are considered by establishing a grid of ...

  14. Soil conservation options for olive orchards on sloping land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleskens, L.; Graaff, de J.

    2003-01-01

    Olive production is an important and growing agricultural activity throughout the Meditteranean zone. At the same time, soil erosion is one of the environmental key problems in this zone. Actual erosion in olive production areas is high, in particular on sloping land. Several erosion risk factors

  15. Slope failure susceptibility zonation using integrated remote sensing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    61

    The susceptibility of slopes in open pit coal mines to various modes of failure (i.e. plane, wedge, circular and toppling failure) could be envisaged by virtue of processing and analysis of pertinent satellite data. The aim of the present study was to integrate thematic maps generated using remote sensing image processing ...

  16. Title Qualitative stability assessment of cut slopes along the national ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    64

    Keeping an eye to above problems, a study was carried out along NH-05 covering a stretch of 12 km from Jhakri to Jeori ... 2016). Regional strike of lithological units is ENE-WSW which shows local variations in the trend (Singh 1979). .... Slope 3 is exposed to wedge failure and trend of the intersection line is towards 301°.

  17. Postural Stability Margins as a Function of Support Surface Slopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviroop Dutt-Mazumder

    Full Text Available This investigation examined the effects of slope of the surface of support (35°, 30°, 20°, 10° Facing(Toe Down, 0° Flat and 10°, 20°, 25° Facing (Toe Up and postural orientation on the margins of postural stability in quiet standing of young adults. The findings showed that the center of pressure-CoP (displacement, area and length had least motion at the baseline (0° Flat platform condition that progressively increased as a function of platform angle in both facing up and down directions. The virtual time to collision (VTC dynamics revealed that the spatio-temporal margins to the functional stability boundary were progressively smaller and the VTC time series also more regular (SampEn-Sample Entropy as slope angle increased. Surface slope induces a restricted stability region with lower dimension VTC dynamics that is more constrained when postural orientation is facing down the slope. These findings provide further evidence that VTC acts as a control variable in standing posture that is influenced by the emergent dynamics of the individual-environment-task interaction.

  18. Infiltration on mountain slopes: a comparison of three environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carol P. Harden*; P. Delmas Scruggs

    2003-01-01

    Water is well established as a major driver of the geomorphic change that eventually reduces mountains to lower relief landscapes. Nonetheless, within the altitudinal limits of continuous vegetation in humid climates, water is also an essential factor in slope stability. In this paper, we present results from field experiments to determine infiltration rates at...

  19. 30 CFR 785.15 - Steep slope mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Steep slope mining. 785.15 Section 785.15 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SURFACE COAL MINING AND RECLAMATION OPERATIONS PERMITS AND COAL EXPLORATION SYSTEMS UNDER REGULATORY PROGRAMS...

  20. Challenging conservation agriculture on marginal slopes in Sehoul, Morocco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwilch, G.; Laouina, A.; Chaker, M.; Machouri, N.; Sfa, M.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2015-01-01

    In Sehoul, Morocco, the use of marginal land for agriculture became a necessity for the local population due to increased poverty and the occupation of the best land by new owners. Desertification poses an additional threat to agricultural production on marginal slopes, which are often stony and

  1. A global safety deficiency : False glide slope capture affecting aircraft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurman, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    A serious incident occurred at Eindhoven Airport (Netherlands) in May 2013. A Boeing 737-800 performed a go-around while using the Instrument Landing System (ILS). The flight crew reported a False Glide Slope capture as the reason for the go-around.
    At first the occurrence report did not really

  2. Automating slope monitoring in mines with terrestrial lidar scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, Dario

    2014-05-01

    Static terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) have been an important component of slope monitoring for some time, and many solutions for monitoring the progress of a slide have been devised over the years. However, all of these solutions have required users to operate the lidar equipment in the field, creating a high cost in time and resources, especially if the surveys must be performed very frequently. This paper presents a new solution for monitoring slides, developed using a TLS and an automated data acquisition, processing and analysis system. In this solution, a TLS is permanently mounted within sight of the target surface and connected to a control computer. The control software on the computer automatically triggers surveys according to a user-defined schedule, parses data into point clouds, and compares data against a baseline. The software can base the comparison against either the original survey of the site or the most recent survey, depending on whether the operator needs to measure the total or recent movement of the slide. If the displacement exceeds a user-defined safety threshold, the control computer transmits alerts via SMS text messaging and/or email, including graphs and tables describing the nature and size of the displacement. The solution can also be configured to trigger the external visual/audio alarm systems. If the survey areas contain high-traffic areas such as roads, the operator can mark them for exclusion in the comparison to prevent false alarms. To improve usability and safety, the control computer can connect to a local intranet and allow remote access through the software's web portal. This enables operators to perform most tasks with the TLS from their office, including reviewing displacement reports, downloading survey data, and adjusting the scan schedule. This solution has proved invaluable in automatically detecting and alerting users to potential danger within the monitored areas while lowering the cost and work required for

  3. Effects of rainfall intensity and slope gradient on runoff and sediment yield characteristics of bare loess soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lei; Peng, Mengling; Qiao, Shanshan; Ma, Xiao-Yi

    2018-02-01

    Soil erosion is a universal phenomenon on the Loess Plateau but it exhibits complex and typical mechanism which makes it difficult to understand soil loss laws on slopes. We design artificial simulated rainfall experiments including six rainfall intensities (45, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120 mm/h) and five slopes (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, 25°) to reveal the fundamental changing trends of runoff and sediment yield on bare loess soil. Here, we show that the runoff yield within the initial 15 min increased rapidly and its trend gradually became stable. Trends of sediment yield under different rainfall intensities are various. The linear correlation between runoff and rainfall intensity is obvious for different slopes, but the correlations between sediment yield and rainfall intensity are weak. Runoff and sediment yield on the slope surface both presents an increasing trend when the rainfall intensity increases from 45 mm/h to 120 mm/h, but the increasing trend of runoff yield is higher than that of sediment yield. The sediment yield also has an overall increasing trend when the slope changes from 5° to 25°, but the trend of runoff yield is not obvious. Our results may provide data support and underlying insights needed to guide the management of soil conservation planning on the Loess Plateau.

  4. The 137Cs technique applied to steep Mediterranean slopes (Part I): the effects of lithology, slope morphology and land use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoorl, J.M.; Boix Fayos, C.; Meijer, de R.J.; Graaff, van der E.R.; Veldkamp, A.

    2004-01-01

    Concentrations in the soil of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides have been investigated in order to assess the applicability of the Cs-137 technique in an area of typical Mediterranean steep slopes. This technique can be used to estimate net soil redistribution rates but its potential in areas

  5. The Cs-137 technique applied to steep Mediterranean slopes (Part I) : the effects of lithology, slope morphology and land use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Meijer, R.J.; van der Graaf, E.R.

    2004-01-01

    Concentrations in the soil of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides have been investigated in order to assess the applicability of the Cs-137 technique in an area of typical Mediterranean steep slopes. This technique can be used to estimate net soil redistribution rates but its potential in areas

  6. Submarine landslides on the north continental slope of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiwei; Wang, Dawei; Wu, Shiguo; Völker, David; Zeng, Hongliu; Cai, Guanqiang; Li, Qingping

    2018-02-01

    Recent and paleo-submarine landslides are widely distributed within strata in deep-water areas along continental slopes, uplifts, and carbonate platforms on the north continental margin of the South China Sea (SCS). In this paper, high-resolution 3D seismic data and multibeam data based on seismic sedimentology and geomorphology are employed to assist in identifying submarine landslides. In addition, deposition models are proposed that are based on specific geological structures and features, and which illustrate the local stress field over entire submarine landslides in deep-water areas of the SCS. The SCS is one of the largest fluvial sediment sinks in enclosed or semi-enclosed marginal seas worldwide. It therefore provides a set of preconditions for the formation of submarine landslides, including rapid sediment accumulation, formation of gas hydrates, and fluid overpressure. A new concept involving temporal and spatial analyses is tested to construct a relationship between submarine landslides and different time scale trigger mechanisms, and three mechanisms are discussed in the context of spatial scale and temporal frequency: evolution of slope gradient and overpressure, global environmental changes, and tectonic events. Submarine landslides that are triggered by tectonic events are the largest but occur less frequently, while submarine landslides triggered by the combination of slope gradient and over-pressure evolution are the smallest but most frequently occurring events. In summary, analysis shows that the formation of submarine landslides is a complex process involving the operation of different factors on various time scales.

  7. A Tilt, Soil Moisture, and Pore Water Pressure Sensor System for Slope Monitoring Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanno de Dios

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design, implementation and characterization of a sensor network intended for monitoring of slope deformation and potential failures. The sensor network system consists of a tilt and moisture sensor column, a pore water pressure sensor column and a personal computer for data storage and processing. The tilt sensor column consists of several pipe segments containing tri-axial accelerometers and signal processing electronics. Each segment is joined together by flexible joints to allow for the column to deform and subsequently track underground movement. Capacitive-type sensors for soil moisture measurement are also included in the sensor column, which are used to measure the soil moisture at different depths. The measurements at each segment are transferred via a Controller Area Network (CAN bus, where the CAN master node is located at the top of the column above ground. The CAN master node transmits the collected data from the slave nodes via a wireless connection to a personal computer that performs data storage, processing and display via a Python-based graphical user interface (GUI. The entire system was deployed and characterized on a small-scale slope model. Slope failure was induced via water seepage and the system was demonstrated to ably measure the inclination and soil moisture content throughout the landslide event.

  8. Logisnet: A tool for multimethod, multiple soil layers slope stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta Paulin, G.; Bursik, M.

    2009-05-01

    Shallow landslides and slope failures have been studied from several points of view (inventory, heuristic, statistic, and deterministic). In particular, numerous methods embedded in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications have been developed to assess slope stability. However, little work has been done on the systematic comparison of different techniques and the incorporation of vertical contrasts of geotechnical properties in multiple soil layers. In this research, stability is modeled by using LOGISNET, an acronym for Multiple Logistic Regression, Geographic Information System, and Neural Network. The main purpose of LOGISNET is to provide government planners and decision makers a tool to assess landslide susceptibility. The system is fully operational for models handling an enhanced cartographic-hydrologic model (SINMAP) and multiple logistic regression. The enhanced implementation of SINMAP was tested at regional scale in the Highway 101 corridor in Del Norte County, California, and its susceptibility map was found to have improved factor of safety estimates based on comparison with landslide inventory maps. The enhanced SINMAP and multiple logistic regression subsystems have functions that allow the user to include vertical variation in geotechnical properties through summation of forces in specific soil layers acting on failure planes for a local or regional-scale mapping. The working group of LOGISNET foresees the development of an integrated tool system to handle and support the prognostic studies of slope instability, and communicate the results to the public through maps.

  9. Effects of topographic data quality on estimates of shallow slope stability using different regolith depth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex L.

    2017-01-01

    Thickness of colluvium or regolith overlying bedrock or other consolidated materials is a major factor in determining stability of unconsolidated earth materials on steep slopes. Many efforts to model spatially distributed slope stability, for example to assess susceptibility to shallow landslides, have relied on estimates of constant thickness, constant depth, or simple models of thickness (or depth) based on slope and other topographic variables. Assumptions of constant depth or thickness rarely give satisfactory results. Geomorphologists have devised a number of different models to represent the spatial variability of regolith depth and applied them to various settings. I have applied some of these models that can be implemented numerically to different study areas with different types of terrain and tested the results against available depth measurements and landslide inventories. The areas include crystalline rocks of the Colorado Front Range, and gently dipping sedimentary rocks of the Oregon Coast Range. Model performance varies with model, terrain type, and with quality of the input topographic data. Steps in contour-derived 10-m digital elevation models (DEMs) introduce significant errors into the predicted distribution of regolith and landslides. Scan lines, facets, and other artifacts further degrade DEMs and model predictions. Resampling to a lower grid-cell resolution can mitigate effects of facets in lidar DEMs of areas where dense forest severely limits ground returns. Due to its higher accuracy and ability to penetrate vegetation, lidar-derived topography produces more realistic distributions of cover and potential landslides than conventional photogrammetrically derived topographic data.

  10. Real time monitoring of slope condition for transmission tower safety in Kenyir, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, R. C.; Ismail, A.; Khalid, N. H. N.; Din, N. M.; Hussain, H.; Jamaludin, M. Z.; Abdullah, F.; Arazad, A. Z.; Yusop, H.

    2013-06-01

    The Malaysia national electricity grid traverses throughout the nation over urban and rural areas including mountainous terrain. A major number of the transmission towers have been in existence for over 40 years and some traversed through very remote and high altitude areas like the Titiwangsa range that forms the backbone of the Malay Peninsula. This paper describes the instrumentation and real time monitoring in a transmission tower site in Kenyir, a hilly terrain in the East Coast of Malaysia. The site itself which is between 300-500m above sea level is deep in the rainforest area of Kenyir. The site and surrounding areas has been identified with signs of slope failure. A design concern is the real time slope monitoring sensors reliability and data integrity from the remote area with potential interference to the electronics equipment from the power line. The monitoring system comprised of an automated system for collecting and reporting field monitoring data. The instruments collect readings and transmit real time through GSM to the monitoring office over designated intervals. This initiative is a part of a project on developing an early warning system for monitoring landslide hazards at selected transmission towers. This paper reviews the various instrumentation used and challenges faced and the output received for slope movement warnings.

  11. Real time monitoring of slope condition for transmission tower safety in Kenyir, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omar, R C; Ismail, A; Khalid, N H N; Din, N M; Hussain, H; Jamaludin, M Z; Abdullah, F; Arazad, A Z; Yusop, H

    2013-01-01

    The Malaysia national electricity grid traverses throughout the nation over urban and rural areas including mountainous terrain. A major number of the transmission towers have been in existence for over 40 years and some traversed through very remote and high altitude areas like the Titiwangsa range that forms the backbone of the Malay Peninsula. This paper describes the instrumentation and real time monitoring in a transmission tower site in Kenyir, a hilly terrain in the East Coast of Malaysia. The site itself which is between 300–500m above sea level is deep in the rainforest area of Kenyir. The site and surrounding areas has been identified with signs of slope failure. A design concern is the real time slope monitoring sensors reliability and data integrity from the remote area with potential interference to the electronics equipment from the power line. The monitoring system comprised of an automated system for collecting and reporting field monitoring data. The instruments collect readings and transmit real time through GSM to the monitoring office over designated intervals. This initiative is a part of a project on developing an early warning system for monitoring landslide hazards at selected transmission towers. This paper reviews the various instrumentation used and challenges faced and the output received for slope movement warnings.

  12. Risk assessment and management of unstable slopes on the national forest estate in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, M.; Nettelton, I.; Leech, K.

    2015-09-01

    The National Forest Estate in Scotland has a wide range of geotechnical hazards present, primarily landslides, which may cause a significant risk to people and key infrastructure. UK land owners are increasingly required to understand the risks associated with their land and how their activities may affect landsliding and, in particular, where landslides originating from their land may impact third party assets. A Geographic Information System (GIS) based landslide susceptibility assessment by the British Geological Survey (BGS) identified a number of sites in the National Forest Estate as being susceptible to landslide hazards. Coffey Geotechnics Ltd and the BGS are currently undertaking “ground- truthing” of selected sites to identify and characterise the hazards, pathways and elements at risk. A “Slope Stability Appraisal of Risk” system was used to assign a risk category to areas identified during the “ground-truthing” phase which need to be managed. This system is based on the combination of hazards, receptor type, vulnerability and pathway in a similar manner to that of the Australian Geomechanics Society. A long term strategy for risk management of unstable slopes is under development by Forestry Commission Scotland to provide strategic guidance on future land management and guidance for existing felled sites. Options for risk management include: maintenance of existing systems i.e. drainage; silviculture where establishment of woodland can assist in slope stabilisation; and engineering works such as barrier systems, retaining structures and rock remedial works.

  13. Numerical analysis of free convection in cold helium vapor flows in a long sloped pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fydrych, J.; Pietrowicz, S.

    2017-12-01

    The cryogenic systems of large scientific facilities using superfluid helium technologies include a cold helium circuit composed of a subcooled liquid helium supply line and a low-pressure return line. Due to long distances between the cryogenic plant and cryogenic users the line lengths can reach hundreds or even thousands of meters. Usually the low-pressure return line is a large size pipe, which inner diameter can exceed 300 mm. In some cases the accelerators and also the cold helium circuit lines are sloped. In some transient modes there is a risk of a counter flow in the low-pressure return line. This counter flow phenomenon can be driven mainly by free convection and it can disturb the cool down dynamics or affect the performance characteristic of some cryogenic devices, which are sensitive to cool down rates. This paper presents a numerical analysis of free convection in cold helium vapor flows in a long straight and sloped line. The methodology of numerical modeling of the thermo-hydraulic phenomena is described in detail. The results of the numerical simulations performed for various pipe lengths, slopes and mass flow rates are compiled and discussed.

  14. BAM: Bayesian AMHG-Manning Inference of Discharge Using Remotely Sensed Stream Width, Slope, and Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, M. W.; Gleason, C. J.; Durand, M. T.

    2017-11-01

    The forthcoming Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) NASA satellite mission will measure water surface width, height, and slope of major rivers worldwide. The resulting data could provide an unprecedented account of river discharge at continental scales, but reliable methods need to be identified prior to launch. Here we present a novel algorithm for discharge estimation from only remotely sensed stream width, slope, and height at multiple locations along a mass-conserved river segment. The algorithm, termed the Bayesian AMHG-Manning (BAM) algorithm, implements a Bayesian formulation of streamflow uncertainty using a combination of Manning's equation and at-many-stations hydraulic geometry (AMHG). Bayesian methods provide a statistically defensible approach to generating discharge estimates in a physically underconstrained system but rely on prior distributions that quantify the a priori uncertainty of unknown quantities including discharge and hydraulic equation parameters. These were obtained from literature-reported values and from a USGS data set of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements at USGS stream gauges. A data set of simulated widths, slopes, and heights from 19 rivers was used to evaluate the algorithms using a set of performance metrics. Results across the 19 rivers indicate an improvement in performance of BAM over previously tested methods and highlight a path forward in solving discharge estimation using solely satellite remote sensing.

  15. Slope Reinforcement with the Utilization of the Coal Waste Anthropogenic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwóźdź-Lasoń, Monika

    2017-10-01

    The protection of the environment, including waste management, is one of the pillars of the policy of the Europe. The application which is presented in that paper tries to show a trans-disciplinary way to design geotechnical constructions - slope stability analysis. The generally accepted principles that the author presents are numerous modelling patterns of earth retaining walls as slope stabilization system. The paper constitutes an attempt to summarise and generalise earlier researches which involved FEM numeric procedures and the Z_Soil package. The design of anthropogenic soil used as a material for reinforced earth retaining walls, are not only of commercial but of environmental importance as well and consistent with the concept of sustainable development and the need to redevelop brownfield. This paper tries to show conceptual and empirical modelling approaches to slope stability system used in anthropogenic soil formation such as heaps, resulting from mining, with a special focus on urban areas of South of Poland and perspectives of anthropogenic materials application in geotechnical engineering are discussed.

  16. Sensitivity analysis and calibration of a dynamic physically based slope stability model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieher, Thomas; Rutzinger, Martin; Schneider-Muntau, Barbara; Perzl, Frank; Leidinger, David; Formayer, Herbert; Geitner, Clemens

    2017-06-01

    Physically based modelling of slope stability on a catchment scale is still a challenging task. When applying a physically based model on such a scale (1 : 10 000 to 1 : 50 000), parameters with a high impact on the model result should be calibrated to account for (i) the spatial variability of parameter values, (ii) shortcomings of the selected model, (iii) uncertainties of laboratory tests and field measurements or (iv) parameters that cannot be derived experimentally or measured in the field (e.g. calibration constants). While systematic parameter calibration is a common task in hydrological modelling, this is rarely done using physically based slope stability models. In the present study a dynamic, physically based, coupled hydrological-geomechanical slope stability model is calibrated based on a limited number of laboratory tests and a detailed multitemporal shallow landslide inventory covering two landslide-triggering rainfall events in the Laternser valley, Vorarlberg (Austria). Sensitive parameters are identified based on a local one-at-a-time sensitivity analysis. These parameters (hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, angle of internal friction for effective stress, cohesion for effective stress) are systematically sampled and calibrated for a landslide-triggering rainfall event in August 2005. The identified model ensemble, including 25 behavioural model runs with the highest portion of correctly predicted landslides and non-landslides, is then validated with another landslide-triggering rainfall event in May 1999. The identified model ensemble correctly predicts the location and the supposed triggering timing of 73.0 % of the observed landslides triggered in August 2005 and 91.5 % of the observed landslides triggered in May 1999. Results of the model ensemble driven with raised precipitation input reveal a slight increase in areas potentially affected by slope failure. At the same time, the peak run-off increases more markedly, suggesting that

  17. Instrumental record of debris flow initiation during natural rainfall: Implications for modeling slope stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, D.R.; Schmidt, K.M.; Dietrich, W.E.; McKean, J.

    2009-01-01

    The middle of a hillslope hollow in the Oregon Coast Range failed and mobilized as a debris flow during heavy rainfall in November 1996. Automated pressure transducers recorded high spatial variability of pore water pressure within the area that mobilized as a debris flow, which initiated where local upward flow from bedrock developed into overlying colluvium. Postfailure observations of the bedrock surface exposed in the debris flow scar reveal a strong spatial correspondence between elevated piezometric response and water discharging from bedrock fractures. Measurements of apparent root cohesion on the basal (Cb) and lateral (Cl) scarp demonstrate substantial local variability, with areally weighted values of Cb = 0.1 and Cl = 4.6 kPa. Using measured soil properties and basal root strength, the widely used infinite slope model, employed assuming slope parallel groundwater flow, provides a poor prediction of hydrologie conditions at failure. In contrast, a model including lateral root strength (but neglecting lateral frictional strength) gave a predicted critical value of relative soil saturation that fell within the range defined by the arithmetic and geometric mean values at the time of failure. The 3-D slope stability model CLARA-W, used with locally observed pore water pressure, predicted small areas with lower factors of safety within the overall slide mass at sites consistent with field observations of where the failure initiated. This highly variable and localized nature of small areas of high pore pressure that can trigger slope failure means, however, that substantial uncertainty appears inevitable for estimating hydrologie conditions within incipient debris flows under natural conditions. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Determination of the forward slope in $p~p$ and $\\bar p~p$ elastic scattering up to LHC energy

    CERN Document Server

    Bourrely, C; Wu, T T

    2011-01-01

    In the analysis of experimental data on $p p$ (or $\\bar p p$) elastic differential cross section it is customary to define an average forward slope $b$ in the form $\\exp{(-b|t|)}$ where $t$ is the momentum transfer. Taking as working example the results of experiments at Tevatron and SPS, we will show with the help of the impact picture approach, that this simplifying assumption hides interesting information on the complex non-flip scattering amplitude, and that the slope $b$ is not a constant. We investigate the variation of this slope parameter, including a model-independent way to extract this information from an accurate measurement of the elastic differential cross section. An extension of our results to the LHC energy domain is presented in view of future experiments.

  19. Cooperative Three-Robot System for Traversing Steep Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroupe, Ashley; Huntsberger, Terrance; Aghazarian, Hrand; Younse, Paulo; Garrett, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Teamed Robots for Exploration and Science in Steep Areas (TRESSA) is a system of three autonomous mobile robots that cooperate with each other to enable scientific exploration of steep terrain (slope angles up to 90 ). Originally intended for use in exploring steep slopes on Mars that are not accessible to lone wheeled robots (Mars Exploration Rovers), TRESSA and systems like TRESSA could also be used on Earth for performing rescues on steep slopes and for exploring steep slopes that are too remote or too dangerous to be explored by humans. TRESSA is modeled on safe human climbing of steep slopes, two key features of which are teamwork and safety tethers. Two of the autonomous robots, denoted Anchorbots, remain at the top of a slope; the third robot, denoted the Cliffbot, traverses the slope. The Cliffbot drives over the cliff edge supported by tethers, which are payed out from the Anchorbots (see figure). The Anchorbots autonomously control the tension in the tethers to counter the gravitational force on the Cliffbot. The tethers are payed out and reeled in as needed, keeping the body of the Cliffbot oriented approximately parallel to the local terrain surface and preventing wheel slip by controlling the speed of descent or ascent, thereby enabling the Cliffbot to drive freely up, down, or across the slope. Due to the interactive nature of the three-robot system, the robots must be very tightly coupled. To provide for this tight coupling, the TRESSA software architecture is built on a combination of (1) the multi-robot layered behavior-coordination architecture reported in "An Architecture for Controlling Multiple Robots" (NPO-30345), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 65, and (2) the real-time control architecture reported in "Robot Electronics Architecture" (NPO-41784), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 1 (January 2008), page 28. The combination architecture makes it possible to keep the three robots synchronized and coordinated, to use data

  20. Development of certain aspects of colloid chemistry and physical-chemical mechanics of disperse systems and materials in relation to stability of slopes and grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Plugin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the motive force of the movement the particles in dispersed systems, which include soils, when load is just sole weight of the array was investigated. It is shown that the shearing force of the weight of the soil and the specific cohesion which taken into account in calculating the stability of slopes of embankments and landslides on the slopes, much less than real. The calculations showed that the electrophoretic mechanism is a very real explanation of the observed sliding the upper part of the slope.

  1. Geomorphology and benthic cover of mesophotic coral ecosystems of the upper insular slope of southwest Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, C.; Nemeth, M.; Ruíz, H.; Bejarano, I.; Appeldoorn, R.; Pagán, F.; Schärer, M.; Weil, E.

    2010-06-01

    The upper insular slope of southwest Puerto Rico is defined as extending from the shelf break at ~20 m water depth down to a depth of ~160 m where there is a pronounced change in geomorphic character and the basal slope begins. The upper slope is divided into two geomorphic zones separated by a pronounced break in slope gradient at ~90 m water depth. Descending from the shelf break, these are Zone I (20-90 m) and Zone II (90-160 m). As orientation of the shelf margin changes, geomorphology of Zone I shows systematic variations consistent with changes in exposure to prevailing waves. Within Zone I, exposed southeast-facing slopes have a gentler gradient and lower relief than more sheltered southwest-facing slopes, which are steep and irregular. Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs) are largely restricted to Zone I and concentrated on topographic highs removed from the influence of active downslope sediment transport. Accordingly, MCEs are more abundant, extensive and diverse on southwest-facing slopes where irregular topography funnels downslope sediment transport into steep narrow grooves. MCEs are more sporadic and widely spaced on southeast-facing slopes where topographic highs are more widely spaced and downslope sediment transport is spread over open, low-relief slopes inhibiting coral recruitment and growth. Relict features formed during preexisting sea levels lower than present include deep buttresses at ~45-65 m water depth and a prominent terrace at ~80 m. Based on correlations with existing reef accretion and sea-level records, it is proposed that the 80-m terrace formed during the last deglaciation ~14-15 ka and subsequently drowned during a period of rapid sea-level rise associated with meltwater pulse 1A at ~14 ka and deep buttresses at ~45-65 m formed between ~11.5 and 13.5 ka and then drowned during a period of rapid sea-level rise associated with meltwater pulse 1B at ~11.3 ka.

  2. Physical model studies of seismically induced deformations in slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartman, Joseph

    Physical model experiments were conducted on a 1-g shaking table with the goals of: (1) investigating the mechanisms of seismically induced permanent deformations in slopes and embankments, (2) assessing the accuracy and applicability of the popular "Newmark-type" procedures for estimating deformations in slopes, and (3) developing a suite of fully defined "model-scale" case histories for calibration of existing numerical procedures for predicting seismic slope deformations and for the future development of advanced numerical analyses. The inclined plane experiments indicated that the Newmark (1965) sliding block procedure generally provides unconservative estimates of deformation when the predominant frequency of the input motion is 0.2 to 1.5 times the natural frequency of the sliding mass. Conversely, the procedure was found to be generally conservative when the frequency ratio is in the range of about 1.5 to 2.2. The inclined plane tests also suggest that one-dimensional decoupled deformation analyses are generally conservative, with decoupled analyses overpredicting measured deformations by about 10% to 20% for the tests analyzed. The model slopes were commonly observed to displace along two or more localized shear surfaces. The multiple shear surfaces were typically of the same orientation and generally located within relatively close proximity of each other. Surface deformations varied over the length of each model, with the largest displacements occurring at the toe or along the face of the slope. Newmark's (1965) assumption that deformation occurs along a single surface reasonably approximated the actual deformation behavior for tests where multiple shear surfaces developed in close proximity to each other. For approximately half the tests, however, the single surface assumption proved to be an oversimplification. Accuracy was improved when the Newmark (1965) procedure was modified by using the acceleration-time history recorded in the soil immediately

  3. Uric acid-derived Fe3C-containing mesoporous Fe/N/C composite with high activity for oxygen reduction reaction in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Xiao, Dejian; Chen, Chang Li; Luo, Qiaomei; Yu, Yue; Zhou, Junhao; Guo, Changding; Li, Kai; Ma, Jie; Zheng, Lirong; Zuo, Xia

    2018-02-01

    In this work, a category of Fe3C-containing Fe/N/C mesoporous material has been fabricated by carbonizing the mixture of uric acid, Iron (Ⅲ) chloride anhydrous and carbon support (XC-72) under different pyrolysis temperature. Of all these samples, pyrolysis temperature (800 °C) becomes the most crucial factor in forming Fe3C active sites which synergizes with high content of graphitic N to catalyze oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) is used to exhibit that the space structure around Fe atoms in the catalyst. This kind of catalyst possesses comparable ORR properties with commercial 20% Pt/C (onset potential is 0 V vs. Ag/AgCl in 0.1 M KOH), the average transfer electron number is 3.84 reflecting the 4-electron process. Moreover, superior stability and methanol tolerance deserve to be mentioned.

  4. Environmental Assessment of Construction of Antenna Parts Storage Facility, Upgrade of Perimeter Security Fence, Demolition of Storage Shed, Hawkinsville Air Force Space Surveillance Station, Hawkinsville, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    would be a mini - mum of 325 square feet with a minimum facility length of 25 feet. A facility length of 25 feet is needed to accommodate the largest...Swell Flooding Slope TfA Tifton loamy sand Low No annual flooding or ponding 0 to 2 percent slopes TfB Tifton loamy sand Low No annual flooding...or ponding 2 to 5 percent slopes Ra Rains loamy sand Low Rare to common Nearly level TnC2 Tifton sandy loam Low No annual flooding or ponding 5

  5. Mathematical modeling of slope flows with entrainment as flows of non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayko, Julia; Eglit, Margarita

    2015-04-01

    Non-Newtonian fluids in which the shear stresses are nonlinear functions of the shear strain rates are used to model slope flows such as snow avalanches, mudflows, debris flows. The entrainment of bottom material is included into the model basing on the assumption that in entraining flows the bed friction is equal to the shear stress of the bottom material (Issler et al, 2011). Unsteady motion down long homogeneous slopes with constant inclines is studied numerically for different flow rheologies and different slope angles. Variation of the velocity profile, increase of the flow depth and velocity due to entrainment as well as the value of the entrainment rate is calculated. Asymptotic formulae for the entrainment rate are derived for unsteady flows of different rheological properties. REFERENCES Chowdhury M., Testik F., 2011. Laboratory testing of mathematical models for high-concentration fluid mud turbidity currents. Ocean Engineering 38, 256-270. Eglit, M.E., Demidov, K.S., 2005. Mathematical modeling of snow entrainment in avalanche motion. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 43 (1-2), 10-23. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2012, Mathematical Modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Eglit M. E., Yakubenko A. E., 2014, Numerical modeling of slope flows entraining bottom material. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 108, 139-148. Issler D, M. Pastor Peréz. 2011. Interplay of entrainment and rheology in snow avalanches; a numerical study. Annals of Glaciology, 52(58), pp.143-147 Kern M. A., Tiefenbacher F., McElwaine J., N., 2004. The rheology of snow in large chute flows. Cold Regions Science and Technology, 39, 181 -192. Naaim, M., Faug, T., Naaim-Bouvet, F., 2003. Dry granular flow modelling including erosion and deposition. Surv. Geophys. 24, 569-585. Naaim, M., Naaim-Bouvet, F., Faug, T., Bouchet, A., 2004. Dense snow avalanche modeling: flow, erosion, deposition and obstacle effects. Cold Reg. Sci. Technol. 39, 193-204. Rougier, J & Kern, M 2010, 'Predicting snow

  6. Materials Science Problems of the SCRF Q-Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Z.; Norem, J.; Swenson, D. R.; Hassanein, A.

    2006-11-01

    None of the existing theoretical models can explain all the observed features of the Q-slope. In the present work, we review this problem and show how Atom Probe Tomography and Gas Cluster Ion Beam smoothing can study the basic mechanisms that may be involved. The gas cluster ion beam (GCIB) treatment method has recently been proposed as a new way to significantly reduce the surface roughness and the dark current from the rf-cavity surfaces. In addition to the suppression of the dark current, GCIB might also be an important treatment for mitigation of the Q-slope in superconducting cavities. Niobium surface treatment by cluster ion irradiation was studied based on atomistic and mesoscopic simulation methods and the surface modification dynamics results were compared to experiments.

  7. Integration of Indoor Ski Slopes into the Urban Recreation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Urbonaitė

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Indoor ski slope is an innovative type of active indoor recreation. This new urban character is simulating the concept of mountain ski resort and is considered to be a strong attraction point all year-round. Due to a big scale and complexity, sustainable integration into an urban context should be very carefully considered. Economical, social, environmental and aesthetic impact on surrounding territories is an important factor to be evaluated. International practice shows that the appropriate integration of the above mentioned typology into urban parks increase their popularity and use of the recreation zone. On the other hand, the alien architecture and egocentric dominance of complexes can cause conflict with the existing urban territories and natural environment. Having indoor ski slopes in mind at the stages of regional and town territorial planning is an important point. Only complex development can bring positive results for sustainable town development, town economy, tourism and social life. Article in Lithuanian

  8. Optimal velocity in the race over variable slope trace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroński, Ryszard; Samoraj, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    The minimum-time running problem is reconsidered. The time of covering a given distance is minimized. The function that should be found is the runner's velocity that varies with the distance. The Hill-Keller model of motion is employed. It is based on the Newton second law and an equation of power balance. The new element of the current approach is that the trace slope angle varies with the distance. The problem is formulated and solved in optimal control applying the Chebyshev direct pseudospectral method. The essential finding is that the optimal velocity during the cruise is constant regardless of the local slope of the terrain. Such result is valid if the inequality constraints imposed on the propulsive force or the energy are not active.

  9. Conservation laws for shallow water waves on a sloping beach

    OpenAIRE

    Akyildiz, Yilmaz

    1986-01-01

    Shallow water waves are governed by a pair of non-linear partial differential equations. We transfer the associated homogeneous and non-homogeneous systems, (corresponding to constant and sloping depth, respectively), to the hodograph plane where we find all the non-simple wave solutions and construct infinitely many polynomial conservation laws. We also establish correspondence between conservation laws and hodograph solutions as well as Bäcklund transformations by using the linear nature of...

  10. Center Line Slope Analysis in Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    ?anda, Franti?ek; Perl?k, V?clav; Lincoln, Craig N.; Hauer, J?rgen

    2015-01-01

    Center line slope (CLS) analysis in 2D infrared spectroscopy has been extensively used to extract frequency?frequency correlation functions of vibrational transitions. We apply this concept to 2D electronic spectroscopy, where CLS is a measure of electronic gap fluctuations. The two domains, infrared and electronic, possess differences: In the infrared, the frequency fluctuations are classical, often slow and Gaussian. In contrast, electronic spectra are subject to fast spectral diffusion and...

  11. Evaluation of Thermoelectric Devices by the Slope-Efficiency Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    materials: the Seebeck coefficient, α; the electrical resistivity , ρ; and the thermal conductivity, κ. However, experimental measurement of those...Rload, then total system resistance is equal to 2Rint and open- circuit voltage, Voc, drops by half leading to Approved for public release...Evaluation of Thermoelectric Devices by the Slope-Efficiency Method by Patrick J Taylor Sensors and Electron Devices Directorate, ARL Jay R

  12. Low-velocity impact cratering experiments in granular slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Kosuke; Sumita, Ikuro

    2017-07-01

    Low-velocity impact cratering experiments are conducted in sloped granular targets to study the effect of the slope angle θ on the crater shape and its scales. We use two types of granular matter, sand and glass beads, former of which has a larger friction coefficient μs = tanθr , where θr is the angle of repose. Experiments show that as θ increases, the crater becomes shallower and elongated in the direction of the slope. Furthermore the crater floor steepens in the upslope side and a thick rim forms in the downslope side, thus forming an asymmetric profile. High-speed images show that these features are results of ejecta being dispersed farther towards the downslope side and the subsequent avalanche which buries much of the crater floor. Such asymmetric ejecta dispersal can be explained by combining the Z-model and a ballistic model. Using the topographic maps of the craters, we classify crater shape regimes I-III, which transition with increasing θ : a full-rim crater (I), a broken-rim crater (II), and a depression (III). The critical θ for the regime transitions are larger for sand compared to glass beads, but collapse to close values when we use a normalized slope θ^ = tanθ / tanθr . Similarly we derive θ^-dependences of the scaled crater depth, length, width and their ratios which collapse the results for different targets and impact energies. We compare the crater profiles formed in our experiments with deep craters on asteroid Vesta and find that some of the scaled profiles nearly overlap and many have similar depth / length ratios. This suggests that these Vestan craters may also have formed in the gravity regime and that the formation process can be approximated by a granular flow with a similar effective friction coefficient.

  13. [Current incidence of accidents on Austrian ski slopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedl, G; Philippe, M; Sommersacher, R; Dünnwald, T; Kopp, M; Burtscher, M

    2014-12-01

    Alpine skiing and snowboarding are the most popular winter sports. These sports are also associated with a certain injury risk which, however, has steadily decreased during the past decades. During the winter season 2002/2003 the last large survey on ski injuries in Austria was performed. Among others, modern skiing equipment and optimized slope preparation may impact on the injury risk. We hypothesise that these changes may have led to a further decrease in ski injuries during the past decade. In the winter season 2012/2013, skiing injuries were recorded in 26 Austrian ski areas. Data were collected from rescue personnel on ski slopes and by physicians in the hospital or doctors practice with the help of a questionnaire. A total of 7325 injured skiers and snowboarders (age: 34.8 ± 17.8 years) were recorded (49 % males and 51 % females; 80 % skiers, 14 % snowboarders, 6 % others). The most frequent causes of injury were self-inflicted falls (87 %) and collisions with other skiers/snowboarders (8 %). Most affected injury locations among skiers were the knee (41 %; predominantly in female skiers, > 50 %), shoulder/back (18 %) and arms (10 %). Most affected injury locations among snowboarders were arms (38 %) and shoulder/back (23 %). Head injuries were found at the same frequency (8 %) in skiers and snowboarders. The calculated injury rate was about 0.6 injuries per 1000 skier days and has decreased by more than 50 % during the past decade. Modern skiing equipment and optimised slope preparation may be at least partly responsible for the decreased injury risk on ski slopes which is supported by the observation of a reduced falling frequency. Future preventive measures should focus on a reduction of knee injuries in female skiers. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. A generalization of the Ross-Thomas slope theory

    OpenAIRE

    Odaka, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    We give a formula for the Donaldson--Futaki invariants of certain type of semi test configurations, which essentially generalizes the Ross--Thomas slope theory [28]. The positivity (resp. non-negativity) of those ``a priori special'' Donaldson--Futaki invariants implies K-stability (resp. K-semistability). As an application, we prove the K-(semi)stability of certain polarized varieties with semi-log-canonical singularities, which generalizes some results of [28].

  15. A generalization of Ross-Thomas' slope theory

    OpenAIRE

    Odaka, Yuji

    2009-01-01

    We give a formula of the Donaldson-Futaki invariants for certain type of semi test configurations, which essentially generalizes Ross-Thomas' slope theory. The positivity (resp. non-negativity) of those "a priori special" Donaldson-Futaki invariants implies K-stability (resp. K-semistability). We show its applicability by proving K-(semi)stability of certain polarized varieties with semi-log-canonical singularities, generalizing some results by Ross-Thomas.

  16. Vector polynomials for direct analysis of circular wavefront slope data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Virendra N; Acosta, Eva

    2017-10-01

    In the aberration analysis of a circular wavefront, Zernike circle polynomials are used to obtain its wave aberration coefficients. To obtain these coefficients from the wavefront slope data, we need vector functions that are orthogonal to the gradients of the Zernike polynomials, and are irrotational so as to propagate minimum uncorrelated random noise from the data to the coefficients. In this paper, we derive such vector functions, which happen to be polynomials.

  17. Review of the Frontier Workshop and Q-slope results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianluigi Ciovati

    2005-09-20

    Over the last few years, significant progress has been made to produce field emission free niobium surfaces. Nowadays, the major limitation towards achieving the critical field in radio-frequency (rf) superconducting cavities made of bulk niobium of high purity is represented by the so-called ''high field Q-slope'' or ''Q-drop''. This phenomenon is characterized by a sharp decrease of the cavity quality factor, in absence of field emission, starting at a peak surface magnetic field of the order of 100 mT. It has been observed that these losses are usually reduced by a low-temperature ''in-situ'' baking, typically at 100-120 C for 24-48 h. Several models have been proposed to explain the high field Q-slope and many experiments have been conducted in different laboratories to validate such models. A three-day workshop was held in Argonne in September 2004 to present and discuss experimental and theoretical results on the present limitations of superconducting rf cavities. In this paper, we will focus on the high field Q-slope by reviewing the results presented at the workshop along with other experimental data. In order to explain the Q-drop and the baking effect we will discuss an improved version of the oxygen diffusion model.

  18. Minimizing Slope and Kick of Intermediate Bunches for Electron Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Ions in the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider (JLEIC) will have transverse energy, which limits the beams density. Electron cooling is a process by which a beam of bunched electrons with small transverse kinetic energy is directed along the ion beam with the same velocity. The ions transfer their transverse kinetic energy to the electron bunches, making the ions lose transverse energy. Electron bunches will be supplied by an electron gun. The required current needed to cool the ion beam can be reached by reusing electrons and incorporating RF kicker cavities to supply a pulsed electric field that kicks every 11th bunch out of the cooling ring. This provides an exact solution that yields zero kick and slope to all intermediate bunches in the cooling ring, which is described by a cosine series with 11 terms. The goal of this project is to determine if solutions exist that are sufficiently close to zero kick and slope, but require less than 4 kicker cavities. The method used to find these solutions is minimizing an objective function through Sequential Least Squares Programming (SLSQP). A Pareto front then demonstrated the average kick vs. average slope when using 1 through 4 kickers.

  19. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

  20. Nocturnal Valley Cold Air Pool Displacement on a Desert Mountain Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeglum, M. E.; Hoch, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) program collected a high-resolution observational dataset to test and improve mesoscale model performance and weather prediction in complex terrain. One of the focal points of the MATERHORN field program was a relatively uniform mountain slope where large nocturnal temperature variations due to the displacement of a valley cold air pool (CAP) up the slope have been observed. CAP displacements can significantly impact the near-surface temperature and wind but are poorly represented in mesoscale models. This work aims to identify the spatial and temporal distribution of CAP displacements and the mechanisms causing them. CAP displacements are identified using data from a transect of 4 automatic weather stations (AWS) and 5 flux towers deployed on the east slope of Granite Peak (GP) in Northwest Utah. The instrument transect spans 130 m of elevation starting on the valley floor and rising up the uniform alluvial fan at the base of GP. 116 additional AWS's in the vicinity of GP are used to diagnose the mechanisms causing the displacements. The dense grid of observations allows the tracking of coherent features in the pressure, temperature, and wind fields as they interact with the CAP and the topography of GP. Two time periods, October 2012 and May 2013, were investigated for the presence of CAP displacements and their causes. In October, a typical night exhibits an average of 5 cold-pool displacement events that are evenly distributed between 2100 and 0500 MST when valley CAPs have developed. In May, fewer displacement events are observed (3 per night) and they occur preferentially later in the night, between 0000 and 0400 MST. Displacements are frequently associated with features that can be tracked across the plain surrounding GP. These features include slope and valley flow "fronts" descending the surrounding terrain, seiching, and mesoscale boundaries. In addition to describing the spatial and