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  1. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Simplifying cardiovascular risk estimation using resting heart rate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2010-09-01

    Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is a known, independent cardiovascular (CV) risk factor, but is not included in risk estimation systems, including Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). We aimed to derive risk estimation systems including RHR as an extra variable and assess the value of this addition.

  3. Effect of Smoking on Blood Pressure and Resting Heart Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke K; Skaaby, Tea

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Smoking is an important cardiovascular disease risk factor, but the mechanisms linking smoking to blood pressure are poorly understood. METHODS AND RESULTS: -Data on 141,317 participants (62,666 never, 40,669 former, 37,982 current smokers) from 23 population-based studies were...... included in observational and Mendelian randomisation (MR) meta-analyses of the associations of smoking status and smoking heaviness with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), hypertension, and resting heart rate. For the MR analyses, a genetic variant rs16969968/rs1051730 was used as a proxy...... for smoking heaviness in current smokers. In observational analyses, current as compared with never smoking was associated with lower SBP, DBP, and lower hypertension risk, but with higher resting heart rate. In observational analyses amongst current smokers, one cigarette/day higher level of smoking...

  4. Resting heart rate and cardiovascular events: risk factor or risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    syndrome. In 139 194 patients with a non-ST-segment elevated acute coronary syndrome (NONSTEMI), a clear. J-shaped correlation was found between resting heart and all-cause mortality.5 The lowest mortality rate were in patients with resting heart rates between 50 and 70 beats per minute, but mortality doubled when ...

  5. Resting heart rate is a predictor of mortality in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Marott, Jacob L; Lange, Peter; Vestbo, Jørgen; Schnohr, Peter; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Jensen, Jan Skov; Jensen, Gorm B

    2013-08-01

    The clinical significance of high heart rate in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is unexplored. We investigated the association between resting heart rate, pulmonary function, and prognosis in subjects with COPD. 16 696 subjects aged ≥40 years from the Copenhagen City Heart Study, a prospective study of the general population, were followed for 35.3 years, 10 986 deaths occurred. Analyses were performed using time-dependent Cox-models and net reclassification index (NRI). Resting heart rate increased with severity of COPD (p85 bpm was 5.5 years without COPD, 9.8 years in mild (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stage I), 6.7 years in moderate (GOLD stage II) and 5.9 years in severe/very severe COPD (GOLD stage III/IV), (pNRI 4.9%, p = 0.01; category less NRI 23.0%, pNRI 7.8%, p = 0.002; category less NRI 24.1%, p<0.0001). Resting heart rate increases with severity of COPD. Resting heart rate is a readily available clinical variable that improves risk prediction in patients with COPD above and beyond that of pulmonary function alone. Resting heart rate may be a potential target for intervention in COPD.

  6. Elevated resting heart rate in heart transplant recipients: innocent bystander or adverse prognostic indicator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, S Blake; McCandless, Sean P; Gilbert, Edward M; Stoddard, Gregory J; Kfoury, Abdallah G; Reid, Bruce B; McKellar, Stephen H; Nativi-Nicolau, Jose; Saidi, Abdulfattah; Barney, Jacob; McCreath, Lauren; Koliopoulou, Antigone; Wright, Spencer E; Fang, James C; Stehlik, Josef; Selzman, Craig H; Drakos, Stavros G

    2015-09-01

    The elevated baseline heart rate (HR) of a heart transplant recipient has previously been considered inconsequential. However, we hypothesized that a resting HR above 100 beats per minute (bpm) may be associated with morbidity and mortality. The U.T.A.H. Cardiac Transplant Program studied patients who received a heart transplant between 2000 and 2011. Outpatient HR values for each patient were averaged during the first year post-transplant. The study cohort was divided into two groups: the tachycardic (TC) (HR > 100 bpm) and the non-TC group (HR ≤ 100 bpm) in which mortality, incidence of rejection, and cardiac allograft vasculopathy were compared. Three hundred and ten patients were included as follows: 73 in the TC and 237 in the non-TC group. The TC group had a higher risk of a 10-yr all-cause mortality (p = 0.004) and cardiovascular mortality (p = 0.044). After adjustment for donor and recipient characteristics in multivariable logistic regression analysis, the hazard ratio was 3.9, (p = 0.03, CI: 1.2-13.2) and 2.6 (p = 0.02, CI: 1.2-5.5) for cardiovascular mortality and all-cause mortality, respectively. Heart transplant recipients with elevated resting HR appear to have higher mortality than those with lower resting HR. Whether pharmacologically lowering the HR would result in better outcomes warrants further investigation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Resting and maximal heart rates in ectothermic vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillywhite, H B; Zippel, K C; Farrell, A P

    1999-12-01

    Resting and maximal heart rates (HR) in ectothermic vertebrates are generally lower than those in endotherms and vary by more than an order of magnitude interspecifically. Variation of HR transcends phylogeny and is influenced by numerous factors including temperature, activity, gas exchange, intracardiac shunts, pH, posture, and reflexogenic regulation of blood pressure. The characteristic resting HR is rarely the intrinsic rate of the pacemaker, which is primarily modulated by cholinergic inhibition and adrenergic excitation in most species. Neuropeptides also appear to be involved in cardiac regulation, although their role is not well understood. The principal determinants of resting HR include temperature, metabolic rate and hemodynamic requirements. Maximal HRs generally do not exceed 120 b min-1, but notable exceptions include the heterothermic tuna and small reptiles having HRs in excess of 300 b min-1 at higher body temperatures. Temperature affects the intrinsic pacemaker rate as well as the relative influence of adrenergic and cholinergic modulation. It also influences the evolved capability to increase HR, with maximal cardiac responses matched to preferred body temperatures in some species. Additional factors either facilitate or limit the maximal level of HR, including: (1) characteristics of the pacemaker potential; (2) development of sarcoplasmic reticulum as a calcium store in excitation-contraction coupling; (3) low-resistance coupling of myocardial cells; (4) limitations of force development imposed by rate changes; (5) efficacy of sympathetic modulation; and (6) development of coronary circulation to enhance oxygen delivery to myocardium. In evolutionary terms, both hemodynamic and oxygen requirements appear to have been key selection pressures for rapid cardiac rates.

  8. Genome-wide association studies and resting heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the search for genetic variants regulating resting heart rate. In the last 10 years, GWASs have led to the identification of at least 21 novel heart rate loci. These discoveries have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms...... and pathways that regulate heart rate and link heart rate to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. GWASs capture majority of genetic variation in a population sample by utilizing high-throughput genotyping chips measuring genotypes for up to several millions of SNPs across the genome in thousands...... of individuals. This allows the identification of the strongest heart rate associated signals at genome-wide level. While GWASs provide robust statistical evidence of the association of a given genetic locus with heart rate, they are only the starting point for detailed follow-up studies to locate the causal...

  9. Resting Heart Rate Is Not Associated with Cognitive Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wod, Mette; Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Galatius, Søren

    2018-01-01

    Aims: In order to examine the hypothesis that elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with impaired cognitive score, we investigated the relationship between RHR and cognitive score in middle-aged, elderly and old Danish subjects from the general population. Methods: Composite cognitive...... heart conditions and hypertension. RHR was assessed by palpating radial pulse. Genetic and shared environmental confounding was addressed in intrapair analyses of 2,049 twin pairs. Results: In unadjusted multivariate models and in multivariable models adjusting for age, sex, heart conditions...

  10. Predictive value of casual ECG-based resting heart rate compared with resting heart rate obtained from Holter recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Nicholas; Dixen, Ulrik; Marott, Jacob L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Assessment of heart rate (HR) from Holter recording may afford a more precise estimate of the effect of RHR on cardiovascular risk, as compared to casual RHR. Comparative analysis was carried...... HRs recorded and mean HR calculated from all daytime HRs. Follow-up was recorded from public registers. Outcome measure was hazard rate for the combined endpoint of cardiovascular mortality, non-fatal heart failure and non-fatal acute myocardial infarction. Comparison of casual RHR, Holter RHR...... was found to be marginally superior as a predictor of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The results presented here do not however warrant the abandonment of a tested epidemiological variable....

  11. Predictive value of casual ECG-based resting heart rate compared with resting heart rate obtained from Holter recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Nicholas; Dixen, Ulrik; Marott, Jacob L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is associated with cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Assessment of heart rate (HR) from Holter recording may afford a more precise estimate of the effect of RHR on cardiovascular risk, as compared to casual RHR. Comparative analysis was carried...... and mean HR by Multivariate Cox regression was performed. RESULTS: A total of 57 composite endpoints occurred during 17.1 years of follow-up. Regression analysis suggests correlation between Casual RHR and Holter RHR. Multivariate Cox regression analysis adjusted for gender and age demonstrated hazard...... rates of 1.02 (p = 0.079) for casual RHR, 1.04 (p = 0.036*) for Holter RHR, and 1.03 (p = 0.093) for mean HR for each 10 beat increment in HR. CONCLUSIONS: In a comparative analysis on the correlation and significance of differing RHR measurement modalities RHR measured by 24-hour Holter recording...

  12. Bed rest and increased diuretic treatment in chronic congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildgaard, U; Aldershvile, J; Ring-Larsen, H

    1985-01-01

    To elucidate the effect of bed rest used as an adjunct to increased diuretic treatment, twelve patients with chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) had a 50% increase in loop diuretic dosage and were allocated to either continuous bed rest or bed rest during nights only. The 24-hour bed rest group...... is a reasonable adjunct to diuretic treatment in patients with CHF....

  13. Increased heart rate variability but normal resting metabolic rate in hypocretin/orexin-deficient human narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Reijntjes, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: We investigated autonomic balance and resting metabolic rate to explore their possible involvement in obesity in hypocretin/orexin-deficient narcoleptic subjects. METHODS: Resting metabolic rate (using indirect calorimetry) and variability in heart rate and blood pressure were

  14. Resting heart rate, heart rate variability and functional decline in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ogliari, Giulia; Mahinrad, Simin; Stott, David J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heart rate and heart rate variability, markers of cardiac autonomic function, have been linked with cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether heart rate and heart rate variability are associated with functional status in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. METHODS......: We obtained data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). A total of 5042 participants were included in the present study, and mean followup was 3.2 years. Heart rate and heart rate variability were derived from baseline 10-second electrocardiograms. Heart rate.......3 years. At baseline, higher heart rate was associated with worse ADL and IADL, and lower SDNN was related to worse IADL (all p values heart rate (range 71-117 beats/min) had a 1.79-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-2.22) and 1.35-fold (95% CI 1...

  15. Elevated resting heart rate, physical fitness and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Suadicani, Poul; Hein, Hans Ole

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is an independent risk factor for mortality or a mere marker of physical fitness (VO2Max).......To examine whether elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is an independent risk factor for mortality or a mere marker of physical fitness (VO2Max)....

  16. A Meta-analysis on Resting State High-frequency Heart Rate Variability in Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peschel, Stephanie K V; Feeling, Nicole R; Vögele, Claus; Kaess, Michael; Thayer, Julian F; Koenig, Julian

    2016-09-01

    Autonomic nervous system function is altered in eating disorders. We aimed to quantify differences in resting state vagal activity, indexed by high-frequency heart rate variability comparing patients with bulimia nervosa (BN) and healthy controls. A systematic search of the literature to identify studies eligible for inclusion and meta-analytical methods were applied. Meta-regression was used to identify potential covariates. Eight studies reporting measures of resting high-frequency heart rate variability in individuals with BN (n = 137) and controls (n = 190) were included. Random-effects meta-analysis revealed a sizeable main effect (Z = 2.22, p = .03; Hedge's g = 0.52, 95% CI [0.06;0.98]) indicating higher resting state vagal activity in individuals with BN. Meta-regression showed that body mass index and medication intake are significant covariates. Findings suggest higher vagal activity in BN at rest, particularly in unmedicated samples with lower body mass index. Potential mechanisms underlying these findings and implications for routine clinical care are discussed. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  17. Association of resting heart rate with carotid and aortic arterial stiffness: multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelton, Seamus P; Blankstein, Ron; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Lima, Joao A C; Bluemke, David A; Hundley, W Gregory; Polak, Joseph F; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Blaha, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Resting heart rate is an easily measured, noninvasive vital sign that is associated with cardiovascular disease events. The pathophysiology of this association is not known. We investigated the relationship between resting heart rate and stiffness of the carotid (a peripheral artery) and the aorta (a central artery) in an asymptomatic multi-ethnic population. Resting heart rate was recorded at baseline in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Distensibility was used as a measure of arterial elasticity, with a lower distensibility indicating an increase in arterial stiffness. Carotid distensibility was measured in 6484 participants (98% of participants) using B-mode ultrasound, and aortic distensibility was measured in 3512 participants (53% of participants) using cardiac MRI. Heart rate was divided into quintiles and we used progressively adjusted models that included terms for physical activity and atrioventricular nodal blocking agents. Mean resting heart rate of participants (mean age, 62 years; 47% men) was 63 bpm (SD, 9.6 bpm). In unadjusted and fully adjusted models, carotid distensibility and aortic distensibility decreased monotonically with increasing resting heart rate (P for trend central (aorta) artery.

  18. Hydration status after exercise affect resting metabolic rate and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sepulveda, Mauricio; Cerda-Kohler, Hugo; Pérez-Luco, Cristian; Monsalves, Matías; Andrade, David Cristobal; Zbinden-Foncea, Herman; Báez-San Martín, Eduardo; Ramírez-Campillo, Rodrigo

    2014-12-17

    Heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate are commonly to assess athlete's physiological status and energy requirements. Exercise-induced dehydration can reach up to 5% of body mass per hour. Consequently, dehydration may have a profound physiological effect on human's homeostasis. To compare the effects of dehydration and rehydration after exercise on heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate in college athletes. 14 college athletes were divided into a dehydration group (n=7) and a rehydration group (n=7), both submitted to basal (T1) heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate measurements. After basal measurements both groups were actively dehydrated (-3.4 ± 0.4% of body mass for both groups). Afterwards, dehydration group rested, while rehydration group receive a fluid intake (during a 3 h period) equivalent to 150% of body mass loss achieved during active dehydration. Four hours after active dehydration heart rate variability and resting metabolic rate were re-assessed (T2). At T2 both rehydration group (+13%) and dehydration group (+30%) achieve a significant (prate, however, only dehydration group ..showed a significant reduction in heart rate variability. More so, the change in resting metabolic rate was significantly higher in dehydration group compared to rehydration group. Hydric homeostasis after exercise affects resting metabolic rate and heart rate variability, highlighting the necessity to control hydration state before resting metabolic rate and heart rate variability assessment. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Smoking on Blood Pressure and Resting Heart Rate: A Mendelian Randomization Meta-Analysis in the CARTA Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke K; Skaaby, Tea; Taylor, Amy E; Fluharty, Meg E; Jeppesen, Jørgen L; Bjorngaard, Johan H; Åsvold, Bjørn O; Gabrielsen, Maiken E; Campbell, Archie; Marioni, Riccardo E; Kumari, Meena; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Kaakinen, Marika; Cavadino, Alana; Postmus, Iris; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Wannamethee, S Goya; Lahti, Jari; Räikkönen, Katri; Palotie, Aarno; Wong, Andrew; Dalgård, Christine; Ford, Ian; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Christiansen, Lene; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kuh, Diana; Eriksson, Johan G; Whincup, Peter H; Mbarek, Hamdi; de Geus, Eco J C; Vink, Jacqueline M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Smith, George Davey; Lawlor, Debbie A; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; McConnachie, Alex; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Jukema, J Wouter; Power, Chris; Hyppönen, Elina; Preisig, Martin; Waeber, Gerard; Vollenweider, Peter; Korhonen, Tellervo; Laatikainen, Tiina; Salomaa, Veikko; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kivimaki, Mika; Smith, Blair H; Hayward, Caroline; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Thuesen, Betina H; Sattar, Naveed; Morris, Richard W; Romundstad, Pål R; Munafò, Marcus R; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N

    2015-12-01

    Smoking is an important cardiovascular disease risk factor, but the mechanisms linking smoking to blood pressure are poorly understood. Data on 141 317 participants (62 666 never, 40 669 former, 37 982 current smokers) from 23 population-based studies were included in observational and Mendelian randomization meta-analyses of the associations of smoking status and smoking heaviness with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hypertension, and resting heart rate. For the Mendelian randomization analyses, a genetic variant rs16969968/rs1051730 was used as a proxy for smoking heaviness in current smokers. In observational analyses, current as compared with never smoking was associated with lower systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure and lower hypertension risk, but with higher resting heart rate. In observational analyses among current smokers, 1 cigarette/day higher level of smoking heaviness was associated with higher (0.21 bpm; 95% confidence interval 0.19; 0.24) resting heart rate and slightly higher diastolic blood pressure (0.05 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval 0.02; 0.08) and systolic blood pressure (0.08 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval 0.03; 0.13). However, in Mendelian randomization analyses among current smokers, although each smoking increasing allele of rs16969968/rs1051730 was associated with higher resting heart rate (0.36 bpm/allele; 95% confidence interval 0.18; 0.54), there was no strong association with diastolic blood pressure, systolic blood pressure, or hypertension. This would suggest a 7 bpm higher heart rate in those who smoke 20 cigarettes/day. This Mendelian randomization meta-analysis supports a causal association of smoking heaviness with higher level of resting heart rate, but not with blood pressure. These findings suggest that part of the cardiovascular risk of smoking may operate through increasing resting heart rate. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Resting heart rate, heart rate variability and functional decline in old age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogliari, Giulia; Mahinrad, Simin; Stott, David J; Jukema, J Wouter; Mooijaart, Simon P; Macfarlane, Peter W; Clark, Elaine N; Kearney, Patricia M; Westendorp, Rudi G J; de Craen, Anton J M; Sabayan, Behnam

    2015-10-20

    Heart rate and heart rate variability, markers of cardiac autonomic function, have been linked with cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether heart rate and heart rate variability are associated with functional status in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. We obtained data from the Prospective Study of Pravastatin in the Elderly at Risk (PROSPER). A total of 5042 participants were included in the present study, and mean follow-up was 3.2 years. Heart rate and heart rate variability were derived from baseline 10-second electrocardiograms. Heart rate variability was defined as the standard deviation of normal-to-normal RR intervals (SDNN). Functional status in basic (ADL) and instrumental (IADL) activities of daily living was measured using Barthel and Lawton scales, at baseline and during follow-up. The mean age of the study population was 75.3 years. At baseline, higher heart rate was associated with worse ADL and IADL, and lower SDNN was related to worse IADL (all p values heart rate (range 71-117 beats/min) had a 1.79-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.45-2.22) and 1.35-fold (95% CI 1.12-1.63) higher risk of decline in ADL and IADL, respectively (p for trend heart rate and lower heart rate variability were associated with worse functional status and with higher risk of future functional decline in older adults, independent of cardiovascular disease. This study provides insight into the role of cardiac autonomic function in the development of functional decline. © 2015 Canadian Medical Association or its licensors.

  1. Effect of Smoking on Blood Pressure and Resting Heart Rate: A Mendelian Randomisation Meta-Analysis in the CARTA Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linneberg, Allan; Jacobsen, Rikke K.; Skaaby, Tea; Taylor, Amy E.; Fluharty, Meg E.; Jeppesen, Jørgen L.; Bjorngaard, Johan H.; Åsvold, Bjørn O.; Gabrielsen, Maiken E.; Campbell, Archie; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Kumari, Meena; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Kaakinen, Marika; Cavadino, Alana; Postmus, Iris; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Wannamethee, S. Goya; Lahti, Jari; Räikkönen, Katri; Palotie, Aarno; Wong, Andrew; Dalgård, Christine; Ford, Ian; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Christiansen, Lene; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Kuh, Diana; Eriksson, Johan G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Mbarek, Hamdi; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Smith, George Davey; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Kisialiou, Aliaksei; McConnachie, Alex; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Jukema, J. Wouter; Power, Chris; Hyppönen, Elina; Preisig, Martin; Waeber, Gerard; Vollenweider, Peter; Korhonen, Tellervo; Laatikainen, Tiina; Salomaa, Veikko; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kivimaki, Mika; Smith, Blair H.; Hayward, Caroline; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Thuesen, Betina H.; Sattar, Naveed; Morris, Richard W.; Romundstad, Pål R.; Munafò, Marcus R.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Husemoen, Lise Lotte N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Smoking is an important cardiovascular disease risk factor, but the mechanisms linking smoking to blood pressure are poorly understood. Methods and Results Data on 141,317 participants (62,666 never, 40,669 former, 37,982 current smokers) from 23 population-based studies were included in observational and Mendelian randomisation (MR) meta-analyses of the associations of smoking status and smoking heaviness with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), hypertension, and resting heart rate. For the MR analyses, a genetic variant rs16969968/rs1051730 was used as a proxy for smoking heaviness in current smokers. In observational analyses, current as compared with never smoking was associated with lower SBP, DBP, and lower hypertension risk, but with higher resting heart rate. In observational analyses amongst current smokers, one cigarette/day higher level of smoking heaviness was associated with higher (0.21 beats/minute; 95% CI 0.19; 0.24) resting heart rate, and slightly higher DBP (0.05 mmHg; 95% CI 0.02; 0.08) and SBP (0.08 mmHg; 95% CI 0.03; 0.13). However, in MR analyses amongst current smokers, while each smoking increasing allele of rs16969968/rs1051730 was associated with higher resting heart rate (0.36 beats/minute/allele; 95% CI 0.18; 0.54), there was no strong association with DBP, SBP, or hypertension. This would suggest a 7 beats/minute higher heart rate in those who smoke 20 cigarettes/day. Conclusions This MR meta-analysis supports a causal association of smoking heaviness with higher level of resting heart rate, but not with blood pressure. These findings suggest that part of the cardiovascular risk of smoking may operate through increasing resting heart rate. PMID:26538566

  2. Resting Heart Rate Variability, Facets of Rumination and Trait Anxiety: Implications for the Perseverative Cognition Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeWayne P. Williams

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The perseverative cognition hypothesis (PCH posits that perseveration, defined as the repetitive or sustained activation of cognitive representations of a real or imagined stressor, is a primary mechanism linking psychological (or stress vulnerability with poor health and disease. Resting vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV is an important indicator of self-regulatory abilities, stress vulnerability and overall health. Those with lower resting vmHRV are more vulnerable to stress, and thus more likely to engage in perseverative cognition and experience subsequent negative mental health outcomes such as anxiety. Recent research suggests that rumination—one of the core mechanisms underlying perseveration—is a construct containing (at least two maladaptive (depressive and brooding and one adaptive (reflective types of rumination. However, to date, research has not examined how the association between resting vmHRV may differ between these three facets of rumination, in addition to these facets’ mechanistic role in linking lower resting vmHRV with greater trait anxiety. The current cross-sectional study explores these relationships in a sample of 203 participants (112 females, 76 ethnic minorities, mean age = 19.43, standard deviation = 1.87. Resting vmHRV was assessed during a 5-min-resting period using an Electrocardiogram (ECG. Both trait rumination (including the three facets and anxiety were assessed via self-report scales. Significant negative associations were found between resting vmHRV and maladaptive, but not adaptive, forms of perseveration. Similarly, mediation analyses showed a significant indirect relationship between resting vmHRV and anxiety through maladaptive, but not adaptive, facets of rumination. Our findings support the PCH such that those with stress vulnerability, as indexed by lower resting vmHRV, are more likely to engage in maladaptive perseverative cognition and thus experience negative outcomes such as

  3. Resting Heart Rate Variability, Facets of Rumination and Trait Anxiety: Implications for the Perseverative Cognition Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, DeWayne P; Feeling, Nicole R; Hill, LaBarron K; Spangler, Derek P; Koenig, Julian; Thayer, Julian F

    2017-01-01

    The perseverative cognition hypothesis (PCH) posits that perseveration, defined as the repetitive or sustained activation of cognitive representations of a real or imagined stressor, is a primary mechanism linking psychological (or stress) vulnerability with poor health and disease. Resting vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) is an important indicator of self-regulatory abilities, stress vulnerability and overall health. Those with lower resting vmHRV are more vulnerable to stress, and thus more likely to engage in perseverative cognition and experience subsequent negative mental health outcomes such as anxiety. Recent research suggests that rumination-one of the core mechanisms underlying perseveration-is a construct containing (at least) two maladaptive (depressive and brooding) and one adaptive (reflective) types of rumination. However, to date, research has not examined how the association between resting vmHRV may differ between these three facets of rumination, in addition to these facets' mechanistic role in linking lower resting vmHRV with greater trait anxiety. The current cross-sectional study explores these relationships in a sample of 203 participants (112 females, 76 ethnic minorities, mean age = 19.43, standard deviation = 1.87). Resting vmHRV was assessed during a 5-min-resting period using an Electrocardiogram (ECG). Both trait rumination (including the three facets) and anxiety were assessed via self-report scales. Significant negative associations were found between resting vmHRV and maladaptive, but not adaptive, forms of perseveration. Similarly, mediation analyses showed a significant indirect relationship between resting vmHRV and anxiety through maladaptive, but not adaptive, facets of rumination. Our findings support the PCH such that those with stress vulnerability, as indexed by lower resting vmHRV, are more likely to engage in maladaptive perseverative cognition and thus experience negative outcomes such as anxiety. Our data

  4. Resting heart rate variability predicts safety learning and fear extinction in an interoceptive fear conditioning paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Pappens

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate whether interindividual differences in autonomic inhibitory control predict safety learning and fear extinction in an interoceptive fear conditioning paradigm. Data from a previously reported study (N = 40 were extended (N = 17 and re-analyzed to test whether healthy participants' resting heart rate variability (HRV - a proxy of cardiac vagal tone - predicts learning performance. The conditioned stimulus (CS was a slight sensation of breathlessness induced by a flow resistor, the unconditioned stimulus (US was an aversive short-lasting suffocation experience induced by a complete occlusion of the breathing circuitry. During acquisition, the paired group received 6 paired CS-US presentations; the control group received 6 explicitly unpaired CS-US presentations. In the extinction phase, both groups were exposed to 6 CS-only presentations. Measures included startle blink EMG, skin conductance responses (SCR and US-expectancy ratings. Resting HRV significantly predicted the startle blink EMG learning curves both during acquisition and extinction. In the unpaired group, higher levels of HRV at rest predicted safety learning to the CS during acquisition. In the paired group, higher levels of HRV were associated with better extinction. Our findings suggest that the strength or integrity of prefrontal inhibitory mechanisms involved in safety- and extinction learning can be indexed by HRV at rest.

  5. Elevated resting heart rate is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in healthy men and women.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2010-04-01

    Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is known to be associated with reduced survival but inconsistencies remain, including lack of significance in most studies of healthy women, lack of independence from systolic blood pressure (SBP) in some, and the suggestion that RHR is merely functioning as a marker of physical inactivity or other comorbidities. We aimed to clarify these inconsistencies.

  6. Aggressive behavior: an alternative model of resting heart rate and sensation seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Laura C; Scarpa, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Low resting heart rate is a well-replicated biological correlate of aggression, and sensation seeking is frequently cited as the underlying causal explanation. However, little empirical evidence supports this mediating relationship. Furthermore, the biosocial model of violence and social push theory suggest sensation seeking may moderate the relationship between heart rate and aggression. In a sample of 128 college students (82.0% White; 73.4% female), the current study tested a moderation model as an alternative relationship between resting heart rate and sensation seeking in regard to aggression. Overall, the findings partially supported an interaction effect, whereby the relationship between heart rate and aggression was moderated by sensation seeking. Specifically, the oft-noted relationship between low resting heart rate and increased aggression was found, but only for individuals with low levels of sensation seeking. If replication supports this finding, the results may better inform prevention and intervention work. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genetic influences on heart rate variability at rest and during stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Li, Zhibin; Riese, Harriette; Thayer, Julian F.; Treiber, Frank; Snieder, Harold

    We tested whether the heritability of heart rate variability (HRV) under stress is different from rest and its dependency on ethnicity or gender. HRV indexed by root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) and high-frequency (HF) power was measured at rest and during 3 stressors in 427

  8. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    4 and Department of Radiology,Federal Medical Center, Owerri, Nigeria. ABSTRACT. Background: Heart rate (HR) is a determinant of cardiovascular event risk in patient with hypertension. The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of interval training program on HR in black African subjects with.

  9. The product of resting heart rate times blood pressure is associated with high brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anxin Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate potential associations between resting heart rate, blood pressure and the product of both, and the brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV as a maker of arterial stiffness. METHODS: The community-based "Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities in Community (APAC Study" examined asymptomatic polyvascular abnormalities in a general Chinese population and included participants with an age of 40+ years without history of stroke and coronary heart disease. Arterial stiffness was defined as baPWV≥1400 cm/s. We measured and calculated the product of resting heart rate and systolic blood pressure (RHR-SBP and the product of resting heart rate and mean arterial pressure (RHR-MAP. RESULTS: The study included 5153 participants with a mean age of 55.1 ± 11.8 years. Mean baPWV was 1586 ± 400 cm/s. Significant (P<0.0001 linear relationships were found between higher baPWV and higher resting heart rate or higher arterial blood pressure, with the highest baPWV observed in individuals from the highest quartiles of resting heart rate and blood pressure. After adjusting for confounding parameters such as age, sex, educational level, body mass index, fasting blood concentrations of glucose, blood lipids and high-sensitive C-reactive protein, smoking status and alcohol consumption, prevalence of arterial stiffness increased significantly (P<0.0001 with increasing RHR-SBP quartile (Odds Ratio (OR: 2.72;95%Confidence interval (CI:1.46,5.08 and increasing RHR-MAP (OR:2.10;95%CI:1.18,3.72. Similar results were obtained in multivariate linear regression analyses with baPWV as continuous variable. CONCLUSIONS: Higher baPWV as a marker of arterial stiffness was associated with a higher product of RHR-SBP and RHR-MAP in multivariate analysis. In addition to other vascular risk factors, higher resting heart rate in combination with higher blood pressure are risk factors for arterial stiffness.

  10. Pengaruh Immediet Instrumental Music Hearing Therapy Dengan Progresive Muscle Relaxation Exercise Terhadap Rest Heart Reat

    OpenAIRE

    Trisnowiyanto, Bambang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the immediate effect of listening to music (instrumental music hearing therapy) and muscle relaxation exercises (progressive muscle relaxation exercise) to the resting pulse rate.Background: the number of heartbeats in one minute, which gives a clear picture of the load when the activity of the heart muscle is needed at a particular time. The heart rate can be affected by physical exercise and a good atmosphere to listen to music.Subject: students of junior high school were...

  11. Heritability of resting heart rate and association with mortality in middle-aged and elderly twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus T; Wod, Mette; Galatius, Søren

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Resting heart rate (RHR) possibly has a hereditary component and is associated with longevity. We used the classical biometric twin study design to investigate the heritability of RHR in a population of middle-aged and elderly twins and, furthermore, studied the association between RHR...

  12. Association Between Heart Rate at Rest and Incident Atrial Fibrillation (from the Copenhagen Electrocardiographic Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Morten W; Bachmann, Troels N; Rasmussen, Peter V.

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) at rest is a well-known marker of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Results on the association between HR and incident atrial fibrillation (AF) have, however, been conflicting. Using digital electrocardiograms from 281,451 primary care patients, we aimed to describe...

  13. Resting heart rate and risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in asymptomatic aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anders M; Bang, Casper N; Berg, Ronan M G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An elevated resting heart rate (RHR) may be an early sign of cardiac failure, but its prognostic value during watchful waiting in asymptomatic aortic stenosis (AS) is largely unknown. METHODS: RHR was determined by annual ECGs in the Simvastatin and Ezetimibe in Aortic Stenosis (SEAS...

  14. Relative influence of age, resting heart rate and sedentary life style in short-term analysis of heart rate variability

    OpenAIRE

    E.R. Migliaro; P. Contreras; S. Bech; A. Etxagibel; M. Castro; R. Ricca; K. Vicente

    2001-01-01

    In order to assess the relative influence of age, resting heart rate (HR) and sedentary life style, heart rate variability (HRV) was studied in two different groups. The young group (YG) consisted of 9 sedentary subjects aged 15 to 20 years (YG-S) and of 9 nonsedentary volunteers (YG-NS) also aged 15 to 20. The elderly sedentary group (ESG) consisted of 16 sedentary subjects aged 39 to 82 years. HRV was assessed using a short-term procedure (5 min). R-R variability was calculated in the time-...

  15. A Computational Study on the Relation between Resting Heart Rate and Atrial Fibrillation Hemodynamics under Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmino, Matteo; Scarsoglio, Stefania; Saglietto, Andrea; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Clinical data indicating a heart rate (HR) target during rate control therapy for permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) and assessing its eventual relationship with reduced exercise tolerance are lacking. The present study aims at investigating the impact of resting HR on the hemodynamic response to exercise in permanent AF patients by means of a computational cardiovascular model. The AF lumped-parameter model was run to simulate resting (1 Metabolic Equivalent of Task-MET) and various exercise conditions (4 METs: brisk walking; 6 METs: skiing; 8 METs: running), considering different resting HR (70 bpm for the slower resting HR-SHR-simulations, and 100 bpm for the higher resting HR-HHR-simulations). To compare relative variations of cardiovascular variables upon exertion, the variation comparative index (VCI)-the absolute variation between the exercise and the resting values in SHR simulations referred to the absolute variation in HHR simulations-was calculated at each exercise grade (VCI4, VCI6 and VCI8). Pulmonary venous pressure underwent a greater increase in HHR compared to SHR simulations (VCI4 = 0.71, VCI6 = 0.73 and VCI8 = 0.77), while for systemic arterial pressure the opposite is true (VCI4 = 1.15, VCI6 = 1.36, VCI8 = 1.56). The computational findings suggest that a slower, with respect to a higher resting HR, might be preferable in permanent AF patients, since during exercise pulmonary venous pressure undergoes a slighter increase and systemic blood pressure reveals a more appropriate increase.

  16. Overweight, resting heart rate, and prediabetes/diabetes: A population-based prospective cohort study among Inner Mongolians in China

    OpenAIRE

    Shao Yan Zhang; Jia Hui Wu; Jing Wen Zhou; Zhu Liang; Qiao Yan Qiu; Tian Xu; Ming Zhi Zhang; Chong Ke Zhong; Wei Jiang; Yong Hong Zhang

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the cumulative effect of overweight and resting heart rate on prediabetes/diabetes incidence in an 10-year follow-up study in Inner Mongolians. Among 1729 participants who were free from prediabetes and diabetes at baseline, 503 and 155 subjects developed prediabetes and diabetes, respectively. We categorized the participants into 4 subgroups according to overweight and resting heart rate status. The multivariate-adjusted OR (95% CI) in normal weight with heart rate ?8...

  17. Association between resting heart rate and coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Wang, Weijing; Li, Fang

    2016-10-18

    Resting heart rate is linked to risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess these associations in general populations and in populations of patients with hypertension or diabetes mellitus. We searched PubMed, Embase and MEDLINE from inception to Mar. 5, 2016. We used a random-effects model to combine study-specific relative risks (RRs). We used restricted cubic splines to assess the dose-response relation. We included 45 nonrandomized prospective cohort studies in the meta-analysis. The multivariable adjusted RR with an increment of 10 beats/min in resting heart rate was 1.12 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.09-1.14) for coronary artery disease, 1.05 (95% CI 1.01-1.08) for stroke, 1.12 (95% CI 1.02-1.24) for sudden death, 1.16 (95% CI 1.12-1.21) for noncardiovascular diseases, 1.09 (95% CI 1.06-1.12) for all types of cancer and 1.25 (95% CI 1.17-1.34) for noncardiovascular diseases excluding cancer. All of these relations were linear. In an analysis by category of resting heart rate ( 80 beats/min), the RRs were 0.99 (95% CI 0.93-1.04), 1.08 (95% CI 1.01-1.16) and 1.30 (95% CI 1.19-1.43), respectively, for coronary artery disease; 1.08 (95% CI 0.98-1.19), 1.11 (95% CI 0.98-1.25) and 1.08 (95% CI 0.93-1.25), respectively, for stroke; and 1.17 (95% CI 0.94-1.46), 1.31 (95% CI 1.12-1.54) and 1.57 (95% CI 1.39-1.77), respectively, for noncardiovascular diseases. After excluding studies involving patients with hypertension or diabetes, we obtained similar results for coronary artery disease, stroke and noncardiovascular diseases, but found no association with sudden death. Resting heart rate was an independent predictor of coronary artery disease, stroke, sudden death and noncardiovascular diseases over all of the studies combined. When the analysis included only studies concerning general populations, resting heart rate was not associated with sudden death. © 2016 Canadian Medical

  18. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  19. Evaluation of Resting Cardiac Power Output as a Prognostic Factor in Patients with Advanced Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Omer; Aslan, Gamze; Demirozu, Zumrut T; Yenigun, Cemal Deniz; Yazicioglu, Nuran

    2017-09-15

    If the heart is represented by a hydraulic pump, cardiac power represents the hydraulic function of the heart. Cardiac pump function is frequently determined through left ventricular ejection fraction using imaging. This study aims to validate resting cardiac power output (CPO) as a predictive biomarker in patients with advanced heart failure (HF). One hundred and seventy-two patients with HF severe enough to warrant cardiac transplantation were retrospectively reviewed at a single tertiary care institution between September 2010 and July 2013. Patients were initially evaluated with simultaneous right-sided and left-sided cardiac catheter-based hemodynamic measurements, followed by longitudinal follow-up (median of 52 months) for adverse events (cardiac mortality, cardiac transplantation, or ventricular assist device placement). Median resting CPO was 0.54 W (long rank chi-square = 33.6; p < 0.0001). Decreased resting CPO (<0.54 W) predicted increased risk for adverse outcomes. Fifty cardiac deaths, 10 cardiac transplants, and 12 ventricular assist device placements were documented. The prognostic relevance of resting CPO remained significant after adjustment for age, gender, left ventricular ejection fraction, mean arterial pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, right atrial pressure, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (HR, 3.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.66 to 6.77; p = 0.0007). In conclusion, lower resting CPO supplies independent prediction of adverse outcomes. Thus, it could be effectively used for risk stratification in patients with advanced HF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Resting Bradycardia, Enhanced Postexercise Heart Rate Recovery and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Recreational Ballroom Dancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Carlos Janssen Gomes; Molina, Guilherme Eckhardt; Porto, Luiz Guilherme Grossi; Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: In a cross-sectional study design, we evaluated the resting heart rate (HR[subscript baseline]) and exercise and postexercise stress test-related chronotropic responses in male practitioners of recreational ballroom dancing (BD; n = 25, M[subscript age] = 26.6 ± 6.1 years) compared to a control group of insufficiently active nondancers…

  1. Metabolic profiles in heart failure due to non-ischemic cardiomyopathy at rest and under exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Hennessen, Matthias; Sigl, Johanna; Fuhrmann, Jens C; Witt, Henning; Reszka, Regina; Schmitz, Oliver; Kastler, Jürgen; Fischer, Jenny J; Müller, Oliver J; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Weis, Tanja; Frey, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A

    2017-05-01

    Identification of metabolic signatures in heart failure (HF) patients and evaluation of their diagnostic potential to discriminate HF patients from healthy controls during baseline and exercise conditions. Plasma samples were collected from 22 male HF patients with non-ischemic idiopathic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular systolic dysfunction and 19 healthy controls before (t0), at peak (t1) and 1 h after (t2) symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Two hundred fifty-two metabolites were quantified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography (LC)-MS/MS-based metabolite profiling. Plasma metabolite profiles clearly differed between HF patients and controls at t0 ( P  HF was characterized by decreased levels of complex lipids and fatty acids, notably phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and sphingolipids. Moreover, reduced glutamine and increased glutamate plasma levels, significantly increased purine degradation products, as well as signs of impaired glucose metabolism were observed. The metabolic differences increased strongly according to New York Heart Association functional class and the addition of three metabolites further improved prediction of exercise capacity (Q 2  = 0.24 to 0.35). Despite a high number of metabolites changing significantly with exercise (30.2% at t1/t0), the number of significant alterations between HF and controls was almost unchanged at t 1 and t 2 (30.7 and 29.0% vs. 31.3% at t 0 ) with a similar predictive group separation (Q 2  = 0.50 for t0, 0.52 for t1, and 0.56 for t2, respectively). Our study identified a metabolic signature of non-ischemic HF with prominent changes in complex lipids including phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and sphingolipids. The metabolic changes were already evident at rest and largely preserved under exercise.

  2. Metabolic profiles in heart failure due to non‐ischemic cardiomyopathy at rest and under exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller‐Hennessen, Matthias; Sigl, Johanna; Fuhrmann, Jens C.; Witt, Henning; Reszka, Regina; Schmitz, Oliver; Kastler, Jürgen; Fischer, Jenny J.; Müller, Oliver J.; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Weis, Tanja; Frey, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims Identification of metabolic signatures in heart failure (HF) patients and evaluation of their diagnostic potential to discriminate HF patients from healthy controls during baseline and exercise conditions. Methods Plasma samples were collected from 22 male HF patients with non‐ischemic idiopathic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular systolic dysfunction and 19 healthy controls before (t0), at peak (t1) and 1 h after (t2) symptom‐limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Two hundred fifty‐two metabolites were quantified by gas chromatography‐mass spectrometry (GC‐MS) and liquid chromatography (LC)‐MS/MS‐based metabolite profiling. Results Plasma metabolite profiles clearly differed between HF patients and controls at t0 (P HF was characterized by decreased levels of complex lipids and fatty acids, notably phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and sphingolipids. Moreover, reduced glutamine and increased glutamate plasma levels, significantly increased purine degradation products, as well as signs of impaired glucose metabolism were observed. The metabolic differences increased strongly according to New York Heart Association functional class and the addition of three metabolites further improved prediction of exercise capacity (Q2 = 0.24 to 0.35). Despite a high number of metabolites changing significantly with exercise (30.2% at t1/t0), the number of significant alterations between HF and controls was almost unchanged at t1 and t2 (30.7 and 29.0% vs. 31.3% at t0) with a similar predictive group separation (Q2 = 0.50 for t0, 0.52 for t1, and 0.56 for t2, respectively). Conclusions Our study identified a metabolic signature of non‐ischemic HF with prominent changes in complex lipids including phosphatidylcholines, cholesterol, and sphingolipids. The metabolic changes were already evident at rest and largely preserved under exercise. PMID:28451455

  3. Endogenous Pain Modulation: Association with Resting Heart Rate Variability and Negative Affectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Houte, Maaike; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Bogaerts, Katleen; Van Diest, Ilse; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2017-07-21

    Several chronic pain syndromes are characterized by deficient endogenous pain modulation as well as elevated negative affectivity and reduced resting heart rate variability. In order to elucidate the relationships between these characteristics, we investigated whether negative affectivity and heart rate variability are associated with endogenous pain modulation in a healthy population. An offset analgesia paradigm with noxious thermal stimulation calibrated to the individual's pain threshold was used to measure endogenous pain modulation magnitude in 63 healthy individuals. Pain ratings during constant noxious heat stimulation to the arm (15 seconds) were compared with ratings during noxious stimulation comprising a 1 °C rise and return of temperature to the initial level (offset trials, 15 seconds). Offset analgesia was defined as the reduction in pain following the 1 °C decrease relative to pain at the same time point during continuous heat stimulation. Evidence for an offset analgesia effect could only be found when noxious stimulation intensity (and, hence, the individual's pain threshold) was intermediate (46 °C or 47 °C). Offset analgesia magnitude was also moderated by resting heart rate variability: a small but significant offset effect was found in participants with high but not low heart rate variability. Negative affectivity was not related to offset analgesia magnitude. These results indicate that resting heart rate variability (HRV) is related to endogenous pain modulation (EPM) in a healthy population. Future research should focus on clarifying the causal relationship between HRV and EPM and chronic pain by using longitudinal study designs. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  4. Resting Heart Rate is a Predictor of Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus T; Marott, Jacob Louis; Lange, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The clinical significance of high heart rate in COPD is unexplored.We investigated the association between resting heart rate (RHR), pulmonary function, and prognosis in subjects with COPD.16,696 subjects above 40 years from The Copenhagen City Heart Study, a prospective study of the general...... population, followed for 35.3 years, 10,986 deaths occurring. Analyses were performed using time-dependent Cox-models and net reclassification index (NRI).RHR increased with severity of COPD (pcardiovascular and all-cause mortality across all stages of COPD (p... stage, (categorical NRI 4.9%, p=0.01; categoryless NRI 23.0%, pvariable that improves risk prediction in patients with COPD...

  5. A Computational Study on the Relation between Resting Heart Rate and Atrial Fibrillation Hemodynamics under Exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Anselmino

    Full Text Available Clinical data indicating a heart rate (HR target during rate control therapy for permanent atrial fibrillation (AF and assessing its eventual relationship with reduced exercise tolerance are lacking. The present study aims at investigating the impact of resting HR on the hemodynamic response to exercise in permanent AF patients by means of a computational cardiovascular model.The AF lumped-parameter model was run to simulate resting (1 Metabolic Equivalent of Task-MET and various exercise conditions (4 METs: brisk walking; 6 METs: skiing; 8 METs: running, considering different resting HR (70 bpm for the slower resting HR-SHR-simulations, and 100 bpm for the higher resting HR-HHR-simulations. To compare relative variations of cardiovascular variables upon exertion, the variation comparative index (VCI-the absolute variation between the exercise and the resting values in SHR simulations referred to the absolute variation in HHR simulations-was calculated at each exercise grade (VCI4, VCI6 and VCI8.Pulmonary venous pressure underwent a greater increase in HHR compared to SHR simulations (VCI4 = 0.71, VCI6 = 0.73 and VCI8 = 0.77, while for systemic arterial pressure the opposite is true (VCI4 = 1.15, VCI6 = 1.36, VCI8 = 1.56.The computational findings suggest that a slower, with respect to a higher resting HR, might be preferable in permanent AF patients, since during exercise pulmonary venous pressure undergoes a slighter increase and systemic blood pressure reveals a more appropriate increase.

  6. Psychological Effects of Resting in Natural Environments: Improved choice reaction time and more efficient heart rate restoration as a function of resting with a window view of nature

    OpenAIRE

    Engell, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that natural environments can induce restorative effects on cognitive capacity and autonomic arousal, yielding improvements in cognitive functioning and more efficient heart rate restoration. The present study investigates differences in choice reaction time (CRT) and heart rate variability (HRV) in students (N=10) resting with or without a window view of a natural environment after a minor physical exertion. Subjects performed a pre-test of a Deary-Liewald choice reaction ...

  7. Post-exercise heart-rate recovery correlates to resting heart-rate variability in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Guilherme Eckhardt; Fontana, Keila Elizabeth; Porto, Luiz Guilherme Grossi; Junqueira, Luiz Fernando

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between post-exercise heart-rate recovery (HRR) and resting cardiac autonomic modulation is an incompletely explored issue. To correlate HRR with resting supine and orthostatic autonomic status. HRR at the 1st, 3th, and 5th min following maximal treadmill exercise were correlated with 5-min time-domain (CV, pNN50 and rMSSD) and frequency-domain (TP, LF, HF, LFn, HFn, and LF/HF ratio) indices of heart-rate variability (HRV) in both supine and standing positions in 31 healthy physically active non-athletes men. Statistical analysis employed non-parametric tests with two-tailed p value set at 5 %. Absolute HRR and Δ %HRR at each post-exercise time did not correlated with HRV in supine position, as well as at 1st min in standing position. At the 3rd min and 5th min, these measures negatively correlated with pNN50, rMSSD, TP, and HF indices, and only in the 5th min, they showed negative correlation with HFn and positive correlation with LF, LFn, and LF/HF ratio in the standing position. Coefficient of HRR (CHRR) at the 1st min negatively correlated with pNN50 and rMSSD and at 3rd and 5th min showed positive correlation with LFn and LF/HF ratio in supine position. With HRV indices in standing position CHRR from the 1st to 5th min showed the same respective negative and positive correlations as the other measures. HRR from the 1st to 5th min post-exercise negatively correlated with parasympathetic modulation in resting orthostatic, but showed no correlation in supine position. At the 3rd and 5th min, a positive correlation with combined sympathetic-parasympathetic modulation in both positions was observed.

  8. Resting, night-time, and 24 h heart rate as markers of cardiovascular risk in middle-aged and elderly men and women with no apparent heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Christine D; Olsen, Rasmus H; Pedersen, Lene R; Kumarathurai, Preman; Mouridsen, Mette R; Binici, Zeynep; Intzilakis, Theodoros; Køber, Lars; Sajadieh, Ahmad

    2013-06-01

    Increased heart rate (HR) is a predictor of all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality. We tested which measure of HR had the strongest prognostic value in a population with no apparent heart disease. Six hundred and fifty-three men and women between the age of 55 and 75 years were included in the Copenhagen Holter Study and underwent 48 h ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring. Resting HR was measured after at least 10 min of rest. Twenty-four-hour HR was derived from the mean time between normal-to-normal RR intervals (MEANNN). Night-time HR was derived from a 15 min sequence between 2:00 and 2:15 a.m. The median follow-up time was 76 months, and an adverse outcome was defined as all-cause mortality and the combined endpoint of CV death, acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and revascularization. All three measures of HR were significantly associated with all-cause mortality, also after adjustment for conventional risk factors. We found an association between all three measures of HR and CV events in analyses adjusted for sex and age. However, when adjusting for CV risk factors, the association with resting HR and 24 h HR disappeared. In a fully adjusted model, only night-time HR remained in the model, hazard ratio = 1.17 (1.05-1.30), P = 0.005. In middle-aged subjects with no apparent heart disease, all measures of increased HR were associated with increased mortality and CV risk. However, night-time HR was the only parameter with prognostic importance after multivariable adjustment.

  9. Obesity-associated metabolic changes influence resting and peak heart rate in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandheim, Astrid; Halland, Hilde; Saeed, Sahrai; Cramariuc, Dana; Hetland, Trude; Lønnebakken, Mai Tone; Gerdts, Eva

    2015-01-01

    To study the relationship between obesity and heart rate (HR) in women and men. We studied 241 overweight and obese subjects without known heart disease. All subjects underwent ergospirometry during maximal exercise testing on treadmill and recording of body composition, electrocardiogram and clinic and ambulatory blood pressure. Women (n = 132) were slightly older and had higher fat mass, but lower weight, blood pressure and prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) than men (n = 109) (all p obesity and hypertension did not differ. A significant interaction between sex and HR was demonstrated (p men (all p men, while lower HbA1c and absence of obesity were the main covariates in women in multivariate analyses (all p obesity and obesity-associated metabolic changes influenced both resting and peak exercise HR.

  10. Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the ambulatory monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichlen, J.S.; Brest, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography serves as a valuable adjunct in the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease. Although estimations of regurgitant fractions and the differences between left and right ventricular stroke volumes can be made, the limitations of the techniques do not enable adequate quantitation of the severity of valvular insufficiency to warrant routine use in ambulatory management. The importance of radionuclide ventriculography, however, lies in its ability to examine global ventricular function both at rest and with exercise, thus enabling assessment of the functional reserve of the left and right ventricles. Such data are of considerable value in determining the need for invasive evaluation and the timing of valve replacement in patients with valvular heart disease. 41 references

  11. Predominance of Intrinsic Mechanism of Resting Heart Rate Control and Preserved Baroreflex Sensitivity in Professional Cyclists after Competitive Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Luciene Ferreira; Perlingeiro, Patricia; Hachul, Denise Tessariol; Gomes-Santos, Igor Lucas; Tsutsui, Jeane Mike; Negrao, Carlos Eduardo; De Matos, Luciana D N J

    2016-01-01

    Different season trainings may influence autonomic and non-autonomic cardiac control of heart rate and provokes specific adaptations on heart's structure in athletes. We investigated the influence of transition training (TT) and competitive training (CT) on resting heart rate, its mechanisms of control, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and relationships between heart rate mechanisms and cardiac structure in professional cyclists (N = 10). Heart rate (ECG) and arterial blood pressure (Pulse Tonometry) were recorded continuously. Autonomic blockade was performed (atropine-0.04 mg.kg-1; esmolol-500 μg.kg-1 = 0.5 mg). Vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, parasympathetic (n) and sympathetic (m) modulations, autonomic influence, autonomic balance and BRS were calculated. Plasma norepinephrine (high-pressure liquid chromatography) and cardiac structure (echocardiography) were evaluated. Resting heart rate was similar in TT and CT. However, vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, autonomic influence and parasympathetic modulation (higher n value) decreased in CT (P≤0.05). Sympathetic modulation was similar in both trainings. The autonomic balance increased in CT but still showed parasympathetic predominance. Cardiac diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass also increased in CT (Ptrainings. Intrinsic heart rate mechanism is predominant over vagal effect during CT, despite similar resting heart rate. Preserved blood pressure levels and BRS during CT are probably due to similar sympathetic modulation in both trainings.

  12. Resting heart rate is a risk factor for mortality in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but not for exacerbations or pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam J; Rutten, Frans H; de Boer, Anthonius

    2014-01-01

    increased non-significantly with 7% for every 10 beats/minute increase in resting heart rate (adjusted HR: 1.07 [0.96-1.18], p = 0.208). CONCLUSIONS: Increased resting heart rate is a strong and independent risk factor for all-cause mortality in elderly patients with COPD. An increased resting heart rate...... did not result in an increased risk of exacerbations or pneumonia. This may indicate that the increased mortality risk of COPD is related to non-pulmonary causes. Future randomized controlled trials are needed to investigate whether heart-rate lowering agents are worthwhile for COPD patients....... and information on complications (exacerbation of COPD or pneumonia) by scrutinizing patient files of general practitioners. Multivariable cox regression analysis was performed. RESULTS: During the follow-up 132 (33%) patients died. The overall mortality rate was 50/1000 py (42-59). The major causes of death were...

  13. Higher resting heart rate variability predicts skill in expressing some emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuck, Natalie L; Grant, Rosemary C I; Sollers, John J; Booth, Roger J; Consedine, Nathan S

    2016-12-01

    Vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) is a measure of cardiac vagal tone, and is widely viewed as a physiological index of the capacity to regulate emotions. However, studies have not directly tested whether vmHRV is associated with the ability to facially express emotions. In extending prior work, the current report tested links between resting vmHRV and the objectively assessed ability to facially express emotions, hypothesizing that higher vmHRV would predict greater expressive skill. Eighty healthy women completed self-reported measures, before attending a laboratory session in which vmHRV and the ability to express six emotions in the face were assessed. A repeated measures analysis of variance revealed a marginal main effect for vmHRV on skill overall; individuals with higher resting vmHRV were only better able to deliberately facially express anger and interest. Findings suggest that differences in resting vmHRV are associated with the objectively assessed ability to facially express some, but not all, emotions, with potential implications for health and well-being. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. Heart rate variability under resting conditions in postmenopausal and young women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribeiro T.F.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the modulation of heart rate in a group of postmenopausal women to that of a group of young women under resting conditions on the basis of R-R interval variability. Ten healthy postmenopausal women (mean ± SD, 58.3 ± 6.8 years and 10 healthy young women (mean ± SD, 21.6 ± 0.82 years were submitted to a control resting electrocardiogram (ECG in the supine and sitting positions over a period of 6 min. The ECG was obtained from a one-channel heart monitor at the CM5 lead and processed and stored using an analog to digital converter connected to a microcomputer. R-R intervals were calculated on a beat-to-beat basis from the ECG recording in real time using a signal-processing software. Heart rate variability (HRV was expressed as standard deviation (RMSM and mean square root (RMSSD. In the supine position, the postmenopausal group showed significantly lower (P<0.05 median values of RMSM (34.9 and RMSSD (22.32 than the young group (RMSM: 62.11 and RMSSD: 49.1. The same occurred in the sitting position (RMSM: 33.0 and RMSSD: 18.9 compared to RMSM: 57.6 and RMSSD: 42.8 for the young group. These results indicate a decrease in parasympathetic modulation in postmenopausal women compared to young women which was possibly due both to the influence of age and hormonal factors. Thus, time domain HRV proved to be a noninvasive and sensitive method for the identification of changes in autonomic modulation of the sinus node in postmenopausal women.

  15. Relative influence of age, resting heart rate and sedentary life style in short-term analysis of heart rate variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Migliaro

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the relative influence of age, resting heart rate (HR and sedentary life style, heart rate variability (HRV was studied in two different groups. The young group (YG consisted of 9 sedentary subjects aged 15 to 20 years (YG-S and of 9 nonsedentary volunteers (YG-NS also aged 15 to 20. The elderly sedentary group (ESG consisted of 16 sedentary subjects aged 39 to 82 years. HRV was assessed using a short-term procedure (5 min. R-R variability was calculated in the time-domain by means of the root mean square successive differences. Frequency-domain HRV was evaluated by power spectrum analysis considering high frequency and low frequency bands. In the YG the effort tolerance was ranked in a bicycle stress test. HR was similar for both groups while ESG showed a reduced HRV compared with YG. Within each group, HRV displayed a negative correlation with HR. Although YG-NS had better effort tolerance than YG-S, their HR and HRV were not significantly different. We conclude that HRV is reduced with increasing HR or age, regardless of life style. The results obtained in our short-term study agree with others of longer duration by showing that age and HR are the main determinants of HRV. Our results do not support the idea that changes in HRV are related to regular physical activity.

  16. Relative influence of age, resting heart rate and sedentary life style in short-term analysis of heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaro, E R; Contreras, P; Bech, S; Etxagibel, A; Castro, M; Ricca, R; Vicente, K

    2001-04-01

    In order to assess the relative influence of age, resting heart rate (HR) and sedentary life style, heart rate variability (HRV) was studied in two different groups. The young group (YG) consisted of 9 sedentary subjects aged 15 to 20 years (YG-S) and of 9 nonsedentary volunteers (YG-NS) also aged 15 to 20. The elderly sedentary group (ESG) consisted of 16 sedentary subjects aged 39 to 82 years. HRV was assessed using a short-term procedure (5 min). R-R variability was calculated in the time-domain by means of the root mean square successive differences. Frequency-domain HRV was evaluated by power spectrum analysis considering high frequency and low frequency bands. In the YG the effort tolerance was ranked in a bicycle stress test. HR was similar for both groups while ESG showed a reduced HRV compared with YG. Within each group, HRV displayed a negative correlation with HR. Although YG-NS had better effort tolerance than YG-S, their HR and HRV were not significantly different. We conclude that HRV is reduced with increasing HR or age, regardless of life style. The results obtained in our short-term study agree with others of longer duration by showing that age and HR are the main determinants of HRV. Our results do not support the idea that changes in HRV are related to regular physical activity.

  17. Relationship between Resting Heart Rate, Blood Pressure and Pulse Pressure in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Casonatto, Juliano; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques; Cucato, Gabriel Grizzo; Dias, Raphael Mendes Ritti

    2017-05-01

    High resting heart rate is considered an important factor for increasing mortality chance in adults. However, it remains unclear whether the observed associations would remain after adjustment for confounders in adolescents. To analyze the relationship between resting heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure in adolescents of both sexes. A cross-sectional study with 1231 adolescents (716 girls and 515 boys) aged 14-17 years. Heart rate, blood pressure and pulse pressure were evaluated using an oscillometric blood pressure device, validated for this population. Weight and height were measured with an electronic scale and a stadiometer, respectively, and waist circumference with a non-elastic tape. Multivariate analysis using linear regression investigated the relationship between resting heart rate and blood pressure and pulse pressure in boys and girls, controlling for general and abdominal obesity. Higher resting heart rate values were observed in girls (80.1 ± 11.0 beats/min) compared to boys (75.9 ± 12.7 beats/min) (p ≤ 0.001). Resting heart rate was associated with systolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.15 [0.04; 0.26]) and girls (Beta = 0.24 [0.16; 0.33]), with diastolic blood pressure in boys (Beta = 0.50 [0.37; 0.64]) and girls (Beta = 0.41 [0.30; 0.53]), and with pulse pressure in boys (Beta = -0.16 [-0.27; -0.04]). This study demonstrated a relationship between elevated resting heart rate and increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure in both sexes and pulse pressure in boys even after controlling for potential confounders, such as general and abdominal obesity. A frequência cardíaca de repouso é considerada um importante fator de aumento de mortalidade em adultos. Entretanto, ainda é incerto se as associações observadas permanecem após ajuste para fatores de confusão em adolescentes. Analisar a relação entre frequência cardíaca de repouso, pressão arterial e pressão de pulso em adolescentes dos dois sexos. Estudo transversal

  18. Impact of atrial fibrillation on rest and exercise haemodynamics in heart failure with mid-range and preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaye, David M; Silvestry, Frank E; Gustafsson, Finn

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Heart failure with preserved (HFpEF) and mid-range ejection fraction (HFmrEF) are becoming the most prevalent forms of heart failure. Patients with HFpEF/HFmrEF in atrial fibrillation (AF) have poorer survival and quality of life, but the mechanism underpinning this is unknown. We sought...... left ventricular ejection fraction. At rest, AF patients had significantly increased pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, lower cardiac index and reduced left ventricular stroke work index, despite similar resting heart rate. Under resting conditions, calculated oxygen consumption and systemic...... arteriovenous oxygen gradient were not different between the two groups. During supine cycling at similar levels of workload, AF patients exhibited a reduced capacity to increase their oxygen consumption and this was accompanied by a persistently impaired cardiac index and left ventricular stroke work index...

  19. Resting Heart Rate Does Not Predict Cardiovascular and Renal Outcomes in Type 2 Diabetic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartáková, Vendula; Klimešová, Linda; Kianičková, Katarína; Dvořáková, Veronika; Malúšková, Denisa; Řehořová, Jitka; Svojanovský, Jan; Olšovský, Jindřich; Bělobrádková, Jana; Kaňková, Kateřina

    2016-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) has been associated with increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular events. Limited data are available so far in type 2 diabetic (T2DM) subjects with no study focusing on progressive renal decline specifically. Aims of our study were to verify RHR as a simple and reliable predictor of adverse disease outcomes in T2DM patients. A total of 421 T2DM patients with variable baseline stage of diabetic kidney disease (DKD) were prospectively followed. A history of the cardiovascular disease was present in 81 (19.2%) patients at baseline, and DKD (glomerular filtration rate cardiovascular disease or DKD at baseline compared to those without. Using time-to-event analyses, significant differences in the cumulative incidence of the studied outcomes, that is, progression of DKD (and specifically progressive renal decline), major advanced cardiovascular event, and all-cause mortality, between RHR cardiovascular outcomes in T2DM subjects in Czech Republic.

  20. Predominance of Intrinsic Mechanism of Resting Heart Rate Control and Preserved Baroreflex Sensitivity in Professional Cyclists after Competitive Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciene Ferreira Azevedo

    Full Text Available Different season trainings may influence autonomic and non-autonomic cardiac control of heart rate and provokes specific adaptations on heart's structure in athletes. We investigated the influence of transition training (TT and competitive training (CT on resting heart rate, its mechanisms of control, spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS and relationships between heart rate mechanisms and cardiac structure in professional cyclists (N = 10. Heart rate (ECG and arterial blood pressure (Pulse Tonometry were recorded continuously. Autonomic blockade was performed (atropine-0.04 mg.kg-1; esmolol-500 μg.kg-1 = 0.5 mg. Vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, parasympathetic (n and sympathetic (m modulations, autonomic influence, autonomic balance and BRS were calculated. Plasma norepinephrine (high-pressure liquid chromatography and cardiac structure (echocardiography were evaluated. Resting heart rate was similar in TT and CT. However, vagal effect, intrinsic heart rate, autonomic influence and parasympathetic modulation (higher n value decreased in CT (P≤0.05. Sympathetic modulation was similar in both trainings. The autonomic balance increased in CT but still showed parasympathetic predominance. Cardiac diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass also increased in CT (P<0.05 as well as diastolic function. We observed an inverse correlation between left ventricular diastolic diameter, septum and posterior wall thickness and left ventricular mass with intrinsic heart rate. Blood pressure and BRS were similar in both trainings. Intrinsic heart rate mechanism is predominant over vagal effect during CT, despite similar resting heart rate. Preserved blood pressure levels and BRS during CT are probably due to similar sympathetic modulation in both trainings.

  1. The association and predictive value analysis of metabolic syndrome combined with resting heart rate on cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in the general Chinese population

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Yu; Tang, Zi-Hui; Zeng, Fangfang; Li, Yiming; Zhou, Linuo

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the extent of associations of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and resting heart reate (HR), and to evaluate the predictive value of MetS combined with HR on CAN in a large sample derived from a Chinese population. Materials and methods We conducted a large-scale, population-based, cross-sectional study to explore the relationships of CAN with MetS and resting HR. This study included 2092 participants ...

  2. Resting high-frequency heart rate variability moderates the association between early-life adversity and body adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, David S; Fuller-Rowell, Thomas E; Hinnant, J Benjamin; Kaeppler, Alexander K; Doan, Stacey N

    2017-11-01

    This study investigates resting high-frequency heart rate variability as a moderator of the association between early-life adversity and two measures of body adiposity. Data were collected from 149 young adults attending a large university in the Midwestern United States ( M age  = 18.8 years; 45% black; 55% white; 56% female). Self-reported early-life adversity was associated with greater waist-to-height ratio and body mass index. The strength of these associations was moderated by high-frequency heart rate variability, such that the link was stronger for individuals with lower heart rate variability. Resting high-frequency heart rate variability thus has potential health significance as a biomarker of stress vulnerability.

  3. Relationship of resting heart rate and physical activity with insulin sensitivity in a population-based survey

    OpenAIRE

    Grandinetti, Andrew; Liu, David MKI; Kaholokula, Joseph Keawe?aimoku

    2015-01-01

    Background Resting heart rate (RHR) has been identified as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality, contributing to atherosclerosis, the progression of heart failure, and myocardial ischemia and infarction. This study examines the association RHR and physical activity has with insulin resistance and insulin secretion in a multiethnic cohort from North Kohala, Hawai?i. Methods Cross-sectional data from 1,440 participants of Native Hawaiian, Japanese, Filipino, Cauca...

  4. Low resting heart rate is associated with violence in late adolescence: a prospective birth cohort study in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joseph; Hallal, Pedro C; Mielke, Gregore I; Raine, Adrian; Wehrmeister, Fernando C; Anselmi, Luciana; Barros, Fernando C

    2016-04-01

    Youth violence is a major global public health problem. Three UK and Swedish studies suggest that low resting heart rate predicts male youth violence, but this has not been tested in other social settings nor for females. A prospective, population-based birth cohort study was conducted in Pelotas, Brazil. Heart rate was measured using a wrist monitor at ages 11, 15 and 18 years. Violent crime and non-violent crime were measured at age 18 in self-reports and official records (N = 3618). Confounding variables were assessed in the perinatal period and at age 11, in interviews with mothers and children. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations between quartiles of heart rate at each age, and violent and non-violent crime at age 18, separately for males and females. Lower resting heart rate was a robust correlate of violent and non-violent crime for males. Comparing males in the lowest and top quartiles of heart rate at age 15 years, adjusted odds ratios were 1.9 for violent crime [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.4-2.7] and 1.7 for non-violent crime (95% CI 1.1-2.6). For females, crime outcomes were associated only with low resting heart rate at age 18. Associations were generally linear across the four heart rate quartiles. There was no evidence that associations differed according to socioeconomic status at age 15. Low resting heart rate predicted violent and non-violent crime for males, and was cross-sectionally associated with crime for females. Biological factors may contribute to individual propensity to commit crime, even in a middle-income setting with high rates of violence. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  5. Association between resting heart rate and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in a community-based population study in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ruihua Cao, Yongyi Bai, Ruyi Xu, Ping Ye Department of Geriatric Cardiology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Background: N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP is associated with an increased risk of cardiac insufficiency, which possibly leads to heart failure. However, the relationship between resting heart rate and NT-proBNP is unclear.Objective: This study focuses on this relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP levels in a surveyed community-based population.Methods: We evaluated the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma levels of NT-proBNP in 1,567 participants (mean age 61.0 years, range 21–96 years from a community-based population in Beijing, People’s Republic of China.Results: In patients with high resting heart rate (≥75 beats/min, NT-proBNP was higher than in those having low resting heart rate (<75 beats/min. In multiple linear stepwise regression analysis, plasma NT-proBNP was associated with resting heart rate (partial correlation coefficient, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.18–1.51; P=0.011. A subsequent subgroup analysis revealed that the association between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was strengthened in subjects over 60 years old (partial correlation coefficient 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 0.49–2.36; P=0.031; while the relativity between resting heart rate and plasma NT-proBNP was not emerged in the younger subgroup (<60 years old.Conclusions: Resting heart rate was associated with plasma NT-proBNP in the elderly, which indicated a relationship between resting heart rate and cardiac function damage. Keywords: resting heart rate, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, epidemiology, cardiac function, relationship

  6. Relationship between Cardiometabolic Parameters and Elevated Resting and Effort Heart Rate in Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Cristiane Fernanda da; Burgos, Miria Suzana; Silva, Priscila Tatiana da; Burgos, Leandro Tibiriçá; Welser, Letícia; Sehn, Ana Paula; Horta, Jorge André; Mello, Elza Daniel de; Reuter, Cézane Priscila

    2017-09-01

    Little has been studied on heart rate and its relationship with metabolic disorders. To identify possible association between heart rate (HR) and metabolic disorders in children and adolescents. This cross-sectional study evaluated 2.098 subjects, aged between 7 and 17 years. The variables evaluated were: HR, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), pulse pressure (PP), double-product (DP), myocardial oxygen consumption (mVO2), lipids, glucose and uric acid levels, body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC). The values of HR at rest and effort were divided into quartiles. The association between continuous values of HR and cardiometabolic indicators was tested by linear regression. LDL cholesterol presented a significantly higher mean (p = 0.003) in schoolchildren with resting HR greater or equal to 91 bpm, compared to students with less than 75 bpm. Compared with the quartiles of effort HR, SBP, DBP, glucose and uric acid presented high values when HR was greater or equal than 185 bpm. SBP, glucose and HDL cholesterol demonstrated a significant association with resting HR. Uric acid was observed as a predictor of increased effort HR. Schoolchildren with a higher resting HR have higher mean of LDL cholesterol. For effort HR, there was an increase in blood pressure, glucose and uric acid levels. Uric acid has been shown to be a predictor of elevated effort HR. Pouco se tem estudado sobre frequência cardíaca e suas relações com alterações metabólicas. Verificar se existe associação entre frequência cardíaca e disfunções metabólicas em crianças e adolescentes. Estudo transversal com 2.098 escolares, com idade entre 7 e 17 anos. As variáveis avaliadas foram: frequência cardíaca (FC), pressão arterial sistólica (PAS), diastólica (PAD) e de pulso (PP), duplo-produto (DP), consumo de oxigênio pelo miocárdio (mVO2), perfil lipídico e glicêmico, níveis de ácido úrico, índice de massa corporal (IMC) e circunferência da cintura

  7. Exercise and lifestyle predictors of resting heart rate in healthy young adults

    OpenAIRE

    Nealen, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise is well-understood to provide significant health benefits, through physiological adaptations induced by the repeated exertion stress exercise imposes on our systems. Chief among these are cardiovascular adaptations to exercise, including adjustments of cardiac parameters such as stroke volume, heart rate, and maximal cardiac output. It is commonly assumed that aerobic forms of exercise provide greater cardiovascular benefits than do non-aerobic forms of exercise. To test thi...

  8. Relationship between serum uric acid, metabolic syndrome and resting heart rate in Chinese elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Jiang, Yunqi; Meng, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Both serum uric acid (SUA) and resting heart rate (RHR) are positively associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, little is known regarding the relationship between SUA and RHR. We aimed to investigate the relationship between SUA and RHR in the elderly with MetS. With a retrospective observational analysis, 867 Chinese elderly subjects (437 males and 430 females) were divided into 4 groups according to SUA quartiles. We first investigated the relationship between SUA and MetS. Then we evaluated whether there is an independent association of SUA with RHR in these subjects. There were significant differences of MetS incidence in groups of Quartile 1-4 in male and female (all Pcreatinine, waist-to-height ratio, waist circumference, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and white blood cells (all r>0.30, Pmetabolic risk in Chinese elderly. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Major depressive disorder with melancholia displays robust alterations in resting state heart rate and its variability: Implications for future morbidity and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew eKemp

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Major depressive disorder (MDD is associated with increased heart rate and reductions in its variability (HRV – markers of future morbidity and mortality – yet prior studies have reported contradictory effects. We hypothesised that increases in heart rate and reductions in HRV would be more robust in melancholia relative to controls, than in patients with non-melancholia. Methods: A total of 72 patients with a primary diagnosis of MDD (age M: 36.26, SE: 1.34; 42 females and 94 controls (age M: 35.69, SE: 1.16; 52 females were included in this study. Heart rate and measures of its variability (HRV were calculated from two 2-minute electrocardiogram recordings during resting state. Propensity score matching controlled imbalance on potential confounds between patients with melancholia (n=40 and non-melancholia (n=32 including age, gender, disorder severity and comorbid anxiety disorders. Results: MDD patients with melancholia displayed significantly increased heart rate and lower resting-state HRV (including the square root of the mean squared differences between successive N–N intervals, the absolute power of high frequency and standard deviation of the Poincaré plot perpendicular to the line of identity measures of HRV relative to controls, findings associated with a moderate effect size (Cohens d’s = 0.56-0.58. Patients with melancholia also displayed an increased heart rate relative to those with non-melancholia (Cohen’s d = 0.20.Conclusion: MDD patients with melancholia – but not non-melancholia – display robust increases in heart rate and decreases in HRV. These findings may underpin a variety of behavioural impairments in patients with melancholia including somatic symptoms, cognitive impairment, reduced responsiveness to the environment, and over the longer-term, morbidity and mortality.

  10. Soothing music can increase oxytocin levels during bed rest after open-heart surgery: a randomised control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Ulrica

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of bed rest with music on relaxation for patients who have undergone heart surgery on postoperative day one. Music intervention has been evaluated as an appropriate nursing intervention to reduce patients 'pain, stress and anxiety levels in several clinical settings, but its effectiveness in increasing patients' subjective and objective relaxation levels has not been examined. A randomised controlled trial. Forty patients undergoing open coronary artery bypass grafting and/or aortic valve replacement surgery were randomly allocated to either music listening during bed rest (n = 20) or bed rest only (n = 20). Relaxation was assessed during bed rest the day after surgery by determining the plasma oxytocin, heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, PaO2 SaO2 and subjective relaxation levels. In the music group, levels of oxytocin increased significantly in contrast to the control group for which the trend over time was negative i.e., decreasing values. Subjective relaxation levels increased significantly more and there were also a significant higher levels of PaO2 in the music group compared to the control group. There was no difference in mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate and SaO2 between the groups. Listening to music during bed rest after open-heart surgery has some effects on the relaxation system as regards s-oxytocin and subjective relaxations levels. This effect seems to have a causal relation from the psychological (music makes patients relaxed) to the physical (oxytocin release). Music intervention should be offered as an integral part of the multimodal regime administered to the patients that have undergone cardiovascular surgery. It is a supportive source that increases relaxation.

  11. Influence of heart failure on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Soares de Souza

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the influence of chronic heart failure (CHF on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD, i.e., inspiratory fraction-inspiratory capacity (IC/TLC-and relative inspiratory reserve-[1 − (end-inspiratory lung volume/TLC]. Methods: This was a prospective study involving 56 patients with COPD-24 (23 males/1 female with COPD+CHF and 32 (28 males/4 females with COPD only-who, after careful clinical stabilization, underwent spirometry (with forced and slow maneuvers and whole-body plethysmography. Results: Although FEV1, as well as the FEV1/FVC and FEV1/slow vital capacity ratios, were higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group, all major "static" volumes-RV, functional residual capacity (FRC, and TLC-were lower in the former group (p < 0.05. There was a greater reduction in FRC than in RV, resulting in the expiratory reserve volume being lower in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group. There were relatively proportional reductions in FRC and TLC in the two groups; therefore, IC was also comparable. Consequently, the inspiratory fraction was higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group (0.42 ± 0.10 vs. 0.36 ± 0.10; p < 0.05. Although the tidal volume/IC ratio was higher in the COPD+CHF group, the relative inspiratory reserve was remarkably similar between the two groups (0.35 ± 0.09 vs. 0.44 ± 0.14; p < 0.05. Conclusions: Despite the restrictive effects of CHF, patients with COPD+CHF have relatively higher inspiratory limits (a greater inspiratory fraction. However, those patients use only a part of those limits, probably in order to avoid critical reductions in inspiratory reserve and increases in elastic recoil.

  12. Resting, night-time, and 24 h heart rate as markers of cardiovascular risk in middle-aged and elderly men and women with no apparent heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Christine D; Olsen, Rasmus H; Pedersen, Lene R

    2013-01-01

    years were included in the Copenhagen Holter Study and underwent 48 h ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) monitoring. Resting HR was measured after at least 10 min of rest. Twenty-four-hour HR was derived from the mean time between normal-to-normal RR intervals (MEANNN). Night-time HR was derived from...

  13. Effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced on workdays and weekends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahle-Hinz, Tim; Bamberg, Eva; Dettmers, Jan; Friedrich, Niklas; Keller, Monika

    2014-04-01

    The present study reports the lagged effects of work stress on work-related rumination, restful sleep, and nocturnal heart rate variability experienced during both workdays and weekends. Fifty employees participated in a diary study. Multilevel and regression analyses revealed a significant relationship between work stress measured at the end of a workday, work-related rumination measured during the evening, and restful sleep measured the following morning. Work stress, measured as the mean of 2 consecutive workdays, was substantially but not significantly related to restful sleep on weekends. Work stress was unrelated to nocturnal heart rate variability. Work-related rumination was related to restful sleep on weekends but not on workdays. Additionally, work-related rumination on weekends was positively related to nocturnal heart rate variability during the night between Saturday and Sunday. No mediation effects of work stress on restful sleep or nocturnal heart rate variability via work-related rumination were confirmed.

  14. Resting heart rate is associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality after adjusting for inflammatory markers: The Copenhagen City Heart Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Marott, Jacob L; Allin, Kristine H

    2012-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the association between resting heart rate (RHR) and markers of chronic low-grade inflammation. Also, to examine whether elevated resting heart rate is independently associated with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in the general population, or whether elevated RHR...... is merely a marker of chronic low-grade inflammation. Methods and results: A group of 6518 healthy subjects from the the Danish general population were followed for 18 years during which 1924 deaths occurred. Subjects underwent assessment of baseline RHR, conventional cardiovascular risk factors, high.......09 (1.05-1.14). Conclusion: RHR was associated with markers of chronic low-grade inflammation. However, RHR remained associated with both cardiovascular and all-cause mortality after adjusting for markers of chronic low-grade inflammation. This suggests that RHR is an independent risk factor...

  15. Resting Heart Rate Is Not a Good Predictor of a Clustered Cardiovascular Risk Score in Adolescents: The HELENA Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto César Ferreira de Moraes

    Full Text Available Resting heart rate (RHR reflects sympathetic nerve activity a significant association between RHR and all-cause and cardiovascular mortality has been reported in some epidemiologic studies.To analyze the predictive power and accuracy of RHR as a screening measure for individual and clustered cardiovascular risk in adolescents. The study comprised 769 European adolescents (376 boys participating in the HELENA cross-sectional study (2006-2008 were included in this study. Measurements on systolic blood pressure, HOMA index, triglycerides, TC/HDL-c, VO2máx and the sum of four skinfolds were obtained, and a clustered cardiovascular disease (CVD risk index was computed. The receiver operating characteristics curve was applied to calculate the power and accuracy of RHR to predict individual and clustered CVD risk factors.RHR showed low accuracy for screening CVD risk factors in both sexes (range 38.5%-54.4% in boys and 45.5%-54.3% in girls. Low specificity's (15.6%-19.7% in boys; 18.1%-20.0% in girls were also found. Nevertheless, the sensitivities were moderate-to-high (61.4%-89.1% in boys; 72.9%-90.3% in girls.RHR is a poor predictor of individual CVD risk factors and of clustered CVD and the estimates based on RHR are not accurate. The use of RHR as an indicator of CVD risk in adolescents may produce a biased screening of cardiovascular health in both sexes.

  16. Influence of heart failure on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Aline Soares de; Sperandio, Priscila Abreu; Mazzuco, Adriana; Alencar, Maria Clara; Arbex, Flávio Ferlin; Oliveira, Mayron Faria de; O'Donnell, Denis Eunan; Neder, José Alberto

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of chronic heart failure (CHF) on resting lung volumes in patients with COPD, i.e., inspiratory fraction-inspiratory capacity (IC)/TLC-and relative inspiratory reserve-[1 - (end-inspiratory lung volume/TLC)]. This was a prospective study involving 56 patients with COPD-24 (23 males/1 female) with COPD+CHF and 32 (28 males/4 females) with COPD only-who, after careful clinical stabilization, underwent spirometry (with forced and slow maneuvers) and whole-body plethysmography. Although FEV1, as well as the FEV1/FVC and FEV1/slow vital capacity ratios, were higher in the COPD+CHF group than in the COPD group, all major "static" volumes-RV, functional residual capacity (FRC), and TLC-were lower in the former group (p espirometria forçada e lenta e pletismografia de corpo inteiro. Os pacientes do grupo DPOC+ICC apresentaram maior VEF1, VEF1/CVF e VEF1/capacidade vital lenta; porém, todos os principais volumes "estáticos" - VR, capacidade residual funcional (CRF) e CPT - foram menores que aqueles do grupo DPOC (p < 0,05). A CRF diminuiu mais do que o VR, determinando assim menor volume de reserva expiratória no grupo DPOC+ICC que no grupo DPOC. Houve redução relativamente proporcional da CRF e da CPT nos dois grupos; logo, a CI também foi similar. Consequentemente, a fração inspiratória no grupo DPOC+ICC foi maior que no grupo DPOC (0,42 ± 0,10 vs. 0,36 ± 0,10; p < 0,05). Embora a razão volume corrente/CI fosse maior no grupo DPOC+ICC, a reserva inspiratória relativa foi notadamente similar entre os grupos (0,35 ± 0,09 vs. 0,44 ± 0,14; p < 0,05). Apesar dos efeitos restritivos da ICC, pacientes com DPOC+ICC apresentam elevações relativas dos limites inspiratórios (maior fração inspiratória). Entretanto, esses pacientes utilizam apenas parte desses limites, com o provável intuito de evitar reduções críticas da reserva inspiratória e maior trabalho elástico.

  17. Brain resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy an inseparable pair of brain and heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabisz, A; Treder, N; Fijałkowska, M; Sieminski, M; Fijałkowska, J; Naumczyk, P; Nowak, R; Jaguszewski, M; Cwalina, N; Gruchała, M; Szurowska, E; Fijałkowski, M

    2016-12-01

    Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC) is often triggered by emotional or physical stress factors. Psychological variables can have an impact on the physical manifestations of heart disease. TTC may reflect stunned myocardium from a neurogenic source. Anatomical connections between different parts of the brain can be visualized by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and thus, expressed by diffusion coefficient - fractional anisotropy (FA). A novel tool used to evaluate brain function in the absence of task is resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI). The study included both psychological tests and RS-fMRI examination, and was performed uniformly, in patients with takotsubo and healthy controls. The final group of patients consisted of 13 women, each who underwent a typical pattern of TTC triggered by emotionally stressful factors. The control group included thirteen healthy, age-matched women. Psychological tests revealed that the Type D personality was not more likely to appear among studied patients with takotsubo cardiomyopathy than amongst the healthy population. However, the level of anxiety seen in patients with TTC was increased. There were no differences in FA values between patients and healthy controls. RS-fMRI showed that TTC patients had increased connectivity areas in the precuneus. The healthy controls, when compared to TTC patients had increased connectivity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Taking into account the RS-fMRI results, psychological testing may suggest that TTC patients place a greater focus on themselves (increased tendency to experience negative affectivity, greater conscientiousness) and might have problems with emotional control. Our findings lead to the hypothesis that there is a personality profile for TTC patients' reactions to stressful triggers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effect of A Course of Pilates Exercise on Hypertension, Nitric Oxide, and Resting Heart Rate in the Eldrly Men with Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Eghbali

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: High blood pressure increases various cardiovascular events about 2 to 3 times in a person. The purpose of this study is to recognize the effect of a course of pilates exercise on hypertension, nitric oxide, and resting heart rate in the eldrlymen with hypertension. Materials and Methods: Subjects of this quasi-experimental research included 30 elderly men with hypertension grade one(in the range of systolic-diastolic 140/90 to 159/99mm Hg who participated voluntarily and accessibly in the study and were divided randomly into two experimental peer (15 people and control (15 people groups. Weight, height and BMI of subjects were 75±80, 170±175 and 25-26, respectively. The experimental group did selected exercise of Pilates for eight weeks (three one-hour sessions per week. Desired variables of the subjects of both groups were evaluated 24 hours before the start of exercise and 24 hours after the last session. Data analysis was conducted using dependent and independent t-test by SPSS16 statistical software at the significant level of p≥0.05. Results: The research results showed that the eight-week pilates exercise gave rise to reduction in blood pressure(p≤0.05 as well as resting heart rate (p≤0.05 and to increase in nitric oxide of elderly men with hypertension (p≤0.05. Conclusion: The eight-week pilates exercise reduced blood pressure and resting heart rate and increased the production of nitric oxide in elderly men. So, it seems that the regular physical exercise can be effective as a preventive factor in the outbreak of cardiovascular diseases of the elderly men.

  19. Comparison of heart rate variability between resting state and external-cuff-inflation-and-deflation state: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lizhen; Liu, Chengyu; Li, Peng; Wang, Xinpei; Yan, Chang; Liu, Changchun

    2015-10-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been widely used in clinical research to provide an insight into the autonomic control of the cardiovascular system. Measurement of HRV is generally performed under a relaxed resting state. The effects of other conditions on HRV measurement, such as running, mountaineering, head-up tilt, etc, have also been investigated. This study aimed to explore whether an inflation-and-deflation process applied to a unilateral upper arm cuff would influence the HRV measurement. Fifty healthy young volunteers aged between 21 and 30 were enrolled in this study. Electrocardiogram (ECG) signals were recorded for each subject over a five minute resting state followed by a five minute external-cuff-inflation-and-deflation state (ECID state). A one minute gap was scheduled between the two measurements. Consecutive RR intervals in the ECG were extracted automatically to form the HRV data for each of the two states. Time domain (SDNN, RMSSD and PNN50), frequency domain (LFn, HFn and LF/HF) and nonlinear (VLI, VAI and SampEn) HRV indices were analyzed and compared between the two states. In addition, the effects of mean artery pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) on the aforementioned HRV indices were assessed for the two states, respectively, by Pearson correlation analysis. The results showed no significant difference in all aforementioned HRV indices between the resting and the ECID states (all p  >  0.05). The corresponding HRV indices had significant positive correlation (all p    0.05) for either state. Besides, none of the indices showed HR-related change (all p  >  0.05) for either state except the index of VLI in the resting state. To conclude, this pilot study suggested that the applied ECID process hardly influenced those commonly used HRV indices. It would thus be applicable to simultaneously measure both blood pressure and HRV indices in clinical practice.

  20. Association between Resting Heart Rate and Inflammatory Markers (White Blood Cell Count and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein) in Healthy Korean People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo-Chul; Seo, Inho; Kim, Shin-Hye; Lee, Yong-Jae; Ahn, Song Vogue

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is an important underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and an elevated resting heart rate underlies the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation. We hypothesized an association between resting heart rate and subclinical inflammation. Resting heart rate was recorded at baseline in the KoGES-ARIRANG (Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population) cohort study, and was then divided into quartiles. Subclinical inflammation was measured by white blood cell count and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. We used progressively adjusted regression models with terms for muscle mass, body fat proportion, and adiponectin in the fully adjusted models. We examined inflammatory markers as both continuous and categorical variables, using the clinical cut point of the highest quartile of white blood cell count (≥7,900/mm 3 ) and ≥3 mg/dL for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Participants had a mean age of 56.3±8.1 years and a mean resting heart rate of 71.4±10.7 beats/min; 39.1% were men. In a fully adjusted model, an increased resting heart rate was significantly associated with a higher white blood cell count and higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in both continuous (P for trend heart rate is associated with a higher level of subclinical inflammation among healthy Korean people.

  1. Increased resting heart rate following radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Brian; Chen, Xu; Pehrson, Steen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Sinus tachycardia has been observed following radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation for various kinds of supraventricular tachycardia. This study is aimed at determining the occurrence of changes in sinus-rhythm heart rate (HR) after pulmonary vein (PV) isolation in patients with paroxysmal...

  2. Metabolic profiles in heart failure due to non?ischemic cardiomyopathy at rest and under exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller?Hennessen, Matthias; Sigl, Johanna; Fuhrmann, Jens C.; Witt, Henning; Reszka, Regina; Schmitz, Oliver; Kastler, J?rgen; Fischer, Jenny J.; M?ller, Oliver J.; Giannitsis, Evangelos; Weis, Tanja; Frey, Norbert; Katus, Hugo A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims Identification of metabolic signatures in heart failure (HF) patients and evaluation of their diagnostic potential to discriminate HF patients from healthy controls during baseline and exercise conditions. Methods Plasma samples were collected from 22 male HF patients with non?ischemic idiopathic cardiomyopathy and left ventricular systolic dysfunction and 19 healthy controls before (t0), at peak (t1) and 1?h after (t2) symptom?limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Two hundr...

  3. Studies of free breathing three-dimensional heart delayed enhancement MRI under resting respiration using KING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishihara, Masaru; Kishimoto, Kinya; Ishimoto, Takeshi; Wake, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    Heart delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an attempt to obtain intense image contrast using the null-point of normal myocardium, which changes with time. Imaging is generally conducted under breath-hold, but, if the retrospective gating method is used, it is necessary to shorten the imaging time and to fill the center of the k-space with the data in the early phase of imaging. In the present study, we examined free breathing three-dimensional heart delayed enhancement MRI (3D/KING method) using k-space inspired navigator gating (KING). In the 3D/KING, since respiratory artifact decreases by combining with the fat suppression technique and the gating window can be set widely, the imaging time was shortened in comparison with the conventional 3D method. In 3D/KING/isotropic (iso), on the other hand, the respiratory artifact was decreased by transverse imaging. The mean end time of imaging by the 3D/KING method (n=10) and the 3D/KING/iso (n=5) was 3.05±0.69 and 4.59±0.74 minutes, respectively. Moreover, the signal intensity ratio (SIR) of abnormal myocardium versus normal myocardium in the 3D/KING method was low in comparison with that in the breath-hold method. However, the capability to detect lesions was similar, and good images were obtained from the patients showing poor breath-hold. In the 3D/KING/iso, heart delayed enhancement MRI from multiple directions could be conducted in a single imaging by using the image reconstitution method. (author)

  4. Resting heart rate variability is associated with ex-Gaussian metrics of intra-individual reaction time variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Derek P; Williams, DeWayne P; Speller, Lassiter F; Brooks, Justin R; Thayer, Julian F

    2018-03-01

    The relationships between vagally mediated heart rate variability (vmHRV) and the cognitive mechanisms underlying performance can be elucidated with ex-Gaussian modeling-an approach that quantifies two different forms of intra-individual variability (IIV) in reaction time (RT). To this end, the current study examined relations of resting vmHRV to whole-distribution and ex-Gaussian IIV. Subjects (N = 83) completed a 5-minute baseline while vmHRV (root mean square of successive differences; RMSSD) was measured. Ex-Gaussian (sigma, tau) and whole-distribution (standard deviation) estimates of IIV were derived from reaction times on a Stroop task. Resting vmHRV was found to be inversely related to tau (exponential IIV) but not to sigma (Gaussian IIV) or the whole-distribution standard deviation of RTs. Findings suggest that individuals with high vmHRV can better prevent attentional lapses but not difficulties with motor control. These findings inform the differential relationships of cardiac vagal control to the cognitive processes underlying human performance. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impaired resting myocardial annular velocities are independently associated with mental stress-induced ischemia in coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersbøll, Mads; Al Enezi, Fawaz; Samad, Zainab; Sedberry, Brenda; Boyle, Stephen H; O'Connor, Christopher; Jiang, Wei; Velazquez, Eric J

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between resting myocardial function as assessed by tissue Doppler myocardial velocities and the propensity to develop mental stress-induced ischemia (MSIMI). Tissue Doppler myocardial velocities detect preclinical cardiac dysfunction and clinical outcomes in a range of conditions. However, little is known about the interrelationship between myocardial velocities and the propensity to develop MSIMI compared with exercise stress-induced myocardial ischemia. Resting annular myocardial tissue Doppler velocities were obtained in 225 patients with known coronary heart disease who were subjected to both conventional exercise stress testing as well as a battery of 3 mental stress tests. Diastolic early (e') and late (a') as well as systolic (s') velocities were obtained, and the eas index, an integrated measure of myocardial velocities, was calculated as e'/(a' × s'). MSIMI was defined as: 1) the development or worsening of regional wall motion abnormality; 2) a reduction in left ventricular ejection fraction ≥ 8%; and/or 3) ischemic ST-segment changes during 1 or more of the 3 mental stress tests. A total of 98 of 225 patients (43.7%) exhibited MSIMI. Patients developing MSIMI had significantly lower s' (7.0 ± 1.7 vs. 7.5 ± 1.2, p = 0.016) and a' (8.9 ± 1.8 vs. 10.0 ± 1.9, p stress-induced myocardial ischemia. MSIMI but not exercise stress-induced myocardial ischemia is independently associated with resting abnormalities in myocardial systolic and late diastolic velocities as well as the integrated measure of the eas index in patients with known coronary artery disease. (Responses of Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram Treatment [REMIT]; NCT00574847). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent prosthetic aortic heart valves by rest and dobutamine stress echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minardi Giovanni

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prosthesis used for aortic valve replacement in patients with small aortic root can be too small in relation to body size, thus showing high transvalvular gradients at rest and/or under stress conditions. This study was carried out to evaluate rest and Dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE hemodynamic response of 17-mm St. Jude Medical Regent (SJMR-17 mm in relatively aged patients at mean 24 months follow-up. Methods and results The study population consisted of 19 patients (2 men, 17 women, mean age 69.2 ± 7.3 years. All patients underwent rest Doppler echocardiography before and after surgery and basal and DSE at follow up (infused at rate of 5 micrg/Kg/min and increased by 5 microg/Kg/min at 5 min intervals up to 40 microg/Kg/min. The following parameters were evaluated at rest and/or under DSE: heart rate (HR, ejection fraction (EF, cardiac output (CO, peak and mean velocity and pressure gradients (MxV, MnV, MxPG, MnPG, effective orifice area (EOA, indexed EOA (EOAi, left ventricular mass (LVM, indexed LVM (LVMi, Velocity Time Integral at left ventricular outflow tract (VTI LVOT and transvalvular (Aortic VTI, Doppler velocity index (DVI. At rest MxPG and MnPG were 29.2 ± 7.1 and 16.6 ± 5.8mmHg, respectively; EOA and EOAi resulted 1.14 ± 0.3 cm2 and 0.76 ± 0.2 cm2/m2; DVI was normal (0.50 ± 0.1. At follow-up LVM and LVMi decreased significantly from pre-operative value of 258 ± 43g and 157.4 ± 27.7g/m2 to 191 ± 23.8g and 114.5 ± 10.6g/m2, respectively. DSE increased significantly HR, CO, EF, MxGP (up to 83.4 ± 2 1.9mmHg, MnPG (up to 43.2 ± 12.7mmHg. EOA, EOAi, DVI increased insignificantly (from baseline up to 1.2 ± 0.4 cm2, 0.75 ± 0.3cm2/m2 and 0.48 ± 0.1 respectively. Two patients developed significant intraventricular gradients. Conclusion These data show that SJMR 17-mm prostheses can be safely implanted in aortic position in relatively aged patients, offering a satisfactory hemodynamic

  7. Rest and exercise radionuclide angiography for diagnosis in chronic ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Rest and exercise radionuclide angiography is frequently employed for the diagnosis of chest pain syndromes. Its value and limitations in this regard have been well studied, but proper utilization of the technique requires an understanding of five critical concepts: (1) Radionuclide angiography is superior to treadmill exercise testing and probably equivalent to thallium scintigraphy, although the published series did not use current methods. (2) The true specificity of radionuclide angiography is about 80%, intermediate between the early optimistic estimates and the later pessimistic ones. (3) The peak exercise ejection fraction is the preferred test parameter for diagnosis, although exercise hemodynamics, symptoms, and electrocardiographic changes should also be considered. (4) Although radionuclide angiography is clearly helpful for noninvasive diagnosis, significant numbers of patients will continue to fall in an uncertain category. (5) The proper application of the technique requires recognition of its limitations and careful attention to technical details. When properly applied, this modality can make an important contribution to clinical decision making. 58 references

  8. Negative Affectivity, Depression, and Resting Heart Rate Variability (HRV as Possible Moderators of Endogenous Pain Modulation in Functional Somatic Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike Van Den Houte

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that patients with functional somatic syndromes (FSS have, on average, deficient endogenous pain modulation (EPM, as well as elevated levels of negative affectivity (NA and high comorbidity with depression and reduced resting heart rate variability (HRV compared to healthy controls (HC. The goals of this study were (1 to replicate these findings and (2 to investigate the moderating role of NA, depression, and resting HRV in EPM efficiency within a patient group with fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS. Resting HRV was quantified as the root mean square of successive differences between inter-beat intervals (RMSSD in rest, a vagally mediated time domain measure of HRV.Methods: Seventy-eight patients with fibromyalgia and/or CFS and 33 HC completed a counter-irritation paradigm as a measure of EPM efficiency. Participants rated the painfulness of electrocutaneous stimuli (of individually calibrated intensity on the ankle before (baseline phase, during (counter-irritation phase and after (recovery phase the application of a cold pain stimulus on the forearm. A larger reduction in pain in the counter-irritation phase compared to the baseline phase reflects a more efficient EPM.Results: In contrast to our expectations, there was no difference between pain ratings in the baseline compared to counter-irritation phase for both patients and HC. Therefore, reliable conclusions on the moderating effect of NA, depression, and RMSSD could not be made. Surprisingly, patients reported more pain in the recovery compared to the counter-irritation and baseline phase, while HC did not. This latter effect was more pronounced in patients with comorbid depression, patients who rated the painfulness of the counter-irritation stimulus as high and patients who rated the painfulness of the electrocutaneous stimuli as low. We did not manage to successfully replicate the counter-irritation effect in HC or FSS patients

  9. Does a variation in self-reported physical activity reflect variation in objectively measured physical activity, resting heart rate, and physical fitness? Results from the Tromso study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emaus, Aina; Degerstrøm, Jorid; Wilsgaard, Tom

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: To study the association between self-reported physical activity (PA) and objectively measured PA, resting heart rate, and physical fitness. METHODS: During 2007-08, 5017 men and 5607 women aged 30-69 years attended the sixth survey of the Tromsø study. Self-reported PA during leisure-time ...

  10. Sleeping and resting respiratory rates in dogs and cats with medically-controlled left-sided congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porciello, F; Rishniw, M; Ljungvall, I; Ferasin, L; Haggstrom, J; Ohad, D G

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping and resting respiratory rates (SRR and RRR, respectively) are commonly used to monitor dogs and cats with left-sided cardiac disease and to identify animals with left-sided congestive heart failure (L-CHF). Dogs and cats with subclinical heart disease have SRRmean values dogs and cats with CHF that is well controlled with medical therapy. In this study, SRR and RRR were measured by the owners of 51 dogs and 22 cats with stable, well-controlled CHF. Median canine SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (7-39 breaths/min); eight dogs were ≥25 breaths/min and one dog only was ≥30 breaths/min. Canine SRRmean was unrelated to pulmonary hypertension or diuretic dose. Median feline SRRmean was 20 breaths/min (13-31 breaths/min); four cats were ≥25 breaths/min and only one cat was ≥30 breaths/min. Feline SRRmean was unrelated to diuretic dose. SRR remained stable during collection in both species with little day-to-day variability. The median canine RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (12-44 breaths/min), 17 were ≥25 breaths/min, seven were ≥30 breaths/min, two were >40 breaths/min. Median feline RRRmean was 24 breaths/min (15-45 breaths/min); five cats had RRRmean ≥25 breaths/min; one had ≥30 breaths/min, and two had ≥40 breaths/min. These data suggest that most dogs and cats with CHF that is medically well-controlled and stable have SRRmean and RRRmean dogs and cats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Environment and feeding change the ability of heart rate to predict metabolism in resting Steller sea lions (Eumetopias jubatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Beth L; Rosen, David A S; Haulena, Martin; Hindle, Allyson G; Trites, Andrew W

    2011-01-01

    The ability to use heart rate (fh) to predict oxygen consumption rates ([Formula: see text]) in Steller sea lions and other pinnipeds has been investigated in fasting animals. However, it is unknown whether established fh:[Formula: see text] relationships hold under more complex physiological situations, such as when animals are feeding or digesting. We assessed whether fh could accurately predict [Formula: see text] in trained Steller sea lions while fasting and after being fed. Using linear mixed-effects models, we derived unique equations to describe the fh:[Formula: see text] relationship for fasted sea lions resting on land and in water. Feeding did not significantly change the fh:[Formula: see text] relationship on land. However, Steller sea lions in water displayed a different fh:[Formula: see text] relationship after consuming a 4-kg meal compared with the fasting condition. Incorporating comparable published fh:[Formula: see text] data from Steller sea lions showed a distinct effect of feeding after a 6-kg meal. Ultimately, our study illustrated that both feeding and physical environment are statistically relevant when deriving [Formula: see text] from telemetered fh, but that only environment affects the practical ability to predict metabolism from fh. Updating current bioenergetic models with data gathered using these predictive fh:[Formula: see text] equations will yield more accurate estimates of metabolic rates of free-ranging Steller sea lions under a variety of physiological, behavioral, and environmental states.

  12. Interactions between empathy and resting heart rate in early adolescence predict violent behavior in late adolescence and early adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Chardée A; Choe, Daniel Ewon; Forbes, Erika E; Shaw, Daniel S

    2017-12-01

    Although resting heart rate (RHR) and empathy are independently and negatively associated with violent behavior, relatively little is known about the interplay between these psychophysiological and temperament-related risk factors. Using a sample of 160 low-income, racially diverse men followed prospectively from infancy through early adulthood, this study examined whether RHR and empathy during early adolescence independently and interactively predict violent behavior and related correlates in late adolescence and early adulthood. Controlling for child ethnicity, family income, and child antisocial behavior at age 12, empathy inversely predicted moral disengagement and juvenile petitions for violent crimes, while RHR was unrelated to all measures of violent behavior. Interactive effects were also evident such that among men with lower but not higher levels of RHR, lower empathy predicted increased violent behavior, as indexed by juvenile arrests for violent offenses, peer-reported violent behavior at age 17, self-reported moral disengagement at age 17, and self-reported violent behavior at age 20. Implications for prevention and intervention are considered. Specifically, targeting empathic skills among individuals at risk for violent behavior because of specific psychophysiological profiles may lead to more impactful interventions. © 2017 Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health.

  13. Effects of depression, anxiety, comorbidity, and antidepressants on resting-state heart rate and its variability: an ELSA-Brasil cohort baseline study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andrew H; Brunoni, Andre R; Santos, Itamar S; Nunes, Maria A; Dantas, Eduardo M; Carvalho de Figueiredo, Roberta; Pereira, Alexandre C; Ribeiro, Antonio L P; Mill, José G; Andreão, Rodrigo V; Thayer, Julian F; Benseñor, Isabela M; Lotufo, Paulo A

    2014-12-01

    Increases in resting-state heart rate and decreases in its variability are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, yet contradictory findings have been reported for the effects of the mood and anxiety disorders and of antidepressants. The authors investigated heart rate and heart rate variability in a large cohort from Brazil, using propensity score weighting, a relatively novel method, to control for numerous potential confounders. A total of 15,105 participants were recruited in the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health. Mood and anxiety disorders were ascertained using the Portuguese version of the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised. Heart rate and its variability were extracted from 10-minute resting-state electrocardiograms. Regressions weighted by propensity scores were carried out to compare participants with and without depressive or anxiety disorders, as well as users and non-users of antidepressants, on heart rate and heart rate variability. Use of antidepressants was associated with increases in heart rate and decreases in its variability. Effects were most pronounced for the tricyclic antidepressants (Cohen's d, 0.72-0.81), followed by serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (Cohen's d, 0.42-0.95) and other antidepressants (Cohen's d, 0.37-0.40), relative to participants not on antidepressants. Only participants with generalized anxiety disorder showed robust, though small, increases in heart rate and decreases in its variability after propensity score weighting. The findings may, in part, underpin epidemiological findings of increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Many factors that have an adverse impact on cardiac activity were controlled for in this study, highlighting the importance of cardiovascular risk reduction strategies. Further study is needed to examine whether, how, and when such effects contribute to morbidity and mortality.

  14. Resting heart rate and its relationship with general and abdominal obesity in young male Saudi university students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yar, T.

    2010-01-01

    An elevated resting heart rate (Rhr) has been linked with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Obese people have altered autonomic balance that could lead to elevated Rhr and altered responses to postural changes. As no comparative data are available on Rhr in young normal weight (NW) and obese (OB) adults in Saudi Arabia, the present study was aimed at finding out the effect of adiposity on RHR and RHR response to change in posture. Methods: Second-year male students (n=231; age:19-20 years), were recruited from the Dammam University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia, during the period September 2008 to October 2009. Anthropometric measures were obtained and indices of obesity (body mass index [EMI], waist circumference [WC], waist-to-hip ratio [WHR], waist-to-stature ratio [WSR]) were calculated. RHR in standing and supine positions were obtained from radial pulse. Pearson's correlation (r) between obesity indices and RHR as well as the differences between RHR in NW and OB groups were calculated. Results: General obesity (BMI greater or equal to 25.0 kg/m1 was found in 45.5% students. Central obesity (WC>85 cm or WSR>50.0) was found in 36.8% students. RHR was significantly correlated with BMI, WC and WSR (r=O.305, 0.300, 0.299 respectively, p< O.01) . Subjects above the obesity indices cut-off points had significantly higher values of RHR in both standing and supine positions compared to NW individuals (p<0.05). There was a greater reduction in RHR on changing the posture to supine state in OB group. Conclusion: A significantly higher RHR and a greater change in RHR on changing the posture point towards an altered autonomic balance in OB group of young adolescent males. This underscores the need to implement health education program to combat obesity at school and college levels. (author)

  15. Race and Resting-State Heart Rate Variability in Brazilian Civil Servants and the Mediating Effects of Discrimination: An ELSA-Brasil Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andrew H; Koenig, Julian; Thayer, Julian F; Bittencourt, Marcio S; Pereira, Alexandre C; Santos, Itamar S; Dantas, Eduardo M; Mill, José G; Chor, Dora; Ribeiro, Antonio L P; Benseñor, Isabela M; Lotufo, Paulo A

    2016-10-01

    African Americans are characterized by higher heart rate variability (HRV), a finding ostensibly associated with beneficial health outcomes. However, these findings are at odds with other evidence that blacks have worse cardiovascular outcomes. Here, we examine associations in a large cohort from the ELSA-Brasil study and determined whether these effects are mediated by discrimination. Three groups were compared on the basis of self-declared race: "black" (n = 2,020), "brown" (n = 3,502), and "white" (n = 6,467). Perceived discrimination was measured using a modified version of the Everyday Discrimination Scale. Resting-state HRV was extracted from 10-minute resting-state electrocardiograms. Racial differences in HRV were determined by regression analyses weighted by propensity scores, which controlled for potentially confounding variables including age, sex, education, and other health-related information. Nonlinear mediation analysis quantified the average total effect, comprising direct (race-HRV) and indirect (race-discrimination-HRV) pathways. Black participants displayed higher HRV relative to brown (Cohen's d = 0.20) and white participants (Cohen's d = 0.31). Brown relative to white participants also displayed a small but significantly higher HRV (Cohen's d = 0.14). Discrimination indirectly contributed to the effects of race on HRV. This large cohort from the Brazilian population shows that HRV is greatest in black, followed by brown, relative to white participants. The presence of higher HRV in these groups may reflect a sustained compensatory psychophysiological response to the adverse effects of discrimination. Additional research is needed to determine the health consequences of these differences in HRV across racial and ethnic groups.

  16. Acetylcholine and bradykinin trigger preconditioning in the heart through a pathway that includes Akt and NOS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Thomas; Qin, Qining; Philipp, Sebastian; Alexeyev, Mikhail F; Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M

    2004-12-01

    In the rabbit heart, bradykinin and ACh trigger preconditioning by a mechanism involving ATP-sensitive potassium channel-dependent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recent evidence indicates that the pathway by which bradykinin causes ROS generation includes nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and protein kinase G (PKG). On the other hand, Akt was shown to be essential for ACh to generate ROS. This study determines whether these two G-coupled receptor agonists indeed have similar signaling targets, i.e., whether Akt is involved in bradykinin's pathway and whether NOS is involved in ACh's pathway. Isolated adult rabbit cardiomyocytes were incubated for 15 min in reduced MitoTracker red, which becomes fluorescent only after exposure to ROS. Bradykinin (400 nM) and ACh (250 microM) caused a 51.4 +/- 14.8% and 39.8 +/- 11.7% increase, respectively, in ROS production (P hydrochloride (L-NIO, 5 microM). L-NIO also blocked the anti-infarct effect of ACh (550 microM) in isolated rabbit hearts exposed to 30 min of regional ischemia. We conclude that both bradykinin and ACh trigger ROS generation by sequentially activating Akt and NOS.

  17. Night-time heart rate cut-off point definition by resting office tachycardia in untreated hypertensive patients: data of the Spanish ABPM registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinyoles, Ernest; de la Sierra, Alejandro; Roso, Albert; de la Cruz, Juan J; Gorostidi, Manuel; Segura, Julián; Banegas, José R; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Ruilope, Luís M

    2014-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that an elevated resting heart rate (HR) is a risk factor for both total and cardiovascular mortality. Our aim was to estimate the night-time HR cut-off point that best predicts cardiovascular risk office tachycardia in hypertensive patients. Untreated hypertensive patients without concomitant cardiovascular diseases were included. Office and ambulatory HRs were measured. Cardiovascular risk office tachycardia was defined by office HR at least 85 beats per minute (bpm). Different night-time HR cut-offs were estimated by receiver operating characteristic curve analyses to predict cardiovascular risk office tachycardia. The best cut-off was selected on the basis of its combined sensitivity and specificity. A total of 32 569 hypertensive patients were included: 46.5% women, mean age (SD) 52 (14) years, office blood pressure 146 (16)/89 (11) mmHg, diabetes 10.3%, smoking 19.2%, BMI 29 (6.8) kg/m, office HR 77 (11.2) bpm, and night-time HR 64.9 (9.3) bpm. A total of 7070 (21.7%) patients were found to have cardiovascular risk office tachycardia. The night-time HR value that better predicted cardiovascular risk office tachycardia was more than 66 bpm. In comparison with patients with night HR below this value, those with night-time tachycardia were predominantly women, younger, with higher ambulatory blood pressure, greater BMI, and higher prevalence of diabetes and smoking. All comparisons were statistically significant (P less than 0.001). A mean night-time HR more than 66 bpm is a good predictor of cardiovascular risk office tachycardia in untreated hypertensive patients and could be considered a variable associated with an increased cardiovascular risk.

  18. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-01-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 +/- 81 to 350 +/- 77 ml and from 52 +/- 26 to 43 +/- 20 volume units, respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 +/- 10 to 17 +/- 9 mm Hg and 10 +/- 5 to 6 +/- 5 mm Hg. Although stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 +/- 6% to 22+/- 5% and from 25 +/- 9% to 29 +/- 11%, respectively. During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. This, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured

  19. Heart rate variability reveals that a decrease in parasympathetic ('rest-and-digest') activity dominates autonomic stress responses in a free-living seabird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Martina S; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Yamamoto, Maki; Yoda, Ken

    2017-10-01

    The autonomic stress response, often referred to as the 'fight-or-flight' response, is a highly conserved physiological reaction to stress in vertebrates that occurs via a decrease in parasympathetic (PNS) activity, which promotes self-maintenance 'rest and digest' processes, and an increase in sympathetic (SNS) activity, which prepares an animal for danger ('fight-or-flight'). Though the PNS and SNS both innervate most organs, they often control different tissues and functions within those organs (though the pacemaker of the heart is controlled by both). Moreover the PNS and SNS are regulated independently. Yet until now, most studies of autonomic stress responses in non-model species focused only on the SNS response. We used external electrocardiogram loggers to measure heart rate and heart rate variability indexes that reflect PNS and SNS activity in a seabird, the Streaked Shearwater (Calonectris leucomelas), during the stress of handling, and during recovery in the nest burrow or during restraint in a cloth bag. We show for the first time in a free-living animal that the autonomic stress response is mediated primarily by a rapid decrease in PNS activity: handling stress induced a large and long-lasting depression of PNS 'rest-and-digest' activity that required two hours to recover. We also found evidence for a substantially smaller and shorter-lasting SNS 'fight-or-flight' response. Confinement in a cloth bag was less stressful for birds than handling, but more stressful than recovering in nest burrows. We show that quantifying autonomic activity from heart rate variability is effective for non-invasively studying stress physiology in free-living animals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Reproducibility of heart rate variability parameters measured in healthy subjects at rest and after a postural change maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Dantas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Heart rate variability (HRV provides important information about cardiac autonomic modulation. Since it is a noninvasive and inexpensive method, HRV has been used to evaluate several parameters of cardiovascular health. However, the internal reproducibility of this method has been challenged in some studies. Our aim was to determine the intra-individual reproducibility of HRV parameters in short-term recordings obtained in supine and orthostatic positions. Electrocardiographic (ECG recordings were obtained from 30 healthy subjects (20-49 years, 14 men using a digital apparatus (sampling ratio = 250 Hz. ECG was recorded for 10 min in the supine position and for 10 min in the orthostatic position. The procedure was repeated 2-3 h later. Time and frequency domain analyses were performed. Frequency domain included low (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz and high frequency (HF, 0.15-0.4 Hz bands. Power spectral analysis was performed by the autoregressive method and model order was set at 16. Intra-subject agreement was assessed by linear regression analysis, test of difference in variances and limits of agreement. Most HRV measures (pNN50, RMSSD, LF, HF, and LF/HF ratio were reproducible independent of body position. Better correlation indexes (r > 0.6 were obtained in the orthostatic position. Bland-Altman plots revealed that most values were inside the agreement limits, indicating concordance between measures. Only SDNN and NNv in the supine position were not reproducible. Our results showed reproducibility of HRV parameters when recorded in the same individual with a short time between two exams. The increased sympathetic activity occurring in the orthostatic position probably facilitates reproducibility of the HRV indexes.

  1. Effects of a low-glycemic load diet on resting energy expenditure and heart disease risk factors during weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mark A; Swain, Janis; Goldfine, Allison B; Rifai, Nader; Ludwig, David S

    2004-11-24

    Weight loss elicits physiological adaptations relating to energy intake and expenditure that antagonize ongoing weight loss. To test whether dietary composition affects the physiological adaptations to weight loss, as assessed by resting energy expenditure. DESIGN, STUDY, AND PARTICIPANTS: A randomized parallel-design study of 39 overweight or obese young adults aged 18 to 40 years who received an energy-restricted diet, either low-glycemic load or low-fat. Participants were studied in the General Clinical Research Centers of the Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Children's Hospital, Boston, Mass, before and after 10% weight loss. The study was conducted from January 4, 2001, to May 6, 2003. Resting energy expenditure measured in the fasting state by indirect calorimetry, body composition by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, cardiovascular disease risk factors, and self-reported hunger. Resting energy expenditure decreased less with the low-glycemic load diet than with the low-fat diet, expressed in absolute terms (mean [SE], 96 [24] vs 176 [27] kcal/d; P = .04) or as a proportion (5.9% [1.5%] vs 10.6% [1.7%]; P = .05). Participants receiving the low-glycemic load diet reported less hunger than those receiving the low-fat diet (P = .04). Insulin resistance (P = .01), serum triglycerides (P = .01), C-reactive protein (P = .03), and blood pressure (P = .07 for both systolic and diastolic) improved more with the low-glycemic load diet. Changes in body composition (fat and lean mass) in both groups were very similar (P = .85 and P = .45, respectively). Changes in dietary composition within prevailing norms can affect physiological adaptations that defend body weight. Reduction in glycemic load may aid in the prevention or treatment of obesity, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus.

  2. Reproducibility of heart rate variability, blood pressure variability and baroreceptor sensitivity during rest and head-up tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Michael V; Agner, Erik; Kanters, Jørgen K

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Previous studies have indicated moderate-to-poor reproducibility of heart rate variability (HRV) but the reproducibility of blood pressure variability (BPV) and spectral measures of baroreceptor sensitivity (BRS) are not well established. METHODS: We measured normal-to-normal heart beat...... pressures were extracted for the assessment of day-to-day and short-term reproducibility. Power spectrum analysis (Fourier) and transfer function analysis was performed. Reproducibility was assessed using the coefficient of variation (CV). The reproducibility of the mean RR interval, mean systolic......, diastolic and mean blood pressure was good (CVspectral parameters of HRV (CV range 18-36%) and BPV (16-44%) and moderate reproducibility of BRS (14-20%). CONCLUSION: Spectral estimates of BRS had only moderate reproducibility although...

  3. Oxytocin increases heart rate variability in humans at rest: implications for social approach-related motivation and capacity for social engagement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H Kemp

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Oxytocin (OT plays a key regulatory role in human social behaviour. While prior studies have examined the effects of OT on observable social behaviours, studies have seldom examined the effects of OT on psychophysiological markers such as heart rate variability (HRV, which provides an index of individual's motivation for social behaviour. Furthermore, no studies have examined the impact of OT on HRV under resting conditions, which provides an index of maximal capacity for social engagement. OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of OT on HRV measures in healthy male participants while at rest. OT was hypothesised to increase HRV, compared to placebo, and that the effects would be greatest for a non-linear measure of HRV (the detrended fluctuation scaling exponent. METHODS: Twenty-one male participants were recruited for this study. Participants were non-smokers, not on any medications and reported no history of psychiatric illness, neurological disorder, or any other serious medical condition (e.g. diabetes, cardiovascular disease. The study employed a randomised, placebo-controlled, within-subject, crossover, experimental design. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: HRV was calculated from electrocardiography under a standardized, 10-minute, resting state condition. RESULTS: As hypothesised, OT increased HRV and these effects were largest using the detrended fluctuation scaling exponent, a non-linear measure. These changes were observed in the absence of any change in state mood, as measured by the profile of mood states. Importantly, participants were unable to correctly guess which treatment they had been assigned at either of the two assessments. CONCLUSIONS: Together with the broader literature on OT and HRV, findings suggest that acute administration of OT may facilitate a fundamental psychophysiological feature of social behaviour, increasing capacity for social engagement. Findings also suggest that HRV changes may provide a novel biomarker of

  4. High intensity interval training (HIIT) improves resting blood pressure, metabolic (MET) capacity and heart rate reserve without compromising cardiac function in sedentary aging men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Fergal; Herbert, Peter; Elliott, Adrian D; Richards, Jo; Beaumont, Alexander; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F

    2017-05-13

    This study examined a programme of pre-conditioning exercise with subsequent high intensity interval training (HIIT) on blood pressure, echocardiography, cardiac strain mechanics and maximal metabolic (MET) capacity in sedentary (SED) aging men compared with age matched masters athletes (LEX). Using a STROBE compliant observational design, 39 aging male participants (SED; n=22, aged 62.7±5.2yrs) (LEX; n=17, aged=61.1±5.4yrs) were recruited to a study that necessitated three distinct assessment phases; enrolment (Phase A), following pre-conditioning exercise in SED (Phase B), then following 6weeks of HIIT performed once every five days by both groups before reassessment (Phase C). Hemodynamic, echocardiographic and cardiac strain mechanics were obtained at rest and maximal cardiorespiratory and chronotropic responses were obtained at each measurement phase. The training intervention improved systolic, mean arterial blood pressure, rate pressure product and heart rate reserve (each PHIIT. Echocardiography and cardiac strain measures were unremarkable apart from trivial increase to intra-ventricular septum diastole (IVSd) (PHIIT. A programme of preconditioning exercise with HIIT induces clinically relevant improvements in blood pressure, rate pressure product and encourages recovery of heart rate reserve in SED, while improving maximal MET capacity in both SED and LEX without inducing any pathological cardiovascular remodeling. These data add to the emerging repute of HIIT as a safe and promising exercise prescription to improve cardiovascular function and metabolic capacity in sedentary aging. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultra-Short-Term Heart Rate Variability Indexes at Rest and Post-Exercise in Athletes: Evaluating the Agreement with Accepted Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Esco, Andrew A. Flatt

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the agreement of the vagal-related heart rate variability index, log-transformed root mean square of successive R-R intervals (lnRMSSD, measured under ultra-short-term conditions (< 60 seconds with conventional longer term recordings of 5 minutes in collegiate athletes under resting and post-exercise conditions. Electrocardiographic readings were collected from twenty-three athletes within 5-minute segments at rest and at 25-30 minutes of supine recovery following a maximal exercise test. From each 5-minute segment, lnRMSSD was recorded as the criterion measure. Within each 5-minute segment, lnRMSSD was also determined from randomly selected ultra-short-term segments of 10-, 30-, and 60-seconds in length, which were compared to the criterion. When compared to the criterion measures, the significant intraclass correlation (from 0.98 to 0.81, p < 0.05 and typical error (from 0.11 to 0.34 increased as ultra-short-term measurement duration decreased (i.e., from 60 seconds to 10 seconds. In addition, the limits of agreement (Bias ± 1.98 SD increased as ultra-short-term lnRMSSD duration decreased as follows: 0.00 ± 0.22 ms, -0.07 ± 0.41 ms, -0.20 ± 0.94 ms for the 60-, 30-, and 10-second pre-exercise segments, respectively, and -0.15 ± 0.39 ms, -0.14 ± 0.53 ms, -0.12 ± 0.76 ms for the 60-, 30-, and 10-second post-exercise segments, respectively. This study demonstrated that as ultra-short-term measurement duration decreased from 60 seconds to 10 seconds, the agreement to the criterion decreased. Therefore, 60 seconds appears to be an acceptable recording time for lnRMSSD data collection in collegiate athletes.

  6. Late effects of anthracycline therapy in childhood in relation to the function of the heart at rest and under physical stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, D; Hilger, F; Binswanger, J; Andelfinger, G; Hartmann, W

    1995-05-01

    To evaluate the long-term effects of anthracyclines on the myocardium of the young child we examined 34 patients who had been treated with anthracyclines in childhood. In addition to anthracycline, the patients were treated with other potentially cardiotoxic substances within the framework of different protocols. The mean cumulative anthracycline dose was 128.6 mg/m2, the average age at onset of chemotherapy 4.2 years, and the time interval after discontinuation of treatment 9.0 years. The cardiological examination consisted of a physical examination, electrocardiography and echocardiography, including Doppler and bio-impedance cardiography. The patients were studied at rest and after physical exercise with a cycle ergometer test in a supine position. The results of the physical examination, the electrocardiogram at rest and the 24 h Holter monitoring were normal. The left ventricular enddiastolic diameter, shortening fraction, velocity of fibre shortening (VCF), the diastolic flow profile at the mitral valve level and the cardiac stroke volume at rest were also normal. However, the shortening fraction (SF) was below the margin of 2 standard deviations in two patients and the VCF in three patients. There was a significant reduction in septal thickness, (-1.4 SD, P 0.0002) and in the left ventricular myocardial mass (-0.76 SD, P = 0.0042). Physical working capacity was normal. Immediately after physical stress the expected rise of SF and VCF did not occur and the SF fell below the values at rest. In comparison to a healthy control group the SF and the VCF were markedly decreased (P > 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Effect of Smoking on Blood Pressure and Resting Heart Rate - A Mendelian Randomization Meta-Analysis in the CARTA Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linneberg, A.; Jacobsen, R.K.; Skaaby, T.; Taylor, A.E.; Fluharty, M.E.; Jeppesen, J.; Bjorngaard, J.H.; Asvold, B.O.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Campbell, A.; Marioni, R.E.; Kumari, M.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Kaakinen, M.; Cavadino, A.; Postmus, I.; Ahluwalia, T.S.; Wannamethee, S.G.; Lahti, J.; Räikkönen, K.; Palotie, A.; Wong, A.; Dalgard, C.; Ford, I.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Christiansen, L.; Kyvik, K.O.; Kuh, D; Eriksson, J.G.; Whincup, P.H.; Mbarek, H.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Vink, J.M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Davey Smith, G.; Lawlor, D.A.; Kisialiou, A.; McConnachie, A.; Padmanabhan, S.; Jukema, J.W.; Power, C.; Hyppönen, E.; Preisig, M.; Waeber, G.; Vollenweider, P.; Korhonen, T.; Laatikainen, T.; Salomaa, V.; Kaprio, J.; Kivimaki, M.; Smith, B.H.; Hayward, C.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Thuesen, B.H.; Sattar, N.; Morris, R.W.; Romundstad, P.R.; Munafò, M.; Jarvelin, M.R.; Husemoen, L.L.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background-Smoking is an important cardiovascular disease risk factor, but the mechanisms linking smoking to blood pressure are poorly understood. Methods and Results-Data on 141 317 participants (62 666 never, 40 669 former, 37 982 current smokers) from 23 population-based studies were included in

  8. Effect of smoking on blood pressure and resting heart rate: A Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in the CARTA Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linneberg, A.; Jacobsen, R.K.; Skaaby, T.; Taylor, A.E.; Fluharty, M.E.; Jeppesen, J.L.; Björngaard, J.H.; Asvold, B.A.; Gabrielsen, M.E.; Campbell, A.; Marioni, R.E.; Kumari, M.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Kaakinen, M.; Cavadino, A.; Postmus, I.; Ahluwalia, T.V.S.; Wannamethee, S.G.; Lahti, J.; Raikkonen, K.; Palotie, A.; Wong, A.; Dalgard, C.; Ford, I.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Christiansen, L.; Kyvik, K.O.; Kuh, D.; Eriksson, J.G.; Whincup, P.H.; Mbarek, H.; Geus, E.J.C. de; Vink, J.M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Smith, G.D.; Lawlor, D.A.; Kisialiou, A.; McConnachie, A.; Padmanabhan, S.; Jukema, J.W.; Power, C.; Hypponen, E.; Preisig, M.; Waeber, G.; Vollenweider, P.; Korhonen, T.; Laatikainen, T.; Salomaa, V.; Kaprio, J.; Kivimaki, M.; Smith, B.H.; Hayward, C.; Sorensen, T.I.A.; Thuesen, B.H.; Sattar, N.; Morris, R.W.; Romundstad, P.R.; Munafò, M.R.; Jarvelin, M.R.; Husemoen, L.L.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background; Smoking is an important cardiovascular disease risk factor, but the mechanisms linking smoking to blood pressure are poorly understood.Methods and Results: Data on 141 317 participants (62 666 never, 40 669 former, 37 982 current smokers) from 23 population-based studies were included in

  9. [Rest gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion post (99m)Tc-MIBI injection in a patient with acute chest pain and with no medical history of ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negre-Busó, M; Muntaner-Muñoz, L; Rubió-Rodríguez, A; Marin-Buriticá, A; Ferran-Sureda, N; Bassaganyas-Vilarrasa, J

    2015-01-01

    Gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging is a widely used technique indicated for assessment of patients with no clear diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. Early rest gated-SPECT myocardial perfusion study in patients with acute chest pain has high sensitivity and high negative predictive value for ruling out coronary disease. We report a case of a patient admitted for the study of her chest pain. She underwent a myocardial perfusion stress-rest whose interpretation could have been equivocal due to the clinical status of the patient during the injection of the radiotracer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  10. Heart rate index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  11. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE OF ISCHEMIC GENESIS AND CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: POSSIBILITIES OF COMBINATION THERAPY INCLUDING NEBIVOLOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Fedotov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the features of chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis concurrent with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and to investigate the effect of the cardioselective β1-adrenoblocker (β1-AB nebivolol on the course of COPD and the parameters of the bronchopulmonary system in patients with CHF of ischemic genesis during treatment.Subjects and methods.The investigation enrolled 63 patients aged 40–70 years, including 43 patients with functional class (FC II–IV CHF with a Simpson left ventricular ejection fraction of  45 % concurrent with COPD (a study group and 20 patients with CHF and no bronchopulmonary pathology (a control group. The study group patients were randomly divided into 2 subgroups: 1 23 patients who received nebivolol in addition to background therapy; 2 20 patients in whom the therapy ruled out the use of β1-AB. The control patients were switched to nebivolol therapy. During 6-month follow-up, the authors made clinical examination, recorded the rate, duration, and severity of COPD exacerbations, performed a 6-minute walking test (6MWT, and used a clinical status scale modified by R. Cody, a dyspnea 0–10 category ratio (Borg scale, and a Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale (MRS scale. Besides, quality of life in patients was assessed using the specific Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. All the patients underwent echocardiography, bronchodilatation-induced external respiratory function test, peak flowmetry, and blood brain natriuretic peptide quantification. These studies were conducted at baseline and at 1 and 6 months of therapy.Results. During the investigation, the patients with CHF concurrent with COPD were found to have a high rate of hypertensive disease, prior myocardial infarctions, atrial fibrillations, and higher FC exertional angina. These patients also showed a delayed optimal result achievement during the combination therapy involving the use of β1-AB

  12. CHRONIC HEART FAILURE OF ISCHEMIC GENESIS AND CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE: POSSIBILITIES OF COMBINATION THERAPY INCLUDING NEBIVOLOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Fedotov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the features of chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic genesis concurrent with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and to investigate the effect of the cardioselective β1-adrenoblocker (β1-AB nebivolol on the course of COPD and the parameters of the bronchopulmonary system in patients with CHF of ischemic genesis during treatment.Subjects and methods.The investigation enrolled 63 patients aged 40–70 years, including 43 patients with functional class (FC II–IV CHF with a Simpson left ventricular ejection fraction of  45 % concurrent with COPD (a study group and 20 patients with CHF and no bronchopulmonary pathology (a control group. The study group patients were randomly divided into 2 subgroups: 1 23 patients who received nebivolol in addition to background therapy; 2 20 patients in whom the therapy ruled out the use of β1-AB. The control patients were switched to nebivolol therapy. During 6-month follow-up, the authors made clinical examination, recorded the rate, duration, and severity of COPD exacerbations, performed a 6-minute walking test (6MWT, and used a clinical status scale modified by R. Cody, a dyspnea 0–10 category ratio (Borg scale, and a Medical Research Council Dyspnoea Scale (MRS scale. Besides, quality of life in patients was assessed using the specific Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire. All the patients underwent echocardiography, bronchodilatation-induced external respiratory function test, peak flowmetry, and blood brain natriuretic peptide quantification. These studies were conducted at baseline and at 1 and 6 months of therapy.Results. During the investigation, the patients with CHF concurrent with COPD were found to have a high rate of hypertensive disease, prior myocardial infarctions, atrial fibrillations, and higher FC exertional angina. These patients also showed a delayed optimal result achievement during the combination therapy involving the use of β1-AB

  13. RESTful NET

    CERN Document Server

    Flanders, Jon

    2008-01-01

    RESTful .NET is the first book that teaches Windows developers to build RESTful web services using the latest Microsoft tools. Written by Windows Communication Foundation (WFC) expert Jon Flanders, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how you can use WCF and other components of the .NET 3.5 Framework to build, deploy and use REST-based web services in a variety of application scenarios. RESTful architecture offers a simpler approach to building web services than SOAP, SOA, and the cumbersome WS- stack. And WCF has proven to be a flexible technology for building distributed systems not necessa

  14. Guideline-recommended therapy, including beta-blocker utilization, in patients with chronic heart failure: results from a Canadian community hospital heart function clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heffernan M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Michael Heffernan Division of Cardiology, Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, Oakville, ON, Canada Abstract: A comprehensive analysis of beta-blocker utilization and other guideline-recommended therapies for the treatment of chronic heart failure in a Canadian community hospital heart function clinic has not been undertaken and was, therefore, the focus of this study. The proportion of patients who would be potential candidates for ivabridine and sacubitril–valsartan therapy as a result of fulfilling the criteria for enrollment in either the Systolic Heart failure treatment with the If inhibitor ivabradine Trial (SHIFT study (left-ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] >35%, sinus rhythm, New York Heart Association II–IV or the Prospective Comparison of angiotensin receptor-neprilysin inhibitor (ARNI with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI to determine impact on global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure (PARADIGM-HF study (LVEF <40%, New York Heart Association II–IV, glomerular filtration rate >30 mL/min, was also assessed. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was carried out in all 371 patients treated in this community heart function clinic for at least a 12-month period. The patients were elderly (mean age 74±13.3 years and predominately male (61.5% with symptomatic (82.5% moderate left-ventricular dysfunction (LVEF 45.4%±15.6%. A substantial proportion of the patients also had a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (52.8%. The total use of beta blockers exceeded 87%, while 100% of patients without a documented contraindication or intolerance to a beta blocker received therapy. Adherence to other guideline-recommended pharmacotherapies specifically for heart failure with reduced left ventricular ejection was high: 86.1% of the eligible patients were treated with an ACEI/angiotensin receptor blocker and 61.9% received a mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist. We determined that 13.7% of the complement of this heart

  15. Mechanistic characterization of aerobic alcohol oxidation catalyzed by Pd(OAc)(2)/pyridine including identification of the catalyst resting state and the origin of nonlinear [catalyst] dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Bradley A; Guzei, Ilia A; Stahl, Shannon S

    2004-09-15

    The Pd(OAc)(2)/pyridine catalyst system is one of the most convenient and versatile catalyst systems for selective aerobic oxidation of organic substrates. This report describes the catalytic mechanism of Pd(OAc)(2)/pyridine-mediated oxidation of benzyl alcohol, which has been studied by gas-uptake kinetic methods and (1)H NMR spectroscopy. The data reveal that turnover-limiting substrate oxidation by palladium(II) proceeds by a four-step pathway involving (1) formation of an adduct between the alcohol substrate and the square-planar palladium(II) complex, (2) proton-coupled ligand substitution to generate a palladium-alkoxide species, (3) reversible dissociation of pyridine from palladium(II) to create a three-coordinate intermediate, and (4) irreversible beta-hydride elimination to produce benzaldehyde. The catalyst resting state, characterized by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, consists of an equilibrium mixture of (py)(2)Pd(OAc)(2), 1, and the alcohol adduct of this complex, 1xRCH(2)OH. These in situ spectroscopic data provide direct support for the mechanism proposed from kinetic studies. The catalyst displays higher turnover frequency at lower catalyst loading, as revealed by a nonlinear dependence of the rate on [catalyst]. This phenomenon arises from a competition between forward and reverse reaction steps that exhibit unimolecular and bimolecular dependences on [catalyst]. Finally, overoxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzoic acid, even at low levels, contributes to catalyst deactivation by formation of a less active palladium benzoate complex.

  16. Association between RR interval and high-frequency heart rate variability acquired during short-term, resting recordings with free and paced breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandercock, Gavin; Gladwell, Valerie; Beneke, Ralph; Dawson, Samantha; Nunan, David; Brodie, David

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) oscillations in RR interval from 0.15–0.40 Hz are widely accepted as a measure of cardiac vagal outflow but the HF/RR relationship appears complex, particularly with longer RR intervals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the HF/RR interval relationship during free and paced breathing. HF power and mean RR interval length were recorded in 150 men and 120 women (mean age 34.5 ± 11.4) during 5 min of supine rest with either free or paced (12 cycles min −1 ) breathing. Linear and quadratic models were used to assess the relationship between RR interval and the natural logarithm of HF power (lnHF). The RR interval length at which there was no further increase in lnHF was determined as the deflection point. ANCOVA was used to determine differences in the linear regression slopes for lnHF/RR with paced or free breathing. With free breathing (n = 131), the adjusted R 2 was similar between linear (15.3%) and quadratic (17.5%) fits and saturation of lnHF occurred within the recorded RR interval range (1326 ms). With paced breathing (n = 139), adjusted R 2 values were again similar between linear (22.4%) and quadratic (23.2%) fits. The deflection point was outside the range of recorded RR intervals at 1458 ms. ANCOVA showed a significant difference in the slope of the lnHF/RR regression lines between free and paced breathing. The lnHF/RR relationship is weaker when derived from between-subject recordings than from repeated within-subject samples. lnHF/RR showed evidence of saturation at ∼45 bpm with free breathing. With paced breathing, a deflection in lnHF was found outside the recorded RR interval range (∼41 bpm). Paced breathing creates a stronger lnHF/RR relationship. The slope of the lnHF/RR regression line with paced breathing is significantly different from that observed with free breathing. It appears that lnHF is a valid index of vagal outflow, except in subjects with very low heart rates. Paced breathing data collection protocols

  17. Effects of 16 Weeks of Concurrent Training on Resting Heart Rate Variability and Cardiorespiratory Fitness in People Living With HIV/AIDS Using Antiretroviral Therapy: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Rafael E; Guariglia, Débora A; Okuno, Nilo M; Deminice, Rafael; Peres, Sidney B; Moraes, Solange M F

    2016-12-01

    Pedro, RE, Guariglia, DA, Okuno, NM, Deminice, R, Peres, SB, and Moraes, SMF. Effects of 16 weeks of concurrent training on resting heart rate variability and cardiorespiratory fitness in people living with HIV/AIDS using antiretroviral therapy: a randomized clinical trial. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3494-3502, 2016-The study evaluated the effects of concurrent training on resting heart rate variability (HRVrest) and cardiorespiratory fitness in people living with HIV/AIDS undergoing antiretroviral therapy (ART). Fifty-eight participants were randomized into 2 groups (control and training group); however, only 33 were analyzed. The variables studied were HRVrest indices, submaximal values of oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2sub) and heart rate (HR5min), peak speed (Vpeak), and peak oxygen uptake (V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak). The training group performed concurrent training (15-20 minutes of aerobic exercise plus 40 minutes of resistance exercise), 3 times per week, for 16 weeks. Posttraining V[Combining Dot Above]O2peak and Vpeak increased, and HR5min decreased. Resting heart rate variability indices did not present statistical differences posttraining; however, the magnitude-based inferences demonstrated a "possibly positive effect" for high frequency (HF) and low frequency (LF) plus high frequency (LF + HF) and a "likely positive effect" for R-Rmean posttraining. In conclusion, concurrent training was effective at improving cardiorespiratory fitness and endurance performance. Moreover, it led to probably a positive effect on HF and a likely positive effect on R-Rmean in people living with HIV/AIDS undergoing ART.

  18. Mutations in TKT Are the Cause of a Syndrome Including Short Stature, Developmental Delay, and Congenital Heart Defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Lia; Wamelink, Mirjam M C; Salomons, Gajja S; Roos, Birthe; Pop, Ana; Dauber, Andrew; Hwa, Vivian; Andrew, Melissa; Douglas, Jessica; Feingold, Murray; Kramer, Nancy; Saitta, Sulagna; Retterer, Kyle; Cho, Megan T; Begtrup, Amber; Monaghan, Kristin G; Wynn, Julia; Chung, Wendy K

    2016-06-02

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) is increasingly being utilized to diagnose individuals with undiagnosed disorders. Developmental delay and short stature are common clinical indications for WES. We performed WES in three families, using proband-parent trios and two additional affected siblings. We identified a syndrome due to an autosomal-recessively inherited deficiency of transketolase, encoded by TKT, on chromosome 3p21. Our series includes three families with a total of five affected individuals, ranging in age from 4 to 25 years. Two families of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry were homozygous for an 18 base pair in-frame insertion in TKT. The third family was compound heterozygous for nonsense and missense variants in TKT. All affected individuals had short stature and were developmentally delayed. Congenital heart defects were noted in four of the five affected individuals, and there was a history of chronic diarrhea and cataracts in the older individuals with the homozygous 18 base pair insertion. Enzymatic testing confirmed significantly reduced transketolase activity. Elevated urinary excretion of erythritol, arabitol, ribitol, and pent(ul)ose-5-phosphates was detected, as well as elevated amounts of erythritol, arabitol, and ribitol in the plasma of affected individuals. Transketolase deficiency reduces NADPH synthesis and nucleic acid synthesis and cell division and could explain the problems with growth. NADPH is also critical for maintaining cerebral glutathione, which might contribute to the neurodevelopmental delays. Transketolase deficiency is one of a growing list of inborn errors of metabolism in the non-oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Resting and exercise haemodynamics in relation to six-minute walk test in patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Kaye, David; Borlaug, Barry A

    2018-01-01

    AIMS: Patients with heart failure and preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) are characterized by functional impairment and an abnormal haemodynamic response to exercise. The six-minute walk test (6MWT) serves as a standardized test for functional capacity quantification in heart failure patients, a...

  20. RESTful Web Services Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Allamaraju, Subbu

    2010-01-01

    While the REST design philosophy has captured the imagination of web and enterprise developers alike, using this approach to develop real web services is no picnic. This cookbook includes more than 100 recipes to help you take advantage of REST, HTTP, and the infrastructure of the Web. You'll learn ways to design RESTful web services for client and server applications that meet performance, scalability, reliability, and security goals, no matter what programming language and development framework you use. Each recipe includes one or two problem statements, with easy-to-follow, step-by-step i

  1. Association between resting heart rate across the life course and all-cause mortality: longitudinal findings from the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Gill, Thomas M; Shah, Imran; Hughes, Alun D; Deanfield, John E; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca

    2014-09-01

    Resting heart rate (RHR) is an independent risk factor for mortality. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether elevations in childhood and mid-adulthood RHR, including changes over time, are associated with mortality later in life. We sought to evaluate the association between RHR across the life course, along with its changes and all-cause mortality. We studied 4638 men and women from the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD) cohort born during 1 week in 1946. RHR was obtained during childhood at ages 6, 7 and 11, and in mid-adulthood at ages 36 and 43. Using multivariable Cox regression, we calculated the HR for incident mortality according to RHR measured at each time point, along with changes in mid-adulthood RHR. At age 11, those in the top fifth of the RHR distribution (≥97 bpm) had an increased adjusted hazard of 1.42 (95% CI 1.04 to 1.93) for all-cause mortality. A higher adjusted risk (HR, 95% CI 2.17, 1.40 to 3.36) of death was also observed for those in the highest fifth (≥81 bpm) at age 43. For a >25 bpm increased change in the RHR over the course of 7 years (age 36-43), the adjusted hazard was elevated more than threefold (HR, 95% CI 3.26, 1.54 to 6.90). After adjustment, RHR at ages 6, 7 and 36 were not associated with all-cause mortality. Elevated RHR during childhood and midlife, along with greater changes in mid-adulthood RHR, are associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Quantitative circumferential strain analysis using adenosine triphosphate-stress/rest 3-T tagged magnetic resonance to evaluate regional contractile dysfunction in ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Masashi, E-mail: m.nakamura1230@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Shitsukawa, Toon-city, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Kido, Tomoyuki [Department of Radiology, Saiseikai Matsuyama Hospital, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan); Kido, Teruhito; Tanabe, Yuki; Matsuda, Takuya; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito [Department of Radiology, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Shitsukawa, Toon-city, Ehime 791-0295 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Infarcted segments could be differentiated from non-ischemic and ischemic segments with high sensitivity and specificity under at rest conditions. • The time-to-peak circumferential strain values in infarcted segments were more significantly delayed than those in non-ischemic and ischemic segments. • Both circumferential strain and circumferential systolic strain rate values under ATP-stress conditions were significantly lower in ischemic segments than in non-ischemic segments. • Subtracting stress and rest circumferential strain had a higher diagnostic capability for ischemia relative to only utilizing rest or ATP-stress circumferential strain values. • A circumferential strain analysis using tagged MR can quantitatively assess contractile dysfunction in ischemic and infarcted myocardium. - Abstract: Purpose: We evaluated whether a quantitative circumferential strain (CS) analysis using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-stress/rest 3-T tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can depict myocardial ischemia as contractile dysfunction during stress in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). We evaluated whether it can differentiate between non-ischemia, myocardial ischemia, and infarction. We assessed its diagnostic performance in comparison with ATP-stress myocardial perfusion MR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)-MR imaging. Methods: In 38 patients suspected of having CAD, myocardial segments were categorized as non-ischemic (n = 485), ischemic (n = 74), or infarcted (n = 49) from the results of perfusion MR and LGE-MR. The peak negative CS value, peak circumferential systolic strain rate (CSR), and time-to-peak CS were measured in 16 segments. Results: A cutoff value of −12.0% for CS at rest allowed differentiation between infarcted and other segments with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 76%, accuracy of 76%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81. Additionally, a cutoff value of 477.3 ms for time-to-peak CS at rest

  3. [Clinical and cost effectiveness of rehabilitation programs including physical exercises for patients with ischemic heart disease under conditions of resort and outpatient clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhova, E V; Guliaeva, S F; Tsarev, Iu K; Chervotkina, L A

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate clinical and cost effectiveness of rehabilitation programs including long-term physical training of moderate intensity intended for the management of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) who had undergone acute coronary events; the programs were adapted to the treatment under conditions of spa resorts, dispensaries, and outpatient clinics. It was shown that rehabilitation of patients presenting with CDH with the use of moderately intensive physical exercises during a long period enhances the effectiveness of application of the available funds due to improved clinical course of coronary heart disease, tolerance of physical load, and quality of life.

  4. Comparison of rest and adenosine stress quantitative and semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance in patients with ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Qayyum, Faiza; Larsson, Henrik B W

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to compare absolute quantified myocardial perfusion (MP) to semi-quantitative measurements of MP using MRI for detection of ischemia. Twenty-nine patients underwent rest and stress MP imaging obtained by 1.5T MRI and analyzed using own developed software and by commercial available...... software. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that absolute quantitative data correlated stronger to maxSI (rest: r=0.296, p=.193; stress: r=0.583, p=0.011; myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR): r=0.789, p....058; stress: r=0.096, p=0.704; MPR: r=0.682, p=0.004; and Δ MBF: r=0.055, p=0.804). Absolute quantified MP was able to distinguish between ischemic and non-ischemic territories at rest (left anterior descending artery (LAD): 103.1±11.3mL/100g/min vs. 206.3±98.5mL/100g/min; p=0.001, right coronary artery (RCA...

  5. Association of heart rate profile during exercise with the severity of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cay, Serkan; Ozturk, Sezgin; Biyikoglu, Funda; Yildiz, Abdulkadir; Cimen, Tolga; Uygur, Belma; Tuna, Funda

    2009-05-01

    Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. Autonomic nervous system abnormalities are associated with coronary artery disease and its complications. Exercise stress tests are routinely used for the detection of the presence of coronary artery disease. In this study, we observed the association between heart rate profile during exercise and the severity of coronary artery disease. One hundred and sixty patients with abnormal exercise treadmill test (> or =1 mm horizontal or downsloping ST-segment depression; 119 men, 41 women; mean age = 57 +/- 9 years) were included in the study. Use of any drug affecting heart rate was not permitted. Resting heart rate before exercise, maximum heart rate during exercise, and resting heart rate after exercise (5 min later) were measured and two parameters were calculated: heart rate increment (maximum heart rate - resting heart rate before exercise) and heart rate decrement (maximum heart rate - resting heart rate after exercise). All patients underwent selective coronary angiography and subclassified into two groups according to stenotic lesion severity. Group 1 had at least 50% of stenotic lesion and group 2 had less than 50%. Patients in the first group had increased resting heart rate, decreased maximum heart rate, decreased heart rate increment, and decreased heart rate decrement compared with second group. All patients were classified into tertiles of resting heart rate, heart rate increment, and heart rate decrement level to evaluate whether these parameters were associated with severity of coronary artery stenosis in the study. The multiple-adjusted odds ratio of the risk of severe coronary atherosclerosis was 21.888 (95% confidence interval 6.983-68.606) for the highest tertile of resting heart rate level compared with the lowest tertile. In addition, the multiple-adjusted odds ratio of the risk of severe coronary atherosclerosis was 20.987 (95% confidence interval 6

  6. Quantitative circumferential strain analysis using adenosine triphosphate-stress/rest 3-T tagged magnetic resonance to evaluate regional contractile dysfunction in ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Masashi; Kido, Tomoyuki; Kido, Teruhito; Tanabe, Yuki; Matsuda, Takuya; Nishiyama, Yoshiko; Miyagawa, Masao; Mochizuki, Teruhito

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated whether a quantitative circumferential strain (CS) analysis using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-stress/rest 3-T tagged magnetic resonance (MR) imaging can depict myocardial ischemia as contractile dysfunction during stress in patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). We evaluated whether it can differentiate between non-ischemia, myocardial ischemia, and infarction. We assessed its diagnostic performance in comparison with ATP-stress myocardial perfusion MR and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE)-MR imaging. In 38 patients suspected of having CAD, myocardial segments were categorized as non-ischemic (n=485), ischemic (n=74), or infarcted (n=49) from the results of perfusion MR and LGE-MR. The peak negative CS value, peak circumferential systolic strain rate (CSR), and time-to-peak CS were measured in 16 segments. A cutoff value of -12.0% for CS at rest allowed differentiation between infarcted and other segments with a sensitivity of 79%, specificity of 76%, accuracy of 76%, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.81. Additionally, a cutoff value of 477.3ms for time-to-peak CS at rest allowed differentiation between infarcted and other segments with a sensitivity of 61%, specificity of 91%, accuracy of 88%, and an AUC of 0.75. The differences in CS values between ATP-stress and rest conditions (ΔCS) in non-ischemic segments (median [first quartile, third quartile] -1.7 [-3.2, -0.1] %) were smaller than in segments with ischemia (+1.1 [+0.3, +2.3] %, p<0.001). A cutoff value of +0.3% for the ΔCS value could differentiate segments with ischemia from non-ischemic segments with a sensitivity of 75%, a specificity of 82%, an accuracy of 82%, and an AUC of 0.86. Circumferential strain analysis using tagged MR can quantitatively assess contractile dysfunction in ischemic and infarcted myocardium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of rest and adenosine stress quantitative and semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion using magnetic resonance in patients with ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Abbas A; Qayyum, Faiza; Larsson, Henrik B W; Kjaer, Andreas; Hasbak, Philip; Vejlstrup, Niels G; Kastrup, Jens

    The aim was to compare absolute quantified myocardial perfusion (MP) to semi-quantitative measurements of MP using MRI for detection of ischemia. Twenty-nine patients underwent rest and stress MP imaging obtained by 1.5T MRI and analyzed using own developed software and by commercial available software. Linear regression analysis demonstrated that absolute quantitative data correlated stronger to maxSI (rest: r=0.296, p=.193; stress: r=0.583, p=0.011; myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR): r=0.789, pstress: r=0.096, p=0.704; MPR: r=0.682, p=0.004; and Δ MBF: r=0.055, p=0.804). Absolute quantified MP was able to distinguish between ischemic and non-ischemic territories at rest (left anterior descending artery (LAD): 103.1±11.3mL/100g/min vs. 206.3±98.5mL/100g/min; p=0.001, right coronary artery (RCA): 124.1±45.2mL/100g/min vs. 241.3±81.7mL/100g/min; pstress (LAD: 148.1±47.2mL/100g/min vs. 296.6±111.6mL/100g/min; p=0.012, RCA: 173.4±63.7mL/100g/min vs. 290.2±100.6mL/100g/min; p=0.008, and LCX: 206.6±105.1mL/100g/min vs. 273.8±78.0mL/100g/min; p=0.186). The correlation between global maxSI and positron emission tomography data was non-significant at rest and borderline significant at stress (r=0.265, p=0.382 and r=0.601, p=0.050, respectively). Quantified MP may be useful in patients for detection of ischemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Feasibility of including patients with migration background in a structured heart failure management programme: A prospective case-control study exemplarily on Turkish migrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Pfister

    Full Text Available Structured management programmes deliver optimized care in heart failure patients and improve outcome. We examined the feasibility of including patients with migration background speaking little or no German in a heart failure management programme.After adaption of script material and staff to Turkish language we aimed to recruit 300 Turkish and 300 German (control group patients within 18 months using the operational basis of a local heart failure management programme for screening, contact and inclusion. Of 488 and 1,055 eligible Turkish and German patients identified through screening, 165 Turkish (34% and 335 German (32% patients consented on participation (p = 0.46. General practitioners contributed significantly more of the Turkish (84% than of the German patients (16%, p<0.001. Contact attempts by programme staff were significantly less successful in Turkish (52% than in German patients (60%, p = 0.005 due to significantly higher rate of missing phone numbers (36% vs 25%, invalid address data (28% vs 7% and being unreachable by phone more frequently (39% vs 26%, all p<0.001. Consent rate was significantly higher in successfully contacted Turkish (63% compared to German patients (50%, p<0.001.The inclusion of Turkish minority patients into a heart failure management programme is feasible with higher consent rate than in Germans. However, effort is high due to inherent logistic adaptions and barriers in identification and contacting of patients.DRKS00007780.

  9. Peripheral heart action (PHA) training as a valid substitute to high intensity interval training to improve resting cardiovascular changes and autonomic adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Alessandro; Persiani, Michela; Damiani, Nicholas; Perazzolo, Monica; Raffi, Milena

    2015-04-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of peripheral heart action training compared with high intensity interval training on changes in autonomic regulation and physical fitness. Eighteen young adults (9 women, 9 men) (age 24 ± 3 years, BMI of 22.67 kg/m(2), V'O2max 32.89 ml/kg/min) were randomly assigned to either a high intensity interval training group (n = 8) or a peripheral heart action training (PHA) group (n = 10). Before and after training, maximal whole-body muscular strength, time series of beat-to-beat intervals for heart rate variability, and baroreflex sensitivity were recorded. Arterial baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability were estimated on both time and frequency domains. Physical fitness level was evaluated with maximum oxygen consumption test. The effects of PHA whole-body resistance training increased muscular strength and maximum oxygen consumption, with an effect on vagal-cardiac control and cardiovagal baroreflex sensitivity. After 30 training sessions performed in 3 months, PHA resistance exercise promoted cardiovascular adaptations, with a decrease in the power spectral component of vascular sympathetic activity and an increase in the vagal modulation. Low-frequency oscillation estimated from systolic blood pressure variability seems to be a suitable index of the sympathetic modulation of vasomotor activity. This investigation also want to emphasize the beneficial effects of this particular resistance exercise training, considering also that the increase in muscular strength is inversely associated with all-cause mortality and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, independent of cardiorespiratory fitness levels.

  10. Comparing the Effects of Rest and Massage on Return to Homeostasis Following Submaximal Aerobic Exercise: a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Portia B

    2016-03-01

    Postexercise massage can be used to help promote recovery from exercise on the cellular level, as well as systemically by increasing parasympathetic activity. No studies to date have been done to assess the effects of massage on postexercise metabolic changes, including excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC). The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of massage recovery and resting recovery on a subject's heart rate variability and selected metabolic effects following a submaximal treadmill exercise session. One healthy 24-year-old female subject performed 30 minutes of submaximal treadmill exercise prior to resting or massage recovery sessions. Metabolic data were collected throughout the exercise sessions and at three 10 minute intervals postexercise. Heart rate variability was evaluated for 10 minutes after each of two 30-minute recovery sessions, either resting or massage. Heart rate returned to below resting levels (73 bpm) with 30 and 60 minutes of massage recovery (72 bpm and 63 bpm, respectively) compared to 30 and 60 minutes of resting recovery (77 bpm and 74 bpm, respectively). Heart rate variability data showed a more immediate shift to the parasympathetic state following 30 minutes of massage (1.152 LF/HF ratio) versus the 30-minute resting recovery (6.91 LF/HF ratio). It took 60 minutes of resting recovery to reach similar heart rate variability levels (1.216 LF/HF) found after 30 minutes of massage. Ventilations after 30 minutes of massage recovery averaged 7.1 bpm compared to 17.9 bpm after 30 minutes of resting recovery. No differences in EPOC were observed through either the resting or massage recovery based on the metabolic data collected. Massage was used to help the subject shift into parasympathetic activity more quickly than rest alone following a submaximal exercise session.

  11. Prolonged job strain reduces time-domain heart rate variability on both working and resting days among cardiovascular-susceptible nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana Borchini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Modifications of hearth rate variability (HRV constitute a marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS deregulation, a promising pathway linking job strain (JS and cardiovascular diseases (CVD. The study objective is to assess whether exposures to recent and prolonged JS reduce time-domain HRV parameters on working days (WD among CVD-susceptible nurses and whether the association also persists on resting days (RD. Material and methods 313 healthy nurses were investigated twice with one year interval to assess JS based on the demand-control and the effort-reward models. 36, 9 and 16 CVD-susceptible nurses were classified as low JS in both surveys (stable low strain – SLS, recent high JS (high JS at the second screening only-RHS and prolonged high JS (high strain in both surveys-PHS, respectively. In 9, 7 and 10 of them, free from comorbidities/treatments interfering with HRV, two 24-h ECG recordings were performed on WD and RD. Differences in the time domain HRV metrics among JS categories were assessed using ANCOVA, adjusted for age and smoking. Results In the entire sample (mean age: 39 years, 83% females the prevalence of high job strain was 38.7% in the second survey. SDNN (standard deviation of all normal RR intervals on WD significantly declined among JS categories (p = 0.02, with geometric mean values of 169.1, 145.3 and 128.9 ms in SLS, RHS, PHS, respectively. In the PHS group, SDNN remained lower on RD as compared to the low strain subjects (142.4 vs. 171.1 ms, p = 0.02. Similar findings were found for the SDNN_Index, while SDANN (standard deviation of average RR intervals in all 5 min segments of registration mean values reduced in the PHS group during WD only. Conclusions Our findings suggest that persistent JS lowers HRV time-domain parameters, supporting the hypothesis that the ANS disorders may play an intermediate role in the relationship between work stress and CVD.

  12. Prolonged job strain reduces time-domain heart rate variability on both working and resting days among cardiovascular-susceptible nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchini, Rossana; Bertù, Lorenza; Ferrario, Marco M; Veronesi, Giovanni; Bonzini, Matteo; Dorso, Marco; Cesana, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of hearth rate variability (HRV) constitute a marker of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) deregulation, a promising pathway linking job strain (JS) and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The study objective is to assess whether exposures to recent and prolonged JS reduce time-domain HRV parameters on working days (WD) among CVD-susceptible nurses and whether the association also persists on resting days (RD). 313 healthy nurses were investigated twice with one year interval to assess JS based on the demand-control and the effort-reward models. 36, 9 and 16 CVD-susceptible nurses were classified as low JS in both surveys (stable low strain - SLS), recent high JS (high JS at the second screening only-RHS) and prolonged high JS (high strain in both surveys-PHS), respectively. In 9, 7 and 10 of them, free from comorbidities/treatments interfering with HRV, two 24-h ECG recordings were performed on WD and RD. Differences in the time domain HRV metrics among JS categories were assessed using ANCOVA, adjusted for age and smoking. In the entire sample (mean age: 39 years, 83% females) the prevalence of high job strain was 38.7% in the second survey. SDNN (standard deviation of all normal RR intervals) on WD significantly declined among JS categories (p = 0.02), with geometric mean values of 169.1, 145.3 and 128.9 ms in SLS, RHS, PHS, respectively. In the PHS group, SDNN remained lower on RD as compared to the low strain subjects (142.4 vs. 171.1 ms, p = 0.02). Similar findings were found for the SDNN_Index, while SDANN (standard deviation of average RR intervals in all 5 min segments of registration) mean values reduced in the PHS group during WD only. Our findings suggest that persistent JS lowers HRV time-domain parameters, supporting the hypothesis that the ANS disorders may play an intermediate role in the relationship between work stress and CVD. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  13. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to help prevent your first heart attack. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes A heart-healthy lifestyle can help prevent ... blood to flow to the heart muscle. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Treatment for a heart attack usually includes ...

  14. Thallium-201 right lung/heart ratio during exercise in patients with coronary artery disease: relation to thallium-201 myocardial single-photon emission tomography, rest and exercise left ventricular function and coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, O.; Pezard, P.; Le Jeune, J.J.; Denizot, B.; Jallet, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital, Angers (France); Furber, A. [Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Angers (France); Vielle, B. [Department of Biostatistics, University Hospital, Angers (France)

    1999-06-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate lung thallium-201 uptake on exercise with {sup 201}Tl single-photon emission tomography (SPET) myocardial perfusion imaging, rest and exercise equilibrium radionuclide angiographic and coronary angiographic findings in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) using a simple, reproducible lung/heart (L/H) ratio that would be easy to use in clinical practice. L/H ratio was defined on the anterior planar image obtained during exercise {sup 201}Tl SPET acquisition as the mean counts per pixel in an entire right lung field region of interest divided by the mean counts per pixel in the hottest myocardial wall region of interest. We studied 103 patients. Fifty-nine patients (group I) with <5% likelihood of CAD were used as a reference group. In 44 CAD patients (group II), L/H ratio was compared with {sup 201}Tl SPET, radionuclide angiographic and coronary angiographic variables. The group I L/H ratio of 0.35{+-}0.05 (mean {+-}1 SD) was significantly lower (P<0.001) than the group II L/H ratio of 0.45{+-}0.10. An L/H ratio >0.45 (mean+2 SD in group I) was considered abnormal. In group II, L/H ratio showed a significant correlation with stress and rest {sup 201}Tl perfusion defect size (r=0.39 and r=0.42, P<0.01, respectively), but not with extent of ischaemic myocardium. The mean L/H ratio was 0.41{+-}0.10 in patients with one-vessel disease (n=15), 0.46{+-}0.08 in those with two-vessel disease (n=17) and 0.47{+-}0.12 in those with three-vessel disease (n=12), but no significant difference was found between the three subgroups. L/H ratio showed a significant inverse relation with rest and exercise left ventricular ejection fraction (r=-0.37 and r=-0.50, P<0.05 and P<0.001, respectively). Using stepwise multiple regression analysis, exercise left ventricular ejection fraction and previous history of hypertension were the sole two variables independently predictive of the L/H ratio. In conclusion, although lung thallium uptake is

  15. Obesity and Heart Failure as a Mediator of the Cerebrorenal Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Jindal, Ankur; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R.

    2013-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is contributing substantially to the burden of cardiovascular disease including heart disease and congestive heart failure, in the United States and the rest of the world. Overnutrition as a driver of obesity, promotes alterations in fatty acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism that influence myocardial function and progression of heart failure from diastolic to systolic failure. The association of progressive heart failure and progressive chronic kidney disease is well docu...

  16. Effect of the data sampling rate on accuracy of indices for heart rate and blood pressure variability and baroreflex function in resting rats and mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Vivek; Rarick, Kevin R; Stauss, Harald M

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the minimal sampling rate (SR) required for blood pressure (BP) waveform recordings to accurately determine BP and heart rate (HR) variability indices and baroreceptor reflex sensitivity in rats and mice. We also determined if an 8-bit (versus 12-bit) analog-to-digital converter (ADC) resolution is sufficient to accurately determine these hemodynamic parameters and if spline interpolation to 1000 Hz of BP waveforms sampled at lower SRs can improve accuracy. BP and ECG recordings (1000 Hz SR, 12-bit ADC resolution) from two strains of rats and BP recordings (1000 Hz SR, 12-bit ADC resolution) from two strains of mice were mathematically converted to lower SRs and/or 8-bit ADC resolution. Time-domain HR variability and frequency-domain HR and BP variability indices and baroreflex sensitivity (using the sequence technique) were determined and the results obtained from the original files were compared to the results obtained from the mathematically altered files. Our results demonstrate that an ADC resolution of 8 bit is not sufficient to determine HR and BP variability in rats and mice and baroreceptor reflex sensitivity in mice. Average values for systolic, mean and diastolic BP and HR can be accurately derived from BP waveforms recorded at a minimal SR of 200 Hz in rats and mice. Spline interpolation of BP waveforms to 1000 Hz prior to extracting derived parameters reduces this minimal SR to 50 Hz in rats but still requires 200 Hz in mice. Frequency-domain BP variability (very low and low frequency spectral powers) can be estimated accurately at a minimum SR of 100 Hz in rats and mice and spline interpolation of BP waveforms to 1000 Hz reduces this minimal SR to 50 Hz in rats but does not reduce the minimal SR in mice. Time- and frequency-domain HR variability parameters require at least a SR of 1000 Hz in rats and mice. Spline interpolation of BP waveforms to 1000 Hz reduces this minimal SR to 100 Hz in rats and to 200 Hz in

  17. N-terminal-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide during pharmacological heart rate reduction in hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, M; Kistorp, C; Corell, P

    2009-01-01

    of pharmacologically induced heart rate reduction in untreated hyperthyroidism. We designed a noncontrolled interventional study. Eighteen women with newly diagnosed hyperthyroidism were evaluated (including an echocardiography) before and after pharmacological heart rate reduction with 360 mg verapamil daily for 6......; resting heart rate [from mean 97 to 80 beats per min (17.5%), p...-index decreased from median 319 to 315 arbitrary units (p=0.039) and free triiodothyronine-index increased from 8.6 to 9.9 arbitrary units (p=0.010). No changes in echocardiographic parameters were observed. A decrease in resting heart rate in untreated hyperthyroidism due to verapamil treatment did not result...

  18. REST based mobile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambow, Mark; Preuss, Thomas; Berdux, Jörg; Conrad, Marc

    2008-02-01

    Simplicity is the major advantage of REST based webservices. Whereas SOAP is widespread in complex, security sensitive business-to-business aplications, REST is widely used for mashups and end-user centric applicatons. In that context we give an overview of REST and compare it to SOAP. Furthermore we apply the GeoDrawing application as an example for REST based mobile applications and emphasize on pros and cons for the use of REST in mobile application scenarios.

  19. Occurrence of composite cardiac endpoints with change in resting heart rate among Chinese patients with coronary artery disease: Chinese cohort from the real-world BISO-CAD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yundai; Yang, Xinchun; Huang, Shi'an; Fu, Guosheng; Chen, Xiaoping; Yang, Yu; Liu, Shaowen; Xu, Haiyan; Ma, Tianrong; Zhou, Xuchen; Lv, Zhan; Yang, Ming; Gan, Xuedong; Xu, Dong; Cao, Feng; Liu, Huiliang; Li, Junxia; Zheng, Qiangsun; Wang, Ningfu; Yuan, Yong; Liu, Wenxian; Yang, Tianlun

    2018-03-20

    We evaluated change in resting heart rate (RHR) and its impact on the prognosis in Chinese coronary artery disease (CAD) patients treated with bisoprolol and also assessed the drug safety and tolerability. This phase IV, single arm observational study was a sub-study of the BISO-CAD study conducted across 20 hospitals in China, between October 2011 to July 2015 with follow-up at 6, 12 and 18 months after baseline. The primary endpoint was occurrence of composite cardiac events. A total of 663 CAD patients (baseline RHR 75.47 ± 6.62 bpm) were enrolled in intent-to-treat (ITT) set, whereas efficacy analysis (EA) set enrolled 513 patients. In the ITT set, the risk and the number of composite cardiac events in patients with mean RHR 69-74bpm was significantly higher compared with <65 bpm group (ITT: estimate: 1.03 ± 0.47, P = 0.029). Incidence of composite cardiac endpoint was not affected by continuous mean RHR (P = 0.5070). RHR significantly decreased from baseline to 18-months, most obvious in first six months (p <0.0001). Ejection fraction and fractional shortening significantly improved in both ITT and EA sets. Average RHR of 69-74 bpm had significant effect on admission to hospital for acute coronary syndrome in ITT (estimate 1.10, HR 3.004, P = 0.0196) and EA (estimate 1.26, HR3.526, P = 0.0132) groups. 7 (1.1%) patients reported drug related adverse events. Reduction in RHR with bisoprolol lowered the incidence of composite cardiac events along with an acceptable safety and tolerability profile.

  20. The effects of infographics and several quantitative versus qualitative formats for cardiovascular disease risk, including heart age, on people's risk understanding.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Olga C; Vonk, Suzanne I; Van den Haak, Maaike J; van Hooijdonk, Charlotte M J; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2018-01-01

    To study how comprehension of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is influenced by: (1) infographics about qualitative risk information, with/without risk numbers; (2) which qualitative risk dimension is emphasized; (3) heart age vs. traditional risk format.

  1. [Heart sound recognition algorithm based on PNN for evaluating cardiac contractility change trend].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xingming; Yan, Yan; Yao, Xiaoshuai; Xiao, Shouzhong

    2006-10-01

    This paper discusses the recognition of heart sound for evaluating the cardiac contractility change trend, which includes heart sound samples recorded at different exercise condition. Especially, focused on the recognition of heart sound recorded after high intensity exercise workload. The algorithm proposed consisted of two correlative methods. The first was to recognize heart sound recorded at rest and after low intensity exercise workloads by probabilistic neural network and the second was to recognize heart sound recorded after high intensity exercise workloads based on the characteristic of heart sound. Both methods have two consecutive phases. Firstly, all peaks, including the peaks of both heart sounds and noise, are marked by a repetitive threshold detecting algorithm. Secondly, probabilistic neural network is employed to classify the peaks detected in the first phase into Si, S2, and noise. Finally, the performance of the algorithm was evaluated using 45 digital heart sound recordings including normal and abnormal heart sound, which were recorded at rest and after low intensity exercise workloads, and 28 digital heart sound recordings recorded after high intensity exercise workloads. The results showed that over 94% of heart sound samples were classified and recognized correctly. Moreover, the reasons for the wrong classification, of which omitting and misdetection are two main problems, are also discussed and solutions are proposed. So this method can be improved and refined in following studies. In conclusion, this algorithm is a reliable approach to detect and classify heart sounds, providing a solid basis for further heart sound analysis.

  2. Alternative REST Splicing Underappreciated

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guo-Lin; Miller, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    As a major orchestrator of the cellular epigenome, the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) can either repress or activate thousands of genes depending on cellular context, suggesting a highly context-dependent REST function tuned by environmental cues. While REST shows cell-type non-selective active transcription, an N-terminal REST4 isoform caused by alternative splicing - inclusion of an extra exon (N3c) which introduces a pre-mature stop codon - has been implicated in...

  3. ASSESSMENT OF THE CHANGES IN BLOOD PRESSURE CIRCADIAN PROFILE AND VARIABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION DURING COMBINED THERAPY INCLUDING IVABRADINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Surovtseva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the changes in blood pressure (BP circadian profile and variability in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic etiology and arterial hypertension (HT due to the complex therapy including ivabradine. Material and methods. Patients (n=90 with CHF class II–III NYHA associated with stable angina II-III class and HT were examined. The patients were randomized into 3 groups depending on received drugs: perindopril and ivabradine - group 1; perindopril, bisoprolol and ivabradine - group 2; perindopril and bisoprolol - group 3. The duration of therapy was 6 months. Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM was assessed at baseline and after treatment. Results. More significant reduction in average 24-hours systolic BP was found in groups 1 and 2 compared to group 3 (Δ%: -19.4±0,4; -21.1±0.4 and -11.8±0.6, respectively as well as diastolic BP (Δ%: -10.6±0.6; -12.9±0.4 and -4,3±0.3, respectively and other ABPM indicators. Improvement of BP circadian rhythm was found due to increase in the number of «Dipper» patients (p=0.016. More significant reduction in average daily and night systolic and diastolic BP (p=0.001, as well as daily and night BP variability (p=0.001 was also found in patients of group 2 compared to these of group 1. Conclusion. Moderate antihypertensive effect (in respect of both diastolic and systolic BP was shown when ivabradine was included into the complex therapy of patients with ischemic CHF and HT. The effect was more pronounced when ivabradine was combined with perindopril and bisoprolol. This was accompanied by reduction in high BP daily variability and improvement of the BP circadian rhythm. 

  4. ASSESSMENT OF THE CHANGES IN BLOOD PRESSURE CIRCADIAN PROFILE AND VARIABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEART FAILURE AND ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION DURING COMBINED THERAPY INCLUDING IVABRADINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Surovtseva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To assess the changes in blood pressure (BP circadian profile and variability in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF of ischemic etiology and arterial hypertension (HT due to the complex therapy including ivabradine. Material and methods. Patients (n=90 with CHF class II–III NYHA associated with stable angina II-III class and HT were examined. The patients were randomized into 3 groups depending on received drugs: perindopril and ivabradine - group 1; perindopril, bisoprolol and ivabradine - group 2; perindopril and bisoprolol - group 3. The duration of therapy was 6 months. Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM was assessed at baseline and after treatment. Results. More significant reduction in average 24-hours systolic BP was found in groups 1 and 2 compared to group 3 (Δ%: -19.4±0,4; -21.1±0.4 and -11.8±0.6, respectively as well as diastolic BP (Δ%: -10.6±0.6; -12.9±0.4 and -4,3±0.3, respectively and other ABPM indicators. Improvement of BP circadian rhythm was found due to increase in the number of «Dipper» patients (p=0.016. More significant reduction in average daily and night systolic and diastolic BP (p=0.001, as well as daily and night BP variability (p=0.001 was also found in patients of group 2 compared to these of group 1. Conclusion. Moderate antihypertensive effect (in respect of both diastolic and systolic BP was shown when ivabradine was included into the complex therapy of patients with ischemic CHF and HT. The effect was more pronounced when ivabradine was combined with perindopril and bisoprolol. This was accompanied by reduction in high BP daily variability and improvement of the BP circadian rhythm. 

  5. Physiological and Functional Alterations after Spaceflight and Bed Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar P; Peters, Brian T; Miller, Chris A; Kofman, Igor S; Reschke, Millard F; Taylor, Laura C; Lawrence, Emily L; Wood, Scott J; Laurie, Steven S; Lee, Stuart M C; Buxton, Roxanne E; May-Phillips, Tiffany R; Stenger, Michael B; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori L; Ryder, Jeffrey W; Feiveson, Alan H; Bloomberg, Jacob J

    2018-04-03

    Exposure to microgravity causes alterations in multiple physiological systems, potentially impacting the ability of astronauts to perform critical mission tasks. The goal of this study was to determine the effects of spaceflight on functional task performance and to identify the key physiological factors contributing to their deficits. A test battery comprised of 7 functional tests and 15 physiological measures was used to investigate the sensorimotor, cardiovascular and neuromuscular adaptations to spaceflight. Astronauts were tested before and after 6-month spaceflights. Subjects were also tested before and after 70 days of 6° head-down bed rest, a spaceflight analog, to examine the role of axial body unloading on the spaceflight results. These subjects included Control and Exercise groups to examine the effects of exercise during bed rest. Spaceflight subjects showed the greatest decrement in performance during functional tasks that required the greatest demand for dynamic control of postural equilibrium which was paralleled by similar decrements in sensorimotor tests that assessed postural and dynamic gait control. Other changes included reduced lower limb muscle performance and increased heart rate to maintain blood pressure. Exercise performed during bed rest prevented detrimental change in neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, however, both bed rest groups experienced functional and balance deficits similar to spaceflight subjects. Bed rest data indicates that body support unloading experienced during spaceflight contributes to postflight postural control dysfunction. Further, the bed rest results in the Exercise group of subjects confirm that resistance and aerobic exercises performed during spaceflight can play an integral role in maintaining neuromuscular and cardiovascular function, which can help in reducing decrements in functional performance. These results indicate that a countermeasure to mitigate postflight postural control dysfunction is

  6. Clustering of resting state networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan H Lee

    Full Text Available The goal of the study was to demonstrate a hierarchical structure of resting state activity in the healthy brain using a data-driven clustering algorithm.The fuzzy-c-means clustering algorithm was applied to resting state fMRI data in cortical and subcortical gray matter from two groups acquired separately, one of 17 healthy individuals and the second of 21 healthy individuals. Different numbers of clusters and different starting conditions were used. A cluster dispersion measure determined the optimal numbers of clusters. An inner product metric provided a measure of similarity between different clusters. The two cluster result found the task-negative and task-positive systems. The cluster dispersion measure was minimized with seven and eleven clusters. Each of the clusters in the seven and eleven cluster result was associated with either the task-negative or task-positive system. Applying the algorithm to find seven clusters recovered previously described resting state networks, including the default mode network, frontoparietal control network, ventral and dorsal attention networks, somatomotor, visual, and language networks. The language and ventral attention networks had significant subcortical involvement. This parcellation was consistently found in a large majority of algorithm runs under different conditions and was robust to different methods of initialization.The clustering of resting state activity using different optimal numbers of clusters identified resting state networks comparable to previously obtained results. This work reinforces the observation that resting state networks are hierarchically organized.

  7. Clustering of resting state networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Megan H; Hacker, Carl D; Snyder, Abraham Z; Corbetta, Maurizio; Zhang, Dongyang; Leuthardt, Eric C; Shimony, Joshua S

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the study was to demonstrate a hierarchical structure of resting state activity in the healthy brain using a data-driven clustering algorithm. The fuzzy-c-means clustering algorithm was applied to resting state fMRI data in cortical and subcortical gray matter from two groups acquired separately, one of 17 healthy individuals and the second of 21 healthy individuals. Different numbers of clusters and different starting conditions were used. A cluster dispersion measure determined the optimal numbers of clusters. An inner product metric provided a measure of similarity between different clusters. The two cluster result found the task-negative and task-positive systems. The cluster dispersion measure was minimized with seven and eleven clusters. Each of the clusters in the seven and eleven cluster result was associated with either the task-negative or task-positive system. Applying the algorithm to find seven clusters recovered previously described resting state networks, including the default mode network, frontoparietal control network, ventral and dorsal attention networks, somatomotor, visual, and language networks. The language and ventral attention networks had significant subcortical involvement. This parcellation was consistently found in a large majority of algorithm runs under different conditions and was robust to different methods of initialization. The clustering of resting state activity using different optimal numbers of clusters identified resting state networks comparable to previously obtained results. This work reinforces the observation that resting state networks are hierarchically organized.

  8. Motion-insensitive determination of B1+ amplitudes based on the bloch-siegert shift in single voxels of moving organs including the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokumaci, Ayse Sila; Pouymayou, Bertrand; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2016-05-01

    To reliably determine the amplitude of the transmit radiofrequency ( B1+) field in moving organs like the liver and heart, where most current techniques are usually not feasible. B1+ field measurement based on the Bloch-Siegert shift induced by a pair of Fermi pulses in a double-triggered modified Point RESolved Spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence with motion-compensated crusher gradients has been developed. Performance of the sequence was tested in moving phantoms and in muscle, liver, and heart of six healthy volunteers each, using different arrangements of transmit/receive coils. B1+ determination in a moving phantom was almost independent of type and amplitude of the motion and agreed well with theory. In vivo, repeated measurements led to very small coefficients of variance (CV) if the amplitude of the Fermi pulse was chosen above an appropriate level (CV in muscle 0.6%, liver 1.6%, heart 2.3% with moderate amplitude of the Fermi pulses and 1.2% with stronger Fermi pulses). The proposed sequence shows a very robust determination of B1+ in a single voxel even under challenging conditions (transmission with a surface coil or measurements in the heart without breath-hold). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The effects of infographics and several quantitative versus qualitative formats for cardiovascular disease risk, including heart age, on people's risk understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Olga C; Vonk, Suzanne I; van den Haak, Maaike J; van Hooijdonk, Charlotte M J; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2018-03-11

    To study how comprehension of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is influenced by: (1) infographics about qualitative risk information, with/without risk numbers; (2) which qualitative risk dimension is emphasized; (3) heart age vs. traditional risk format. For aim 1, a 2 (infographics versus text) x 2 (risk number versus no risk number) between-subjects design was used. For aim 2, three pieces of information were tested within-subjects. Aim 3 used a simple comparison group. Participants (45-65 yrs old) were recruited through an online access panel; low educated people were oversampled. They received hypothetical risk information (20%/61yrs). Primary outcomes: recall, risk appraisals, subjective/objective risk comprehension. behavioral intentions, information evaluations. Infographics of qualitative risk dimensions negatively affected recall, subjective risk comprehension and information evaluations. No effect of type of risk dimension was found on risk perception. Heart age influenced recall, comprehension, evaluations and affective risk appraisals. Infographics of hypothetical CVD risk information had detrimental effects on measures related to risk perception/comprehension, but effects were mainly seen in undereducated participants. Heart age influenced perceptions/comprehension of hypothetical risk in a way that seemed to support understanding. Heart age seems a fruitful risk communication approach in disease risk calculators. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimation of torque on mechanical heart valves due to magnetic resonance imaging including an estimation of the significance of the Lenz effect using a computational model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, Neil M. [44 Ardgowan Street, Greenock PA16 8EL (United Kingdom). E-mail: neil.robertson at physics.org; Diaz-Gomez, Manuel [Plaza Alcalde Horacio Hermoso, 2, 3-A 41013 Seville (Spain). E-mail: manolo-diaz at latinmail.com; Condon, Barrie [Department of Clinical Physics, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow G51 4TF (United Kingdom). E-mail: barrie.condon at udcf.gla.ac.uk

    2000-12-01

    Mitral and aortic valve replacement is a procedure which is common in cardiac surgery. Some of these replacement valves are mechanical and contain moving metal parts. Should the patient in whom such a valve has been implanted be involved in magnetic resonance imaging, there is a possible dangerous interaction between the moving metal parts and the static magnetic field due to the Lenz effect. Mathematical models of two relatively common forms of single-leaflet valves have been derived and the magnitude of the torque which opposes the motion of the valve leaflet has been calculated for a valve disc of solid metal. In addition, a differential model of a ring-strengthener valve type has been considered to determine the likely significance of the Lenz effect in the context of the human heart. For common magnetic field strengths at present, i.e. 1 to 2 T, the effect is not particularly significant. However, there is a marked increase in back pressure as static magnetic field strength increases. There are concerns that, since field strengths in the range 3 to 4 T are increasingly being used, the Lenz effect could become significant. At 5 to 10 T the malfunction of the mechanical heart valve could cause the heart to behave as though it is diseased. For unhealthy or old patients this could possibly prove fatal. (author)

  11. Is Rest Really Rest? Resting State Functional Connectivity during Rest and Motor Task Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkiewicz, Michael T; Crawley, Adrian P; Mikulis, David J

    2018-04-18

    Numerous studies have identified the default mode network (DMN) within the brain of healthy individuals, which has been attributed to the ongoing mental activity of the brain during the wakeful resting-state. While engaged during specific resting-state fMRI paradigms, it remains unclear as to whether traditional block-design simple movement fMRI experiments significantly influence the default mode network or other areas. Using blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI we characterized the pattern of functional connectivity in healthy subjects during a resting-state paradigm and compared this to the same resting-state analysis performed on motor task data residual time courses after regressing out the task paradigm. Using seed-voxel analysis to define the DMN, the executive control network (ECN), and sensorimotor, auditory and visual networks, the resting-state analysis of the residual time courses demonstrated reduced functional connectivity in the motor network and reduced connectivity between the insula and the ECN compared to the standard resting-state datasets. Overall, performance of simple self-directed motor tasks does little to change the resting-state functional connectivity across the brain, especially in non-motor areas. This would suggest that previously acquired fMRI studies incorporating simple block-design motor tasks could be mined retrospectively for assessment of the resting-state connectivity.

  12. Pro REST API development with nodejs

    CERN Document Server

    Doglio, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Pro REST API Development with Node.js is your guide to managing and understanding the full capabilities of successful REST development. API design is a hot topic in the programming world, but not many resources exist for developers to really understand how you can leverage the advantages. This book will provide a brief background on REST and the tools it provides (well known and not so well known). Understand how there is more to REST than just JSON and URLs. You will then cover and compare the maintained modules currently available in the npm community, including Express, Restify, Vatican,

  13. Comparison of the Effects of Seated, Supine, and Walking Interset Rest Strategies on Work Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouellette, Kristen A; Brusseau, Timothy A; Davidson, Lance E; Ford, Candus N; Hatfield, Disa L; Shaw, Janet M; Eisenman, Patricia A

    2016-12-01

    Ouellette, KA, Brusseau, TA, Davidson, LE, Ford, CN, Hatfield, DL, Shaw, JM, and Eisenman, PA. Comparison of the effects of seated, supine, and walking interset rest strategies on work rate. J Strength Cond Res 30(12): 3396-3404, 2016-The idea that an upright posture should be maintained during the interset rest periods of training sessions is pervasive. The primary aim of this study was to determine differences in work rate associated with 3 interset rest strategies. Male and female members of the CrossFit community (male n = 5, female n = 10) were recruited to perform a strenuous training session designed to enhance work capacity that involved both cardiovascular and muscular endurance exercises. The training session was repeated on 3 separate occasions to evaluate 3 interset rest strategies, which included lying supine on the floor, sitting on a flat bench, and walking on a treadmill (0.67 m·s). Work rate was calculated for each training session by summing session joules of work and dividing by the time to complete the training session (joules of work per second). Data were also collected during the interset rest periods (heart rate [HR], respiratory rate [RR], and volume of oxygen consumed) and were used to explain why one rest strategy may positively impact work rate compared with another. Statistical analyses revealed significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) between the passive and active rest strategies, with the passive strategies allowing for improved work rate (supine = 62.77 ± 7.32, seated = 63.66 ± 8.37, and walking = 60.61 ± 6.42 average joules of work per second). Results also suggest that the passive strategies resulted in superior HR, RR, and oxygen consumption recovery. In conclusion, work rate and physiological recovery were enhanced when supine and seated interset rest strategies were used compared with walking interset rest.

  14. A Comparison of Spatio-Temporal Disease Mapping Approaches Including an Application to Ischaemic Heart Disease in New South Wales, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Anderson

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The field of spatio-temporal modelling has witnessed a recent surge as a result of developments in computational power and increased data collection. These developments allow analysts to model the evolution of health outcomes in both space and time simultaneously. This paper models the trends in ischaemic heart disease (IHD in New South Wales, Australia over an eight-year period between 2006 and 2013. A number of spatio-temporal models are considered, and we propose a novel method for determining the goodness-of-fit for these models by outlining a spatio-temporal extension of the Moran’s I statistic. We identify an overall decrease in the rates of IHD, but note that the extent of this health improvement varies across the state. In particular, we identified a number of remote areas in the north and west of the state where the risk stayed constant or even increased slightly.

  15. Implementation of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Blood Cholesterol Guideline Including Data From the Improved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaeian, Boback; Dinkler, John; Watson, Karol

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. The management of blood cholesterol through use of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) in at-risk patients is a pillar of medical therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. The recent 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guideline on managing blood cholesterol provides an important framework for the effective implementation of risk-reduction strategies. The guideline identifies four cohorts of patients with proven benefits from statin therapy and streamlines the dosing and monitoring recommendations based on evidence from published, randomized controlled trials. Primary care physicians and cardiologists play key roles in identifying populations at elevated ASCVD risk. In providing a practical management overview of the current blood cholesterol guideline, we facilitate more informed discussions on treatment options between healthcare providers and their patients. PMID:26198559

  16. Bed rest during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Belizán JM, Bergel E. Bed rest in singleton pregnancies for preventing preterm birth. Cochrane Database ... and Gynecology, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda Center for Fertility, ...

  17. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Home / Heart Attack Heart Attack Also known as Myocardial infarction Leer en español ... or years after the procedure. Other Treatments for Heart Attack Other treatments for heart attack include: Medicines Medical ...

  18. Definition and Classification of Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Lainscak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the definition and classification of heart failure, updated since the recent 2016 European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic heart failure. Heart failure is defined by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC as a clinical syndrome characterised by symptoms such as shortness of breath, persistent coughing or wheezing, ankle swelling and fatigue, that may be accompanied by the following signs: jugular venous pressure, pulmonary crackles, increased heart rate and peripheral oedema. However, these signs may not be present in the early stages and in patients treated with diuretics. When apparent, they are due to a structural and/or functional cardiac abnormality, leading to systolic and/or diastolic ventricular dysfunction, resulting in a reduced cardiac output and/or elevated intra- cardiac pressures at rest or during stress. According to the most recent ESC guidelines the initial evaluation of patients with suspected heart failure should include a clinical history and physical examination, laboratory assessment, chest radiography, and electrocardiography. Echocardiography can confirm the diagnosis. Beyond detecting myocardial abnormality, other impairments such as abnormalities of the valves, pericardium, endocardium, heart rhythm, and conduction may be found. The identification of the underlying aetiology is pivotal for the diagnosis of heart failure and its treatment. The authors review the definitions and classifications of heart failure.

  19. Rationale and Design of the Reduce Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Patients With Heart Failure (Reduce LAP-HF) Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasenfuss, Gerd; Gustafsson, Finn; Kaye, David

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is characterized by elevated left atrial pressure during rest and/or exercise. The Reduce LAP-HF (Reduce Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Patients With Heart Failure) trial will evaluate the safety and performance of the Interatrial...... patients with ejection fraction ≥40% and New York Heart Association functional class III or IV heart failure with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) ≥15 mm Hg at rest or ≥25 mm Hg during supine bike exercise will be implanted with an IASD System II, and followed for 6 months to assess the primary...... include death, stroke, myocardial infarction, or requirement of implant removal. Primary outcome measures for device performance include success of device implantation, reduction of PCWP at rest and during exercise, and demonstration of left-to-right flow through the device. Key secondary end points...

  20. Preference of female mosquitoes for natural and artificial resting sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Eubanks, Micky D; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2008-06-01

    At a wetland study site in Tuskegee National Forest, AL, resting female mosquitoes were collected from natural and artificial resting sites to identify species-specific resting sites and to evaluate various artificial resting sites for their utility in collecting resting mosquitoes. Natural resting sites included small tree cavities, large tree cavities, and understory vegetation. Artificial resting sites included resting boxes, fiber pots, and plastic trash cans. We collected 12,888 female mosquitoes, representing 23 species in 8 genera, during the 6-month study. Each mosquito species demonstrated a preference for a particular type of resting site. Resting Aedes vexans females were collected almost exclusively from understory vegetation, while the great majority of Anopheles quadrimaculatus females were aspirated from large tree cavities. Culex erraticus and Cx. peccator females preferred trash cans over other available resting sites. Females of Cx. territans, although collected most commonly in large tree cavities, were also collected frequently from understory vegetation and trash cans. A multiple regression of resting-site parameters (excluding vegetation), including volume, surface area, and opening size, indicated that 50% and 20% of the variability associated with An. quadrimaculatus and Cx. territans collections, respectively, could be explained by opening size. Inner surface area and volume accounted for 33% and 12% of variation in Cx. erraticus and Cx. peccator collections, respectively. Thus, female mosquitoes generally preferred larger resting sites over smaller resting sites. Similarly shaped artificial resting sites (fiber pots and trash cans) yielded comparable numbers of females per unit of volume (for those species that preferred artificial resting sites), indicating that shape of the resting site is an important factor in resting-site preference. In addition, trash cans proved to be a valuable novel tool for collecting resting female mosquitoes.

  1. How to Recognize 'Athlete's Heart'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jere H

    1992-08-01

    In brief Chronic endurance exercise inbrief duces various cardiac adapta- JHHHM tions, including an enlarged left ventricular cavity and an appropriate increase in wall thickness (eccentric hypertrophy), greater ability to increase stroke volume during exercise, and bradycardia at rest. Strength athletes have thicker left ventricular walls with no increase in cavity size (concentric hypertrophy). In the past, chest x-rays and ECG have suggested some of these changes, however, echocardiograms have clearly established the syndrome of the athlete's heart. In addition, these adaptations seldom exceed the range of normal variation seen in the general population. Understanding these alterations helps distinguish healthy adaptations to exercise from signs of disease.

  2. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  3. The Resting Motor Threshold - Restless or Resting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke Ninija; Raffin, Estelle Emeline; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-01-01

    Background The resting motor threshold (RMT) is used to individually adjust the intensity of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) intensity and is assumed to be stable. Here we challenge this notion by showing that RMT expresses acute context-dependent fluctuations. Method In twelve participants......, the RMT of the right first dorsal interosseus muscle was repeatedly determined using a threshold-hunting procedure while participants performed motor imagery and visual attention tasks with the right or left hand. Data were analyzed using repeated-measure ANOVA. Results RMT differed depending on which...... hand performed the task (P = 0.003). RMT of right FDI was lower during motor imagery than during visual attention of the right hand (P = 0.002), but did not differ between left-hand tasks (P = 0.988). Conclusions State-dependent changes of RMT occur in absence of overt motor activity and can...

  4. Determinants of global left ventricular peak diastolic filling rate during rest and exercise in normal volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filiberti, A.W.; Bianco, J.A.; Baker, S.P.; Doherty; Nalivaika, L.A.; King, M.A.; Alpert, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    Early peak diastolic filling rate (PFR) of the left ventricle (LV) is said to be a sensitive index of LV dysfunction in patients with coronary disease, hypertension and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Radionuclide (RN0 multigated PFR was measured in 20 normal volunteers (13 males, 7 females, mean age 31 yrs., range 20-43) at rest and during supine bicycle exercise conducted to a symptomatic end-point. At rest, RN PFR was 3.4 +- SD 0.4 end-diastolic vols./sec (range 3.1 - 3.6). During exercise all normal volunteers had a progressive and numerically and statistically significant increase in PFR. Stepwise multiple linear regression (BMPD2R) was applied to the rest and exercise PFR data to develop a linear model describing the main determinants of the RN PFR. The potential independent variables which were included in the model were heart rate (HR), ejection fraction (EF), systolic arterial pressure, systolic ejection rate and exercise stage. Ranking of variables for prediction of RN PFR, and exclusion of less important variables, was done by F value criteria. The final multivariate equation was: LVPFR = -3.84437 + 0.03834 HR + 0.07537 LVEF. The model fit was highly significant (p<0.001), and accounted for 89 per cent of variability in the PFR. The authors conclude that the left ventricular peak filling rate is critically determined by heart rate and by ejection fraction at rest and during exercise.

  5. Montana rest area usage : data acquisition and usage estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    The Montana Department of Transportation (MDT) has initiated research to refine the figures employed in the : estimation of Montana rest area use. This work seeks to obtain Montana-specific data related to rest area usage, : including water flow, eff...

  6. REST based service composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik; Ingstrup, Mads; Pløger, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an ongoing work developing and testing a Service Composition framework based upon the REST architecture named SECREST. A minimalistic approach have been favored instead of a creating a complete infrastructure. One focus has been on the system's interaction model. Indeed, an ai...

  7. Norepinephrine remains increased in the six-minute walking test after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Veiga Guimarães

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate the neurohormonal activity in heart transplant recipients and compare it with that in heart failure patients and healthy subjects during rest and just after a 6-minute walking test. INTRODUCTION: Despite the improvements in quality of life and survival provided by heart transplantation, the neurohormonal profile is poorly described. METHODS: Twenty heart transplantation (18 men, 49±11 years and 8.5±3.3 years after transplantation, 11 heart failure (8 men, 43±10 years, and 7 healthy subjects (5 men 39±8 years were included in this study. Blood samples were collected immediately before and during the last minute of the exercise. RESULTS: During rest, patients' norepinephrine plasma level (659±225 pg/mL was higher in heart transplant recipients (463±167 pg/mL and heathy subjects (512±132, p<0.05. Heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level was not different than that of healthy subjects. Just after the 6-minute walking test, the heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level (1248±692 pg/mL was not different from that of heart failure patients (1174±653 pg/mL. Both these groups had a higher level than healthy subjects had (545±95 pg/mL, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Neurohormonal activity remains increased after the 6-minute walking test after heart transplantation.

  8. The effect of low-dose β-blocker on heart rate and heart rate variability in health subjects wth a resting heart rate of less than 65 beats per minute: Effect on the quality of prospective electrocardiography-gated coronary CT angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chul Hwan; Kim, Tae Hoon [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Min [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Yoo Jin [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    We assessed the effect of a low-dose β-blocker on heart rate (HR), HR variability (HRV) and image quality of prospective electrocardiography-gated coronary CT angiography (CCTA) in healthy subjects with low HR. CCTA was performed with a 64-slice CT in 75 subjects with a HR of less than 65 beats per minute (bpm). Subjects were divided into 2 groups: Group 1 (G1), 35 with a low dose β-blocker; and Group 2 (G2), 40 without pre-medication. The image quality (IQ) of the CCTA was assessed on a 4-point grading scale (1, poor; 4, excellent). Initial HR (bpm) was not different between the 2 groups. HR during CCTA was lower in G1 than G2 (50.3 ± 5.6 vs. 53.3 ± 4.8, p = 0.016). HRV was not different between the 2 groups. Per-segment analysis showed better IQ at the mid-segment of the right coronary artery (3.0 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.1, p = 0.039) and the first diagonal branch (3.4 ± 0.6 vs. 3.1 ± 0.7, p = 0.024), in the G1 than the G2 group, respectively. The IQ was negatively correlated with HR, but no correlation was found between HRV and IQ. The IQs in the per-vessel analysis were not different between the 2 groups. Low-dose β-blocker reduced HR and improved the IQ of CCTA in a few segments, even at a HR of less than 65 bpm. However the effect was limited.

  9. Specific Circuit Training in Young Judokas: Effects of Rest Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Stephane; Roux, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Ten adolescent judokas performed circuit training consisting of six 40-s periods of judo exercises separated by 40 s (CT1:1), 120 s (CT1:3), or 200 s (CT1:5) of rest. Heart rate, blood lactate concentration, and the number of repetitions were recorded. Heart rate reached [approximately]180 beats[middle dot]min-1 at the end of work periods, with…

  10. Heart murmurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  11. The transcription factor REST is lost in aggressive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wagoner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The function of the tumor suppressor RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST is lost in colon and small cell lung cancers and is known to induce anchorage-independent growth in human mammary epithelial cells. However, nothing is currently known about the role of this tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Here, we test the hypothesis that loss of REST function plays a role in breast cancer. To assay breast tumors for REST function, we developed a 24-gene signature composed of direct targets of the transcriptional repressor. Using the 24- gene signature, we identified a previously undefined RESTless breast tumor subtype. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we confirmed the aberrant expression of REST target genes in the REST-less tumors, including neuronal gene targets of REST that are normally not expressed outside the nervous system. Examination of REST mRNA identified a truncated splice variant of REST present in the REST-less tumor population, but not other tumors. Histological analysis of 182 outcome-associated breast tumor tissues also identified a subpopulation of tumors that lack full-length, functional REST and over-express the neuroendocrine marker and REST target gene Chromogranin A. Importantly, patients whose tumors were found to be REST-less using either the 24-gene signature or histology had significantly poorer prognosis and were more than twice as likely to undergo disease recurrence within the first 3 years after diagnosis. We show here that REST function is lost in breast cancer, at least in part via an alternative splicing mechanism. Patients with REST-less breast cancer undergo significantly more early disease recurrence than those with fully functional REST, regardless of estrogen receptor or HER2 status. Importantly, REST status may serve as a predictor of poor prognosis, helping to untangle the heterogeneity inherent in disease course and response to treatment. Additionally, the alternative splicing observed in REST

  12. Early life adversity and/or posttraumatic stress disorder severity are associated with poor diet quality, including consumption of trans fatty acids, and fewer hours of resting or sleeping in a US middle-aged population: A cross-sectional and prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrieli, Anna; Farr, Olivia M; Davis, Cynthia R; Crowell, Judith A; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2015-11-01

    Early life adversity (ELA) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are associated with poorer psychological and physical health. Potential underlying mechanisms and mediators remain to be elucidated, and the lifestyle habits and characteristics of individuals with ELA and/or PTSD have not been fully explored. We investigated whether the presence of ELA and/or PTSD are associated with nutrition, physical activity, resting and sleeping and smoking. A cross-sectional sample of 151 males and females (age: 45.6±3.5 years, BMI: 30.0±7.1 kg/m(2)) underwent anthropometric measurements, as well as detailed questionnaires for dietary assessment, physical activity, resting and sleeping, smoking habits and psychosocial assessments. A prospective follow-up visit of 49 individuals was performed 2.5 years later and the same outcomes were assessed. ELA and PTSD were evaluated as predictors, in addition to a variable assessing the combined presence/severity of ELA-PTSD. Data were analyzed using analysis of covariance after adjusting for several socioeconomic, psychosocial and anthropometric characteristics. Individuals with higher ELA or PTSD severity were found to have a poorer diet quality (DASH score: p=0.006 and p=0.003, respectively; aHEI-2010 score: ELA p=0.009), including further consumption of trans fatty acids (ELA p=0.003); the differences were significantly attenuated null after adjusting mainly for education or income and/or race. Further, individuals with higher ELA severity reported less hours of resting and sleeping (p=0.043) compared to those with zero/lower ELA severity, and the difference remained significant in the fully adjusted model indicating independence from potential confounders. When ELA and PTSD were combined, an additive effect was observed on resting and sleeping (p=0.001); results remained significant in the fully adjusted model. They also consumed more energy from trans fatty acids (p=0.017) tended to smoke more (p=0.008), and have less physical

  13. Reclassification of cardiovascular risk by myocardial perfusion imaging in diabetic patients with abnormal resting electrocardiogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petretta, M; Acampa, W; Evangelista, L; Daniele, S; Zampella, E; Assante, R; Nappi, C; Cantoni, V; Fiumara, G; Cuocolo, A

    2014-06-01

    Despite an extensive use of stress myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS), no study addressed the role of perfusion imaging in diabetic patients with abnormal resting electrocardiogram (ECG). We compared analytical approaches to assess the added value of stress MPS variables in estimating coronary heart disease outcomes in diabetic patients with abnormal resting ECG. A total of 416 patients with diabetes and abnormal resting ECG who underwent stress MPS were prospectively followed up after the index study. The end point was the occurrence of a major cardiac event, including cardiac death and nonfatal myocardial infarction. At the end of follow-up (median 58 months), 42 patients experienced events. MPS data increased the predictive value of a model including traditional cardiovascular risk factors and left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (likelihood ratio χ² from 17.54 to 24.15, p patients were reclassified to a lower risk category, with a 5-year event rate of 3.5%, and 40 patients were reclassified to a higher risk category, with a 5-year event rate of 20%. The addition of MPS findings to a model based on traditional cardiovascular risk factors and LV ejection fraction improves risk classification for incident cardiac events in diabetic patients with abnormal resting ECG. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Physiology of Bed Rest. Chapter 39

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Suzanne M.; Schneider, Victor S.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Prolonged rest in bed has been utilized by physicians and other health-care workers to immobilize and confine patients for rehabilitation and restoration of health since time immemorial. The sitting or horizontal position is sought by the body to relieve the strain of the upright or vertical postures, for example during syncopal situations, bone fractures, muscle injuries, fatigue, and probably also to reduce energy expenditure. Most health-care personnel are aware that adaptive responses occurring during bed rest proceed concomitantly with the healing process; signs and symptoms associated with the former should be differentiated from those of the latter. Not all illnesses and infirmities benefit from prolonged bed rest. Considerations in prescribing bed rest for patients-including duration, body position, mode and duration of exercise, light-dark cycles, temperature, and humidity-have not been investigated adequately. More recently, adaptive physiological responses have been measured in normal, healthy subjects in the horizontal or slightly head-down postures during prolonged bed rest as analogs for the adaptive responses of astronauts exposed to the microgravity environment of outer and bed-rest research.

  15. Heart Attack Payment - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – state data. This data set includes state-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  16. Heart Attack Payment - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – provider data. This data set includes provider data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  17. Heart Attack Payment - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – national data. This data set includes national-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  18. Why are heart operations postponed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papadopoulos Dimitrios

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim To investigate the reasons that lead to postponement of cardiac operations, in order to elucidate the problem and help patients through modes of prevention. Methods-Design We retrospectively included in the study all patients submitted to elective adult heart surgery in our department during the 4-year period 2007-2010 and noted all cases of postponement after official inclusion in the operating schedule. Results 94 out of a total of 575 patients (16.34% scheduled for elective cardiac operation had their procedure postponed. The reasons were mainly organisatory (in 49 cases, 52.12%, which in order of significance were: unavailability in operating rooms, shortage in matching erythrocyte units and shortage in anaesthetic/nursing staff. The rest of the cases (45, 47.88% were postponed due to medical reasons, which in order of significance were: febrile situations, including infections of the respiratory, gastrointestinal and urinary system, problems with the regulation of antiplatelet and antithrombotic drugs, neurological manifestations such as stroke and transient ischaemic attacks, exacerbation of asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, arrhythmias, renal problems and allergic reactions to drugs. Patients with advanced age and increased Euroscore values were most possible to have their heart operation postponed. Conclusions Heart operations are postponed due to organisatory as well as medical reasons, the latter mainly affecting older, morbid patients who therefore require advanced preoperative care.

  19. REST: a toolkit for resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Song

    Full Text Available Resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI has been drawing more and more attention in recent years. However, a publicly available, systematically integrated and easy-to-use tool for RS-fMRI data processing is still lacking. We developed a toolkit for the analysis of RS-fMRI data, namely the RESting-state fMRI data analysis Toolkit (REST. REST was developed in MATLAB with graphical user interface (GUI. After data preprocessing with SPM or AFNI, a few analytic methods can be performed in REST, including functional connectivity analysis based on linear correlation, regional homogeneity, amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF, and fractional ALFF. A few additional functions were implemented in REST, including a DICOM sorter, linear trend removal, bandpass filtering, time course extraction, regression of covariates, image calculator, statistical analysis, and slice viewer (for result visualization, multiple comparison correction, etc.. REST is an open-source package and is freely available at http://www.restfmri.net.

  20. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  1. Insufficient Rest or Sleep and Its Relation to Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes and Obesity in a National, Multiethnic Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Anoop; Syamala, Shirmila; Kalidindi, Sita

    2010-01-01

    Background A new question on insufficient rest/sleep was included in the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for the 50 states, District of Columbia, and three US territories. No previous study, however, has examined perceived insufficient rest/sleep in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) or diabetes mellitus. We examined the association between self-reported insufficient rest/sleep and CVD, diabetes, and obesity in a contemporary sample of US adults. Methods Multiethnic, nationally representative, cross-sectional survey (2008 BRFSS) participants were >20 years of age (n = 372, 144, 50% women). Self-reported insufficient rest/sleep in the previous month was categorized into four groups: zero, 1–13, 14–29, and 30 days. There were five outcomes: 1) any CVD, 2) coronary heart disease (CHD), 3) stroke, 4) diabetes mellitus, and 5) obesity (body mass index≥30 kg/m2). We employed multivariable logistic regression to calculate odds ratio (OR), (95% confidence interval (CI), of increasing categories of insufficient rest/sleep, taking zero days of insufficient rest/sleep as the referent category. Principal Findings Insufficient rest/sleep was found to be associated with 1) any CVD, 2) CHD, 3) stroke, 4) diabetes mellitus, and 5) obesity, in separate analyses. Compared to those reporting zero days of insufficient sleep (referent), the OR (95% CI) associated with all 30 days of insufficient sleep was 1.67 (1.55–1.79) for any cardiovascular disease, 1.69(1.56–1.83) for CHD, 1.51(1.36–1.68) for stroke, 1.31(1.21–1.41) for diabetes, and 1.51 (1.43–1.59) for obesity. Conclusions In a multiethnic sample of US adults, perceived insufficient rest/sleep was found to be independently associated with CHD, stroke, diabetes mellitus and obesity. PMID:21152066

  2. Insufficient rest or sleep and its relation to cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity in a national, multiethnic sample.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Shankar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A new question on insufficient rest/sleep was included in the 2008 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS for the 50 states, District of Columbia, and three US territories. No previous study, however, has examined perceived insufficient rest/sleep in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD or diabetes mellitus. We examined the association between self-reported insufficient rest/sleep and CVD, diabetes, and obesity in a contemporary sample of US adults. METHODS: Multiethnic, nationally representative, cross-sectional survey (2008 BRFSS participants were >20 years of age (n=372, 144, 50% women. Self-reported insufficient rest/sleep in the previous month was categorized into four groups: zero, 1-13, 14-29, and 30 days. There were five outcomes: 1 any CVD, 2 coronary heart disease (CHD, 3 stroke, 4 diabetes mellitus, and 5 obesity (body mass index≥30 kg/m2. We employed multivariable logistic regression to calculate odds ratio (OR, (95% confidence interval (CI, of increasing categories of insufficient rest/sleep, taking zero days of insufficient rest/sleep as the referent category. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Insufficient rest/sleep was found to be associated with 1 any CVD, 2 CHD, 3 stroke, 4 diabetes mellitus, and 5 obesity, in separate analyses. Compared to those reporting zero days of insufficient sleep (referent, the OR (95% CI associated with all 30 days of insufficient sleep was 1.67 (1.55-1.79 for any cardiovascular disease, 1.69(1.56-1.83 for CHD, 1.51(1.36-1.68 for stroke, 1.31(1.21-1.41 for diabetes, and 1.51 (1.43-1.59 for obesity. CONCLUSIONS: In a multiethnic sample of US adults, perceived insufficient rest/sleep was found to be independently associated with CHD, stroke, diabetes mellitus and obesity.

  3. Differences in heart rate profile during exercise among subjects with subclinical thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maor, Elad; Kivity, Shaye; Kopel, Eran; Segev, Shlomo; Sidi, Yechezkel; Goldenberg, Ilan; Olchovsky, David

    2013-10-01

    Clinical thyroid disease is associated with changes in the cardiovascular system, including changes in heart rate during exercise. However, data on the relation between subclinical thyroid disease (SCTD) and heart rate during exercise are limited. We investigated 3799 apparently healthy subjects who were evaluated in the Institute for Preventive Medicine at the Sheba Medical Center. All subjects answered standard health questionnaires; were examined by a physician; completed routine blood tests including thyrotropin, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels; and underwent a treadmill exercise according to the Bruce protocol. Subjects with known thyroid disease or those who were taking thyroid-related drugs were excluded from the analysis. Heart rate profile was compared between patients with subclinical hypothyroidism (SCHypoT), patients with normal thyroid function, and patients with subclinical hyperthyroidism (SCHyperT) using propensity score matching. Seventy patients had SCHyperT and 273 had SCHypoT. Compared with age- and sex-matched normal subjects, SCHyperT subjects had a higher resting heart rate (83±17 vs. 76±12 beats per minute [bpm], p=0.006), a significantly higher recovery heart rate (94±12 vs. 90±12 bpm, p=0.045), and a significantly lower heart rate reserve (80±20 vs. 87±18 bpm, p=0.006). Subjects with SCHypoT showed a trend toward a lower resting heart rate (75±13 vs. 77±15 bpm, p=0.09) and had a significantly lower recovery heart rate (88±12 vs. 90±13 bpm, p=0.035). There was no significant difference in exercise duration or blood pressure between subjects with SCTD and their matched normal controls. Subjects with SCTD have a significantly different heart rate profile during rest, exercise, and recovery.

  4. Determination of Work-Rest Schedules Based on Physical Workload Among Bakers in Ahvaz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Afshari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Bakery workers due to exposure to radiant heat and doing manual labor are at risk of heat-related illnesses and musculoskeletal disorders Objectives The current study aimed to determine the appropriate work-rest time interval using two indexes of wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT and relative heart rate (RHR. Methods It was an analytical and descriptive research. Heart rate of workers was continuously recorded to achieve the physiological monitoring and the obtained information was used to determine the work difficulty and physical workload. The ratio of heat stress and RHR was measured using the WBGT and polar team pro device, respectively. Work-rest schedules were detected through the heart rate reserve and heat stress indexes. The level of significance was α = 0.05. Results Physical workload based on heart rate was estimated light to moderate in bakery workers. Suitable work-rest schedule for all bakery workers according to WBGT index was 25% work-75% rest and based on heart rate reserve index in half of the workers was 50% work-50% rest, and in the other half of the bakery workers was continuous work without rest. According to Kappa test, there was no agreement between the two methods of heat stress index and heart rate reserve to determine the work-rest schedules of workers (P < 0.001. Conclusions Physical workloads on the basis of heart rate were light for all workers except the workers of Tanoury who had moderate workload. Meanwhile, determining the work-rest schedule was different using the two indexes. The heart rate reserve index represents the physiological status of individual during the work and states the ratio of physical workload more precisely.

  5. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Marten E.; Warren, Helen R.; Cabrera, Claudia P.; Verweij, Niek; Mifsud, Borbala; Haessler, Jeffrey; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A.; Fu, Yi-Ping; Weiss, Stefan; Lin, Henry J.; Grarup, Niels; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Pistis, Giorgio; Shah, Nabi; Brody, Jennifer A.; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lin, Honghuang; Mei, Hao; Smith, Albert V.; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Hall, Leanne M.; van Setten, Jessica; Trompet, Stella; Prins, Bram P.; Isaacs, Aaron; Radmanesh, Farid; Marten, Jonathan; Entwistle, Aiman; Kors, Jan A.; Silva, Claudia T.; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; de Boer, Rudolf; de Haan, Hugoline G.; de Mutsert, Renée; Dedoussis, George; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Felix, Stephan B.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hagemeijer, Yanick; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Huang, Paul L.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kähönen, Mika; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Kolcic, Ivana; Launer, Lenore J.; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Simin; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Mangino, Massimo; Morris, Andrew D.; Mulas, Antonella; Murray, Alison D.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Orrú, Marco; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peters, Annette; Porteous, David J.; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lihong; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roselli, Carolina; Rudan, Igor; Sattar, Naveed; Sever, Peter; Sinner, Moritz F.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen E.; Taylor, Kent D.; Tobin, Martin D.; Uitterlinden, André; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Hoes, Arno W.; van der Meer, Peter; Völker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Xie, Zhijun; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Tinker, Andrew; Polasek, Ozren; Rosand, Jonathan; Jamshidi, Yalda; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Jukema, J. Wouter; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Wilson, James; Lubitz, Steven A.; Kääb, Stefan; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Caulfield, Mark J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Sanna, Serena; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Deloukas, Panos; Pedersen, Oluf; Rotter, Jerome I.; Dörr, Marcus; O'Donnell, Chris J.; Hayward, Caroline; Arking, Dan E.; Kooperberg, Charles; van der Harst, Pim; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Stricker, Bruno H.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to discover new genetic loci associated with heart rate from Exome Chip meta-analyses. Heart rate was measured from either elecrtrocardiograms or pulse recordings. We meta-analysed heart rate association results from 104 452 European-ancestry individuals from 30 cohorts, genotyped using the Exome Chip. Twenty-four variants were selected for follow-up in an independent dataset (UK Biobank, N = 134 251). Conditional and gene-based testing was undertaken, and variants were investigated with bioinformatics methods. We discovered five novel heart rate loci, and one new independent low-frequency non-synonymous variant in an established heart rate locus (KIAA1755). Lead variants in four of the novel loci are non-synonymous variants in the genes C10orf71, DALDR3, TESK2 and SEC31B. The variant at SEC31B is significantly associated with SEC31B expression in heart and tibial nerve tissue. Further candidate genes were detected from long-range regulatory chromatin interactions in heart tissue (SCD, SLF2 and MAPK8). We observed significant enrichment in DNase I hypersensitive sites in fetal heart and lung. Moreover, enrichment was seen for the first time in human neuronal progenitor cells (derived from embryonic stem cells) and fetal muscle samples by including our novel variants. Our findings advance the knowledge of the genetic architecture of heart rate, and indicate new candidate genes for follow-up functional studies. PMID:28379579

  6. DIRAC RESTful API

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casajus Ramo, A; Graciani Diaz, R; Tsaregorodtsev, A

    2012-01-01

    The DIRAC framework for distributed computing has been designed as a flexible and modular solution that can be adapted to the requirements of any community. Users interact with DIRAC via command line, using the web portal or accessing resources via the DIRAC python API. The current DIRAC API requires users to use a python version valid for DIRAC. Some communities have developed their own software solutions for handling their specific workload, and would like to use DIRAC as their back-end to access distributed computing resources easily. Many of these solutions are not coded in python or depend on a specific python version. To solve this gap DIRAC provides a new language agnostic API that any software solution can use. This new API has been designed following the RESTful principles. Any language with libraries to issue standard HTTP queries may use it. GSI proxies can still be used to authenticate against the API services. However GSI proxies are not a widely adopted standard. The new DIRAC API also allows clients to use OAuth for delegating the user credentials to a third party solution. These delegated credentials allow the third party software to query to DIRAC on behalf of the users. This new API will further expand the possibilities communities have to integrate DIRAC into their distributed computing models.

  7. Parenting Behaviors, Parent Heart Rate Variability, and Their Associations with Adolescent Heart Rate Variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rebecca A; Scott, Brandon G; Weems, Carl F

    2017-05-01

    Adolescence is a potentially important time in the development of emotion regulation and parenting behaviors may play a role. We examined associations among parenting behaviors, parent resting heart rate variability, adolescent resting heart rate variability and parenting behaviors as moderators of the association between parent and adolescent resting heart rate variability. Ninety-seven youth (11-17 years; 49.5 % female; 34 % African American, 37.1 % Euro-American, 22.6 % other/mixed ethnic background, and 7.2 % Hispanic) and their parents (n = 81) completed a physiological assessment and questionnaires assessing parenting behaviors. Inconsistent discipline and corporal punishment were negatively associated with adolescent resting heart rate variability, while positive parenting and parental involvement were positively associated. Inconsistent discipline and parental involvement moderated the relationship between parent and adolescent resting heart rate variability. The findings provide evidence for a role of parenting behaviors in shaping the development of adolescent resting heart rate variability with inconsistent discipline and parental involvement potentially influencing the entrainment of resting heart rate variability in parents and their children.

  8. Mechanisms for decreased exercise capacity after bed rest in normal middle-aged men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, J.; Goldwater, D.; Convertino, V.A.; McKillop, J.H.; Goris, M.L.; DeBusk, R.F.

    1983-01-15

    The mechanisms responsible for the decrease in exercise capacity after bed rest were assessed in 12 apparently healthy men aged 50 +/- 4 years who underwent equilibrium gated blood pool scintigraphy during supine and upright multistage bicycle ergometry before and after 10 days of bed rest. After bed rest, echocardiographically measured supine resting left ventricular end-diastolic volume decreased by 16% (p less than 0.05). Peak oxygen uptake during supine effort after bed rest was diminished by 6% (p . not significant (NS)), whereas peak oxygen uptake during upright effort declined by 15% (p less than 0.05). After bed rest, increases in heart rate were also greater during exercise in the upright than in the supine position (p less than 0.05). Values of left ventricular ejection fraction increased normally during both supine and upright effort after bed rest and were higher than corresponding values before bed rest (p less than 0.05). After bed rest, increased left ventricular ejection fraction and heart rate largely compensated for the reduced cardiac volume during supine effort, but these mechanisms were insufficient to maintain oxygen transport capacity at levels during upright effort before bed rest. These results indicate that orthostatically induced cardiac underfilling, not physical deconditioning or left ventricular dysfunction, is the major cause of reduced effort tolerance after 10 days of bed rest in normal middle-aged men.

  9. Myocardial uptake characteristics of three 99mTc-labeled tracers for myocardial perfusion imaging one hour after rest injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manka-Waluch, A.; Palmedo, H.; Reinhardt, M.J.; Joe, A.Y.; Manka, C.; Guhlke, S.; Biersack, H.J.; Bucerius, J.

    2006-01-01

    99m Tc-tetrofosmin and 99m Tc-sestamibi are approved tracers for myocardial perfusion studies. Recently, a 99m Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) preparation from a different manufacturer ( 99m Tc-cardiospect-MIBI) has been introduced to the market. Therefore, the aim of this study was the evaluation of 99m Tc-tetrofosmin as well as of two different 99m Tc-labeled MIBI tracers with regard to differences in imaging quality under resting conditions. Sixty patients (mean age 63.8 years±1.25) with known or suspected coronary artery disease but without evidence of rest-ischemia were included. Twenty patients in each group were examined by a two-day-rest-stress protocol using the three 99m Tc-labeled tracers. Visual analysis of all images was performed by two experienced physicians blinded with regard to the applied tracer. Regions of interest (ROI) were defined over the heart, lung and whole body only in the rest imaging in order to calculate heart-to-lung, lung-to-whole body-, and heart-to-whole body-ratios. The heart-to-lung ratio was statistically significant higher for 99 m T c-cardiospect-MIBI as compared to 99m Tc-sestamibi as well as to 99m Tc-tetrofosmin. Furthermore, a significantly higher heart-to-lung ratio was found for 99m Tc-sestamibi as compared to 99m Tc-tetrofosmin. The heart-to-whole body-ratio and the lung-to-whole body-ratio were equivalent between all tracers. Visual analysis revealed only slight differences regarding image quality between all tracers. ROI analysis surprisingly revealed a significant higher myocardial uptake and consequently a higher heart-to-lung ratio for 99m Tc-cardiospect-MIBI. Whether this leads to a better visual image quality has to be evaluated in future studies with larger study populations as well as semiquantitative segmental analysis of the myocardial perfusion images. (author)

  10. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  11. Physiology Of Prolonged Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1991-01-01

    Report describes physiological effects of prolonged bed rest. Rest for periods of 24 hours or longer deconditions body to some extent; healing proceeds simultaneously with deconditioning. Report provides details on shifts in fluid electrolytes and loss of lean body mass, which comprises everything in body besides fat - that is, water, muscle, and bone. Based on published research.

  12. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Functional Mobility and Balance: Relationship to Resting State Motor Cortex Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdeniz, B.; Koppelmans, V.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA offers researchers from a variety of backgrounds the opportunity to study bed rest as an experimental analog for space flight. Extended exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble many of the effects of a low-gravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The aim of our study is to a) identify changes in brain function that occur with prolonged bed rest and characterize their recovery time course; b) assess whether and how these changes impact behavioral and neurocognitive performance. Thus far, we completed data collection from six participants that include task based and resting state fMRI. The data have been acquired through the bed rest facility located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Subjects remained in bed with their heads tilted down 6 degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Behavioral measures and neuroimaging assessments were obtained at seven time points: a) 7 and 12 days before bed rest; b) 7, 30, and 65 days during bed rest; and c) 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (FcMRI) analysis was performed to assess the connectivity of motor cortex in and out of bed rest. We found a decrease in motor cortex connectivity with vestibular cortex and the cerebellum from pre bed rest to in bed rest. We also used a battery of behavioral measures including the functional mobility test and computerized dynamic posturography collected before and after bed rest. We will report the preliminary results of analyses relating brain and behavior changes. Furthermore, we will also report the preliminary results of a spatial working memory task and vestibular stimulation during in and out of bed rest.

  13. Obesity and heart failure as a mediator of the cerebrorenal interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Ankur; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Sowers, James R

    2013-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is contributing substantially to the burden of cardiovascular disease including heart disease and congestive heart failure, in the United States and the rest of the world. Overnutrition as a driver of obesity, promotes alterations in fatty acid, lipid, and glucose metabolism that influence myocardial function and progression of heart failure from diastolic to systolic failure. The association of progressive heart failure and progressive chronic kidney disease is well documented and often referred to as the cardiorenal syndrome, as well as a prognosticator for cerebrovascular disease (e.g. stroke). Whether the relationship between obesity, heart disease/failure and risk for chronic kidney disease and stroke is direct or a confluence of risk factors is poorly understood. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  15. RESTful Web Services at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, R.

    2011-06-14

    RESTful (REpresentational State Transfer) web services are an alternative implementation to SOAP/RPC web services in a client/server model. BNLs IT Division has started deploying RESTful Web Services for enterprise data retrieval and manipulation. Data is currently used by system administrators for tracking configuration information and as it is expanded will be used by Cyber Security for vulnerability management and as an aid to cyber investigations. This talk will describe the implementation and outstanding issues as well as some of the reasons for choosing RESTful over SOAP/RPC and future directions.

  16. The Danish Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. STUDY POPULATION: All adult (≥15 years) patients...... undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. MAIN VARIABLES: The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR...

  17. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Marten E.; Warren, Helen R; Cabrera, Claudia P; Verweij, Niek; Mifsud, Borbala; Haessler, Jeffrey; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A.; Fu, Yi-Ping; Weiss, Stefan; Lin, Henry J.; Grarup, Niels; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Pistis, Giorgio; Shah, Nabi; Brody, Jennifer A.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Lin, Honghuang; Mei, Hao; Smith, Albert V.; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Hall, Leanne M; van Setten, Jessica; Trompet, Stella; Prins, Bram P.; Isaacs, Aaron; Radmanesh, Farid; Marten, Jonathan; Entwistle, Aiman; Kors, Jan A.; Silva, Claudia T; Alonso, Alvaro; Bis, Joshua C.; de Boer, Rudolf; de Haan, Hugoline G; de Mutsert, Renee; Dedoussis, George; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Felix, Stephan B.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hagemeijer, Yanick; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Tamara B.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Huang, Paul L.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kahonen, Mika; Kanters, Jorgen K.; Kolcic, Ivana; Launer, Lenore J.; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Simin; MacFarlane, Peter W.; Mangino, Massimo; Morris, Andrew D.; Mulas, Antonella; Murray, Alison D.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Orru, Marco; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Peters, Annette; Porteous, David J.; Poulter, Neil; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lihong; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Roselli, Carolina; Rudan, Igor; Sattar, Naveed; Sever, Peter; Sinner, Moritz F.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stanton, Alice V.; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Taylor, Kent D.; Tobin, Martin D.; Uitterlinden, Andre; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Hoes, Arno W.; van der Meer, Peter; Voelker, Uwe; Waldenberger, Melanie; Xie, Zhijun; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Tinker, Andrew; Polasek, Ozren; Rosand, Jonathan; Jamshidi, Yalda; Duijn, Cornelia Mvan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Jukema, Wouter J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Wilson, James G.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Caulfield, Mark J.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Sanna, Serena; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Deloukas, Panos; Pedersen, Oluf; Rotter, Jerome I.; Doerr, Marcus; O'Donnell, Chris J.; Hayward, Caroline; Arking, Dan E.; Kooperberg, Charles; van der Harst, Pim; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Stricker, Bruno H.; Munroe, Patricia B.

    2017-01-01

    Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to

  18. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Marten E; Warren, Helen R; Cabrera, Claudia P

    2017-01-01

    Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims to di...

  19. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van den Berg (Marten); H. Warren (Helen); Cabrera, C.P. (Claudia P.); Verweij, N. (Niek); Mifsud, B. (Borbala); J. Haessler (Jeff); N.A. Bihlmeyer (Nathan A.); Fu, Y.-P. (Yi-Ping); Weiss, S. (Stefan); Lin, H.J. (Henry J.); N. Grarup (Niels); Li-Gao, R. (Ruifang); G. Pistis (Giorgio); N. Shah (Nisha); J.A. Brody (Jennifer A.); Müller-Nurasyid, M. (Martina); H. Lin (Honghuang); H. Mei (Hao); A.V. Smith (Albert V.); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); L.M. Hall (Leanne M.); J. van Setten (Jessica); S. Trompet (Stella); Prins, B.P. (Bram P.); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); F. Radmanesh (Farid); J. Marten (Jonathan); Entwistle, A. (Aiman); J.A. Kors (Jan); C.T. Silva (Claudia Tamar); A. Alonso (Alvaro); J.C. Bis (Joshua); R.A. de Boer (Rudolf); H.G. De Haan (Hugoline G.); R. de Mutsert (Reneé); G.V. Dedoussis (George); A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); P.T. Ellinor (Patrick); Eppinga, R.N. (Ruben N.); S.B. Felix (Stephan); X. Guo (Xiuqing); Hagemeijer, Y. (Yanick); T. Hansen (T.); T.B. Harris (Tamara); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); Huang, P.L. (Paul L.); S.-J. Hwang (Shih-Jen); M. Kähönen (Mika); J.K. Kanters; I. Kolcic (Ivana); L.J. Launer (Lenore); M. Li (Man); J. Yao (Jiefen); A. Linneberg (Allan); Liu, S. (Simin); P.W. MacFarlane (Peter); M. Mangino (Massimo); Morris, A.D. (Andrew D.); Mulas, A. (Antonella); Murray, A.D. (Alison D.); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); M. Orrù (Marco); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); A. Peters (Annette); D.J. Porteous (David J.); N.R. Poulter (Neil); B.M. Psaty (Bruce M.); L. Qi (Lihong); Raitakari, O.T. (Olli T.); Rivadeneira, F. (Fernando); Roselli, C. (Carolina); I. Rudan (Igor); N. Sattar (Naveed); P. Sever (Peter); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); E.Z. Soliman (Elsayed); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A. Stanton (Alice); K. Stirrups (Kathy); K.D. Taylor (Kent); M.D. Tobin (Martin); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); I. Vaartjes (Ilonca); A.W. Hoes (Arno); van der Meer, P. (Peter); U. Völker (Uwe); Waldenberger, M. (Melanie); Xie, Z. (Zhijun); M. Zoledziewska (Magdalena); Tinker, A. (Andrew); O. Polasek (Ozren); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Jamshidi, Y. (Yalda); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); J.F. Wilson (James); Lubitz, S.A. (Steven A.); S. Kääb (Stefan); N. Sotoodehnia (Nona); M. Caulfield (Mark); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); S. Sanna (Serena); D.O. Mook-Kanamori (Dennis); Deloukas, P. (Panos); O. Pedersen (Oluf); J.I. Rotter (Jerome I.); M. Dörr (Marcus); C.J. O'Donnell (Christopher J.); C. Hayward (Caroline); D.E. Arking (Dan); C. Kooperberg (Charles); van der Harst, P. (Pim); M. Eijgelsheim (Mark); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); P. Munroe (Patricia)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractResting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This

  20. Emerging hemodynamic signatures of the right heart (Third International Right Heart Failure Summit, part 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bradley A

    2014-12-01

    Despite the importance of preserved right ventricular structure and function with respect to outcome across the spectrum of lung, cardiac, and pulmonary vascular diseases, only recently have organized efforts developed to consider the pulmonary vascular-right ventricular apparatus as a specific unit within the larger context of cardiopulmonary pathophysiology. The Third International Right Heart Failure Summit (Boston, MA) was a multidisciplinary event dedicated to promoting a dialogue about the scientific and clinical basis of right heart disease. The current review provides a synopsis of key discussions presented during the section of the summit titled "Emerging Hemodynamic Signatures of the Right Heart." Specifically, topics emphasized in this element of the symposium included (1) the effects of pulmonary vascular dysfunction at rest or provoked by exercise on the right ventricular pressure-volume relationship, (2) the role of pressure-volume loop analysis as a method to characterize right ventricular inefficiency and predict right heart failure, and (3) the importance of a systems biology approach to identifying novel factors that contribute to pathophenotypes associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension and/or right ventricular dysfunction. Collectively, these concepts frame a forward-thinking paradigm shift in the approach to right heart disease by emphasizing factors that regulate the transition from adaptive to maladaptive right ventricular-pulmonary vascular (patho)physiology.

  1. Heart Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kilometers), which is far enough to circle the earth more than twice! See also on other sites: ... For the Public Heart Information Center Project Heart Women’s Heart Health Clinical Trials 6770 Bertner Avenue Houston, ...

  2. Value of resting echocardiographic findings and dobutamine stress echocardiography for diagnosing myocardial ischemia in patients with suspected angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsunomiya, Hiroto; Hidaka, Takayuki; Masada, Kenji; Shimonaga, Takashi; Higaki, Tadanao; Iwasaki, Toshitaka; Mitsuba, Naoya; Ishibashi, Ken; Kurisu, Satoshi; Kihara, Yasuki

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic value of resting echocardiographic findings including total heart calcification (THC) score in combination with dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) for detection of myocardial ischemia. Altogether, 110 patients with suspected angina pectoris underwent resting echocardiography and DSE. On the basis of resting echocardiography, we determined the THC score, left anterior descending artery diastole-to-systole velocity ratio (LAD-DSVR), and positive myocardial velocity during isovolumic relaxation phase (VIVR ) detected by color-coded tissue Doppler imaging. Myocardial ischemia was diagnosed by a 25% or greater reduction in the internal diameter of major coronary vessels with impaired fractional flow reserve (FFR ≤0.80). DSE had excellent specificity (89%) but modest sensitivity (52%) for wall-motion abnormality (WMA) analysis. Multivariate analysis showed that THC score ≥2 (odds ratio and 95% confidence interval: 4.49 [2.29-10.6]; P = 0.018), LAD-DSVR ≤1.5 (6.43 [1.39-20.3], P = 0.019), and duration of positive VIVR ≥71 msec (7.93 [3.72-12.1]; P < 0.001) were independent predictors of ischemia. The combination of inducible WMA and THC score yielded significantly higher sensitivity for ischemia detection than the inducible WMA alone (80% vs. 52%, P = 0.0008). Using receiver operating characteristics analyses, adding all three resting echocardiographic findings to clinical variables plus inducible WMA further improved prediction of ischemia (P = 0.028). Integration of DSE and resting echocardiographic findings describing degree of heart calcification, impaired LAD flow, and extent of delayed ejection motion of the myocardium improves detection of coronary angiogram-based FFR-guided ischemia. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. God rest our hearts: Religiosity and cognitive reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishkin, Allon; Bigman, Yochanan E; Porat, Roni; Solak, Nevin; Halperin, Eran; Tamir, Maya

    2016-03-01

    Although religiosity is often accompanied by more intense emotions, we propose that people who are more religious may be better at using 1 of the most effective emotion regulation strategies-namely, cognitive reappraisal. We argue that religion, which is a meaning-making system, is linked to better cognitive reappraisal, which involves changing the meaning of emotional stimuli. Four studies (N = 2,078) supported our hypotheses. In Study 1, religiosity was associated with more frequent use of cognitive reappraisal in 3 distinct religions (i.e., Islam, Christianity, Judaism). In Studies 2A-2B, we replicated these findings using 2 indices of cognitive reappraisal and in a large representative sample. In Studies 3-4, individuals more (vs. less) religious were more effective in using cognitive reappraisal in the laboratory. We discuss how these findings inform our understanding of the psychology of religion and of emotion regulation. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Clinical physiology of bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1993-01-01

    Maintenance of optimal health in humans requires the proper balance between exercise, rest, and sleep as well as time in the upright position. About one-third of a lifetime is spent sleeping; and it is no coincidence that sleeping is performed in the horizontal position, the position in which gravitational influence on the body is minimal. Although enforced bed rest is necessary for the treatment of some ailments, in some cases it has probably been used unwisely. In addition to the lower hydrostatic pressure with the normally dependent regions of the cardiovascular system, body fuid compartments during bed rest in the horizontal body position, and virtual elimination of compression on the long bones of the skeletal system during bed rest (hypogravia), there is often reduction in energy metabolism due to the relative confinement (hypodynamia) and alteration of ambulatory circadian variations in metabolism, body temperature, and many hormonal systems. If patients are also moved to unfamiliar surroundings, they probably experience some feelings of anxiety and some sociopsychological problems. Adaptive physiological responses during bed rest are normal for that environment. They are attempts by the body to reduce unnecessary energy expenditure, to optimize its function, and to enhance its survival potential. Many of the deconditioning responses begin within the first day or two of bed rest; these early responses have prompted physicians to insist upon early resumption of the upright posture and ambulation of bedridden patients.

  5. Cerebral Blood Flow during Rest Associates with General Intelligence and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Nagase, Tomomi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-01-01

    Recently, much scientific attention has been focused on resting brain activity and its investigation through such methods as the analysis of functional connectivity during rest (the temporal correlation of brain activities in different regions). However, investigation of the magnitude of brain activity during rest has focused on the relative decrease of brain activity during a task, rather than on the absolute resting brain activity. It is thus necessary to investigate the association between cognitive factors and measures of absolute resting brain activity, such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), during rest (rest-CBF). In this study, we examined this association using multiple regression analyses. Rest-CBF was the dependent variable and the independent variables included two essential components of cognitive functions, psychometric general intelligence and creativity. CBF was measured using arterial spin labeling and there were three analyses for rest-CBF; namely mean gray matter rest-CBF, mean white matter rest-CBF, and regional rest-CBF. The results showed that mean gray and white matter rest-CBF were significantly and positively correlated with individual psychometric intelligence. Furthermore, mean white matter rest-CBF was significantly and positively correlated with creativity. After correcting the effect of mean gray matter rest-CBF the significant and positive correlation between regional rest-CBF in the perisylvian anatomical cluster that includes the left superior temporal gyrus and insula and individual psychometric intelligence was found. Also, regional rest-CBF in the precuneus was significantly and negatively correlated with individual creativity. Significance of these results of regional rest-CBF did not change when the effect of regional gray matter density was corrected. The findings showed mean and regional rest-CBF in healthy young subjects to be correlated with cognitive functions. The findings also suggest that, even in young cognitively intact

  6. Cerebral blood flow during rest associates with general intelligence and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Nagase, Tomomi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-01-01

    Recently, much scientific attention has been focused on resting brain activity and its investigation through such methods as the analysis of functional connectivity during rest (the temporal correlation of brain activities in different regions). However, investigation of the magnitude of brain activity during rest has focused on the relative decrease of brain activity during a task, rather than on the absolute resting brain activity. It is thus necessary to investigate the association between cognitive factors and measures of absolute resting brain activity, such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), during rest (rest-CBF). In this study, we examined this association using multiple regression analyses. Rest-CBF was the dependent variable and the independent variables included two essential components of cognitive functions, psychometric general intelligence and creativity. CBF was measured using arterial spin labeling and there were three analyses for rest-CBF; namely mean gray matter rest-CBF, mean white matter rest-CBF, and regional rest-CBF. The results showed that mean gray and white matter rest-CBF were significantly and positively correlated with individual psychometric intelligence. Furthermore, mean white matter rest-CBF was significantly and positively correlated with creativity. After correcting the effect of mean gray matter rest-CBF the significant and positive correlation between regional rest-CBF in the perisylvian anatomical cluster that includes the left superior temporal gyrus and insula and individual psychometric intelligence was found. Also, regional rest-CBF in the precuneus was significantly and negatively correlated with individual creativity. Significance of these results of regional rest-CBF did not change when the effect of regional gray matter density was corrected. The findings showed mean and regional rest-CBF in healthy young subjects to be correlated with cognitive functions. The findings also suggest that, even in young cognitively intact

  7. Ivabradine: Heart Failure and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Rahul; Garg, Jalaj; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Shah, Neeraj; Lanier, Gregg; Martinez, Mathew W; Freudenberger, Ronald

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure affects over 5 million people in the United States and carries a high rate of mortality. Ivabradine, a new agent has been added to the current medical options for managing heart failure. It is a selective funny current (If) inhibitor in sinoatrial node and slows its firing rate, prolonging diastolic depolarization without a negative inotropic effect. Ivabradine was only recently approved by Food and Drug administration after the results of Systolic Heart Failure Treatment with the If Inhibitor Ivabradine (SHIFT) trial, for a reduction in rehospitalizations from chronic heart failure. This trial assessed patients with stable heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and a heart rate of at least 70 beats per minute at rest on maximally tolerated beta-blocker therapy and demonstrated statistically significant reduction in heart failure hospitalization and deaths. Additionally, ivabradine has been associated with reduced cardiac remodeling, reduced heart rate variability, improvement in exercise tolerance, improved heart failure class of New York Heart Association, and better quality of life. It has also been tried in other conditions, such as inappropriate sinus tachycardia and cardiogenic shock, and is currently in phase II trial for patients with newly diagnosed multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Resting and energy reserves of Aedes albopictus collected in common landscaping vegetation in St. Augustine, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Dayana M; Qualls, Whitney A; Roque, Deborah; Naranjo, Diana P; Alimi, Temitope; Arheart, Kristopher L; Müller, Günter C; Beier, John C; Xue, Rui-De

    2013-09-01

    The resting behavior of Aedes albopictus was evaluated by aspirating diurnal resting mosquitoes from common landscape vegetation in residential communities in St. Augustine, FL. Energy reserves of the resting mosquitoes were analyzed to determine if there was a correlation between mosquito resting habitat and energy accumulation. Six species of plants were selected and 9 collections of resting mosquitoes were aspirated from each plant using a modified John W. Hock backpack aspirator during June and July 2012. Eight mosquito species were collected, with Ae. albopictus representing 74% of the overall collection. The number of Ae. albopictus collected varied significantly with the species of vegetation. When comparing the vegetation and abundance of resting mosquitoes, the highest percentages of Ae. albopictus were collected resting on Ruellia brittoniana (Mexican petunia), Asplenium platyneuron (fern), Gibasis geniculate (Tahitian bridal veil), followed by Plumba goauriculata (plumbago), Setcreasea pallida (purple heart), and Hibiscus tiliaceus (hibiscus). There were significant differences in lipid and glycogen accumulation based on type of vegetation Ae. albopictus was found resting in. Resting mosquitoes' sugar reserves were not influenced by species of vegetation. However, there was an overall correlation between vegetation that serves as a resting habitat and energy reserve accumulation. The results of our study demonstrate the potential to target specific vegetation for control of diurnal resting mosquitoes.

  9. Expression of REST4 in human gliomas in vivo and influence of pioglitazone on REST in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Huan [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China); Gao, Zhangfeng [Department of Neurosurgery, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Wu, Nayiyuan; Zeng, Liu; Tang, Xinyue; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Liansheng [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China); Li, Zhi, E-mail: lizhi489@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China)

    2015-08-07

    The repressor element-1 (RE1) silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) has an irreplaceable role during the differentiation of neurons. REST has multiple splice variants which link to various types of cancer. Previous work had highlighted the role of REST in glioma, where the expression of REST is enhanced. But whether alternative splicing of REST is expressed in glioma has not been described. Here, we show that a specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens, and will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists have a role of antineoplastic in various tumor cells, which including glioma cells. Moreover, study indicated that PPARγ agonist pioglitazone can promote alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. In this study, we selected pioglitazone as a tool drug to explore whether the role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma is mediated by regulating REST expression or promoting alternative splicing of REST in glioma cells. Results show that pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cell in vitro, which may be mediated by down-regulating REST mRNA level but not by inducing alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. Our study firstly reports the expression of REST4 in glioma tissue samples. And we recommend that pioglitazone, which can reduce the expression level of REST, represents a promising drug for therapy of glioma. - Highlights: • A specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens in vivo. • REST4 will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. • Pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cells. • The role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma may be mediated by down-regulating REST.

  10. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year almost 800,000 Americans have a heart attack. A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart suddenly ... it's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if you or ...

  11. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  12. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S. ... disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease is ...

  13. Review Paper Heart Failure in Small Animals - Advances in Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rationale for the use of drugs and supportive therapy in the management of heart diseases (HDs) and heart failure (HF), is discussed in the light of contemporary concepts. The in-adequacy of the age-long therapy of heart failure with oxygen supplementation, cardiac glycosides, rest and the withholding of salt in food is ...

  14. High-resolution phase-contrast MRI of aortic and pulmonary blood flow during rest and physical exercise using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Tim Frederik, E-mail: tim.weber@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Tengg-Kobligk, Hendrik von, E-mail: hendrik.tengg-kobligk@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kopp-Schneider, Annette, E-mail: kopp@dkfz-heidelberg.de [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia, E-mail: julia.ley-zaporozhan@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Pediatric Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 430, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich, E-mail: hans-ulrich.kauczor@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 110, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Ley, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.ley@med.uni.heidelberg.de [Department of Radiology, German Cancer Research Center, INF 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Pediatric Radiology, University Medical Center Heidelberg, INF 430, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To establish high-resolution phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer to quantify aortic and pulmonary blood flow during resting conditions and exercise. Materials and methods: In 20 healthy volunteers (mean age, 26.8 {+-} 5.0 years) high-resolution PC-MRI (mean temporal resolution, 7.4 {+-} 3.2 ms) was performed in the ascending aorta (AA) and main pulmonary artery (PA) during physical rest and three exercise stages: stage 1, no-load operation; stage 2, heart rate increase 40% compared to rest; stage 3, heart rate increase 80% compared to rest. Flow quantification in AA and PA included flow volume (FV), average velocity (AV), peak velocity (PV) and time to PV (TP). Results: In stage 1 only TP demonstrated a significant change. With progression to stage 2, all parameters altered significantly. Flow measurements during stage 3 evidenced further alterations only of AV and TP regarding both AA and PA. The deviation of the heart rate from the desired target value was significantly higher for stage 3 compared to stage 2, and 15% of the subjects did not reach the desired target heart rate of stage 3 at all. Conclusion: Flow quantification by high-resolution PC-MRI during exercise using a MRI compatible bicycle ergometer is feasible. Medium exercise stages are necessary and sufficient to demonstrate flow alterations in healthy volunteers. PC-MRI ergometry may give insights into aberrant hemodynamic conditions in patients with cardiovascular and pulmonary disease.

  15. RESTful Java web services security

    CERN Document Server

    Enríquez, René

    2014-01-01

    A sequential and easy-to-follow guide which allows you to understand the concepts related to securing web apps/services quickly and efficiently, since each topic is explained and described with the help of an example and in a step-by-step manner, helping you to easily implement the examples in your own projects. This book is intended for web application developers who use RESTful web services to power their websites. Prior knowledge of RESTful is not mandatory, but would be advisable.

  16. Effects of an interatrial shunt on rest and exercise hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaye, David; Shah, Sanjiv J; Borlaug, Barry A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A treatment based on an interatrial shunt device has been proposed for counteracting elevated pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) in patients with heart failure and mildly reduced or preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). We tested the theoretical hemodynamic effects...... of the conditions tested. CONCLUSIONS: The interatrial shunt reduced left-sided cardiac output with a marked reduction in PCWP. This approach may reduce the propensity for heart failure exacerbations and allow patients to exercise longer, thus attaining higher heart rates and cardiac outputs with the shunt compared...... of this approach with the use of a previously validated cardiovascular simulation. METHODS AND RESULTS: Rest and exercise hemodynamics data from 2 previous independent studies of patients with HFpEF were simulated. The theoretical effects of a shunt between the right and left atria (diameter up to 12 mm) were...

  17. Inhalation of ultrafine carbon particles alters heart rate and heart rate variability in people with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Rathin; Zareba, Wojciech; Utell, Mark J; Pietropaoli, Anthony P; Chalupa, David; Little, Erika L; Oakes, David; Bausch, Jan; Wiltshire, Jelani; Frampton, Mark W

    2014-07-16

    Diabetes may confer an increased risk for the cardiovascular health effects of particulate air pollution, but few human clinical studies of air pollution have included people with diabetes. Ultrafine particles (UFP, ≤100 nm in diameter) have been hypothesized to be an important component of particulate air pollution with regard to cardiovascular health effects. 17 never-smoker subjects 30-60 years of age, with stable type 2 diabetes but otherwise healthy, inhaled either filtered air (0-10 particles/cm3) or elemental carbon UFP (~107 particles/cm3, ~50 ug/m3, count median diameter 32 nm) by mouthpiece, for 2 hours at rest, in a double-blind, randomized, crossover study design. A digital 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) was recorded continuously for 48 hours, beginning 1 hour prior to exposure. Analysis of 5-minute segments of the ECG during quiet rest showed reduced high-frequency heart rate variability with UFP relative to air exposure (p = 0.014), paralleled by non-significant reductions in time-domain heart rate variability parameters. In the analysis of longer durations of the ECG, we found that UFP exposure increased the heart rate relative to air exposure. During the 21- to 45-hour interval after exposure, the average heart rate increased approximately 8 beats per minute with UFP, compared to 5 beats per minute with air (p = 0.045). There were no UFP effects on cardiac rhythm or repolarization. Inhalation of elemental carbon ultrafine particles alters heart rate and heart rate variability in people with type 2 diabetes. Our findings suggest that effects may occur and persist hours after a single 2-hour exposure.

  18. Relationships Between Biomarkers and Left Ventricular Filling Pressures at Rest and During Exercise in Patients After Myocardial Infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads J; Ersbøll, Mads; Bro-Jeppesen, John

    2014-01-01

    regarding PCWP at rest and during exercise in subjects with preserved EF after MI. METHODS AND RESULTS: Seventy-four subjects with EF >45% and recent MI underwent right heart catheterization at rest and during a symptom-limited semisupine cycle exercise test with simultaneous echocardiography. Plasma...

  19. Metodika návrhu RESTful API

    OpenAIRE

    Melena, Lukáš

    2017-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is RESTful API Design methodology. RESTful API is currently very popular type of API, but there is missing comprehensive guide how to create it. The target of this thesis is to design methodology of design RESTful API which fulfills all REST and Resource-oriented architecture principles defined by Fielding, Richardson and Ruby. The focus of the methodology is only on analysis and design of API. The first part is about description of RESTful API current situation, ma...

  20. Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorsal, Anders; Wiggers, Henrik; McMurray, John J V

    2018-01-01

    This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint.......This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint....

  1. Heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... part in support groups for people with heart disease . Outlook (Prognosis) After a heart attack, you have a higher ... P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014: ...

  2. 78 FR 64179 - Hours of Service of Drivers; Amendment of the 30-Minute Rest Break Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ...; Amendment of the 30-Minute Rest Break Requirement AGENCY: Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA... of Service of Drivers'' to provide an exception from the 30- minute rest break requirement for short...). The final rule included a new provision requiring drivers to take a rest break during the work day...

  3. RESTful web services with Dropwizard

    CERN Document Server

    Dallas, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    A hands-on focused step-by-step tutorial to help you create Web Service applications using Dropwizard. If you are a software engineer or a web developer and want to learn more about building your own Web Service application, then this is the book for you. Basic knowledge of Java and RESTful Web Service concepts is assumed and familiarity with SQL/MySQL and command-line scripting would be helpful.

  4. Resting energy expenditure is not influenced by classical music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slinde Frode

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity shows an increasing prevalence worldwide and a decrease in energy expenditure has been suggested to be one of the risk factors for developing obesity. An increase in resting energy expenditure would have a great impact on total energy expenditure. This study shows that classical music do not influence resting energy expenditure compared to complete silence. Further studies should be performed including other genres of music and other types of stress-inductors than music.

  5. Coronary heart disease index based on longitudinal electrocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, J. C.; Cronin, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A coronary heart disease index was developed from longitudinal ECG (LCG) tracings to serve as a cardiac health measure in studies of working and, essentially, asymptomatic populations, such as pilots and executives. For a given subject, the index consisted of a composite score based on the presence of LCG aberrations and weighted values previously assigned to them. The index was validated by correlating it with the known presence or absence of CHD as determined by a complete physical examination, including treadmill, resting ECG, and risk factor information. The validating sample consisted of 111 subjects drawn by a stratified-random procedure from 5000 available case histories. The CHD index was found to be significantly more valid as a sole indicator of CHD than the LCG without the use of the index. The index consistently produced higher validity coefficients in identifying CHD than did treadmill testing, resting ECG, or risk factor analysis.

  6. Rest requirements and rest management of personnel in shift work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammell, B.D. [PDG Environmental, Melbourne, FL (United States); Scheuerle, A. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A difficulty-weighted shift assignment scheme is proposed for use in prolonged and strenuous field operations such as emergency response, site testing, and short term hazardous waste remediation projects. The purpose of the work rotation plan is to increase productivity, safety, and moral of workers. Job weighting is accomplished by assigning adjustments to the mental and physical intensity of the task, the protective equipment worn, and the climatic conditions. The plan is based on medical studies of sleep deprivation, the effects of rest adjustments, and programs to reduce sleep deprivation and normalize shift schedules.

  7. Effects of activity-rest schedules on physiological strain and spinal load in hospital-based porters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beynon, C; Burke, J; Doran, D; Nevill, A

    2000-10-01

    Workers in physically demanding occupations require rest breaks to recover from physiological stress and biomechanical loading. Physiological stress can increase the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders and repeated loading of the spine may increase the potential for incurring back pain. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of an altered activity-rest schedule on physiological and spinal loading in hospital-based porters. An existing 4-h activity-rest schedule was obtained from observations on eight male porters. This schedule formed the normal trial, which included two 5- and one 15-min breaks. An alternative 4-h schedule was proposed (experimental condition) that had two breaks each of 12.5 min. It was hypothesized that the experimental trial is more effective in promoting recovery from physiological strain and spinal shrinkage than the normal trial, due to the 5-min breaks being insufficient to allow physiological variables to return to resting levels or the intervertebral discs to reabsorb fluid. Ten males performed both test conditions and oxygen uptake VO2, heart rate, minute ventilation VE, perceived exertion and spinal shrinkage were recorded. There were no significant differences in any of the measured variables between the two trials (p > 0.05). Median heart rates were 78 (range 71-93) and 82 (71-90) beats.min(-1) for the normal trial and the experimental trial respectively, indicating that the activity was of low intensity. The light intensity was corroborated by the oxygen uptakes (0.75, range 0.65-0.94 1.min(-1)). Spinal shrinkage occurred to the same extent in the two trials (2.12 +/- 3.16 mm and 2.88 +/- 2.92 mm in the normal trial and the experimental trial respectively). Varying the length and positioning of the rest breaks did not significantly affect the physiological responses or magnitude of spinal shrinkage between the two trials. More physically demanding work than the porters' schedule should induce greater physiological

  8. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Lactate kinetics in human tissues at rest and during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Hall, Gerrit

    2010-01-01

    lactate metabolism at rest and during exercise and suggestions are put forward to explain the simultaneous lactate uptake and release; and (2) lactate metabolism in the heart, liver, kidneys, brain, adipose tissue and lungs will be discussed and its potential importance in these tissues.......Lactate production in skeletal muscle has now been studied for nearly two centuries and still its production and functional role at rest and during exercise is much debated. In the early days skeletal muscle was mainly seen as the site of lactate production during contraction and lactate production...... associated with a lack of muscle oxygenation and fatigue. Later it was recognized that skeletal muscle not only played an important role in lactate production but also in lactate clearance and this led to a renewed interest, not the least from the Copenhagen School in the 1930s, in the metabolic role...

  10. Clinical use of nuclear cardiology in the assessment of heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Lei; Shi Hongcheng

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is the most commonly performed non-invasive cardiac imaging test in patients with heart failure, and it plays an important role in their assessment and management. Quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography is used to assess quantitatively cardiac volume, left ventricular ejection fraction, stroke volume, and cardiac diastolic function. Resting and stress myocardial perfusion imaging can not only identify nonischemic heart failure and ischemic heart failure, but also demonstrate myocardial viability. Diastolic heart failure also termed as heart failure with a preserved left ventricular ejection fraction is readily identified by nuclear cardiology techniques and can accurately be estimated by peak filling rate and time to peak filling rate. With newer techniques such as three-dimensional, quantitative gated single positron emission computed tomography can assess movement of the left ventricle, and wall thickening evaluation aids its assessment. Myocardial perfusion imaging is also commonly used to identify candidates for implantable cardiac defibrillator and cardiac resynchronization therapies. Neurotransmitter imaging using 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine offers prognostic information in patients with heart failure. Metabolism and function in the heart are closely related, and energy substrate metabolism is a potential target of medical therapies to improve cardiac function in patients with heart failure. Cardiac metabolic imaging using 123 I-15-(p-iodophenyl) 3-R, S-methylpentadecacoic acid is a commonly used tracer in clinical studies to diagnose metabolic heart failure. Nuclear cardiology tests, including neurotransmitter imaging and metabolic imaging, are now easily preformed with new tracers to improve heart failure diagnosis. Nuclear cardiology techniques contribute significantly to identifying patients with heart failure and to guiding their management decisions. (authors)

  11. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-05-01

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Sustainable Rest Area Design and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    One way in which State Departments of Transportation (DOTs) can modernize their rest areas while reducing operations and maintenance costs is by incorporating sustainable practices into rest area design and operations. Sustainability practices that D...

  13. Correlation of the severity of diabetic retinopathy and the heart muscle perfusion in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryniszewski, Wiesław; Kuśmierczyk, Jarosław; Maziarz, Zbigniew; Goś, Roman; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Banach, Maciej; Rysz, Jacek; Pesudovs, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to investigate whether microvascular disturbances in patients with type 2 diabetes (DM) as defined by retinal examination predict the existence of macrovascular disturbances found on radioisotopic perfusion examinations of the heart muscle. A total of 100 patients with type 2 DM and an additional cardiovascular risk factor were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent comprehensive ophthalmologic examination, including fundus color photography and fluorescein angiography, and were divided into three groups: group 1 (NoDR): met the inclusion criteria but had no diabetic retinopathy; group 2 (NPDR): had signs of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy; group 3 (PDR): had signs of preproliferative or proliferative diabetic retinopathy. After collecting general medical history and clinical data, patients underwent heart muscle perfusion studies. All patients followed a 48-h protocol heart muscle perfusion examination in the rest state as well as after the standardized exercise test. Single photon emission computed tomography examination was performed. In the PDR group, the impairment of the heart muscle perfusion at stress and rest was more frequent than in the NPDR and NoDR groups. Analysis of the heart muscle perfusion results for the three groups showed a significant relationship with the severity of microvascular complications observed in eye fundus examinations. Comprehensive ophthalmologic assessment of the progression of diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 DM may be an indicator of heart muscle perfusion disturbance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Restful API Architecture Based on Laravel Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianjun; Ji, Zhoupeng; Fan, Yu; Zhan, Yongsong

    2017-10-01

    Web service has been an industry standard tech for message communication and integration between heterogeneous systems. RESTFUL API has become mainstream web service development paradigm after SOAP, how to effectively construct RESTFUL API remains a research hotspots. This paper presents a development model of RESTFUL API construction based on PHP language and LARAVEL framework. The key technical problems that need to be solved during the construction of RESTFUL API are discussed, and implementation details based on LARAVEL are given.

  15. REST API : Implementation with Flask-Python

    OpenAIRE

    Alemu, Musse Bekabil

    2014-01-01

    Author Musse Alemu Year 2014 Supervisor Mattila Erkki Commissioned by Oy Aurora Data and Systems Ltd. Title of thesis REST API No. of pages + app. 44 + 2 Communication between various systems is common in the technology world. Thus, this thesis report discussed one of the popular means of communication, REST API. Additionally, it described the six basic constraints of REST conjointly to HATEOAS constraint. Furthermore, it observed all the good advantages REST API has over...

  16. Aberrant REST-mediated transcriptional regulation in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Koji; Uchida, Shusaku; Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Matsubara, Toshio; Hobara, Teruyuki; Funato, Hiromasa; Watanabe, Yoshifumi

    2010-04-01

    There is growing evidence that aberrant transcriptional regulation is one of the key components of the pathophysiology of mood disorders. The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) is a negative regulator of genes that contain the repressor element-1 (RE-1) binding site. REST has many target genes, including corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), brain-derived neurotrophic factor, serotonin 1A receptor, which are suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression and the action of antidepressants. However, a potential role for REST-mediated transcriptional regulation in mood disorders remains unclear. In this study, we examined the mRNA levels of REST and its known and putative target genes, using quantitative real-time PCR in peripheral blood cells of patients with major depressive and bipolar disorders in both a current depressive and a remissive state. We found reduced mRNA expression of REST and increased mRNA expression of CRH, adenylate cyclase 5, and the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, member 12-13 in patients with major depressive disorder in a current depressive state, but not in a remissive state. Altered expression of these mRNAs was not found in patients with bipolar disorder. Our results suggest that the aberrant REST-mediated transcriptional regulation of, at least, CRH, adenylate cyclase 5, and tumor necrosis factor superfamily, member 12-13, might be state-dependent and associated with the pathophysiology of major depression. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Normalized cut group clustering of resting-state FMRI data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn van den Heuvel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional brain imaging studies have indicated that distinct anatomical brain regions can show coherent spontaneous neuronal activity during rest. Regions that show such correlated behavior are said to form resting-state networks (RSNs. RSNs have been investigated using seed-dependent functional connectivity maps and by using a number of model-free methods. However, examining RSNs across a group of subjects is still a complex task and often involves human input in selecting meaningful networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report on a voxel based model-free normalized cut graph clustering approach with whole brain coverage for group analysis of resting-state data, in which the number of RSNs is computed as an optimal clustering fit of the data. Inter-voxel correlations of time-series are grouped at the individual level and the consistency of the resulting networks across subjects is clustered at the group level, defining the group RSNs. We scanned a group of 26 subjects at rest with a fast BOLD sensitive fMRI scanning protocol on a 3 Tesla MR scanner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An optimal group clustering fit revealed 7 RSNs. The 7 RSNs included motor/visual, auditory and attention networks and the frequently reported default mode network. The found RSNs showed large overlap with recently reported resting-state results and support the idea of the formation of spatially distinct RSNs during rest in the human brain.

  18. Causes and Predictors of Death in Patients With Coronary Heart Disease (from the Heart and Soul Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Elizabeth Y; Dixson, Jeffrey; Schiller, Nelson B; Whooley, Mary A

    2017-01-01

    Although the prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD) in the United States has increased during the past 25 years, cardiovascular mortality has decreased due to advances in CHD therapy and prevention. We sought to determine the proportion of patients with CHD who die from cardiovascular versus noncardiovascular causes and the causes and predictors of death, in a cohort of patients with CHD. The Heart and Soul Study enrolled 1,024 participants with stable CHD from 2000 to 2002 and followed them for 10 years. Causes of mortality were assigned based on detailed review of medical records, death certificates, and coroner reports by blinded adjudicators. During 7,680 person-years of follow-up, 401 participants died. Of these deaths, 42.4% were cardiovascular and 54.4% were noncardiovascular. Myocardial infarction, stroke, and sudden death accounted for 72% of cardiovascular deaths. Cancer, pneumonia, and sepsis accounted for 67% of noncardiovascular deaths. Independent predictors of cardiac mortality were older age, inducible ischemia on stress echocardiography, higher heart rate at rest, smoking, lower hemoglobin, and higher N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (all p values <0.05); independent predictors of noncardiac mortality included older age, inducible ischemia, higher heart rate, lower exercise capacity, and nonuse of statins (all p values <0.05). In conclusion, mortality in this cohort was more frequently due to noncardiovascular causes, and predictors of noncardiovascular mortality included factors traditionally associated with cardiovascular mortality. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Experimental evaluation of the influence of various rests on task performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasaka, Akihiko; Hirose, Ayako

    2000-01-01

    This report deals with the result of the experiment that 8 subjects had executed adding task and search task. They executed each task in 80 minutes under 5 conditions: (1) with no rest, and with 4 kinds of 20 minutes rests, in which they (2) opened eyes, (3) closed eyes, (4) closed eyes with listening classic music and (5) closed eyes with feet massage, in the middle of the task. The results of analysis of variance with the task performance in the latter half, there were significant differences between each condition with every subject in adding task, and with 6 subjects in search task. However, the orders of the task performance with each condition were not the same by each subject. It was suggested that transition of the arousal levels under the rest was related to the effects of the rest rather than the subjects' taste in rests. In the rest, the percentage of α wave of electroencephalogram and the coefficient of variation of R-R interval (time interval of heart beats) were increased than in executing task. The mean Kendall's rank correlation of coefficient with the order of increase rate of α/β wave and the task performance in the latter half was slightly negative in adding task, but was about 0.4 in search task. From these results, about six requirements for 'an effective rest' were able to be mentioned, for example, 'the devices that raises the arousal levels is carried out just before a rest end'. (author)

  20. Functional radioanatomy of the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikhonov, K.B.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive data on radioanatomy of the heart and main vessels as applied to standard projections are presented. Anatomic structure evolution during heart cycle is described. A current trend towards complex examination of the heart and minor circulation vessels is illustrated, including digital roentgenography, digital subtraction angiography, nmr imaging, computerized tomography, radioisotope examination of the heart and positron emission tomography. Data testifying to essential effect of resperation phase and patient's placement on X-ray picture of the heart and blood flow in the lungs. 291 refs.; 131 figs

  1. Heart transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hospital for 7 to 21 days after a heart transplant. The first 24 to 48 hours will likely be in ... follow your self-care instructions. Biopsies of the heart muscle are ... after transplant, and then less often after that. This helps ...

  2. Intrasellar Symptomatic Salivary Gland Rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic salivary gland tissue in sellar turcica is frequently observed in microscopic examination at autopsy. This tissue is considered clinically silent. Only 2 symptomatic cases have been previously reported. Here we report a 28-year-old woman presenting with galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 6×5-mm nodule in the posterior aspect of the pituitary gland. This nodule showed isointensity on T1- and T2-weighted images and less enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted images. Transsphenoidal exploration revealed a cystic lesion within the pituitary gland, which consisted of a grayish gelatinous content. The pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of salivary gland rest.

  3. Same day injections of Tc-99m methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (hexamibi) for myocardial tomographic imaging: Comparison between rest-stress and stress-rest injection sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taillefer, R.; Gagnon, A.; Laflamme, L.; Leveille, J.; Phaneuf, D.C.

    1989-01-01

    It has been shown that both rest and stress 99m Tc-hexamibi myocardial perfusion imaging can be performed on the same day using two different doses injected within few h (the first one at rest followed by a second at stress). In order to evaluate and compare 2 sequences (rest-stress and stress-rest) of 99m Tc-hexamibi injections performed the same day, 18 patients with either abnormal 201 Tl myocardial scan or abnormal coronary angiography were studied with 2 99m Tc-hexamibi injections protocols. The rest-stress study was performed as follows: 7 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi was injected at rest. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 60 min later. Immediately after the rest study, patients were injected at peak stress with 25 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi. Tomographic imaging was repeated 1 h later. Patients were submitted to the stress-rest protocol within 3 days. Tomographic imaging was done 1 h after a 7 mCi injection at stress. This study was followed by an injection of 25 mCi 99m Tc-hexamibi at rest, a tomographic study was performed 60 min later. Myocardial sections were reconstructed in horizontal long, vertical long, and short axes. Data analysis also included polar map representation. A total of 324 segments were interpreted blind by 3 observers, there was an agreement in 283/324 (87.3%) segments between the 2 protocols. However, 24 segments (7.4%) judged ischemic on rest-stress were called scars on stress-rest. In three patients, myocardial segments were judged normal on the rest image of the rest-stress protocol while they were found abnormal (false positive images) on the stress-rest sequence. Stress images from both protocols were judged similar in 17 patients. In conclusion, when using a short time interval (less than 2 h) between two 99m Tc-hexamibi injections, it is preferable to do a rest-stress sequence since the rest image performed initially represents a true rest study, which is not necessarily the case with the stress-rest sequence

  4. Stress echo for evaluation of valvular heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yavagal, S.T.; Deshpande, Niteen; Admane, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Resting echocardiography is the most important tool for diagnosing valvular heart disease. However, treatment planning in valvular heart diseases may require additional information in some patients, particularly asymptomatic patients with severe valve disease or symptomatic patients with moderate disease. Stress echocardiography provides invaluable information in these situations and aids decision making. Stress echocardiography is performed using either physical stress or dobutamine stress a...

  5. PlanHab study: assessment of psycho-neuroendocrine function in male subjects during 21 d of normobaric hypoxia and bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strewe, C; Zeller, R; Feuerecker, M; Hoerl, M; Kumprej, I; Crispin, A; Johannes, B; Debevec, T; Mekjavic, I; Schelling, G; Choukèr, A

    2017-03-01

    Immobilization and hypoxemia are conditions often seen in patients suffering from severe heart insufficiency or primary pulmonary diseases (e.g. fibrosis, emphysema). In future planned long-duration and exploration class space missions (including habitats on the moon and Mars), healthy individuals will encounter such a combination of reduced physical activity and oxygen tension by way of technical reasons and the reduced gravitational forces. These overall unconventional extraterrestrial conditions can result in yet unknown consequences for the regulation of stress-permissive, psycho-neuroendocrine responses, which warrant appropriate measures in order to mitigate foreseeable risks. The Planetary Habitat Simulation Study (PlanHab) investigated these two space-related conditions: bed rest as model of reduced gravity and normobaric hypoxia, with the aim of examining their influence on psycho-neuroendocrine responses. We hypothesized that both conditions independently increase measures of psychological stress and enhance neuroendocrine markers of stress, and that these effects would be exacerbated by combined treatment. The cross-over study composed of three interventions (NBR, normobaric normoxic horizontal bed rest; HBR, normobaric hypoxic horizontal bed rest; HAMB, normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement) with 14 male subjects during three sequential campaigns separated by 4 months. The psychological state was determined through three questionnaires and principal neuroendocrine responses were evaluated by measuring cortisol in saliva, catecholamine in urine, and endocannabinoids in blood. The results revealed no effects after 3 weeks of normobaric hypoxia on psycho-neuroendocrine responses. Conversely, bed rest induced neuroendocrine alterations that were not influenced by hypoxia.

  6. Long-term L-Triiodothyronine (T3) treatment in stable systolic heart failure patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmager, Pernille; Schmidt, Ulla; Mark, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic heart failure (HF) is characterized by reduced serum T3 levels and increased activity of the T3 degrading enzyme deiodinase D3. This may result in an intracellular composition of the cardiomyocyte mimicking that of hypothyroidism. Short-term T3-administration to systolic HF...... during T3-treatment and neither did the neurohormonal profile. There were no side-effects in terms of cardiac arrhythmias and no change in resting heart rate. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not support the hypothesis that oral T3 treatment might be beneficial to patients with chronic, stable systolic HF...... with a modest degree of reduced LVEF and low-normal serum T3 concentrations. The study included both functional studies of heart contractility as well as measures of the neurohormonal activation....

  7. [Heart enlargement in an athlete--a diagnostic challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindermann, W; Janzen, I; Urhausen, A; Schieffer, H J

    1998-02-01

    Endurance training can result in an enlargement of the heart. These athlete's hearts are rarer than generally assumed. Pathological causes, resulting in an eccentric hypertrophy, have to be considered. We report on a 32 year old athlete performing approximately 10 hours of endurance training weekly. He consulted a physician because of a drop in performance. The eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy, diagnosed by means of echocardiography, was not interpreted as a solely physiological cardiac adaptation because the ejection fraction did not increase during exercise (stress-echocardiography), the left ventricular diastolic function (maximum E/A-ratio) was impaired at rest, and the ergometric performance was reduced in comparison to the heart size. The invasive diagnostics including myocardial biopsy demonstrate histologically a focal fibrosis as the result of former myocarditis. The fibrosis was possibly involved in the genesis of the eccentric hypertrophy based on structural dilatation through a preferably mesenchymal lesion. It remains open whether the long-term endurance training had forced the dilatation. This case demonstrates that pathological causes must be excluded if in athletes an enlarged heart does not concur together with a clearly increased ergometric performance. Stress-echocardiography and endomyocardial biopsy can considerably contribute to the differential diagnosis between physiological and pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

  8. Resting state brain networks in the prairie vole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Juan J; Portillo, Wendy; Paredes, Raul G; Young, Larry J; Alcauter, Sarael

    2018-01-19

    Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) has shown the hierarchical organization of the human brain into large-scale complex networks, referred as resting state networks. This technique has turned into a promising translational research tool after the finding of similar resting state networks in non-human primates, rodents and other animal models of great value for neuroscience. Here, we demonstrate and characterize the presence of resting states networks in Microtus ochrogaster, the prairie vole, an extraordinary animal model to study complex human-like social behavior, with potential implications for the research of normal social development, addiction and neuropsychiatric disorders. Independent component analysis of rsfMRI data from isoflurane-anestethized prairie voles resulted in cortical and subcortical networks, including primary motor and sensory networks, but also included putative salience and default mode networks. We further discuss how future research could help to close the gap between the properties of the large scale functional organization and the underlying neurobiology of several aspects of social cognition. These results contribute to the evidence of preserved resting state brain networks across species and provide the foundations to explore the use of rsfMRI in the prairie vole for basic and translational research.

  9. Resting state networks and memory consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, Neil B.; Robertson, Edwin M.; Mehta, Puja; Miall, R. Chris

    2009-01-01

    Despite their name, resting state networks (RSNs) provide a clear indication that the human brain may be hard-working. Unlike the cardiac and respiratory systems, which greatly reduce their rate of function during periods of inactivity, the human brain may have additional responsibilities during rest. One particularly intriguing function performed by the resting brain is the consolidation of recent learned information, which is known to take place over a period of several hours after learning...

  10. The resting human brain and motor learning

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, Neil B.; Robertson, Edwin M.; Miall, R. Chris

    2009-01-01

    Summary Functionally related brain networks are engaged even in the absence of an overt behavior. The role of this resting state activity, evident as low-frequency fluctuations of BOLD (see [1] for review, [2?4]) or electrical [5, 6] signals, is unclear. Two major proposals are that resting state activity supports introspective thought or supports responses to future events [7]. An alternative perspective is that the resting brain actively and selectively processes previous experiences [8]. H...

  11. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heart defibrillator or pacemaker Inner ear (cochlear) implants Kidney disease or dialysis (you may not be able to receive contrast) Recently placed artificial joints Certain types of vascular stents Worked with ...

  12. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain Fatigue Heart attack Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  13. Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... graph show each step of an electrical signal's journey through the heart. EKG The image shows the ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs ...

  14. Heart Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the stories that unite us in a shared journey toward better heart health. Hear from our new ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs ...

  15. About Heart Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Heart Attacks Updated:Jan 11,2018 A heart attack is ... coronary artery damage leads to a heart attack . Heart Attack Questions and Answers What is a heart attack? ...

  16. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Types of Heart Failure Updated:May 8,2017 Left-sided heart failure ... This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure Introduction Types of Heart ...

  17. Lung Disease Including Asthma and Adult Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases Resources Lung Disease including Asthma and Adult Vaccination Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... more about health insurance options. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Heart Disease, ...

  18. Effects of three day bed-rest on circulatory, metabolic and hormonal responses to oral glucose load in endurance trained athletes and untrained subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorawinski, J.; Kubala, P.; Kaciuba-Uociako, H.; Nazar, K.; Titow-Stupnicka, E.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Endurance trained long distance runners and untrained individuals underwent three days of bed rest and oral glucose loading. Before and after bed rest, individuals were given glucose tolerance tests, and their heart rates, blood pressure, blood glucose levels, insulin levels, and catecholamine interactions were measured. Results indicated that glucose tolerance is more affected by bed rest-induced deconditioning in untrained individuals than in trained individuals.

  19. Resting state fMRI: A review on methods in resting state connectivity analysis and resting state networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, K A; Akhil Raja, K; Arun, K M; Rajesh, P G; Thomas, Bejoy; Kapilamoorthy, T R; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan

    2017-08-01

    The inquisitiveness about what happens in the brain has been there since the beginning of humankind. Functional magnetic resonance imaging is a prominent tool which helps in the non-invasive examination, localisation as well as lateralisation of brain functions such as language, memory, etc. In recent years, there is an apparent shift in the focus of neuroscience research to studies dealing with a brain at 'resting state'. Here the spotlight is on the intrinsic activity within the brain, in the absence of any sensory or cognitive stimulus. The analyses of functional brain connectivity in the state of rest have revealed different resting state networks, which depict specific functions and varied spatial topology. However, different statistical methods have been introduced to study resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity, yet producing consistent results. In this article, we introduce the concept of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging in detail, then discuss three most widely used methods for analysis, describe a few of the resting state networks featuring the brain regions, associated cognitive functions and clinical applications of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. This review aims to highlight the utility and importance of studying resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging connectivity, underlining its complementary nature to the task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  20. Ensuring the Right to Rest: City Rest Break Ordinances and Access to Rest Breaks in the Construction Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jennifer; Boggess, Bethany; Timm, Emily

    2017-10-23

    To evaluate the effectiveness of city Rest Break Ordinance (RBO) policies in expanding access to rest at work. We use data from surveys of construction workers in Austin and Dallas, Texas, in 2009, 2012 and 2015 (n = 557) to calculate the odds of receiving a rest break in pre- versus post-RBO Austin and in post-RBO Austin versus pre-RBO Dallas, controlling for demographic and employment characteristics. Construction workers were 35% more likely to report receiving a rest break in Austin post-RBO and 16% less likely in Dallas without a RBO as compared to Austin with a RBO. The increased likelihood of receiving rest breaks at work in a RBO city suggests that, in the absence of enforceable national standards, city-level RBOs can be an important first step to effective prevention of HRIs and heat-related fatalities at work.

  1. Xamoterol in severe congestive heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tangø, M; Lyngborg, K; Mehlsen, J

    1992-01-01

    Twelve patients in severe congestive heart failure were given placebo, 100 mg xamoterol (Corwin) twice daily and 200 mg xamoterol twice daily, respectively, in 3 two-week periods in a double-blind randomised study. At the end of each treatment period the patients were evaluated. No differences were...... found between placebo and xamoterol in the following parameters: New York Heart Association function group index, heart volume, body weight, exercise duration on bicycle and treadmill, heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure at rest. However, during exercise we found significantly lower...... heart rate and rate-pressure product during xamoterol treatment. This reduction is probably indicating occupation of beta-adrenoreceptors with concomitant reduced oxygen consumption during exercise....

  2. Feasibility Study of a Lunar Analog Bed Rest Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.; Platts, Steven H.; Yarbough, Patrice; Buccello-Stout, Regina

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a 9.5deg head-up tilt bed rest model to simulate the effects of the 1/6 g load to the human body that exists on the lunar surface. The lunar analog bed rest model utilized a modified hospital bed. The modifications included mounting the mattress on a sled that rolled on bearings to provide freedom of movement. The weight of the sled was off-loaded using a counterweight system to insure that 1/6 body weight was applied along the long axis (z-axis) of the body. Force was verified through use of a force plate mounted at the foot of the bed. A seating assembly was added to the bed to permit periods of sitting. Subjects alternated between standing and sitting positions throughout the day. A total of 35% of the day was spent in the standing position and 65% was spent sitting. In an effort to achieve physiologic fluid shifts expected for a 1/6 G environment, subjects wore compression stockings and performed unloaded foot and ankle exercises. Eight subjects (3 females and 5 males) participated in this study. Subjects spent 13 days in the pre-bed rest phase, 6 days in bed rest and 3 days post bed rest. Subjects consumed a standardized diet throughout the study. To determine feasibility, measures of subject comfort, force and plasma volume were collected. Subject comfort was assessed using a Likert scale. Subjects were asked to assess level of comfort (0-100) for 11 body regions and provide an overall rating. Results indicated minimal to no discomfort as most subjects reported scores of zero. Force measures were performed for each standing position and were validated against subject s calculated 1/6 body weight (r(sup 2) = 0.993). The carbon monoxide rebreathing technique was used to assess plasma volume during pre-bed rest and on the last day of bed rest. Plasma volume results indicated a significant decrease (p = 0.001) from pre to post bed rest values. Subjects lost on average 8.3% (sd = 6.1%) during the

  3. The heart and the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Dümcke, Christine Winkler; Krag, Aleksander

    2009-01-01

    to secure perfusion of vital organs. In patients with advanced cirrhosis, physical and/or pharmacological stress may reveal a reduced cardiac performance with systolic and diastolic dysfunction and electrophysical abnormalities, termed cirrhotic cardiomyopathy. Pathophysiological mechanisms include reduced......Cardiac failure affects the liver and liver dysfunction affects the heart. Chronic and acute heart failure can lead to cardiac cirrhosis and cardiogenic ischemic hepatitis. These conditions may impair liver function and treatment should be directed towards the primary heart disease and seek...

  4. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy

  5. Music and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Cognitive Rest: An Integrated Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kathleen H.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive rest has been suggested as a treatment for school athletes who have sustained a concussion, but the concept has rarely been defined. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive definition of cognitive rest, based on an integrative literature review. The method of synthesis was guided by Avant and Walker's concept analysis…

  7. The cause of ischaemic nocturnal rest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Bülow, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1988-01-01

    of symptomatology. In two limbs, with a normal peripheral circulation, blood flow decreased by 8 +/- 7%. In five limbs with arterial insufficiency, but no rest pain, blood flow decreased by 16 +/- 8% and in eight limbs with ischaemic nocturnal rest pain blood flow was reduced by 32 +/- 12% during sleep...

  8. Heart rates and swim speeds of emperor penguins diving under sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooyman, G L; Ponganis, P J; Castellini, M A; Ponganis, E P; Ponganis, K V; Thorson, P H; Eckert, S A; LeMaho, Y

    1992-04-01

    Heart rate during overnight rest and while diving were recorded from five emperor penguins with a microprocessor-controlled submersible recorder. Heart rate, cardiac output and stroke volume were also measured in two resting emperor penguins using standard electrocardiography and thermodilution measurements. Swim velocities from eight birds were obtained with the submersible recorder. The resting average of the mean heart rates was 72 beats min-1. Diving heart rates were about 15% lower than resting rates. Cardiac outputs of 1.9-2.9 ml kg-1 s-1 and stroke volumes of 1.6-2.7 ml kg-1 were similar to values recorded from mammals of the same body mass. Swim velocities averaged 3 m s-1. The swim speeds and heart rates suggest that muscle O2 depletion must occur frequently: therefore, many dives require a significant energy contribution from anaerobic glycolysis.

  9. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest as a Spaceflight Analogue on Resting State Sensorimotor Network Functional Connectivity and Neurocognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassady, K.; Koppelmans, V.; Yuan, P.; Cooke, K.; De Dios, Y.; Stepanyan, V.; Szecsy, D.; Gadd, N.; Wood, S.; Reuter-Lorenz, P.; hide

    2015-01-01

    pre bed rest to the last day in bed rest. In contrast, connectivity within the default mode network remained stable over the course of bed rest. We also utilized a battery of behavioral measures including spatial working memory tasks and measures of functional mobility and balance. These behavioral measurements were collected before, during, and after bed rest. We will report the preliminary findings of correlations observed between brain functional connectivity and behavioral performance changes. Our results suggest that sensorimotor brain networks exhibit decoupling with extended periods of reduced usage. The findings from this study could aid in the understanding and future design of targeted countermeasures to alleviate the detrimental health and neurocognitive effects of long-duration spaceflight.

  10. The Correlation of Adiponectin, and Visfatin Serum Levels With Ischemic Heart Disease in Postmenopausal women: A population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Darabi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a controversial evidence about adiponectin role in cardiovascular diseases and visfatin role has been suggested in pathogenesis of coronary artery disease. Material and Methods: A total of 378 postmenopausal women were randomly selected from 13 clusters in Bushehr Port. The prevalence of ischemic heart disease was assessed by using the Minnesota Code with a 12-lead resting electrocardiogram (EKG. Serum adiponectin and visfatin levels were measured by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods Results: A total of 159 patients (41.8 percent were suffering from ischemic heart disease. There was no significant difference between women with ischemic heart disease and healthy postmenopausal women in adiponectin serum level. However, diabetic women with ischemic heart disease, compared with healthy postmenopausal women had a higher level of visfatin (Geometric Mean: 3.05±1.84 ng/ml versus 2.52±1.90 ng/ml, respectively; p=0.023. Multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that higher serum levels of visfatin were significantly associated with a higher prevalence of ischemic heart disease after adjusting for potential confounders, including classical cardiovascular risk factors and circulating hs-CRP levels [odds ratio=3.26, confidence interval (1.14-9.68, p=0.027]. Conclusion: Adiponectin was not correlated with ischemic heart disease among postmenopausal women. But visfatin serum level correlated with ischemic heart disease in postmenopausal non-diabetic women independently from cardiovascular risk factors.

  11. Chemotherapy Side Effects: A Cause of Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A cause of heart disease? Can chemotherapy side effects increase the risk of heart disease? Answers from Timothy J. Moynihan, M.D. Chemotherapy side effects may increase the risk of heart disease, including ...

  12. Left ventricular deformation at rest predicts exercise-induced elevation in pulmonary artery wedge pressure in patients with unexplained dyspnoea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Santos, Mário; Rivero, Jose

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Impaired left ventricular (LV) deformation despite preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF) is common and predicts outcomes in heart failure with preserved LVEF. We hypothesized that impaired LV deformation at rest is a marker of impaired cardiac systolic and diastolic reserve, and aimed...... referred for evaluation of dyspnoea. All patients underwent rest echocardiography followed by right heart catheterization and cardiopulmonary exercise testing with concomitant invasive haemodynamic monitoring. The LS, CS and CS/LS ratio were measured by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography...

  13. Effects of Different Types of 3D Rest Frames on Reducing Cybersickness in a Virtual Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KyungHun Han

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A virtual environment (VE presents several kinds of sensory stimuli for creating a virtual reality. Some sensory stimuli presented in the VE have been reported to provoke cybersickness, which is caused by conflicts between sensory stimuli, especially conflicts between visual and vestibular sensations. Application of a rest frame has been known to be effective on reducing cybersickness by alleviating sensory conflict. The form and the way rest frames are presented in 3D VEs have different effects on reducing cybersickness. In this study, two different types of 3D rest frames were created. For verifying the rest frames' effects in reducing cybersickness, twenty subjects were exposed to two different rest frame conditions and a non-rest frame condition after an interval of three days in 3D VE. We observed the characteristic changes in the physiology of cybersickness in terms of autonomic regulation. Psychophysiological signals including EEG, EGG, and HRV were recorded and a simulator sickness questionnaire (SSQ was used for measuring the intensity of the sickness before and after the exposure to the different conditions. In the results, the SSQ was reduced significantly in the rest frame conditions. Psychophysiological responses changed significantly in the rest frame conditions compared to the non-rest frame condition. The results suggest that the rest frame conditions have condition-specific effects on reducing cybersickness by differentially alleviating aspects of visual and vestibular sensory conflicts in 3D VE.

  14. Maternal heart rate changes during labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söhnchen, N; Melzer, K; Tejada, B Martinez de; Jastrow-Meyer, N; Othenin-Girard, V; Irion, O; Boulvain, M; Kayser, B

    2011-10-01

    Labour and delivery represent a considerable effort for pregnant women. Lack of aerobic fitness may limit pushing efforts during childbirth and represents increased cardiovascular strain and risk. Increasing prevalence of sedentary behaviour and lack of aerobic fitness may reduce heart rate reserve during labour. We quantified maternal heart rate reserve (maximum heart rate minus resting heart rate) of 30 healthy pregnant women during labour and delivery and related it to habitual daily physical activity levels quantified during the third pregnancy trimester by the Pregnancy Physical Activity Questionnaire. Heart rates during labour reached values similar to those observed during moderate to heavy physical exercise. During active pushing one out of five women reached heart rates more than 90% of their heart rate reserve (188 ± 7 beats per min). Half of the women reached more than 70% of heart rate reserve (172 ± 14 beats per min). Physically inactive women used more of their heart rate reserve as physically more active women (87 ± 20% vs. 65 ± 12%, upper and lower tertile respectively, plabour is increased in physically inactive women and may potentially limit the intensity and duration of pushing efforts. Such higher cardiovascular strain in physically less active women may represent increased cardiovascular risk during labour. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Grape Juice: Same Heart Benefits as Wine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... juice offer the same heart benefits as red wine? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L.D. ... some of the same heart benefits of red wine, including: Reducing the risk of blood clots Reducing ...

  16. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worse. Heart-healthy lifestyle changes include: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for a healthy weight Managing stress Physical activity Quitting smoking Many lifestyle habits begin during childhood. Thus, parents and families should ...

  17. Smokeless tobacco, sport and the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagué, Frédéric; Guenancia, Charles; Gudjoncik, Aurélie; Moreau, Daniel; Cottin, Yves; Zeller, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Smokeless tobacco (snuff) is a finely ground or shredded tobacco that is sniffed through the nose or placed between the cheek and gum. Chewing tobacco is used by putting a wad of tobacco inside the cheek. Smokeless tobacco is widely used by young athletes to enhance performance because nicotine improves some aspects of physiology. However, smokeless tobacco has harmful health effects, including cardiovascular disorders, linked to nicotine physiological effects, mainly through catecholamine release. Nicotine decreases heart rate variability and the ventricular fibrillation threshold, and promotes the occurrence of various arrhythmias; it also impairs endothelial-dependent vasodilation and could therefore promote premature atherogenesis. At rest, heart rate, blood pressure, inotropism, cardiac output and myocardial oxygen consumption are increased by nicotine, leading to an imbalance between myocardial oxygen demand and supply. The same occurs at submaximal levels of exercise. These increases are accompanied by a rise in systemic resistances. At maximal exercise, heart rate, cardiac output and maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max) are unaffected by nicotine. Because endothelial dysfunction is promoted by nicotine, paradoxical coronary vasoconstriction may occur during exercise and recovery. Nicotine induces a decrease in muscular strength and impairs anaerobic performance. However, nicotine is used in sports as it diminishes anxiety, enhances concentration and agility, improves aerobic performance and favours weight control. Importantly, smokeless tobacco, similar to cigarette smoking, leads to nicotine dependence through dopaminergic pathways. Smokeless tobacco has harmful cardiovascular effects and is addictive: it fulfils all the criteria for inclusion in the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list as a doping product. Smokeless tobacco use in sporting activities must be discouraged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. A REST-ful interpretation for embedded modular systems based on open architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyke, James

    2016-05-01

    The much-anticipated revolution of the "Internet of things" (IoT) is expected to generate one trillion internet devices within the next 15 years, mostly in the form of simple wireless sensor devices. While this revolution promises to transform silicon markets and drive a number of disruptive changes in society, it is also the case that the protocols, complexity, and security issues of extremely large dynamic, co-mingled networks is still poorly understood. Furthermore, embedded system developers, to include military and aerospace users, have largely ignored the potential (good and bound) of the cloudlike, possibly intermingling networks having variable structure to how future systems might be engineered. In this paper, we consider a new interpretation of IoT inspired modular architecture strategies involving the representational state transfer (REST) model, in which dynamic networks with variable structure employ stateless application programming interface (API) concepts. The power of the method, which extends concepts originally developed for space plug-and-play avionics, is that it allows for the fluid co-mingling of hardware and software in networks whose structure can overlap and evolve. Paradoxically, these systems may have the most stringent determinism and fault-tolerant needs. In this paper we review how RESTful APIs can potentially be used to design, create, test, and deploy systems rapidly while addressing security and referential integrity even when the nodes of many systems might physically co-mingle. We will also explore ways to take advantage of the RESTful paradigm for fault tolerance and what extensions might be necessary to deal with high-performance and determinism.

  19. The use of heart rate turbulence and heart rate variability in the assessment of autonomic regulation and circadian rhythm in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without apparent heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poliwczak, A R; Waszczykowska, E; Dziankowska-Bartkowiak, B; Koziróg, M; Dworniak, K

    2018-03-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus is a progressive autoimmune disease. There are reports suggesting that patients even without overt signs of cardiovascular complications have impaired autonomic function. The aim of this study was to assess autonomic function using heart rate turbulence and heart rate variability parameters indicated in 24-hour ECG Holter monitoring. Methods Twenty-six women with systemic lupus erythematosus and 30 healthy women were included. Twenty-four hour ambulatory ECG-Holter was performed in home conditions. The basic parameters of heart rate turbulence and heart rate variability were calculated. The analyses were performed for the entire day and separately for daytime activity and night time rest. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the basic anthropometric parameters. The mean duration of disease was 11.52 ± 7.42. There was a statistically significant higher turbulence onset (To) value in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, median To = -0.17% (minimum -1.47, maximum 3.0) versus To = -1.36% (minimum -4.53, maximum -0.41), P lupus erythematosus group than in the healthy controls, including SDANN and r-MSSD and p50NN. Concerning the morning activity and night resting periods, the results were similar as for the whole day. In the control group, higher values in morning activity were noted for parameters that characterise sympathetic activity, especially SDANN, and were significantly lower for parasympathetic parameters, including r-MSSD and p50NN, which prevailed at night. There were no statistically significant changes for systemic lupus erythematosus patients for p50NN and low and very low frequency. There was a positive correlation between disease duration and SDNN, R = 0.417; P < 0.05 and SDANN, R = 0.464; P < 0.05, a negative correlation between low/high frequency ratio and r-MSSD, R = -0.454; P < 0.05; p50NN, R = -0.435; P < 0.05 and high frequency

  20. [The artificial heart. Current experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisance, D; Deleuze, P

    1989-06-01

    Various assistance or replacement systems, usually including pneumatic pumps, are now used in human medicine to treat irreversible shocks. These systems are still very far from the ideal artificial heart, but they enable the ventricular work to be partially or totally achieved for a limited length of time, thus ensuring the patient's survival pending heart transplantation. The two systems most frequently used nowadays, i.e. orthotopic ventricular prosthesis or "internal artificial heart" and ventricular shunt or "external artificial heart" are described. The clinical experience available provides a first evaluation of the true performance of these systems.

  1. Vitamin D and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall Brinkley, D; Ali, Omair M; Zalawadiya, Sandip K; Wang, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    Vitamin D is principally known for its role in calcium homeostasis, but preclinical studies implicate multiple pathways through which vitamin D may affect cardiovascular function and influence risk for heart failure. Many adults with cardiovascular disease have low vitamin D status, making it a potential therapeutic target. We review the rationale and potential role of vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and treatment of chronic heart failure. Substantial observational evidence has associated low vitamin D status with the risk of heart failure, ventricular remodeling, and clinical outcomes in heart failure, including mortality. However, trials assessing the influence of vitamin D supplementation on surrogate markers and clinical outcomes in heart failure have generally been small and inconclusive. There are insufficient data to recommend routine assessment or supplementation of vitamin D for the prevention or treatment of chronic heart failure. Prospective trials powered for clinical outcomes are warranted.

  2. [Heart failure in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Otmar; Buser, Peter; Brunner-La Rocca, Hanspeter

    2011-02-01

    The prevalence of heart failure substantially increases with advancing age. Nevertheless, heart failure in the elderly is commonly under-diagnosed, because dyspnoea and fatigue are often attributed to the natural process of aging. Age-related alterations of the cardiovascular system and the presence of multiple comorbidities not only change the clinical features of heart failure, but also have an impact on heart failure treatment in this population. Cautious uptitration of the individual drugs and vigorous clinical and laboratory monitoring is mandatory to avoid undesired side effects. Although guideline-recommended heart failure therapy is derived from trials that included mainly middle-aged patients with few comorbidities, it has proven beneficial even in the very elderly. Today, guideline-recommended heart failure therapy is still too often withheld from elderly patients out of fear of potential side effects.

  3. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  4. Evaluating the normal individual cardiac function in different imaging phases post exercise and rest by gated SPECT myocardial perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua, W.; Li, S.J.; Liu, J.Z.; Li, X.F.; Jin, C.R.; Hu, G.; Wang, J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Objectives: To evaluate the normal individual cardiac function in the different imaging phases post-exercise and rest by GSPECT. Methods: 46 normal individuals underwent exercise/rest GSPECT using 99mTc-MIBI by 2- day program. Sequential imaging was started 15, 35 and 120 minutes after exercise and rest imaging was performed the following day. The left ventricular EF and EDV, ESV values were calculated with the Cedars-Sinai program. Results: The EF values of post- exercise at 15, 35, and 120m was 64.48±7.43%, 65.02±7.66%, and 60.98±7.28% respectively, and the rest EF value was 61.46±7.23%. The post exercise EF at 15m and 35m was higher than EF at post- exercise 120m and rest, but there is a significant difference only between post exercise 35m and rest (P< 0.05), and all post exercise EF did not increase at least 5% from EF at-rest. The EDV and ESV values did not have statistically significant differences at 15, 35,120m post-exercise and rest. The heart rate at 15,35m post- exercise was higher significantly than at rest. Conclusions: The different imaging phases after exercise with 99mTc-MIBI GSPECT affects LVEF in normal individuals, the 35m post- exercise EF is highest. (author)

  5. Heart failure in children - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestive heart failure - children; Cor pulmonale - children; Cardiomyopathy - children; CHF - children; Congenital heart defect - heart failure in children; Cyanotic heart disease - heart failure in children; Birth ...

  6. Prevalence of coronary heart disease in Scotland: Scottish Heart Health Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, W C; Kenicer, M B; Tunstall-Pedoe, H; Clark, E C; Crombie, I K

    1990-01-01

    Data from 10,359 men and women aged 40-59 years from 22 districts in the Scottish Heart Health Study were used to describe the prevalence rates of coronary heart disease in Scotland in 1984-1986 and their relation to the geographical variation in mortality in these districts. Prevalence was measured by previous history, Rose chest pain questionnaire, and the Minnesota code of a 12 lead resting electrocardiogram. The prevalence of coronary heart disease in Scotland was high compared with studi...

  7. Effects of Rest-Break Intention on Rest-Break Frequency and Work-Related Fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasche, Gerhard; Pasalic, Sanja; Bauböck, Verena-Maria; Haluza, Daniela; Schoberberger, Rudolf

    2017-03-01

    The present paper presents findings from two studies addressing the effects of the employee's intention to have rest breaks on rest-break frequency and the change of well-being during a workday. Rest breaks are effective in avoiding an accumulation of fatigue during work. However, little is known about individual differences in rest-break behavior. In Study 1, the association between rest-break intention and the daily number of rest breaks recorded over 4 consecutive workdays was determined by generalized linear model in a sample of employees ( n = 111, 59% females). In Study 2, professional geriatric nurses ( n = 95 females) who worked over two consecutive 12-hour day shifts recorded well-being (fatigue, distress, effort motivation) at the beginning and the end of their shifts. The effect of rest-break intention on the change of well-being was determined by multilevel modeling. Rest-break intention was positively associated with the frequency of rest breaks (Study 1) and reduced the increase of fatigue and distress over the workday (Study 2). The results indicate that individual differences account for the number of breaks an employee takes and, as a consequence, for variations in the work-related fatigue and distress. Strengthening rest-break intentions may help to increase rest-break behavior to avoid the buildup of fatigue and distress over a workday.

  8. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure, tightness, pain, or a squeezing or aching sensation in your chest or arms that may spread to your neck, jaw or back Nausea, indigestion, heartburn or abdominal pain Shortness of breath Cold sweat Fatigue Lightheadedness or sudden dizziness Heart attack ...

  9. Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may need to have a pacemaker. Rarely, the tricuspid valve can become damaged by the endomyocardial biopsy procedure; if that happens it will need to be repaired or replaced. Patients with congenital heart disease who have had a coarctation repair or problems ...

  10. Discovery of novel heart rate-associated loci using the Exome Chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Berg, Marten E; Warren, Helen R; Cabrera, Claudia P

    2017-01-01

    long-range regulatory chromatin interactions in heart tissue (SCD, SLF2 and MAPK8). We observed significant enrichment in DNase I hypersensitive sites in fetal heart and lung. Moreover, enrichment was seen for the first time in human neuronal progenitor cells (derived from embryonic stem cells......Resting heart rate is a heritable trait, and an increase in heart rate is associated with increased mortality risk. Genome-wide association study analyses have found loci associated with resting heart rate, at the time of our study these loci explained 0.9% of the variation. This study aims...... to discover new genetic loci associated with heart rate from Exome Chip meta-analyses.Heart rate was measured from either elecrtrocardiograms or pulse recordings. We meta-analysed heart rate association results from 104 452 European-ancestry individuals from 30 cohorts, genotyped using the Exome Chip. Twenty...

  11. Relationship between cardiac function and resting cerebral blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Otto M; Jensen, Lars T; Krabbe, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Although both impaired cardiac function and reduced cerebral blood flow are associated with ageing, current knowledge of the influence of cardiac function on resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of cardiac function on CBF. CBF......) and 2.4 l min(-1) m(-2), respectively, in females. No effects of cardiac output or cardiac index on CBF or structural signs of brain ageing were observed. However, fractional brain flow defined as the ratio of total brain flow to cardiac output was inversely correlated with cardiac index (r(2) = 0.22, P...... = 0.008) and furthermore lower in males than in females (8.6% versus 12.5%, P = 0.003). Fractional brain flow was also inversely correlated with cerebral white matter lesion grade, although this effect was not significant when adjusted for age. Frequency analysis of heart rate variability showed...

  12. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents ... the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) and Allison ...

  13. Employment after heart transplantation among adults with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumin, Dmitry; Chou, Helen; Hayes, Don; Tobias, Joseph D; Galantowicz, Mark; McConnell, Patrick I

    2017-12-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease may require heart transplantation for end-stage heart failure. Whereas heart transplantation potentially allows adults with congenital heart disease to resume their usual activities, employment outcomes in this population are unknown. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence and predictors of work participation after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease. Retrospective review of a prospective registry. United Network for Organ Sharing registry of transplant recipients in the United States. Adult recipients of first-time heart transplantation with a primary diagnosis of congenital heart disease, performed between 2004 and 2015. None. Employment status reported by transplant centers at required follow-up intervals up to 5 y posttransplant. Among 470 patients included in the analysis (mean follow-up: 5 ± 3 y), 127 (27%) worked after transplant, 69 (15%) died before beginning or returning to work, and 274 (58%) survived until censoring, but did not participate in paid work. Multivariable competing-risks regression analysis examined characteristics associated with posttransplant employment, accounting for mortality as a competing outcome. In descriptive and multivariable analysis, pretransplant work participation was associated with a greater likelihood of posttransplant employment, while the use of Medicaid insurance at the time of transplant was associated with a significantly lower likelihood of working after transplant (subhazard ratio compared to private insurance: 0.55; 95% confidence interval: 0.32, 0.95; P = .032). Employment was rare after heart transplantation for congenital heart disease, and was significantly less common than in the broader population of adults with congenital heart disease. Differences in return to work were primarily related to pretransplant employment and the use of public insurance, rather than clinical characteristics. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Reduced intrinsic heart rate is associated with reduced arrhythmic susceptibility in guinea-pig heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-12-01

    In the clinical setting, patients with slower resting heart rate are less prone to cardiovascular death compared with those with elevated heart rate. However, electrophysiological adaptations associated with reduced cardiac rhythm have not been thoroughly explored. In this study, relationships between intrinsic heart rate and arrhythmic susceptibility were examined by assessments of action potential duration (APD) rate adaptation and inducibility of repolarization alternans in sinoatrial node (SAN)-driven and atrioventricular (AV)-blocked guinea-pig hearts perfused with Langendorff apparatus. Electrocardiograms, epicardial monophasic action potentials, and effective refractory periods (ERP) were assessed in normokalemic and hypokalemic conditions. Slower basal heart rate in AV-blocked hearts was associated with prolonged ventricular repolarization during spontaneous beating, and with attenuated APD shortening at increased cardiac activation rates during dynamic pacing, when compared with SAN-driven hearts. During hypokalemic perfusion, the inducibility of repolarization alternans and tachyarrhythmia by rapid pacing was found to be lower in AV-blocked hearts. This difference was ascribed to prolonged ERP in the setting of reduced basal heart rate, which prevented ventricular capture at critically short pacing intervals required to induce arrhythmia. Reduced basal heart rate is associated with electrophysiological changes that prevent electrical instability upon an abrupt cardiac acceleration.

  15. Association between uncoupling protein 2, adiponectin and resting energy expenditure in obese women with normal and low resting energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghadomi Masoumi, Zahra; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Hedayati, Mahdi; Pishva, Hamideh

    2018-02-01

    Obesity is recognized as the most prevalent metabolic disease worldwide. Decreases in energy expenditure may increase risk of obesity. One of the key regulators of energy balance is uncoupling protein2 (UCP2), a transporter protein presents in mitochondrial inner membrane. Moreover, adiponectin is the most abundant adipocytokine, it may play a role in energy metabolism and gene expression of UCP2. The aim of this study was to investigate potential associations between the level of uncoupling protein 2 and adiponectin and their relationship with REE (Resting Energy Expenditure) in obese women with normal and low resting energy expenditure. A total of 49 subjects (women, 25-50 years old), were included in current study, 16 subjects with BMI > 30 and low resting energy expenditure, 17 subjects with BMI > 30 and normal resting energy expenditure and 16 non-obese subjects as a control group. Anthropometric, body composition parameters and resting energy expenditure were measured. Plasma adiponectin, UCP2 protein and total protein in PBMC were determined. Measured resting energy expenditure in obese subjects with low REE was significantly lower than other groups. Plasma adiponectin in the obese subjects with low REE was significantly lower compared to normal weight group. There was a significant relationship between 'UCP2 protein/Total protein' ratio and plasma adiponectin in obese group with low REE and in three groups when we pooled. There was a significant association between REE and plasma adiponectin in three groups when we pooled. There was a significant association between plasma adiponectin and REE. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between UCP2 and REE.

  16. Be Still My Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Betsy; Ball, Rhonda

    This project description is designed to show how graphing calculators and calculator-based laboratories (CBLs) can be used to explore topics in physics and health sciences. The activities address such topics as respiration, heart rate, and the circulatory system. Teaching notes and calculator instructions are included as are blackline masters. (MM)

  17. Rest and exercise ventricular function in adults with congenital ventricular septal defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jablonsky, G.; Hilton, J.D.; Liu, P.P.; Morch, J.E.; Druck, M.N.; Bar-Shlomo, B.Z.; McLaughlin, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    Rest and exercise right and left ventricular function were compared using equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography in 19 normal sedentary control subjects and 34 patients with hemodynamically documented congenital ventricular septal defect (VSD). Gated radionuclide angiography was performed at rest and during each level of graded supine bicycle exercise to fatigue. Heart rate, blood pressure, maximal work load achieved, and right and left ventricular ejection fractions were assessed. The control subjects demonstrated an increase in both the left and right ventricular ejection fractions with exercise. All study groups failed to demonstrate an increase in ejection fraction in either ventricle with exercise. Furthermore, resting left ventricular ejection fraction in Groups 2 and 3 was lower than that in the control subjects and resting right ventricular ejection fraction was lower in Group 3 versus control subjects. Thus left and right ventricular function on exercise were abnormal in patients with residual VSD as compared with control subjects; rest and exercise left ventricular ejection fractions remained abnormal despite surgical closure of VSD in the remote past; resting left and right ventricular function was abnormal in patients with Eisenmenger's complex; lifelong volume overload may be detrimental to myocardial function

  18. Rest and exercise ventricular function in adults with congenital ventricular septal defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jablonsky, G.; Hilton, J.D.; Liu, P.P.; Morch, J.E.; Druck, M.N.; Bar-Shlomo, B.Z.; McLaughlin, P.R.

    1983-01-15

    Rest and exercise right and left ventricular function were compared using equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography in 19 normal sedentary control subjects and 34 patients with hemodynamically documented congenital ventricular septal defect (VSD). Gated radionuclide angiography was performed at rest and during each level of graded supine bicycle exercise to fatigue. Heart rate, blood pressure, maximal work load achieved, and right and left ventricular ejection fractions were assessed. The control subjects demonstrated an increase in both the left and right ventricular ejection fractions with exercise. All study groups failed to demonstrate an increase in ejection fraction in either ventricle with exercise. Furthermore, resting left ventricular ejection fraction in Groups 2 and 3 was lower than that in the control subjects and resting right ventricular ejection fraction was lower in Group 3 versus control subjects. Thus left and right ventricular function on exercise were abnormal in patients with residual VSD as compared with control subjects; rest and exercise left ventricular ejection fractions remained abnormal despite surgical closure of VSD in the remote past; resting left and right ventricular function was abnormal in patients with Eisenmenger's complex; lifelong volume overload may be detrimental to myocardial function.

  19. Epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine during a 4-day head-down bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pequignot, J M; Guell, A; Gauquelin, G; Jarsaillon, E; Annat, G; Bes, A; Peyrin, L; Gharib, C

    1985-01-01

    Head-down bed rest at an angle of 6 degrees was used as an experimental model to simulate the hemodynamic effects of microgravity, i.e., the shift of fluids from the lower to the upper part of the body. The sympathoadrenal activity during acute (from 0.5 to 10 h) and prolonged (4 days) head-down bed rest was assessed in eight healthy men (24 +/- 1 yr) by measuring epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and methoxylated metabolite levels in their plasma and urine. Catecholamine (CA) and methoxyamine levels were essentially unaltered at any time of bed rest. Maximal changes in plasma were on the second day (D2): NE, 547 +/- 84 vs. 384 +/- 55 pg/ml; DA, 192 +/- 32 vs. 141 +/- 16 pg/ml; NS. After 24 h of bed rest, heart rate decreased from 71 +/- 1 to 63 +/- 3/min (P less than 0.01). Daily dynamic leg exercise [50% maximum O2 uptake (VO2 max)] used as a countermeasure did not alter the pattern of plasma CA during bed rest but resulted in a higher urinary NE excretion during postexercise recovery (+45% on D2; P less than 0.05). The data indicate no evident relationship between sympathoadrenal function and stimulation of cardiopulmonary receptors or neuroendocrine changes induced by central hypervolemia during head-down bed rest.

  20. Regulation of β-adrenergic control of heart rate by GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) and tetrahydrobiopterin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlam, David; Herring, Neil; Douglas, Gillian; De Bono, Joseph P.; Li, Dan; Danson, Edward J.; Tatham, Amy; Lu, Cheih-Ju; Jennings, Katie A.; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Casadei, Barbara; Paterson, David J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Clinical markers of cardiac autonomic function, such as heart rate and response to exercise, are important predictors of cardiovascular risk. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for enzymes with roles in cardiac autonomic function, including tyrosine hydroxylase and nitric oxide synthase. Synthesis of BH4 is regulated by GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), encoded by GCH1. Recent clinical studies report associations between GCH1 variants and increased heart rate, but the mechanistic importance of GCH1 and BH4 in autonomic function remains unclear. We investigate the effect of BH4 deficiency on the autonomic regulation of heart rate in the hph-1 mouse model of BH4 deficiency. Methods and results In the hph-1 mouse, reduced cardiac GCH1 expression, GTPCH enzymatic activity, and BH4 were associated with increased resting heart rate; blood pressure was not different. Exercise training decreased resting heart rate, but hph-1 mice retained a relative tachycardia. Vagal nerve stimulation in vitro induced bradycardia equally in hph-1 and wild-type mice both before and after exercise training. Direct atrial responses to carbamylcholine were equal. In contrast, propranolol treatment normalized the resting tachycardia in vivo. Stellate ganglion stimulation and isoproterenol but not forskolin application in vitro induced a greater tachycardic response in hph-1 mice. β1-adrenoceptor protein was increased as was the cAMP response to isoproterenol stimulation. Conclusion Reduced GCH1 expression and BH4 deficiency cause tachycardia through enhanced β-adrenergic sensitivity, with no effect on vagal function. GCH1 expression and BH4 are novel determinants of cardiac autonomic regulation that may have important roles in cardiovascular pathophysiology. PMID:22241166

  1. Heart Transplantation in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hae-Young; Oh, Byung-Hee

    2017-04-25

    Heart transplantation (HTx) is the effective way to improve quality of life as well as survival in terminal heart failure (HF) patients. Since the first heart transplant in 1968 in Japan and in earnest in 1987 at Taiwan, HTx has been continuously increasing in Asia. Although the current percentage of heart transplants from Asia comprises only 5.7% of cases in the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) registry, the values were under-reported and soon will be greatly increased. HTx in Asia shows comparable with or even better results compared with ISHLT registry data. Several endemic infections, including type B hepatitis, tuberculosis, and cytomegalovirus, are unique aspects of HTx in Asia, and need special attention in transplant care. Although cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is considered as a leading cause of death after HTx globally, multiple observations suggest less prevalence and benign nature of CAV among Asian populations. Although there are many obstacles such as religion, social taboo or legal process, Asian countries will keep overcoming obstacles and broaden the field of HTx.

  2. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle becomes ...

  3. What Is Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... which could relieve angina. Heart Valve Repair or Replacement For the heart to work well, blood must ... have blood flowing through it. Heart-Lung Bypass Machine The image shows how a heart-lung bypass ...

  4. Getting a New Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a procedure that opens clogged arteries. Repair the heart valve . This procedure can often make your heart function ... heart muscle. Ventricular assist devices (VAD) . These are mechanical pumps that surgeons insert to help the heart ...

  5. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... Ginther RM, Forbess JM. Pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass. In: ... Care . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2017:chap 37. LeRoy S, ...

  6. Coronary heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... more calcium, the higher your chance for CHD. Exercise stress test . Heart CT scan . Nuclear stress test .

  7. Elegants ja eklektika - Rest Art / Lylian Meister

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Meister, Lylian, 1966-

    2007-01-01

    Tallinnas Mustika keskuses asuvas sisustussalongis Rest Art pakutavast. Asjade müümise kõrval pakutakse kodudele ja hotellidele-restoranidele terviklahendusi. Salongi kujundas Kard Männil. 4 värv. vaadet

  8. Effects Of Exercise During Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Bernauer, Edmund M.

    1993-01-01

    Pair of reports adds to growing body of knowledge of physical deconditioning caused by prolonged bed rest and effectiveness of various exercise regimens in preserving or restoring fitness. Major objective to determine what regimens to prescribe to astronauts before flight, during prolonged weightlessness, and immediately before returning to Earth. Knowledge also benefits patients confined by illness or injury. First report discusses experiment on effects of two types of periodic, intense, short-duration exercise during bed rest. Experiment also discussed in documents "Effects Of Exercise During Prolonged Bed Rest" (ARC-12190), and "Isotonic And Isokinetic Exercise During Bed Rest" (ARC-12180). Second report reviews knowledge acquired with view toward development of protocols for exercise regimens.

  9. USAJOBS Job Opportunity Announcements (JOA) REST API

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — This REST-based API is designed to support lightweight Federal Job Opportunity Announcement (JOA) content consumption by consumers. It is anticipated that this API...

  10. RESTful Java patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Bhakti

    2014-01-01

    This book is aimed at novice developers who want to gain insights into building RESTful services and improve productivity, as well as for advanced developers who want to delve into more complicated topics.

  11. Brief wakeful resting can eliminate directed forgetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Andreas; Bäuml, Karl-Heinz T

    2017-02-01

    When cued to intentionally forget previously encoded memories, participants typically show reduced recall of the memories on a later recall test. We examined how such directed forgetting is affected by a brief period of wakeful resting between encoding and test. Encoding was followed by a "passive" wakeful resting period in which subjects heard emotionally neutral music or perceived neutral pictures, or it was followed by an "active" distraction period in which subjects were engaged in counting or calculation tasks. Whereas typical directed forgetting was present after active distraction, the forgetting was absent after wakeful resting. The findings indicate that the degree to which people can intentionally forget memories is influenced by the cognitive activity that people engage in shortly after learning takes place. The results provide first evidence on the interplay between wakeful resting and intentional forgetting.

  12. Partnership strategies for safety roadside rest areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    This project studied the many factors influencing the potential for public private partnerships for Safety : Roadside Rest Areas. It found that Federal and California State laws and regulations represent important : barriers to certain types and loca...

  13. Airline Chair-rest Deconditioning: Induction of Immobilization Thromboemboli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Rehrer, N. J.; Mohler, S. R.; Quach, D. T.; Evans, D. G.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Air passenger miles will likely double by year 2020. The altered and restrictive environment in an airliner cabin can influence hematological homeostasis in passengers and crew. Flight-related deep various thromboemboli (DVT) have been associated with at least 577 deaths on 42 of 120 airlines from 1977 to 1984 (25 deaths/million departures), whereas many such cases go unreported. However, there are four major factors that could influence formation of possible flight-induced DVT: sleeping accomodations (via sitting immobilization), travelers' medical history (via tissue injury), cabin environmental factors (via lower partial pressure of oxygen and lower relative humidity), and the more encompassing chair-rest deconditioning (C-RD) syndrome. There is ample evidence that recent injury and surgery (especially in deconditioned hospitalized patients) facilitate thrombophlebitis and formation of DVT that may be exacerbated by the immobilization of prolonged air travel. In the healthy flying population immobilization factors associated with prolonged (> 5 hr) C-RID such as total body dehydration, hypovolemia and increased blood viscosity, and reduced various blood flow (pooling) in the legs may facilitate formation of DVT. However, data from at least four case-controlled epidemiological studies did not confirm a direct causative relationship between air travel and DART, but factors such as history of vascular thromboemboli, various insufficiency, chronic heart failure, obesity, immobile standing position, more than 3 pregnancies, infectious disease, long-distance travel, muscular trauma and violent physical effort were significantly more frequent in DVT patients than in controls. Thus, there is no clear, direct evidence yet that prolonged sitting in airliner seats, or prolonged experimental chair-rest- or bed- rest-deconditioning treatments cause deep various thromboemboli in healthy people.

  14. Airline chair-rest deconditioning: induction of immobilisation thromboemboli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.; Rehrer, Nancy J.; Mohler, Stanley R.; Quach, David T.; Evans, David G.

    2004-01-01

    Air passenger miles will likely double by year 2020. The altered and restrictive environment in an airliner cabin can influence haematological homeostasis in passengers and crew. Flight-related deep venous thromboemboli (DVT) have been associated with at least 577 deaths on 42 of 120 airlines from 1977 to 1984 (25 deaths/million departures), whereas many such cases go unreported. However, there are four major factors that could influence formation of possible flight-induced DVT: sleeping accommodations (via sitting immobilisation); travellers' medical history (via tissue injury); cabin environmental factors (via lower partial pressure of oxygen and lower relative humidity); and the more encompassing chair-rest deconditioning (C-RD) syndrome. There is ample evidence that recent injury and surgery (especially in deconditioned hospitalised patients) facilitate thrombophlebitis and formation of DVT that may be exacerbated by the immobilisation of prolonged air travel.In the healthy flying population, immobilisation factors associated with prolonged (>5 hours) C-RD such as total body dehydration, hypovolaemia and increased blood viscosity, and reduced venous blood flow (pooling) in the legs may facilitate formation of DVT. However, data from at least four case-controlled epidemiological studies did not confirm a direct causative relationship between air travel and DVT, but factors such as a history of vascular thromboemboli, venous insufficiency, chronic heart failure, obesity, immobile standing position, more than three pregnancies, infectious disease, long-distance travel, muscular trauma and violent physical effort were significantly more frequent in DVT patients than in controls. Thus, there is no clear, direct evidence yet that prolonged sitting in airliner seats, or prolonged experimental chair-rest or bed-rest deconditioning treatments cause DVT in healthy people.

  15. Cognitive function at rest and during exercise following breakfast omission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Takaaki; Sudo, Mizuki; Okuda, Naoki; Yasuno, Tetsuhiko; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Higaki, Yasuki; Ando, Soichi

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that breakfast omission, as opposed to breakfast consumption, has the detrimental effects on cognitive function. However, the effects of acute exercise following breakfast omission on cognitive function are poorly understood, particularly during exercise. The purpose of this study was to examine the interactive effects of breakfast and exercise on cognitive function. Ten participants completed cognitive tasks at rest and during exercise in the breakfast consumption or omission conditions. Blood glucose concentration was measured immediately after each cognitive task. We used cognitive tasks to assess working memory [Spatial Delayed Response (DR) task] and executive function [Go/No-Go (GNG) task]. The participants cycled ergometer for 30 min while keeping their heart rate at 140 beats·min(-1). Accuracy of the GNG task was lower at rest in the breakfast omission condition than that in the breakfast consumption condition (Go trial: P=0.012; No-Go trial: P=0.028). However, exercise improved accuracy of the Go trial in the breakfast omission condition (P=0.013). Reaction time in the Go trial decreased during exercise relative to rest in both conditions (P=0.002), and the degree of decreases in reaction time was not different between conditions (P=0.448). Exercise and breakfast did not affect the accuracy of the Spatial DR task. The present results indicate that breakfast omission impairs executive function, but acute exercise improved executive function even after breakfast omission. It appears that beneficial effects of acute exercise on cognitive function are intact following breakfast omission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Echocardiographic assessment of right heart function in heart transplant recipients and the relation to exercise hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmensen, Tor Skibsted; Eiskjaer, Hans; Løgstrup, Brian Bridal; Andersen, Mads Jønsson; Mellemkjaer, Søren; Poulsen, Steen Hvitfeldt

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to characterize right heart function in heart transplantation (HTx) patients using advanced echocardiographic assessment and simultaneous right heart catheterization (RHC). Comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic assessment of right heart function was performed in 105 subjects (64 stable HTx patients and 41 healthy controls). RHC was performed at rest and during semi-supine maximal exercise test. Compared with controls, in conclusion, HTx patients had impaired right ventricle (RV) systolic function in terms of decreased RV-free wall (FW) global longitudinal strain (GLS) (-20 ± 5% vs. -28 ± 5%, P exercise capacity (r = 0.58, P routine right heart function evaluation after HTx. Invasively assessed RV systolic reserve was strongly associated with exercise capacity. © 2016 Steunstichting ESOT.

  17. A Comparison of Tandem Walk Performance Between Bed Rest Subjects and Astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chris; Peters, Brian; Kofman, Igor; Philips, Tiffany; Batson, Crystal; Cerisano, Jody; Fisher, Elizabeth; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Feiveson, Alan; Reschke, Millard; hide

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts experience a microgravity environment during spaceflight, which results in a central reinterpretation of both vestibular and body axial-loading information by the sensorimotor system. Subjects in bed rest studies lie at 6deg head-down in strict bed rest to simulate the fluid shift and gravity-unloading of the microgravity environment. However, bed rest subjects still sense gravity in the vestibular organs. Therefore, bed rest isolates the axial-unloading component, thus allowing for the direct study of its effects. The Tandem Walk is a standard sensorimotor test of dynamic postural stability. In a previous abstract, we compared performance on a Tandem Walk test between bed rest control subjects, and short- and long-duration astronauts both before and after flight/bed rest using a composite index of performance, called the Tandem Walk Parameter (TWP), that takes into account speed, accuracy, and balance control. This new study extends the previous data set to include bed rest subjects who performed exercise countermeasures. The purpose of this study was to compare performance during the Tandem Walk test between bed rest subjects (with and without exercise), short-duration (Space Shuttle) crewmembers, and long-duration International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers at various time points during their recovery from bed rest or spaceflight.

  18. MATLAB Toolboxes for Reference Electrode Standardization Technique (REST) of Scalp EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Li; Li, Fali; Liu, Qiang; Wen, Xin; Lai, Yongxiu; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    Reference electrode standardization technique (REST) has been increasingly acknowledged and applied as a re-reference technique to transform an actual multi-channels recordings to approximately zero reference ones in electroencephalography/event-related potentials (EEG/ERPs) community around the world in recent years. However, a more easy-to-use toolbox for re-referencing scalp EEG data to zero reference is still lacking. Here, we have therefore developed two open-source MATLAB toolboxes for REST of scalp EEG. One version of REST is closely integrated into EEGLAB, which is a popular MATLAB toolbox for processing the EEG data; and another is a batch version to make it more convenient and efficient for experienced users. Both of them are designed to provide an easy-to-use for novice researchers and flexibility for experienced researchers. All versions of the REST toolboxes can be freely downloaded at http://www.neuro.uestc.edu.cn/rest/Down.html, and the detailed information including publications, comments and documents on REST can also be found from this website. An example of usage is given with comparative results of REST and average reference. We hope these user-friendly REST toolboxes could make the relatively novel technique of REST easier to study, especially for applications in various EEG studies.

  19. Effects of Yoga on Heart Rate Variability and Mood in Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, I-Hua; Lin, Yuh-Jen; Wu, Wen-Lan; Chang, Yu-Kai; Lin, I-Mei

    2015-12-01

    To examine the effects of an 8-week yoga program on heart rate variability and mood in generally healthy women. Randomized controlled trial. Fifty-two healthy women were randomly assigned to a yoga group or a control group. Participants in the yoga group completed an 8-week yoga program, which comprised a 60-minute session twice a week. Each session consisted of breathing exercises, yoga pose practice, and supine meditation/relaxation. The control group was instructed not to engage in any yoga practice and to maintain their usual level of physical activity during the study. Participants' heart rate variability, perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and state and trait anxiety were assessed at baseline (week 0) and after the intervention (week 9). No measures of heart rate variability changed significantly in either the yoga or control group after intervention. State anxiety was reduced significantly in the yoga group but not in the control group. No significant changes were noted in perceived stress, depression, or trait anxiety in either group. An 8-week yoga program was not sufficient to improve heart rate variability. However, such a program appears to be effective in reducing state anxiety in generally healthy women. Future research should involve longer periods of yoga training, include heart rate variability measures both at rest and during yoga practice, and enroll women with higher levels of stress and trait anxiety.

  20. Experimental evaluation of the influence of various rests on task performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagasaka, Akihiko; Hirose, Ayako [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-01-01

    This report deals with the result of the experiment that 8 subjects had executed adding task and search task. They executed each task in 80 minutes under 5 conditions: (1) with no rest, and with 4 kinds of 20 minutes rests, in which they (2) opened eyes, (3) closed eyes, (4) closed eyes with listening classic music and (5) closed eyes with feet massage, in the middle of the task. The results of analysis of variance with the task performance in the latter half, there were significant differences between each condition with every subject in adding task, and with 6 subjects in search task. However, the orders of the task performance with each condition were not the same by each subject. It was suggested that transition of the arousal levels under the rest was related to the effects of the rest rather than the subjects' taste in rests. In the rest, the percentage of {alpha} wave of electroencephalogram and the coefficient of variation of R-R interval (time interval of heart beats) were increased than in executing task. The mean Kendall's rank correlation of coefficient with the order of increase rate of {alpha}/{beta} wave and the task performance in the latter half was slightly negative in adding task, but was about 0.4 in search task. From these results, about six requirements for 'an effective rest' were able to be mentioned, for example, 'the devices that raises the arousal levels is carried out just before a rest end'. (author)

  1. Controle autonômico da frequência cardíaca de pacientes com doenças cardiorrespiratórias crônicas e indivíduos saudáveis em repouso e durante a manobra de acentuação da arritmia sinusal respiratória Autonomic control of heart rate in patients with chronic cardiorespiratory disease and in healthy participants at rest and during a respiratory sinus arrhythmia maneuver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel S. Reis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a modulação autonômica da frequência cardíaca (FC em repouso, na postura supina e durante a manobra de acentuação da arritmia sinusal respiratória (M-ASR de pacientes com doença pulmonar obstrutiva crônica (DPOC ou com insuficiência cardíaca crônica (ICC. MÉTODOS: Vinte e oito homens foram subdivididos em três grupos: 10 com DPOC (GD e 69±9 anos; 9 com ICC (GI e 62±8 anos; e 9 saudáveis (GC com 64±5 anos. Em repouso, os intervalos R-R a partir do sinal eletrocardiográfico foram obtidos nas seguintes situações: 1 15 minutos na posição supina e 2 4 minutos durante M-ASR na posição supina. Os dados foram analisados nos domínios do tempo (índices RMSSD e SDNN e da frequência. Durante M-ASR, foram calculadas a razão expiração/inspiração (E/I e a diferença inspiração/expiração (∆IE. RESULTADOS: Os principais achados mostraram que os pacientes com ICC apresentaram menores valores de RMSSD (12,2±2,6 vs 20,4±6,5, BFab (99,2±72,7 vs 305,3±208,9 e AFun (53,4±29,9 vs 178,9±113,1 quando comparados ao controle. Além disso, a banda de BFab foi significantemente reduzida no grupo DPOC quando comparado ao controle (133,8±145,5 vs 305,3±208,9. Adicionalmente, pacientes com ICC e DPOC mostraram menor razão E/I (1,1±0,06 vs 1,2±0,1 e 1,1±0,03 vs 1,2±0,1 e ∆IE (7,0±3,5 vs 12,7±0,1 e 4,9±1,6 vs 12,7±0,1, respectivamente, comparados ao GC durante a M-ASR. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados deste estudo sugerem que tanto a DPOC como a ICC produzem impacto negativo sobre o controle autonômico da FC. Artigo registrado no Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR sob o número: ACTRN12609000467235OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the autonomic modulation of heart rate (HR at rest in the supine position and during a respiratory sinus arrhythmia maneuver (M-RSA among participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD or with chronic heart failure (CHF. METHODS: Twenty-eight men were divided

  2. Lung uptake of thallium-201 on resting myocardial imaging in assessment of pulmonary edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamaki, N.; Yonekura, Y.; Yamamoto, K. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Hospital)

    1981-03-01

    We have noted increased lung uptake of thallium-201 on resting myocardial images in patients with congestive heart failure. To evaluate this phenomenon, lung uptake of thallium on resting myocardial imaging was examined in 328 patients with various cardiovascular diseases. Increased lung uptake was observed in 117 cases (78%) with myocardial infarction, 32 (37%) with angina pectoris, 6 (27%) with hypertensive heart disease, 7 (30%) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 6 (100%) with congestive cardiomyopathy, 11 (100%) with valvular heart disease, and 7 (71%) with congenital heart disease, however, only one (5%) of normal subjects revealed increased uptake. Left ventricular ejection fraction was evaluated in 32 cases with ischemic heart disease on the same day and it was significantly decreased as the lung uptake of thallium increased. Increased thallium activity in the lung seemed to be another noninvasive marker of lift heart failure in ischemic heart disease. Lung uptake of thallium was compared with pulmonary congestive signs on chest X-ray in 29 cases. The uptake was well correlated with the degree of pulmonary edema, and thallium myocardial image revealed remarkably increased lung uptake in all the patients accompanied with pulmonary interstitial edema on chest X-ray. Therefore, this phenomenon will demonstrate pulmonary edema, since thallium may be extracted to the increased interstitial distribution space of the lung as well as the myocardium in a patient with pulmonary edema. We conclude that thallium myocardial scintigraphy is useful not only in identification and localization of myocardial ischemia or infarction, but also in evaluation of pulmonary edema at the same time.

  3. Lung uptake of thallium-201 on resting myocardial imaging in assessment of pulmonary edema

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, Nagara; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Yamamoto, Kazutaka

    1981-01-01

    We have noted increased lung uptake of thallium-201 on resting myocardial images in patients with congestive heart failure. To evaluate this phenomenon, lung uptake of thallium on resting myocardial imaging was examined in 328 patients with various cardiovascular diseases. Increased lung uptake was observed in 117 cases (78%) with myocardial infarction, 32 (37%) with angina pectoris, 6 (27%) with hypertensive heart disease, 7 (30%) with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 6 (100%) with congestive cardiomyopathy, 11 (100%) with valvular heart disease, and 7 (71%) with congenital heart disease, however, only one (5%) of normal subjects revealed increased uptake. Left ventricular ejection fraction was evaluated in 32 cases with ischemic heart disease on the same day and it was significantly decreased as the lung uptake of thallium increased. Increased thallium activity in the lung seemed to be another noninvasive marker of lift heart failure in ischemic heart disease. Lung uptake of thallium was compared with pulmonary congestive signs on chest X-ray in 29 cases. The uptake was well correlated with the degree of pulmonary edema, and thallium myocardial image revealed remarkably increased lung uptake in all the patients accompanied with pulmonary interstitial edema on chest X-ray. Therefore, this phenomenon will demonstrate pulmonary edema, since thallium may be extracted to the increased interstitial distribution space of the lung as well as the myocardium in a patient with pulmonary edema. We conclude that thallium myocardial scintigraphy is useful not only in identification and localization of myocardial ischemia or infarction, but also in evaluation of pulmonary edema at the same time. (author)

  4. Asymmetrically thickened posterior wall is associated with decline of ejection fraction after stress on adenosine stress/rest thallium-201 gated myocardial SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bom Sahn; Lee, Won Woo; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul; Kim, Sang Eun [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    LV parameters (LVEF. ESVI and EDVI) on adenosine stress/rest thallium-201 gated myocardial SPECT (gSPECT) are various from stress to rest. We investigated the reason why they were various in patients without coronary artery disease. Seventy-one patients(M:F=32:39, age 58.1{+-}9.7yrs), who underwent gSPECT and coronary angiography (CAG) due to chest pain or preoperative evaluation were included. CAG results were normal or insignificant. Exclusion criteria were atrial fibrillation, thyroid disease, primary cardiomyopathy, myocardial bridge, LBBB, MI, and valvular heart disease. Patients were calssified into 3 groups by EF difference ({delta}EF=rest-stress EF) on gSPECT : group1 ({delta}EF{>=}10), group2 (0 {<=}{delta}EF<10), and group3 ({delta}EF<0). LV parameters on gSPECT and thicknesses of IVS (interventricular septum) and LVPW (left ventricular posterior wall) on echocardiography were compared among the 3 groups. Myocardial perfusion status were normal or mild reversible/persistent perfusion defect in 76.1% (54/71). LVEFs at stress were not different among all 3 groups : 59.3{+-}8.54% in group 1 (61.3{+-}10.22% in group 2 and 64.8{+-}7.58% in group 3 (p>0.05). But LVEF at rest was smaller in group 3 (58.7{+-}8.38%) than the other groups (72.5{+-}8.77% in group1 and 66.7{+-}10.6% in group2) (p<0.01). EDVIs and ESVI at stress were larger than those at rest in all groups (p<0.05) except ESVI in group 3 (16.2{+-}6.21ml at stress and 17.5{+-}6.41ml at rest, p<0.01), and that was attributed to EF<0 in group 3. In echocardiographical analysis, group 3 had significantly increased wall thickness of LVPW (10.7{+-}1.2mm versus 9.4{+-}1.6mm, p=0.01) and decreased wall thickness ratio of IVS/LVPW (0.963{+-}0.102 versus 1.048{+-}0.104, p=0.035) than group 1. In patients without coronary artery disease, LVEF, EDVI and ESVI on gSPECT were various and decline of LVEF from stress to rest was caused by unnormalized ESVI . Asymmetrically thickened LVPW may play a crucial role and

  5. Metabolic, cardiovascular, and perceptual responses to a thermogenic nutritional supplement at rest, during exercise, and recovery in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergstrom, Haley C; Housh, Terry J; Traylor, Daniel A; Lewis, Robert W; Cochrane, Kristen C; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O; Housh, Dona J; Cramer, Joel T

    2014-08-01

    Twenty-one men (mean ± SD; age = 23.5 ± 2.6 years, BMI = 26.0 ± 2.4 kg-1·m-2) completed this randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, crossover study to examine acute responses to a thermogenic nutritional supplement. Each testing session included: (a) 30 minutes resting, followed by placebo or thermogenic nutritional supplementation, (b) 50 minutes postsupplementation resting, (c) 60 minutes walking, and (d) 50 minutes postexercise recovery. Gas exchange variables and heart rate (HR) were recorded during each phase. Blood pressure was recorded during all phases except exercise. Ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded only during exercise. There were no significant differences for any of the measures between the supplement and placebo during the initial resting or postsupplementation phases. During exercise, energy expenditure (EE) (placebo = 18.98-19.06 kJ·min-1 and supplement = 19.44-19.82 kJ·min-1) and VO2 (placebo = 11.27-11.35 ml·kg-1·min-1; supplement = 11.64-11.82 ml·kg-1·min-1) were greater for the supplement than placebo. There were no differences in respiratory exchange ratio (RER), HR, or RPE between the supplement and placebo during exercise. Postexercise, only VO2 (placebo = 3.53-3.63 ml·kg-1·min-1; supplement = 3.71-3.84 ml·kg-1·min-1) was greater for the supplement than placebo, but there were no differences in EE, RER, HR, or blood pressure. These findings suggested that the specific blend of ingredients in the thermogenic nutritional supplement, when combined with exercise, increased the metabolic rate with minimal changes in cardiovascular function and no effect on RPE.

  6. Influence of Different Work and Rest Distributions on Performance and Fatigue During Simulated Team Handball Match Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Samantha L; Twist, Craig

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of different interchange strategies on performance and pacing strategy during a simulated team-sport protocol. Eight youth male team handball players completed 2 conditions (LONG-work: 3 × 13:00 minutes, rest: 8:00 minutes; SHORT-work: 5 × 7:48 minutes, rest: 3:45 minutes). Participants were tested for 20-m sprint, countermovement jump, throwing performance, and heart rate (HR) during conditions. Postcondition measures included repeated shuttle-sprint and jump ability, session rating of perceived exertion, blood lactate, and glucose. Faster sprint (3.87 ± 0.27 seconds cf. 3.97 ± 0.24 seconds, effect size [ES] = 0.39, p = 0.03) and throwing performance (70.02 ± 7.40 km·h(-1) cf. 69.04 ± 5.57 km·h(-1), p > 0.05, ES = -0.15) occurred in SHORT compared with LONG by a "likely small" difference. Higher summated HR (157 ± 21 cf. 150 ± 15 AU) occurred in SHORT compared with LONG by a "likely small" difference (ES = 0.37, p > 0.05). SHORT resulted in lower session rating of perceived exertion (224 ± 45 AU cf. 282 ± 35 AU, ES = 1.45, p = 0.001) and higher blood glucose (6.06 ± 0.69 mmol·l(-1) cf. 4.98 ± 1.10 mmol·l(-1), ES = -1.17, p = 0.03) by a "most likely moderate" difference compared with LONG. Repeated shuttle sprint was better preserved after SHORT, with "moderately lower" 10 and 25 m times (p ≤ 0.05). Interchange strategies using SHORT rather than LONG work and rest periods result in lower physiological load, leading to improved fatigue resistance and better preservation of high-intensity movements during matches.

  7. Resting site use of giant pandas in Wanglang Nature Reserve

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Dongwei; Wang, Xiaorong; Li, Junqing

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the resting sites used by the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), which restricts our understanding of their resting habits and limits conservation efforts. To enhance our understanding of resting site requirements and factors affecting the resting time of giant pandas, we investigated the characteristics of resting sites in the Wanglang Nature Reserve, Sichuan Province, China. The results indicated that the resting sites of giant pandas were characterised by a mean sl...

  8. Stress Impact on Resting State Brain Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, José Miguel; Sampaio, Adriana; Ferreira, Luís Miguel; Santos, Nadine Correia; Marques, Paulo; Marques, Fernanda; Palha, Joana Almeida; Cerqueira, João José; Sousa, Nuno

    2013-01-01

    Resting state brain networks (RSNs) are spatially distributed large-scale networks, evidenced by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. Importantly, RSNs are implicated in several relevant brain functions and present abnormal functional patterns in many neuropsychiatric disorders, for which stress exposure is an established risk factor. Yet, so far, little is known about the effect of stress in the architecture of RSNs, both in resting state conditions or during shift to task performance. Herein we assessed the architecture of the RSNs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a cohort of participants exposed to prolonged stress (participants that had just finished their long period of preparation for the medical residence selection exam), and respective gender- and age-matched controls (medical students under normal academic activities). Analysis focused on the pattern of activity in resting state conditions and after deactivation. A volumetric estimation of the RSNs was also performed. Data shows that stressed participants displayed greater activation of the default mode (DMN), dorsal attention (DAN), ventral attention (VAN), sensorimotor (SMN), and primary visual (VN) networks than controls. Importantly, stressed participants also evidenced impairments in the deactivation of resting state-networks when compared to controls. These functional changes are paralleled by a constriction of the DMN that is in line with the pattern of brain atrophy observed after stress exposure. These results reveal that stress impacts on activation-deactivation pattern of RSNs, a finding that may underlie stress-induced changes in several dimensions of brain activity.

  9. Serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT2A) gene promoter variant interacts with chronic perceived stress to modulate resting parasympathetic activity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chuan-Chia; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chang, Hsin-An; Chang, Tieh-Ching; Shyu, Jia-Fwa; Huang, San-Yuan

    2017-02-01

    Decreased resting vagal (parasympathetic) tone is implicated in the development of stress-related disorders, including anxiety and depression. Chronic stress elevates the expression of serotonin 2A receptors (5-HT2A), while activation of 5-HT2A leads to inhibition of parasympathetic synaptic transmission. The T allele of the promoter variant, rs6311 (C>T), of the 5-HT2A gene has been shown to increase the 5-HT2A expression in vitro and to be associated with anxiety and depressive disorders. We thus hypothesized that the 5-HT2A functional polymorphism may influence resting vagal activity among persons with chronically high levels of perceived stress. A total of 1138 well-defined healthy, medication-free Han Chinese were included for 5-HT2A genotyping. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was used to measure the level of perceived stress during the last month and participants were divided into low and high PSS groups. Resting-state heart rate variability (HRV) was used to assess autonomic function. No significant between-genotype difference was found in any HRV variable in the low PSS group (n=610). However, in the high PSS group (n=528), high frequency power and root mean square of successive heartbeat interval differences (both HRV indices of parasympathetic activity) were significantly reduced in T/T genotype carriers compared to C/C homozygotes. Our findings are the first to show that individuals homozygous for the high-expressing 5-HT2A (T) allele exhibit diminished resting vagal tone-an index of stress vulnerability-when experiencing chronically elevated levels of perceived stress. The present results may advance our understanding of the genetic mechanism underlying individual differences in susceptibility to stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomarkers in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, Aditi; Januzzi, James L

    2015-06-01

    The care of patients with acutely decompensated heart failure is being reshaped by the availability and understanding of several novel and emerging heart failure biomarkers. The gold standard biomarkers in heart failure are B-type natriuretic peptide and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Novel biomarkers that are increasingly involved in the processes of myocardial injury, neurohormonal activation, and ventricular remodeling are showing promise in improving diagnosis and prognosis among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. These include midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide, soluble ST2, galectin-3, highly-sensitive troponin, and midregional proadrenomedullin. There has also been an emergence of biomarkers for evaluation of acute decompensated heart failure that assist in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea, such as procalcitonin (for identification of acute pneumonia), as well as markers that predict complications of acute decompensated heart failure, such as renal injury markers. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology and usefulness of established and emerging biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  12. Unusual presentation of thyrotoxicosis as complete heart block and renal failure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narain Rajay

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Thyrotoxicosis is a clinical entity often very difficult to diagnose without biochemical confirmation as its clinical features can be highly varied. The most common cardiac manifestations of thyrotoxicosis are resting sinus tachycardia, supraventricular tachycardia including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter with or without cardiac failure. Bradycardia and atrio-ventricular conduction defects are very uncommon in thyrotoxicosis. Case presentation We report the case of a 59-year-old Caucasian man presenting with progressive weight loss, abnormal liver function, acute renal failure and complete heart block due to thyrotoxicosis. Conclusion Thyrotoxicosis should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with bradycardia and heart blocks associated with abnormal symptoms like weight loss. Nevertheless, the clinical, electrophysiological and biochemical abnormalities associated with thyrotoxicosis may be completely reversible restoring euthyroid state.

  13. An exploration of heart rate response to differing music rhythm and tempos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Ariany G; Guida, Heraldo L; Antônio, Ana Márcia Dos S; Marcomini, Renata S; Fontes, Anne M G G; Carlos de Abreu, Luiz; Roque, Adriano L; Silva, Sidney B; Raimundo, Rodrigo D; Ferreira, Celso; Valenti, Vitor E

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate acute cardiac response and heart rate variability (HRV) when listening to differing forms of music. Eleven healthy men aged between 18 and 25 years old were included in the study. HRV was recorded at rest for ten minutes with no music, then were asked to listen to classical baroque or heavy metal music for a period of 20 min. It was noted that heart rate variability did not affect HRV indices for time and frequency. In conclusion, music with different tempos does not influence cardiac autonomic regulation in men. However more studies are suggested to explore this topic in greater detail. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exercise countermeasures for bed-rest deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose for this 30-day bed rest study was to investigate the effects of short-term, high intensity isotonic and isokinetic exercise training on maintenance of working capacity (peak oxygen uptake), muscular strength and endurance, and on orthostatic tolerance, posture and gait. Other data were collected on muscle atrophy, bone mineralization and density, endocrine analyses concerning vasoactivity and fluid-electrolyte balance, muscle intermediary metabolism, and on performance and mood of the subjects. It was concluded that: The subjects maintained a relatively stable mood, high morale, and high esprit de corps throughout the study. Performance improved in nearly all tests in almost all the subjects. Isotonic training, as opposed to isokinetic exercise training, was associated more with decreasing levels of psychological tension, concentration, and motivation; and improvement in the quality of sleep. Working capacity (peak oxygen uptake) was maintained during bed rest with isotonic exercise training; it was not maintained with isokinetic or no exercise training. In general, there was no significant decrease in strength or endurance of arm or leg muscles during bed rest, in spite of some reduction in muscle size (atrophy) of some leg muscles. There was no effect of isotonic exercise training on orthostasis, since tilt-table tolerance was reduced similarly in all three groups following bed rest. Bed rest resulted in significant decreases of postural stability and self-selected step length, stride length, and walking velocity, which were not influenced by either exercise training regimen. Most pre-bed rest responses were restored by the fourth day of recovery.

  15. Association Between Resting-State Microstates and Ratings on the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipinis, Evaldas; Melynyte, Sigita; Koenig, Thomas; Jarutyte, Lina; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus; Ruksenas, Osvaldas; Griskova-Bulanova, Inga

    2017-03-01

    There is a gap in understanding on how physiologically observed activity is related to the subjective, internally oriented experience during resting state. Microstate analysis is a frequent approach to evaluate resting-state EEG. But the relationship of commonly observed resting-state microstates to psychological domains of resting is not clear. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ) was recently introduced, offering an effective way to quantify subjective states after a period of resting and associate these quantifiers to psychological and physiological variables. In a sample of 94 healthy volunteers who participated in closed-eyes 5 min resting session with concurrent EEG recording and subsequent filling of the ARSQ we evaluated parameters of microstate Classes A, B, C, D. We showed a moderate negative association between contribution (r = -0.40) of Class C and experienced somatic awareness (SA). The negative correlation between Class C and SA seems reasonable as Class C becomes more dominant when connections to contextual information (and bodily sensations as assessed with SA) are loosened (in reduced attention states, during sleep, hypnosis, or psychosis). We suggest that the use of questionnaires such as the ARSQ is helpful in exploring the variation of resting-state EEG parameters and its relationship to variation in sensory and non-sensory experiences.

  16. Utility of Time and Frequency Domain Parameters of Heart Rate Variability in the Context of Autonomic Disorders Characterized by Orthostatic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jacquie; Racosta, Juan M; Balint, Brittany; Kimpinski, Kurt

    2018-03-01

    The clinical significance of heart rate variability in the context of autonomic dysfunction continues to be a matter of debate. A consensus is lacking on the best heart rate variability measures for clinical purposes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the utility of heart rate variability parameters in healthy versus autonomic dysfunction. Healthy young (n = 134), healthy older (n = 32), and patients with mild (postural tachycardia syndrome; n = 25) and severe (neurogenic orthostatic hypotension; n = 34) autonomic dysfunction were included. Time and frequency parameters during baseline, head-up tilt (HUT), and heart rate response to deep breathing (HRDB) were compared. Cardiovagal time parameters were significantly reduced during HUT in healthy young and postural tachycardia syndrome (P heart rate (HR) (61.4 ± 9.0 bpm vs. 76.8 ± 13.6 bpm; P Heart rate changes corroborated these findings. Resting HR was significantly lower in healthy older (62.6 ± 11.0 bpm vs. 70.7 ± 12.4 bpm), and [INCREMENT]HR during HRDB was significantly higher (15.9 ± 9.2 bpm vs. 3.9 ± 4.2 bpm; P heart rate variability have a greater utility than frequency parameters in clinical autonomic disorders.

  17. REST in practice Hypermedia and systems architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, Jim; Robinson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Why don't typical enterprise projects go as smoothly as projects you develop for the Web? Does the REST architectural style really present a viable alternative for building distributed systems and enterprise-class applications? In this insightful book, three SOA experts provide a down-to-earth explanation of REST and demonstrate how you can develop simple and elegant distributed hypermedia systems by applying the Web's guiding principles to common enterprise computing problems. You'll learn techniques for implementing specific Web technologies and patterns to solve the needs of a typical com

  18. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire reveals multiple phenotypes of resting-state cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Alexander eDiaz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state neuroimaging is a dominant paradigm for studying brain function in health and disease. It is attractive for clinical research because of its simplicity for patients, straightforward standardization, and sensitivity to brain disorders. Importantly, non-sensory experiences like mind wandering may arise from ongoing brain activity. However, little is known about the link between ongoing brain activity and cognition, as phenotypes of resting-state cognition—and tools to quantify them—have been lacking. To facilitate rapid and structured measurements of resting-state cognition we developed a 50-item self-report survey, the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ. Based on ARSQ data from 813 participants assessed after five minutes eyes-closed rest in their home, we identified seven dimensions of resting-state cognition using factor analysis: Discontinuity of Mind, Theory of Mind, Self, Planning, Sleepiness, Comfort, and Somatic Awareness. Further, we showed that the structure of cognition was similar during resting-state fMRI and EEG, and that the test-retest correlations were remarkably high for all dimensions. To explore whether inter-individual variation of resting-state cognition is related to health status, we correlated ARSQ-derived factor scores with psychometric scales measuring depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Mental health correlated positively with Comfort and negatively with Discontinuity of Mind. Finally, we show that sleepiness may partially explain a resting-state EEG profile previously associated with Alzheimer’s disease. These findings indicate that the ARSQ readily provides information about cognitive phenotypes and that it is a promising tool for research on the neural correlates of resting-state cognition in health and disease.

  19. Disentangling Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia in Heart Rate Variability Records

    OpenAIRE

    Topçu, Çağdaş; Frühwirth, Matthias; Moser, Maximilian; Rosenblum, Michael; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2018-01-01

    Different measures of heart rate variability and particularly of respiratory sinus arrhythmia are widely used in research and clinical applications. Inspired by the ideas from the theory of coupled oscillators, we use simultaneous measurements of respiratory and cardiac activity to perform a nonlinear decomposition of the heart rate variability into the respiratory-related component and the rest. We suggest to exploit the technique as a universal preprocessing tool, both for the analysis of r...

  20. Rest and the associated benefits in restorative sleep: a concept analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helvig, Ashley; Wade, Sonya; Hunter-Eades, Lee

    2016-01-01

    To report an analysis of the concept of rest. Consistency in the literature to describe the concept and use of rest is limited. Concept analysis may be advantageous in rendering an operational definition in the health care setting. This analysis is important to examine the concept of rest for structure and function to promote an understanding of the phenomenon. Rest is a vital component of restorative sleep which has implications for physical, mental and spiritual well-being. Concept analysis. A literature search was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, ProQuest and an online Internet search with the majority of articles published between 1995-2015. This concept analysis was implemented using the eight step approach developed by Walker and Avant. In health care, rest incorporates the cessation of activity used to promote physical and mental health. Defining attributes of rest include a pathway to calm, inner tranquillity and mental health; base of support; and stillness. Antecedents for rest are time, suitable environment and willingness. Resulting consequences include renewed physical energy, mental clarity and improved health. Rest is a concept that is used frequently in the discipline of nursing but also in various other disciplines. Rest is a basic necessity for restorative sleep to enhance well-being through the restoration of the body, mind and spirit. Defining the concept of rest in the practice of patient care is necessary for consistent use of the term in the development of holistic, patient-centred therapies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Low heart rate as a risk factor for child and adolescent proactive aggressive and impulsive psychopathic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Adrian; Fung, Annis Lai Chu; Portnoy, Jill; Choy, Olivia; Spring, Victoria L

    2014-01-01

    Although low resting heart rate has been viewed as a well-replicated biological correlate of child and adolescent antisocial behavior, little is known about how it interacts with psychosocial adversity in predisposing to both reactive-proactive aggression and psychopathy, and whether this relationship generalizes to an East Asian population. This study tests the hypothesis that low resting heart rate will be associated with aggression and psychopathic traits, and that heart rate will interact with adversity in predisposing to these antisocial traits. Resting heart rate was assessed in 334 Hong Kong male and female schoolchildren aged 11-17 years. A social adversity index was calculated from a psychosocial interview of the parent, while parents assessed their children on the Reactive-Proactive Aggression Questionnaire and the Antisocial Personality Screening Device. Low resting heart rate was significantly associated with higher proactive aggression, impulsive features of psychopathy, and total child psychopathy. Low resting heart rate interacted with high psychosocial adversity in explaining higher reactive (but not proactive) aggression, as well as impulsive psychopathy. These findings provide support for a biosocial perspective of reactive aggression and impulsive psychopathy, and document low resting heart rate as a robust correlate of both childhood impulsive psychopathic behavior and proactive aggression. To our knowledge, this study is the first to document low resting heart rate as a correlate of child psychopathy and the second to establish low heart rate as a risk factor of antisocial behavior in an East Asian population. The findings provide further evidence for both low resting heart rate as a potential biomarker for childhood psychopathic and aggressive behavior, and also a biosocial perspective on childhood antisocial behavior. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The History of Surgery at the Montreal Heart Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Claude M; Cartier, Raymond; Roy, Denis; Perrault, Louis P

    2016-01-01

    The Montreal Heart Institute (MHI) is a specialty hospital dedicated to cardiology and heart surgery. Founded in 1954 by Paul David, it is currently affiliated with the Université de Montréal. The Montreal Heart Institute is a center that has rested on the shoulders of multiple pioneers over the past 63 years. Renowned for its sustained excellence and commitment to patient care, the MHI also focuses on research and innovation. It has become one of the leading heart institutions in modern cardiac surgery and also one of the busiest cardiac surgery centers in the country. Our leaders have impacted the treatment of patients with heart diseases through clinical care and education. Staff surgeons have been trained at top centers across the world for the benefit of Canadian patients. The MHI was a pioneer in heart transplantation and CABG surgery and focuses on evaluative research of new technology. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - surgery; Congestive heart failure - surgery; Cardiomyopathy - surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure

  4. ACE phenotyping in human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhomirova, Victoria E; Kost, Olga A; Kryukova, Olga V; Golukhova, Elena Z; Bulaeva, Naida I; Zholbaeva, Aigerim Z; Bokeria, Leo A; Garcia, Joe G N; Danilov, Sergei M

    2017-01-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), which metabolizes many peptides and plays a key role in blood pressure regulation and vascular remodeling, is expressed as a type-1 membrane glycoprotein on the surface of different cells, including endothelial cells of the heart. We hypothesized that the local conformation and, therefore, the properties of heart ACE could differ from lung ACE due to different microenvironment in these organs. We performed ACE phenotyping (ACE levels, conformation and kinetic characteristics) in the human heart and compared it with that in the lung. ACE activity in heart tissues was 10-15 lower than that in lung. Various ACE effectors, LMW endogenous ACE inhibitors and HMW ACE-binding partners, were shown to be present in both heart and lung tissues. "Conformational fingerprint" of heart ACE (i.e., the pattern of 17 mAbs binding to different epitopes on the ACE surface) significantly differed from that of lung ACE, which reflects differences in the local conformations of these ACEs, likely controlled by different ACE glycosylation in these organs. Substrate specificity and pH-optima of the heart and lung ACEs also differed. Moreover, even within heart the apparent ACE activities, the local ACE conformations, and the content of ACE inhibitors differ in atria and ventricles. Significant differences in the local conformations and kinetic properties of heart and lung ACEs demonstrate tissue specificity of ACE and provide a structural base for the development of mAbs able to distinguish heart and lung ACEs as a potential blood test for predicting atrial fibrillation risk.

  5. Nocturnal breathing in cyanotic congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legault, Sylvie; Lanfranchi, Paola; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore; Dore, Annie; Khairy, Paul; Marcotte, François; Mercier, Lise-Andrée

    2008-08-18

    Sleep disordered breathing is frequently observed in patients with cardiovascular disease. Even in the absence of heart disease, acute and chronic hypoxia have been shown to promote sleep-related periodic breathing with central apnea characterized by a repetitive reduction or lack of respiratory activity. Cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) is associated with chronic hypoxia, regardless of whether an increase in pulmonary artery pressures coexists. Sleep aggravated hypoxia has been observed in many such patients, but it remains to be determined whether sleep disordered breathing is contributory. We, therefore, sought to assess sleep-related breathing pattern in patients with CCHD. Adults with CCHD, resting arterial oxygen saturation 40% were prospectively enrolled in a cross-sectional study. To assess sleep and respiratory indices, subjects underwent a standardized clinical appraisal that included arterial blood gas analysis and a comprehensive sleep study with an ambulatory device. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) >or=5/h was considered to indicate sleep apnea. Ten adults with CCHD, aged 38+/-11 years, completed the study. Seven patients had elevated pulmonary artery pressures, with a mean systolic pressure of 86.3+/-18.1 mm Hg. All patients demonstrated normal sleep parameters. Oxygen saturation further declined in 5 patients during sleep. However, no associated alteration in respiratory parameters was observed and no significant arrhythmia. The mean AHI was 1.1+/-1.0/h. No subject met the pre-defined criterion for sleep apnea. Although further oxygen desaturation may be observed during sleep in patients with CCHD, it occurs in the absence of sleep disordered breathing.

  6. The Danish Heart Failure Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt, Inge; Nakano, Anne; Egstrup, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the Danish Heart Failure Registry (DHFR) is to monitor and improve the care of patients with incident heart failure (HF) in Denmark. STUDY POPULATION: The DHFR includes inpatients and outpatients (≥18 years) with incident HF. Reporting to the DHFR is mandatory......: The main variables recorded in the DHFR are related to the indicators for quality of care in patients with incident HF: performance of echocardiography, functional capacity (New York Heart Association functional classification), pharmacological therapy (angiotensin converting enzyme/angiotensin II...

  7. A resting bottom sodium cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, D.

    2012-01-01

    This follows ICAPP 2011 paper 11059 'Fast Reactor with a Cold Bottom Vessel', on sodium cooled reactor vessels in thermal gradient, resting on soil. Sodium is frozen on vessel bottom plate, temperature increasing to the top. The vault cover rests on the safety vessel, the core diagrid welded to a toric collector forms a slab, supported by skirts resting on the bottom plate. Intermediate exchangers and pumps, fixed on the cover, plunge on the collector. At the vessel top, a skirt hanging from the cover plunges into sodium, leaving a thin circular slit partially filled by sodium covered by argon, providing leak-tightness and allowing vessel dilatation, as well as a radial relative holding due to sodium inertia. No 'air conditioning' at 400 deg. C is needed as for hanging vessels, and this allows a large economy. The sodium volume below the slab contains isolating refractory elements, stopping a hypothetical corium flow. The small gas volume around the vessel limits any LOCA. The liner cooling system of the concrete safety vessel may contribute to reactor cooling. The cold resting bottom vessel, proposed by the author for many years, could avoid the complete visual inspection required for hanging vessels. However, a double vessel, containing support skirts, would allow introduction of inspecting devices. Stress limiting thermal gradient is obtained by filling secondary sodium in the intermediate space. (authors)

  8. Positive pressure breathing during rest and exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, E.A. den; Heus, R.

    2003-01-01

    The requirements to maintain a positive pressure with respiratory protection during heavy exercise and the effects on ventilation and feelings of discomfort were investigated. Eight male subjects participated, using the respirator system during rest and exercise at about 80% of their individual

  9. [Creep of amalgam fillings under clasp rests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchers, L; Jung, T; West, M

    1989-10-01

    A clinically realistic experiment was set up to obtain information on the amount of vertical settling of clasp rests in amalgam restorations under functional loading. Mesioocclusal cavities were prepared in 16 lower molar specimens cast in brass. The cavities were filled with amalgam and provided with a mesial rest seat. A constant load of 100 N was applied via a simplified (experimental) saddle to a cobalt-chromium E-clasp cast to the saddle. The duration of the load corresponded to 160 days of clinical function. The chronological course of vertical displacement was analyzed mathematically. According to this result the process can be divided into three components: settling immediately upon load initiation (mean value 96 microns, transition creep (mean value 25 microns) and creep ata constant rate (mean value 15 microns). The mean overall vertical displacement of the rests was 136 microns, the maximum value 287 microns. These findings suggest that vertical settling of a clasp rest into its seat in an amalgam restoration may eventually result in significant changes in occlusion and may almost completely exhaust gingival resilience.

  10. Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A 30-day 6 deg. head-down bed rest study was conducted to evaluate high-intensity, short-duration, alternating isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regiments designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (acclimation) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (a) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (b) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40%, but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regiments, and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  11. Pulse pressure as a haemodynamic variable in systolic heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrie, Colin James

    2016-01-01

    In patients with heart failure, the heart is unable to pump enough blood to satisfy the requirements of the body. Explanations for this include heart muscle damage after a heart attack. This could be very recently, or in the past, sometimes dating back many years. In other cases the explanation for

  12. Aging changes in the heart and blood vessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vessels URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004006.htm Aging changes in the heart and blood vessels To ... changes in the heart include deposits of the "aging pigment," lipofuscin . The heart muscle cells degenerate slightly. The valves inside the heart, which ...

  13. There Is More to the Dissection of a Pig's Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2004-01-01

    The dissection of the mammalian heart in secondary biology classes need not be restricted to revealing the internal structure of the heart and its function. It could also be used to demonstrate other important aspects of blood circulation, including the blood supply to the heart itself as well as the causes and effects of coronary heart disease.…

  14. Teaching from the Heart: A Search for Meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Clifford E.

    Ancient cultures believed the heart was the crossing point of passion and intellect, and modern scientists are realizing that the brain, heart, and immune systems are connected. The heart thinks, remembers, communicates, and contains stored information. Metaphors for the heart include sensitivity, compassion, sincerity, courage, respect, and…

  15. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Diuretics for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Rajaa F; Flather, Marcus; Purcell, Henry; Poole-Wilson, Philip A; Coats, Andrew J S

    2012-02-15

    Chronic heart failure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diuretics are regarded as the first-line treatment for patients with congestive heart failure since they provide symptomatic relief. The effects of diuretics on disease progression and survival remain unclear. To assess the harms and benefits of diuretics for chronic heart failure Updated searches were run in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials in The Cochrane Library (CENTRAL Issue 1 of 4, 2011), MEDLINE (1966 to 22 February 2011), EMBASE (1980 to 2011 Week 07) and HERDIN database (1990 to February 2011). We hand searched pertinent journals and reference lists of papers were inspected. We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. No language restrictions were applied. Double-blinded randomised controlled trials of diuretic therapy comparing one diuretic with placebo, or one diuretic with another active agent (e.g. ACE inhibitors, digoxin) in patients with chronic heart failure. Two authors independently abstracted the data and assessed the eligibility and methodological quality of each trial. Extracted data were analysed by determining the odds ratio for dichotomous data, and difference in means for continuous data, of the treated group compared with controls. The likelihood of heterogeneity of the study population was assessed by the Chi-square test. If there was no evidence of statistical heterogeneity and pooling of results was clinically appropriate, a combined estimate was obtained using the fixed-effects model. This update has not identified any new studies for inclusion. The review includes 14 trials (525 participants), 7 were placebo-controlled, and 7 compared diuretics against other agents such as ACE inhibitors or digoxin. We analysed the data for mortality and for worsening heart failure. Mortality data were available in 3 of the placebo-controlled trials (202 participants). Mortality was lower for participants treated with diuretics than for

  17. Stress Impact on Resting State Brain Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Soares

    Full Text Available Resting state brain networks (RSNs are spatially distributed large-scale networks, evidenced by resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies. Importantly, RSNs are implicated in several relevant brain functions and present abnormal functional patterns in many neuropsychiatric disorders, for which stress exposure is an established risk factor. Yet, so far, little is known about the effect of stress in the architecture of RSNs, both in resting state conditions or during shift to task performance. Herein we assessed the architecture of the RSNs using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in a cohort of participants exposed to prolonged stress (participants that had just finished their long period of preparation for the medical residence selection exam, and respective gender- and age-matched controls (medical students under normal academic activities. Analysis focused on the pattern of activity in resting state conditions and after deactivation. A volumetric estimation of the RSNs was also performed. Data shows that stressed participants displayed greater activation of the default mode (DMN, dorsal attention (DAN, ventral attention (VAN, sensorimotor (SMN, and primary visual (VN networks than controls. Importantly, stressed participants also evidenced impairments in the deactivation of resting state-networks when compared to controls. These functional changes are paralleled by a constriction of the DMN that is in line with the pattern of brain atrophy observed after stress exposure. These results reveal that stress impacts on activation-deactivation pattern of RSNs, a finding that may underlie stress-induced changes in several dimensions of brain activity.

  18. Cyanotic heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the aorta Ebstein anomaly Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Tetralogy of Fallot Total anomalous pulmonary venous return Transposition of the ... through the middle Cardiac catheterization Heart, front view Tetralogy of Fallot Clubbing Cyanotic heart disease References Bernstein D. Cyanotic ...

  19. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  20. Congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001114.htm Congenital heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Congenital heart disease (CHD) is a problem with the heart's structure ...

  1. Heart Health Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is easier to treat. Blood tests and heart health tests can help find heart diseases or identify ... diseases. There are several different types of heart health tests. Your doctor will decide which test or ...

  2. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  3. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  4. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  5. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About CDC.gov . Home About Heart Disease Coronary Artery Disease Heart Attack Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms ... Privacy FOIA No Fear Act OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO ( ...

  6. Abnormal functional network connectivity among resting-state networks in children with frontal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widjaja, E; Zamyadi, M; Raybaud, C; Snead, O C; Smith, M L

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is considered a disorder of neural networks. The aims of this study were to assess functional connectivity within resting-state networks and functional network connectivity across resting-state networks by use of resting-state fMRI in children with frontal lobe epilepsy and to relate changes in resting-state networks with neuropsychological function. Fifteen patients with frontal lobe epilepsy and normal MR imaging and 14 healthy control subjects were recruited. Spatial independent component analysis was used to identify the resting-state networks, including frontal, attention, default mode network, sensorimotor, visual, and auditory networks. The Z-maps of resting-state networks were compared between patients and control subjects. The relation between abnormal connectivity and neuropsychological function was assessed. Correlations from all pair-wise combinations of independent components were performed for each group and compared between groups. The frontal network was the only network that showed reduced connectivity in patients relative to control subjects. The remaining 5 networks demonstrated both reduced and increased functional connectivity within resting-state networks in patients. There was a weak association between connectivity in frontal network and executive function (P = .029) and a significant association between sensorimotor network and fine motor function (P = .004). Control subjects had 79 pair-wise independent components that showed significant temporal coherence across all resting-state networks except for default mode network-auditory network. Patients had 66 pairs of independent components that showed significant temporal coherence across all resting-state networks. Group comparison showed reduced functional network connectivity between default mode network-attention, frontal-sensorimotor, and frontal-visual networks and increased functional network connectivity between frontal-attention, default mode network-sensorimotor, and frontal

  7. The effects of rehabilitation on the muscles of the trunk following prolonged bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hides, Julie A; Lambrecht, Gunda; Richardson, Carolyn A; Stanton, Warren R; Armbrecht, Gabriele; Pruett, Casey; Damann, Volker; Felsenberg, Dieter; Belavý, Daniel L

    2011-05-01

    Microgravity and inactivity due to prolonged bed rest have been shown to result in atrophy of spinal extensor muscles such as the multifidus, and either no atrophy or hypertrophy of flexor muscles such as the abdominal group and psoas muscle. These effects are long-lasting after bed rest and the potential effects of rehabilitation are unknown. This two-group intervention study aimed to investigate the effects of two rehabilitation programs on the recovery of lumbo-pelvic musculature following prolonged bed rest. 24 subjects underwent 60 days of head down tilt bed rest as part of the 2nd Berlin BedRest Study (BBR2-2). After bed rest, they underwent one of two exercise programs, trunk flexor and general strength (TFS) training or specific motor control (SMC) training. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbo-pelvic region was conducted at the start and end of bed rest and during the recovery period (14 and 90 days after re-ambulation). Cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of the multifidus, psoas, lumbar erector spinae and quadratus lumborum muscles were measured from L1 to L5. Morphological changes including disc volume, spinal length, lordosis angle and disc height were also measured. Both exercise programs restored the multifidus muscle to pre-bed-rest size, but further increases in psoas muscle size were seen in the TFS group up to 14 days after bed rest. There was no significant difference in the number of low back pain reports for the two rehabilitation groups (p=.59). The TFS program resulted in greater decreases in disc volume and anterior disc height. The SMC training program may be preferable to TFS training after bed rest as it restored the CSA of the multifidus muscle without generating potentially harmful compressive forces through the spine.

  8. Antecedents and outcomes of nurses' rest break organization: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendsche, Johannes; Ghadiri, Argang; Bengsch, Amelie; Wegge, Jürgen

    2017-10-01

    To prevent an accumulation of strain during work and to reduce error risk, many countries have made rest breaks mandatory. In the nursing literature, insufficient rest break organization is often reported. However, the outcomes of nurses' rest break organization and its anteceding factors are less clear. We searched for academic literature on nurses' rest break organization in electronic databases (PubMed, Medline, PsycArticles, PsycINFO, CINAHL). Our search yielded 93 potentially relevant articles published between 01/1990 and 04/2016. The final sample in our scoping review consisted of 36 publications and included data from 35 independent and international study samples and two reviews. Several studies reported a high prevalence of missed, interrupted, or delayed rest breaks in nursing. Nurses' rest breaks often related to better physical and mental well-being but did not affect motivational outcomes and performance systematically. Results on the effects of napping breaks were inconsistent. Rest break activities and high quality rest break areas are further factors that relieve nurses from job demands and can be helpful in coping with them. Several study results indicated that temporal and quantitative work demands, job resources, and individual characteristics influence rest break organization. However, most of these findings stem from studies that do not allow causal conclusions to be drawn. Well-designed rest breaks influence nurses' occupational well-being and behavior positively. However, the mechanisms and moderating break-, work-, and person-related factors involved in producing these effects are not well understood today. Thus, further theory building and stronger empirical data are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Long-Duration Space Flight and Bed Rest Effects on Testosterone and Other Steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Martina; Wang, Zuwei; Huntoon, Carolyn L.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Limited data suggest that testosterone is decreased during space flight, which could contribute to bone and muscle loss. Objective: The main objective was to assess testosterone and hormone status in long- and short-duration space flight and bed rest environments and to determine relationships with other physiological systems, including bone and muscle. Design: Blood and urine samples were collected before, during, and after long-duration space flight. Samples were also collected before and after 12- to 14-d missions and from participants in 30- to 90-d bed rest studies. Setting: Space flight studies were conducted on the International Space Station and before and after Space Shuttle missions. Bed rest studies were conducted in a clinical research center setting. Data from Skylab missions are also presented. Participants: All of the participants were male, and they included 15 long-duration and nine short-duration mission crew members and 30 bed rest subjects. Main Outcome Measures: Serum total, free, and bioavailable testosterone were measured along with serum and urinary cortisol, serum dehydroepiandrosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SHBG. Results: Total, free, and bioavailable testosterone was not changed during long-duration space flight but were decreased (P space flight. There were no changes in other hormones measured. Testosterone concentrations dropped before and soon after bed rest, but bed rest itself had no effect on testosterone. Conclusions: There was no evidence for decrements in testosterone during long-duration space flight or bed rest. PMID:22049169

  10. Neuroaging through the Lens of the Resting State Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cieri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI allows studying spontaneous brain activity in absence of task, recording changes of Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD signal. rs-fMRI enables identification of brain networks also called Resting State Networks (RSNs including the most studied Default Mode Network (DMN. The simplicity and speed of execution make rs-fMRI applicable in a variety of normal and pathological conditions. Since it does not require any task, rs-fMRI is particularly useful for protocols on patients, children, and elders, increasing participant’s compliance and reducing intersubjective variability due to the task performance. rs-fMRI has shown high sensitivity in identification of RSNs modifications in several diseases also in absence of structural modifications. In this narrative review, we provide the state of the art of rs-fMRI studies about physiological and pathological aging processes. First, we introduce the background of resting state; then we review clinical findings provided by rs-fMRI in physiological aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI, Alzheimer Dementia (AD, and Late Life Depression (LLD. Finally, we suggest future directions in this field of research and its potential clinical applications.

  11. Electroencephalographic Resting-State Networks: Source Localization of Microstates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custo, Anna; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Wells, William M; Tomescu, Miralena I; Brunet, Denis; Michel, Christoph M

    2017-12-01

    Using electroencephalography (EEG) to elucidate the spontaneous activation of brain resting-state networks (RSNs) is nontrivial as the signal of interest is of low amplitude and it is difficult to distinguish the underlying neural sources. Using the principles of electric field topographical analysis, it is possible to estimate the meta-stable states of the brain (i.e., the resting-state topographies, so-called microstates). We estimated seven resting-state topographies explaining the EEG data set with k-means clustering (N = 164, 256 electrodes). Using a method specifically designed to localize the sources of broadband EEG scalp topographies by matching sensor and source space temporal patterns, we demonstrated that we can estimate the EEG RSNs reliably by measuring the reproducibility of our findings. After subtracting their mean from the seven EEG RSNs, we identified seven state-specific networks. The mean map includes regions known to be densely anatomically and functionally connected (superior frontal, superior parietal, insula, and anterior cingulate cortices). While the mean map can be interpreted as a "router," crosslinking multiple functional networks, the seven state-specific RSNs partly resemble and extend previous functional magnetic resonance imaging-based networks estimated as the hemodynamic correlates of four canonical EEG microstates.

  12. Target Heart Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Check Recipe Certification Program Nutrition Requirements Heart-Check Professional Resources Contact the Heart-Check Certification Program Simple Cooking and Recipes Dining Out Choosing a Restaurant Deciphering ...

  13. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  14. Aspirin and heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fluids and diuretics Heart failure - home monitoring Heart failure - what to ask your ... of Cardiology, Harborview Medical Center, University of Washington Medical School, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed ...

  15. Identification of heart rate-associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tonu; Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.; Peal, David S.; Evans, David M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Segre, Ayellet V.; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; den Heijer, Martin; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U.; Kutalik, Zoltan; Luan, Jian'an; Kemp, John P.; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E.; Njajou, Omer T.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H. M.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Kerr, Kathleen F.; Lind, Penelope A.; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N.; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M.; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Soren; Chanock, Stephen J.; Chines, Peter S.; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Doerr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B.; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K.; Johansson, Asa; Junttila, Juhani; Kaeaeb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kooner, Angrad S.; Kors, Jan A.; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Paeivi; Lakatta, Edward G.; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lynch, Stacey N.; Markus, Marcello R. P.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Mateo Leach, Irene; McArdle, Wendy L.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Medland, Sarah E.; Miller, Kathryn A.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ong, Ken K.; Newman, Anne B.; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Ring, Susan M.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A.; Sehmi, Jaban S.; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T.; Singleton, Andrew B.; Smith, Albert V.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D.; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M.; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M. A.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G.; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A.; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G.; Oostra, Ben A.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Verschuren, W. M. Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A.; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W. L. Mark; Chambers, John C.; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B.; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Hunter, David J.; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kahonen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S.; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R.; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rimm, Eric B.; Rioux, John D.; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S.; Shields, Denis C.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Strachan, David P.; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V.; Visscher, Peter M.; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R.; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Sibon, Ody C. M.; Milan, David J.; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J.; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously

  16. Adenosine Stress and Rest T1 Mapping Can Differentiate Between Ischemic, Infarcted, Remote, and Normal Myocardium Without the Need for Gadolinium Contrast Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Alexander; Wijesurendra, Rohan S; Francis, Jane M; Robson, Matthew D; Neubauer, Stefan; Piechnik, Stefan K; Ferreira, Vanessa M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of T1 mapping at rest and during adenosine stress as a novel method for ischemia detection without the use of gadolinium contrast. In chronic coronary artery disease (CAD), accurate detection of ischemia is important because targeted revascularization improves clinical outcomes. Myocardial blood volume (MBV) may be a more comprehensive marker of ischemia than myocardial blood flow. T1 mapping using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) is highly sensitive to changes in myocardial water content, including MBV. We propose that T1 mapping at rest and during adenosine vasodilatory stress can detect MBV changes in normal and diseased myocardium in CAD. Twenty normal controls (10 at 1.5-T; 10 at 3.0-T) and 10 CAD patients (1.5-T) underwent conventional CMR to assess for left ventricular function (cine), infarction (late gadolinium enhancement [LGE]) and ischemia (myocardial perfusion reserve index [MPRI] on first-pass perfusion imaging during adenosine stress). These were compared to novel pre-contrast stress/rest T1 mapping using the Shortened Modified Look-Locker Inversion recovery technique, which is heart rate independent. T1 values were derived for normal myocardium in controls and for infarcted, ischemic, and remote myocardium in CAD patients. Normal myocardium in controls (normal wall motion, MPRI, no LGE) showed normal resting T1 (954 ± 19 ms at 1.5-T; 1,189 ± 34 ms at 3.0-T) and significant positive T1 reactivity during adenosine stress compared to baseline (6.2 ± 0.5% at 1.5-T; 6.3 ± 1.1% at 3.0-T; all p Ischemic myocardium showed elevated resting T1 compared to normal (987 ± 17 ms; p stress can differentiate between normal, infarcted, ischemic, and remote myocardium with distinctive T1 profiles. Stress/rest T1 mapping holds promise for ischemia detection without the need for gadolinium contrast. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radioisotope heart examination during exercise to diagnose ischemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farsky, S.

    1986-01-01

    The radioisotope exercise test is discussed and its benefits characterized for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, namely the use of 99m Tc in scintiscanning heart ventricles and of 201 Tl in scintiscanning myocardial perfusion. The exercise ventricular function and perfusion scintigraphies are compared with the common exercise ECG examination, and their superior sensitivity and specificity emphasized. Considering the constraints of scintigraphic imaging, indications are outlined for patients including those with suspect serious ischemic heart disease in whom the exercise ECG test has been negative or inconclusive, patients with the so-called nondiagnostic ECG, patients with atypical symptoms, and healthy individuals for whom the exercise ECG test indicated with respect to their occupation has been positive. Both radionuclide imaging techniques are complementary and are shown to be valuable not only in improving the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease but also in identifying the high-risk patients in whom cardiac surgery is to be considered. (L.O.)

  18. Heart, lipids and hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter; Winhofer, Yvonne; Krššák, Martin; Krebs, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in general population. Besides well-known risk factors such as hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, growing evidence suggests that hormonal changes in various endocrine diseases also impact the cardiac morphology and function. Recent studies highlight the importance of ectopic intracellular myocardial and pericardial lipid deposition, since even slight changes of these fat depots are associated with alterations in cardiac performance. In this review, we overview the effects of hormones, including insulin, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and cortisol, on heart function, focusing on their impact on myocardial lipid metabolism, cardiac substrate utilization and ectopic lipid deposition, in order to highlight the important role of even subtle hormonal changes for heart function in various endocrine and metabolic diseases. © 2017 The authors.

  19. Heart, lipids and hormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wolf

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in general population. Besides well-known risk factors such as hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, growing evidence suggests that hormonal changes in various endocrine diseases also impact the cardiac morphology and function. Recent studies highlight the importance of ectopic intracellular myocardial and pericardial lipid deposition, since even slight changes of these fat depots are associated with alterations in cardiac performance. In this review, we overview the effects of hormones, including insulin, thyroid hormones, growth hormone and cortisol, on heart function, focusing on their impact on myocardial lipid metabolism, cardiac substrate utilization and ectopic lipid deposition, in order to highlight the important role of even subtle hormonal changes for heart function in various endocrine and metabolic diseases.

  20. Implementation of the NASA AG-Bed Rest Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, L. E.; Paloski, W. H.; Young, L. R.

    2007-01-01

    .0 m radius SRC. They were oriented radially in the supine position so that the centrifugal force was aligned with their long body axis, and while spinning, they #stood# on a force plate, supporting the centrifugal loading (2.5 g at the feet, 1.0 g at the heart). The subject station allowed free translation over approximately 10 cm to ensure full loading of the lower extremities and to allow for anti-orthostatic muscle contractions. Control subjects were positioned on the centrifuge but did not spin. Following the bed rest phase, subjects were allowed to ambulate again, but remained within the facility for an additional 9 days and participated in multiple follow-up tests of physiological function.

  1. Venipuncture procedure affects heart rate variability and chronotropic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliszczewicz, Brian; Esco, Michael R; E Bechke, Emily; Feito, Yuri; M Williamson, Cassie; Brown, Danielle; Price, Brandi

    2017-10-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has been shown to be influenced by several factors such as noise, sleep status, light, and emotional arousal; however, little evidence is available concerning autonomic responses to a venipuncture. The purpose of this study was to investigate changes of HRV indexes and heart rate (HR) during and following a venipuncture procedure among healthy individuals. 33 healthy individuals (22.8 ± 0.56 years, 167 ± 1.56 cm, 69.5 ± 2.61 kg) participated. Testing included 10-minute HRV analysis prior to the venipuncture, a 1-minute venipuncture procedure followed by a 10-minute analysis of HRV, and a total recording of 21 minutes. The first 5 minutes of the 21-minute recordings were discarded, and the remaining 5 minutes of the resting segment was analyzed (PRE), and the last 5 minutes of the 21-minute recording (POST). The log transformation of the time domain root mean squared of successive differences (lnRMSSD) and the frequency domains of high frequency (lnHF) and low frequency (lnLF) and LF/HF ratio (lnLF/HF) were used to quantify autonomic activity. HR was measured in 1-minute segments at 2 minutes prior (PRE), venipuncture (STICK), and post (P1-5). HR significantly increased at STICK (P = 0.002), and fell below resting at P-5 (P venipuncture procedure. Practitioners and researchers who are interested in collecting blood and measuring HRV need to account for the influence of the venipuncture. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Long QT interval in resting electrocardiogram – and what next? Sports cardiologist’s pointofview. Part 1. From electrophysiology to diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Krenc

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrocardiography is the most common and available cardiovascular diagnostic procedure and an important tool in everyday clinical practice of a family physician. Electrocardiogram interpretation is therefore an invaluable clinical skill. Resting 12-lead electrocardiogram allows to detect asymptomatic patients, especially athletes, with life-threatening heart diseases in order to protect them from sudden cardiac death. The vast majority of sudden cardiac deaths in young athletes (under 35 years of age are due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. Three to four per cent of young athletes who die suddenly have no evidence of structural heart disease and the cause of their cardiac arrest is a primary electrical heart disease such as inherited cardiac ion channel defects (channelopathies, including long QT syndrome. Long QT syndrome is a leading cause of sudden death in the young. It is characterised by prolongation of the QT interval and by the occurrence of syncope, due to torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia, cardiac arrest and sudden death. Although these life-threatening cardiac events are usually associated with physical effort or emotional stress, they may also occur during rest or sleep. The diagnosis of long QT syndrome is mainly based on the QTc measurement. When using a  prolonged QTc to diagnose long QT syndrome, it is necessary to exclude secondary causes of QTc prolongation that can occur with drugs, acquired cardiac conditions or electrolyte imbalance. Preventive measures for cardiac events include, i.a., pharmacotherapy (β-blockers and electrotherapy (implantation of implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. The aim of this paper is to provide family doctors with some practical guidance useful in the interpretation of a resting electrocardiogram with prolonged QT interval. Genetic and acquired causes of prolonged QT interval, diagnostic criteria for

  3. A new look at the comparative physiology of insect and human hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sláma, Karel

    2012-08-01

    Recent electrocardiographic (ECG) studies of insect hearts revealed the presence of human-like, involuntary and purely myogenic hearts. Certain insects, like a small light-weight species of hoverfly (Episyrphus balteatus), have evolved a very efficient cardiac system comprised of a compact heart ventricle and a narrow tube of aorta, which evolved as an adaptation to sustained hovering flights. Application of thermocardiographic and optocardiographic ECG methods revealed that adult flies of this species use the compact muscular heart chamber (heart ventricle) for intensive pumping of insect "blood" (haemolymph) into the head and thorax which is ringed all over with indirect flight musculature. The recordings of these hearts revealed extremely high, record rates of forward-directed, anterograde heartbeat (up to 10Hz), associated with extremely enhanced synchronic (not peristaltic) propagation of systolic myocardial contractions (32.2mm/s at room temperature). The relatively slow, backward-directed or retrograde cardiac contractions occurred only sporadically in the form of individual or twinned pulses replacing occasionally the resting periods. The compact heart ventricle contained bi-directional lateral apertures, whose opening and closure diverted the intracardiac anterograde "blood" streams between the abdominal haemocoelic cavity and the aortan artery, respectively. The visceral organs of this flying machine (crop, midgut) exhibited myogenic, extracardiac peristaltic pulsations similar to heartbeat, including the periodically reversed forward and backward direction of the peristaltic waves. The tubular crop contracted with a periodicity of 1Hz, both forwards and backwards, with propagation of the peristaltic waves at 4.4mm/s. The air-inflated and blindly ended midgut contracted at 0.2Hz, with a 0.9mm/s propagation of the peristaltic contraction waves. The neurogenic system of extracardiac haemocoelic pulsations, widely engaged in the regulation of circulatory and

  4. Autonomic response to tactical pistol performance measured by heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew G; Swain, David P; Branch, J David; Spina, Robert J; Grieco, Carmine R

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated changes in autonomic tone during a tactical pistol competition. At rest and during a match, heart rate variability (HRV) was examined in 28 healthy subjects. Heart rate variability time-domain variables (including interbeat interval [IBI]) and frequency-domain variables (low frequency [LF], high frequency [HF], total power [TP]) measured during shooting were subtracted from those measured during rest to produce Δs. The shooting task involved several, rapid tactical maneuvers. Raw time to completion and inaccurate shots (points down [PDs]) were recorded and combined to form a match score where lower values indicated superior shooting performance. Mean (±SD) raw time was 135.9 ± 34.1 seconds, PDs were 78 ± 34, and match score was 175.3 ± 39.8. Shooting decreased IBI (i.e., increased heart rate) and LF. ΔLF, ΔHF, and ΔTP were independent of ΔIBI. Raw time was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) correlated to shooting IBI (r = 0.404) and ΔIBI (r = -0.426). Points down were significantly correlated to ΔTP (r = 0.416) and ΔLF (r = 0.376). Match score was significantly correlated to ΔIBI (r = -0.458), ΔHF (r = 0.467), ΔLF (r = 0.377), and ΔTP (r = 0.451). In conclusion, individuals with a greater decrease in IBI (and thus heart rate) performed better by accomplishing the match faster. Individuals with less change in stress-related HRV measures (LF, HF, and TP) performed better through improved accuracy. Thus, HRV-derived sympathetic response is significantly related to shooting performance and should be used to assess marksmanship effectiveness under duress.

  5. Attenuated heart rate response is associated with hypocretin deficiency in patients with narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Gertrud Laura; Knudsen, Stine; Petersen, Eva Rosa; Kempfner, Jacob; Gammeltoft, Steen; Sorensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Jennum, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that hypocretin-1 may influence the cerebral control of the cardiovascular system. We analyzed whether hypocretin-1 deficiency in narcolepsy patients may result in a reduced heart rate response. We analyzed the heart rate response during various sleep stages from a 1-night polysomnography in patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls. The narcolepsy group was subdivided by the presence of +/- cataplexy and +/- hypocretin-1 deficiency. Sleep laboratory studies conducted from 2001-2011. In total 67 narcolepsy patients and 22 control subjects were included in the study. Cataplexy was present in 46 patients and hypocretin-1 deficiency in 38 patients. None. All patients with narcolepsy had a significantly reduced heart rate response associated with arousals and leg movements (P hypocretin-1 deficiency and cataplexy groups compared with patients with normal hypocretin-1 levels (P hypocretin-1 deficiency significantly predicted the heart rate response associated with arousals in both REM and non-REM in a multivariate linear regression. Our results show that autonomic dysfunction is part of the narcoleptic phenotype, and that hypocretin-1 deficiency is the primary predictor of this dysfunction. This finding suggests that the hypocretin system participates in the modulation of cardiovascular function at rest.

  6. Reduced Dietary Sodium Intake Increases Heart Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels A; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2016-01-01

    Reduced dietary sodium intake (sodium reduction) increases heart rate in some studies of animals and humans. As heart rate is independently associated with the development of heart failure and increased risk of premature death a potential increase in heart rate could be a harmful side......-effect of sodium reduction. The purpose of the present meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of sodium reduction on heart rate. Relevant studies were retrieved from an updated pool of 176 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in the period 1973-2014. Sixty-three of the RCTs including 72 study...... populations reported data on heart rate. In a meta-analysis of these data sodium reduction increased heart rate with 1.65 beats per minute [95% CI: 1.19, 2.11], p sodium reduction...

  7. Soundscape Ecology of Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin Resting Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenehan, Heather Leigh

    -frequency active sonar event in August 2011, sound pressure levels in the 3.15 kHz 1/3 rd-octave band were as high as 45.8 dB above median ambient noise levels. Human activity both inside (vessels) and outside (sonar and aquaculture) the bays significantly altered the resting bay soundscape. Inside the bays there are high levels of human activity including vessel-based tourism directly targeting the dolphins. The interactions between humans and dolphins in their resting bays are of concern; therefore, my third chapter aimed to assess the acoustic response of the dolphins to human activity. Using days where acoustic recordings overlapped with visual surveys I found the greatest response in a bay with dolphin-centric activities, not in the bay with the most vessel activity, indicating that it is not the magnitude that elicits a response but the focus of the activity. In my fourth chapter I summarize the key results from my first three chapters to illustrate the power of multiple site design to prioritize action to protect Hawaiian spinner dolphins in their resting bays, a chapter I hope will be useful for managers should they take further action to protect the dolphins.

  8. Mechanisms and management of heart failure in active rheumatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fulminating active rheumatic carditis has been observed for over three decades in this environment with no recent alteration in either the incidence or the pattern of presentation. Heart failure (in this context defined as 'an inadequate circulation at rest together with a raised pulmonary venous pressure, with or without an ...

  9. An algae-covered alligator rests warily

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    An algae-covered alligator keeps a wary eye open as it rests in one of the ponds at Kennedy Space Center. American alligators feed and rest in the water, and lay their eggs in dens they dig into the banks. The young alligators spend their first several weeks in these dens. The Center shares a boundary with the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  10. Take heart!

    CERN Multimedia

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Recently, ten new semi-automatic defibrillators were installed at various locations around CERN. This is a preventive measure intended to provide cardiac arrest victims with the best possible response. The first responder could be you!   The Director-General has welcomed the initiative of the Medical Service and Fire Brigade for the installation of ten new semi-automatic defibrillators. You have probably seen them on your way to the restaurant, for example:  brand new semi-automatic defibrillators, ready for an emergency. Housed in a white wall-mounted case, the bright red defibrillators are marked with a white heart symbol crossed by a lightning bolt (see photo). The defibrillator is designed so that anyone can use it. “Anyone can use it, you don’t need to be a health professional,” says Dr Reymond from CERN's Medical Service. Together with the CERN Fire Brigade, he is behind the initiative to have these units put in place. And with good reason, as the unit...

  11. EEG microstates during resting represent personality differences

    OpenAIRE

    Schlegel, Felix; Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L.; Milz, Patricia; Gianotti, Lorena R. R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the spontaneous brain electric activity of 13 skeptics and 16 believers in paranormal phenomena; they were university students assessed with a self-report scale about paranormal beliefs. 33-channel EEG recordings during no-task resting were processed as sequences of momentary potential distribution maps. Based on the maps at peak times of Global Field Power, the sequences were parsed into segments of quasi-stable potential distribution, the 'microstates'. The microstates were ...

  12. The effect of a supervised exercise training programme on sleep quality in recently discharged heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suna, Jessica M; Mudge, Alison; Stewart, Ian; Marquart, Louise; O'Rourke, Peter; Scott, Adam

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disturbances, including insomnia and sleep-disordered breathing, are a common complaint in people with heart failure and impair well-being. Exercise training (ET) improves quality of life in stable heart failure patients. ET also improves sleep quality in healthy older patients, but there are no previous intervention studies in heart failure patients. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of ET on sleep quality in patients recently discharged from hospital with heart failure. This was a sub-study of a multisite randomised controlled trial. Participants with a heart failure hospitalisation were randomised within six weeks of discharge to a 12-week disease management programme including exercise advice (n=52) or to the same programme with twice weekly structured ET (n=54). ET consisted of two one-hour supervised aerobic and resistance training sessions, prescribed and advanced by an exercise specialist. The primary outcome was change in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) between randomisation and week 12. At randomisation, 45% of participants reported poor sleep (PSQI≥5). PSQI global score improved significantly more in the ET group than the control group (-1.5±3.7 vs 0.4±3.8, p=0.03). Improved sleep quality correlated with improved exercise capacity and reduced depressive symptoms, but not with changes in body mass index or resting heart rate. Twelve weeks of twice-weekly supervised ET improved sleep quality in patients recently discharged from hospital with heart failure. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  13. The Danish Heart Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan C

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cengiz Özcan,1,2 Knud Juel,1 Jens Flensted Lassen,3 Lene Mia von Kappelgaard,1 Poul Erik Mortensen,4 Gunnar Gislason1,2 1The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen K, Denmark; 2Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Hellerup, Denmark; 3Department of Cardiology, The Heart Center, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark; 4Department of Thoracic Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark Aim: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. Study population: All adult ($15 years patients undergoing coronary angiography (CAG, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI, coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. Main variables: The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR and WDHR. For each type of procedure, up to 70 variables are registered in the DHR. Since 2010, the data quality protocol encompasses fulfillment of web-based validation rules of daily-submitted records and yearly approval of the data by the EDHR and WDHR. Descriptive data: The data collection on procedure has been complete for PCI and surgery since 2000, and for CAG as of 2006. From 2000 to 2014, the number of CAG, PCI, and surgical procedures changed by 231%, 193%, and 99%, respectively. Until the end of 2014, a total of 357,476 CAG, 131,309 PCI, and 60,831 surgical procedures had been performed, corresponding to 249,445, 100,609, and 55,539 first-time patients, respectively. The DHR generally has a high level of completeness (1–missing of each procedure (.90% when compared to the National Patient Registry. Variables important for assessing the quality of care have

  14. Right and left ventricular ejection fraction at rest and during exercise assessed with radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlstroem, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Right (RVEF) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) assessed with radionuclide angiocardiography were compared to simultaneously obtained catheterization results at rest and during exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Blood pool imaging was performed with red blood cells (RBC) labelled with 99 Tcsup(m) in vivo as this method gave more stable 99 Tcsup(m) levels in blood compared to 99 Tcsup(m)-labelled human serum albumin and because it was more convenient than labelling RBC in vitro. RVEF measured with first pass (FP) technique and equilibrium (EQ) technique correlated well at rest, r = 0.86, and during exercise, r = 0.91. The FP technique had the best reproducibility and reference values at rest were 49+-5 per cent increasing with exercise. When 99 Tcsup(m) and 133 Xe were compared to assess RVEF with FP technique, the correlation was good, r = 0.88. LVEF assessed with EQ technique and a fixed end-diastolic region of interest was very reproducible at rest and during exercise; reference values at rest were 56+-8 per cent increasing with exercise. In 10 patients with pulmonary hypertension significant negative correlations were found between RVEF assessed with FP technique and pressures in pulmonary artery and right atrium. Abnormal RVEF was found in all patients with right ventricular disfunction. In 22 patients with recent myocardial infarction measurements of LVEF detected left ventricular disfunction better than did measurement of pulmonary artery diastolic pressure. During effort angina in another 10 patients all had abnormal LVEF and abnormal hemodynamics. By combining ejection fraction and stroke volume, ventricular volumes were calculated at rest and during exercise. (author)

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging quantitation of changes in muscle volume during 7 days of strict bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, A A; Stuart, C A; Brunder, D G; Hillman, G R

    1995-10-01

    Prolonged bed rest results in a loss of leg lean body mass. Previous studies using bed rest as a model for microgravity have shown decreases in leg mass after 12 and 14 d, 5 and 17 wk. As magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide a precise and non-invasive means of determining muscle volume, we sought to determine if changes in leg muscle volume could be detected in bed rest periods as short as 7 d. Five young, healthy, male volunteers were subjected to 7 d of absolute bed rest. Each subject underwent MRI quantitation of segmental muscle volumes of the calves and thighs before and after bed rest. Eleven (calf) and nine (thigh) contiguous 1-cm thick transaxial images were generated over prescribed regions using a Technicare MRI imager with a 0.6T superconducting magnet and body coil. Image processing was performed using a generalized 8-bit medical image analysis package developed at University of Texas Medical Branch. Images were analyzed for muscle and non-muscle volumes (including fat, blood vessel, and bone marrow volumes). The MRI quantitation demonstrated bed rest-induced significant decreases in segmental thigh muscle (approximately 3.0%, p image analysis of MRI images provides a sensitive tool capable of detecting leg volume changes of as little as 3.0% over a 7-d period of strict bed rest.

  16. Giant Vertebral Notochordal Rest: Magnetic Resonance and Diffusion Weighted Imaging Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oner, Ali Yusuf; Akpek, Sergin; Tali, Turgut; Ucar, Murat

    2009-01-01

    A giant vertebral notochordal rest is a newly described, benign entity that is easily confused with a vertebral chordoma. As microscopic notochordal rests are rarely found in adult autopsies, the finding of a macroscopic vertebral lesion is a new entity with only seven previously presented cases. We report here radiological findings, including diffusion weighted images, of a patient with a giant notochordal remnant confined to the L5 vertebra, with an emphasis on its distinction from a chordoma

  17. Congenital Heart Disease: Causes, Diagnosis, Symptoms, and Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, RongRong; Liu, Min; Lu, Lei; Zheng, Yi; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-07-01

    The congenital heart disease includes abnormalities in heart structure that occur before birth. Such defects occur in the fetus while it is developing in the uterus during pregnancy. About 500,000 adults have congenital heart disease in USA (WebMD, Congenital heart defects medications, www.WebMD.com/heart-disease/tc/congenital-heart-defects-medications , 2014). 1 in every 100 children has defects in their heart due to genetic or chromosomal abnormalities, such as Down syndrome. The excessive alcohol consumption during pregnancy and use of medications, maternal viral infection, such as Rubella virus, measles (German), in the first trimester of pregnancy, all these are risk factors for congenital heart disease in children, and the risk increases if parent or sibling has a congenital heart defect. These are heart valves defects, atrial and ventricular septa defects, stenosis, the heart muscle abnormalities, and a hole inside wall of the heart which causes defect in blood circulation, heart failure, and eventual death. There are no particular symptoms of congenital heart disease, but shortness of breath and limited ability to do exercise, fatigue, abnormal sound of heart as heart murmur, which is diagnosed by a physician while listening to the heart beats. The echocardiogram or transesophageal echocardiogram, electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, cardiac catheterization, and MRI methods are used to detect congenital heart disease. Several medications are given depending on the severity of this disease, and catheter method and surgery are required for serious cases to repair heart valves or heart transplantation as in endocarditis. For genetic study, first DNA is extracted from blood followed by DNA sequence analysis and any defect in nucleotide sequence of DNA is determined. For congenital heart disease, genes in chromosome 1 show some defects in nucleotide sequence. In this review the causes, diagnosis, symptoms, and treatments of congenital heart disease are described.

  18. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  19. Biological heart valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubotaru, Anatol; Cebotari, Serghei; Tudorache, Igor; Beckmann, Erik; Hilfiker, Andres; Haverich, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Cardiac valvular pathologies are often caused by rheumatic fever in young adults, atherosclerosis in elderly patients, or by congenital malformation of the heart in children, in effect affecting almost all population ages. Almost 300,000 heart valve operations are performed worldwide annually. Tissue valve prostheses have certain advantages over mechanical valves such as biocompatibility, more physiological hemodynamics, and no need for life-long systemic anticoagulation. However, the major disadvantage of biological valves is related to their durability. Nevertheless, during the last decade, the number of patients undergoing biological, rather than mechanical, valve replacement has increased from half to more than three-quarters for biological implants. Continuous improvement in valve fabrication includes development of new models and shapes, novel methods of tissue treatment, and preservation and implantation techniques. These efforts are focused not only on the improvement of morbidity and mortality of the patients but also on the improvement of their quality of life. Heart valve tissue engineering aims to provide durable, "autologous" valve prostheses. These valves demonstrate adaptive growth, which may avoid the need of repeated operations in growing patients.

  20. A Study of the Radiotherapy Techniques for the Breast Including Internal Mammary Lymph Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyoung Keun; Shim, Su Jung; You, Sei Hwan; Kim, Yong Bae; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Jong Dae; Suh, Chang Ok [Yonsei Cancer Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    This study was designed to determine the optimum radiotherapy technique for internal mammary node (IMN) irradiation after breast-conserving surgery. We selected ten cases of early stage partial mastectomy for plan comparison. Five of the patients were treated to the right-side breast and the rest of the patients were treated to the left-side breast. For each case, four different treatment plans were made to irradiate the entire breast, IMNs and supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLs). The four planning techniques include a standard tangential field (STF), wide tangential field (WTF), partially wide tangential field (PWT) and a photon-electron mixed field (PEM). We prescribed a dose of 50.4 Gy to the SCL field at a 3 cm depth and isocenter of the breast field. The dose distribution showed clear characteristics depending on the technique used. All of the techniques covered the breast tissue well. IMN coverage was also good, except for the STF, which was not intended to cover IMNs. For the cases of the left-side breasts, the volume of the heart that received more than 30 Gy was larger (in order) for the WTF, PWT, PEM and STF. For radiation pneumonitis normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the PWT showed the best results followed by the STF. Despite the variety of patient body shapes, the PWT technique showed the best results for coverage of IMNs and for reducing the lung and heart dose.

  1. A Study of the Radiotherapy Techniques for the Breast Including Internal Mammary Lymph Nodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyoung Keun; Shim, Su Jung; You, Sei Hwan; Kim, Yong Bae; Keum, Ki Chang; Kim, Jong Dae; Suh, Chang Ok

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the optimum radiotherapy technique for internal mammary node (IMN) irradiation after breast-conserving surgery. We selected ten cases of early stage partial mastectomy for plan comparison. Five of the patients were treated to the right-side breast and the rest of the patients were treated to the left-side breast. For each case, four different treatment plans were made to irradiate the entire breast, IMNs and supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLs). The four planning techniques include a standard tangential field (STF), wide tangential field (WTF), partially wide tangential field (PWT) and a photon-electron mixed field (PEM). We prescribed a dose of 50.4 Gy to the SCL field at a 3 cm depth and isocenter of the breast field. The dose distribution showed clear characteristics depending on the technique used. All of the techniques covered the breast tissue well. IMN coverage was also good, except for the STF, which was not intended to cover IMNs. For the cases of the left-side breasts, the volume of the heart that received more than 30 Gy was larger (in order) for the WTF, PWT, PEM and STF. For radiation pneumonitis normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), the PWT showed the best results followed by the STF. Despite the variety of patient body shapes, the PWT technique showed the best results for coverage of IMNs and for reducing the lung and heart dose

  2. Interactive Whole-Heart Segmentation in Congenital Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Danielle F; Dalca, Adrian V; Geva, Tal; Powell, Andrew J; Moghari, Mehdi H; Golland, Polina

    2015-10-01

    We present an interactive algorithm to segment the heart chambers and epicardial surfaces, including the great vessel walls, in pediatric cardiac MRI of congenital heart disease. Accurate whole-heart segmentation is necessary to create patient-specific 3D heart models for surgical planning in the presence of complex heart defects. Anatomical variability due to congenital defects precludes fully automatic atlas-based segmentation. Our interactive segmentation method exploits expert segmentations of a small set of short-axis slice regions to automatically delineate the remaining volume using patch-based segmentation. We also investigate the potential of active learning to automatically solicit user input in areas where segmentation error is likely to be high. Validation is performed on four subjects with double outlet right ventricle, a severe congenital heart defect. We show that strategies asking the user to manually segment regions of interest within short-axis slices yield higher accuracy with less user input than those querying entire short-axis slices.

  3. Heart rate variability in patients undergoing univentricular heart repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Kushal; Garg, Pankaj; Deepak, Kishore Kumar; Talwar, Sachin; Airan, Balram; Choudhary, Shiv Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Altered cardiac autonomic control may play a role in the long-term outcome of patients undergoing univentricular heart repair. This study was undertaken to compare bidirectional superior cavopulmonary anastomosis with preserved antegrade pulmonary blood flow and total cavopulmonary connection, with regard to their effects on cardiac autonomic activity, as measured by heart rate variability indices, prior to and early after surgery. This prospective study included 46 patients (27 with bidirectional superior cavopulmonary anastomosis and 19 with total cavopulmonary connection. Heart rate variability was measured preoperatively and at 2 and 9 months postoperatively. The heart rate variability was measured by a 900-s electrocardiogram recording. Comparisons were drawn between and within groups, using standard statistical methods. All heart rate variability parameters were comparable in the 2 groups preoperatively. At the first follow-up, all heart rate variability parameters had decreased in both groups, but the decreases were not statistically significant. Between-group comparisons showed significantly higher parasympathetic and lower sympathetic tone in the bidirectional superior cavopulmonary anastomosis group. At the second follow-up, the bidirectional superior cavopulmonary anastomosis group had a significant increase in overall cardiac autonomic tone, and the total cavopulmonary connection group had a significant increase in parasympathetic tone, compared to the first follow-up. Between-group comparisons showed higher cardiac autonomic tone in the bidirectional superior cavopulmonary anastomosis group. Total cavopulmonary connection leads to a significant reduction in overall cardiac autonomic tone, compared to bidirectional superior cavopulmonary anastomosis with antegrade pulmonary blood flow.

  4. Rest and treatment/rehabilitation following sport-related concussion: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kathryn J; Leddy, John J; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Seifert, Tad; McCrea, Michael; Silverberg, Noah D; Feddermann-Demont, Nina; Iverson, Grant L; Hayden, Alix; Makdissi, Michael

    2017-06-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the evidence regarding rest and active treatment/rehabilitation following sport-related concussion (SRC). Systematic review. MEDLINE (OVID), CINAHL (EbscoHost), PsycInfo (OVID), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (OVID), SPORTDiscus (EbscoHost), EMBASE (OVID) and Proquest DissertationsandTheses Global (Proquest) were searched systematically. Studies were included if they met the following criteria: (1) original research; (2) reported SRC as the diagnosis; and (3) evaluated the effect of rest or active treatment/rehabilitation. Review articles were excluded. Twenty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria (9 regarding the effects of rest and 19 evaluating active treatment). The methodological quality of the literature was limited; only five randomised controlled trials (RCTs) met the eligibility criteria. Those RCTs included rest, cervical and vestibular rehabilitation, subsymptom threshold aerobic exercise and multifaceted collaborative care. A brief period (24-48 hours) of cognitive and physical rest is appropriate for most patients. Following this, patients should be encouraged to gradually increase activity. The exact amount and duration of rest are not yet well defined and require further investigation. The data support interventions including cervical and vestibular rehabilitation and multifaceted collaborative care. Closely monitored subsymptom threshold, submaximal exercise may be of benefit. PROSPERO 2016:CRD42016039570. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Mechanisms and management of diuretic resistance in congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruyne, L K M

    2003-05-01

    Diuretic drugs are used almost universally in patients with congestive heart failure, most frequently the potent loop diuretics. Despite their unproven effect on survival, their indisputable efficacy in relieving congestive symptoms makes them first line therapy for most patients. In the treatment of more advanced stages of heart failure diuretics may fail to control salt and water retention despite the use of appropriate doses. Diuretic resistance may be caused by decreased renal function and reduced and delayed peak concentrations of loop diuretics in the tubular fluid, but it can also be observed in the absence of these pharmacokinetic abnormalities. When the effect of a short acting diuretic has worn off, postdiuretic salt retention will occur during the rest of the day. Chronic treatment with a loop diuretic results in compensatory hypertrophy of epithelial cells downstream from the thick ascending limb and consequently its diuretic effect will be blunted. Strategies to overcome diuretic resistance include restriction of sodium intake, changes in dose, changes in timing, and combination diuretic therapy.

  6. Physiologic consequences of local heart irradiation in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, B.J.; Lauk, S.; Bornhausen, M.; Trott, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    Noninvasive methods have been used to study the long-term cardiovascular and pulmonary functional changes at rest and after exercise in adult rats following local heart irradiation with single x-ray doses of 15, 17.5 or 20 Gy, and in non-irradiated control animals. Rats that had undergone a chronic exercise program were compared with untrained cohorts. The earliest dysfunction detected was an increased respiratory rate (f) at 10 weeks after irradiation in the highest dose group. In contrast, both telemetric heart-rate (HR) and rhythm and indirect systolic blood pressure measurements performed at rest only revealed changes starting at 43 weeks after irradiation with 20 Gy, up to which point the rats showed no clinical signs of heart failure. However, the number of minutes required for the recovery of the HR to pre-exercise levels following the implementation of a standardized exercise challenge was elevated in untrained rats compared with their trained cohorts at 18 weeks after irradiation with 20 Gy. Increases in recovery times were required in the two lowest dose groups, starting at 26 weeks after irradiation. It was concluded that the reserve capacity of the cardiopulmonary system masks functional decrements at rest for many months following local heart irradiation, necessitating the use of techniques which reveal reductions in reserve capacities. Further, the influence of local irradiation to the heart and lungs deserves closer scrutiny due to mutual interactions

  7. Analysis of exercise-to-rest ratios during division IA televised football competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iosia, Mikaele F; Bishop, Phillip A

    2008-03-01

    A play in football is speculated to last 3 to 5 seconds. There are few if any peer-reviewed studies determining the exercise-to-rest ratios of a televised National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division IA college football competition. In this study, we measured the duration of a play, rest intervals between plays, and series of plays. The results of this study may aid strength and conditioning professionals in developing appropriate conditioning programs for their teams that compete on television based on appropriate exercise-to-rest ration training. Durations may have been influenced by the style of offense. Style of play for this study was determined to be running (RUN), passing (PASS), or balanced (BAL). Two NCAA Division IA teams were selected for each style of play based on their offensive production from the 2004 season. The average duration of a play was 5.23 +/- 1.7 seconds. Durations of RUN and PASS plays were 4.86 +/- 1.4 and 5.60 +/- 1.7 seconds, respectively. Durations related to style for RUN, PASS, and BAL were 4.84 +/- 1.4, 5.41 +/- 1.6, and 5.44 +/- 1.6 seconds, respectively. Duration of rest between plays was 46.9 +/- 34 seconds, including extended rest periods such as time outs and injury attention. The average duration of rest between plays without extended rest was 36.1 +/- 6.7 seconds. Average rest time between series was 11:39 +/- 4:19 minutes. The average duration of a PASS play was significantly different (P < 0.05) than that of a RUN play. The average duration of a play for PASS was significantly different (P < 0.05) from that of RUN and BAL. There was no significant difference between style of play and duration of rest between plays or series.

  8. Effects of prolonged bed rest on the total peripheral resistance baroreflex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, X.; Mukkamala, R.; Sheynberg, N.; Williams, G. H.; Cohen, R. J.; Mark, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance following prolonged exposure to microgravity continues to be a primary concern of the human space program. Reduced autonomic tone has been demonstrated to contribute to this phenomenon, and the heart rate baroreflex, in particular, has been repeatedly shown to be impaired. However, only the works of Yelle et al. have attempted to address the role of the total peripheral resistance (TPR) baroreflex, a potentially more significant contributor to blood pressure regulation. We applied a previously developed method for estimating the static gains of both the arterial and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes to data obtained before and after 16-day bed rest. Reductions in the estimated static gains of the arterial (statistically significant) and cardiopulmonary TPR baroreflexes were found after bed rest. This study supports the works of Yelle et al, which imply that the TPR baroreflex is reduced after spaceflight.

  9. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  10. Time required to stabilize thermographic images at rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marins, João Carlos Bouzas; Moreira, Danilo Gomes; Cano, Sergio Piñonosa; Quintana, Manuel Sillero; Soares, Danusa Dias; Fernandes, Alex de Andrade; Silva, Fabrício Sousa da; Costa, Carlos Magno Amaral; Amorim, Paulo Roberto dos Santos

    2014-07-01

    Thermography for scientific research and practical purposes requires a series of procedures to obtain images that should be standardized; one of the most important is the time required for acclimatization in the controlled environment. Thus, the objective of this study was to identify the appropriate acclimatization time in rest to reach a thermal balance on young people skin. Forty-four subjects participated in the study, 18 men (22.3 ± 3.1 years) and 26 women (21.7 ± 2.5 years). Thermographic images were collected using a thermal imager (Fluke®), totaling 44 images over a period of 20 min. The skin temperature (TSK) was measured at the point of examination which included the 0 min, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20. The body regions of interest (ROI) analyzed included the hands, forearms, arms, thighs, legs, chest and abdomen. We used the Friedman test with post hoc Dunn's in order to establish the time at rest required to obtain a TSK balance and the Mann-Whitney test was used to compare age, BMI, body fat percentage and temperature variations between men and women, considering always a significance level of p < 0.05. Results showed that women had significantly higher temperature variations than men (p < 0.01) along the time. In men, only the body region of the abdomen obtained a significant variance (p < 0.05) on the analyzed period, both in the anterior and posterior part. In women, the anterior abdomen and thighs, and the posterior part of the hands, forearms and abdomen showed significant differences (p < 0.05). Based on our results, it can be concluded that the time in rest condition required reaching a TSK balance in young men and women is variable, but for whole body analysis it is recommended at least 10 min for both sexes.

  11. Variation in heart rate influences the assessment of transient ischemic dilation in myocardial perfusion scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leslie, William D; Levin, Daniel P; Demeter, Sandor J

    2007-01-01

    Transient arrhythmias can affect transient ischemic dilation (TID) ratios. This study was initiated to evaluate the frequency and effect of normal heart rate change on TID measures in routine clinical practice. Consecutive patients undergoing stress/rest sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion scintigraphy were studied (N = 407). Heart rate at the time of stress and rest imaging were recorded. TID ratios were analyzed in relation to absolute change in heart rate (stress minus rest) for subjects with normal perfusion and systolic function (Group 1, N = 169) and those with abnormalities in perfusion and/or function (Group 2, N = 238). In Group 1, mean TID ratio was inversely correlated with the change in heart rate (r = -0.47, P < 0.0001). For every increase of 10 BPM in heart rate change, the TID ratio decreased by approximately 0.06 (95% confidence interval 0.04–0.07). In Group 2, multiple linear regression demonstrated that the change in heart rate (beta = -0.25, P < 0.0001) and the summed difference score (beta = 0.36, P < 0.0001) were independent predictors of the TID ratio. Normal variation in heart rate between the stress and rest components of myocardial perfusion scans is common and can influence TID ratios in patients with normal and abnormal cardiac scans

  12. Renovascular heart failure: heart failure in patients with atherosclerotic renal artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawarada, Osami; Yasuda, Satoshi; Noguchi, Teruo; Anzai, Toshihisa; Ogawa, Hisao

    2016-07-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery disease presents with a broad spectrum of clinical features, including heart failure as well as hypertension, and renal failure. Although recent randomized controlled trials failed to demonstrate renal artery stenting can reduce blood pressure or the number of cardiovascular or renal events more so than medical therapy, increasing attention has been paid to flash pulmonary edema and congestive heart failure associated with atherosclerotic renal artery disease. This clinical entity "renovascular heart failure" is diagnosed retrospectively. Given the increasing global burden of heart failure, this review highlights the background and catheter-based therapeutic aspects for renovascular heart failure.

  13. WISE-2005: Integrative Cardiovascular Responses with LBNP during 60-Day Bed Rest in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, R. L.; Kerbeci, P.; Arbeille, Ph.; Mattar, L.; Shoemaker, J. K.

    2005-01-01

    During 2005, 24 women will take part in the Women International Space-simulation for Exploration (WISE). In this paper we report on the first phase that studied 4 Exercise (EX+LBNP), 4 nutrition (NUT), and 4 no countermeasure control (CON) subjects. The EX+LBNP group completed regular exercise on a treadmill inside LBNP, flywheel resistive exercise and static periods of LBNP, and had recovery days. The NUT group received daily protein supplements. Integrative cardiovascular responses were obtained and here we report data for heart rate during LBNP, blood volume and angiotensin 11. LBNP was applied at 0, -10, -20 and -30 mmHg for 2-minutes for each stage. Blood was sampled prebed rest and on HDT-60. After 60-days head down bed rest, HR in the CON group increased by 6.1+/-2.8 bpm at rest and by 20.7+/-5.0 bpm at -30 mmHg LBNP. The EX+LBNP group had increases of 3.6+/-5.6 and 11.6+/-5.4 bpm, while the NUT group HR increased 2.6+/-3.1 and 9.4+/-3.6 bpm. The EX+LBNP group had almost no change in blood volume or plasma angiotensin II from pre-bed rest to HDT60, while both the CON and NUT groups had larger increases in plasma volume and almost double concentrations of angiotensin II. These data show a positive effect in the EX+LBNP group on the heart rate response as well as an unexpected possible benefit in the NUT group. Further studies are required to confirm possible cardiovascular benefits of the protein supplement.

  14. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  15. Identification of heart rate–associated loci and their effects on cardiac conduction and rhythm disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hoed, Marcel; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Esko, Tõnu; Brundel, Bianca J J M; Peal, David S; Evans, David M; Nolte, Ilja M; Segrè, Ayellet V; Holm, Hilma; Handsaker, Robert E; Westra, Harm-Jan; Johnson, Toby; Isaacs, Aaron; Yang, Jian; Lundby, Alicia; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kim, Young Jin; Go, Min Jin; Almgren, Peter; Bochud, Murielle; Boucher, Gabrielle; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Hadley, David; Van Der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Heijer, Martin Den; Igl, Wilmar; Jackson, Anne U; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian’an; Kemp, John P; Kristiansson, Kati; Ladenvall, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias; Montasser, May E; Njajou, Omer T; O’Reilly, Paul F; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Pourcain, Beate St.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Weihua; Draisma, Harmen H M; Feitosa, Mary F; Kerr, Kathleen F; Lind, Penelope A; Mihailov, Evelin; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Song, Ci; Weedon, Michael N; Xie, Weijia; Yengo, Loic; Absher, Devin; Albert, Christine M; Alonso, Alvaro; Arking, Dan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Balkau, Beverley; Barlassina, Cristina; Benaglio, Paola; Bis, Joshua C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Brage, Søren; Chanock, Stephen J; Chines, Peter S; Chung, Mina; Darbar, Dawood; Dina, Christian; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Felix, Stephan B; Fischer, Krista; Fuchsberger, Christian; de Geus, Eco J C; Goyette, Philippe; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-liisa; Havulinna, Aki S; Heckbert, Susan R; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Holewijn, Suzanne; Hoogstra-Berends, Femke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jensen, Majken K; Johansson, Åsa; Junttila, Juhani; Kääb, Stefan; Kanon, Bart; Ketkar, Shamika; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kooner, Angrad S; Kors, Jan A; Kumari, Meena; Milani, Lili; Laiho, Päivi; Lakatta, Edward G; Langenberg, Claudia; Leusink, Maarten; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert N; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Lynch, Stacey N; Markus, Marcello R P; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Leach, Irene Mateo; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarroll, Steven A; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Kathryn A; Montgomery, Grant W; Morrison, Alanna C; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Navarro, Pau; Nelis, Mari; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Ong, Ken K; Newman, Anne B; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Psaty, Bruce M; Rao, Dabeeru C; Ring, Susan M; Rossin, Elizabeth J; Rudan, Diana; Sanna, Serena; Scott, Robert A; Sehmi, Jaban S; Sharp, Stephen; Shin, Jordan T; Singleton, Andrew B; Smith, Albert V; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Tim D; Stewart, Chip; Stringham, Heather M; Tarasov, Kirill V; Uitterlinden, André G; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Whitfield, John B; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Andrew; Wong, Quenna; Jamshidi, Yalda; Zitting, Paavo; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Ekelund, Ulf; Forouhi, Nita G; Froguel, Philippe; Hingorani, Aroon; Ingelsson, Erik; Kivimaki, Mika; Kronmal, Richard A; Kuh, Diana; Lind, Lars; Martin, Nicholas G; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Quertermous, Thomas; Rotter, Jerome I; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Verschuren, W M Monique; Walker, Mark; Albanes, Demetrius; Arnar, David O; Assimes, Themistocles L; Bandinelli, Stefania; Boehnke, Michael; de Boer, Rudolf A; Bouchard, Claude; Caulfield, W L Mark; Chambers, John C; Curhan, Gary; Cusi, Daniele; Eriksson, Johan; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Gilst, Wiek H; Glorioso, Nicola; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Groop, Leif; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hu, Frank B; Huikuri, Heikki V; Hunter, David J; Iribarren, Carlos; Isomaa, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kraft, Peter; Iacoviello, Licia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lokki, Marja-Liisa L; Mitchell, Braxton D; Navis, Gerjan; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Poulter, Neil R; Qi, Lu; Raitakari, Olli T; Rimm, Eric B; Rioux, John D; Rizzi, Federica; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Sever, Peter S; Shields, Denis C; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sinisalo, Juha; Stanton, Alice V; Stolk, Ronald P; Strachan, David P; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tuomilehto, Jaako; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Virtamo, Jarmo; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Widen, Elisabeth; Cho, Yoon Shin; Olsen, Jesper V; Visscher, Peter M; Willer, Cristen; Franke, Lude; Erdmann, Jeanette; Thompson, John R; Pfeufer, Arne; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Ellinor, Patrick T; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Metspalu, Andres; Perola, Markus; Beckmann, Jacques S; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Wareham, Nicholas J; Munroe, Patricia B; Sibon, Ody C M; Milan, David J; Snieder, Harold; Samani, Nilesh J; Loos, Ruth J F

    2013-01-01

    Elevated resting heart rate is associated with greater risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. In a 2-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in up to 181,171 individuals, we identified 14 new loci associated with heart rate and confirmed associations with all 7 previously established loci. Experimental downregulation of gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster and Danio rerio identified 20 genes at 11 loci that are relevant for heart rate regulation and highlight a role for genes involved in signal transmission, embryonic cardiac development and the pathophysiology of dilated cardiomyopathy, congenital heart failure and/or sudden cardiac death. In addition, genetic susceptibility to increased heart rate is associated with altered cardiac conduction and reduced risk of sick sinus syndrome, and both heart rate–increasing and heart rate–decreasing variants associate with risk of atrial fibrillation. Our findings provide fresh insights into the mechanisms regulating heart rate and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:23583979

  16. Effects of exercise on fluid exchange and body composition in man during 14-day bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Bernauer, E. M.; Juhos, L. T.; Young, H. L.; Morse, J. T.; Staley, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A description is presented of an investigation in which body composition, fluid intake, and fluid and electrolyte losses were measured in seven normal, healthy men during three 2-wk bed-rest periods, separated by two 3-wk recovery periods. During bed rest the subjects remained in the horizontal position continuously. During the dietary control periods, body mass decreased significantly with all three regimens, including no exercise, isometric exercise, and isotonic excercise. During bed rest, body mass was essentially unchanged with no exercise, but decreased significantly with isotonic and isometric exercise. With one exception, there were no statistically significant changes in body density, lean body mass, or body fat content by the end of each of the three bed-rest periods.

  17. Can Wearable Devices Accurately Measure Heart Rate Variability? A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Konstantinos; Larentzakis, Andreas V; Khamis, Nehal N; Alsuhaibani, Ghadah I; Alaska, Yasser A; Giallafos, Elias J

    2018-03-01

    A growing number of wearable devices claim to provide accurate, cheap and easily applicable heart rate variability (HRV) indices. This is mainly accomplished by using wearable photoplethysmography (PPG) and/or electrocardiography (ECG), through simple and non-invasive techniques, as a substitute of the gold standard RR interval estimation through electrocardiogram. Although the agreement between pulse rate variability (PRV) and HRV has been evaluated in the literature, the reported results are still inconclusive especially when using wearable devices. The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate if wearable devices provide a reliable and precise measurement of classic HRV parameters in rest as well as during exercise. A search strategy was implemented to retrieve relevant articles from MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases, as well as, through internet search. The 308 articles retrieved were reviewed for further evaluation according to the predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Eighteen studies were included. Sixteen of them integrated ECG - HRV technology and two of them PPG - PRV technology. All of them examined wearable devices accuracy in RV detection during rest, while only eight of them during exercise. The correlation between classic ECG derived HRV and the wearable RV ranged from very good to excellent during rest, yet it declined progressively as exercise level increased. Wearable devices may provide a promising alternative solution for measuring RV. However, more robust studies in non-stationary conditions are needed using appropriate methodology in terms of number of subjects involved, acquisition and analysis techniques implied.

  18. Hypoxic responses in resting hyperthermic humans

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This thesis investigated the interaction between steady state hypoxia and passive hyperthermia on human ventilation and the influence of the PETCO2 on this interaction. On one of two days males twice breathed 12% oxygen for 20 min while either normothermic or hyperthermic with PETCO2 clamped -1 mm Hg above resting (iHVR). On the other day the same tests were performed except P&02 was uncontrolled (pHVR). Hyperthermia increased euoxic ventilation compared to normothermia (plO.OO1). During ...

  19. Mechanism of artificial heart

    CERN Document Server

    Yamane, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    This book first describes medical devices in relation to regenerative medicine before turning to a more specific topic: artificial heart technologies. Not only the pump mechanisms but also the bearing, motor mechanisms, and materials are described, including expert information. Design methods are described to enhance hemocompatibility: main concerns are reduction of blood cell damage and protein break, as well as prevention of blood clotting. Regulatory science from R&D to clinical trials is also discussed to verify the safety and efficacy of the devices.

  20. Indoor resting heights of some anophelines in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñones, M L; Suarez, M F

    1990-12-01

    The nocturnal, indoor resting behavior of female anophelines in Colombia was studied. Anopheles darlingi and An. marajoara had a tendency to rest close to the ground, but An. oswaldoi and An. rangeli rested higher up. This behavior was independent of bloodfed status (except for An. oswaldoi) and whether the surface had been sprayed with DDT. With this information it should be possible to modify insecticide applications to coincide with the resting preferences of these species.

  1. Framework for ReSTful Web Services in OSGi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Khawaja S.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Mittman, David S.; Fox, Jason M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Wallick, Michael N.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Rabe, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ensemble ReST is a software system that eases the development, deployment, and maintenance of server-side application programs to perform functions that would otherwise be performed by client software. Ensemble ReST takes advantage of the proven disciplines of ReST (Representational State Transfer. ReST leverages the standardized HTTP protocol to enable developers to offer services to a diverse variety of clients: from shell scripts to sophisticated Java application suites

  2. Psychosocial Predictors of Adverse Events in Heart Failure: The Utility of Multiple Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-17

    Heart Failure Hospitalization in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease Without Previously Diagnosed Heart Failure: Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort...psychiatry 33:636-41 82. Tennant CC, Langeluddecke PM, Fulcher G, Wilby J. 1988. Acute and chronic life event stress in coronary atherosclerosis...underlying causes of heart failure include coronary heart disease, hypertension, valvular 15 heart disease, chronic pulmonary disease

  3. Heart rate and heart rate variability responses to Tai Chi and jogging in Beijing and Graz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litscher, Gerhard; Zhang, Weibo; Huang, Tao; Wang, Lu

    2011-02-01

    Tai Chi is a famous training method in China, and jogging is a popular kind of exercise both in Austria and China. Nevertheless, there is little information concerning online monitoring of biosignals during both training activities in parallel. Within the last years innovative scientific monitoring tools for evaluating features of neurocardial fitness have been developed. The goal of this study was to demonstrate heart rate and heart rate variability analysis for the first time during Tai Chi and jogging. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring over a period of 75 minutes was performed simultaneously in two healthy volunteers using the same type of equipment (medilog AR12 systems). Two healthy persons (both male, 49 years and 52 years, respectively), both hobby sportsmen, were monitored continuously during two resting periods before and after active sport and also during Tai Chi and jogging, respectively. Data acquisition was performed without any technical problems in both subjects. Poincaré plots of sequential R-R intervals (beat to beat variability) show two ellipses of different shape and magnitude. During resting periods blood pressure effects can be clearly seen in one subject (jogging). The same effects, however reduced, are obvious in the other volunteer during Tai Chi. The present investigations during Tai Chi and jogging highlight the potential value of heart rate and heart rate variability monitoring even under difficult conditions. The innovative kind of analysis helps to show how well the human body reacts to sport, stress and recovery.

  4. Deterministic Approach to Detect Heart Sound Irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mengko

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A new method to detect heart sound that does not require machine learning is proposed. The heart sound is a time series event which is generated by the heart mechanical system. From the analysis of heart sound S-transform and the understanding of how heart works, it can be deducted that each heart sound component has unique properties in terms of timing, frequency, and amplitude. Based on these facts, a deterministic method can be designed to identify each heart sound components. The recorded heart sound then can be printed with each component correctly labeled. This greatly help the physician to diagnose the heart problem. The result shows that most known heart sounds were successfully detected. There are some murmur cases where the detection failed. This can be improved by adding more heuristics including setting some initial parameters such as noise threshold accurately, taking into account the recording equipment and also the environmental condition. It is expected that this method can be integrated into an electronic stethoscope biomedical system.

  5. Longer rest periods for intensive rotational grazing limit diet quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Longer rest periods for intensive rotational grazing limit diet quality of sheep without enhancing environmental benefits. ... This experiment was established to compare three intensive rotational grazing strategies (fast rotation [FR], average 57-day rest; slow rotation [SR], average 114-day rest; and flexible grazing [FX], based ...

  6. Rationale and Design of the Reduce Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Patients With Heart Failure (Reduce LAP-HF) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenfuss, Gerd; Gustafsson, Finn; Kaye, David; Shah, Sanjiv J; Burkhoff, Dan; Reymond, Marie-Christine; Komtebedde, Jan; Hünlich, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) is characterized by elevated left atrial pressure during rest and/or exercise. The Reduce LAP-HF (Reduce Elevated Left Atrial Pressure in Patients With Heart Failure) trial will evaluate the safety and performance of the Interatrial Shunt Device (IASD) System II, designed to directly reduce elevated left atrial pressure, in patients with HFpEF. The Reduce LAP-HF Trial is a prospective, nonrandomized, open-label trial to evaluate a novel device that creates a small permanent shunt at the level of the atria. A minimum of 60 patients with ejection fraction ≥40% and New York Heart Association functional class III or IV heart failure with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) ≥15 mm Hg at rest or ≥25 mm Hg during supine bike exercise will be implanted with an IASD System II, and followed for 6 months to assess the primary and secondary end points. Safety and standard clinical follow-up will continue through 3 years after implantation. Primary outcome measures for safety are periprocedural and 6-month major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) and systemic embolic events (excluding pulmonary thromboembolism). MACCE include death, stroke, myocardial infarction, or requirement of implant removal. Primary outcome measures for device performance include success of device implantation, reduction of PCWP at rest and during exercise, and demonstration of left-to-right flow through the device. Key secondary end points include exercise tolerance, quality of life, and the incidence of heart failure hospitalization. Reduce LAP-HF is the first trial intended to lower left atrial pressure in HFpEF by means of creating a permanent shunt through the atrial septum with the use of a device. Although the trial is primarily designed to study safety and device performance, we also test the pathophysiologic hypothesis that reduction of left atrial pressure will improve symptoms and quality of life in patients

  7. Resting State Functional Connectivity in Early Blind Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold eBurton

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Task-based neuroimaging studies in early blind humans (EB have demonstrated heightened visual cortex responses to non-visual paradigms. Several prior functional connectivity studies in EB have shown altered connections consistent with these task-based results. But these studies generally did not consider behavioral adaptations to lifelong blindness typically observed in EB. Enhanced cognitive abilities shown in EB include greater serial recall and attention to memory. Here, we address the question of the extent to which brain intrinsic activity in EB reflects such adaptations. We performed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging study contrasting 14 EB with 14 age/gender matched normally sighted controls (NS. A principal finding was markedly greater functional connectivity in EB between visual cortex and regions typically associated with memory and cognitive control of attention. In contrast, correlations between visual cortex and non-deprived sensory cortices were significantly lower in EB. Thus, the available data, including that obtained in prior task-based and resting state fMRI studies, as well as the present results, indicate that visual cortex in EB becomes more heavily incorporated into functional systems instantiating episodic recall and attention to non-visual events. Moreover, EB appear to show a reduction in interactions between visual and non-deprived sensory cortices, possibly reflecting suppression of inter-sensory distracting activity.

  8. EEG microstates during resting represent personality differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Felix; Lehmann, Dietrich; Faber, Pascal L; Milz, Patricia; Gianotti, Lorena R R

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the spontaneous brain electric activity of 13 skeptics and 16 believers in paranormal phenomena; they were university students assessed with a self-report scale about paranormal beliefs. 33-channel EEG recordings during no-task resting were processed as sequences of momentary potential distribution maps. Based on the maps at peak times of Global Field Power, the sequences were parsed into segments of quasi-stable potential distribution, the 'microstates'. The microstates were clustered into four classes of map topographies (A-D). Analysis of the microstate parameters time coverage, occurrence frequency and duration as well as the temporal sequence (syntax) of the microstate classes revealed significant differences: Believers had a higher coverage and occurrence of class B, tended to decreased coverage and occurrence of class C, and showed a predominant sequence of microstate concatenations from A to C to B to A that was reversed in skeptics (A to B to C to A). Microstates of different topographies, putative "atoms of thought", are hypothesized to represent different types of information processing.The study demonstrates that personality differences can be detected in resting EEG microstate parameters and microstate syntax. Microstate analysis yielded no conclusive evidence for the hypothesized relation between paranormal belief and schizophrenia.

  9. Resting State Network Estimation in Individual Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Carl D.; Laumann, Timothy O.; Szrama, Nicholas P.; Baldassarre, Antonello; Snyder, Abraham Z.

    2014-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to study brain networks associated with both normal and pathological cognitive function. The objective of this work is to reliably compute resting state network (RSN) topography in single participants. We trained a supervised classifier (multi-layer perceptron; MLP) to associate blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) correlation maps corresponding to pre-defined seeds with specific RSN identities. Hard classification of maps obtained from a priori seeds was highly reliable across new participants. Interestingly, continuous estimates of RSN membership retained substantial residual error. This result is consistent with the view that RSNs are hierarchically organized, and therefore not fully separable into spatially independent components. After training on a priori seed-based maps, we propagated voxel-wise correlation maps through the MLP to produce estimates of RSN membership throughout the brain. The MLP generated RSN topography estimates in individuals consistent with previous studies, even in brain regions not represented in the training data. This method could be used in future studies to relate RSN topography to other measures of functional brain organization (e.g., task-evoked responses, stimulation mapping, and deficits associated with lesions) in individuals. The multi-layer perceptron was directly compared to two alternative voxel classification procedures, specifically, dual regression and linear discriminant analysis; the perceptron generated more spatially specific RSN maps than either alternative. PMID:23735260

  10. Energy landscapes of resting-state brain networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamitsu eWatanabe

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available During rest, the human brain performs essential functions such as memory maintenance, which are associated with resting-state brain networks (RSNs including the default-mode network (DMN and frontoparietal network (FPN. Previous studies based on spiking-neuron network models and their reduced models, as well as those based on imaging data, suggest that resting-state network activity can be captured as attractor dynamics, i.e., dynamics of the brain state toward an attractive state and transitions between different attractors. Here, we analyze the energy landscapes of the RSNs by applying the maximum entropy model, or equivalently the Ising spin model, to human RSN data. We use the previously estimated parameter values to define the energy landscape, and the disconnectivity graph method to estimate the number of local energy minima (equivalent to attractors in attractor dynamics, the basin size, and hierarchical relationships among the different local minima. In both of the DMN and FPN, low-energy local minima tended to have large basins. A majority of the network states belonged to a basin of one of a few local minima. Therefore, a small number of local minima constituted the backbone of each RSN. In the DMN, the energy landscape consisted of two groups of low-energy local minima that are separated by a relatively high energy barrier. Within each group, the activity patterns of the local minima were similar, and different minima were connected by relatively low energy barriers. In the FPN, all dominant energy were separated by relatively low energy barriers such that they formed a single coarse-grained global minimum. Our results indicate that multistable attractor dynamics may underlie the DMN, but not the FPN, and assist memory maintenance with different memory states.

  11. Gender Differences in Baroreflex Sensitivity after Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzeno, Natalia M.; Stenger, M. B.; Ribeiro, L. C.; Lee, S. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    Two potential contributing factors to post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance are decreases in baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and sympathetic nervous system response. The purpose of this study was to examine the shape of the BRS curve and sympathetic response to a wide range of blood pressures (BP) before and during 6 head-down bed rest (BR). METHODS: Normal volunteers were tested one day before BR (20M, 1 0F) and near BR days 30 (20M, 10F), 60 (16M, 8F), and 90 (1 0M, 5F). BP was pharmacologically manipulated by 10-min infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) at 3 increasing concentrations with a 20-min rest between PE and SNP. Electrocardiogram and continuous finger blood pressure were recorded. A blood sample was drawn at the end of each infusion to measure plasma norepinephrine levels. The spontaneous baroreflex slope (SBS), a measure of BRS, was calculated as the slope of a sequence of 3 or more beats in which the systolic BP (SBP) and following R-R interval (RR) both increased or decreased. The data included saturated responses at the upper but not the lower end of the BP range. Mean response curves were constructed using second-order mixed model analysis. Results are based on term significance in the models. RESULTS RR: RR was lower during BR than pre BR (pgenders were modeled by a linear response; compared to males, females had an attenuated (lower slope) RR response to changes in SBP (p=0.031). SBS: SBS vs SBP analysis showed a lower SBS during BR (pgender and BR. Not only do gender and BR baseline differences exist, but gender and BR also influence the slope and saturation of the BRS curves. Attenuated and saturating RR and SBS responses, as well as differences in baseline values, may contribute to the higher rates of orthostatic intolerance in women and after bed rest.

  12. Acute effects of ingesting Java Fit™ energy extreme functional coffee on resting energy expenditure and hemodynamic responses in male and female coffee drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willoughby Darryn S

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a functional coffee beverage containing additional caffeine, green tea extracts, niacin and garcinia cambogia to regular coffee to determine the effects on resting energy expenditure (REE and hemodynamic variables. Methods Subjects included five male (26 ± 2.1 y, 97.16 ± 10.05 kg, 183.89 ± 6.60 cm and five female (28.8 ± 5.3 y, 142.2 ± 12.6 lbs regular coffee drinkers. Subjects fasted for 10 hours and were assessed for 1 hour prior (PRE and 3 hours following 1.5 cups of coffee ingestion [JavaFit™ Energy Extreme (JF ~400 mg total caffeine; Folgers (F ~200 mg total caffeine] in a double-blind, crossover design. REE, resting heart rate (RHR, and systolic (SBP and diastolic (DBP blood pressure was assessed at PRE and 1, 2, and 3-hours post coffee ingestion. Data were analyzed by three-factor repeated measures ANOVA (p Results JF trial resulted in a significant main effect for REE (p 2 (p Conclusion Results from this study suggest that JavaFit™ Energy Extreme coffee is more effective than Folgers regular caffeinated coffee at increasing REE in regular coffee drinkers for up to 3 hours following ingestion without any adverse hemodynamic effects.

  13. Relationships of physiologically equivalent temperature and hospital admissions due to I30-I51 other forms of heart disease in Germany in 2009-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ivy; Perkins, David R; Bearman, Nick

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to understand relationships of the weather as biometeorological and hospital admissions due to other forms of heart disease by subtypes, which have been paid less attention, in a national setting in recent years. This is an ecological study. Ten percent of daily hospital admissions of the included hospitals (n = 1618) across Germany that were available between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011 (n = 5,235,600) were extracted from Statistisches Bundesamt, Germany. We identified I30-I51 other forms of heart disease by the International Classification of Diseases version 10 as the study outcomes. Daily weather data from 64 weather stations that have covered 13 German states, including air temperature, humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, radiation flux and vapour pressure, were obtained and generated into physiologically equivalent temperature (PET). Admissions due to other diseases of pericardium, nonrheumatic mitral valve disorders, nonrheumatic aortic valve disorders, cardiomyopathy, atrioventricular and left bundle-branch block, other conduction disorders, atrial fibrillation and flutter, and other cardiac arrhythmias peaked when PET was between 0 and 10 °C. Complications and ill-defined descriptions of heart disease admissions peaked at PET 0 °C. Cardiac arrest and heart failure admissions peaked when PET was between 0 and -10 °C while the rest did not vary significantly. A common drop of admissions was found when PET was above 10 °C. More medical resources could have been needed for heart health on days when PETs were public would seem to be imperative.

  14. Tendon vibration attenuates superficial venous vessel response of the resting limb during static arm exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ooue Anna

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The superficial vein of the resting limb constricts sympathetically during exercise. Central command is the one of the neural mechanisms that controls the cardiovascular response to exercise. However, it is not clear whether central command contributes to venous vessel response during exercise. Tendon vibration during static elbow flexion causes primary muscle spindle afferents, such that a lower central command is required to achieve a given force without altering muscle force. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate whether a reduction in central command during static exercise with tendon vibration influences the superficial venous vessel response in the resting limb. Methods Eleven subjects performed static elbow flexion at 35% of maximal voluntary contraction with (EX + VIB and without (EX vibration of the biceps brachii tendon. The heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rating of perceived exertion (RPE in overall and exercising muscle were measured. The cross-sectional area (CSAvein and blood velocity of the basilic vein in the resting upper arm were assessed by ultrasound, and blood flow (BFvein was calculated using both variables. Results Muscle tension during exercise was similar between EX and EX + VIB. However, RPEs at EX + VIB were lower than those at EX (P P vein in the resting limb at EX decreased during exercise from baseline (P vein at EX + VIB did not change during exercise. CSAvein during exercise at EX was smaller than that at EX + VIB (P vein did not change during the protocol under either condition. The decreases in circulatory response and RPEs during EX + VIB, despite identical muscle tension, showed that activation of central command was less during EX + VIB than during EX. Abolishment of the decrease in CSAvein during exercise at EX + VIB may thus have been caused by a lower level of central command at EX + VIB rather than EX. Conclusion Diminished central command induced by tendon

  15. The Ensembl REST API: Ensembl Data for Any Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Andrew; Beal, Kathryn; Keenan, Stephen; McLaren, William; Pignatelli, Miguel; Ritchie, Graham R S; Ruffier, Magali; Taylor, Kieron; Vullo, Alessandro; Flicek, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We present a Web service to access Ensembl data using Representational State Transfer (REST). The Ensembl REST server enables the easy retrieval of a wide range of Ensembl data by most programming languages, using standard formats such as JSON and FASTA while minimizing client work. We also introduce bindings to the popular Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor tool permitting large-scale programmatic variant analysis independent of any specific programming language. The Ensembl REST API can be accessed at http://rest.ensembl.org and source code is freely available under an Apache 2.0 license from http://github.com/Ensembl/ensembl-rest. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  16. "Therapeutic" bed rest in pregnancy: unethical and unsupported by data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, Christina A; Grimes, David A; Lyerly, Anne Drapkin

    2013-06-01

    "Therapeutic" bed rest continues to be used widely, despite evidence of no benefit and known harms. In this commentary, we summarize the Cochrane reviews of bed rest and propose an ethical argument for discontinuing this practice. Cochrane systematic reviews do not support "therapeutic" bed rest for threatened abortion, hypertension, preeclampsia, preterm birth, multiple gestations, or impaired fetal growth. This assessment has been echoed in other comprehensive reviews. Prescribing bed rest is inconsistent with the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, and justice. Hence, if bed rest is to be used, it should be only within a formal clinical trial.

  17. Heart failure etiology impacts survival of patients with heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pecini, Redi; Møller, Daniel Vega; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The impact of heart failure (HF) etiology on prognosis of HF is not well known. METHODS: 3078 patients (median age 75years, 61% male) hospitalized with HF were studied. Patients were classified into six etiology groups: hypertension (HTN, 13.9%), ischemic heart disease (IHD, 42.......4%), valvular disease (VHD, 9.5%), dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, 7.9%), other (11.5%), and unknown etiology (14.8%). Patients with normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were also included. Follow-up was up to 5years. RESULTS: In multivariable analysis, with HTN as the reference, VHD showed the highest...

  18. Resting-state connectivity of pre-motor cortex reflects disability in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogonowski, A-M; Siebner, H R; Soelberg Sørensen, P; Paulson, O B; Dyrby, T B; Blinkenberg, M; Madsen, K H

    2013-11-01

    To characterize the relationship between motor resting-state connectivity of the dorsal pre-motor cortex (PMd) and clinical disability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). A total of 27 patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) and 15 patients with secondary progressive MS (SP-MS) underwent functional resting-state magnetic resonance imaging. Clinical disability was assessed using the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). Independent component analysis was used to characterize motor resting-state connectivity. Multiple regression analysis was performed in SPM8 between the individual expression of motor resting-state connectivity in PMd and EDSS scores including age as covariate. Separate post hoc analyses were performed for patients with RR-MS and SP-MS. The EDSS scores ranged from 0 to 7 with a median score of 4.3. Motor resting-state connectivity of left PMd showed a positive linear relation with clinical disability in patients with MS. This effect was stronger when considering the group of patients with RR-MS alone, whereas patients with SP-MS showed no increase in coupling strength between left PMd and the motor resting-state network with increasing clinical disability. No significant relation between motor resting-state connectivity of the right PMd and clinical disability was detected in MS. The increase in functional coupling between left PMd and the motor resting-state network with increasing clinical disability can be interpreted as adaptive reorganization of the motor system to maintain motor function, which appears to be limited to the relapsing-remitting stage of the disease. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Development of resting cardiovascular activity during the first 2 years of life differs in breastfed and formula-fed boys and girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate whether early infant diet influences cardiovascular development we recorded resting heart-rate (HR) at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 mo in awake healthy children who were breastfed (BF) or fed milk formula (MF) or soy formula (SF) during infancy (n = 83-146/group/age). HR, and indices of autono...

  20. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire reveals multiple phenotypes of resting-state cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diaz, B.A.; van der Sluis, S.; Moens, S.; Benjamins, J.S.; Migliorati, F.; Stoffers, D.; den Braber, A.; Poil, S.S.; Hardstone, R.E.; van t Ent, D.; Boomsma, D.I.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Mansvelder, H.D.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Linkenkaer Hansen, K.

    2013-01-01

    Resting-state neuroimaging is a dominant paradigm for studying brain function in health and disease. It is attractive for clinical research because of its simplicity for patients, straightforward standardization, and sensitivity to brain disorders. Importantly, non sensory experiences like mind

  1. Resting site use of giant pandas in Wanglang Nature Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongwei; Wang, Xiaorong; Li, Junqing

    2017-10-23

    Little is known about the resting sites used by the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), which restricts our understanding of their resting habits and limits conservation efforts. To enhance our understanding of resting site requirements and factors affecting the resting time of giant pandas, we investigated the characteristics of resting sites in the Wanglang Nature Reserve, Sichuan Province, China. The results indicated that the resting sites of giant pandas were characterised by a mean slope of 21°, mean nearest tree size of 53.75 cm, mean nearest shrub size of 2.82 cm, and mean nearest bamboo number of 56. We found that the resting sites were closer to bamboo than to trees and shrubs, suggesting that the resting site use of giant pandas is closely related to the presence of bamboo. Considering that giant pandas typically rest near a large-sized tree, protection of large trees in the forests is of considerable importance for the conservation of this species. Furthermore, slope was found to be an important factor affecting the resting time of giant pandas, as they tended to rest for a relatively longer time in sites with a smaller degree of slope.

  2. Increased interhemispheric resting-state functional connectivity after sleep deprivation: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuanqiang; Feng, Zhiyan; Xu, Junling; Fu, Chang; Sun, Jinbo; Yang, Xuejuan; Shi, Dapeng; Qin, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Several functional imaging studies have investigated the regional effects of sleep deprivation (SD) on impaired brain function; however, potential changes in the functional interactions between the cerebral hemispheres after SD are not well understood. In this study, we used a recently validated approach, voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC), to directly examine the changes in interhemispheric homotopic resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) after SD. Resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) was performed in 28 participants both after rest wakefulness (RW) and a total night of SD. An interhemispheric RSFC map was obtained by calculating the Pearson correlation (Fisher Z transformed) between each pair of homotopic voxel time series for each subject in each condition. The between-condition differences in interhemispheric RSFC were then examined at global and voxelwise levels separately. Significantly increased global VMHC was found after sleep deprivation; specifically, a significant increase in VMHC was found in specific brain regions, including the thalamus, paracentral lobule, supplementary motor area, postcentral gyrus and lingual gyrus. No regions showed significantly reduced VMHC after sleep deprivation. Further analysis indicates that these findings did not depend on the various sizes of smoothing kernels that were adopted in the preprocessing steps and that the differences in these regions were still significant with or without global signal regression. Our data suggest that the increased VMHC might reflect the compensatory involvement of bilateral brain areas, especially the bilateral thalamus, to prevent cognitive performance deterioration when sleep pressure is elevated after sleep deprivation. Our findings provide preliminary evidence of interhemispheric correlation changes after SD and contribute to a better understanding of the neural mechanisms of SD.

  3. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror

    2015-01-01

    To contribute to devise successful beta-cell differentiation strategies for the cure of Type 1 diabetes we sought to uncover barriers that restrict endocrine fate acquisition by studying the role of the transcriptional repressor REST in the developing pancreas. Rest expression is prevented...... in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic...... endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3...

  4. Exercise thermoregulation after 14 days of bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Reese, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of bed rest and exercise training during bed rest on body temperature and thermoregulatory responses at rest and during exercise are investigated. Seven male subjects underwent three two-week periods of bed rest during which isometric, isotonic, or no exercises were performed, separated by two ambulatory control periods and preceded by a two-week control period, during which they exercised regularly. Rectal and mean skin temperatures and sweating responses were determined during 70-min submaximal supine exercise during the bed rest and recovery periods. Measurements reveal a reduction in basal oral temperature during the control-recovery periods, with a relatively constant level during bed rest periods, and a significant increase in the rectal temperature elavation brought on by exercise following all three bed-rest regimes. It is concluded that the excessive increase in rectal temperature could be influenced by changes in skin heat conductance or the inhibition of sweating.

  5. Comparison of exercise capacity with resting left ventricular function evaluated by various non-invasive methods in patients with old myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamabe, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Tajiri, Eiichi; Hayakawa, Masanori; Minamiji, Katsumi

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between exercise capacity and resting left ventricular function assessed by several non-invasive methods in patients with old myocardial infarction was investigated. Subjects were 25 male patients whose endpoint was either dyspnea or general fatigue at the symptom-limited maximal graded treadmill exercise test according to Bruce protocol. The indices obtained by non-invasive cardiac examinations included left ventricular fractional shortening (% FS), scintigraphic infact size (% SIS) by 201 Tl myocardial scintigraphy and PEP/ET. A significant correlation of exercise duration with % FS (r = 0.67, p < 0.001) or with % SIS (r = -0.55, p < 0.02) indicated that the more impaired resting left ventricular function, the more was decreased exercise capacity. Also, a significant correlation of systolic blood pressure at the endpoint in exercise test with % FS (r = 0.58, p < 0.005) or with % SIS (r = 0.69, p < 0.001) indicated that inadequate blood pressure response might be partially attributed to impaired left ventricular function during exercise. The response of heart rate at the Bruce protocol stage I correlated with % FS (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) and with % SIS (r = 0.53, p < 0.02), respectively. These findings may be interpreted as chronotropic compensatory mechanism for limited stroke volume during exercise in patients with impaired left ventricular function. Thus, it was concluded that resting left ventricular function assessed by non-invasive cardiac examinations may predict exercise capacity prior to the test to some extent. These informations can be utilized for the decision of the planning at cardiac rehabilitation and also for the guidance in daily activities. (J.P.N.)

  6. NASA'S Standard Measures During Bed Rest: Adaptations in the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Martin, David S.; Cromwell, Roni L.; Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Bed rest is a well-accepted analog of space flight that has been used extensively to investigate physiological adaptations in a larger number of subjects in a shorter amount of time than can be studied with space flight and without the confounding effects associated with normal mission operations. However, comparison across studies of different bed rest durations, between sexes, and between various countermeasure protocols have been hampered by dissimilarities in bed rest conditions, measurement protocols, and testing schedules. To address these concerns, NASA instituted standard bed rest conditions and standard measures for all physiological disciplines participating in studies conducted at the Flight Analogs Research Unit (FARU) at the University of Texas-Medical Branch. Investigators for individual studies employed their own targeted study protocols to address specific hypothesis-driven questions, but standard measures tests were conducted within these studies on a non-interference basis to maximize data availability while reducing the need to implement multiple bed rest studies to understand the effects of a specific countermeasure. When possible, bed rest standard measures protocols were similar to tests nominally used for medically-required measures or research protocols conducted before and after Space Shuttle and International Space Station missions. Specifically, bed rest standard measures for the cardiovascular system implemented before, during, and after bed rest at the FARU included plasma volume (carbon monoxide rebreathing), cardiac mass and function (2D, 3D and Doppler echocardiography), and orthostatic tolerance testing (15- or 30-minutes of 80 degree head-up tilt). Results to-date indicate that when countermeasures are not employed, plasma volume decreases and the incidence of presyncope during head-up tilt is more frequent even after short-duration bed rest while reductions in cardiac function and mass are progressive as bed rest duration

  7. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000166.htm Pericarditis - after heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack . Causes Two types of pericarditis can occur after ...

  8. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a brief ... of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. A ...

  9. Right heart ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiography - right heart ... The catheter will be moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can record pressures from the right atrium and right ventricle. Contrast material ("dye") is ...

  10. Menopause and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Menopause and Heart Disease Updated:Jun 23,2017 Heart ... can become more evident after the onset of menopause. Menopause does not cause cardiovascular diseases . However, certain ...

  11. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Understanding Problems and Causes Heart Murmurs and Valve Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - Problem: Pulmonary Valve Stenosis Problem: Mitral ...

  12. Causal interactions in resting-state networks predict perceived loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yin; Yang, Li; Chen, Sifan; Guo, Daqing; Ding, Zechao; Tam, Kin Yip; Yao, Dezhong

    2017-01-01

    Loneliness is broadly described as a negative emotional response resulting from the differences between the actual and desired social relations of an individual, which is related to the neural responses in connection with social and emotional stimuli. Prior research has discovered that some neural regions play a role in loneliness. However, little is known about the differences among individuals in loneliness and the relationship of those differences to differences in neural networks. The current study aimed to investigate individual differences in perceived loneliness related to the causal interactions between resting-state networks (RSNs), including the dorsal attentional network (DAN), the ventral attentional network (VAN), the affective network (AfN) and the visual network (VN). Using conditional granger causal analysis of resting-state fMRI data, we revealed that the weaker causal flow from DAN to VAN is related to higher loneliness scores, and the decreased causal flow from AfN to VN is also related to higher loneliness scores. Our results clearly support the hypothesis that there is a connection between loneliness and neural networks. It is envisaged that neural network features could play a key role in characterizing the loneliness of an individual.

  13. Altered Resting Brain Function and Structure in Professional Badminton Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Xin; Zhu, Senhua; Wang, Pin; Ye, Zhuoer; Zhou, Ke; Zhuo, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Neuroimaging studies of professional athletic or musical training have demonstrated considerable practice-dependent plasticity in various brain structures, which may reflect distinct training demands. In the present study, structural and functional brain alterations were examined in professional badminton players and compared with healthy controls using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and resting-state functional MRI. Gray matter concentration (GMC) was assessed using voxel-based morphometry (VBM), and resting-brain functions were measured by amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and seed-based functional connectivity. Results showed that the athlete group had greater GMC and ALFF in the right and medial cerebellar regions, respectively. The athlete group also demonstrated smaller ALFF in the left superior parietal lobule and altered functional connectivity between the left superior parietal and frontal regions. These findings indicate that badminton expertise is associated with not only plastic structural changes in terms of enlarged gray matter density in the cerebellum, but also functional alterations in fronto-parietal connectivity. Such structural and functional alterations may reflect specific experiences of badminton training and practice, including high-capacity visuo-spatial processing and hand-eye coordination in addition to refined motor skills. PMID:22840241

  14. Differences in resting corticolimbic functional connectivity in bipolar I euthymia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Salvatore; Moody, Teena D; Vizueta, Nathalie; Thomason, Moriah E; Monti, Martin M; Townsend, Jennifer D; Bookheimer, Susan Y; Altshuler, Lori L

    2012-01-01

    Objective We examined resting state functional connectivity in the brain between key emotion regulation regions in bipolar I disorder to delineate differences in coupling from healthy subjects. Methods Euthymic subjects with bipolar I disorder (n = 20) and matched healthy subjects (n = 20) participated in a resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Low frequency fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal were correlated in the six connections between four anatomically-defined nodes: left and right amygdala and left and right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (vlPFC). Seed-to-voxel connectivity results were probed for commonly coupled regions. Following this, an identified region was included in a mediation analysis to determine the potential of mediation. Results The bipolar I disorder group exhibited significant hyperconnectivity between right amygdala and right vlPFC relative to healthy subjects. The connectivity between these regions in the bipolar I disorder group was partially mediated by activity in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Conclusions Greater coupling between right amygdala and right vlPFC and their partial mediation by the ACC were found in bipolar I disorder subjects in remission and in the absence of a psychological task. These findings have implications for a trait-related and clinically-important imaging biomarker. PMID:23347587

  15. Predicting survival in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pocock, Stuart J; Ariti, Cono A; McMurray, John J V

    2012-01-01

    AimsUsing a large international database from multiple cohort studies, the aim is to create a generalizable easily used risk score for mortality in patients with heart failure (HF).Methods and resultsThe MAGGIC meta-analysis includes individual data on 39 372 patients with HF, both reduced...

  16. Intranasal oxytocin reduces heart rate variability during a mental arithmetic task: A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Lincoln M; Gibson, Stephen J; Labuschagne, Izelle; Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie; Giummarra, Melita J

    2018-02-02

    Heart rate variability (HRV) refers to variation in the interval between successive heart beats. Low HRV is an indicator of potential autonomic nervous system dysfunction. People with chronic pain often display autonomic dysregulation, especially in the parasympathetic nervous system. The hormone oxytocin has been shown to increase HRV in non-clinical samples, but its potential impact on HRV in persons with chronic pain is unknown. This study investigated the impact of intranasal oxytocin on HRV in persons with chronic neck and shoulder pain. Participants included 24 individuals with chronic neck and shoulder pain lasting >12months and 24 age- and sex-matched pain-free controls. In a randomised double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, participants self-administered intranasal oxytocin (24IU) in one session, and placebo in another, before HRV was recorded at rest and during a mental arithmetic task. Intranasal oxytocin did not influence HRV at rest. However, compared to placebo, intranasal oxytocin elicited small decreases in low-frequency and high-frequency HRV in both groups during the mental arithmetic task. These results suggest that intranasal oxytocin may enhance the salience of the mental arithmetic task, leading to reduced engagement of the parasympathetic nervous system when completing the task. Further investigation and replication of these findings are required to improve our understanding of the effects of intranasal oxytocin on autonomic functioning both at rest and under cognitive stress. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Secondary Hyperparathyroidism in Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morsy, Mohamed S; Dishmon, Dwight A; Garg, Nadish; Weber, Karl T

    2017-10-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a well-known pathophysiologic feature of chronic renal failure. In recent years, SHPT has become recognized as a complication of the aldosteronism associated with congestive heart failure and where excretory Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ wasting results in plasma-ionized hypocalcemia and hypomagnesemia. Elevations in plasma parathyroid hormone have adverse systemic consequences, including intracellular Ca 2+ overloading of myocytes and vascular smooth muscle with the induction of oxidative stress. Herein, we briefly review the presence and adverse outcomes of SHPT in persons with heart failure. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Working Model Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite student interest, the heart is often a poorly understood topic in biology. To help students understand this vital organ's physiology, the author created this investigation activity involving the mammalian heart and its role in the circulatory system. Students design, build, and demonstrate working artificial "hearts" to exhibit what they…

  19. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  20. Chronic heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with a reduction in morbidity and mortality.3. Clinical picture. The symptoms of heart failure are ... crepitations and a third heart sound gallop, are more predictive, but none of them are 100% diagnostic. Therefore ... some abnormality) in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. A normal ECG should prompt an ...

  1. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing or ... the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and it happens slowly over time. It's the ...

  2. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  3. Heart attack - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and lifestyle Cholesterol - drug treatment Controlling your high blood pressure Deep vein thrombosis - discharge Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart attack - what to ask your doctor Heart bypass ... pacemaker - discharge High blood pressure - what to ask your doctor How to read ...

  4. Spatiotemporal dynamics of the brain at rest--exploring EEG microstates as electrophysiological signatures of BOLD resting state networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Han; Zotev, Vadim; Phillips, Raquel; Drevets, Wayne C; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2012-05-01

    Neuroimaging research suggests that the resting cerebral physiology is characterized by complex patterns of neuronal activity in widely distributed functional networks. As studied using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal, the resting brain activity is associated with slowly fluctuating hemodynamic signals (~10s). More recently, multimodal functional imaging studies involving simultaneous acquisition of BOLD-fMRI and electroencephalography (EEG) data have suggested that the relatively slow hemodynamic fluctuations of some resting state networks (RSNs) evinced in the BOLD data are related to much faster (~100 ms) transient brain states reflected in EEG signals, that are referred to as "microstates". To further elucidate the relationship between microstates and RSNs, we developed a fully data-driven approach that combines information from simultaneously recorded, high-density EEG and BOLD-fMRI data. Using independent component analysis (ICA) of the combined EEG and fMRI data, we identified thirteen microstates and ten RSNs that are organized independently in their temporal and spatial characteristics, respectively. We hypothesized that the intrinsic brain networks that are active at rest would be reflected in both the EEG data and the fMRI data. To test this hypothesis, the rapid fluctuations associated with each microstate were correlated with the BOLD-fMRI signal associated with each RSN. We found that each RSN was characterized further by a specific electrophysiological signature involving from one to a combination of several microstates. Moreover, by comparing the time course of EEG microstates to that of the whole-brain BOLD signal, on a multi-subject group level, we unraveled for the first time a set of microstate-associated networks that correspond to a range of previously described RSNs, including visual, sensorimotor, auditory, attention, frontal, visceromotor and default mode networks. These

  5. The Effect of 8 Weeks Yoga Training on Respiratory Function and Heart Rate of Non-Athlete Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KH

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Results of this study showed that 8 weeks of practicing yoga and pranayama to increase vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in the first second and decreased heart rate and respiratory rate at rest is. Keywords: Yoga, Pranayama, spirometric indices, heart rate

  6. What Is Heart Valve Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is called a valve-in-valve procedure. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes to Treat Other Related Heart Conditions To ... your doctor may advise you to make heart-healthy lifestyle changes, such as: Heart-healthy eating Aiming for ...

  7. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Heart Failure Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... mean that the heart has stopped beating. Heart Failure in the United States About 5.7 million ...

  8. Limited-Access Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery Menu Topics Topics FAQs Limited-Access Heart Surgery Article Info En español Thousands of heart surgeries ... with cardiovascular disease. What is minimally invasive heart surgery? In minimally invasive heart surgery, surgeons take steps ...

  9. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes ... the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Cholesterol Salt Video: Know Your ...

  10. Human thermoregulatory function during exercise and immersion after 35 days of horizontal bed-rest and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekjavic, Igor B; Golja, Petra; Tipton, Michael J; Eiken, Ola

    2005-10-01

    The present study evaluated the effect of 35 days of experimental horizontal bed-rest on exercise and immersion thermoregulatory function. Fifteen healthy male volunteers were assigned to either a Control (n = 5) or Bed-rest (n = 10) group. Thermoregulatory function was evaluated during a 30-min bout of submaximal exercise on a cycle ergometer, followed immediately by a 100-min immersion in 28 degrees C water. For the Bed-rest group, exercise and immersion thermoregulatory responses observed post-bed-rest were compared with those after a 5 week supervised active recovery period. In both trials, the absolute work load during the exercise portion of the test was identical. During the exercise and immersion, we recorded skin temperature, rectal temperature, the difference in temperature between the forearm and third digit of the right hand (DeltaT(forearm-fingertip))--an index of skin blood flow, sweating rate from the forehead, oxygen uptake and heart rate at minute intervals. Subjects provided ratings of temperature perception and thermal comfort at 5-min intervals. Exercise thermoregulatory responses after bed-rest and recovery were similar. Subjective ratings of temperature perception and thermal comfort during immersion indicated that subjects perceived similar combinations of Tsk and Tre to be warmer and thermally less uncomfortable after bed-rest. The average (SD) exercise-induced increase in Tre relative to resting values was not significantly different between the Post-bed-rest (0.4 (0.2) degrees C) and Recovery (0.5 (0.2) degrees C) trials. During the post-exercise immersion, the decrease in Tre, relative to resting values, was significantly (P immersions, respectively. The gain of the shivering response (increase in VO(2) relative to the decrease in Tre; VO(2)/Tre) was 1.19 l min(-1) degrees C(-1) in the Recovery trial, and was significantly attenuated to 0.51 l min(-1) degrees C(-1) in the Post-bed-rest trial. The greater cooling rate observed in the post-bed-rest

  11. Baroreflex Sensitivity Decreases During 90-Day Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenger, M. B.; Arzeno, N. M.; Platts, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) decreases during spaceflight and simulated spaceflight (head down bed rest [BR]). However, previous studies have only examined BRS in response to a limited blood pressure (BP) range or to a single sudden change in BP. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to examine BRS during 90 days of 6deg head-down tilt BR over a broad range of BP perturbations. METHODS: Nineteen normal volunteers (12M, 7F) were tested one day before BR, and then near BR days 30, 60 and 90. BP was pharmacologically altered by continuous infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Electrocardiogram and continuous BP were collected during 10 min of normal saline (NS), followed by increasing concentrations of PE (10 min each of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.6 micro-g/kg/min). After a 20 min break, NS was infused again for 10 min, followed by increasing concentrations of SNP (10 min each of 0.4, 0.8, 1.2 micro-g/kg/min). Baroreceptor sensitivity was measured as the slope of a sequence of 3 or more beats in which the systolic BP and following R-R interval (RR) both increased or decreased. Spectral heart rate variability (HRV) and mean RR were analyzed using data from only the NS infusions. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was performed to examine the effects of BR and gender. RESULTS: RR decreased (pbaroreflex slope, our measure of BRS, increased with PE and decreased with SNP across BR (pbaroreflex sensitivity decrease during 90 days of BR, and BRS tends to diminish more in women than in men.

  12. Heart transplantation for Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Ana Rita; Prieto, David; Antunes, Pedro; Franco, Fátima; Antunes, Manuel J

    2017-11-01

    Chagas disease is an endemic disease in Latin America that is increasingly found in non-endemic areas all over the world due to the flow of migrants from Central and South America. We present the case of a Brazilian immigrant in Portugal who underwent orthotopic heart transplantation for end-stage Chagas cardiomyopathy. Immunosuppressive therapy included prednisone, mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus. Twelve months after the procedure she is asymptomatic, with good graft function, and with no evidence of complications such as graft rejection, opportunistic infections, neoplasms or reactivation of Trypanosoma cruzi infection. By reporting the first case in Portugal of heart transplantation for Chagas cardiomyopathy, we aim to increase awareness of Chagas disease as an emerging global problem and of Chagas cardiomyopathy as a serious complication for which heart transplantation is a valuable therapeutic option. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Tempat Kedudukan Rest Lingual dalam Pembuatan Gigi Tiruan Sebagian Lepas Kerangka Logam Lingual Rest Seat in Removable Partial Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armida Sofyanis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In certain cases, lingual rest is needed to provide better retention for RPD. Lingual rest is a cingulum rest placed on the lower jaw in RPD design. It is used as an indirect retainer. To make the rest fit best, a good rest seat should be prepared in the cingulum. The outline form of the lingual rest is a half moon shaped with a smooth curve from one marginal ridge to the other, crossing the center of the tooth. The rest seat itself should be V shaped, and the depth is 1 - 1 1/2mm. In this situation, one of four options should be considered i.e.: fabricate a cast veneer crown, or a three quarter crown to place a lingual pin-lay, or put a small amalgam restoration in the base of the preparation when the dentin has been touched.  

  14. Effects of Cluster Sets and Rest-Redistribution on Mechanical Responses to Back Squats in Trained Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufano James J.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Eight resistance-trained men completed three protocols separated by 48-96 hours. Each protocol included 36 repetitions with the same rest duration, but the frequency and length of rest periods differed. The cluster sets of four (CS4 protocol included 30 s of rest after the 4th, 8th, 16th, 20th, 28th, and 32nd repetition in addition to 120 s of rest after the 12th and 24th repetition. For the other two protocols, the total 420 s rest time of CS4 was redistributed to include nine sets of four repetitions (RR4 with 52.5 s of rest after every four repetitions, or 36 sets of single repetitions (RR1 with 12 s of rest after every repetition. Mean (MF and peak (PF force, velocity (MV and PV, and power output (MP and PP were measured during 36 repetitions and were collapsed into 12 repetitions for analysis. Repeated measures ANOVA 3 (protocol x 12 (repetition showed a protocol x repetition interaction for PF, MV, PV, MP, and PP (p-values from <0.001 to 0.012. No interaction or main effect was present for MF. During RR1, MV, PV, MP, and PP were maintained, but decreased throughout every 4-repetition sequence during CS4 and RR4. During CS4 and RR4, PF was less following a rest period compared to subsequent repetitions, whereas PF was maintained during RR1. These data indicate that rest redistribution results in similar average kinetics and kinematics, but if total rest time is redistributed to create shorter but more frequent sets, kinetics and kinematics may remain more constant.

  15. Ethnic Differences in Resting Heart Rate Variability : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, LaBarron K.; Hu, Dixie D.; Koenig, Julian; Sollers, John J.; Kapuku, Gaston; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold; Thayer, Julian F.

    Background Ethnic disparities in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are widely documented in the literature. Recently, research has shown that decreased parasympathetic cardiac modulation is associated with the established and emerging risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and stroke. In

  16. The effect of physical exercise and resting heart rate on cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, R.H.H.

    2012-01-01

    The number of people conducting exercise in a natural environment, such as walking parts of an ancient pilgrimage, is increasing, justifying scientific research to its health effects. Walking part of the pilgrimage route to Santiago de Compostela in Spain, consisting of 280 km in 12 days, resulted

  17. Gender differences in the relationship between resting heart rate variability and 24-hour blood pressure variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Julian F; Sollers, John J; Friedman, Bruce H; Koenig, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The study explored the relationship between time- and frequency-domain indices of cardiac autonomic control and 24 h blood pressure variability (BPV) in a sample of healthy men and women. Vagally mediated cardiac control was inversely related to 24 h BPV, and measures of cardiac autonomic control were better predictors of systolic BPV in men and better predictors of diastolic BPV in women. These findings may help researchers to understand the disparity in cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality between men and women.

  18. Effect of smoking on the central circulation at rest and during exercise as studied by radiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timisjaervi, J.; Kuikka, J.; Hirvonen, L.; Kettunen, R.; Moskinen, M.; Kari-Koskinen, O.; Tuominen, M.

    1980-01-01

    The pulmonary vessels are the first target of tobacco smoke in the circulatory system, but the functional changes occuring in the pulmonary circulation are poorly understood. Hence 46 volunteers were studied by radiocardiography under the following conditions: 1. At rest before and after smoking 2 cigarettes (15 men); 2. After repeated ergometer exercise (5 min. 100 W) with and without smoking (13 men); and 3. Control experiments under the corresponding conditions without smoking (18 subjects). A significant increase occured in heart rate, cardiac output and systolic arterial blood pressure after smoking when at rest, but an almost significant decrease in pulmonary dispersion volume, whereas the heart rate and pulmonary capillary pressure attained significantly higher values after than before smoking in the exercise tests, with a significant decrease observed in stroke volume, pulmonary blood volume and pulmonary dispersion volume. It is concluded that smoking impairs physical performance increases pulmonary capillary pressure and reduces pulmonary blood volume and probably the number of open capillaries. (orig.) [de

  19. Diagnostic value of stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging in detection of coronary disease in elderly patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Pingping; Tian Yueqin; Fang Wei; Shen Rui; Yang Minfu; Wei Hongxing; Guo Xinhua; He Zuoxiang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Coronary artery disease is one of the most common causes of death in elderly people. Yet, definite diagnosis is a dilemma due to the variety of symptoms and signs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of nuclear stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging(MPI) in detection of coronary disease in the elderly. Methods: Two hundred and five elderly subjects (≥60 years old, average of 67 ± 5) who were suspected to have coronary disease, underwent both stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging (185 with exercise stress and 20 with adenosine stress) and coronary angiography (CAG). All had no pereutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) or coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Coronary angiography was used as a 'golden standard' to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the stress-rest myocardial perfusion imaging. χ 2 -test was used in data analysis with SPSS 15.0. Results: Among 205 patients. there were 57 patients with an abnormal CAG result and 148 patients with a normal result. Of the 57 patients, there were 30 one-, 19 two-, and 8 three-vessel stenosis. Fifteen were mild-, 17 were moderate-, 17 were severe stenosis, and 8 were totally occluded.About 63% (36/57) had positive stress-rest MPI. Of the 148 subjects who had a normal CAG, 135 had negative MPL. The sensitivity.specificity and accuracy of stress MPI were 63% (36/57), 91% (135/148) and 83% (171/205) in patient level.respectively. The di-agnostic sensitivities of stress-rest MPI for detection of one-, two-, and three-vessel stenosis were 57%(17/30), 58% (11/19) and 8/8, respectively. All 185 patients who underwent exemise stress MPI were divided into 2 groups according to whether the patients reached the target heart rate or not at the peak of the test. And 53 patients (29%) were group 1 (reached the target heart rate)and 132 patients (71%) were group 2 (did not reach the target heart rate). The sensitivity of group 1 wag higher than that of group 2, but with no

  20. Prognostic Factors for Survival in Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Sayuri; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Fujisaki, Shinya; Higashi, Akifumi; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Sada, Yoshiharu; Hidaka, Takayuki; Kurisu, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Hideya; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological data of pulmonary hypertension (PH) due to left heart disease (LHD) are limited. This study investigated hemodynamic and clinical factors associated with mortality in patients with PH due to LHD. We conducted a retrospective review in 243 patients with PH due to LHD, defined as mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg and pulmonary wedge pressure >15 mmHg at rest in right heart catheterization. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were performed. Seventy-five patients died during an average follow-up of 52 months (range, 20-73 months). On multivariate analysis, only diastolic pulmonary vascular pressure gradient (DPG) ≥7 mmHg among hemodynamic measurements was a predictor of mortality. Elevated N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP), more severe New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, anemia, and renal dysfunction were more strongly associated with mortality. Mean right atrial pressure (RAP) and currently available markers of pulmonary vascular remodeling including transpulmonary pressure gradient (TPG) and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) had no effect on survival. DPG is weakly associated with mortality in PH due to LHD. Clinical factors such as NT-pro BNP, NYHA class, anemia and renal dysfunction are superior predictors. The prognostic ability of hemodynamic factors such as mean RAP, TPG, PVR and DPG is limited.

  1. Endocannabinoids and the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiley, C. Robin

    2009-01-01

    Endocannabinoids, such as anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol, are synthesized from membrane phospholipids in the heart and other cardiovascular tissues. They activate cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, TRPV1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and perhaps a novel vascular G-protein-coupled receptor. Inactivation is by cellular uptake and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). Endocannabinoids relax coronary and other arteries and decrease cardiac work, but seem not to be involved in tonic regulation of cardiovascular function. They act as a stress response system which is activated, for example, in myocardial infarction and circulatory shock. Endocannabinoids are largely protective; they decrease tissue damage and arrhythmia in myocardial infarction, may reduce progression of atherosclerosis (CB2 receptor stimulation inhibits lesion progression), and FAAH knockout mice (which have enhanced endocannabinoid levels) show decreased cardiac dysfunction with age compared to wild-types. However, endocannabinoids may mediate doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction. Their signaling pathways are not fully elucidated but they can lead to changed expression of a variety of genes, including those involved in inflammatory responses. There is potential for therapeutic targeting of endocannabinoids and their receptors, but their apparent involvement in both protective and deleterious actions on the heart mean that careful risk assessment is needed before any treatment can be introduced. PMID:19276990

  2. The heart: Congenital disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, C.B.

    1987-01-01

    The most important diagnostic requirement in congenital heart disease (CHD) is definition of cardiovascular pathoanatomy. The considerable success in operative correction of even the most complex anomalies in recent years compels ever increasing precision in preoperative demonstration of these anomalies. Early experience with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at several institutions indicated that this modality is an effective noninvasive technique for evaluation of CHD. Indeed, MRI seems to have some advantage over other techniques, including angiography, for definitive diagnosis of congenital anomalies of the heart and great arteries and veins. The absence of ionizing radiation and contrast medium in MRI is an additional advantage; the former is particularly important for children, who, up to this time, have frequently been subjected to enormous radiation burdens from multiple cineangiograms during initial diagnosis and follow-up. This chapter describes the MRI appearance of cardiovascular anatomy im the segmental fashion proposed for analysis of complex CHD. Likewise, MRI demonstration of congenital cardiovascular lesions is organized into abnormalities situated at the four segmental cardiovascular levels: great vessels, atria, ventricles, and visceroatrial relationship. The role of MRI in evaluation of complex ventricular anomalies such as single ventricle and thoracic aortic abnormalities is specifically described

  3. Resting state networks' corticotopy: the dual intertwined rings architecture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Mesmoudi

    Full Text Available How does the brain integrate multiple sources of information to support normal sensorimotor and cognitive functions? To investigate this question we present an overall brain architecture (called "the dual intertwined rings architecture" that relates the functional specialization of cortical networks to their spatial distribution over the cerebral cortex (or "corticotopy". Recent results suggest that the resting state networks (RSNs are organized into two large families: 1 a sensorimotor family that includes visual, somatic, and auditory areas and 2 a large association family that comprises parietal, temporal, and frontal regions and also includes the default mode network. We used two large databases of resting state fMRI data, from which we extracted 32 robust RSNs. We estimated: (1 the RSN functional roles by using a projection of the results on task based networks (TBNs as referenced in large databases of fMRI activation studies; and (2 relationship of the RSNs with the Brodmann Areas. In both classifications, the 32 RSNs are organized into a remarkable architecture of two intertwined rings per hemisphere and so four rings linked by homotopic connections. The first ring forms a continuous ensemble and includes visual, somatic, and auditory cortices, with interspersed bimodal cortices (auditory-visual, visual-somatic and auditory-somatic, abbreviated as VSA ring. The second ring integrates distant parietal, temporal and frontal regions (PTF ring through a network of association fiber tracts which closes the ring anatomically and ensures a functional continuity within the ring. The PTF ring relates association cortices specialized in attention, language and working memory, to the networks involved in motivation and biological regulation and rhythms. This "dual intertwined architecture" suggests a dual integrative process: the VSA ring performs fast real-time multimodal integration of sensorimotor information whereas the PTF ring performs multi

  4. Resting State Networks' Corticotopy: The Dual Intertwined Rings Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesmoudi, Salma; Perlbarg, Vincent; Rudrauf, David; Messe, Arnaud; Pinsard, Basile; Hasboun, Dominique; Cioli, Claudia; Marrelec, Guillaume; Toro, Roberto; Benali, Habib; Burnod, Yves

    2013-01-01

    How does the brain integrate multiple sources of information to support normal sensorimotor and cognitive functions? To investigate this question we present an overall brain architecture (called “the dual intertwined rings architecture”) that relates the functional specialization of cortical networks to their spatial distribution over the cerebral cortex (or “corticotopy”). Recent results suggest that the resting state networks (RSNs) are organized into two large families: 1) a sensorimotor family that includes visual, somatic, and auditory areas and 2) a large association family that comprises parietal, temporal, and frontal regions and also includes the default mode network. We used two large databases of resting state fMRI data, from which we extracted 32 robust RSNs. We estimated: (1) the RSN functional roles by using a projection of the results on task based networks (TBNs) as referenced in large databases of fMRI activation studies; and (2) relationship of the RSNs with the Brodmann Areas. In both classifications, the 32 RSNs are organized into a remarkable architecture of two intertwined rings per hemisphere and so four rings linked by homotopic connections. The first ring forms a continuous ensemble and includes visual, somatic, and auditory cortices, with interspersed bimodal cortices (auditory-visual, visual-somatic and auditory-somatic, abbreviated as VSA ring). The second ring integrates distant parietal, temporal and frontal regions (PTF ring) through a network of association fiber tracts which closes the ring anatomically and ensures a functional continuity within the ring. The PTF ring relates association cortices specialized in attention, language and working memory, to the networks involved in motivation and biological regulation and rhythms. This “dual intertwined architecture” suggests a dual integrative process: the VSA ring performs fast real-time multimodal integration of sensorimotor information whereas the PTF ring performs multi

  5. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  6. Reduced myocardial perfusion reserve and transmural perfusion gradient in heart transplant arteriopathy assessed by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, Olaf M; Wilke, Norbert M; Panse, Prasad; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Wilson, Betsy V; Wilson, Robert F; Miller, Leslie W

    2003-09-17

    The goal of this study was to detect transplant arteriopathy (Tx-CHD) by a reduced myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) and resting endomyocardial/epimyocardial perfusion ratio (Endo/Epi ratio). Transplant arteriopathy often lacks clinical symptoms and is the reason for frequent surveillance angiography in heart transplant (Tx) recipients. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging (MRPI) allows noninvasive assessment of transmural and selective endomyocardial and epimyocardial perfusion. Fifteen healthy volunteers (controls) and three groups (A, B, C) of Tx recipients were included. In controls and patients, MPR (hyperemic/resting perfusion) and Endo/Epi ratio were determined with MRPI after injection of gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid at rest and during hyperemia (intravenous adenosine). Group A (n = 10) had no left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and/or prior rejection, while patients in group B (n = 10) had at least one of these characteristics. Patients in group A and B had a normal coronary angiogram and a coronary flow reserve (CFR) of > or =2.5 (CFR = hyperemic/resting blood flow). Group C (n = 7) had Tx-CHD diagnosed by angiography and a reduced CFR (2.3 with sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 85%. If LV hypertrophy and prior rejection are excluded, Tx-CHD can be excluded by an Endo/Epi ratio of >1.3 with 100% and 80%. Magnetic resonance perfusion imaging detects Tx-CHD by a decreased MPR. After exclusion of LV hypertrophy and prior rejection, resting Endo/Epi ratio alone might be sufficient to indicate Tx-CHD.

  7. Cardiovascular indicators at rest, and during an incremental test in young males. DOI: 10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n1p32

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Quieroti Rodrigues

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study compared blood glucose levels, heart rate at rest and during exercise, besides body composition between hypertensive and normotensive individuals. The sample consisted of 32 young males with an average age of 22.6 years. Initially, the blood pressure was measured to split the sample into two groups: hypertensive and normotensive. Subsequently were measured, fasting blood glucose, bioelectrical impedance, anthropometry, and resting heart rate, heart rate during maximal effort test and recovery phase. Statistical analysis was composed by Student t test and two-way repeated measures analysis. The significance adopted was p = 0.05. The analyzed data showed that hypertensive patients present higher metabolic rates and hemodynamic values than normotensive individuals, which are indicators of cardiovascular risk.

  8. Angiotensin inhibition in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John JV Mcmurray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival in patients with heart failure remains very poor, and is worse than that for most common cancers, including bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is not completely blocked by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition. Blockade of the RAAS at the AT1-receptor has the theoretical benefit of more effective blockade of the actions of angiotensin II. ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is prevent the breakdown of bradykinin: this has been blamed for some of the unwanted effects of ACE-Is although bradykinin may have advantageous effects in heart failure. Consequently, ACE-Is and ARBs might be complementary or even additive treatments; recent trials have tested these hypotheses. The Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM programme compared the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB candesartan (target dose 32 mg once daily to placebo in three distinct but complementary populations of patients with symptomatic heart failure. These were: patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF who were ACE-I-intolerant (CHARM-Alternative; patients with reduced LVEF who were being treated with ACE-Is (CHARM-Added; and patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function (CHARM-Preserved. There were substantial and statistically significant reductions in the primary composite end point (risk of cardiovascular death or hospital admission for heart failure in CHARM-Alternative. This was also the case in CHARM-Added, supporting and extending the findings of Val-HeFT. In CHARM-Preserved, the effect of candesartan on the primary end point did not reach conventional statistical significance though hospital admission for heart failure was reduced significantly with candesartan. In the CHARM-Overall programme there was a statistically borderline reduction in all-cause mortality with a clear reduction in cardiovascular mortality. All-cause mortality was

  9. Angiotensin inhibition in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John JV McMurray

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Survival in patients with heart failure remains very poor, and is worse than that for most common cancers, including bowel cancer in men and breast cancer in women. The renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS is not completely blocked by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibition. Blockade of the RAAS at the AT1-receptor has the theoretical benefit of more effective blockade of the actions of angiotensin II. ACE inhibitors (ACE-Is prevent the breakdown of bradykinin: this has been blamed for some of the unwanted effects of ACE-Is although bradykinin may have advantageous effects in heart failure. Consequently, ACE-Is and ARBs might be complementary or even additive treatments; recent trials have tested these hypotheses.The Candesartan in Heart failure Assessment of Reduction in Mortality and morbidity (CHARM programme compared the angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB candesartan (target dose 32 mg once daily to placebo in three distinct but complementary populations of patients with symptomatic heart failure. These were: patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF who were ACE-I-intolerant (CHARM-Alternative; patients with reduced LVEF who were being treated with ACE-Is (CHARM-Added; and patients with preserved left ventricular systolic function (CHARM-Preserved.There were substantial and statistically significant reductions in the primary composite end point (risk of cardiovascular death or hospital admission for heart failure in CHARM-Alternative. This was also the case in CHARM-Added, supporting and extending the findings of Val-HeFT. In CHARM-Preserved, the effect of candesartan on the primary end point did not reach conventional statistical significance though hospital admission for heart failure was reduced significantly with candesartan. In the CHARM-Overall programme there was a statistically borderline reduction in all-cause mortality with a clear reduction in cardiovascular mortality. All-cause mortality was

  10. Isometric stress in cardiovascular magnetic resonance - a simple and easily replicable method of assessing cardiovascular differences not apparent at rest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortensen, Kristian H.; Jones, Alexander; Steeden, Jennifer A.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Muthurangu, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Isometric exercise may unmask cardiovascular disease not evident at rest, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is proven for comprehensive resting assessment. This study devised a simple isometric exercise CMR methodology and assessed the hemodynamic response evoked by isometric exercise. A biceps isometric exercise technique was devised for CMR, and 75 healthy volunteers were assessed at rest, after 3-minute biceps exercise, and 5-minute of recovery using: (1) blood pressure (BP) and (2) CMR measured aortic flow and left ventricular function. Total peripheral resistance (SVR) and arterial compliance (TAC), cardiac output (CO), left ventricular volumes and function (ejection fraction, stroke volume, power output), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and rate pressure product were assessed at all time points. Image quality was preserved during stress. During exercise there were increases in CO (+14.9 %), HR (+17.0 %), SVR (+9.8 %), systolic BP (+22.4 %), diastolic BP (+25.4 %) and mean BP (+23.2 %). In addition, there were decreases in TAC (-22.0 %) and left ventricular ejection fraction (-6.3 %). Age and body mass index modified the evoked response, even when resting measures were similar. Isometric exercise technique evokes a significant cardiovascular response in CMR, unmasking physiological differences that are not apparent at rest. (orig.)

  11. Isometric stress in cardiovascular magnetic resonance - a simple and easily replicable method of assessing cardiovascular differences not apparent at rest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Kristian H.; Jones, Alexander; Steeden, Jennifer A.; Taylor, Andrew M.; Muthurangu, Vivek [UCL Centre for Cardiovascular MR, UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Science, Level 6 Old Nurses Home, Cardiorespiratory Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    Isometric exercise may unmask cardiovascular disease not evident at rest, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging is proven for comprehensive resting assessment. This study devised a simple isometric exercise CMR methodology and assessed the hemodynamic response evoked by isometric exercise. A biceps isometric exercise technique was devised for CMR, and 75 healthy volunteers were assessed at rest, after 3-minute biceps exercise, and 5-minute of recovery using: (1) blood pressure (BP) and (2) CMR measured aortic flow and left ventricular function. Total peripheral resistance (SVR) and arterial compliance (TAC), cardiac output (CO), left ventricular volumes and function (ejection fraction, stroke volume, power output), blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and rate pressure product were assessed at all time points. Image quality was preserved during stress. During exercise there were increases in CO (+14.9 %), HR (+17.0 %), SVR (+9.8 %), systolic BP (+22.4 %), diastolic BP (+25.4 %) and mean BP (+23.2 %). In addition, there were decreases in TAC (-22.0 %) and left ventricular ejection fraction (-6.3 %). Age and body mass index modified the evoked response, even when resting measures were similar. Isometric exercise technique evokes a significant cardiovascular response in CMR, unmasking physiological differences that are not apparent at rest. (orig.)

  12. Intrinsic functional connectivity between amygdala and hippocampus during rest predicts enhanced memory under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Voogd, Lycia D; Klumpers, Floris; Fernández, Guillén; Hermans, Erno J

    2017-01-01

    Declarative memories of stressful events are less prone to forgetting than mundane events. Animal research has demonstrated that such stress effects on consolidation of hippocampal-dependent memories require the amygdala. In humans, it has been shown that during learning, increased amygdala-hippocampal interactions are related to more efficient memory encoding. Animal models predict that following learning, amygdala-hippocampal interactions are instrumental to strengthening the consolidation of such declarative memories. Whether this is the case in humans is unknown and remains to be empirically verified. To test this, we analyzed data from a sample of 120 healthy male participants who performed an incidental encoding task and subsequently underwent resting-state functional MRI in a stressful and a neutral context. Stress was assessed by measures of salivary cortisol, blood pressure, heart rate, and subjective ratings. Memory was tested afterwards outside of the scanner. Our data show that memory was stronger in the stress context compared to the neutral context and that stress-induced cortisol responses were associated with this memory enhancement. Interestingly, amygdala-hippocampal connectivity during post-encoding awake rest regardless of context (stress or neutral) was associated with the enhanced memory performance under stress. Thus, our findings are in line with a role for intrinsic functional connectivity during rest between the amygdala and the hippocampus in the state effects of stress on strengthening memory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Symposium Conclusion: Women's cardiovascular health after bed rest or space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughson, Richard L.; Arbeille, Phillipe; Shoemaker, Kevin; Edgell, Heather

    The Canadian Space Agency has recently funded research on two long-duration missions to study cardiovascular deconditioning associated with bed rest or space flight. The first, Women's International Space simulation for Exploration (WISE-2005) examined the responses during a 60-day head down bed rest (HDBR) of 24 women with or without a countermeasure that consisted of supine treadmill running within a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) device followed by 10-minutes resting LBNP and on different days high intensity resistance exercise on a flywheel device. The second study, Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular Control on return from the International Space Station (CCISS) is currently underway with two male astronauts tested and the first woman anticipated later this year. Women have been previously identified as being more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance than men after both bed rest and space flight studies. Thus, in the WISE-2005 study we examined responses of the cardiovascular system after HDBR in women and compared these to previously published data from men. We found that after HDBR women have a greater increase in heart rate with infusion of the drug isoproterenol and this was consistent with observations in men. However, during drug infusion the women had a reduction in leg vascular resistance while men had an increase. The exercise countermeasure group had preserved heart rate and leg vascular resistance responses to drug infusion. The ability to vasoconstrict the legs and splanchnic region is critical to maintenance of upright posture after HDBR and space flight. In the WISE-2005 study, subjects who were able to constrict the legs and/or splanchnic region after HDBR were much less likely to have a marked drop in blood pressure before the end of 10-minutes upright tilt, and subjects who performed the countermeasure were more likely to be in this group of tilt test finishers. These data provide new insight into mechanisms that might be responsible for

  14. Nuclear comparative morphometric study between DCIS and normal resting mammary gland tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacu, Mariana; Aşchie, Mariana; Boşoteanu, Mădălina; Petcu, L

    2011-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is the malignant epithelial cell proliferation that affect only ducts, including lobular, without basement membrane interruption. Benign or malignant cell phenotype is defined by nuclear appearance. Morphometric analysis could provide quantitative information about nuclear profile in several lesions. In this study, we assess nuclear morphometric features of mammary epithelial cells in DCIS compared to normal resting mammary gland tissue. For morphological evaluation, we included two groups of mammary gland tissue. The first group comprised breast tissue from 20 women surgically treated and histopathologically confirmed with DCIS. The second control group was represented by normal resting mammary tissue obtained from another 20 women surgically treated for fibroadenoma. Evaluated morphometric parameters were: nuclear area (NA), nuclear perimeter (P), maximum diameter (Dmax), minimum diameter (Dmin), elongation factor (E). Morphometric assessment of DCIS nuclei showed significant higher values than normal resting breast tissue. Morphometric analysis gave information about tumor aggressiveness, invasion tendency and disease prognostic.

  15. Pilot Randomized Study of a Gratitude Journaling Intervention on Heart Rate Variability and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Patients With Stage B Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwine, Laura S; Henry, Brook L; Pung, Meredith A; Wilson, Kathleen; Chinh, Kelly; Knight, Brian; Jain, Shamini; Rutledge, Thomas; Greenberg, Barry; Maisel, Alan; Mills, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Stage B, asymptomatic heart failure (HF) presents a therapeutic window for attenuating disease progression and development of HF symptoms, and improving quality of life. Gratitude, the practice of appreciating positive life features, is highly related to quality of life, leading to development of promising clinical interventions. However, few gratitude studies have investigated objective measures of physical health; most relied on self-report measures. We conducted a pilot study in Stage B HF patients to examine whether gratitude journaling improved biomarkers related to HF prognosis. Patients (n = 70; mean [standard deviation] age = 66.2 [7.6] years) were randomized to an 8-week gratitude journaling intervention or treatment as usual. Baseline (T1) assessments included the six-item Gratitude Questionnaire, resting heart rate variability (HRV), and an inflammatory biomarker index. At T2 (midintervention), the six-item Gratitude Questionnaire was measured. At T3 (postintervention), T1 measures were repeated but also included a gratitude journaling task. The gratitude intervention was associated with improved trait gratitude scores (F = 6.0, p = .017, η = 0.10), reduced inflammatory biomarker index score over time (F = 9.7, p = .004, η = 0.21), and increased parasympathetic HRV responses during the gratitude journaling task (F = 4.2, p = .036, η = 0.15), compared with treatment as usual. However, there were no resting preintervention to postintervention group differences in HRV (p values > .10). Gratitude journaling may improve biomarkers related to HF morbidity, such as reduced inflammation; large-scale studies with active control conditions are needed to confirm these findings. Clinicaltrials.govidentifier:NCT01615094.

  16. Use of CCK-8 to improve resting 99Tcm-MIBI cardiac scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, S.; Hille, N.; Webb, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: MIBI excretion is mainly hepatobiliary, and resting 99 Tc m -MIBI studies can be compromised by abdominal activity, especially left subdiaphragmatic activity, presumably due to excretion into small bowel (SB). Retention of activity within the liver and biliary system can also impair scan quality. This study examined whether cholecystokinin (CCK) can: clear activity from SB; improve clearance of 99 Tc m -MIBI from the liver and biliary system; improve image quality? 22 patients were divided into CCK (n 11) and control (n = 11) groups. The CCK group received 370 MBq of 99 Tc m -MIBI at rest. At 30 min SPET was acquired. CCK-8 was then infused (0.01 μg.kg -1 over 3 min). 15 min later (70 min after intravenous MIBI), a second SPET was obtained. Controls had identical images, but no CCK. A physician blinded to CCK status graded the images for liver and SB activity, and overall scan quality. Liver and heart ROIs were drawn, count rates determined and comparisons made between groups and across time. In patients with SB activity initially interfering with the inferior wall, images post-CCK were dramatically better. Image quality at 70 min was significantly better than at 30 min in CCK and control groups. However, improvement in image quality and liver/heart count rate ratios was not significantly greater for the CCK group than for controls (P = 0.2). Liver activity reduced over time, but MIBI clearance from liver was not significantly increased by CCK. In conclusion: (1) CCK clears small bowel activity when present. It is useful when rest images are poor due to left subdiaphragmatic activity. (2) CCK does not increase clearance rate of 99 Tc m -MIBI from liver. (3) The trend for CCK to improve image quality for all patients is not significant. CCK is thus not recommended for use in every patient

  17. Functional connectivity analysis of the brain network using resting-state fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterns of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals reflect the underlying neural architecture. The study of the brain network based on these self-organized patterns is termed resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). This review article aims at briefly reviewing a basic concept of this technology and discussing its implications for neuropsychological studies. First, the technical aspects of resting-state fMRI, including signal sources, physiological artifacts, image acquisition, and analytical methods such as seed-based correlation analysis and independent component analysis, are explained, followed by a discussion on the major resting-state networks, including the default mode network. In addition, the structure-function correlation studied using diffuse tensor imaging and resting-state fMRI is briefly discussed. Second, I have discussed the reservations and potential pitfalls of 2 major imaging methods: voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and task fMRI. Problems encountered with voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping can be overcome by using resting-state fMRI and evaluating undamaged brain networks in patients. Regarding task fMRI in patients, I have also emphasized the importance of evaluating the baseline brain activity because the amplitude of activation in BOLD fMRI is hard to interpret as the same baseline cannot be assumed for both patient and normal groups. (author)

  18. The Use of RESTful Web Services in Medical Informatics and Clinical Research and Its Implementation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    RESTful web services nowadays are state-of-the-art in business transactions over the internet. They are however not very much used in medical informatics and in clinical research, especially not in Europe. To make an inventory of RESTful web services that can be used in medical informatics and clinical research, including those that can help in patient empowerment in the DACH region and in Europe, and to develop some new RESTful web services for use in clinical research and regulatory review. A literature search on available RESTful web services has been performed and new RESTful web services have been developed on an application server using the Java language. Most of the web services found originate from institutes and organizations in the USA, whereas no similar web services could be found that are made available by European organizations. New RESTful web services have been developed for LOINC codes lookup, for UCUM conversions and for use with CDISC Standards. A comparison is made between "top down" and "bottom up" web services, the latter meant to answer concrete questions immediately. The lack of RESTful web services made available by European organizations in healthcare and medical informatics is striking. RESTful web services may in short future play a major role in medical informatics, and when localized for the German language and other European languages, can help to considerably facilitate patient empowerment. This however requires an EU equivalent of the US National Library of Medicine.

  19. Evaluation of long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure. Is cardiac imaging with iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine useful?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Michihiro; Kurihara, Tadashi

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cardiac sympathetic activity on long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure was evaluated by cardiac imaging with 123 I-MIBG in 46 patients admitted for the first episode of heart failure. Cardiac imaging was performed with 123 I-MIBG and 201 Tl at rest on separate days before discharge. Using whole body imaging, the ratio of cardiac uptake of the isotope to total injected dose was calculated (percentage uptake). The cardiac uptake ratio of 123 I-MIBG (percentage uptake of 123 I-MIBG divided by percentage uptake of 201 Tl) and percentage washout of 123 I-MIBG from the heart over 3 hours were calculated as scintigraphic parameters. Cardiac events were defined as cardiac death or deterioration of heart failure requiring readmission. Scintigraphic parameters, clinical parameters, left ventricular function obtained by echocardiography and neurohumoral parameters were compared between the event group and event-free group. During the follow-up period, cardiac events developed in 14 patients (30%). Univariate analysis showed uptake ratio and washout rate of 123 I-MIBG, percentage uptake of 201 Tl, New York Heart Association class at discharge, fractional shortening of the left ventricle, serum norepinephrine and atrial natriuretic peptide levels differed significantly between the two groups. Cox proportional-hazard analysis showed that the uptake ratio was an independent predictor of cardiac events. When a cut-off point in the uptake ratio equal to or less than 0.50 and age equal to or more than 65 years old were included in the Cox proportional-hazard analysis instead of actual numbers, relative risks of cardiac events by each index were 31.2 and 4.2, respectively. These data suggest that cardiac uptake of 123 I-MIBG is a strong and independent predictor of long-term prognosis in patients with heart failure. (K.H.)

  20. Effect of in vivo heart irradiation on the development of antioxidant defenses and cardiac functions in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benderitter, M.; Assem, M.; Maupoil, V.

    1995-01-01

    During radiotherapy of thoracic tumors, the heart is often included in the primary treatment volume, and chronic impairment of myocardial function occurs. The cellular biomolecules are altered directly by radiation or damaged indirectly by free radical production. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the biochemical and functional response of the rat heart to a single high dose of radiation. The effect of 20 Gy local X irradiation was determined in the heart of Wistar rats under general anesthesia. Mechanical performances were measured in vitro using an isolated perfused working heart model, and cardiac antioxidant defenses were also evaluated. Hearts were studied at 1 and 4 months after irradiation. This single dose of radiation induced a marked drop in the mechanical activity of the rat heart: aortic output was significantly reduced (18% less than control values) at 1 month postirradiation and remained depressed for the rest of the experimental period (21% less than control 4 months after treatment). This suggests the development of myocardial failure after irradiation. The decline of functional parameters was associated with changes in antioxidant defenses. The decrease in cardiac levels of vitamin E (-30%) was associated with an increase in the levels of Mn-SOD and glustathione peroxidase (+45.5% and +32%, respectively, at 4 months postirradiation). However, cardiac vitamin C and catalase levels remained constant. Since these antioxidant defenses were activated relatively long after irradiation, it is suggested that this was probable due to the production of free radical species associated with the development of inflammation. 49 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab