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Sample records for included radon concentration

  1. Radon concentration in The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, R.J. de; Put, L.W.; Veldhuizen, A.

    1986-02-01

    In 1000 dwellings, which can be assumed to be an reasonable representation of the average Dutch dwellings, time averaged radon concentrations, radon daughter concentrations and gamma-exposure tempi are determined during a year with passive dosemeters. They are also determined outdoor at circa 200 measure points. (Auth.)

  2. Ion climate and radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busbarna, L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristic values of radon concentration in natural ion climate and in open air were compared and the effect of artificially produced negative ion excess on the radon concentration of air was studied. The results show that the radon concentration measurable at the rise of negative ion excess is smaller than that in the case of natural equilibrium. This effect can be utilized lowering the background of the scintillation chambers, thus increasing their sensitivity. The negative ions of the artificial ion climate lower radon concentration in closed space. The question arises whether only the ion climate is responsible for the effects on the organism and on the nervous system or the radon concentration of the air also contributes to them. (author)

  3. Control of indoor radon and radon progeny concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sextro, R.G.

    1985-05-01

    There are three general categories of techniques for the control of radon and radon progeny concentrations in indoor air - restriction of radon entry, reduction of indoor radon concentrations by ventilation or air cleaning, and removal of airborne radon progeny. The predominant radon entry process in most residences appears to be pressure driven flow of soil gas through cracks or other openings in the basement, slab, or subfloor. Sealing these openings or ventilation of the subslab or subfloor space are methods of reducing radon entry rates. Indoor radon concentrations may be reduced by increased ventilation. The use of charcoal filters for removal of radon gas in the indoor air by adsorption has also been proposed. Concentrations of radon progeny, which are responsible for most of the health risks associated with radon exposures, can be controlled by use of electrostatic or mechanical filtration. Air circulation can also reduce radon progeny concentrations in certain cases. This paper reviews the application and limitations of each of these control measures and discusses recent experimental results.

  4. Control of indoor radon and radon progeny concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sextro, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    There are three general categories of techniques for the control of radon and radon progeny concentrations in indoor air -- restriction of radon entry, reduction of indoor radon concentrations by ventilation or air cleaning, and removal of airborne radon progeny. The predominant radon entry process in most residences appears to be pressure driven flow of soil gas through cracks or other openings in the basement, slab, or subfloor. Sealing these openings or ventilation of the subslab or subfloor space are methods of reducing radon entry rates. Indoor radon concentrations may be reduced by increased ventilation. The use of charcoal filters for removal of radon gas in indoor air by adsorption has also been proposed. Concentrations of radon progeny, which are responsible for most of the health risks associated with radon exposures, can be controlled by use of electrostatic or mechanical filtration. Air circulation can also reduce radon progeny concentrations in certain cases. This paper reviews the application and limitations of each of these control measures and discusses recent experimental results

  5. Radon concentration in buildings of the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Kemski, J.; Siehl, A.

    1997-01-01

    Since the 70ies, investigations on the determination and evaluation of the population's exposure to radiation by radon and its progeny have been carried out in Germany. Of topical interest is the radon concentration in buildings and especially in dependence on the radon potential in the geological subsoil. Measurements in buildings in East and West Germany have shown that there are no serious differences in the frequency distributions of indoor radon concentration between the new and old federal states. Thus, the classification of radon concentrations up to 250 Bq m -3 already made in 1988 by the German Commission on Radiological Protection for the old federal states can be applied as a normal range throughout the whole Federal Republic of Germany. It is estimated that the normal range of radon concentration in 1.1 to 1.8% of the buildings in Germany is exceeded. Radon concentrations above 250 Bq m 3 concentrate on areas with increased geogenic radon potential which concerns approximately 3% of the German territory. Empirical ranking classifications, including as relevant characteristic values the radon concentrations in the ground air and the gas permeability of the soil in a depth of 1 m, are used on the quantification of the geogenic radon potential. A high geogenic radon potential means that the concentration of radon in buildings in these areas is likely to be higher that it is typical of the country in the whole. Since the radon concentration in buildings is influenced by a complex chain of effects of different processes in soils and rocks in their natural condition, in the anthropogenically influenced building ground as well as in the contact zone of the building with the ground, and since the condition of the buildings plays an important role for the radon transition from the soil into the building, a high geogenic radon potential does not necessarily lead to a high indoor radon concentration [de

  6. Airborne radon concentrations in different environments in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoon-Shin; Iida, Takao

    1998-01-01

    Little information has been presented average radon concentrations in the living spaces in Korea to date although radon has become a great concern in recent years to the Korean population due to association with the lung cancer risk. Since radon related health risks depends on long-term exposure, it is vital to know the relationship between these short-term measurements and long-term radon concentrations in the different living spaces. Previous studies have shown that many factors may contribute to the temporal and geographic variation in radon entry and retention in living spaces. These factors may differ from one region of the country to another and over time. Thus, it is important that comparisons of different measurement protocols include samples drawn from a broad range of radon sources, different types of environments, and lifestyles. The present work compares the results of short-term and long-term surveys of radon measurements conducted in various areas in Korea that contains average radon-strength sources, different types of living spaces, and different seasons. Most of average airborne radon concentrations using track etch radon detectors were measured in different environments such as houses, subway stations, underground stores, indoor and outdoor office buildings. In addition to these studies, a series of radon surveys using passive integrating radon cup monitors were undertaken in different types of dwellings in Seoul for one year since April 1996, while the same survey using radon discriminative dosimeters were conducted in major six cities in Korea. Radon concentrations in basements in the selected dwellings were higher than those levels measured in the first floor, while indoor radon concentrations were significantly higher than the corresponding outdoor levels at six survey sites. The results suggest the need to more definitely assess sources of radon concentrations as well as to provide more information about technical measurements of different

  7. Monitoring of radon concentration in dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Ryuhei

    1991-01-01

    Radon problems in dwellings have recently received much attention. Radon concentration in dwellings, as well as in the general environment, varies with various factors such as meteorological conditions and soil components. Therefore, a long term monitoring of radon concentration is required to obtain an average concentration. This paper reviews a passive type radon monitor that is handy and allows a long term radon monitoring. It provides the structure and principle of the radon monitor, covering the type, filter function, sensitivity of diffusion collecting type (cup type), electrostatic collecting type, adsorption collecting type, and detector of radon monitor. Actual examples of the radon monitor are also given. Radon daughter nuclides will have become major foci of exposure countermeasures. In the future, the development of a passive type monitor for determining potential alpha energy concentration is required. (N.K.)

  8. Indoor Radon Concentration Related to Different Radon Areas and Indoor Radon Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhásová Šenitková, Ingrid; Šál, Jiří

    2017-12-01

    Indoor radon has been observed in the buildings at areas with different radon risk potential. Preventive measures are based on control of main potential radon sources (soil gas, building material and supplied water) to avoid building of new houses above recommended indoor radon level 200 Bq/m3. Radon risk (index) estimation of individual building site bedrock in case of new house siting and building protection according technical building code are obligatory. Remedial actions in buildings built at high radon risk areas were carried out principally by unforced ventilation and anti-radon insulation. Significant differences were found in the level of radon concentration between rooms where radon reduction techniques were designed and those where it was not designed. The mathematical model based on radon exhalation from soil has been developed to describe the physical processes determining indoor radon concentration. The model is focused on combined radon diffusion through the slab and advection through the gap from sub-slab soil. In this model, radon emanated from building materials is considered not having a significant contribution to indoor radon concentration. Dimensional analysis and Gauss-Newton nonlinear least squares parametric regression were used to simplify the problem, identify essential input variables and find parameter values. The presented verification case study is introduced for real buildings with respect to various underground construction types. Presented paper gives picture of possible mathematical approach to indoor radon concentration prediction.

  9. Preliminary background radon and radon progeny concentrations at North Ranger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auty, R.; Du Preez, H. [Energy Resources of Australia Ltd., Jabiru, NT (Australia). Safety, Health and Radiation Protection Dept.

    1994-12-31

    The aim of this study was to determine background concentrations due to radon ({sup 222}Rn) and radon progeny at the North Ranger lease and proposed transport corridor. The results of this study would assist in establishing rehabilitation standards. Airborne {sup 222}Rn and short lived products vary significantly over a period of time. These variations are primarily due to changes in meteorological conditions. A program was set up to monitor radon and radon progeny concentrations over an extensive period of time so that diurnal and seasonal variations could be assessed. This paper outlines the methodologies, instrumentation, current results and proposed work. 3 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. Radon concentration in a house of Calvados

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leleyter, L.; Riffault, B.; Mazenc, B.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies indicate a link between the risk of lung cancer and residential radon exposure. However, in France, awareness of this problem was made relatively late. Accordingly this study examines the radon concentration in a private home in Calvados (Normandy region). Findings show that the presence of a fireplace in a house can accelerate radon convective transfer, and that simple adjustments to interior and exterior accommodation can significantly reduce radon concentrations in the home. (authors)

  11. Comparative survey of outdoor, residential and workplace radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros, Nirmalla; Field, R. William; Field, Dan W.; Steck, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated radon concentrations in above-ground (i.e. first floor) workplace in Missouri and compared them with above-ground radon concentrations in nearby homes and outdoor locations. This study also examined the potential utility of using home and outdoor radon concentrations to predict the radon concentration at a nearby workplace (e.g. county agencies and schools). Even though workplace radon concentrations were not statistically different from home radon concentrations, the radon concentration at a particular home, or outdoor location, was a poor predictor of the radon concentration at a nearby workplace. Overall, 9.6 and 9.9 % of homes and workplace, respectively, exhibited radon concentrations of ≥148 Bq m -3 . Because of the percentage of workplace with elevated radon concentrations, the results suggest that additional surveys of workplace radon concentrations are needed, especially in areas of high radon potential, to assess the contribution of workplace radon exposure to an individual's overall radon exposure. (authors)

  12. Radon concentrations in Norwegian kindergartens: survey planning and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birovljev, A.; Strand, T.; Heiberg, A.

    1998-01-01

    An extensive radon survey in Norwegian kindergartens and schools was started in early 1997; so far 2481 kindergartens were examined. Preliminary results of the first phase of the survey are presented in tabular and graphic form including, among others, the dependence of average radon concentration on the construction year of the kindergartens and on the age of the buildings. (A.K.)

  13. Intercomparison of different instruments for measuring radon concentration in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, Michikuni; Iida, Takao

    1990-01-01

    An intercomparison of different instruments for measurement of radon concentration was carried out. The instruments include an ionization chamber, the charcoal-trap method, a flow-type ionization chamber (pulse-counting method), a two-filter method, an electrostatic collection method and a passive integration radon monitor. All instruments except for the passive radon monitor have been calibrated independently. Measurements were performed over a concentration range from about 3.5 Bq·m -3 (in outdoor air) to 110 Bq·m -3 (in indoor air). The results obtained by these techniques, except the two-filter technique, are comparable. Radon daughter concentration measured using a filter-sampling method was about 52% of radon concentration. (author)

  14. Intercomparison of different instruments that measure radon concentration in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimo, M.; Iida, T.; Ikebe, Y.

    1987-01-01

    An intercomparison of different instruments for measurement of radon concentration was carried out. The instruments include an ionization chamber, the charcoal-trap technique, a flow-type ionization chamber (pulse-counting technique), a two-filter method, an electrostatic collection method and a passive integrating radon monitor. All instruments except for the passive radon monitor have been calibrated independently. Measurements were performed over a concentration range from about 3.5 Bq/m/sup 3/ (in outdoor air) to 110 Bq/m/sup 3/ (in indoor air). The results obtained from these techniques, except the two-filter technique, are comparable. Radon daughter concentration measured using a filter-sampling technique was about 52% of radon concentrations

  15. Radon concentrations in Western Australian homes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toussaint, L.F. [Health Dept. of Western Australia, Perth, WA (Australia). Radiation Health Branch

    1994-12-31

    Although there have been previous surveys of radon levels in some Western Australian homes, given the size of Western Australia (WA), it is desirable to carry out more measurements to better assess the likely radiation dose to the WA population. By monitoring a sufficient number of homes it will also be possible to identify any areas w here pockets of high radon concentrations exist in WA. An initial phase 1, radon survey, was carried out over the whole of the State. From the data gathered from phase 1 areas where higher radon levels might occur were identified. These areas of higher radon levels were investigated in phase 2 of the radon survey. Phase 2 involved dividing WA into 4 regions (based on electoral districts) and investigating radon levels in each region. For each region, approximately 500 homes were selected at random for radon monitoring. So far phase 1 has been completed and for phase 2 Regions 1 and 2 have been monitored. Data from phase 1 and Region 1 are presented. Initial data indicate a mean radon level of 15.7 Bqm{sup -3}, with 3 homes recording radon levels in excess of 100 Bqm{sup -3}. 11 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  16. Metrology of radon and thoron concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durcik, M; Vicanova, M.

    1998-01-01

    The alpha spectrometry measurements of radon (radon-222) and thoron (radon-220) concentrations by ionisation chamber, used only in laboratory conditions are described in this paper. For the measurements of radon and thoron in dwellings and work areas was proposed diffusion double chamber detector with track detector. The described dosimeter is very useful for routine measurement and would be applied in measuring of radon and thoron concentrations in caves and dwellings. Big disadvantage of the dosimeter is small holes in cover and it could not be used in dusty areas. From previous measurements of the equilibrium equivalent thoron concentrations by semiconductor detector the measured values ranged from 0.1 to 5.6 Bq m -3 in the Slovak kindergartens were obtained

  17. Modeled atmospheric radon concentrations from uranium mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droppo, J.G.

    1985-04-01

    Uranium mining and milling operations result in the release of radon from numerous sources of various types and strengths. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) under the Clean Air Act, is assessing the health impact of air emissions of radon from underground uranium mines. In this case, the radon emissions may impact workers and residents in the mine vicinity. To aid in this assessment, the EPA needs to know how mine releases can affect the radon concentrations at populated locations. To obtain this type of information, Pacific Northwest Laboratory used the radon emissions, release characteristics and local meterological conditions for a number of mines to model incremental radon concentrations. Long-term, average, incremental radon concentrations were computed based on the best available information on release rates, plume rise parameters, number and locations of vents, and local dispersion climatology. Calculations are made for a model mine, individual mines, and multiple mines. Our approach was to start with a general case and then consider specific cases for comparison. A model underground uranium mine was used to provide definition of the order of magnitude of typical impacts. Then computations were made for specific mines using the best mine-specific information available for each mine. These case study results are expressed as predicted incremental radon concentration contours plotted on maps with local population data from a previous study. Finally, the effect of possible overlap of radon releases from nearby mines was studied by calculating cumulative radon concentrations for multiple mines in a region with many mines. The dispersion model, modeling assumptions, data sources, computational procedures, and results are documented in this report. 7 refs., 27 figs., 18 tabs

  18. Measurement of radon activity concentration in buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godet, J.L.; Perrin, M.L.; Pineau, C.; Dechaux, E.

    2010-01-01

    Radon exposure, along with medical-related exposure, is the leading source of exposure to ionising radiation for the French population. Measurement campaigns are done in the action plan, drawn up by the French nuclear safety authority (ASN), in cooperation with the French directorate for housing, town planning and countryside (DHUP), the French radiation protection and nuclear safety institute (IRSN), the French health monitoring institute (InVS) and the French scientific and technical centre for construction (CSTB). The review of 2005-2008 measurement campaign shows that of the 7356 buildings screened, 84.8% had activity concentration levels below the 400 Bq/m 3 action level. For the other buildings (15.2%), action will be required to reduce human exposure to radon, possibly including building renovation/redevelopment work. In the 1999-2002 measurement campaign,12% of the 13,000 buildings screened had a radon activity concentration level higher than 400 Bq/m 3 . In addition, the ASN and the French general directorate of labour (DGT) are continuing to work on drawing up regulations for occupational risk management. The second national health and environment plan (PNSE 2) was published on 26 June 2009. It follows on from the actions initiated in PNSE 1, a document provided for under the Public Health Act dated 9 August 2004 and under the French 'Grenelle' environmental agreements. On the basis of guidelines laid out in PNSE 2, a radon action plan for 2009-2012 will be drawn up, enabling some of the actions to be continued, particularly in the fields of new building projects and dwellings. (author)

  19. The effect and the amendment of thermoregulation to the stability of radon concentration in radon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiongjie; Wang Renbo; Qu Jinhui; Tang Bin; Zhu Zhifu; Man Zaigang

    2010-01-01

    When the temperature in the airtight radon chamber was adjusted, it would induce the frequent changes of the air pressure in chamber, then the radon concentration in the radon chamber would continuously reduce, which could seriously destroy the stability of the radon concentration in radon chamber. In this paper, on the study of the effect reasons to the stability of radon concentration in airtight radon chamber due to the thermoregulation, a new amendment scheme was put forward, and the solutions of the relevant parameters were discussed. The amendment scheme had been successfully applied to HD-6 radon chamber, and achieved good results. (authors)

  20. CONTRIBUTION OF RADON FLOWS AND RADON SOURCES TO THE RADON CONCENTRATION IN A DWELLING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEIJER, RJ; STOOP, P; PUT, LW

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a model is presented for analysis of the radon concentrations in a compartment in terms of contributions from transport by flows of air between compartments and from radon sources in the compartment. Measurements were made to study the effect of increased natural ventilation of the

  1. The Correlation between Radon Emission Concentration and Subsurface Geological Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntoro, Yudi; Setiawan, Herru L.; Wijayanti, Teni; Haerudin, Nandi

    2018-03-01

    Exploration activities with standard methods have already encountered many obstacles in the field. Geological survey is often difficult to find outcrop because they are covered by vegetation, alluvial layer or as a result of urban development and housing. Seismic method requires a large expense and licensing in the use of dynamite is complicated. Method of gravity requires the operator to go back (looping) to the starting point. Given some of these constraints, therefore it needs a solution in the form of new method that can work more efficiently with less cost. Several studies in various countries have shown a correlation between the presence of hydrocarbons and Radon gas concentration in the earth surface. By utilizing the properties of Radon that can migrate to the surface, the value of Radon concentration in the surface is suggested to provide information about the subsurface structure condition. Radon is the only radioactive substance that gas-phased at atmospheric temperature. It is very abundant in the earth mantle. The vast differences of temperatures and pressures between the mantle and the earth crust cause the convection flow toward earth surface. Radon in gas phase will be carried by convection flow to the surface. The quantity of convection currents depend on the porosity and permeability of rocks where Radon travels within, so that Radon concentration in the earth surface delineates the porosity and permeability of subsurface rock layers. Some measurements were carried out at several locations with various subsurface geological conditions, including proven oil fields, proven geothermal field, and frontier area as a comparison. These measurements show that the average and the background concentration threshold in the proven oil field (11,200 Bq/m3) and proven geothermal field (7,820 Bq/m3) is much higher than the quantity in frontier area (329 and 1,620 Bq/m3). Radon concentration in the earth surface is correlated with the presence of geological

  2. Contribution of radon in tap water to indoor radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesell, T.F.; Prichard, H.M.

    1980-01-01

    The contribution of radon ( 222 Rn) in domestic water supplies to the concentration of 222 Rn in indoor atmospheres has been investigated and found to be significant for concentrations over a few thousand picocuries per liter in the water supply. A model predicting average indoor increments due to this source is presented and supported by a series of measurements made in the laboratory and in private homes in the vicinity of Houston, Texas. The efficiency with which radon is transferred from water to air was experimentally determined, and these efficiencies were combined with estimates of average indoor water use to produce a source term proportional to the concentration of 222 Rn in the tap water. The importance of the dwelling volume and the air change rate is discussed

  3. Effect of fresh air ventilation on indoor radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hao; Wu Jianhua; Fu Shi

    2012-01-01

    The radon concentration of laboratory for radon simulation (LRS) was measured by the RAD7 radon monitor, and the effect of the different fresh air ventilations on indoor radon concentration was studied and analyzed. The indoor radon concentration of LRS can be accumulated up to 2000 Bq/m 3 and the average radon exhalation rate of the LRS is 14.5 Bq · m -2 . h -1 . Furthermore, when the fresh air enters into the LRS continuously, the indoor radon concentration decreases exponentially with the increase of time. The equilibrium radon concentration and equilibrium time of LRS decrease exponentially with the increase of the rate of fresh air ventilation. In addition, the indoor radon concentration increases by accumulation with the decrease of the rate of fresh air ventilation. (authors)

  4. Turbidimetry for measurement of radon concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Huanqiang [HuBei Provincial Academy of Medical Sciences, WuHan (China). Inst. of Radioactive Protection

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes a turbidimetric technique counting the tracks registered on CR-39 foils exposed to radon. Instead of eyeview through microscope, by using the differential spectrophotometer, strong correlation between the radon cumulative concentration and track turbidence was observed(r=0.999). Under the etching condition of 7.07 mol{center_dot}L{sup -1} KOH water solution at 80{sup o}C for 16 hr, linear regression showed that the ratio of track turbidence and cumulative concentration of radon exposure was 1.99 x 10{sup -1} turbidence (KBq m{sup -1}h){sup -1} and the determination limit was 36 KBq m{sup -3}h. The details of the experiments are represented in this paper. (Author).

  5. A study of radon indoor concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Ruiz, W.; Segovia, N.; Ponciano, G.

    2000-01-01

    It was realized a study of radon concentration in houses of Mexico City and in a laboratory of the Nuclear Centre of Salazar, State of Mexico. The radon determination in air was realized with solid nuclear track detectors and with Honeywell and Alpha guard automatic equipment. The results show that the majority of houses have values under 148 Bq/m 3 obtaining some housings with upper values located in the Lomas zone. A study in smokers houses and another of controls showed very similar distributions. It was studied the day time fluctuations finding that radon increases considerably during the dawn. Some upper values obtained in a laboratory of the Nuclear Centre were remedied with ventilation. (Author)

  6. Determination of radon gas and respirable ore dust concentrations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study has estimated the concentrations of radon gas and respirable ore dust in the Merelani underground tanzanite mines. Two different portable monitors were used to measure the radon gas and respirable ore dust concentrations respectively. The mean radon gas concentration (disintegrations per second per cubic ...

  7. Local probability of indoor radon concentration to exceed the threshold estimated from geogenic radon potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bossew Peter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Indoor radon has been recognized as an important air pollutant. Based on epidemiological evidence, it is estimated that indoor radon is the second cause of lung cancer after smoking. As a consequence, one tries to limit exposure through regulations concerning the remediation of the existing and prevention of future exposure. In this context, an essential task is the delineation of areas in which it can be expected with certain confidence that time-averaged indoor radon concentrations in dwellings and workplaces exceed the reference level. These are called radon priority areas to denote that these are areas in which remedial and preventive action has to be implemented with priority. There are different definitions of radon priority areas and different methods to estimate them from data. In Germany, the current approach uses the geogenic radon potential as the predictor. However, legal reference levels pertain to indoor radon concentration, not to the geogenic radon potential. One therefore has to identify derived reference levels for geogenic radon potential through statistical association of both quantities. This paper presents a method to derive the local probability that indoor radon concentration exceeds a threshold, given the local geogenic radon potential. The relationship can be used to derive geogenic radon potential reference levels which in turn serve to define radon priority areas.

  8. Concentration en radon dans une maison du Calvados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leleyter, Lydia; Riffault, Benoit; Mazenc, Bernard

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies indicate a link between the risk of lung cancer and residential radon exposure. However, in France, awareness of this problem was made relatively late. Accordingly this study examines the radon concentration in a private home in Calvados. Findings show that the presence of a fireplace in a house can accelerate radon convective transfer, and that simple adjustments to interior and exterior accommodation can significantly reduce radon concentrations in the home.

  9. Modeling of indoor radon concentration from radon exhalation rates of building materials and validation through measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Amit; Chauhan, R.P.; Joshi, Manish; Sahoo, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    Building materials are the second major source of indoor radon after soil. The contribution of building materials towards indoor radon depends upon the radium content and exhalation rates and can be used as a primary index for radon levels in the dwellings. The radon flux data from the building materials was used for calculation of the indoor radon concentrations and doses by many researchers using one and two dimensional model suggested by various researchers. In addition to radium content, the radon wall flux from a surface strongly depends upon the radon diffusion length (L) and thickness of the wall (2d). In the present work the indoor radon concentrations from the measured radon exhalation rate of building materials calculated using different models available in literature and validation of models was made through measurement. The variation in the predicted radon flux from different models was compared with d/L value for wall and roofs of different dwellings. The results showed that the radon concentrations predicted by models agree with experimental value. The applicability of different model with d/L ratio was discussed. The work aims to select a more appropriate and general model among available models in literature for the prediction of indoor radon. -- Highlights: • The measurement of indoor radon concentration was carried out by pin hole based dosimeter. • The indoor radon concentration was calculated from different model available in the literature. • A comparison of wall flux from two different approaches was carried out for different d/L ratio. • A more appropriate model for prediction of indoor radon concentration was validated

  10. Measurements of radon concentrations in Spa waters in Amasya, Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yigitoglu, I., E-mail: ibrahim.yigitoglu@gop.edu.tr; Ucar, B. [Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat (Turkey); Oner, F. [Faculty of Education, Department of Physics, Amasya University, Amasya Turkey (Turkey); Yalim, H. A. [Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Physics, Afyon Kocatepe University, Afyonkarahisar Turkey (Turkey)

    2016-04-18

    The aim of this study is to determine the radon concentrations in thermal waters in the Amasya basin in Turkey and to explore the relationship between radon anomalies and active geological faults. The radon concentration measurements were performed in four thermal Spas around Amasya basin. The water samples were collected from tap waters in thermal water sources. The obtained radon concentrations ranged from 0.15 ± 0.12 to 0.71 ± 0.32 BqL{sup −1} for Spa waters. The relationship between the radon concentration anomalies and earthquakes that occurred in the sampling period are discussed.

  11. Evaluation of the uniformity of concentration of radon in a radon chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiongjie, Zhang; Ye, Zhang; Yang, Liu; Bin, Tang

    2016-01-01

    In order to solve the problem that the evaluation results of the uniformity of concentration of radon in a radon chamber via various methods were difficult to compare, according to its statistical properties, a mathematical model was built to analyze the uniformity of concentration of radon; an evaluation method for the overall uniformity of concentration of radon was proposed on the basis of single-factor multi-group ANOVA, and a detection method for nonuniform points in a radon chamber was proposed on the basis of single-factor two-group t-test; an evaluation process of the uniformity of concentration of radon in a radon chamber was established. The proposed method was applied to evaluate the HD-6 small and medium-sized radon chambers and achieved good results. - Highlights: • The mathematical model was built to analyze the uniformity of concentration of radon. • An evaluation method was proposed to evaluate the uniformity of radon concentration. • The method was successfully used in evaluating the uniformity in a radon chamber.

  12. Radon concentration measurements in therapeutic spring water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deak, N.; Horvath, A.; Sajo B, L.; Marx, G.

    1996-01-01

    It is believed that people undergoing a curative cycle in a given spa, may receive a dose in the range of 400 mSv/year which is many times the average annual dose so that their risk of lung cancer may increase by 3% or more. To determine the risk due to the natural radioactivity, of the most frequented spas in Budapest (H), we selected four and some others located on the country side being of particular interest. Results of the radon concentration in spring water are presented, with the evidence that some spas have a high radon concentration. We conclude that patients receiving treatment may be exposed to an additional dose in the range of 29-76 mSv/year that at the bronchia could be between 445-1182 mSv/year. (authors). 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Geologic influence on indoor radon concentrations and gamma radiation levels in Norwegian dwellings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundal, Aud Venche

    2003-09-01

    Indoor radon levels in 1618 Norwegian dwellings located in different geological settings were compared with geological information in order to determine potential correlations between geological factors and indoor radon concentrations in Norway and to establish whether geological information is useful in radon risk analysis. In two geographically limited areas, Kinsarvik and Fen, detailed geological and geochemical investigations were carried out in order to explain their elevated natural radiation environment. Significant correlations between geology and indoor radon concentrations in Norway are found when the properties of both the bedrock and the overburden are taken into account. Areas of high radon risk in Norway include 1) exposed bedrock with elevated levels of radium (mainly alum shale and granites) and b) highly permeable unconsolidated sediments derived from all rock types (mainly glaciofluvial and fluvial deposits) and moderately permeable sediments containing radium rich rock fragments (mainly basal till). More than 20 % of Norwegian dwellings located in the high-risk areas can be expected to contain radon levels exceeding 200 Bq/m3. The elevated radon risk related to penneable building grounds is illustrated in Kinsarvik where the highly permeable sediments and the large vadose zone underlying the Huse residential area enable the transport of radon from large volumes into the dwellings resulting in enhanced indoor radon concentrations. Subterranean air flows caused by temperature/pressure differences between soil air and atmospheric air and elevations differences within the Huse area are shown to strongly affect the annual variations in indoor radon concentrations. The marked contrasts in radon risk potential between different types of building grounds are clearly illustrated in the Fen area where outcrops of the radium rich Fen carbonatites represent areas of high radon risk while only low levels of both indoor radon concentrations and indoor gamma

  14. Radon concentration inversions in the troposphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.

    1987-07-01

    Vertical concentrations of radon in the lower troposphere were obtained in Southern Brazil up to 7Km high and have shown unexpected inverted profiles. The presence of low pressure center systems southwest to the flight path suggested that inversions might have been originated by a vertical transport mechanism based on the large scale circulation of developing synoptic systems. A simple friction-driven circulation model was contructed and the transport equation was solved. (author) [pt

  15. How to Ensure Low Radon Concentrations in Indoor Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn; Wraber, Ida Kristina

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on methods for measuring radon levels in the indoor air in buildings as well as on concrete solutions that can be carried out in the building to prevent radon leakage and to lower the radon concentration in the indoor air of new buildings. The radon provision in the new Danish...... Building Regulations from 2010 has been tightened as a result of new recommendations from the World Health Organization. Radon can cause lung cancer and it is not known whether there is a lower limit for its harmfulness. It is therefore important to reduce the radon concentration as much as possible in new...... buildings. The airtightness is a major factor when dealing with radon in buildings. Above the ground it is important to build airtight in compliance with energy requirements and against the ground it is important to prevent radon from seeping into the building. There is a direct connection between...

  16. Estimation of radon concentration in dwellings in and around ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It has been established that radon and its airborne decay products can present serious radiation hazards. A long term exposure to high concentration of radon causes lung cancer. Besides, it is also known that out of the total radiation dose received from natural and man-made sources, 60% of the dose is due to radon and ...

  17. Estimation of radon concentration in dwellings in and around ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    concentration of radon and lung cancer (Archer et al 1973; Sevc et al 1988; Pershagen et al 1993) and kidney diseases (Waxweiler et al 1981). So the interest has been focussed on the measurement of radon inside the domestic premises. Large scale surveys of indoor radon levels have been under- taken in many ...

  18. Indoor radon and decay products: Concentrations, causes, and control strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report is another in the on going technical report series that addresses various aspects of the DOE Radon Research Program. It provides an overview of what is known about the behavior of radon and its decay products in the indoor environment and examines the manner in which several important classes of factors -- structural, geological, and meteorological -- affect indoor radon concentrations. Information on US indoor radon concentrations, currently available monitoring methods and novel radon control strategies are also explored. 238 refs., 22 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Variations of radon concentration in the atmosphere. Gamma dose rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchorz-Trzeciakiewicz, D. E.; Solecki, A. T.

    2018-02-01

    The purposes of research were following: observation and interpretation of variations of radon concentration in the atmosphere - vertical, seasonal, spatial and analysis of relation between average annual radon concentration and ground natural radiation and gamma dose rate. Moreover we wanted to check the occurrence of radon density currents and the possibility of radon accumulation at the foot of the spoil tip. The surveys were carried out in Okrzeszyn (SW Poland) in the area of the spoil tip formed during uranium mining that took place in 60's of 20th century. The measurements were carried out in 20 measurements points at three heights: 0.2 m, 1 m and 2 m a.g.l. using SSNTD LR-115. The survey lasted one year and detectors were exchanged at the beginning of every season. Uranium eU (ppm), thorium eTh (ppm) and potassium K (%) contents were measured using gamma ray spectrometer Exploranium RS-230, ambient gamma dose rate using radiometer RK-100. The average radon concentration on this area was 52.8 Bq m-3. The highest radon concentrations were noted during autumn and the lowest during winter. We observed vertical variations of radon concentration. Radon concentrations decreased with increase of height above ground level. The decrease of radon with increase of height a.g.l. had logarithmic character. Spatial variations of radon concentrations did not indicate the occurrence of radon density currents and accumulation of radon at the foot of the spoil tip. The analysis of relation between average radon concentrations and ground natural radiation (uranium and thorium content) or gamma dose rate revealed positive relation between those parameters. On the base of results mentioned above we suggested that gamma spectrometry measurements or even cheaper and simpler ambient gamma dose rate measurements can be a useful tool in determining radon prone areas. This should be confirmed by additional research.

  20. The effect of some soil characteristics on soil radon concentration and radon exhalation from soil surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Kainan; Cheng, Jianping; Guo, Qiuju

    2004-01-01

    To find out the impacts of soil characters on radon concentration in soil and radon exhalation from soil, field measurements on soil radon concentrations (60 cm under the soil surface) and radon exhalation rate from soil surface were carried out in totally 31 points with different types of soil in three cities in both South and North China. Soil radium contents, water contents, soil porosity and grain size were concretely analyzed in our laboratory. The linear simulation was used to analyze the above data. The results showed that radon exhalation rate from soil and radon concentrations in soil have direct proportion to soil radium contents. Rather high radium content and radon exhalation rate were measured in Guiyang area, 67±28Bq/Kg and 40±59 mBq/m 2 ·s, however no high soil radon concentration was found due to the difficulties in the measurements on clay soils with high saturation. Compared with soil radium contents, radon exhalation rate from soil and soil radon concentrations are more easily impacted by soil characters and change in a rather large range. (author)

  1. Environmental site assessments should include radon gas testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    There are two emerging influences that will require radon gas testing as part of many property transfers and most site assessments. These requirements come from lending regulators and state legislatures. Fannie Mae and others have developed environmental investigation guidelines for the purchase of environmentally contaminated real estate. These guidelines include radon gas testing for many properties. Several states have enacted laws that require environmental disclosure forms be prepared to ensure that the parties involved in certain real estate transactions are aware of the environmental liabilities that may come with the transfer of property. Indiana has recently enacted legislation that would require the disclosure of the presence of radon gas on many commercial real estate transactions. With more lenders and state governments likely to follow this trend, radon gas testing should be performed during all property transfers and site assessment to protect the parties involved from any legal liabilities

  2. Property transfer assessments should include radon gas testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nardi, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    There are two emerging influences that will require radon gas testing as part of many property transfers and most environmental assessments. These requirements come from lending regulators and state legislatures and affect single family, multifamily, and commercial properties. Fannie Mae and others have developed environmental investigation guidelines for protection from long term legal liabilities in the purchase of environmentally contaminated real estate. These guidelines include radon gas testing for many properties. Several states have enacted laws that require environmental disclosure forms be prepared to ensure that the parties involved in certain real estate transactions are aware of the environmental liabilities that may come with the transfer of property. Indiana has recently enacted legislation that would require the disclosure of the presence of radon gas on many commercial real estate transactions. With more banks and state governments following this trend, radon gas testing should be performed during all property transfers and environmental assessments to protect the parties involved from any long term legal liabilities

  3. Design Criteria for Achieving Low Radon Concentration Indoors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Design criteria for achieving low radon concentration indoors are presented in this paper. The paper suggests three design criteria. These criteria have to be considered at the early stage of the building design phase to meet the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization in most...... countries. The three design criteria are; first, establishing a radon barrier facing the ground; second, lowering the air pressure in the lower zone of the slab on ground facing downwards; third, diluting the indoor air with outdoor air. Three criteria when used can prevent radon infiltration and lower...... the radon concentration in the indoor air. In addition, a cheap and reliable method for measuring the radon concentration in the air indoors is described. The provision on radon in the Danish Building Regulations complies with the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization. Radon can cause...

  4. Seasonal variation in concentration of radon and thoron at non-uranium mines in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Hongxing; Wu Yunyun; Zhang Qingzhao; Shang Bing

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the seasonal variation in concentrations of radon and thoron in non-uranium mine. Methods: Eight kinds of mineral types from 9 non-uranium mines were selected, including copper, gold, aluminium, manganese, antimonium, tungsten, copper-nickel and coal mines in 6 provinces, such as Yunnan, Shandong, Xinjiang, Heilongjiang, Hunan and Guizhou. LD-P R-T discriminative detectors were used to measure radon and thoron concentrations in underground mines during four seasons in one year. Results: Radon concentrations in underground mines showed a significantly seasonal variation. Radon concentration ranged from 35.5 to 4841 Bq/m 3 in summer, and the average value in four mines exceeded 1000 Bq/m 3 of the control limit for workplace (GB 18871-2002) . In winter, radon concentration ranged from 5 to 1917 Bq/m 3 , only one of them exceeded the control limit. The ratio of radon from summer to winter ranged from 2 to 12. Ventilation was one of the main factors which influenced the seasonal variation of radon. While the thoron concentration in underground mines showed a tendency that it was higher in summer and lower in winter. It was difficult to attain representative values for thoron, due to the influence of location of detectors. The seasonal variation of thoron should be further studied. Conclusions: Seasonal variation for radon and thoron should be taken into account to estimate the effective dose to miners. The values of radon concentration during the short term should be corrected. (authors)

  5. Measurements of the radon-222 and its daughters concentrations throughout Gaza strip, Palestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasas, M.F.; Yassin, S.S.; Shabat, M.M.

    2005-01-01

    High Radon levels are present in the granite and grandiositic rocks that. spread in sand dunes along coast of Gaza. Such materials are rich in uranium and T widely used in the construction of dwelling in the Gaza, and their contribution to high indoor Radon levels is most relevant.The present work aims to investigate approaches, measures and detection of indoor Radon level throughout Gaza Strip. Five hundred CR-39 dosimeters were distributed over six locations in the middle Yv-region of Gaza Strip. Results suggest that Radon concentrations range from l3.36 to 83.82 Bq/m 3 and a maximum value of 97.01 Bq/m 3 .The average Radon concentrations was 37.83 Bq/m 3 with standard deviation of 11.23.The results provide a framework for future studies that include a large, broader survey of Radon concentration in Palestine

  6. Radon in soil concentration levels in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segovia, N.; Tamez, E.; Mena, M

    1991-09-15

    Radon in soil surveys in Mexico have been carried out since 1974 both for uranium prospectus and to correlate mean values of the gas emanation with local telluric behaviour. The mapping includes the northern uranium mining region, the Mexican Neo volcanic Belt, the coastal areas adjacent to the zone of subduction of the Cocos Plate under the North American Plate, some of the active volcanoes of Southern Mexico and several sedimentary valleys in Central Mexico. Recording of {sup 222} Rn alpha decay is systematically performed with LR115 track detectors. Using mean values averaged over different observation periods at fixed monitoring stations, a radon in soil map covering one third of the Mexican territory is presented. The lowest mean values have been found in areas associated with active volcanoes. The highest levels are found in uranium ore zones. Intermediate values are obtained in regions with enhanced hydrothermal activity and stations associated with intrusive rocks. (Author)

  7. Procedure manual for the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentrations using the radon grab-sampling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.L.

    1986-04-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology established the Technical Measurements Center to provide standardization, calibration, comparability, verification of data, quality assurance, and cost-effectiveness for the measurement requirements of DOE remedial action programs. One of the remedial-action measurement needs is the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentration. One method for accomplishing such estimations in support of DOE remedial action programs is the radon grab-sampling method. This manual describes procedures for radon grab sampling, with the application specifically directed to the estimation of average indoor radon-daughter concentration (RDC) in highly ventilated structures. This particular application of the measurement method is for cases where RDC estimates derived from long-term integrated measurements under occupied conditions are below the standard and where the structure being evaluated is considered to be highly ventilated. The radon grab-sampling method requires that sampling be conducted under standard maximized conditions. Briefly, the procedure for radon grab sampling involves the following steps: selection of sampling and counting equipment; sample acquisition and processing, including data reduction; calibration of equipment, including provisions to correct for pressure effects when sampling at various elevations; and incorporation of quality-control and assurance measures. This manual describes each of the above steps in detail and presents an example of a step-by-step radon grab-sampling procedure using a scintillation cell

  8. Application of sensitive and supersensitive radon detectors for radon flux density and radon concentration in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahorowski, W.; Whittlestone, S.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents a review of principles and operational parameters of the latest instrumental development in sensitive and high sensitive radon detectors at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The focus is on advances in measurement technology of radon concentration in air and radon flux density. Two areas in which ANSTO is actively involved are discussed. The first area concerns radon in air monitoring at Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station. Results recorded at the Station with a supersensitive radon detector characterised by lower limit of detection down to few mBq m -3 with time resolution better than 90 minutes are presented to illustrate importance of the technique in global monitoring of airborne pollution. The second area concerns estimates of radon and thoron fluxes from large geographical areas. This is illustrated by results obtained during an Australia-wide survey of radon fluxes and from thoron flux measurements around the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. The radon flux estimates from Australia come from a coarse net of spot measurements combined with data from aerial gamma surveys. It is argued that as radon global flux and air concentration estimates improve, the data will provide progressively more stringent tests of global air transport models. (author)

  9. Seasonal variation of indoor radon concentration in a desert climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khateeb, H M; Nuseirat, M; Aljarrah, K; Al-Akhras, M-Ali H; Bani-Salameh, H

    2017-12-01

    Radon is one of the sources that negatively affect dwellings air quality and is ranked as a main cause of lung cancer after cigarette smoking. The indoor radon concentrations usually affected by the conditions of the environment surrounding the dwellings. Seasonal variations can have a significant impact on the indoor radon concentrations. In this article, we studied the seasonal variations of indoor radon concentration in a desert climate, particularly in gulf countries that usually leave the windows and doors closed all over the time. Four hundred dosimeters containing CR-39 detectors were planted for three months to measure the variation in radon concentration between winter and summer seasons. Our measurements showed that a building with a basement revealed a significant variation between radon concentration in winter (44.3 ± 3.1Bqm -3 ) and in summer (26.1 ± 1.7Bqm -3 ). Buildings without basements showed that the indoor radon concentration in winter (16.1 ± 1.7Bqm -3 ) is very much close to that in summer (16.7 ± 1.8Bqm -3 ). Our results indicated that seasonal variations can significantly affect indoor radon concentration for buildings established with basements. However; in the study region, the average indoor radon concentration as well as the annual effective dose rate are found to be below the action level recommended by ICRP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Radon and radon daughters' concentration in spring and wells waters from Presidente Prudente: preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio, Ana Maria Araya; Saenz, Carlos Alberto Tello; Pereira, Luiz Augusto Stuani

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the preliminary results about the concentration of radon and radon daughters in wells and springs water from Presidente Prudente. Six water samples were studied: three from well-water, two from springs water and one from potable water. For the determination of α-activity the samples were placed inside plastic containers where the CR-39 tracks detectors were outside the water. The track density of α-particles were measured by using optical microscopy. The results show that one sample from well-water presented higher concentration of radon and radon daughters than the other samples. (author)

  11. Continuous measurement of radon concentration in air with Lucas cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaj, B.; Urbanski, P.

    1998-01-01

    Lucas cell was investigated as alpha radiation detector for continuous measurement of radon concentration in air with air sampling by means of the pump. The investigations carried out indicate that short lived radon decay products inside of the Lucas chamber with dimensions φ54x74 mm (0.17L) attach to the internal walls of the cell and are not removed when the cell is flushed with fresh air. This effect and the known effect of increase of radon daughters concentration when pure radon is introduced into the cell results in delay of response of the gage to variations of radon concentration. The response of the gage is considered and signal processing is suggested that can be useful in continuous measurement of radon concentration. (author)

  12. Environmental Concentration of Radon and Radon Progeny in a Nuclear Facility in a Decommissioning Stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, M. P.; Correa, E.; Sancho, C.

    1999-01-01

    According to the new European Directive 96/29/EURATOM the radiological risk due to natural radionuclides must be consider and the pertinent periodic control must be realized. During the works performed at CIEMAT an estimation of the effective average doses due to Radon inhalation in work places of the installation have been performed. Radon and Radon progeny concentration has been measured in continuous joint whit the meteorological conditions as temperature, pressure and relative humidity. Two different equipment has been used: Alpha-guard whit ionization chamber detector and Eda-wlm-300 whit a semiconductor detector. A passive Radon detector, E-perm has been simultaneously used in the monitoring system. The results obtained during the measuring of Radon and Radon progeny concentrations indoors and estimation of doses have been analyzed and are presented in the paper. (Author) 11 refs

  13. Radon and radon-daughter concentrations in air in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.H.; Lindstrom, J.B.; Dungey, C.E.; Kisieleski, W.E.

    1979-11-01

    Radon concentration, working level, and meteorological variables were measured continuously from June 1977 through June 1978 at three stations in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill with measurements integrated to hourly intervals. Both radon and daughters show strong variations associated with low wind velocities and stable atmospheric conditions, and diurnal variations associated with thermal inversions. Average radon concentration shows seasonal dependence with highest concentrations observed during fall and winter. Comparison of radon concentrations and working levels between three stations shows strong dependence on wind direction and velocity. Radon concentrations and working-level distributions for each month and each station were analyzed. The average maximum, minimum, and modal concentration and working levels were estimated with observed frequencies. The highest concentration is 11,000 pCi/m 3 on the tailings. Working-level variations parallel radon variations but lag by less than one hour. The highest working levels were observed at night when conditions of higher secular radioactive equilibrium for radon daughters exist. Background radon concentration was measured at two stations, each located about 25 km from the mill, and the average is 408 pCi/m 3 . Average working-level background is 3.6 x 10 -3

  14. Radon and radon-daughter concentrations in air in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momeni, M H; Lindstrom, J B; Dungey, C E; Kisieleski, W E

    1979-11-01

    Radon concentration, working level, and meteorological variables were measured continuously from June 1977 through June 1978 at three stations in the vicinity of the Anaconda Uranium Mill with measurements integrated to hourly intervals. Both radon and daughters show strong variations associated with low wind velocities and stable atmospheric conditions, and diurnal variations associated with thermal inversions. Average radon concentration shows seasonal dependence with highest concentrations observed during fall and winter. Comparison of radon concentrations and working levels between three stations shows strong dependence on wind direction and velocity. Radon concentrations and working-level distributions for each month and each station were analyzed. The average maximum, minimum, and modal concentration and working levels were estimated with observed frequencies. The highest concentration is 11,000 pCi/m/sup 3/ on the tailings. Working-level variations parallel radon variations but lag by less than one hour. The highest working levels were observed at night when conditions of higher secular radioactive equilibrium for radon daughters exist. Background radon concentration was measured at two stations, each located about 25 km from the mill, and the average is 408 pCi/m/sup 3/. Average working-level background is 3.6 x 10/sup -3/.

  15. Factors underlying residential radon concentration: Results from Galicia, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barros-Dios, J.M.; Ruano-Ravina, A.; Gastelu-Iturri, J.; Figueiras, A.

    2007-01-01

    Radon causes lung cancer when inhaled for prolonged periods of time. A range of factors influence residential radon concentration and this study therefore sought to ascertain which dwelling-related factors exert an influence on radon levels. A cross-sectional study was conducted from 2001 to 2003 which analyzed 983 homes of as many subjects randomly selected from the 1991 census. Sampling was carried out by district and stratified by population density to ensure that more detectors were placed in the most heavily populated areas. Radon concentration and different dwelling characteristics were measured in each of the homes selected. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to ascertain which factors influenced radon concentration. The geometric mean of radon concentration was 69.5 Bq/m 3 , and 21.3% of homes had concentrations above 148 Bq/m 3 . Factors shown to influence radon concentration in the bivariate analysis were: age of dwelling; interior building material; exterior building material; and storey on which the detector was placed. Explanatory variables in the multivariate analysis were: age of dwelling; number of storeys; distance off floor; and interior building material. The model was significant, but the variability explained was around 10%. These results highlight the fact that the study area is an area of high radon emission and that factors other than those directly related with the characteristics of the dwelling also influence radon concentration

  16. Study of a Greek area with enhanced indoor radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louizi, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Koukouliou, V.; Kehagia, K.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the focus is on Arnea Chalkidikis, an area in Greece with granitic geological background and indications of possible elevated radon concentration indoors. Data are reported of indoor radon measurements with etched track detectors and those used for dosimetric estimations. Moreover, data are reported on soil gas and soil radon concentrations in Arnea, as well as radon and uranium concentrations in water samples. From the measured radon concentrations in water samples the contribution to the overall dose has been calculated. For a period of 1 month, indoor radon and progeny activity has also been monitored in the dwelling that has the maximum indoor radon concentration in Greece. This dwelling is in Arnea and the dose delivered to the inhabitants has been calculated. Mean annual effective dose due to indoor radon was 4.5 mSv and about 11% of this was due to the use of water. Mean soil gas concentration and soil radon concentration were (90 ± 30) kBq m -3 (P -3 (P -1 (P<0.05). (author)

  17. Indoor radon concentration in Korea residential environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae Hyun; Kang, Dae Ryong; Park, Si Hyun; Yoon, Dan Ki; Lee, Cheol Min

    2018-02-21

    The purpose of this study is to provide basic data for the evaluation and management of health effects with respect to exposure to radon within residential environments in South Korea. It is part of a case-control study to develop a management plan based on indoor radon exposure levels and assess their impact on health. To investigate the long-term cumulative concentration levels of radon, 599 patients who have respiratory diseases were recruited in South Korea, and alpha track detectors were installed in their residences for a period of 3 months from mid-2015 to late 2016. A survey was then conducted to determine the factors affecting the radon concentration. The radon concentration levels were analyzed in conjunction with the survey results. The results show that the arithmetic mean of the radon concentrations in domestic residences was in the range of 70.8 ± 65.2 Bq/m 3 . An analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed to identify the environmental factors affecting the radon concentration and contributing to variations in the residential radon concentration based on the height of the residence. The results show that the contribution of the local environmental factor to the variation in radon concentration (p  0.05), the same was found with regard to the construction year after the control (p < 0.05).

  18. Diurnal Variation of Radon Concentration in the Postojna Cave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoric, A.; Vaupotic, J.

    2011-01-01

    Postojna Cave, with 20 km of galleries, is the longest known cave system and also the largest of about 20 show caves in Slovenia and one of the most visited show caves in the world. It is well known that high concentrations of radon are common in karstic caves, although quantities of uranium (238U) in limestone are rather low. The reason for this is low natural ventilation of the underground cavities. Tectonic faults constitute an additional source of radon. Variations of radon concentration in cave air arise from a balance of the emission from cave surfaces and drip waters, decay in cave air, and exchange with the outside atmosphere. Because of its elevated radon concentrations, Postojna Cave has been under permanent radon survey since 1995. The influence of meteorological conditions on the radon levels and their temporal variations depends mostly on the shape of the cave, and the number and directions of cracks, corridors and fissures connecting the cave rooms with the outside atmosphere. The driving force for air movement in horizontal caves, and thus the inflow of fresh air and release of the cave air to the atmosphere, is the temperature difference between the cave air and outdoors, which causes seasonal pattern of radon concentration in the cave with high levels in summer and low in winter. However, on a daily scale different behaviour of radon can be observed at different locations in the cave. In this paper diurnal variation of radon concentration at two locations is presented and discussed. Postojna Cave is a horizontal cave with a stable yearly temperature around 10 degrees of @C. Continuous measurements of radon concentration were carried out from 2005 to 2010 at two locations along the guided tourist trail. Radon concentration was measured with Radim 5 WP monitors (SMM Company, Prague, Czech Republic) with sampling frequency once an hour. The evaluation of five-year radon monitoring at two sites in the Postojna Cave reveals significant diurnal and

  19. Variations in radon concentration in groundwater of Kumaon Himalaya, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourai, A A; Gusain, G S; Rautela, B S; Joshi, V; Prasad, G; Ramola, R C

    2012-11-01

    The radon content in groundwater sources depends on the radium concentration in the rock of the aquifer. Radon was measured in water in many parts of the world, mostly for the risk assessment due to consumption of drinking water. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. Airborne radon can be released during normal household activities and can pose a greater potential health risk than radon ingested with water. Transport of radon through soil and bedrock by water depends mainly on the percolation of water through the pores and along fracture planes of bedrock. In this study, the radon concentration in water from springs and hand pumps of Kumaun Himalaya, India was measured using the radon emanometry technique. Radon concentration was found to vary from 1 to 392 Bq l(-1) with a mean of 50 Bq l(-1) in groundwater in different lithotectonic units. The radon level was found to be higher in the area consisting of granite, quartz porphyry, schist, phyllites and lowest in the area having sedimentary rocks, predominantly dominated by quartzite rocks.

  20. Measurement of the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface by tracing the radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanliang Tan; Detao Xiao

    2013-01-01

    The paper will present a method based on the accumulation chamber technique for measuring of radon exhalation from the medium surface. A radon monitor traces the change of radon concentration in the accumulation chamber, and then the radon exhalation can be obtained accurately through linear fit. Based on our recent experiments, the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface obtained from this method is in good agreement with the actual exhalation rate of our simulation facility. This method is superior to the competition method which obtains the radon exhalation through the exponential fit by an external PC-system. The calculation for the exponential fit is very easy by computer and related software. However, for portable instruments, the single chip microcomputer can't calculate the exponential fit rapidly. Thus, this method is usable for developing the new portable instrument to classify building materials, etc. (author)

  1. Development of a model for radon concentration in indoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelle, Bjørn Petter

    2012-01-01

    A model is developed for calculation of the radon concentration in indoor air. The model takes into account various important parameters, e.g. radon concentration in ground, radon diffusion resistance of radon barrier, air permeance of ground, air pressure difference between outdoor ground and indoor at ground level, ventilation of the building ground and number of air changes per hour due to ventilation. Characteristic case studies are depicted in selected 2D and 3D graphical plots for easy visualization and interpretation. The radon transport into buildings might be dominated by diffusion, pressure driven flow or a mixture of both depending on the actual values of the various parameters. The results of our work indicate that with realistic or typical values of the parameters, most of the transport of radon from the building ground to the indoor air is due to air leakage driven by pressure differences through the construction. By incorporation of various and realistic values in the radon model, valuable information about the miscellaneous parameters influencing the indoor radon level is gained. Hence, the presented radon model may be utilized as a simple yet versatile and powerful tool for examining which preventive or remedial measures should be carried out to achieve an indoor radon level below the reference level as set by the authorities. - Highlights: ► Model development for calculation of radon concentration in indoor air. ► Radon model accounting for various important parameters. ► Characteristic case studies depicted in 2D and 3D graphical plots. ► May be utilized for examining radon preventive measures.

  2. An investigation of factors influencing indoor radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majborn, B.; Soerensen, A.; Nielsen, S.P.; Boetter-Jensen, L.

    1988-05-01

    Variations in indoor radon concentrations and some influencing factors have been studied during a two-year period (1986-1987) in 16 almost identical single-family houses.The annual average radon concentration in the houses varied from about 50 to about 400 Bq/m 3 . Variations in soil characteristics and radon concentration in soil gas could not be directly related to the variations of the average indoor radon concentrations. Most of the houses showed a ''normal'' seasonal variation of the radon concentration with a maximum in the winter and minimum in the summer. A deviating seasonal variation was found in three of the houses. Hourly data obtained in one unoccupied house during a period of 2-1/2 months showed no or only weak correlations between the indoor radon concentration and meteorological factors. However, for most of the houses, the seasonal variation of the indoor radon concentration was well correlated with the average indoor-outdoor temperature difference on a 2-month basis. It was demonstrated that the radon concentration can be strongly reduced in the Risoe houses if a district-heating duct, which is connected to all the houses, is ventilated, so that a slightly lowered pressure is maintained in the duct. 5 taps., 24 ill. (author)

  3. Measurement and modeling of indoor radon concentrations in residential buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Hyun; Whang, Sungim; Lee, Hyun Young; Lee, Cheol-Min; Kang, Dae Ryong

    2018-01-08

    Radon, the primary constituent of natural radiation, is the second leading environmental cause of lung cancer after smoking. To confirm a relationship between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer, estimating cumulative levels of exposure to indoor radon for an individual or population is necessary. This study sought to develop a model for estimate indoor radon concentrations in Korea. Especially, our model and method may have wider application to other residences, not to specific site, and can be used in situations where actual measurements for input variables are lacking. In order to develop a model, indoor radon concentrations were measured at 196 ground floor residences using passive alpha-track detectors between January and April 2016. The arithmetic (AM) and geometric (GM) means of indoor radon concentrations were 117.86±72.03 and 95.13±2.02 Bq m-3, respectively. Questionnaires were administered to assess the characteristics of each residence, the environment around the measuring equipment, and lifestyles of the residents. Also, national data on indoor radon concentrations at 7643 detached houses for 2011-2014 were reviewed to determine radon concentrations in the soil, and meteorological data on temperature and wind speed were utilized to approximate ventilation rates. The estimated ventilation rates and radon exhalation rates from the soil varied from 0.18 to 0.98 h-1 (AM=0.59±0.17 h-1) and 326.33 to 1392.77 Bq m-2 h-1 (AM=777.45±257.39 and GM=735.67±1.40 Bq m-2 h-1), respectively. With these results, the developed model was applied to estimate indoor radon concentrations for 157 residences (80% of all 196 residences), which were randomly sampled. The results were in better agreement for Gyeongi and Seoul than for other regions of Korea. Overall, the actual and estimated radon concentrations were in better agreement, except for a few low-concentration residences.

  4. Measurements of radon activity concentrations in air at Niska spa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrovic, F.; Vuckovic, B.; Ninkovic, M.

    2004-01-01

    Radon activity concentrations in air were measured in the recreational-tourist center of Niska Banja. Alpha Guard PQ 2000/ MC50 instrumentation (Genitron instruments, Frankfurt) was used. The observed indoor radon concentrations in the air of the Radon Hotel pool lay within the range of 0.980-1.908 kBq/m 3 and were directly dependent on the exhalation of radon from thermomineral waters. Radon concentrations were also measured outdoors, at locations for capping thermomineral water, as well as at locations for draining used water from the Radon Hotel pool. Outdoor radon concentrations as high as over 500 Bq/m 3 were observed. Gamma dose rates were measured in parallel and found to lie within the range of 72-420 nSv/h. The gamma doses correlated well with the observed radon levels. The largest gamma dose rates in air were measured in the pool of Radon Hotel and at the site where this thermomineral water is being capped

  5. Measurement of radon exhalation rate and soil gas radon concentration in areas of southern Punjab (Pakistan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujahid, S. A.; Hussain, S.; Ramzan, M.

    2010-01-01

    Plastic track detectors were used to measure the radon concentration and exhalation rate from the soil samples. The samples were collected from areas of southern Punjab (Pakistan). In a laboratory experiment, passive alpha dosemeters were installed inside cylindrical bottles containing the soil samples. The radon concentrations and the radon exhalation rate were found in the ranges of 34±7 to 260±42 Bq m -3 and 38±8 to 288±46 mBq m -2 h -1 , respectively. The on-site measurements of radon in the soil gas were also carried out in these areas using a scintillation alpha counter. The concentration of radon in the soil gas was found in the range of 423±82-3565±438 Bq m -3 . (authors)

  6. Accurate Measurement of Indoor Radon Concentration using a Low-Effective Volume Radon Monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Aya; Minami, Nodoka; Yasuoka, Yumi; Iimoto, Takeshi; Omori, Yasutaka; Nagahama, Hiroyuki; Muto, Jun; Mukai, Takahiro

    2017-12-01

    AlphaGUARD is a low-effective volume detector and one of the most popular portable radon monitors which is currently available. This study investigated whether AlphaGUARD can accurately measure the variable indoor radon levels. The consistency of the radon-concentration data obtained by AlphaGUARD is evaluated against simultaneous measurements by two other monitors (each ~10 times more sensitive than AlphaGUARD). When accurately measuring radon concentration with AlphaGUARD, we found that the net counts of the AlphaGUARD were required of at least 500 counts, <25% of the relative percent difference. AlphaGUARD can provide accurate measurements of radon concentration for the world average level (~50 Bq m-3) and the reference level of workplace (1000 Bq m-3), using integrated data over at least 3 h and 10 min, respectively. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. The use of mechanical ventilation with heat recovery for controlling radon and radon-daughter concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.; Roseme, G.D.

    1980-01-01

    An energy research house in Maryland was found to have radon concentrations far in excess of recommended guidelines. A mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery was installed in this house to test its effectiveness as an energy-efficient control technique for indoor radon. Radon concentration was monitored continuously for two weeks under varying ventilation conditions (0.07 to 0.8 air changes per hour (ach)) and radon daughter concentrations were measured by grab-sample techniques about nine times daily during this period. At ventilation rates of 0.6 ach and higher radon and radon daughter levels dropped below guidelines for indoor concentrations. Comparison with other studies indicates that indoor radon buildup may be a problem in a considerable portion of houses characterized by their low infiltration rates. The use of mechanical ventilation systems with air-to-air heat exchangers may offer a practical, cost-effective, and energy-efficient means of alleviating not only the radon problem specifically but also the general deterioration of indoor air quality in houses designed or retrofitted to achieve low infiltration

  8. Reduction of radon daughter concentrations in structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-12-01

    A structure was identified in Salt Lake City wherein uranium mill tailings had been used in the construction and where unusually high levels of radon daughter concentrations (RDC's) existed. The physical and radiological characteristics of the structure were assessed. Ventilation techniques were investigated to assess their effectiveness in reducing RDC's. A preferred set of equipment was identified, installed in the structure and operated to reduce RDC's. Parametric studies were conducted to determine if supplying fresh air or recirculating air through electrostatic precipitators is more effective in reducing RDC's. Fresh air was found to be more effective in reducing RDC's. RDC's have been reduced to levels at or near the target of 0.03 working level under optimal ventilation conditions. Natural gas consumption with the new equipment is about 39% higher than with the original equipment. Electrical energy usage and electrical demand are respectively 50 and 44% higher with the new equipment than with the original equipment. 16 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  9. Measurements of radon activity concentration in mouse tissues and organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimori, Yuu; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Sakoda, Akihiro; Kataoka, Takahiro; Yamaoka, Kiyonori; Mitsunobu, Fumihiro

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the biokinetics of inhaled radon, radon activity concentrations in mouse tissues and organs were determined after mice had been exposed to about 1 MBq/m 3 of radon in air. Radon activity concentrations in mouse blood and in other tissues and organs were measured with a liquid scintillation counter and with a well-type HP Ge detector, respectively. Radon activity concentration in mouse blood was 0.410 ± 0.016 Bq/g when saturated with 1 MBq/m 3 of radon activity concentration in air. In addition, average partition coefficients obtained were 0.74 ± 0.19 for liver, 0.46 ± 0.13 for muscle, 9.09 ± 0.49 for adipose tissue, and 0.22 ± 0.04 for other organs. With these results, a value of 0.414 for the blood-to-air partition coefficient was calculated by means of our physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. The time variation of radon activity concentration in mouse blood during exposure to radon was also calculated. All results are compared in detail with those found in the literature.

  10. Indoor Radon and Its Decay Products: Concentrations, Causes, and Control Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nero, A.V.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Revzan, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    This report is an introduction to the behavior of radon 222 and its decay products in indoor air. This includes review of basic characteristics of radon and its decay products and of features of the indoor environment itself, all of which factors affect behavior in indoor air. The experimental and theoretical evidence on behavior of radon and its decay products is examined, providing a basis for understanding the influence of geological, structural, and meteorological factors on indoor concentrations, as well as the effectiveness of control techniques. We go on to examine three important issues concerning indoor radon. We thus include (1) an appraisal of the concentration distribution in homes, (2) an examination of the utility and limitations of popular monitoring techniques and protocols, and (3) an assessment of the key elements of strategies for controlling radon levels in homes.

  11. A compact multiparameter acquisition system for radon concentration studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese; Baiano; Boiano; D'Onofrio; Roca; Sabbarese; Vollaro

    2000-07-01

    A compact device suitable to acquire and display, at the same time, radon concentrations in a given atmosphere, and the environmental parameters characterising the atmosphere, is presented and described. It consists of two main blocks: (i) a detection section including a set of sensors for measuring pressure, humidity and temperature, and a set of silicon surface barrier detectors mounted in electrostatic cells collecting the ionised radon daughters; (ii) a single NIM module featuring an eight channel 12 bit ADC and the linear electronics to shape the signals from the silicon detectors. The system is controlled by a computer via a RS232 port. The software, implemented in Visual Basic, allows to display the energy distribution of the pulses coming from the alpha detectors and to initialise and control all phases of the acquisition. The results of preliminary tests show the high reliability of the system.

  12. A compact multiparameter acquisition system for radon concentration studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliese, M.; Baiano, G.; Boiano, A.; D'Onofrio, A.; Roca, V.; Sabbarese, C.; Vollaro, P.

    2000-01-01

    A compact device suitable to acquire and display, at the same time, radon concentrations in a given atmosphere, and the environmental parameters characterising the atmosphere, is presented and described. It consists of two main blocks: (i) a detection section including a set of sensors for measuring pressure, humidity and temperature, and a set of silicon surface barrier detectors mounted in electrostatic cells collecting the ionised radon daughters; (ii) a single NIM module featuring an eight channel 12 bit ADC and the linear electronics to shape the signals from the silicon detectors. The system is controlled by a computer via a RS232 port. The software, implemented in Visual Basic, allows to display the energy distribution of the pulses coming from the alpha detectors and to initialise and control all phases of the acquisition. The results of preliminary tests show the high reliability of the system

  13. Design Criteria for Achieving Acceptable Indoor Radon Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Torben Valdbjørn

    2016-01-01

    Design criteria for achieving an acceptable indoor radon concentration are presented in this paper. The paper suggests three design criteria. These criteria have to be considered at the early stage of the building design phase to meet the latest recommendations from the World Health Organization...... in most countries. The three design criteria are; first, establishing a radon barrier facing the ground; second, lowering the air pressure in the lower zone of the slab on ground facing downwards; third, diluting the indoor air with outdoor air. The first two criteria can prevent radon from infiltrating...... from the ground, and the third criteria can dilute the indoor air. By combining these three criteria, the indoor radon concentration can be lowered achieving an acceptable level. In addition, a cheap and reliable method for measuring the radon concentration in the indoor air is described. The provision...

  14. Investigation on residential radon concentration in Jingchuan county

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Wan Yihong; Chen Hongxiao; Shang Bin

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports an investigated result of residential radon concentration in Jingchuan County, Gansu Province, during May 2004 to November 2006. Alpha track detectors were used to measure radon level. Construction types of house and percentages of residents living in the county were also investigated through questionnaires. The result showed that the mean radon concentration in 62 investigated houses was 96.2 Bq·m -3 . The radon concentration in cave dwelling was the highest among all type of dwellings. The average level in cave dwelling is 110.2 Bq·m -3 , which was significantly higher than the national mean value published in literatures, and exceed the WHO recommended value of 100 Bq·m -3 . A considerable number of rural residents are living in cave dwellings in Jingchuan County. Attention should be paid to the radon problem and some proper protection measures taken. (authors)

  15. Estimation of radon concentration in dwellings in and around ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Physics, Pandu College, Guwahati 781 012, India. ∗. Corresponding author. e-mail: deygautam63@yahoo.com. It has been established that radon and its airborne decay products can present serious radiation hazards. A long term exposure to high concentration of radon causes lung cancer. Besides, it is ...

  16. Effect of environmental conditions on radon concentration-track ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this work, the effect of environmental conditions viz., temperature (Т) and relative humidity (RH) on the track density-radon concentrations calibration factor (K) has been studied for CR-39 and LR-115 track detectors. The factor K was determined using a reference radon chamber in the National Institute for ...

  17. Estimation of radon concentration in dwellings in and around ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Besides, it is also known that out of the total radiation dose received from natural and man-made sources, 60% of the dose is due to radon and its progeny. Taking this into account, an attempt has been made to estimate radon concentration in dwellings in and around Guwahati using aluminium dosimeter cups with CR-39 ...

  18. Radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... radon-resistant features. These features include gravel and plastic sheeting below the foundation, along with proper sealing ... 4 in 10 Americans at Risk from Air Pollution News: American Lung Association Reacts to Proposed Volkswagen ...

  19. Radon concentrations in the air of Slovene (Yugoslavia) underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobal, I.; Vaupotic, J.; Udovc, J.; Burger, J.; Stropnik, B.

    1990-01-01

    Radon-222 was measured in the air active underground mines in Slovenia, Yugoslavia, comprising one mercury mine, one lead mine, and six coal mines. Scintillation cells were used for measurement of radon. The highest concentration of 77 kBqm -3 was found in the Mezica lead mine, while the concentration in the Idrija mercury mine was usually below 1 kBq m -3 ; concentrations in coal mines seldom exceeded 0.5 kBq m -3

  20. Radon concentration measurements in the desert caves of Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mustafa, Hanan; Al-Jarallah, M.I.; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Abu-Jarad, F.

    2005-01-01

    Beneath the harsh deserts of Saudi Arabia lie dark chambers and complex mazes filled with strange shapes and wondrous beauty. Radon concentration measurements have been carried out in the desert caves of Al-Somman Plateau in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Passive radon dosimeters, based on alpha particle etch track detectors with an inlet filter, were used in this study. A total of 59 dosimeters were placed in five caves for a period of six months. Out of 59 dosimeters, 37 could be collected for analysis. Measurements showed significant variations in radon concentrations in caves depending upon their natural ventilation. The results of the study show that the average radon concentration in the different caves ranges from 74 up to 451Bqm -3 . The average radon concentration in four of the caves was low in the range 74-114Bqm -3 . However, one cave showed an average radon concentration of 451Bqm -3 . Radon is not a problem for tourists in the majority of caves. However, sometimes it may imply some limitation to the working time of guides

  1. Measurement of the concentration of radon in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aten, J.B.Th.; Bierhuizen, H.W.J.; Hoek, L.P. van; Ros, D.; Weber, J.

    1975-01-01

    A simple transportable air monitoring apparatus was developed for controlling the radon contamination of air in laboratory rooms. It is not highly accurate but is sufficient to register the order of magnitude of the radon concentration. Air is pumped through a filter for one or two hours and an alpha decay curve of the dust on the filter is determined. Scintillation counting forty minutes after sampling indicates the radon activity. The calibration method of measuring the equilibrium of daughter product concentrations is discussed extensively

  2. Radon concentration in the springs of the alluvial fan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiuchi, Kimiko; Ishii, Tadashi; Kobayashi, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Rokugo alluvial fan is one of the typical stratified alluvial fans which have grown in the east edge of Yokote basin in Akita Prefecture. Many of Rokugo's springs are gushing out from 45 m to 50 m above the sea level where city town have been developed. Mechanism of gushing out of spring is closely bound up with the landform of this area. There is nearly no radon existing in the surface water, but in groundwater, radon concentrations are stable in every stratums and infiltration of groundwater to surface water. We would like to obtain some hydrological information by measuring radon concentration in water samples of Rokugo alluvial fan. (author)

  3. Measurement of radon concentration in air employing Lucas chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machaj, B.

    1997-01-01

    The results of investigations aimed to determine the main features of radon concentration gauge in air, employing 0.17 L Lucas chamber, and air sample forced by an air pump are presented. For two hour sampling and measuring cycle time the dynamic error in the worst case (first read out) equals 5 % relative to the step jump of radon concentration. This is due to the increase of activity of the decay products in the chamber. It was observed that the short lived radon decay products (Po-218, Pb-214, Bi-214) are depositing on the walls of the chamber and they are not removed by flushing the chamber with air. (author)

  4. Measurements of Radon Concentration in Yemen Using Spark Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arafa, W.; Abou-Leila, M.; Hafiz, M.E.; Al-Glal, N.

    2011-01-01

    Spark counter has been designed and realized and the optimum applied voltage was found to be 600 V. Excellent consistent agreements was observed between counted number of tracks by spark counter and reading by optical microscope. Radon concentration in some houses in Sana'a and Hodeidah cities in Yemen had been performed using LR-115 SSNTD and spark counter system. The average radon concentration in both cities was far lower the alert value. The results showed that radon concentration in the metropolitan area Sana'a was higher than that in Hodeidah city. Also, it was observed that old residential houses had higher levels of radon concentrations have compared to newly built houses in the metropolitan area Sana'a

  5. Developing an interactive computational system to simulate radon concentration inside ancient egyptian tombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metwally, S. M.; Salama, E.; El-Fikia, S. A.; Abo-EImagd, M.; Eissa, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    RSSP (Radon Scale Software Package) is an interactive support system that simulates the radon concentration inside ancient Egyptian tombs and the consequences on the population in terms of internal and external exposure. RSSP consists of three interconnected modules: the first one simulates the radon concentration inside ancient Egyptian tombs using a developed mathematical model. This model introduces the possibility of controlling the rate of radon accumulation via additional artificial ventilation systems. The source of inputs is an editable database for the tombs includes the geometrical dimensions and some environmental parameters like temperature and outdoor radon concentration at the tombs locations. The second module simulates the absorbed dose due to internal exposure of radon and its progeny. The third module simulates the absorbed dose due to external exposure of Gamma rays emitted from the tomb wall rocks. RSSP introduces the facility of following the progress of radon concentration as well as Internal and external absorbed dose in a wide range of time (seconds, minutes, hours and days) via numerical data and the corresponding graphical interface

  6. Distribution of indoor radon concentrations and uranium-bearing rocks in Texas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudak, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare regional patterns of indoor radon concentration with uranium-bearing rock zones and county populations in Texas. Zones yielding radon concentrations that are relatively high for Texas include shale and sandstone in northwest Texas; red beds in north-central Texas; felsic volcanic rocks in west Texas; and sandstone, limestone, and igneous rocks in central Texas. Located in northwest Tecas, only five of the 202 counties evaluated have mean indoor radon concentrations above 4.0 pCi l -1 . Two of those counties have populations above the state median of 20115. The highest county mean concentration is 8.8 pCi l -1 . Results of the study suggest that (1) regional geology influences indoor radon concentrations in Texas, (2) statewide, the radon concentrations are relatively low, (3) highly populated counties do not coincide with regions of high indoor radon concentration, and (4) regions that may warrant further monitoring include northwest Texas and, to a lesser degree, west and central Texas. (orig.)

  7. A survey of indoor radon and particular concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Yukiko

    1993-01-01

    Lung disease risk from inhalation of radon can be enhanced by the presence of particular pollutants in indoor air. The indoor concentration of radon and particulates were measured in homes, a department store, and offices in a high building in Tokyo metropolis, as well as in homes in both northern and western Japan. Passive radon monitors were located in living rooms and offices for more than three months at 99 sites during the winter of 1988 and 1989. Indoor radon concentration ranged from 11.1 Bq/m 3 to 148 Bq/m 3 (n=99) and averaged value S.D. was 36.5±14.2 Bq/m 3 . However, the average concentration in air conditional buildings was 21.8±9.51 Bq/m 3 (n=17). Simultaneously at 65 of the radon sites, indoor particulates were collected using personal dust samplers by impaction methods. Deposited particulate concentrations on the sampler were measured and calculated in a unit of μm/m 3 . Concentrations were determined for particle sizes above and below 2.5 μm, for both smoking or non smoking sites. Consequently, concentration of particle size below 2.5 μm was high in smoking rooms. Finally, it was considered that smoking was a complex indoor pollutant as adherence of radon daughter to aerosols. (author)

  8. Measurement of indoor radon concentration in kindergartens in Sofia, Bulgaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Kremena; Stojanovska, Zdenka; Tsenova, Martina; Badulin, Viktor; Kunovska, Bistra

    2014-11-01

    As a part of the systematic survey of indoor radon in Bulgaria, the indoor radon concentration was measured in 296 kindergarten buildings of Sofia city during 3 months (February to April 2013) using the CR-39 nuclear tract detectors. In 256 buildings at least two frequently occupied rooms (mainly playrooms) were observed. Altogether, 922 measurements were performed. The frequency distribution was well described by the lognormal function. The measured radon concentrations range between 9 and 1415 Bq m(-3) with a geometric mean of 101 Bq m(-3) (2.08) and an arithmetic mean 132 Bq m(-3) with a standard deviation of 118 Bq m(-3). The radon concentrations obtained in this survey were compared with that in Sofia city dwellings obtained from a previous study. A detailed statistical analysis of the building factors was presented. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Detection of radon products in atmosphere and its concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Naemi, H.M.

    1993-01-01

    The climate of the State of Qatar is very warm during the summer and also for considerable parts of the spring and autumn. Energy-tight houses and buildings with air conditioning working day and night for several months are very common. Consequently, the problem of accumulation of indoor radon may exist. No measurements of radon concentration in Qatar have been performed before. The aim of the present work is to implement a suitable technique to measure radon concentration in Qatari houses and buildings. As a first stage, it was found reasonable to start with a technique to evaluate the short-term average indoor radon concentration. The activated charcoal method was chosen to perform this evaluation

  10. Survey of radon concentrations in three Italian towns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malanca, A.; Pessina, V.; Dallara, G.

    1992-01-01

    Radon-222 was measured in 187 dwellings in Parma, Reggio Emilia, and Orvieto. Samples were collected using activated carbon canisters, placed in basements and on the upper floors for at least 48 h in the period starting from January 1989 to July 1990. Gamma spectroscopy was used for the measurement of 222 Rn and its progeny. The data for the three towns show a lognormal distribution. Owing to the high radium concentration in building materials and underlying soil, high radon concentrations were observed in Orvieto's dwellings. Additional measurements carried out in 22 public schools of Parma and Reggio Emilia showed moderate radon concentrations, while significant radon levels were recorded in 37 castles and ancient buildings in Parma and Reggio Emilia provinces

  11. Measurement and modeling of indoor radon concentrations in residential buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Park

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Radon, the primary constituent of natural radiation, is the second leading environmental cause of lung cancer after smoking. To confirm a relationship between indoor radon exposure and lung cancer, estimating cumulative levels of exposure to indoor radon for an individual or population is necessary. This study sought to develop a model for estimate indoor radon concentrations in Korea. Especially, our model and method may have wider application to other residences, not to specific site, and can be used in situations where actual measurements for input variables are lacking. In order to develop a model, indoor radon concentrations were measured at 196 ground floor residences using passive alpha-track detectors between January and April 2016. The arithmetic mean (AM and geometric mean (GM means of indoor radon concentrations were 117.86±72.03 and 95.13±2.02 Bq/m3, respectively. Questionnaires were administered to assess the characteristics of each residence, the environment around the measuring equipment, and lifestyles of the residents. Also, national data on indoor radon concentrations at 7643 detached houses for 2011-2014 were reviewed to determine radon concentrations in the soil, and meteorological data on temperature and wind speed were utilized to approximate ventilation rates. The estimated ventilation rates and radon exhalation rates from the soil varied from 0.18 to 0.98/hr (AM, 0.59±0.17/hr and 326.33 to 1392.77 Bq/m2/hr (AM, 777.45±257.39; GM, 735.67±1.40 Bq/m2/hr, respectively. With these results, the developed model was applied to estimate indoor radon concentrations for 157 residences (80% of all 196 residences, which were randomly sampled. The results were in better agreement for Gyeonggi and Seoul than for other regions of Korea. Overall, the actual and estimated radon concentrations were in better agreement, except for a few low-concentration residences.

  12. Indoor radon concentration in some earthquake prone areas of Haryana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kant, Krishan

    2005-01-01

    The problem of radon is an important global problem and the radon and its progeny are a major source of natural radiation exposure and contribute to more than 50% of the dose equivalent received by general population from all sources of radiation, both naturally occurring and man-made. In view of the above fact, the measurement of radon concentration levels in dwellings is of fundamental importance from health and hygiene point of view. Keeping this in view, alpha active pollutant (radon, thoron and their progeny) concentration inside the dwellings in earthquake prone districts of Haryana was measured using LR-115, Type II Plastic track detectors. Radon concentration and inhalation dose rates to the inhabitants in this area have been calculated. Results of various measurements on the radon and its progeny concentration, annual exposure and annual inhalation dose received by the workers have been reported. The calculated values of potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC), radon levels (EEC), annual exposure and annual inhalation dose in the dwellings of earthquake prone districts of Haryana varied from 2.76 mWL to 13.41 mWL with an average of 5.60 ± 0.76 mWL, 25.5 Bq m -3 to 124 Bq m -3 with an average of 51.78 ± 7.04 Bq m -3 , 0.11 WLM to 0.56 WLM with an average of 0.23 ± 0.03 WLM and 0.44 mSv to 2.13 mSv with an average of 0.88 ± 0.12 mSv respectively. The radon concentrations were found to be higher in these areas as compared to the studies carried out earlier in other parts of the state. (author)

  13. RADON CONCENTRATIONS IN SELECTED THERMAL WATERS IN SLOVAKIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blahušiak, P; Holý, K; Mullerová, M; Smetanová, I

    2017-11-01

    Radon concentration in thermal waters used in selected spas and aqua parks in Slovakia was investigated. In total, 23 thermal water sources were monitored. Measured radon levels varied in a large interval, from 4.1 to 488 Bq l-1. High radon activity (180 Bq l-1) was also found in thermal potable water in fountains used by the patients and the public. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Relation between residential radon concentrations and housing characteristics. The Cracow study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jedrychowski, W.; Flak, E.; Wesolowski, J.; Liu Kaishen

    1995-01-01

    The survey on indoor radon exposure was undertaken to explain whether the excess in lung cancer deaths in the Cracow city center may be attributed to this particular exposure. A total of 310 detectors was placed in households randomly chosen from three homogeneous strata of residential buildings. The first stratum included houses in the old city center constructed predominantly from stone bricks. The second stratum covered the city area with big apartment condominiums built from concrete blocks. The third stratum consisted of single family houses located in a suburban area. From each of these residency strata a random sample of an equal number of households was chosen, and the radon detectors were placed in households located at various levels of the buildings. The three-month radon sampling data were used to determine the distribution of various levels of radon in the households. In the measurement of radon exposure, Landauer α-track samplers were used. The data collected show that the type of building was the best single predictor of indoor radon concentrations. Other variables found to be associated significantly with indoor concentrations were the household level in the building and the house age. In general, residences with concrete slabs and dwellings with rarely-opened windows were found to have slightly higher radon concentrations. (author) 2 tabs., 15 refs

  15. Radon and aldehyde concentrations in the indoor environment. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moschandreas, D.J.; Rector, H.E.

    1981-04-01

    Findings regarding indoor air contaminants in the energy-efficient residence (EER) in Mt. Airy, Maryland are reported. The objectives of the study were to collect and analyze relevant air quality samples (specifically radon and aldehydes), characterize the indoor air quality with respect to radon and aldehydes, and develop relationships between air infiltration rates and contaminant levels. One-fifth of the measured formaldehyde concentrations were in the range that may cause health concerns. Although indoor temperature and relative humidity affect indoor HCHO concentration, the elevated formaldehyde concentrations were measured under very low air infiltration rates. The data show that ventilation of the indoor air space is somewhat effective in reducing high HCHO concentrations. The operation of the heat exchanger led to an increase of the air infiltration rate which in turn resulted in substantial reduction of formaldehyde concentrations. A considerable number of the collected samples of indoor air displayed radon concentrations at levels higher than 1.0 to 4.0 nCim -3 (assuming an equilibrium factor of 0.5, these radon levels would correspond to working levels above the health guidelines suggested by the US EPA for homes in Florida built on land reclaimed from phosphate mining). As in the case of indoor formaldehyde concentrations, elevated indoor concentrations are substantially reduced when the infiltration rate is increased. The data base shows that the use of the air to air heat exchanger leads to reduction of indoor radon concentration by increasing the residential ventilation rate

  16. Daily fluctuations in radon concentration in a Cordoba factory complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Germanier, A.; Perez, R.; Rubio, M.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This work shows the fluctuations of indoor radon concentration in some rooms placed inside a Cordoba Factory Complex. The measurements were performed by Victoreen Radon Monitor. The system was shaped to sample single radon concentration values after one hour integration. It utilizes a passive diffusion chamber and a silicon diffused junction detector. A portion of decay products will plate-out onto the detector and emit alpha particles into the depletion region of a diffused junction detector. The alpha energy is deposited in the detector in the form of ionization which generates a charge pulse. Only alpha pulses of an energy level similar Po-218 and Po-214 are detected. The study of the meteorological parameters shows that the daily fluctuations of the radon concentration respond to the transport and dispersion processes of radon gas through the air. Air temperature, wind's direction and speed are found to be fundamentals parameters in the observed time behavior. The meteorological data were obtained by a portable station (Davis Weathe Monitor II). The radon concentration present a maximum value (1850 Bq/m 3 ) at the night and a minimum value (150 Bq/m 3 ) at the day. (author) [es

  17. Anomalous radon concentration in a nuclear research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balcazar, M.; Pena, P.

    2014-08-01

    Radon monitoring in more than 60 selected points were part of surveillance radiation activities in the nuclear center of Mexico; three major facilities were inspected, the TRIGA Mark III research reactor, the Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator and the Pelletron electron Accelerator. During a major maintenance activities in the research reactor, the air extraction system was not functioning for more than a month causing of a radon build up exhaled from the massive concrete of the building, reaching concentrations in some places up to 2.1 kb m -3 . The irradiation room at the Tandem Accelerator presented high radon concentrations up to nearly 5 kb m -3 , manly in the trenches were pipes and electric wires are located, the radon source was identified as originated from small caves under the floor. Low radon concentrations were found inside a similar building where a Pelletron accelerator is located. The reasons for the abnormal radon concentrations and the mitigation actions to remove any risk for the worker are discussed in detail in this paper. (author)

  18. Anomalous radon concentration in a nuclear research facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcazar, M.; Pena, P., E-mail: miguel.balcazar@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    Radon monitoring in more than 60 selected points were part of surveillance radiation activities in the nuclear center of Mexico; three major facilities were inspected, the TRIGA Mark III research reactor, the Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator and the Pelletron electron Accelerator. During a major maintenance activities in the research reactor, the air extraction system was not functioning for more than a month causing of a radon build up exhaled from the massive concrete of the building, reaching concentrations in some places up to 2.1 kb m{sup -3}. The irradiation room at the Tandem Accelerator presented high radon concentrations up to nearly 5 kb m{sup -3}, manly in the trenches were pipes and electric wires are located, the radon source was identified as originated from small caves under the floor. Low radon concentrations were found inside a similar building where a Pelletron accelerator is located. The reasons for the abnormal radon concentrations and the mitigation actions to remove any risk for the worker are discussed in detail in this paper. (author)

  19. Measurement of indoor and outdoor radon concentrations during Superstorm Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotrappa, Payasada; Paul, Prateek; Stieff, Alex; Stieff, Frederick

    2013-12-01

    Superstorm Sandy affected much of the US East Coast extending over 1800 km. It passed over the test location in the State of Maryland on 29 October 2012. Being 350 km away from the regions of highest intensity the storm was of lower intensity at the test location. Continuous radon monitors and passive radon monitors were used for the measurement. The test location was the basement of a single family home representing the indoor concentration. A partially opened garage of the same test home represented the outdoor radon concentration. In 24 h, the atmospheric pressure dropped from 990 to 960 mbar and the indoor radon concentration increased from 70 to 1500 Bq m(-3) and returned to the normal of 70 Bq m(-3) at the end of the storm. Throughout the storm, the outdoor radon concentration was not significantly affected. Probable reasons for such surprisingly large changes are discussed. However, the outdoor temperature dropped from 13°C to 7°C during the radon peak.

  20. Ventilation systems as an effective tool for control of radon daughter concentration in mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-10-01

    Introduced with a brief discussion of the key role of ventilation in controlling mine atmospheres, the effects of the design of the ventilation system on the control of radon daughter concentrations are illustrated with specific reference to Alcan's Director Mine, St-Lawrence, Nfld. (This fluorspar mine was found to have high radon concentrations due to mine water bringing in dissolved radon.) After a discussion of the health physics history of the mine, the various phases of the ventilation system design and the general results are detailed. The author draws some conclusions having general application to the design of any mine with a radon or thoron daughter concentration. These include minimizing the 'age' of the air; the need for continuous ventilation in all areas; the value of remote control and monitoring; and the benefits of mine pressurization

  1. Radon concentration levels in dwellings and mine atmospheres in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segovia, N.; Pena, P.; Mireles, F.; Davila, I.; Quirino, L.

    1993-01-01

    Atmospheric radon surveys have been conducted in dwellings and mine atmospheres from the city of Zacatecas and single family homes in Mexico City. The monitoring was performed with track detectors, LR115 type II. The radon concentration values in most of the atmospheres studied were less than 150 Bq/m 3 ; the maximum value at the top soil in mines reached 1200 Bq/m 3 . (author)

  2. Calculating flux to predict future cave radon concentrations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rowberry, Matthew David; Martí, Xavier; Frontera, C.; Van De Wiel, M.J.; Briestenský, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 157, JUN (2016), 16-26 ISSN 0265-931X R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : cave radon concentration * cave radon flux * cave ventilation * radioactive decay * fault slip * numerical modelling Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure; BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.310, year: 2016

  3. Measurements of radon concentrations in a sample representative of housing in Franche-Comte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aury, K.; Clinard, F.; Tillier, C.; Catelinois, O.; Pirard, P.; Aury, K.; Nourry, L.; Hochart, A.

    2008-01-01

    Three departments on four ones in Franche-Comte are classified at risk for radon: measurements are so compulsory in establishments receiving public. For the residential sector, no obligation of measurement are compulsory when french people spend 70% of their time in it. The data concerning homes are fragmentary and deserve to be completed. This campaign of measurements has confirmed the existence of radon in relatively high concentrations in Franche-Comte, including the sedimentary areas, justifying the necessity to realize a precise evaluation of the sanitary impact. The model will allow to study different strategies to reduce radon in houses. (N.C.)

  4. Study of temporal variation of radon concentrations in public drinking water supplies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, Emma L. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1995-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed a Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for radon-222 in public drinking water supplies of 300 pCi/L. Proposed monitoring requirements include collecting quarterly grab samples for the first year, then annual samples for the remainder of the compliance cycle provided first year quarterly samples average below the MCL. The focus of this research was to study the temporal variation of groundwater radon concentrations to investigate how reliably one can predict an annual average radon concentration based on the results of grab samples. Using a "slow-flow" collection method and liquid scintillation analysis, biweekly water samples were taken from ten public water supply wells in North Carolina (6 month - 11 month sampling periods). Based on study results, temporal variations exist in groundwater radon concentrations. Statistical analysis performed on the data indicates that grab samples taken from each of the ten wells during the study period would exhibit groundwater radon concentrations within 30% of their average radon concentration.

  5. Radon Concentration in Groundwater in the Central Region of Gyeongju, Korea - 13130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Min; Lee, A. Rim; Park, Chan Hee; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is a well known cause of lung cancer through inhalation. Nevertheless, stomach cancer can also occur if radon-containing water is ingested. This study measured the radon concentration in groundwater for drinking or other domestic uses in the central region of Gyeongju, Korea. The groundwater samples were taken from 11 points chosen from the 11 administrative districts in the central region of Gyeongju by selecting a point per district considering the demographic distribution including the number of tourists who visit the ancient ruins and archaeological sites. The mean radon concentrations in the groundwater samples ranged from 14.38 to 9050.73 Bq.m -3 , which were below the recommendations by the U.S. EPA and WHO. (authors)

  6. An analysis of factors affecting the high radon concentration in different types of houses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulan Ljiljana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of indoor radon measurements carried out in municipality of Zubin Potok, northwestern part of Kosovo and Metohija. Annual measurements in two rooms of each house were performed by solid state nuclear track detectors commercially known as Gammadata. Average indoor radon concentration in different type of houses varied from 29-326 Bq/m3. A different year of house's construction including various types of building materials were selected for survey. A detail analysis showed that the differences in radon concentration occur between various building materials used for construction, flooring level, type of room and behavior of inhabitants. It was found that building materials in some houses contribute additionally to indoor radon.

  7. Investigation of the areas of high radon concentration in Gyeongju

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Min; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Shin Jae; Moon, Joo Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the radon concentrations at 21 elementary schools in Gyeongju, Republic of Korea, to identify those schools with high radon concentrations. Considering their geological characteristics and the preliminary survey results, three schools were finally placed under close scrutiny. For these three schools, continuous measurements over 48 h were taken at the principal's and administration office. The radon concentrations at one school, Naenam, exceeded the action level (148 Bq/m 3 ) established by the U.S. EPA, while those at the other two schools were below that level. - Highlights: • Preliminary measurements of the indoor radon concentrations were performed at the auditoriums in 23 elementary schools in Gyeongju. • Considering the geological characteristics and preliminary survey results, three elementary schools were screened for closer scrutiny. • For the three schools, continuous measurements were made at their principal's and administration offices over 48-h period. • The scrutiny revealed one elementary school of high radon concentration much higher than the U.S. EPA action level

  8. Influence of architectural style on indoor radon concentration in a radon prone area: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, A; García-Paniagua, J; Guillén, J; Montalbán, B

    2018-01-01

    Indoor radon is a major health concern as it is a known carcinogenic. Nowadays there is a trend towards a greater energy conservation in buildings, which is reflected in an increasing number of regulations. But, can this trend increase the indoor radon concentration? In this paper, we selected a radon prone area in Spain and focused on single-family dwellings constructed in a variety of architectural styles. These styles ranged from 1729 up to 2014, with varying construction techniques (from local resources to almost universally standard building materials) and regulations in force (from none to the Spanish regulation in force). The 226 Ra concentrations in soil and surface radon exhalation rates were rather similar in this area, mean values ranging 70-126Bq/kg and 49-100mBq/m 2 ·s, respectively. Indoor radon concentration was generally greater than the contribution from soil exhalation (surface exhalation rates), especially in New dwellings (1980-2014). Its concentration in dwellings built in the Traditional style (1729-1940) was significantly lower than in the new houses. This can be consequence of the air tightness of the dwellings as a consequence of the different regulations in force. In the period covered by the Traditional style, there was no regulation in force, and dwelling had loose air tight. Whereas in recent times, there are mandatory regulations assuring a better air tightness of the buildings. Refurbishment of Traditional dwellings also seems to increase the indoor radon concentration, as they must also comply with the regulations in force. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Seasonal variation of radon concentrations in UK homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miles, J C H; Howarth, C B; Hunter, N

    2012-01-01

    The patterns of seasonal variation of radon concentrations were measured in 91 homes in five regions of the UK over a period of two years. The results showed that there was no significant difference between the regions in the pattern or magnitude of seasonal variation in radon concentrations. The arithmetic mean variation was found to be close to that found previously in the UK national survey. Differences in the pattern between the two years of the study were not significant. Two-thirds of homes in the study followed the expected pattern of high radon in the winter and low radon in the summer. Most of the rest showed little seasonal variation, and a few showed a reversed seasonal pattern. The study does not provide any clear evidence for the recorded house characteristics having an effect on the seasonal variation in radon concentrations in UK homes, though the statistical power for determining such effects is limited in this study. The magnitude of the seasonal variation varied widely between homes. Analysis of the individual results from the homes showed that because of the wide variation in the amount of seasonal variation, applying seasonal correction factors to the results of three-month measurements can yield only relatively small improvements in the accuracy of estimates of annual mean concentrations.

  10. Measurement of radon concentration in Taiz city dwellings-yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Taher M.; Ahmed, Hayel A.; Ismail, Rokhsana M.

    2001-01-01

    Radon gas considered being a high part of natural radiation background. Emitting alpha particles; radon daughters may be deposited into the lungs and cause health hazards. For this reason, estimation of radon levels in dwellings was done in many countries. In our country, Radon group in the Department of physics, University of Aden has been studied radon level in Aden dwelling. The present study is about the radon level in Taiz City - Yemen. Passive diffusion dosimeters containing (SSNTD s ) Cr - 39 detectors were used in the present work. 125 dosimeters were distributed into dwellings of ten regions in Taiz City. Results obtained show that Rn 222 levels vary between 4 Bq/m 3 and 99 Bq/m 3 . The average concentration in Al-Hasseb district is 23 Bq/m 3 and in Algumhuri hospital district is 53 Bq/m 3 . In other regions it varies between the two values. Whereas the general average in the Taiz City is 34 Bq/m 3 . (author)

  11. Investigation of indoor radon concentration in block houses in Omderman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, H. A. M.

    2010-12-01

    Radon is one of the naturally occurring radioactive elements in the environment as a member of the natural uranium decay. Exposure to radon in the home and workplace is one of the main risks of ionizing radiation thought to cause tens of thousands of deaths from lung cancer each year. In order to reduce this burden it is important that national authorities have methods and tools bases on solid scientific evidence and sound public health policy. The public needs to be aware of radon risks and the means to reduce and prevent these. This study presents of the studies dealing with the investigation of exposure from ionizing radiation. The radon levels in some selected type of building styles (Bricks Albulk) were investigated in Omderman city (public housing). The radon level in most of the houses found to range between 87.63 and 206 Bq/m 3 with average value of 127±23 Bq/m 3 . This is well lay within the allowable limit with average. The study indicates that building materials used does not add significant concentration of radon to indoor. It can be considered as safe type of building style from radiation protection point of view. (Author)

  12. Gamma environmental dosimetry and radon concentration in Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo B, L.; Greaves E, D.

    1996-01-01

    The environmental radiation levels have been determined in Venezuela by means of different techniques including the passive dosimeters and the alpha and gamma dosimetry besides the gross alpha/beta counting. The most important conclusion is that the presence of artificial radionuclides (Cesium-137, Beryllium-7 and Cadmium-109) was observed in different environmental samples and in food considered contaminant. The values of gamma levels are between 28 and 40 mGy/day and the mean value of radon concentration in closed environment is 36 Bq/m 3 ; the higher values of a factor 10 have been measured in the Andes region. The 20% of analysed drinking water has a concentration of alpha radionuclides emitters less than 0.005 Bq/l and only the 8% is greater than 0.450 Bq/l. (authors). 6 refs., 1 fig

  13. Procedure for the characterization of radon potential in existing dwellings and to assess the annual average indoor radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collignan, Bernard; Powaga, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Risk assessment due to radon exposure indoors is based on annual average indoor radon activity concentration. To assess the radon exposure in a building, measurement is generally performed during at least two months during heating period in order to be representative of the annual average value. This is because radon presence indoors could be very variable during time. This measurement protocol is fairly reliable but may be a limiting in the radon risk management, particularly during a real estate transaction due to the duration of the measurement and the limitation of the measurement period. A previous field study defined a rapid methodology to characterize radon entry in dwellings. The objective of this study was at first, to test this methodology in various dwellings to assess its relevance with a daily test. At second, a ventilation model was used to assess numerically the air renewal of a building, the indoor air quality all along the year and the annual average indoor radon activity concentration, based on local meteorological conditions, some building characteristics and in-situ characterization of indoor pollutant emission laws. Experimental results obtained on thirteen individual dwellings showed that it is generally possible to obtain a representative characterization of radon entry into homes. It was also possible to refine the methodology defined in the previous study. In addition, numerical assessments of annual average indoor radon activity concentration showed generally a good agreement with measured values. These results are encouraging to allow a procedure with a short measurement time to be used to characterize long-term radon potential in dwellings. - Highlights: • Test of a daily procedure to characterize radon potential in dwellings. • Numerical assessment of the annual radon concentration. • Procedure applied on thirteen dwellings, characterization generally satisfactory. • Procedure useful to manage radon risk in dwellings, for real

  14. Determination of radon and progeny concentrations in Brazilian underground mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraenkel, Mario O.; Gouvea, Vandir de Azevedo; Macacini, Jose F.; Cardozo, Katia; Carvalho Filho, Carlos A. de; Lima, Carlos E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present the activities related to the determination of radon and progeny concentrations in underground mines in Brazil. Radon is originated from decay of radium-226 and radium-228 present in rocks. Radon and its short-lived progeny can be retained in the workers pulmonary alveoli, and this way they bring about cancer risk to these mining professionals. The occurrence of high radon concentrations in underground coal and copper mines and the lack of systematic survey motivated CNEN, the regulatory agency, to develop the Radon Project, aiming to aid the formulation of a specific regulation with occupational dose limits consistent with international standards recommended by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Dozens of underground mines are currently in operation in the national. It had to be noted that about 50% of these mines are located in Minas Gerais province, and for this reason it was chosen to start the Project. In each underground mine it is installed in selected points passive nuclear track etch radon detectors, type LEXAN and Cr-39, for periods from three to five months. It was also made local measurements with Dose Man Pro detectors from SARAD. The points are chosen according to geological features, radiometric activity and characteristics of prospect development. The determination of radon present in mines has been made in IEN (Nuclear Engineering Institute)/Rio de Janeiro-RJ, LAPOC (Pocos de Caldas Laboratory)/Pocos de Caldas-MG e ESPOA (Porto Alegre Office)/Porto Alegre-RS. Until now it was visited about 35 mines in a universe of about 50 mines, from which 20% showed concentration values higher than international limits (ICRP 65), between 500 and 1500 Bq.m -3 . (author)

  15. Indoor air radon concentration in schools in Prizren, Kosovo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahtijari, M.; Stegnar, P.; Shemsidini, Z.; Kobal, I.; Vaupotic, J.

    2006-01-01

    Indoor air radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations were measured in spring and winter in 30 rooms of 9 elementary schools and 19 rooms of 6 high schools in Prizren, Kosovo, using alpha scintillation cells. Only in three rooms of elementary schools and four rooms of high schools did winter concentrations exceed 400 Bq m -3 . (authors)

  16. Measurement of radon concentration in super-Kamiokande's buffer gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Sekiya, H.; Tasaka, S.; Takeuchi, Y.; Wendell, R. A.; Matsubara, M.; Nakahata, M.

    2017-09-01

    To precisely measure radon concentrations in purified air supplied to the Super-Kamiokande detector as a buffer gas, we have developed a highly sensitive radon detector with an intrinsic background as low as 0 . 33 ± 0 . 07 mBq /m3. In this article, we discuss the construction and calibration of this detector as well as results of its application to the measurement and monitoring of the buffer gas layer above Super-Kamiokande. In March 2013, the chilled activated charcoal system used to remove radon in the input buffer gas was upgraded. After this improvement, a dramatic reduction in the radon concentration of the supply gas down to 0 . 08 ± 0 . 07 mBq /m3. Additionally, the Rn concentration of the in-situ buffer gas has been measured 28 . 8 ± 1 . 7 mBq /m3 using the new radon detector. Based on these measurements we have determined that the dominant source of Rn in the buffer gas arises from contamination from the Super-Kamiokande tank itself.

  17. Radon

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... del radón Home Buyers and Sellers Radon Protection: Buying a Home Radon Protection: Building a Home Radon- ... Open Government Regulations.gov Subscribe USA.gov White House Ask. Contact Us Hotlines FOIA Requests Frequent Questions ...

  18. A study of radon indoor concentration; Un estudio de concentracion de radon intramuros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, P.; Ruiz, W.; Segovia, N.; Ponciano, G. [ININ, Gerencia de Ciencias Ambientales, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It was realized a study of radon concentration in houses of Mexico City and in a laboratory of the Nuclear Centre of Salazar, State of Mexico. The radon determination in air was realized with solid nuclear track detectors and with Honeywell and Alpha guard automatic equipment. The results show that the majority of houses have values under 148 Bq/m{sup 3} obtaining some housings with upper values located in the Lomas zone. A study in smokers houses and another of controls showed very similar distributions. It was studied the day time fluctuations finding that radon increases considerably during the dawn. Some upper values obtained in a laboratory of the Nuclear Centre were remedied with ventilation. (Author)

  19. Measurement of airborne concentrations of radon-220 daughter products by alpha-particle spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.; Ryan, M.T.; Perdue, P.T.

    1978-01-01

    The decay of naturally occurring uranium-238 and thorium-232 produces radon-222 and radon-220 isotopes which can escape into the atmosphere. If these radon gases become concentrated in air, their daughter products may present an inhalation hazard to man. The airborne concentrations of radon-222 can usually be measured very accurately in the presence of normal airborne concentrations of radon-220 and its daughters. In contrast, the measurements of the airborne concentrations of radon-220 daughters are usually complicated by the presence of radon-222 and its daughters even at normally occurring airborne concentrations. The complications involved in these measurements can be overcome in most situations by using an alpha particle spectrometer to distinguish the activity of radon-222 daughters from that due to radon-220 daughters collected on a filter. A practical spectrometer for field measurements of alpha particle activity on a filter is discussed

  20. Radon concentration measurements in waters in Greece and Cyprus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louizi, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Tzortzi, A.; Thanassas, D.; Serefoglou, A.; Georgiou, E.; Vogiannis, E.; Koukouliou, V.

    2004-01-01

    A total of 35 measurements in Greece and 15 in Cyprus were performed. Radon concentrations in drinking water in Greece were from (1.1±0.5) to (410±50) Bq/L. The corresponding concentrations in underground potable waters in Cyprus ranged between (0.4±0.3) Bq/L and (15±4) Bq/L. High concentrations, viz. (120±20), (320±40) and (410±50) Bq/L, were observed in three samples collected from the city of Arnea Chalkidekis in northern Greece. One water sample from Lesvos Island (north-eastern part of Greece) exhibited a radon concentration of (140±20) Bq/L. Six samples of hot spring water from the city of Loutraki (Attica prefecture), characterized as 'medicinal drinking water', contained concentrations of radon between (220±10) and (340±20) Bq/L. Radon concentrations in potable and non-potable underground water in Greece and Cyprus ranged between (0.4±0.3) and (15±4) Bq/L, whereas in surface water the range was from (2.7±0.8) to (24±6) Bq/L. (P.A.)

  1. Effect of ventilation type on radon concentration at places of work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oksanen, E.

    1994-01-01

    Indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations were measured at 76 child care facilities and 36 schools in southern Finland. The buildings had three different types of ventilation systems: mechanical air supply and exhaust, mechanical exhaust, and natural ventilation, the first being most common. The effect of the ventilation type on the long-term radon concentration was studied in child care facilities. The radon concentrations were highest in the naturally ventilated buildings. The mechanical air supply and exhaust system maintained the lowest values in cold wintertime. In school buildings both the long-term radon concentration and short-term radon and daughter concentrations were measured. The correlation of the ventilation type and the radon concentration was not obvious in this group of measurements, but the radon concentrations and the equilibrium factors were highest in buildings with natural ventilation. Radon concentrations were generally lower during the working hours than during the one-month period, as expected. (author)

  2. Overview of current radon and radon daughter research at LBL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This report provides a brief summary of radon and radon daughter research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The radon and radon daughter research program has two broad goals: (1) the study of sources of radon and its subsequent transport into houses, and (2) research on the behavior of radon daughters in indoor environments. Additional research effort is directed to several auxiliary areas, including development of instrumentation and monitoring techniques, studies of indoor air movement, and measurement and control of indoor particulate concentrations

  3. Radon concentration measurements in waters in Greece and Cyprus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louizi, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Tzortzi, A.; Thanassas, D.; Serefoglou, A.; Georgiou, E.; Vogiannis, E.; Koukouliou, V.

    2004-01-01

    The radon content of drinking water samples was determined with Alpha Guard Pro equipped with an appropriate unit (Aqua Kit). The samples were collected from water taps in dwellings located at various cities in Greece and Cyprus. In addition, surface water samples from rivers, lakes and seas as well as potable underground and hot spring water samples from Greece and Cyprus were also collected. For a precise determination of radon concentration in water samples, special procedures were followed both for sampling and transportation, as well as for measurement. Intercomparison experiments were designed and implemented before and during the study. Radon concentrations in drinking water samples in Greece ranged between 1.1 ± 0.5 Bq/L and 410±50 Bq/L. The corresponding concentrations in Cyprus ranged between 1.3 ± 0.8 Bq/L and 15±4 Bq/L. Three samples collected from the city of Arnea Chalkidikis (Northern Greece) exhibited high concentrations of 120±20 Bq/L, 320±40 Bq/L and 410±50 Bq/L. This city is identified as a high radon potential area. One water sample located in Lesvos Island (North-East part of Greece) exhibited radon concentration 140±20 Bq/L. Additional six samples displayed high concentrations in potable hot spring water samples. These samples which were collected from the city of Loutraki (Peloponnesus) ranged between 220-230 Bq/L. In addition, two samples characterized as 'medicinal drinking water' gave concentrations between 320 Bq/L and 340 Bq/L. For underground water samples the radon concentrations ranged between 1.2±0.7 Bq/L and 15±4 Bq/L, while for surface water samples the range was 2.7±0.8 Bq/L to 24±6 Bq/L. The observed concentrations of radon gas in potable water samples in Greece were found to be largely low. In Cyprus, they were all well below 15 Bq/L

  4. Estimation of indoor radon concentration based on radon flux from soil and groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, R C; Prasad, Ganesh; Gusain, G S

    2011-09-01

    The indoor radon concentration was estimated based on the radon flux in soil and groundwater. The indoor radon concentration in Budhakedar area of Garhwal Himalaya, India is estimated to be 3.0-131.4 Bq/m(3) in summer and 4.6-92.4 Bq/m(3) in winter. Based on the available data from study area, the calculated value of diffusion coefficient for the soil ranges from 0.1×10(-2) to 3.0×10(-2)cm(2) s(-1) in the summer season and 0.1×10(-2) to 0.4×10(-2)cm(2) s(-1) in the winter season. The calculated value of diffusion flux in the study area is found to vary from 0.1×10(-2) to 16.1×10(-2)Bq m(-2) s(-1) in summer season and 0.1×10(-2)-12.2×10(-2)Bq m(-2) s(-1) in winter season. The formulation was tested by comparing the results of radon values from two different seasons of a year. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berico, M.; Formignani, M.; Mariotti, F.

    2001-01-01

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of 218 Po, 214 Pb and 214 Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated [it

  6. Radon concentration: a tool for assessing the fracture network at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radon concentration: a tool for assessing the fracture network at Guanyinyan study area, China. ... in tunnels in the area. This work has positive implications for the location of groundwater resources in fractured-rock aquifers such as in South Africa, where most aquifers are fractured rock. Water SA Vol.29(1) 2003: 49-53 ...

  7. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acena, M. L.; Crespo, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs

  8. Measurement of indoor radon concentration by CR-39 track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Masayoshi; Yoneda, Shigeru; Nakanishi, Takashi.

    1990-01-01

    A convenient and cheap method for measuring indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentration with a CR-39 track detector is described. The detector consisted of two sheets of CR-39 enclosed separately in two plastic pots : one covered by a filter (cup method) and another no covering (bare method). The bare method was used here to supplement the cup method. To compare with the result of the CR-39 detector, alpha-ray spectrometry was carried out with a Si(Au) detector in a controlled radon exposure chamber. Indoor radon concentration measured in 133 houses in several districts of Ishikawa Prefecture have been found to range from 6 Bq/m 3 to as high as 113 Bq/m 3 with a median value of 24 Bq/m 3 . The problems to measure indoor radon concentration using the CR-39 detector are also discussed with emphasis on the position of setting the detector in the room and the possible thoron contribution to the detector. (author)

  9. Predicted indoor radon concentrations from a Monte Carlo simulation of 1 000 000 granite countertop purchases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, J G; Zwack, L M; MacIntosh, D L; Minegishi, T; Stewart, J H; McCarthy, J F

    2013-01-01

    Previous research examining radon exposure from granite countertops relied on using a limited number of exposure scenarios. We expanded upon this analysis and determined the probability that installing a granite countertop in a residential home would lead to a meaningful radon exposure by performing a Monte Carlo simulation to obtain a distribution of potential indoor radon concentrations attributable to granite. The Monte Carlo analysis included estimates of the probability that a particular type of granite would be purchased, the radon flux associated with that type, the size of the countertop purchased, the volume of the home where it would be installed and the air exchange rate of that home. One million countertop purchases were simulated and 99.99% of the resulting radon concentrations were lower than the average outdoor radon concentrations in the US (14.8 Bq m −3 ; 0.4 pCi l −1 ). The median predicted indoor concentration from granite countertops was 0.06 Bq m −3 (1.59 × 10 −3 pCi l −1 ), which is over 2000 times lower than the US Environmental Protection Agency’s action level for indoor radon (148 Bq m −3 ; 4 pCi l −1 ). The results show that there is a low probability of a granite countertop causing elevated levels of radon in a home. (paper)

  10. Airborne and waterborne radon concentrations in areas with use of groundwater supplies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Tokonami, S.; Yoshinaga, S.; Narazaki, Y.

    2006-01-01

    A preliminary survey of airborne and waterborne radon concentrations was given for an area where groundwater is used as a source of public water supply. The average of the waterborne radon concentrations was 77 Bq/l for 36 samples and that of airborne radon concentrations was 18 Bq/m 3 for ten houses. It is concluded that the exposure dose due to radon-in-water is likely to be much smaller than the total dose from natural radiation. (author)

  11. The use of track registration detectors to reconstruct contemporary and historical airborne radon ( sup 2 sup 2 sup 2 Rn) and radon progeny concentrations for a radon-lung cancer epidemiologic study

    CERN Document Server

    Steck, D J

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies that investigate the relationship between radon and lung cancer require accurate estimates for the long-term average concentrations of radon progeny in dwellings. Year-to-year and home-to-home variations of radon in domestic environments pose serious difficulties for reconstructing an individual's long-term radon-related exposure. The use of contemporary radon gas concentrations as a surrogate for radon-related dose introduces additional uncertainty in dose assessment. Studies of glass exposed in radon chambers and in a home show that radon progeny deposited on, and implanted in, glass hold promise for reconstructing past radon concentrations in a variety of atmospheres. We developed an inexpensive track registration detector for the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study (IRLCS) that simultaneously measures contemporary airborne radon concentrations, surface deposited alpha activity density, and implanted sup 2 sup 1 sup 0 Po activity density. The implanted activity is used to reconstruct the cum...

  12. Long-term variation of outdoor radon equilibrium equivalent concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoetzl, H.; Winkler, R.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term variation of outdoor radon equilibrium equivalent concentration was investigated from 1982 to 1992 at a semi-natural location 10 km north of Munich, southern Germany. For this period the continuous measurement yielded a long-term average of 8.6 Bq.m -3 (arithmetic mean) and 6.9 Bq.m -3 (geometric mean), from which an average annual effective dose of 0.14 mSv due to outdoor radon can be derived. A long-term trend of the radon concentration was not detectable over the whole period of observation. However, by time series analysis, a long-term cyclic pattern was identified with two maxima (1984-1986, 1989-1991) and two minima (1982-1983, 1987-1988). The seasonal pattern is characterized by an autumn maximum and an early summer minimum. On average, the seasonal maximum in October was found to be higher by a factor of 2 than the June minimum. The diurnal variation of the radon concentration shows a maximum in the early morning and a minimum in the afternoon. On average, this maximum is a factor of 2 higher than the minimum. In the long term a seasonal pattern was observed for diurnal variation, with an average diurnal maximum to minimum ratio of 1.5 in winter compared with 3.5 in the summer months. The radon concentration is correlated with a meteorological parameter (stagnation index) which takes into account horizontal and vertical exchange processes and the wash-out of aerosols in the lower atmosphere. (orig.)

  13. Automatic measuring instrument for radon daughters concentration of precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Tsuguo; Aoki, Masayoshi; Okabe, Shigeru

    1986-01-01

    An automatic measuring instrument for the radon daughters concentration of precipitation has been constructed and used successfully. The precipitation collected by a polyethylene funnel during 15 min is led to a glass cell set in a well-type NaI(Tl) scintillator, and after 5 min counting the water sample is pumped out. A sequence of operations of sampling, measurement, recording, draining out and correction for the volume of the water sample is performed automatically, and is repeated at every 15 min. The instrument has sensitivity and durability enough for practical use at outdoors. This instrument enables the measurement of radon daughters concentration as low as 0.5 Bq/ml at precipitation rate as small as 0.5 mm/h. For the improvement of accuracy of the monitoring system of environmental γ-radiation, the effect of radon daughters accumulated on the ground surface by precipitation can be eliminated on real time by means of providing it with the output of this instrument. This instrument can be used for the measurement not only of the radon daughters but also of the other radioactive nuclides in precipitation. (author)

  14. Prediction of long-term indoor radon concentration based on short-term measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanovska Zdenka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for the estimation of annual radon concentration based on short-term (three months measurements. The study involves results from two independent sets of indoor radon concentration measurements performed in 16 cities of the Republic of Macedonia. The first data set contains winter and annual radon concentration obtained during the National survey in 2010 and the second, contains only the radon concentration measured during the winter of 2013. Both data sets pertain to radon concentration from the same cities and have been measured applying the same methodology in ground floor dwellings. The results appeared to be consistent and the dispersion of radon concentration was low. Linear regression analysis of the radon concentration measured in winter of 2010 and of the 2010 annual radon concentration revealed a high coefficient of determination R2 = 0.92, with a relative uncertainty of 3%. Furthermore, this model was used to estimate the annual radon concentration solely from winter-term measurements performed in 2013. The geometrical mean of the estimated annual radon concentration of the 2013: radon concentration (A-2013 =98 Bqm-3 was almost equal to the geometrical mean of the annual radon concentration from the 2010, radon concentration (A-2010 = 99 Bqm-3. Analysis of the influence of building characteristics, such as presence/absence of a basement in the building, or the dominant building material on the estimated annual radon concentration is also reported. Our results show that a low number of relatively short-term radon measurements may produce a reasonable insight into a gross average obtained in a larger survey.

  15. A prediction model for assessing residential radon concentration in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauri, Dimitri D.; Huss, Anke; Zimmermann, Frank; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Röösli, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Indoor radon is regularly measured in Switzerland. However, a nationwide model to predict residential radon levels has not been developed. The aim of this study was to develop a prediction model to assess indoor radon concentrations in Switzerland. The model was based on 44,631 measurements from the nationwide Swiss radon database collected between 1994 and 2004. Of these, 80% randomly selected measurements were used for model development and the remaining 20% for an independent model validation. A multivariable log-linear regression model was fitted and relevant predictors selected according to evidence from the literature, the adjusted R², the Akaike's information criterion (AIC), and the Bayesian information criterion (BIC). The prediction model was evaluated by calculating Spearman rank correlation between measured and predicted values. Additionally, the predicted values were categorised into three categories (50th, 50th–90th and 90th percentile) and compared with measured categories using a weighted Kappa statistic. The most relevant predictors for indoor radon levels were tectonic units and year of construction of the building, followed by soil texture, degree of urbanisation, floor of the building where the measurement was taken and housing type (P-values <0.001 for all). Mean predicted radon values (geometric mean) were 66 Bq/m³ (interquartile range 40–111 Bq/m³) in the lowest exposure category, 126 Bq/m³ (69–215 Bq/m³) in the medium category, and 219 Bq/m³ (108–427 Bq/m³) in the highest category. Spearman correlation between predictions and measurements was 0.45 (95%-CI: 0.44; 0.46) for the development dataset and 0.44 (95%-CI: 0.42; 0.46) for the validation dataset. Kappa coefficients were 0.31 for the development and 0.30 for the validation dataset, respectively. The model explained 20% overall variability (adjusted R²). In conclusion, this residential radon prediction model, based on a large number of measurements, was demonstrated to be

  16. Optimisation of elevated radon concentration measurement by using electro-chemical etching of nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celikovic, I.; Ujic, P.; Fujimoto, K.; Tommasino, L.; Demajo, A.; Zunic, Z.; Celikovic, I.)

    2007-01-01

    In the paper, two methods for adjusting of passive radon-thoron discriminative dosimeters (UFO detector) for enhanced radon concentration measurement are presented. Achieved upper limit of detection is 5.94 MBq m-3 d [sr

  17. Radon Concentration in the Cataniapo-Autana River Basin, Amazonas State, Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Greaves, E. D.; Alvarez, H.; Liendo, J.; Vásquez, G.

    2007-10-01

    Radon activity concentration is measured in rivers of the Autana-Cataniapo hydrologic basin. The region experiments mining and it is forecasted that the basin will be perturbed. Radon activity monitoring is one of the methods to measure environmental changes. Values of radon concentration in water range between 0.4 and 30 Bq L-1.

  18. A retrospective study of radon daughter concentrations in the workplace in the fluorspar mines of St. Lawrence, Newfoundland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corkhill, D.A.; Dory, A.B.

    1984-07-01

    Fluorspar mining began in St. Lawrence, Newfoundland in the early thirties. In the early years the existing economic and social conditions resulted in poor health and safety practices in the mines. A high incidence of many types of pulmonary diseases, including lung cancer, among the miners was investigated by the Department of National Health and Welfare, and by 1960 radiation in the mines was recognized as the major cause. The original epidemiological study used radon daughter exposure estimates determined from a limited number of radon daughter measurements in one of the mines. Insufficient experience existed at that time to allow a proper technical assessment of the mines and to modify the estimated radon daughter concentrations accordingly. A review of the environmental conditions in the early years of mining and a revision of the estimates of radon daughter concentrations in those mines is presented. Environmental working conditions were determined based on a review of maps, inspectors' reports, Commission hearings, recollections of former workers and of the authors. Comparison to the conditions in the mines in later years, when radiation samples were taken more frequently allowed estimations of the probable radon daughter concentrations that would have existed in the mines earlier. Ranges of estimated average concentrations were made by mines for each year and wherever possible for broad types of job classes. Rather than attempting to propose single numbers for radon daughter concentrations, which in turn might have implied an accuracy that did not exist, ranges of average radon daughter concentrations were estimated

  19. Seasonal variations of radon concentrations in single-family houses with different sub-structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majborn, B.

    1992-01-01

    Seasonal variations of indoor radon concentrations have been studied in 70 single-family houses selected according to the type of sub-structure and the type of soil underneath the house. Five categories of sub-structure were included - slab-on-grade, crawl space, basement, and combinations...... of basement with slab-on-grade or crawl space. Half of the houses are located on clayey till and the other half on glaciofluvial gravel. In each house radon was measured in a living room and a bedroom, in the basement if present, and in the crawl space if present and accessible. The measurements were made...... with track detectors on a quarterly basis throughout a year. For living rooms and bedrooms the seasonal variations range from being highly significant for the slab-on-grade houses to being insignificant for the crawl space houses. For basements and crawl spaces the geometric mean radon concentrations do...

  20. Develop generic equations to determine radon daughters concentrations in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Jerby, B.

    2011-06-01

    Measurements of radon daughter concentrations in air are very important to determine the human dose from background radiation. Therefore, many studies tried to find measurements methods depending on many specific parameters such as measurement time, air pumping period and sample volume. In this study a general equations to determine radon daughter's concentrations in air was found using direct samples. The Equations results were closed to the results obtained from other well known methods. Many measurements with different places and various conditions were performed; the results showed that the new equations are able to be used with an error less than 10%, The relative error can be reduced by increasing the pumping rate or measuring high concentration cases.(author)

  1. RADON CONCENTRATION TIME SERIES MODELING AND APPLICATION DISCUSSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stránský, V; Thinová, L

    2017-11-01

    In the year 2010 a continual radon measurement was established at Mladeč Caves in the Czech Republic using a continual radon monitor RADIM3A. In order to model radon time series in the years 2010-15, the Box-Jenkins Methodology, often used in econometrics, was applied. Because of the behavior of radon concentrations (RCs), a seasonal integrated, autoregressive moving averages model with exogenous variables (SARIMAX) has been chosen to model the measured time series. This model uses the time series seasonality, previously acquired values and delayed atmospheric parameters, to forecast RC. The developed model for RC time series is called regARIMA(5,1,3). Model residuals could be retrospectively compared with seismic evidence of local or global earthquakes, which occurred during the RCs measurement. This technique enables us to asses if continuously measured RC could serve an earthquake precursor. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. MEASUREMENTS OF AIRBORNE CONCENTRATIONS OF RADON AND THORON DECAY PRODUCTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalupnik, S; Skubacz, K; Urban, P; Wysocka, M

    2017-11-01

    Liquid scintillation counting (LSC) is a measuring technique, broadly applied in environmental monitoring of radionuclides. One of the possible applications of LSC is the measurement of radon and thoron decay products. But this method is suitable only for grab sampling. For long-term measurements a different technique can be applied-monitors of potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) with thermoluminescent detectors (TLD). In these devices, called Alfa-2000 sampling probe, TL detectors (CaSO4:Dy) are applied for alpha particles counting. Three independent heads are placed over the membrane filter in a dust sampler's microcyclone. Such solution enables simultaneous measurements of PAEC and dust content. Moreover, the information which is stored in TLD chips is the energy of alpha particles, not the number of counted particles. Therefore, the readout of TL detector shows directly potential alpha energy, with no dependence on equilibrium factor, etc. This technique, which had been used only for radon decay products measurements, was modified by author to allow simultaneous measurements of radon and thoron PAEC. The LSC method can be used for calibration of portable radon decay products monitors. The LSC method has the advantage to be an absolute one, the TLD method to measure directly the (dose relevant) deposited energy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Factors affecting yearly variations of indoor radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steck, D.J.; Baynes, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    Since indoor radon exposures take place over many years while radon measurement periods are shorter, we are studying the yearly variation of indoor radon concentrations in approximately 100 houses located throughout Minnesota. Most houses were initially measured for one or more years in the late 1980's and for 5 consecutive years starting in 1990. Two houses have been monitored for 12 y. Each year, two alpha track detectors were placed on the two lowest livable levels. The year-to-year variations averaged about 35% (corrected for instrumental uncertainties) in both basements and first floors. The minimum observed variation was 5% and the maximum was 130%. Some homes have shown substantial variation associated with Structural modifications. While most homes show no obvious systematic trends, a few houses have shown temporal trends that may be associated with aging or climate. We are studying possible correlation between year-to-year radon variation, climatic variables (yearly-average and seasonal such as heating/cooling degree days, precipitation, soil moisture), and structural changes

  4. Investigation of radon and thoron concentrations in a landmark skyscraper in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazumasa Inoue; Masahiro Fukushi

    2013-01-01

    The temporal variation of the radon concentration, and the radon and thoron concentrations every 3 months for a year were measured using two types of devices in a landmark skyscraper, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Daiichi Building. In the measurement of temporal variation of the radon concentration using a pulse type ionization chamber, the average radon concentration was 21 ± 13 Bq m -3 (2-68 Bq m -3 ). The measured indoor radon concentration had a strong relationship with the operation of the mechanical ventilation system and the activities of the office workers. The radon concentration also increased together with temperature. Other environmental parameters, such as air pressure and relative humidity, were not related to the radon concentration. In the long-term measurements using a passive radon and thoron discriminative monitor, no seasonal variation was observed. The annual average concentrations of radon and thoron were 16 ± 8 and 16 ± 7 Bq m -3 , respectively. There was also no relationship between the two concentrations. The annual average effective dose for office workers in this skyscraper was estimated to be 0.08 mSv y -1 for 2000 working hours per year. When considering the indoor radon exposure received from their residential dwellings using the annual mean radon concentration indoors in Japan (15.5 Bq m -3 ), the annual average effective dose was estimated to be 0.37 mSv y -1 . This value was 31 % of the worldwide average annual effective dose. (author)

  5. Measurement of radon, radon daughters and thoron concentrations by multi-detector devices. No. E/12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somogyi, G.; Varga, Zs.

    1983-01-01

    There is a growing interest in collection of data concerning human exposures to naturally occurring alpha-emitting radionuclides (e.g. in mines, dwellings, building materials, industrial wastes, coal fuel cycle, water supply, soil, plants, etc.). Most of such studies are incomplete for the following reasons: in radon measurements the contribution of thoron is generally neglected, the determination of equilibrium factor is complicated or not possible at all, short- and long-term concentration fluctuations cause difficulties in obtaining representative mean values, the plate-out effect is generally not taken into account. A variety of simple methods were studied that could be used to overcome some of these difficulties by using cups equipped with two or more alpha-sensitive nuclear track detectors. A theoretical foundation of the quantitative measurements with such devices is presented. Experimental data are reported on radon, radon daughters and thoron concentrations measured by multi-detector devices in cave soil gas and in air of Hungarian dwellings. (author)

  6. A study of radon-222 concentrations in North Carolina groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The groundwater of 400 North Carolina homes was sampled to ascertain the distribution and extent of 222 Rn in North Carolina groundwater. Arithmetic mean (AM) and geometric mean (GM) concentrations of 1,816 pCi L -1 and 656 pCi L -1 were found for the state. These results indicate that two-thirds of 114 degree C. homes served by groundwater exceed the EPA proposed 300 pCi L -1 maximum contaminant level (MCL). Only 2% of NC homes exceeded 10,000 pCi L-1. The Eastern region had the lowest radon concentrations by far, with a GM of 2-)0 pCi L -1 . The Central region and Western region had GM's of 794 pCi L -1 and 1,032 pCi L -1 respectively. The groundwater data approached a log normal distribution. No consistent trends were noted in the relationship between indoor radon concentrations and groundwater radon concentrations. A correlation coefficient of 0.00921 revealed a very weak linear relationship

  7. Charcoal canisters for measurement of indoor Radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Luca, A.; Mancini, C.

    1990-01-01

    The dose from 222 Rn is due to the alpha decay of its short-lived daughters; the most involved human tissue is the bronchial epithelium. The consequences of such irradiation are of stochastic type (lung cancer). Following the ICRP procedures it is possible to estimate the dose related to the population vs the measured 22 22Rn activity concentration. In this work are examined the problems related to the use of activated charcoal canisters for the adsorption of Radon gas. The measurement system used is based on: i) charcoal canisters, 4 '' diameter and 70g of charcoal; ii) low background gamma spectrometer utilizing a 3 '' x3 ' 3 ' NaI(Tl) scintillator. Several screening mesurements were performed in the city of Rome. In particular values obtained in houses (the average radon concentration determined was 85 Bq/m 3 ), underground and catacombs are here reported

  8. Charcoal canisters for measurement of indoor radon concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Luca, A.; Mancini, C. (Rome Univ. La Sapienza (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Nucleare e Conversione di Energia)

    The dose from /sup 222/Rn is due to the alpha decay of its short-lived daughters. The most involved human tissue is the bronchial epithelium. Consequences of such irradiation are of the stochastic type (lung cancer). Following the ICRP procedures, it is possible to estimate the dose related to the population versus the measured /sup 222/Rn activity concentration. This work examines the problems related to the use of activated charcoal canisters for the adsorption of radon gas. The measurement system used is based on: charcoal canisters (4 inch diameter and 70 g of charcoal); a low background gamma spectrometer, utilizing a 3x3 inch NaI(Tl) scintillator. Several screening measurements were performed in the city of Rome. Values obtained in houses (the average radon concentration determined was 85 Bq/cubic meter), the subway system, and catacombs are reported.

  9. Radon concentrations inside castles and other ancient buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malanca, A.; Pessina, V.; Dallara, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sixty-two measurements of Rn-222 concentrations were made in 24 castles and 13 ancient buildings in 30 different places situated in the provinces of Parma and Reggio Emilia (Northern Italy). The method used was that of activated carbon canisters which were placed in selected settings for at least 48 h in the period staring from December 1990 to May 1991. It was possible to determine the amount of radon in each canister via its daughters gamma emitters counted by Nal(Tl) and Ge(I) detectors. The mean radon concentrations were 72 Bq m -3 (arithmetic mean) and 49 Bq m -3 (geometric mean), a good deal higher than the values obtained from measurements carried out in modern dwellings in the same area; 30 Bq m -3 (arithmetic mean) and 19 Bq m -3 (geometric mean). (author). 20 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Radon concentrations in residential housing in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonehara, Hidenori; Aoyama, Takashi; Radford, E.P.; Kato, Hiroo; Sakanoue, Masanobu.

    1992-01-01

    A measurement of indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentrations in Hiroshima and Nagasaki was carried out to examine an effect of the exposure on atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. Two hundred dwellings (100 from each city), chiefly of members of the Life Span Study population which is a fixed cohort studied by Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), were selected for this survey. We used two types of alpha-track detector: a Terradex detector type SF and a bare-track detector improved by Yonehara et al. Comparative measurements showed that although there was an adequate correlation between the values obtained using the two detectors, the geometric mean value for the bare-track detector was 45% of that for the Terradex detector. This difference was considered to be due to differences in the calibration methods and sensitivities of the detectors to thoron ( 220 Rn). The arithmetic mean values of the radon concentrations for 193 locations in Hiroshima and 192 locations in Nagasaki measured by Terradex SF detector were 103 Bq m -3 and 40.6 Bq m -3 , respectively. The values at 100 locations in Hiroshima and at 93 locations in Nagasaki measured by the bare detector were 43.1. Bq m -3 and 13.6 Bq m -3 , respectively. The significant difference between the geometric mean values of the concentration in Hiroshima and Nagasaki measured by both methods was observed. The difference might be attributable to the different geological environments of the two cities. The difference between the estimated dose equivalents for exposure to radon daughters in dwellings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki over the last 30 years might amount to 0.4 or 0.8 Sv; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in lung cancer mortality in the low-dose range in either city. Nevertheless, the indoor-radon concentrations estimated in this survey could significantly influence the dose-response relationships for A-bomb exposure. (author)

  11. Measurement of radon concentration in some water samples belonging to some adjoining areas of Pathankot, Punjab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Ajay, E-mail: ajay782@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Sumit, E-mail: sumitshrm210@gmail.com [Post Graduate Department of Physics, DAV College, Amritsar-143001 (India)

    2015-08-28

    The study of radon concentration was measured in some areas of Pathankot district, Punjab, India, from the health hazard point of view due to radon. The exposure to radon through drinking water is largely by inhalation and ingestion. RAD 7, an electronic solid state silicon detector (Durridgeco., USA) was used to measure the radon concentration in drinking water samples of the study area. The recorded values of radon concentration in these water samples are below the recommended limit by UNSCEAR and European commission. The recommended limit of radon concentration in water samples is 4 to 40 Bq/l given by UNSCEAR [1] and European commission has recommended the safe limit for radon concentration in water sample is 100 Bq/l [2].

  12. Survey of Indoor Radon Concentrations in California Elementary Schools. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Joey Y.; Liu, Kai-Shen; Waldman, Jed

    This paper reports on the concentrations of radon found within a sample of 378 elementary schools in California. Long-term alpha-track radon detectors were placed in 6,485 classrooms within participating schools to detect radon levels for between 220 to 366 days. Only classrooms were tested. Results show that about 5.6 percent of the schools…

  13. A study on the radon concentrations in water in Jeddah (Saudi Arabia) and the associated health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tayyeb, Z.A.; Kinsara, A.R.; Farid, S.M.

    1998-01-01

    Several studies have shown that water-borne 222 Rn contributes to indoor air concentrations. A passive radon measurement method was employed to determine radon activity concentrations in the water of Jeddah city (Saudi Arabia). Tap water, flushing water and drinking water, including natural mineral water, artificial mineral water and distilled water, have been investigated for their radon concentrations. It is observed that the radon concentration in natural mineral water samples is the highest and that in flush water, it is the lowest. From these measurements, the corresponding annual effective dose for the stomach and the lung are determined. It is found that the annual effective dose resulting from direct consumption of water is far greater than that due to inhalation of radon emanated from tap water and flushing water. Moreover, it is also seen that the annual effective dose resulting from inhalation of radon emanated from tap water and flushing water is negligible compared to the total annual effective dose for indoor radon in Jeddah. (author)

  14. The use of mechanical ventilation with heat recovery for controlling radon and radon-daughter concentrations in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Boegel, M.L.; Hollowell, C.D.; Roseme, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    An energy research house in Maryland was found to have radon concentrations far in excess of recommended guidelines. A mechanical ventilation system with heat recovery was installed in this house to test its effectiveness as an energy-efficient control technique for indoor radon. Radon concentration was monitored continuously for 2 weeks under varying ventilation conditions [0.07-0.8 air changes per hour (ach)] and radon-daughter concentrations were measured by grab-sample techniques about nine times daily during this period. At ventilation rates of 0.6 ach and higher, radon-daughter levels dropped below guidelines for indoor concentrations. Comparison with other studies indicates that indoor radon buildup may be a problem in a considerable portion of houses characterized by their low infiltration rates. The use of mechanical ventilation systems with air-to-air heat exchangers may offer a practical, cost-effective and energy-efficient means of alleviating not only the radon problem specifically but also the general deterioration of indoor air quality in many houses designed or retrofitted to achieve low infiltration. (author)

  15. Characteristics of radon and thoron concentration in coastal groundwater

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshikawa, Masashi; Onodera, Shin-ichi; Saito, Mitsuyo; Ono, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    222Rn (radon) and 220Rn(thoron) are remarked as useful geochemical tracers for analyzing surface water and groundwater interaction. We applied the methodology of Dimova et al. (2009) to thoron analysis of groundwater in Kurobe, Toyama pref. and Saijo, Ehime pref., Japan. It seemed that radon equilibration in water ? air exchange system spent about 15 min, On the other hand, thoron equilibration was quicker than that of radon. The radon concentration was one order higher in granitic rock areas...

  16. Statistical evidence of the geological control over radon soil gas concentrations and its implications for mapping radon potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badr, I.; Durrani, S.A.; Oliver, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Determining how radon varies spatially over a given area in the natural environment is important for defining high risk areas and has implications for building practice. To achieve the former, radon concentrations in three areas of the English Midlands were surveyed. The first area comprised a single rock formation near Hereford (described elsewhere). The others, reported here, were areas where elevated concentrations of radon were expected. One was an area comprising two major rock types near Buxton in Derbyshire where a multistage sampling design was used to determine the approximate spatial scale of variation in soil radon concentration. The third was an area of more complex geology near Nottingham, where sampling along a transect enabled the structure and scale of variation to be determined. In all of the areas radon concentrations varied considerably, both over large and small distances. The data were analysed using methods embodied in geostatistics. The results showed that structure in the spatial variation of radon for the Buxton and Nottingham surveys at the longer scale could be attributed to the effect of lithology. The latter appears to account for approximately 50% of the total variation in both surveys. These results have important implications for mapping radon and also for building programmes, insurance, etc. They also suggest that to estimate radon reliably at the local level by interpolation would generally require very intensive sampling, i.e. at a scale of metres rather than kilometres. However, stratification of an area based on geology, with sampling within the strata designed to estimate average radon concentrations optimally, would provide reasonable estimates in certain situations for somewhat less sampling effort. (author)

  17. Determination of the Radon Concentration and Radioactivity Level in Karaca Cave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kara, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the radon gas concentration in the Karaca cave which is open to tourism has been determined and the negative effects of radon gas on people were discussed. Karaca cave (Gumushane) is visited by many tourists every year. The measurements of radon gas concentration which affects the health of human beings negatively and even causes the lung cancer when it reaches high points have been done for the summer and winter season. LR-115 passive radon detector was used to determine radon concentrations in the cave both winter and summer season. The average radon concentration in the Karaca cave were determined as 823 Bq/m 3 and 1023 Bq/m 3 for the summer and winter season, respectively. Moreover, to find out the natural radioactivity in the cave, the gamma spectroscopic analysis of soil, stone and stalagmite samples were carried out and their relations with the radon gas in the cave atmosphere was analyzed

  18. Pumping time required to obtain tube well water samples with aquifer characteristic radon concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricardo, Carla Pereira; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete; Palmieri, Helena E.L.; Linhares, Maria G.M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C., E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br, E-mail: help@cdtn.br, E-mail: mgml@cdtn.br, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Radon is an inert noble gas, which comes from the natural radioactive decay of uranium and thorium in soil, rock and water. Radon isotopes emanated from radium-bearing grains of a rock or soil are released into the pore space. Radon that reaches the pore space is partitioned between the gaseous and aqueous phases. Thus, the groundwater presents a radon signature from the rock that is characteristic of the aquifer. The characteristic radon concentration of an aquifer, which is mainly related to the emanation, is also influenced by the degree of subsurface degassing, especially in the vicinity of a tube well, where the radon concentration is strongly reduced. Looking for the required pumping time to take a tube well water sample that presents the characteristic radon concentration of the aquifer, an experiment was conducted in an 80 m deep tube well. In this experiment, after twenty-four hours without extraction, water samples were collected periodically, about ten minutes intervals, during two hours of pumping time. The radon concentrations of the samples were determined by using the RAD7 Electronic Radon Detector from Durridge Company, a solid state alpha spectrometric detector. It was realized that the necessary time to reach the maximum radon concentration, that means the characteristic radon concentration of the aquifer, is about sixty minutes. (author)

  19. Pumping time required to obtain tube well water samples with aquifer characteristic radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricardo, Carla Pereira; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de

    2011-01-01

    Radon is an inert noble gas, which comes from the natural radioactive decay of uranium and thorium in soil, rock and water. Radon isotopes emanated from radium-bearing grains of a rock or soil are released into the pore space. Radon that reaches the pore space is partitioned between the gaseous and aqueous phases. Thus, the groundwater presents a radon signature from the rock that is characteristic of the aquifer. The characteristic radon concentration of an aquifer, which is mainly related to the emanation, is also influenced by the degree of subsurface degassing, especially in the vicinity of a tube well, where the radon concentration is strongly reduced. Looking for the required pumping time to take a tube well water sample that presents the characteristic radon concentration of the aquifer, an experiment was conducted in an 80 m deep tube well. In this experiment, after twenty-four hours without extraction, water samples were collected periodically, about ten minutes intervals, during two hours of pumping time. The radon concentrations of the samples were determined by using the RAD7 Electronic Radon Detector from Durridge Company, a solid state alpha spectrometric detector. It was realized that the necessary time to reach the maximum radon concentration, that means the characteristic radon concentration of the aquifer, is about sixty minutes. (author)

  20. Influence of indoor air conditions on radon concentration in a detached house.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Keramatollah; Mahmoudi, Jafar; Ghanbari, Mahdi

    2013-02-01

    Radon is released from soil and building materials and can accumulate in residential buildings. Breathing radon and radon progeny for extended periods hazardous to health and can lead to lung cancer. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence indoor radon concentrations. This paper focuses on effects of air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity on indoor radon concentrations in a one family detached house in Stockholm, Sweden. In this study a heat recovery ventilation system unit was used to control the ventilation rate and a continuous radon monitor (CRM) was used to measure radon levels. FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package was used to simulate radon entry into the building and air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity effects using a numerical approach. The results from analytical solution, measurements and numerical simulations showed that air change rate, indoor temperature and moisture had significant effects on indoor radon concentration. Increasing air change rate reduces radon level and for a specific air change rate (in this work Ach = 0.5) there was a range of temperature and relative humidity that minimized radon levels. In this case study minimum radon levels were obtained at temperatures between 20 and 22 °C and a relative humidity of 50-60%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Radon in Austria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, H.

    2000-01-01

    Several projects in Austria deal with the problem of enhanced radon exposure to the public. The Austrian Radon Project is the largest project within this task, with the aim of investigating the radon concentrations in Austrian homes. Another project concerns mitigation methods. According to the EU directive EURATOM 96/29 it is also necessary to check working places for possibly enhanced radon concentrations. These projects are and will be funded by the government. The federal government of Upper Austria sponsored a project to test the indoor air quality in kindergartens including radon measurements. Within an EU research project, the radon concentrations in Austrian springs and groundwater were systematically listed and analyzed. Additional investigations will focus on methods to improve the radon potential maps from the Austrian Radon Project by including geological and other information. (author)

  2. Diagnostics of and measures against radon concentrations in a dwelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.

    1994-02-01

    Results are presented of measurements in a test-dwelling in the period april 1993 - november 1993. The purpose of the measurements was to investigate the possibilities of using a blower door (a fan in a wall of the dwelling) for specifying sources of radon in the dwelling, employing the diagnostic method developed at the KVI (Nuclear Physics Accelerator Institute in Groningen, Netherlands). Special attention is paid to the measurement of two input variables for the diagnostic method: transparency of the walls of the dwelling and the strength of static sources. Also measures aimed at reducing radon concentrations in the dwelling are discussed. The main conclusions are that (a) the pressure-variation method is a valid procedure to measure the transparency of walls and floors; (b) the blower door is a suitable technique for arriving at a correct diagnosis; and (c) over-pressurizing the crawl-space is the most effective measure in reducing the radon concentration of the crawl-space. More research on air flows in the soil is recommended. 21 figs., 28 tabs., 7 refs

  3. Continuous measurement of the radon concentration in water using electret ion chamber method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dua, S.K.; Hopke, P.K.

    1992-10-01

    A radon concentration of 300 pCi/L has been proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency as a limit for radon dissolved in municipal drinking water supplies. There is therefore a need for a continuous monitor to insure that the daily average concentration does not exceed this limit. In order to calibrate the system, varying concentrations of radon in water have been generated by bubbling radon laden air through a dynamic flowthrough water system. The value of steady state concentration of radon in water from this system depends on the concentration of radon in air, the air bubbling rate, and the water flow rate. The measurement system has been designed and tested using a 1 L volume electret ion chamber to determine the radon in water. In this dynamic method, water flows directly through the electret ion chamber. Radon is released to the air and measured with the electret. A flow of air is maintained through the chamber to prevent the build-up of high radon concentrations and too rapid discharge of the electret. It was found that the system worked well when the air flow was induced by the application of suction. The concentration in the water was calculated from the measured concentration in air and water and air flow rates. Preliminary results suggest that the method has sufficient sensitivity to measure concentrations of radon in water with acceptable accuracy and precision

  4. Influence of indoor air conditions on radon concentration in a detached house

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbari, Keramatollah; Mahmoudi, Jafar; Ghanbari, Mahdi

    2013-01-01

    Radon is released from soil and building materials and can accumulate in residential buildings. Breathing radon and radon progeny for extended periods hazardous to health and can lead to lung cancer. Indoor air conditions and ventilation systems strongly influence indoor radon concentrations. This paper focuses on effects of air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity on indoor radon concentrations in a one family detached house in Stockholm, Sweden. In this study a heat recovery ventilation system unit was used to control the ventilation rate and a continuous radon monitor (CRM) was used to measure radon levels. FLUENT, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package was used to simulate radon entry into the building and air change rate, indoor temperature and relative humidity effects using a numerical approach. The results from analytical solution, measurements and numerical simulations showed that air change rate, indoor temperature and moisture had significant effects on indoor radon concentration. Increasing air change rate reduces radon level and for a specific air change rate (in this work Ach = 0.5) there was a range of temperature and relative humidity that minimized radon levels. In this case study minimum radon levels were obtained at temperatures between 20 and 22 °C and a relative humidity of 50–60%. - Highlights: ► We use CFD to simulate indoor radon concentration and distribution. ► The effects of ventilation rate, temperature and moisture are investigated. ► Model validation is performed through analytical solution and measurement results. ► Results show that ventilation rate is inversely proportional to radon level. ► There is a range of temperature and relative humidity that minimize radon level.

  5. Measurement of soil and outdoor radon concentration with reference to meteorological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakati, R.K.; Walia, D.; Saxena, A.; Bhattacharjee, B.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of soil gas radon and outdoor radon concentration have been carried out in some specific places of Karbi Anglong district of Assam, India using Barasol MC2 and AlphaGUARD PQ 2000, PRO respectively. The global position of Karbi Anglong district is - latitudinal extension 25 deg 32' North - 26 deg 33' North and longitudinal extension 92 deg 09' East - 93 deg 52' East. Whereas the soil gas radon concentration have been found to vary from 596 Bq/m 3 at Ganjang to 66287 Bq/m 3 at Dokmoka. Outdoor radon concentration has maximum and minimum values of 841± 119.25 Bq/m 3 at Jasra(East) and 30.08 ± 6.06 Bq/m 3 at Dokmoka respectively with a mean value of 249.05±53.77 Bq/m 3 . An attempt has been made to study the variations of soil gas radon and outdoor radon concentration with various meteorological parameters. Considerable variations of soil gas radon and outdoor radon concentration have been observed with temperature, pressure and relative humidity. The soil gas radon concentration have been observed to be inversely related with temperature and barometric pressure and that the outdoor radon concentration bears a positive correlation with relative humidity and negative correlation with ambient temperature and pressure of the measured sites. (author)

  6. Investigations on indoor radon in Austria, Part 1: Seasonality of indoor radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossew, Peter; Lettner, Herbert

    2007-01-01

    In general, indoor radon concentration is subject to seasonal variability. The reasons are to be found (1) in meteorological influence on the transport properties of soil, e.g. through temperature, frozen soil layers and soil water saturation; and (2) in living habits, e.g. the tendency to open windows in summer and keep them closed in winter, which in general leads to higher accumulation of geogenic Rn in closed rooms in winter. If one wants to standardize indoor Rn measurements originally performed at different times of the year, e.g. in order to make them comparable, some correction transform as a function of measurement time which accounts for these effects must be estimated. In this paper, the seasonality of indoor Rn concentration measured in Austria is investigated as a function of other factors that influence indoor Rn. Indoor radon concentration is clearly shown to have seasonal variability, with higher Rn levels in winter. However, it is complicated to quantify the effect because, as a consequence of the history of an Rn survey, the measurement season maybe correlated to geological regions, which may introduce a bias in the estimate of the seasonality amplitude

  7. Studies on spatial distribution of indoor radon concentration at Mysore city, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pruthvi Rani, K.S.; Chandrashekara, M.S.; Paramesh, L.

    2016-01-01

    Radon is a radioactive inert gas, with a half life of 3.82 days. Radium present in soil rocks and building material are the sources of atmospheric radon. Radon and its short-lived decay products ( 218 Po, 214 Pb, 214 Bi, and 214 Po) can be deposited in the lung tissues and give rise to higher radiation doses. Radon is now recognized as the second most important cause of lung cancer after smoking in the general population. In the present investigation a systematic study of the distribution of radon concentration has been carried out in a small room at different co-ordinates and time scales

  8. The seasonal variation of radon concentration in the atmosphere of Chichi-jima island in the pacific ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Katsuhiro

    2008-01-01

    We continuously measured the radon concentration from April 2001 to December 2004 in Chichi-jima Is. We expect that the radon concentration at Chichi-jima Is. would be influenced only by the air mass transported through the long distance. The hourly values had very large variations, ranging from 0.2 to 6.0 Bqm -3 . No diurnal periodicity was found in the variation of the radon concentration. We found that the monthly averages of the radon concentration had a clear long term pattern, showing the highest in the winter and the lowest in the summer. To analyze the radon long time variation, an arriving air mass is grouped into five sectors according to the backward trajectory. Sector I is the sea areas surrounding Chichi-jima Is. Sector II including Philippines, Indonesia and the southeast Asia is spread the southwestern Pacific Ocean from Chichi-jima Is. and sector V is spread the northeastern way to the southeast. Sector III includes China, Mongolia, Korea and the western Japan region and sector IV two regions of the eastern Siberia and the eastern Japan. The radon long time variation showed a high positive correlation between the number of arrivals of the continental air mass, while strong negative correlation between the maritime air mass. (author)

  9. Radon concentrations in groundwater in Busan measured with a liquid scintillation counter method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, J S; Ahn, J K; Kim, H-Ch; Lee, D W

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first measurement of radon concentrations in drinking groundwater from private and public deep-bored wells located in the south-eastern area of Korea. The measurements were carried out on 439 samples by using a liquid scintillation method. The results show that the radon concentrations of the samples range from 0 to about 300 Bq l(-1). We find that Sasang ward shows the highest median value of radon concentration among 13 different wards, while Jung ward has the lowest. We find that the radon concentrations are highly dependent on the type of geological rock aquifers.

  10. Evaluation of the radon concentration in Ocna Dej salt mine, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marian Romeo Calin; Mihaela Antonina Calin

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of radon is of interest both for the health risk assessment and development of radon therapy in enclosed spaces like as caves, mines and spas. In Romania, radon therapy is not in use, yet. The development of this treatment method in mines from our country involves primarily, the evaluation of radon levels in the salt mines. In this paper, the results of radon gas measurement that were performed at Ocna Dej salt mine (Romania) are presented. The radon measurements were performed using two systems: radon monitor Pylon AB-5 system and CIS-P5M system. The average radon concentration was found to be between 9.14 ± 5.10 Bq/m 3 and 31.70 ± 2.76 Bq/m 3 . These radon levels are lower in comparison to those reported for mines, caves or spas in other countries where radon therapy and speleotherapy is frequently in use. Radon concentration and environmental conditions from Ocna Dej salt mine are suitable for therapeutic applications. (author)

  11. Performance tests for instruments measuring radon activity concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, T.R.; Buchroeder, H.; Schmidt, V.

    2009-01-01

    Performance tests of electronic instruments measuring the activity concentration of 222 Rn have been carried out with respect to the standard IEC 61577-2. In total, 9 types of instrument operating with ionization chambers or electrostatic collection have been tested for the influence of different climatic and radiological factors on the measurement characteristics. It is concluded that all types of instrument, which are commercially available, are suitable for indoor radon measurements. Because of the dependence on climatic conditions, the outdoor use is partly limited.

  12. Radon in indoor concentrations and indoor concentrations of metal dust particles in museums and other public buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, G L; Braz, D; de Jesus, E F; Santos, S M; Cardoso, K; Hecht, A A; Dias da Cunha, Moore K

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the public and occupational exposure to radon and metal-bearing particles in museums and public buildings located in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For this study, four buildings were selected: two historic buildings, which currently house an art gallery and an art museum; and two modern buildings, a chapel and a club. Integrated radon concentration measurements were performed using passive radon detectors with solid state nuclear track detector-type Lexan used as nuclear track detector. Air samplers with a cyclone were used to collect the airborne particle samples that were analyzed by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. The average unattached-radon concentrations in indoor air in the buildings were above 40 Bq/m(3), with the exception of Building D as measured in 2009. The average radon concentrations in indoor air in the four buildings in 2009 were below the recommended reference level by World Health Organization (100 Bq/m(3)); however, in 2011, the average concentrations of radon in Buildings A and C were above this level, though lower than 300 Bq/m(3). The average concentrations of unattached radon were lower than 148 Bq/m(3) (4pCi/L), the USEPA level recommended to take action to reduce the concentrations of radon in indoor air. The unattached-radon average concentrations were also lower than the value recommended by the European Union for new houses. As the unattached-radon concentrations were below the international level recommended to take action to reduce the radon concentration in air, it was concluded that during the period of sampling, there was low risk to human health due to the inhalation of unattached radon in these four buildings.

  13. Measurements of radon concentrations in waters and soil gas of Zonguldak, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koray, Abdullah; Akkaya, Gizem; Kahraman, Ayşegül; Kaynak, Gökay

    2014-12-01

    The radon concentrations in soil-gas and water samples (in the form of springs, catchment, tap, thermal) used as drinking water or thermal were measured using a professional radon monitor AlphaGUARD PQ 2000PRO. The measured radon concentrations in water samples ranged from 0.32 to 88.22 Bq l(-1). Most of radon levels in potable water samples are below the maximum contaminant level of 11 Bq l(-1) recommended by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The calculated annual effective doses due to radon intake through water consumption varied from 0.07 to 18.53 µSv y(-1). The radon concentrations in soil gas varied from 295.67 to 70 852.92 Bq m(-3). The radon level in soil gas was found to be higher in the area close to the formation boundary thrust and faults. No correlation was observed between radon concentrations in groundwater and soil gas. Also, no significant correlation was observed between soil-gas radon and temperature, pressure and humidity. The emanation of radon from groundwater and soil gas is controlled by the geological formation and by the tectonic structure of the area. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Measurement of soil and outdoor radon concentration with reference to meteorological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakati, R.K.; Walia, D.; Saxena, A.; Bhattacharjee, B.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement of soil and outdoor radon concentration have been carried out in some specific places of Karbi Anglong district of Assam, India using Barasol MC2 and Alpha GUARD PQ2000, PRO respectively. The global position of Karbi Anglong district is - latitudinal extension 25 deg 32' North - 26 deg 33' North and longitudinal extension 92 deg 09' East - 93 deg 52' East. Whereas the soil gas radon concentration have been found to vary from 596 Bq/m 3 at Ganjang to 66287 Bq/m 3 at Dokmoka, outdoor radon concentration has maximum and minimum values of 841 ± 119.25 Bq/m 3 at Jasra (East) and 30.08 ± 6.06 Bq/m 3 at Dokmoka respectively with a mean value of 249.05 ± 53.77 Bq/m 3 . An attempt has been made to study the variations of soil gas radon and outdoor radon concentration with various meteorological parameters. Considerable variations of soil gas radon and outdoor radon concentration have been observed with temperature, pressure and relative humidity. The soil gas radon concentration have been observed to be inversely related with temperature and barometric pressure and that the outdoor radon concentration bears a positive correlation with relative humidity and negative correlation with ambient temperature and pressure of the measured sites. (author)

  15. Influence of Blasted Uranium Ore Heap on Radon Concentration in Confined Workspaces of Shrinkage Mining Stope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Y. J.; Liang, T.; Ding, D. X.; Lei, B.; Su, H.; Zhang, Y. F.

    2017-07-01

    A calculation model for radon concentration in shrinkage mining stopes under various ventilation conditions was established in this study. The model accounts for the influence of permeability and area of the blasted ore heap, ventilation air quantity, and airflow direction on radon concentration in a confined workspace; these factors work together to allow the engineer to optimize the ventilation design. The feasibility and effectiveness of the model was verified by applying it to mines with elevated radon radiation exposure. The model was found to accurately changes in radon concentration according to the array of influence factors in underground uranium mines.

  16. Radon in a Karstic Region School: Concentrations in Soil Gas and Indoors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaupotic, J.; Kobal, I.; Barisic, D.; Lulic, S.

    1998-01-01

    The school presented in this paper exceeded instantaneous indoor radon concentration of 1000 Bqm -3 , obtained within the Slovene radon programme. Thus, additional measurements were performed and the radiation doses of teachers and pupils estimated. Radon concentrations between 1000 and 3000 Bqm -3 during teaching hours were found and the yearly effective doses from 0.75 to 1.1 mSv for the pupils and from 1.1 to 4.2 mSv for the teachers were calculated. In the soil gas radon and thoron concentration ranging from 70 to 150 kBqm -3 were obtained. The school was mitigated during summer 1998. (author)

  17. Radon Concentrations in Drinking Water in Beijing City, China and Contribution to Radiation Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun-Yun; Ma, Yong-Zhong; Cui, Hong-Xing; Liu, Jian-Xiang; Sun, Ya-Ru; Shang, Bing; Su, Xu

    2014-01-01

    222Rn concentrations in drinking water samples from Beijing City, China, were determined based on a simple method for the continuous monitoring of radon using a radon-in-air monitor coupled to an air-water exchanger. A total of 89 water samples were sampled and analyzed for their 222Rn content. The observed radon levels ranged from detection limit up to 49 Bq/L. The calculated arithmetic and geometric means of radon concentrations in all measured samples were equal to 5.87 and 4.63 Bq/L, respectively. The average annual effective dose from ingestion of radon in drinking water was 2.78 μSv, and that of inhalation of water-borne radon was 28.5 μSv. It is concluded that it is not the ingestion of waterborne radon, but inhalation of the radon escaping from water that is a substantial part of the radiological hazard. Radon in water is a big concern for public health, especially for consumers who directly use well water with very high radon concentration. PMID:25350007

  18. Radon Concentrations in Drinking Water in Beijing City, China and Contribution to Radiation Dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Yun Wu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 222Rn concentrations in drinking water samples from Beijing City, China, were determined based on a simple method for the continuous monitoring of radon using a radon-in-air monitor coupled to an air-water exchanger. A total of 89 water samples were sampled and analyzed for their 222Rn content. The observed radon levels ranged from detection limit up to 49 Bq/L. The calculated arithmetic and geometric means of radon concentrations in all measured samples were equal to 5.87 and 4.63 Bq/L, respectively. The average annual effective dose from ingestion of radon in drinking water was 2.78 μSv, and that of inhalation of water-borne radon was 28.5 μSv. It is concluded that it is not the ingestion of waterborne radon, but inhalation of the radon escaping from water that is a substantial part of the radiological hazard. Radon in water is a big concern for public health, especially for consumers who directly use well water with very high radon concentration.

  19. Study on radon concentrations in Antarctica's instrumentation and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, H.E. da.

    1990-04-01

    Continuos measurements of the natural radioactive gas sup(222)Rn are made at the Brazilian Antarctic station Comandante Ferraz (62 sup(0)S, 58 sup(0)W) to study the continental influence of air masses over the Antarctic peninsula. The technique employed in the measurements is base on the process of electrostatic collection of the ionized Polonium isotopes (the Radon decay products). The efficiency of collection is of the order of 50% to 57% for an applied electric potential of 17 kV. The collection chamber has a hemispheric shape in order to optimize the collection yield. The observed radioactivity at the Ferraz station for the period March to November 1986 and 1987 exhibited different behaviors. The year 1986 showed an average radioactivity of (2.6 ± 1.8) x 10 sup(-2) Bq.m sup(-3), while in 1987 a 50% decrease in the concentration was observed with a value of (1.44 ± 0.8) x 10 sup(-2) Bq.m sup(-3). Associated variations of wind velocity and continental aerosol loads were also observed. Periodicities in the radon time series displayed more intense peaks at 25 to 30 day periods. No seasonal trend was observed. Transient increases of radon correlated with short deicing periods. The average flux of Rn were calculated from a sampling network consisting of 20 points spread over the exposed regoliths and outcrops of the King George island, with values of 250 atoms m sup(-2) s sup(-1) for the sup(220)Rn and 7500 atoms m sup(-2) s sup(-1) for the sup(222)Rn isotope. (author)

  20. National and Regional Surveys of Radon Concentration in Dwellings. Review of Methodology and Measurement Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Reliable, comparable and 'fit for purpose' results are essential requirements for any decision based on analytical measurements. For the analyst, the availability of tested and validated sampling and analytical procedures is an extremely important tool for carrying out such measurements. For maximum utility, such procedures should be comprehensive, clearly formulated and readily available to both the analyst and the customer for reference. In the specific case of radon surveys, it is very important to design a survey in such a way as to obtain results that can reasonably be considered representative of a population. Since 2004, the Environment Programme of the IAEA has included activities aimed at the development of a set of procedures for the measurement of radionuclides in terrestrial environmental samples. The development of radon measurement procedures for national and regional surveys started with the collection and review of more than 160 relevant scientific papers. On the basis of this review, this publication summarizes the methodology and the measurement techniques suitable for a population representative national or regional survey on radon concentration in the indoor air of dwellings. The main elements of the survey design are described and discussed, such as the sampling scheme, the protocols, the questionnaire and the data analysis, with particular attention to the potential biases that can affect the representativeness of the results. Moreover, the main measurement techniques suitable for national surveys on indoor radon are reviewed, with particular attention to the elements that can affect the precision and accuracy of the results

  1. Radon and thoron concentrations in offices and dwellings of the Gunma prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, M.; Tokonami, S.; Zhuo, W.

    2005-01-01

    A one year survey of indoor radon and thoron concentrations was carried out in offices and dwellings of the Gunma prefecture, Japan. A passive integrating radon and thoron discriminative monitor was used in the survey. The annual mean radon concentration was 22±14 Bq x m -3 , and ranged from 12 to 93 Bq x m -3 among the 56 surveyed rooms. Radon concentration in offices was generally higher than that in the dwellings, with the arithmetic averages of 29 and 17 Bq x m -3 , respectively. Radon concentrations were generally lower in the traditional Japanese wooden houses than those houses built with other building materials. Seasonal variation of indoor radon was also observed in this survey. Compared to summer and autumn, radon concentrations were generally higher in spring and winter. The mean value of thoron to radon ratio was estimated to be 1.3, higher values were observed in the dwellings than in the offices. The annual effective dose from the exposure to indoor radon was estimated to be 0.47 mSv after taking the occupancy factors of offices and dwellings into account. (author)

  2. Determining Radium-226 concentration from Radon-222 emanation in building materials: a theoretical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, Rafael C.; Perna, Allan F.N.; Narloch, Danielle C.; Del Claro, Flavia; Correa, Janine N.; Paschuk, Sergei A.

    2017-01-01

    It was developed an improved theoretical model capable to estimate the radium concentration in building materials solely measuring the radon-222 concentration in a con ned atmosphere. This non-destructive technique is not limited by the size of the samples, and it intrinsically includes back diffusion. The resulting equation provides the exact solution for the concentration of radon-222 as a function of time and distance in one dimension. The effective concentration of radium-226 is a fit parameter of this equation. In order to reduce its complexity, this equation was simplified considering two cases: low diffusion in the building material compared to the air, and a building material initially saturated with radon-222. These simplified versions of the exact one dimension solution were used to t experimental data. Radon-222 concentration was continuously measured for twelve days with an AlphaGUARD TM detector, located at the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics at Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR). This model was applied to two different materials: cement mortar and concrete, which results were respectively (15:7 ±8:3) Bq=kg and (10:5±2:4) Bq=kg for the radium-226 effective concentration. This estimation was confronted with the direct measurements of radium in the same materials (same sources) using gamma-ray spectrometry, fulfilled at Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), which results were respectively (13:81±0:23) Bq=kg and (12:61±0:22) Bq=kg. (author)

  3. Determining Radium-226 concentration from Radon-222 emanation in building materials: a theoretical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barreto, Rafael C.; Perna, Allan F.N.; Narloch, Danielle C.; Del Claro, Flavia; Correa, Janine N.; Paschuk, Sergei A., E-mail: baarreth@gmail.com, E-mail: allan_perna@hotmail.com, E-mail: daninarloch@hotmail.com, E-mail: aviadelclaro@gmail.com, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Departamento Academico de Fisica e Departamento Academico de Construcao Civil

    2017-07-01

    It was developed an improved theoretical model capable to estimate the radium concentration in building materials solely measuring the radon-222 concentration in a con ned atmosphere. This non-destructive technique is not limited by the size of the samples, and it intrinsically includes back diffusion. The resulting equation provides the exact solution for the concentration of radon-222 as a function of time and distance in one dimension. The effective concentration of radium-226 is a fit parameter of this equation. In order to reduce its complexity, this equation was simplified considering two cases: low diffusion in the building material compared to the air, and a building material initially saturated with radon-222. These simplified versions of the exact one dimension solution were used to t experimental data. Radon-222 concentration was continuously measured for twelve days with an AlphaGUARD{sup TM} detector, located at the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics at Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR). This model was applied to two different materials: cement mortar and concrete, which results were respectively (15:7 ±8:3) Bq=kg and (10:5±2:4) Bq=kg for the radium-226 effective concentration. This estimation was confronted with the direct measurements of radium in the same materials (same sources) using gamma-ray spectrometry, fulfilled at Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), which results were respectively (13:81±0:23) Bq=kg and (12:61±0:22) Bq=kg. (author)

  4. Measurement of radon decay product concentrations in South Australian cave systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Andrew [South Australian Health Commission, Adelaide, SA (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    Measurements of radon decay product concentrations have been conducted for periods of up to 14 days in three South Australian cave systems using a continuous monitor. The dependence of radon decay product concentrations on geology, cave use and surface atmospheric conditions is examined. The estimation of doses to workers in these caves is also discussed. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  5. RADON CONCENTRATION IN THE AIR OF NEWLY BUILT AND OPERATING BUILDINGS IN THE ROSTOV REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu Soloviev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents issues of radon accumulation in the air of dwellings and public buildings in the Rostov region. It is shown that radon concentration in the air of commissioned buildings does not depend on the season when the investigation was carried out, while equivalent equilibrium volumetric activity of radon in the operating buildings is approximately twice higher during the cold period, then during the hot period of a year.

  6. Measurement of radon gas concentration in fertilizer samples by using nuclear track detector (CR-39)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karim, M.S.; Abbas, F.I.; Mnawer, E.M.; Abbas, K.H.

    2011-01-01

    In the present work, we have measured the radon gas concentration in ten fertilizers samples for three kinds { mixed fertilizer (M.F), triple super phosphate (T.S.P), single super phosphate (S.S.P) } by using alpha-emitters registrations which are emitted form radon gas in (CR-39) nuclear track detector.The results obtained have shown that the highest average radon gas concentration in fertilizer samples was found in triple super phosphate sample(T.S.P.), which was (177.5Bq/m 3 ) (Iran origin), while the lowest average radon gas concentration was found in single super phosphate (S.S.P.) sample, which was (72.2Bq/m 3 ) (Iraq origin).The present results show that the radon gas concentration in all fertilizers samples is below the allowed limit from (International Commission of Radiation Protection) (ICRP) agency

  7. Determination of indoor radon concentrations at the elementary schools of Fatih district in Istanbul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt, A., E-mail: aziz.kurt@istanbul.edu.tr; Yalcin, L. Sahin, E-mail: latife.sahin@gmail.com; Oktem, Y., E-mail: sgyks@istanbul.edu.tr; Akkus, B., E-mail: akkus@istanbul.edu.tr; Bozkurt, E., E-mail: enginbozkurt88@gmail.com; Hafizoglu, N., E-mail: nurgulhfz87@gmail.com; Ozturk, F. C., E-mail: fcaglaozturk@gmail.com; Aytan, O., E-mail: ozgur@aytan.net; Ertoprak, A., E-mail: aysegulertoprak@gmail.com [Istanbul University, Science Faculty, Physics Department, 34134, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2016-03-25

    Radon is an odorless, tasteless, colorless noble radioactive gas which is produced within the radioactive decay chain of Uranium. The Radon forms in rocks, diffuses into soil and then escapes into atmosphere. When human exposure to high concentration of radon gas from inside, risk of developing lung cancer is increased. There are many methods to determine {sup 222}Rn concentration in the air. In this study, radon concentration of confined air spaces were measured by using LR-115 solid state nuclear track detectors. 509 LR-115 nuclear trace detectors were placed to 25 schools in Fatih District and they effective dose values were calculated. The results of measurements showed that the radon concentration varies between 40-395 Bq/m{sup 3}. This results compared with Turkey’s limits (400 Bq/m{sup 3}) are low, conversely higher compared with WHO’s limits (100 Bq/m{sup 3}).

  8. Radon concentrations profiles over the brazilian Amazon basin during wet season

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.; Dias, P.L.S.; Nordemann, D.J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric radon measurements were performed airborne in the Brazilian Amazon Basin during the wet season ABLE-2B experiment. The vertical profiles of radon showed a small decrease of concentration with increasing altitude at a rate varying from 6.5 to 11 x 10 - 2 Bq m - 3 km - 1. The calculation of the flux balance of radon in the troposphere above the Amazon Basin indicated a residual flux at the upper boundary of the measurement domain (6 km) of 0.14 atom cm - 2 s - 1. This residue may be associated with the turbulent transport of radon due to cloud activity. (author)

  9. Validation and application of the methodology for analysis of radon concentration in the air through the technique of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Caroline de [Pontificia Universidade Catolica de Minas Gerais (PUC-Pocos), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas; Silva, Nivaldo Carlos da, E-mail: ncsilva@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Pocos de Caldas

    2011-07-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas that occurs naturally in soil and could enter into residential. The decay products of radon are radioactive metals which, when inhaled, can be retained in the respiratory system, leading to an internal dose of radiation. The monitoring of radon levels in residences and workplaces is extremely important, since high concentrations of this gas can cause serious public health problems. This study analyzed the concentration of radon in the air in 94 work environments at the Laboratory of Pocos de Caldas - LAPOC/CNEN, including laboratories, administrative rooms, workshop, warehouse and guardhouse. The method employed in the monitoring was the technique of solid state nuclear track detectors, known as SSNTD. For calibration and validation of this method, controlled experiments were conducted in laboratory with specific instrumentation. The monitoring results indicated that most environments present radon concentrations above 100 Bq m{sup -3}, which is the reference level recommended by the World Health Organization. (author)

  10. Validation and application of the methodology for analysis of radon concentration in the air through the technique of solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Caroline de; Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear; Silva, Nivaldo Carlos da

    2011-01-01

    Radon is a radioactive noble gas that occurs naturally in soil and could enter into residential. The decay products of radon are radioactive metals which, when inhaled, can be retained in the respiratory system, leading to an internal dose of radiation. The monitoring of radon levels in residences and workplaces is extremely important, since high concentrations of this gas can cause serious public health problems. This study analyzed the concentration of radon in the air in 94 work environments at the Laboratory of Pocos de Caldas - LAPOC/CNEN, including laboratories, administrative rooms, workshop, warehouse and guardhouse. The method employed in the monitoring was the technique of solid state nuclear track detectors, known as SSNTD. For calibration and validation of this method, controlled experiments were conducted in laboratory with specific instrumentation. The monitoring results indicated that most environments present radon concentrations above 100 Bq m -3 , which is the reference level recommended by the World Health Organization. (author)

  11. Domestic gas contribution to natural radon concentration in Paraguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronel, G.; Sajo B, L.

    1996-01-01

    The technique for measuring the concentration of radon in gas sold commercially for domestic use is presented. It is shown that the contribution is not significant, 5.5±1.4 (Bq/m 3 ), nevertheless it could reach in some cases significant values of intervention (200 Bq/m 3 ). The results indicate that the additional dose to which the population is exposed is approximately 26% of the natural background calculated in approximately 0,28 mSv/year. By assuming a lineal proportionality between dose and risk, the increase of the possibility of catching lethal leukemia or cancer is 16 cases for every million of population. (authors). 8 refs., 1 fig

  12. Radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmen, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The discovery that radon enters into residential and commercial structures and produces adverse health consequences to occupants thereof has raised issues for the real estate profession in connection with transactions involving affected structures. The legal responsibilities of real estate professionals in relation to such structures have not yet been clearly defined. Moreover, consistent and reliable testing methods and results, clear identification of circumstances where testing is necessary, and consensus as to health risks suggested by various radon levels have yet to be achieved. When these legal and technical questions are clarified, real estate buyer and sellers as well as agents and brokers will be greatly benefited

  13. Radon concentration assessment in water sources of public drinking of Covilhã's county, Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Inácio

    2017-04-01

    Radon concentration measurements were performed on thirty three samples collected from water wells at different depths and types of aquifers, at Covilhã's County, Portugal with the radon gas analyser DURRIDGE RAD7. Twenty three, of the total of water samples collected, gave, values over 100 Bq/L, being that 1690 Bq/L was the highest measured value.

  14. A study of some factors which are related to indoor radon concentrations in Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louizi, A.; Nikolopoulos, D.; Lobotesi, E.; Mavroudaki, E.; Koukouliou, V.K.; Chanioti, M.; Papadimitriou, D.; Yiakoumakis, M.; Proukakis, C.

    1997-01-01

    The Medical Physics Department of the University of Athens is conducting radon-222 measurements in Greek dwellings. It is well known that the concentration of radon gas indoors, are related to various factors. A study of these factors has started and first results are reported. (authors)

  15. Determination of the radon Concentration in underground water in selected areas in and around Kumasi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owusu, Seth Adjei

    2012-06-01

    Radon (Rn-222) is a radioactive noble gas of natural origin that may be found anywhere in soil, air and different types of water: surface, borehole, well and spring. It is worth to carry out surveys for the radon in water for radiation protection as well as for geological considerations. The research presenters here was carried out in selected towns in and around Kumasi for the determination of radon concentration in groundwater. The major towns from which samples were taken are , Mowire, Kronum, Aburaso, Medoma, Kenyase, Buokrom, Bomfa, Ayeduase, Kotei, Tikrom. All the samples are used for domestic purposes such as cooking, drinking, bathing and washing. Waters from boreholes and wells in the selected towns were sampled and the radon concentration level measured. The Roll’s method was used for the radon concentration analysis on all the 100 samples. The results shows that, the minimum radon concentration in groundwater was 13015.934 Bq/m3 and it was found at Bomfa, and the highest was found to be 964628.480 Bq/m3, recorded at Mowire. It is believed that this variation of levels is mainly due to the difference in rock type, soil type and geology of the area as well as the depth of the water samples. This information can be used to estimate the possible health hazards from radon in the selected towns in the future from environmental point of view. The data would promote public awareness related to risk of radon exposure. (au)

  16. Risk assessment of radon gas concentration for some selected offices of KNUST campus, Kumasi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bediako, Yaw Addo

    2013-11-01

    Radon (Rn-222) has been identified as an factor that could result in a health hazard by studies all around the world. The health risks can be minimised by preventing measures where radon is highly concentrated as in some mines or homes or offices. A study in the buildup concentration of the inert gas, will give us a better understanding of its possible pathways through soil into the air surrounding and offices where radon releases can become hazardous. Measuring the radon concentrations on campus, can help to deduce the radon flux to identify the problem areas for rehabilitation. An active method incorporating Trace level radon gas detection and continious monitoring method was used in this study to determine the radon concentration of the selected offices. Concentrations ranging from 0.010 to 0.498 pCi/I were detected, with the head of optometry and Visual Science recording the highest concentration of 0.498 pCi/I, while the head of Agricultural Engineering Department office with the least concentration of 0.010 pCi/I. Although these concentrations are generally low as compared with the EPA guidelines of an action level of 4 pCi/I, but no amount of radiation is said to be safe. (au)

  17. Origin of radon concentration of Csalóka Spring in the Sopron Mountains (West Hungary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freiler, Ágnes; Horváth, Ákos; Török, Kálmán; Földes, Tamás

    2016-01-01

    We examined the Csalóka Spring, which has the highest radon concentration in the Sopron Mountains (West Hungary) (, yearly average of 227 ± 10 Bq L(-1)). The main rock types here are gneiss and micaschist, formed from metamorphism of former granitic and clastic sedimentary rocks respectively. The aim of the study was to find a likely source of the high radon concentration in water. During two periods (2007-2008 and 2012-2013) water samples were taken from the Csalóka Spring to measure its radon concentration (from 153 ± 9 Bq L(-1) to 291 ± 15 Bq L(-1)). Soil and rock samples were taken within a 10-m radius of the spring from debrish and from a deformed gneiss outcrop 500 m away from the spring. The radium activity concentration of the samples (between 24.3 ± 2.9 Bq kg(-1) and 145 ± 6.0 Bq kg(-1)) was measured by gamma-spectroscopy, and the specific radon exhalation was determined using radon-chamber measurements (between 1.32 ± 0.5 Bq kg(-1) and 37.1 ± 2.2 Bq kg(-1)). Based on these results a model calculation was used to determine the maximum potential radon concentration, which the soil or the rock may provide into the water. We showed that the maximum potential radon concentration of these mylonitic gneissic rocks (cpot = 2020 Bq L(-1)) is about eight times higher than the measured radon concentration in the water. However the maximum potential radon concentration for soils are significantly lower (41.3 Bq L(-1)) Based on measurements of radon exhalation and porosity of rock and soil samples we concluded that the source material can be the gneiss rock around the spring rather than the soil there. We determined the average radon concentration and the time dependence of the radon concentration over these years in the spring water. We obtained a strong negative correlation (-0.94 in period of 2007-2008 and -0.91 in 2012-2013) between precipitation and radon concentration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Meteorological factors influencing on the radon concentrations in indoor and outdoor airs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Hiroshi

    1989-01-01

    Factors influencing radon concentrations in indoor and outdoor airs are discussed. A balance between source and loss is required in determining the radon concentration. Source refers to as the outdoor and indoor exhalation rate from the ground and the building materials. Loss is caused by turbulent diffusion outdoors and ventilation indoors. A significant factor influencing the exhalation rate of indoor and outdoor radon may be the change in atmospheric pressure. A drop of pressure feeds the high concentration air under the ground or building materials into the open air, and contributes to the increased exhalation rate. The exhalation rate of radon closely depends on the moisture content of the ground or building materials. Up to a certain level of moisture, the radon exhalation increases with increasing moisture content because the emanation power increases by a recoil effect of a fluid present in the internal pores of the materials. Beyond a certain level of moisture, the exhalation decreases rapidly because the pores are filled with water. Radon exhalated from the ground is spread out by turbulent diffusion. The turbulent diffusion may be related to wind velocity and the lapse rate of temperature. There is a remakable difference between indoor and outdoor radon concentrations. The ventilation rate of the house exerted a great effect upon the indoor radon concentration. The ventilation rate is influenced by meteorological factors together with human activities. Of such factors, wind velocity and temperature gradient between indoor and outdoor airs may be the most significant. The correlation coefficients between RaA or radon and some meteorological factors were calculated on the data from the long term measurements on radon and its decay products in and out of a house under normal living conditions. The changes in atmospheric pressure and wind velocity are found to be a significant factor in the variation of concentration of these nuclides. (N.K.)

  19. RADON CONCENTRATION IN THE AREA OF WASTE ROCK DUMPS, BROD, CR-CASE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinova, L; Bican, R; Fronka, A; Johnova, K; Solc, J; Vosahlik, J

    2017-11-01

    There are ~7000 mining waste storage facilities including waste rock dumps in the Czech Republic. One of the radiation protection present subjects is a health impact estimation of the huge mass of material in waste rock dumps left after uranium mining. In this document are presented selected results of waste rock dump long-term monitoring in the area of shaft No. 15 (Pribram, CR) and its estimated health impact to the representative person in a village Brod. The external irradiation was estimated based on in situ gamma spectrometry measurement results and on a Monte Carlo model and it turned out to be negligible (tens μSv), while the internal irradiation (RAMARN, ALGADE Environmental and RAMONIS detection systems) is more significant. The estimated total annual effective dose for representative person is mainly caused by indoor radon inhalation. The maximum outdoor radon concentration in summer season was measured during night hours between 9 p.m. and 7 a.m. and could reach thousands Bq/m3. The average indoor concentration measured in randomly selected houses was 450 Bq/m3. The radon exhalation rate was 35-40 mBq m-2 s-1. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Radon concentration distributions in shallow and deep groundwater around the Tachikawa fault zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunomori, Fumiaki; Shimodate, Tomoya; Ide, Tomoki; Tanaka, Hidemi

    2017-06-01

    Groundwater radon concentrations around the Tachikawa fault zone were surveyed. The radon concentrations in shallow groundwater samples around the Tachikawa fault segment are comparable to previous studies. The characteristics of the radon concentrations on both sides of the segment are considered to have changed in response to the decrease in groundwater recharge caused by urbanization on the eastern side of the segment. The radon concentrations in deep groundwater samples collected around the Naguri and the Tachikawa fault segments are the same as those of shallow groundwater samples. However, the radon concentrations in deep groundwater samples collected from the bedrock beside the Naguri and Tachikawa fault segments are markedly higher than the radon concentrations expected from the geology on the Kanto plane. This disparity can be explained by the development of fracture zones spreading on both sides of the two segments. The radon concentration distribution for deep groundwater samples from the Naguri and the Tachikawa fault segments suggests that a fault exists even at the southern part of the Tachikawa fault line. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Distribution of radon concentrations in child-care facilities in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheol-Min; Kwon, Myung-Hee; Kang, Dae-Ryong; Park, Tae-Hyun; Park, Si-Hyun; Kwak, Jung-Eun

    2017-02-01

    This study was conducted to provide fundamental data on the distribution of radon concentrations in child day-care facilities in South Korea and to help establish radon mitigation strategies. For this study, 230 child-care centers were randomly chosen from all child-care centers nationwide, and alpha track detectors were used to examine cumulative radon exposure concentrations from January to May 2015. The mean radon concentration measured in Korean child-care centers is approximately 52 Bq m -3 , about one-third of the upper limit of 148 Bq m -3 , which is recommended by South Korea's Indoor Air Quality Control in Public Use Facilities, etc. Act and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Furthermore, this concentration is about 50% lower than 102 Bq m -3 , which is the measured concentration of radon in houses nationwide from December 2013 to February 2014. Our results indicate that the amount of ventilation, as a major determining factor for indoor radon concentrations, is strongly correlated with the fluctuation of indoor radon concentrations in Korean child-care centers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanoaerosols Including Radon Decay Products in Outdoor and Indoor Air at a Suburban Site

    OpenAIRE

    Smerajec, Mateja; Vaupotič, Janja

    2012-01-01

    Nanoaerosols have been monitored inside a kitchen and in the courtyard of a suburban farmhouse. Total number concentration and number size distribution (5–1000 nm) of general aerosol particles, as measured with a Grimm Aerosol SMPS+C 5.400 instrument outdoors, were mainly influenced by solar radiation and use of farming equipment, while, indoors, they were drastically changed by human activity in the kitchen. In contrast, activity concentrations of the short-lived radon decay products 218Po, ...

  3. Determination of radon concentration in soil gas by gamma-ray spectrometry of olive oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish [Department of Applied Sciences, College of Technological Studies, Public Authority for Applied Education and Training, Shuwaikh, P.O. Box: 42325, Code 70654 (Kuwait)]. E-mail: dalazmi@paaet.edu.kw; Karunakara, N. [University Science Instrumentation Centre, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri 574 199, Mangalore (India)]. E-mail: karunakara_n@yahoo.com

    2007-03-15

    Measurements of radon concentration in soil gas have been carried out using a bubbling system in which the soil gas is drawn through an active pumping to bubble a liquid absorber (olive oil) for the deposition of the soil gas in it. After the bubbling process, the absorber is then taken for gamma-ray measurements. Gamma-ray photopeaks from the {sup 214}Pb and the {sup 214}Bi radon progeny are considered for the detection of the {sup 222}Rn gas to study the concentration levels for radon soil gas. Results for some field measurements were obtained and compared with results obtained using AlphaGuard radon gas monitor. The technique provides a possible approach for the measurements of radon soil gas with gamma-ray spectrometry.

  4. Determination of radon concentration in soil gas by gamma-ray spectrometry of olive oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Azmi, Darwish; Karunakara, N.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of radon concentration in soil gas have been carried out using a bubbling system in which the soil gas is drawn through an active pumping to bubble a liquid absorber (olive oil) for the deposition of the soil gas in it. After the bubbling process, the absorber is then taken for gamma-ray measurements. Gamma-ray photopeaks from the 214 Pb and the 214 Bi radon progeny are considered for the detection of the 222 Rn gas to study the concentration levels for radon soil gas. Results for some field measurements were obtained and compared with results obtained using AlphaGuard radon gas monitor. The technique provides a possible approach for the measurements of radon soil gas with gamma-ray spectrometry

  5. High variability of indoor radon concentrations in uraniferous bedrock areas in the Balkan region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žunić, Z S; Ujić, P; Nađđerđ, L; Yarmoshenko, I V; Radanović, S B; Komatina Petrović, S; Čeliković, I; Komatina, M; Bossew, P

    2014-12-01

    In this work the strong influence of geological factors on the variability of indoor radon is found in two of three geologically very different regions of South-Eastern Europe. A method to estimate the annual mean concentration when one seasonal measurement is missing is proposed. Large differences of radon concentrations in different rooms of the same house and significant difference in radon concentrations in one season comparing it to the others are noted in certain cases. Geological factors that can lead to such behavior are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nanoaerosols Including Radon Decay Products in Outdoor and Indoor Air at a Suburban Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Smerajec

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoaerosols have been monitored inside a kitchen and in the courtyard of a suburban farmhouse. Total number concentration and number size distribution (5–1000 nm of general aerosol particles, as measured with a Grimm Aerosol SMPS+C 5.400 instrument outdoors, were mainly influenced by solar radiation and use of farming equipment, while, indoors, they were drastically changed by human activity in the kitchen. In contrast, activity concentrations of the short-lived radon decay products 218Po, 214Pb, and 214Bi, both those attached to aerosol particles and those not attached, measured with a Sarad EQF3020-2 device, did not appear to be dependent on these activities, except on opening and closing of the kitchen window. Neither did a large increase in concentration of aerosol particles smaller than 10 or 20 nm, with which the unattached radon products are associated, augment the fraction of the unattached decay products significantly.

  7. Nanoaerosols including radon decay products in outdoor and indoor air at a suburban site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smerajec, Mateja; Vaupotič, Janja

    2012-01-01

    Nanoaerosols have been monitored inside a kitchen and in the courtyard of a suburban farmhouse. Total number concentration and number size distribution (5-1000 nm) of general aerosol particles, as measured with a Grimm Aerosol SMPS+C 5.400 instrument outdoors, were mainly influenced by solar radiation and use of farming equipment, while, indoors, they were drastically changed by human activity in the kitchen. In contrast, activity concentrations of the short-lived radon decay products (218)Po, (214)Pb, and (214)Bi, both those attached to aerosol particles and those not attached, measured with a Sarad EQF3020-2 device, did not appear to be dependent on these activities, except on opening and closing of the kitchen window. Neither did a large increase in concentration of aerosol particles smaller than 10 or 20 nm, with which the unattached radon products are associated, augment the fraction of the unattached decay products significantly.

  8. Assessment of radon and its progeny concentration in Brazilian underground mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Talita O.; Rocha, Zildete; Araujo, Gabriela B.D. de, E-mail: talitaolsantos@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Gouvea, Vandir A.; Cruz, Paulo; Siqueira, Joao B., E-mail: vgouvea@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: pcruz@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: jbsiquei@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Oliveira, Arno H., E-mail: arnoheeren@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    Rock, soil and water contain {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th and their decay products. The distribution of these radionuclides differs in terms of activity concentration depending on the mineral type and origin. All ore processing releases long and short half-life radionuclides, mainly radon and its progeny. It is important to monitor this gas and its products in underground mines in order to assess the radiological hazards of the exposed workers. On this concern, the present work outlines the characterization of the radon and its progeny concentration in the brazilian underground mines. The radon concentration was measured by using E-PERM Electrets Ion Chamber, AlphaGUARD and CR-39 track etch detectors. The radon progeny was determined by using DOSEman detector. The equilibrium state between radon and its progeny was calculated. Based on these data, the annual effective dose for miners was estimated according to UNSCEAR 2000 methodology. Moreover, the contribution from the main sources to the radon level inside mines was evaluated. For this, the following detectors were used: concentration measurements of the soil gas radon were carried out by AlphaGUARD detector; {sup 226}Ra ({sup 214}Bi) specific activity in ore and soil samples were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry HPGe detector; and radon concentration in groundwater samples was performed by RAD7 detector. The radon concentration ranged from 113 to 8171 Bq.m{sup -3} and the Equilibrium Equivalent Concentration varied from 76 to 1174 Bq.m{sup -3}. The general measurement results and the estimated effective doses will be used as bases to prepare the brazilian regulatory standards. (author)

  9. Distance to faults as a proxy for radon gas concentration in dwellings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drolet, Jean-Philippe; Martel, Richard

    2016-02-01

    This research was done to demonstrate the usefulness of the local structural geology characteristics to predict indoor radon concentrations. The presence of geologic faults near dwellings increases the vulnerability of the dwellings to elevated indoor radon by providing favorable pathways from the source uranium-rich bedrock units to the surface. Kruskal-Wallis one-way analyses of variance by ranks were used to determine the distance where faults have statistically significant influence on indoor radon concentrations. The great-circle distance between the 640 spatially referenced basement radon concentration measurements and the nearest fault was calculated using the Haversine formula and the spherical law of cosines. It was shown that dwellings located less than 150 m from a major fault had a higher radon potential. The 150 m threshold was determined using Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA on: (1) all the basement radon measurements dataset and; (2) the basement radon measurements located on uranium-rich bedrock units only. The results indicated that 22.8% of the dwellings located less than 150 m from a fault exceeded the Canadian radon guideline of 200 Bq/m(3) when using all the basement radon measurements dataset. This percentage fell to 15.2% for the dwellings located between 150 m and 700 m from a fault. When using only the basement radon measurements located on uranium-rich bedrock units, these percentages were 30.7% (0-150 m) and 17.5% (150 m-700 m). The assessment and management of risk can be improved where structural geology characteristics base maps are available by using this proxy indicator. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Concentrations Of Radon In Kindergartens And Schools In Like - Sen And Karlovac Counties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radolic, V.; Stanic, D.; Miklavcic, I.; Poje, M.; Muzevic, M.; Krpan, I.; Vukovic, B.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of radon concentrations in schools and kindergartens were performed by means of passive, strippable, nuclear track etched detectors LR - 115 type II (Kodak - Pathe, France). The detectors are paired in the way that one detector (open detector), placed on the circumferential side of the plastic detector vessel, registers total number of alpha particles from radon and its short-lived progenies. At the same time, the other detector (diffusion detector) is placed inside the vessel and it registers only alpha particles emitted by radon. The average radon concentrations in kindergartens and schools of Lika-Senj County are 318 and 317 Bq m -3 while for Karlovac County they are 228 and 304 Bq m -3 respectively. Moreover, there are three schools in Karlovac County with the average radon concentration higher than 1000 Bq m -3 , which represents the action level for intervention measures in Croatia. Even more, there are 2.5 percent of rooms in kindergartens and 4 percent of rooms in schools in Lika - Senj County with measured radon concentrations higher than 1000 Bq m -3 . In Karlovac County there are 2.4 percent of such rooms in kindergartens and 7 percent in schools. Maps of spatial distribution of indoor radon concentrations for homes as well as for kindergartens and schools were created by using the Inverse Distance Weighting interpolation method. This is one of the useful methods for identifying radon prone areas. The authors propose a repetition of measurements in those kindergartens, schools and homes with higher radon concentrations in coordination with the local government. (author).

  11. THE SCREENING INDOOR RADON AND PRELIMINARY STUDY OF INDOOR THORON CONCENTRATION LEVELS IN KUWAIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janik, M; Al-Azmi, D; Sahoo, S K

    2018-02-09

    Indoor measurements of radon and thoron in Kuwait were conducted during the years 2015 and 2016. In this study, 65 dwellings were selected for the long-term radon-thoron survey using passive nuclear track monitors. The monitors (at least one) were used at various locations in the dwellings for 83-306 days. Some measurements were also repeated at the same locations in different seasons. This current study is a preliminary thoron survey with relatively small sample size. The results showed that the range of thoron concentration was from below the lower limit of detection to 35 Bq m-3, whereas the range of radon concentration was within 10-202 Bq m-3. Furthermore, 22% of the radon results exceeded the WHO radon reference level of 100 Bq m-3. The analysis of variance showed a correlation between indoor radon concentration and the season. However, the thoron measurements were rather limited and the values were low. In addition, the relationship was investigated between radon and thoron concentrations involving the floor levels and the type of ventilation systems used. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Long-term radon concentrations estimated from 210Po embedded in glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lively, R.S.; Steck, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Measured surface-alpha activity on glass exposed in radon chambers and houses has a linear correlation to the integrated radon exposure. Experimental results in chambers and houses have been obtained on glass exposed to radon concentrations between 100 Bq m-3 and 9 MBq m-3 for periods of a few days to several years. Theoretical calculations support the experimental results through a model that predicts the fractions of airborne activity that deposit and become embedded or adsorbed. The combination of measured activity and calculated embedded fraction for a given deposition environment can be applied to most indoor areas and produces a better estimate for lifetime radon exposure than estimates based on short-term indoor radon measurements.

  13. Ground-truthing predicted indoor radon concentrations by using soil-gas radon measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimer, G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Predicting indoor radon potential has gained in importance even as the national radon programs began to wane. A cooperative study to produce radon potential maps was conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Department of Energy (DOE), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) with the latter taking the lead role. A county-wide predictive model based dominantly on the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) aerorad data and secondly on geology, both small-scale data bases was developed. However, that model breaks down in counties of complex geology and does not provide a means to evaluate the potential of an individual home or building site. Soil-gas radon measurements on a large scale are currently shown to provide information for estimating radon potential at individual sites sort out the complex geology so that the small-scale prediction index can be validated. An example from Frederick County, Maryland indicates a positive correlation between indoor measurements and soil-gas data. The method does not rely on a single measurement, but a series that incorporate seasonal and meteorological considerations. (author)

  14. Hierarchical modeling of indoor radon concentration: how much do geology and building factors matter?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgoni, Riccardo; De Francesco, Davide; De Bartolo, Daniela; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    Radon is a natural gas known to be the main contributor to natural background radiation exposure and only second to smoking as major leading cause of lung cancer. The main concern is in indoor environments where the gas tends to accumulate and can reach high concentrations. The primary contributor of this gas into the building is from the soil although architectonic characteristics, such as building materials, can largely affect concentration values. Understanding the factors affecting the concentration in dwellings and workplaces is important both in prevention, when the construction of a new building is being planned, and in mitigation when the amount of Radon detected inside a building is too high. In this paper we investigate how several factors, such as geologic typologies of the soil and a range of building characteristics, impact on indoor concentration focusing, in particular, on how concentration changes as a function of the floor level. Adopting a mixed effects model to account for the hierarchical nature of the data, we also quantify the extent to which such measurable factors manage to explain the variability of indoor radon concentration. - Highlights: • It is assessed how the variability of indoor radon concentration depends on buildings and lithologies. • The lithological component has been found less relevant than the building one. • Radon-prone lithologies have been identified. • The effect of the floor where the room is located has been estimated. • Indoor radon concentration have been predicted for different dwelling typologies

  15. Update of Ireland's national average indoor radon concentration - Application of a new survey protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdall, A; Murphy, P; Pollard, D; Fenton, D

    2017-04-01

    In 2002, a National Radon Survey (NRS) in Ireland established that the geographically weighted national average indoor radon concentration was 89 Bq m -3 . Since then a number of developments have taken place which are likely to have impacted on the national average radon level. Key among these was the introduction of amending Building Regulations in 1998 requiring radon preventive measures in new buildings in High Radon Areas (HRAs). In 2014, the Irish Government adopted the National Radon Control Strategy (NRCS) for Ireland. A knowledge gap identified in the NRCS was to update the national average for Ireland given the developments since 2002. The updated national average would also be used as a baseline metric to assess the effectiveness of the NRCS over time. A new national survey protocol was required that would measure radon in a sample of homes representative of radon risk and geographical location. The design of the survey protocol took into account that it is not feasible to repeat the 11,319 measurements carried out for the 2002 NRS due to time and resource constraints. However, the existence of that comprehensive survey allowed for a new protocol to be developed, involving measurements carried out in unbiased randomly selected volunteer homes. This paper sets out the development and application of that survey protocol. The results of the 2015 survey showed that the current national average indoor radon concentration for homes in Ireland is 77 Bq m -3 , a decrease from the 89 Bq m -3 reported in the 2002 NRS. Analysis of the results by build date demonstrate that the introduction of the amending Building Regulations in 1998 have led to a reduction in the average indoor radon level in Ireland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of techniques active and passive in measurement of radon concentration (222Ra) in the air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Evaldo Paulo de

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to perform a study comparing radon concentration measurements between two techniques used to measure radon gas in the air: one using LEXAN polycarbonate plastic detectors and the other the continuous monitor in AlphaGUARD passive mode. The concentrations of radon gas within radon emanation chambers were measured using calibrated / traceable sources generating 222 Rn through 226 Ra. In calibration the 'calibration factor' or 'sensitivity' was determined for the LEXAN plastic detector. The calibration work of the dosimeters was carried out at the Radon Laboratory of the Environmental Analysis Division - DIRAD IRD/CNEN and at the Natural Radioactivity Laboratory (LRN) of the Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN). The 'calibration factor' or 'sensitivity' was found to be 32.34 (traits.cm -2 )/(kBq.d.m -3 ). This factor was used to determine the radon concentration measured by the LEXAN plastic detectors. Also in the calibration, the efficiencies for LEXAN (94.1% ± 9.7%) and AlphaGUARD (92.5% ± 7.2%) were determined. The statistical analysis used showed good parity in the results of the measurements. It was concluded that the results were satisfactory and will serve as a good reference for studies related to the radon air meters used in this work. (author)

  17. Predictive analysis of shaft station radon concentrations in underground uranium mine: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoyan; Hong, Changshou; Li, Xiangyang; Lin, Chunping; Hu, Penghua

    2016-07-01

    This paper presented a method for predicting shaft station radon concentrations in a uranium mine of China through theoretical analysis, mathematical derivation and Monte-Carlo simulation. Based upon the queuing model for tramcars, the average waiting time of tramcars and average number of waiting tramcars were determined, which were further used in developing the predictive model for calculating shaft station radon concentrations. The results exhibit that the extent of variation of shaft station radon concentration in the case study mine is not significantly affected by the queuing process of tramcars, and is always within the allowable limit of 200 Bq m(-3). Thus, the empirical limit of 100,000 T annual ore-hoisting yields has no value in ensuring radiation safety for this mine. Moreover, the developed model has been validated and proved useful in assessing shaft station radon levels for any uranium mine with similar situations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A study on surveillance of environmental factors affecting the variation of indoor radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Shin Ae; Kim, Ok Ja; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Cho, Eun Ok; Choi, Yun Sun; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Park, Seon Hye; Han, Hyeon Sun

    2000-03-01

    Before the main survey, a preliminary survey was carried out to decide the most suitable type of a radon detector the most appropriate places to install such a radon detector. To this end, three types of detectors were set up in 108 locations, approximately 3% of 3,000 to measure the radon levels, and 102 detectors(94%) were collected. As a result of the preliminary survey, Radtrack was chosen as a radon detector for the main survey, and bedrooms on the first floor of houses and the first floor of public buildings were decided to be the places for the first installment of detectors. It is most desirable to survey the radon concentrations in all houses nationwide. Considering the survey period and budgets, however, 3,000 spots were targeted for the main survey at the recommendation of the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety in charge of this study. As it is important to maintain the same panels for a year to measure the radon concentrations at 3,000 locations, a total of 3,237 panels, 10% more than the target sample number, were surveyed considering the possible loss of panels during the survey period. The first radon detector was installed in each of 3,237 spots in December 1999, and collected three months later in March 2000, followed by the installment of the second detector

  19. A study on surveillance of environmental factors affecting the variation of indoor radon concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Shin Ae; Kim, Ok Ja; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Cho, Eun Ok; Choi, Yun Sun; Choi, Jin Kyeong; Park, Seon Hye; Han, Hyeon Sun [Hankook Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    Before the main survey, a preliminary survey was carried out to decide the most suitable type of a radon detector the most appropriate places to install such a radon detector. To this end, three types of detectors were set up in 108 locations, approximately 3% of 3,000 to measure the radon levels, and 102 detectors(94%) were collected. As a result of the preliminary survey, Radtrack was chosen as a radon detector for the main survey, and bedrooms on the first floor of houses and the first floor of public buildings were decided to be the places for the first installment of detectors. It is most desirable to survey the radon concentrations in all houses nationwide. Considering the survey period and budgets, however, 3,000 spots were targeted for the main survey at the recommendation of the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety in charge of this study. As it is important to maintain the same panels for a year to measure the radon concentrations at 3,000 locations, a total of 3,237 panels, 10% more than the target sample number, were surveyed considering the possible loss of panels during the survey period. The first radon detector was installed in each of 3,237 spots in December 1999, and collected three months later in March 2000, followed by the installment of the second detector.

  20. Radon Concentration Measurements and Risk Assessments Around Uludağ Mountain (Bursa, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül KAHRAMAN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The radon concentrations in the groundwater, tap water samples and soil gases of the residential areas and forested lands of Uludağ were measured to research on the dynamics of low-high radon levels over the various rocks types found in this area. Besides, the annual effective doses for groundwater and tap waters were calculated and compared with the recommended dose value by the World Health Organization (WHO to evaluate the health risk of inhabitant. The radon concentrations in water samples for the wet and dry seasons were found in the ranges of 0.17 ± 0.09 - 195.64 ± 6.87 Bq l-1 (median value of 5.13 Bq l-1 and 0.04 ± 0.01 - 199.24 ± 6.54 Bq l-1 (median value of 4.33 Bq l-1, respectively. Elevated radon concentrations were measured in the waters draining through igneous rocks (granite and granodiorite, known as uranium-rich rocks. The average radon and thoron concentrations of soil gases were found to be in the ranges of 0.65 ± 0.01 – 199.66 ± 3.27 kBq m-3 and 4.36 ± 0.36 – 245.9 ± 7.26 kBq m-3, respectively. The highest and lowest radon and thoron concentrations in soil gases were observed in the granitic area and in scree region, respectively.

  1. A comparative study of indoor radon concentrations between dwellings and schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapdan, E.; Altinsoy, N.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the relationship of radon concentrations between dwellings and the schools located in the same regions and to obtain related indoor average radon concentration dwelling–school correction factor for similar locations. The research has been carried out by determining indoor radon concentrations at schools and dwellings located at the same districts in the selected two separate research fields called The Former Adapazari region and The New Adapazari region in the city of Adapazari using a total of 81 Cr-39 passive radon detectors for 75 days. The average radon concentrations have been determined for the dwellings and the schools in 15 districts of the Former Adapazari region as 59.9 Bq m −3 and 57.1 Bq m −3 , respectively. The results in 4 districts of the New Adapazari region were 63.5 Bq m −3 for the dwellings and 61.0 Bq m −3 for the schools. Moreover, the annual effective doses were calculated as 1.33 mSv/y and 1.41 mSv/y for the dwellings of Former Adapazari and New Adapazari, respectively. It was seen that the doses received in the dwellings are about four times the doses received in the schools. The indoor radon concentration dwelling–school correction factor was found to be 1.04±0.01 for the research area.

  2. Multi-scale variability and long-range memory in indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Reik V.; Potirakis, Stelios; Barbosa, Susana

    2014-05-01

    The presence or absence of long-range correlations in the variations of indoor Radon concentrations has recently attracted considerable interest. As a radioactive gas naturally emitted from the ground in certain geological settings, understanding environmental factors controlling Radon concentrations and their dynamics is important for estimating its effect on human health and the efficiency of possible measures for reducing the corresponding exposition. In this work, we re-analyze two high-resolution records of indoor Radon concentrations from Coimbra, Portugal, each of which spans several months of continuous measurements. In order to evaluate the presence of long-range correlations and fractal scaling, we utilize a multiplicity of complementary methods, including power spectral analysis, ARFIMA modeling, classical and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis, and two different estimators of the signals' fractal dimensions. Power spectra and fluctuation functions reveal some complex behavior with qualitatively different properties on different time-scales: white noise in the high-frequency part, indications of some long-range correlated process dominating time scales of several hours to days, and pronounced low-frequency variability associated with tidal and/or meteorological forcing. In order to further decompose these different scales of variability, we apply two different approaches. On the one hand, applying multi-resolution analysis based on the discrete wavelet transform allows separately studying contributions on different time scales and characterize their specific correlation and scaling properties. On the other hand, singular system analysis (SSA) provides a reconstruction of the essential modes of variability. Specifically, by considering only the first leading SSA modes, we achieve an efficient de-noising of our environmental signals, highlighting the low-frequency variations together with some distinct scaling on sub-daily time-scales resembling

  3. Effect of soil moisture on seasonal variation in indoor radon concentration: modelling and measurements in 326 Finnish houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Holmgren, O.; Haenninen, P.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of soil moisture on seasonal variation in soil air and indoor radon is studied. A brief review of the theory of the effect of soil moisture on soil air radon has been presented. The theoretical estimates, together with soil moisture measurements over a period of 10 y, indicate that variation in soil moisture evidently is an important factor affecting the seasonal variation in soil air radon concentration. Partitioning of radon gas between the water and air fractions of soil pores is the main factor increasing soil air radon concentration. On two example test sites, the relative standard deviation of the calculated monthly average soil air radon concentration was 17 and 26 %. Increased soil moisture in autumn and spring, after the snow melt, increases soil gas radon concentrations by 10-20 %. In February and March, the soil gas radon concentration is in its minimum. Soil temperature is also an important factor. High soil temperature in summer increased the calculated soil gas radon concentration by 14 %, compared with winter values. The monthly indoor radon measurements over period of 1 y in 326 Finnish houses are presented and compared with the modelling results. The model takes into account radon entry, climate and air exchange. The measured radon concentrations in autumn and spring were higher than expected and it can be explained by the seasonal variation in the soil moisture. The variation in soil moisture is a potential factor affecting markedly to the high year-to-year variation in the annual or seasonal average radon concentrations, observed in many radon studies. (authors)

  4. Low air exchange rate causes high indoor radon concentration in energy-efficient buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, A.V.; Yarmoshenko, I.V.; Zhukovsky, M.V.

    2015-01-01

    Since 1995, requirements on energy-efficient building construction were established in Russian Building Codes. In the course of time, utilisation of such technologies became prevailing, especially in multi-storey building construction. According to the results of radon survey in buildings constructed meeting new requirements on energy efficiency, radon concentration exceeds the average level in early-constructed buildings. Preponderance of the diffusion mechanism of radon entry in modern multi-storey buildings has been experimentally established. The experimental technique of the assessment of ventilation rate in dwellings under real conditions was developed. Based on estimates of average ventilation rate, it was approved that measures to increase energy efficiency lead to reduction in ventilation rate and accumulation of higher radon concentrations indoors. Obtained ventilation rate values have to be considered as extremely low. (authors)

  5. Annual observations of radon activity concentrations in dwellings of Silesian Voivodeship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wysocka, M.; Chmielewska, I.; Kozlowska, B.; Dorda, J.; Klos, B.; Rubin, J.; Karpinska, M.; Dohojda, M.

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, results of year-long measurements of radon levels in dwellings on the premises of Silesian Voivodeship are presented. Track etched detectors with polymer CR-39 foils were used in the investigations. As the studied buildings were located in different regions of Silesian Voivodeship, therefore results of measurements were analysed due to possible influence of geological structure or effect of mining operations in places, where given dwellings were situated. Elevated concentrations of radon were measured mostly in dwellings located in areas, where permeable Triassic limestone and dolomite occur, as it has been predicted. On the other hand, the impact of mining activity such as disintegration of rock-body and activation of faults plays an important role, too, because it enables radon migration and its entry into buildings. Beside the analysis of seasonal variations of radon activity concentration, the impact of temperature and pressure on these fluctuations outdoor and indoor buildings has been analysed. (authors)

  6. Low air exchange rate causes high indoor radon concentration in energy-efficient buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, A V; Yarmoshenko, I V; Zhukovsky, M V

    2015-06-01

    Since 1995, requirements on energy-efficient building construction were established in Russian Building Codes. In the course of time, utilisation of such technologies became prevailing, especially in multi-storey building construction. According to the results of radon survey in buildings constructed meeting new requirements on energy efficiency, radon concentration exceeds the average level in early-constructed buildings. Preponderance of the diffusion mechanism of radon entry in modern multi-storey buildings has been experimentally established. The experimental technique of the assessment of ventilation rate in dwellings under real conditions was developed. Based on estimates of average ventilation rate, it was approved that measures to increase energy efficiency lead to reduction in ventilation rate and accumulation of higher radon concentrations indoors. Obtained ventilation rate values have to be considered as extremely low. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Variation in the annual average radon concentration measured in homes in Mesa County, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rood, A.S.; George, J.L.; Langner, G.H. Jr.

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the variability in the annual average indoor radon concentration. The TMC has been collecting annual average radon data for the past 5 years in 33 residential structures in Mesa County, Colorado. This report is an interim report that presents the data collected up to the present. Currently, the plans are to continue this study in the future. 62 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs

  8. THE PROBLEM OF THE STUDYING OF RADON INDOOR AIR CONCENTRATION IN THE JEWISH AUTONOMOUS REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Surits

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An article presents the results of radon indoor air concentration estimations for dwellings and public buildings of the Jewish Autonomous region in 2000–2011. More than 15 000 measurements were carried out in all areas of the region during the entire observation period. Areas with an enhanced radon content in indoor air were revealed. The maximum values are registered in Obluchensky area, in separate buildings reaching 2 000 Bq/m3.

  9. Geographical distribution of the annual mean radon concentrations in primary schools of Southern Serbia – application of geostatistical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossew, P.; Žunić, Z.S.; Stojanovska, Z.; Tollefsen, T.; Carpentieri, C.; Veselinović, N.; Komatina, S.; Vaupotič, J.; Simović, R.D.; Antignani, S.; Bochicchio, F.

    2014-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2011 a survey of radon ( 222 Rn) was performed in schools of several districts of Southern Serbia. Some results have been published previously (Žunić et al., 2010; Carpentieri et al., 2011; Žunić et al., 2013). This article concentrates on the geographical distribution of the measured Rn concentrations. Applying geostatistical methods we generate “school radon maps” of expected concentrations and of estimated probabilities that a concentration threshold is exceeded. The resulting maps show a clearly structured spatial pattern which appears related to the geological background. In particular in areas with vulcanite and granitoid rocks, elevated radon (Rn) concentrations can be expected. The “school radon map” can therefore be considered as proxy to a map of the geogenic radon potential, and allows identification of radon-prone areas, i.e. areas in which higher Rn radon concentrations can be expected for natural reasons. It must be stressed that the “radon hazard”, or potential risk, estimated this way, has to be distinguished from the actual radon risk, which is a function of exposure. This in turn may require (depending on the target variable which is supposed to measure risk) considering demographic and sociological reality, i.e. population density, distribution of building styles and living habits. -- Highlights: • A map of Rn concentrations in primary schools of Southern Serbia. • Application of geostatistical methods. • Correlation with geology found. • Can serve as proxy to identify radon prone areas

  10. Assessment of indoor radon concentration in phosphate fertilizer warehouses in Nigeria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okeji, Mark C.; Agwu, Kenneth K.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor radon concentration level was measured in twelve selected phosphate fertilizer warehouses in Nigeria in order to establish potential hazards to persons using such warehouses as offices. The fertilizer warehouses were selected based on the brand of fertilizers stored, size, ventilation pattern and the number of workers in the warehouses during working hours. Electret Ion Chamber Technology (EIC) with the trade name E-PERM TM was employed for the measurement of radon concentration in the warehouses. Average radon concentration in the warehouses range between 33.6 Bq m −3 and 117 Bq m −3 with an arithmetic mean of 91.62±5.9 Bq m −3 . - Highlights: ► Indoor radon in phosphate fertilizer warehouses were measured using E-PERM monitor. ► The result shows that indoor radon varies from 36.6±4.9 to 117.0±8.78 Bq m −3 . ► The average annual effective dose due to indoor radon in the warehouses is 0.87 mSv. ► This value is elevated though below the action level. ► Adequate ventilation is mandatory if phosphate fertilizer must be stored in offices.

  11. Comparative study of radon concentration in selected modern and traditional building at Kenyatta University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chege, W.M.; Rathore, I.V.S.; Chhabra, S.C.; Mustapha, A.O.

    2010-01-01

    Radon is leading source of radiation exposure to the public and increases risk of cancer (UNSCEAR, 2000). There is general lack of data on indoor radon in Kenya especially on building design-traditional versus modern. In rural Kenya traditional mud huts coexist with modern stone building. Indoor radon found to vary widely in Kenya: Mustapha et al (2002): 5-1200 Bqm3, Maina et al (2004): 5-704 Bqm3. None of previous works indicates radon variation with building design. The aim of the current study is to compare radon concentrations in coexisting stone buildings and mud huts. Such data would be useful in formulation of policies regarding housing, as part of radon data base in Kenya Experimental Techniques Characteristic of selected buildings: Traditional Huts: Single roomed, Wall made of wood and plastered using mud, bare floor and no ceiling, grass-thatched or mud plastered, doors and windows remained open during the sampling period. Modern Buildings: (Classes used to represent modern building). Those made of natural stone, wooden floor, ceiling, doors and windows remained shut during the sampling period. Measurement of Radon Concentration Radon sampling was done using Charcoal canisters (EPA type). They were activated, and then exposed simultaneously at sampling sites for 48 hours. Analysis and data acquisition was done using NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer. Radon concentration was calculated based on gamma rays emitted by 214Pb (295 and 352 keV) and 214Bi (609 keV). 13 Results and Discussion Radon levels were higher in classrooms and significantly high in huts. Mean (Bqm-3 ) Minimum (Bqm-3 ) Maximum (Bqm-3 ). Traditional huts had 170.3 15.6 30.2 315.4 while modern buildings had 193 ±19.3 115.76 257.2. There were higher levels in classroom despite lower levels of 226Ra (50.18 Bqkg-1) in natural stone. Possible source of high concentrations: - radon seeping in through floor boards building up over time as building more closed up - Radon concentration was more varied

  12. A study on the environmental behavior of global air pollutants based on the continuous measurements of atmospheric radon concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Takao; Yamazawa, Hiromi

    2003-01-01

    Radon is a useful natural radioactive tracer of air transportation of atmospheric pollution, since radon is a noble gas and chemically inert. The atmospheric radon concentration is usually measured by a high-sensitivity electrostatic collection method or a two-filter method. The variations of radon concentrations observed over a solitary island and in the upper atmosphere are suitable for comparing with those of air pollutants. Some numerical simulation models were used to study the radon global transport in the atmosphere. In East Asia, atmospheric radon and air pollutants are transported with the air stream from the continent of China to the Northwestern Pacific Ocean. It is necessary to clarify the transport mechanism from both radon observations at various locations and numerical simulation. (author)

  13. Radon concentration: A tool for assessing the fracture network at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drinie

    2003-01-01

    Jan 1, 2003 ... This work has positive implications for the location of groundwater resources in fractured-rock aquifers such as in South Africa, where most ... tool in groundwater exploration in South Africa, where the passive Radon Gas Monitor ..... rainfall infiltration, the main infiltration area can be identified;. • The method ...

  14. Measuring variation of indoor radon concentration using bare nuclear tracks detectors, scintillation counters and surface barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishak, I.; Mahat, R.H.; Amin, Y.M.

    1996-01-01

    Bare LRI 15 nuclear track detectors , scintillators counter and surface barrier detectors were used to measured the indoor radon concentration in various location within two rooms. Spatial variation of the radon concentration is caused by positioning of the door, windows, furniture, cracks in the building and also distances from floor, wall and ceiling. It is found that the change in temperature are causing radon concentration to increase at certain time of the day

  15. Estimation of radon concentration in drinking water in and around Honavar taluk, Uttara Kannada district, Karnataka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, S.; Rangaswamy, D.R.; Sannappa, J.; Srinivasa, E.

    2017-01-01

    Water is an essential factor for most life on the planet, and as such the quality of drinking water is an important parameter for a person's health. Radioactive elements such as radon ( 222 Rn) and radium ( 226 Ra) are found in water. Measurement of radon concentration in drinking water has been conducted by many countries in all over the globe. However the interest of this study has been increased throughout the world because of the hazardous effect of radon on health of the human beings. This study was conducted primarily to measure radon activity concentration in drinking water. Thirty Five drinking water samples were taken in and around Honnavar taluk of Uttara Kannada district. Activity concentration of 222 Rn was measured by using emanometry technique. Physico-chemical properties such as pH, electrical conductivity and TDS were estimated using standard technique. Radon activity concentration in water has been found to vary from 1.42±0.18 Bq.l -1 to 19.4±1.8 Bq.l -1 with an average value of 7.68±0.76 Bq.l -1 . Upon comparing radon concentration level obtained in the study with EPA, it was found that 74.3% of samples are far below the maximum contamination level of 11.1 Bq l -1 with an exception of 25.7%. The total average annual effective doses of all the samples are much lower than the safe limit of 100 µSv.y -1 . There is no significant correlation between radon concentration and physico-chemical properties. (author)

  16. Radon concentrations in ground and drinking water in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villalba, L. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, CP 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Colmenero Sujo, L. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, CP 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Chihuahua II, Ave. de las Industrias 11101, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Montero Cabrera, M.E. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, CP 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico)]. E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx; Cano Jimenez, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, CP 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Renteria Villalobos, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, CP 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Delgado Mendoza, C.J. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Ciudad Universitaria S/N, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Jurado Tenorio, L.A. [Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Autonoma de Chihuahua, Ciudad Universitaria S/N, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Davila Rangel, I. [Centro Regional de Estudios Nucleares, Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Cipres 20, Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Herrera Peraza, E.F. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, S.C., Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, CP 31109 Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    This paper reports {sup 222}Rn concentrations in ground and drinking water of nine cities of Chihuahua State, Mexico. Fifty percent of the 114 sampled wells exhibited {sup 222}Rn concentrations exceeding 11 Bq/L, the maximum contaminant level (MCL) recommended by the USEPA. Furthermore, around 48% (123 samples) of the tap-water samples taken from 255 dwellings showed radon concentrations over the MCL. There is an apparent correlation between total dissolved solids and radon concentration in ground-water. The high levels of {sup 222}Rn found may be entirely attributed to the nature of aquifer rocks.

  17. Radon concentrations in ground and drinking water in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalba, L.; Colmenero Sujo, L.; Montero Cabrera, M.E.; Cano Jimenez, A.; Renteria Villalobos, M.; Delgado Mendoza, C.J.; Jurado Tenorio, L.A.; Davila Rangel, I.; Herrera Peraza, E.F.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports 222 Rn concentrations in ground and drinking water of nine cities of Chihuahua State, Mexico. Fifty percent of the 114 sampled wells exhibited 222 Rn concentrations exceeding 11 Bq/L, the maximum contaminant level (MCL) recommended by the USEPA. Furthermore, around 48% (123 samples) of the tap-water samples taken from 255 dwellings showed radon concentrations over the MCL. There is an apparent correlation between total dissolved solids and radon concentration in ground-water. The high levels of 222 Rn found may be entirely attributed to the nature of aquifer rocks

  18. Radon concentrations in ground and drinking water in the state of Chihuahua, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, L; Colmenero Sujo, L; Montero Cabrera, M E; Cano Jiménez, A; Rentería Villalobos, M; Delgado Mendoza, C J; Jurado Tenorio, L A; Dávila Rangel, I; Herrera Peraza, E F

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports (222)Rn concentrations in ground and drinking water of nine cities of Chihuahua State, Mexico. Fifty percent of the 114 sampled wells exhibited (222)Rn concentrations exceeding 11Bq/L, the maximum contaminant level (MCL) recommended by the USEPA. Furthermore, around 48% (123 samples) of the tap-water samples taken from 255 dwellings showed radon concentrations over the MCL. There is an apparent correlation between total dissolved solids and radon concentration in ground-water. The high levels of (222)Rn found may be entirely attributed to the nature of aquifer rocks.

  19. Study on radon concentration monitoring using activated charcoal canisters in high humidity environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yuexing; Wang Haijun; Yang Yifang; Qin Sichang; Wang Zhentao; Zhang Zhenjiang

    2009-01-01

    The effects of humidity on the sensitivity using activated charcoal canisters for measuring radon concentrations in high humidity environments were studied. Every canister filled with 80 g of activated charcoal, and they were exposed to 48 h or 72 h in the relative humidity of 68%, 80%, 88% and 96% (28 degree C), respectively. The amount of radon absorbed in the canisters was determined by counting the gamma rays from 214 Pb and 214 Bi (radon progeny). The results showed that counts decreased with the increase of relative humidity. There was a negative linear relationship between count and humidity. In the relative humidity range of 68%-96%, the sensitivity of radon absorption decreased about 2.4% for every 1% (degree)rise in humidity. The results also showed that the exposure time of the activated charcoal canisters should be less than 3 days. (authors)

  20. Distribution of radon concentration in residences and others buildings of Belo Horizonte city, MG, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Talita de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to ionizing radiation from many natural sources. Radon and its progeny have been recognized as the most important contributors to the natural radioactivity dose, accounting for about half of all human exposure to ionizing radiation. Radon is a α-radioactive noble gas derived from the natural series of uranium and thorium, which occurs in a wide concentration range in all geological materials, especially, in rocks, soils and waters. By diffusion and convection, radon migrates from the rocks and soils to atmosphere and through fissures, pipes and holes it may enter the dwellings and other buildings. Another important radon source in dwellings is its emanation from the construction material. The radon progeny concentration in dwellings has been receiving considerable global attention due to its potential effect in causing lung cancer if it deposited in upper respiratory tract when inhaled. This work presents radon concentration distribution in dwellings in Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte - RMBH. The geological settings of the area are Archean rocks of Granitic Gneissic Complex and of metasediments sequences of the great Precambrian unit of the Iron Quadrangle of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Radon concentration measurements were carried out with continuous detector AlphaGUARD PQ200PRO (Genitron), in passive mode and with passive detectors E-PERM Electrets Ion Chamber-EIC. The radon progeny concentration was carried out with a solid state alpha spectroscope, the DOSEman PRO (Sarad). It was found an indoor radon concentration varying in a large range from 4 to 2664,0 Bq.m -3 , with an average value of 108.0 Bq.m -3 , median of 70 Bq.m -3 , geometric mean equal to 76 Bq.m -3 and standard deviation of 170 Bq.m -3 . About 15% of the results are over the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) actions level, which is 148 Bq.m -3 .The equilibrium factor between radon and its progeny were determined in dwellings, as 0.3 in average. The

  1. Constraining annual and seasonal radon-222 flux density from the Southern Ocean using radon-222 concentrations in the boundary layer at Cape Grim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Zahorowski

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Radon concentrations measured between 2001 and 2008 in marine air at Cape Grim, a baseline site in north-western Tasmania, are used to constrain the radon flux density from the Southern Ocean. A method is described for selecting hourly radon concentrations that are least perturbed by land emissions and dilution by the free troposphere. The distribution of subsequent radon flux density estimates is representative of a large area of the Southern Ocean, an important fetch region for Southern Hemisphere climate and air pollution studies. The annual mean flux density (0.27 mBq m−2 s−1 compares well with the mean of the limited number of spot measurements previously conducted in the Southern Ocean (0.24 mBq m−2 s−1, and to some spot measurements made in other oceanic regions. However, a number of spot measurements in other oceanic regions, as well as most oceanic radon flux density values assumed for modelling studies and intercomparisons, are considerably lower than the mean reported here. The reported radon flux varies with seasons and, in summer, with latitude. It also shows a quadratic dependence on wind speed and significant wave height, as postulated and measured by others, which seems to support our assumption that the selected least perturbed radon concentrations were in equilibrium with the oceanic radon source. By comparing the least perturbed radon observations in 2002–2003 with corresponding ‘TransCom’ model intercomparison results, the best agreement is found when assuming a normally distributed radon flux density with σ=0.075 mBq m−2 s−1.

  2. Measurements of environmental radon - 222 concentrations in indoors and outdoors in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenawy, M.A.; Morsey, A.A.; Kotb, M.A.; Osman, A.; El-Haag, A.

    1990-01-01

    The major contribution to population exposure from natural radiation arises from the inhalation of the decay products of radon. Substantial surveys are being conducted by several investigators to estimate the indoor and outdoor exposure nationally and to discover regional variations. In this work, radon concentration in the indoors and outdoor air was determined using the can technique and employing CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector for lengthy exposures. The range of radon - 222 activity in this survey was 54 -299 PCi.m -3 in Cairo, 22 - 171 PCi.m -3 in Alexandria and 89 - 370 PCi.m -3 in Asiut. Measurements carried out in Aswan and Sinai ranged between 98 - 411 PCi.m -3 . Values of indoors and outdoors radon concentrations were found to vary with time of day, geographic location, season and height above ground. Further work is going on to study the different parameters affecting the levels of the environmental radon. The national survey and associated studies is expected to yield data that may correlate radon activity with some respiratory diseases, particularly lung cancer. (author). 7 refs, 5 figs

  3. Final report of evaluation of dose and measurement of radon concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    A mean annual exposure to radon daughters in indoor air was estimated on the basis of measurement of radon concentration in indoor air in Japan from fiscal 1992 to 1996. Doses were estimated by UNSCEAR method. The representative values in this report show the mean values in whole Japan. Each dose in the local area was different reflecting the different concentration of radon daughters. However, the same parameters were used in each area. When mean annual dose of radon daughters was estimated, we used 15.5 Bq m{sup -3} mean annual exposure to radon daughters in indoor air, 5 Bq m{sup -3} that in outdoor air, 0.4 the equilibrium factor indoor, 0.6 the equilibrium factor outdoor and 0.9 of P. The model of UNSCEAR based on these above values gave 0.46 mSv y{sup -1} mean annual dose of radon daughters which were consisted of from 0.38 mSv y{sup -1} in Kanto district to 0.52 mSv y{sup -1} Kyushu, Okinawa district. (S.Y.)

  4. Radon concentration and its relation with some environmental conditions in the northern safaga bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Arabi, A.M.; Tartor, B.A.; Bashter, I.I.; El-Saman, M.I.; Maiyza, I.A.

    2005-01-01

    The coastal zone along the Red Sea at Safaga town is a site for industrial development and accepting future establishment of dense recreational resorts. It includes Safaga harbour in which international trade depends. Until now most of the coastal area at Safaga is pristine and suffering from continuous increasing population densities. There is no idea about the distribution of hydro graphic parameters or radon level in the northern Safaga bay in spite of the area famous as the treatment area for Psoriases and Rheumatoid as will as attractive area for tourism. The relative high relations exist between the radioactivity component and the ph, specific conductivity, water salinity, water density and dissolved oxygen were calculated. The concentration of 226 R a, 232 T h and 40 K in sediment samples collected from bottom of the northern Safaga Bay fluctuated between 5 to 19 Bq.kg-1, 4 to 19 Bq.kg-1 and 1545 to 6122 Bq.kg-1, respectively. Whereas the concentration of radon air varies between 2 -11 Bq.cm-3

  5. On the simultaneous indoor measurement of the exhalation rates of radon gas from open soil and the concentration of radon progeny in the surrounding air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, K.; Mochizuki, S.; Tanji, T.

    1996-01-01

    It is well known that the outdoor measurements of radon exhalation rates and of radon concentration in atmosphere are affected by the temperature, wind and atmospheric pressure. So far, no clear correlations have been found between these measurements. However, with indoor measurements, especially those recorded in a basement, the temperature is constant and the air now is minimal. This means that we can expect radon exhalation rates and the concentration of radon progeny to be affected by atmospheric pressure alone. Taking these environmental conditions into account, the simultaneous measurement of radon exhalation rates and radon concentrations was performed in the basement of SUT (Science University of Tokyo), Oshamanbe campus in order to clarify the nature of the relationship between radon exhalation rates and concentrations and changes in atmospheric pressure. Atmospheric pressure was also measured simultaneously with the above measurements. The present measurements were carried out during the winter, spring, summer and autumn of 1995. Measurements were made in a series of one week periods. (author)

  6. Assessment of Concentration and the Annual Effective Dose of Radon Gas in Imam Hospital Indoor Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Verijkazemi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and purpose: Exposure to natural sources of radiation, especially radon and its short-term products, is an important issue around the world. Radon exposure causes lung cancer in humans. Therefore, the aim of this study was to measure the concentration of radon gas and its annual effective dose in Imam Hospital of Tehran, Iran and to compare its concentrations with the recommended standards. Methods: Radon levels and meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure, and moisture were measured in different levels and in four seasons, using Radstar and Lutron Electronic devices, respectively, during June 2014-June 2015. The collected data were analyzed through SPSS 18. Annual effective dose was calculated, using the equation for annual effective dose introduced by Scientific Committee of the United Nations. Results: The highest concentration of radon and annual effective dose were observed in the winter, which were 82/15 Bq/m3 and0/48 ms/y, respectively. Furthermore, concerning the various levels, the highest concentration was observed in the lowest level (56/1 Bq/m3.Conclusion: The results of the current study demonstrated that radon concentration was lower than the standards set by Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization. Regarding this, there are not concerns about the possible dangers of radon gas activities for the personnel and patients of the hospital. 

  7. Indoor radon concentration and its possible dependence on ventilation rate and flooring type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashok, G. V.; Nagaiah, N.; Shiva Prasad, N. G.

    2012-01-01

    The results of radon concentration measurements carried out in dwellings with natural ventilation for 1 y in Bangalore are reported. Measurements, covering three sessions of the day (morning, afternoon, night) were performed two times in a month for 1 y at a fixed place of each dwelling at a height of 1 m above the ground surface in selected dwellings. The low-level radon detection system (LLRDS), an active method, was used for the estimation of radon concentration. The measurements were aimed to understand the diurnal variation and the effect of ventilation rate and flooring type on indoor radon concentration. The geometric mean (±geometric standard deviation) of indoor radon concentration from about 500 measurements carried out in 20 dwellings is found to be 25.4 ±1.54 Bq m -3 . The morning, afternoon and night averages were found to be 42.6 ±2.05, 15.3 ±2.18 and 28.5 ±2.2 Bq m -3 , respectively. The approximate natural ventilation rates of the dwellings were calculated using the PHPAIDA-the on-line natural ventilation, mixed mode and air infiltration rate calculation algorithm and their effects on indoor radon concentrations were studied. The inhalation dose and the lung cancer risk due to indoor radon exposure were found to be 0.66 mSv y -1 and 11.9 per 10 6 persons, respectively. The gamma exposure rate was also measured in all the dwellings and its correlation with the inhalation dose rate was studied. (authors)

  8. CONCENTRATION OF RADON IN DWELLINGS OF HEMAVATHI RIVER BASIN, KARNATAKA, INDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, R S; Ningappa, C; Yashaswini, T

    2018-02-15

    Indoor radon, thoron and their progeny levels were measured in various types of dwellings during 2016-17 in Hemavathi river basin, Karnataka by using solid state nuclear track detector based pin-hole dosemeters; dwellings of various types were chosen for the measurement. The dosemeters containing the detector (LR-115, Type II Film) was used for this purpose. The concentration of indoor radon in the study area varied from 30.72 to 196.08 Bq m-3 with a median of 83.13 Bq m-3 and thoron concentration varied from 15.56 to 227.78 Bq m-3. Higher concentrations of radon and its progeny were observed in granite flooring and cement roofing dwellings compared to other types of dwellings. The reason for higher concentration of indoor radon and its progeny is due to activity of radium present in granite and provision of less ventilation in dwellings. The equilibrium equivalent radon, thoron concentrations and annual effective dose are discussed.

  9. Radon and thoron progeny concentration variability in relation to meteorological conditions at Bucharest (Romania)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baciu, Adriana Celestina [National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control, Section for Radioprotection and Radiological Emergencies, Libertatii 14 Blvd, Bucharest 5 (Romania)]. E-mail: adriana.baciu@cncan.ro

    2005-07-01

    The paper presents results of natural radioactivity levels in the atmosphere obtained for a 5 years period (1994-1999) at the Bucharest Environmental Radioactivity Surveillance Station (BERSS). The variability of radon and thoron progeny activity concentrations is analysed in relation to the local dynamics of the meteorological parameters (wind speed, air temperature, air pressure, cloud cover, relative humidity). The radon and thoron progeny concentrations display a daily and seasonal variation, with the highest values in the early morning and the lowest values in the afternoon. The outdoor radon progeny concentrations show maximum values in autumn and minimum values in spring-summer. The outdoor thoron progeny concentrations display maximum values in autumn and minimum values in winter. Significant statistical correlations with the meteorological parameters were obtained. The study on the temporal variability of natural atmospheric radioactivity near Bucharest is a starting point for further assessment of the radiological consequences resulting from human activities.

  10. Characteristics of radon and its progeny concentrations in air-conditioned office buildings in Tokyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokonami, S.; Furukawa, M.; Shicchi, Y.; Sanada, T.; Yamada, Y.

    2003-01-01

    A series of measurements were carried out to understand the characteristics of radon and its progeny in air-conditioned office buildings. Long-term measurements of radon were made with etched track detectors. Continuous measurements of radon and its progeny concentrations were also conducted in some buildings to study their temporal variations. The results show that radon and its progeny concentrations routinely varied along with working activities. They are generally low while people are working, due to air conditioning, whereas they rise steadily after the air conditioning stops. When considering action levels not only in homes but also workplaces, attention should be paid to annual doses from the viewpoint of radiation protection. The annual dose is generally estimated with a long-term measurement of radon concentration using a passive device such as an etched track detector. Since its reading corresponds to a long-term average concentration regardless of working hours, the annual dose will be overestimated. When comparing a real dose after considering the working hours, they differ by a factor of more than 2. (author)

  11. PO.RA project. An analysis on gas radon concentrations in soil versus fluctuations in the groundwater table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serentha', C.; Torretta, M.

    2001-01-01

    Man is daily exposed to natural radiation, mainly due to cosmic rays and natural radioactive elements, whose most important radioactive daughters are 222 Rn (radon) and 220 Rn (thoron). Being these ones gaseous, they can spread through the ground, reaching the atmosphere and accumulating in rooms, where their concentrations may be very high. As radon exhalation is strongly connected with the hydrogeological features of the environment, this study tried to find a relationship between fluctuations in the groundwater table and gas radon concentrations in soil, in order to try estimates of indoor radon concentrations [it

  12. Evaluation of radon concentration in dwellings and well water of Parana State-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Janine Nicolosi

    2011-01-01

    Considering the growing interest of International Agencies and national Governmental organs in studies and measurements of radon activity in air, soil gas and ground water (mainly from artesian wells) as well as scarceness of such measurements at Brazilian territory, present studies were initiated by the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of Federal University of Technology - Parana (UTFPR) in collaboration with the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD) and the Center of Nuclear Technology Development (CDTN) of Brazilian Commission on Nuclear Energy (CNEN). This Collaboration started in 2003. Radon monitoring program is based mainly on use of Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors for radon activity measurements in air. Continuous electronic radon detectors are used for radon measurements in soil gas and water. Current work presents the results of indoor 222 Rn activity of dwellings and working places of Curitiba-PR and radon concentration in ground water samples from artesian wells from aquifers of the same area. The indoor measurements of radon activity were performed using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors CR-39. After the exposition, CR-39 detectors were submitted to chemical development which permitted to make alpha particle tracks counting. The results of calibration of CR-39 together with efficiency of used exhalation chambers as well as alpha particle tracks chemical development procedure were performed in cooperation with CDTN and collaboration with the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The major part of indoor 222 Rn concentration in residences was found below 100 Bq/m3. In the case of working places, all measurements present 222 Rn concentration bellow 100 Bq/m3. The studies of radon activity in water were performed using the samples of water from artesian wells submitted to recursive measurements by instant radon detector AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO during few weeks with intervals of about 4 days between each measurement

  13. 222radon and its alpha decay concentration into university in Cluj

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neda, T.; Mocsy, I.; Tonk, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Bocskai house is an old building in the middle of Kolozsvar city. It was built in 1550. Now it host the Hungarian University Rector's Office and the Faculty of Science and Art, after many modifications. The building has 3 levels. We determined the radon activity concentration and the concentrations of its short-lived daughters in 12 different rooms used for education and as office rooms. The measurements were done with ionization chambers in different conditions in 24 h cycle in the period of 2003-2004. Simultaneously we measured ambient temperature, pressure and relative humidity of the air. We found that the radon activity concentration had values between 40 - 1800 Bq.m-3. Based on the measurements we estimated the exposure from radon and its short lived daughters of the people who work in this building. (author)

  14. Radon soil-gas concentration and exhalation from mine tailings dams in South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ongori, J.; Lindsay, R. [University of the Western Cape, Department of Physics, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa); Newman, R. [Stellenbosch University, Department of Physics, Private Bag X1 Matieland 7602 (South Africa); Maleka, P. [iThemba LABS, Department of Nuclear Physics, P. O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa)

    2014-07-01

    In Africa as well as in the world, South Africa plays an important role in the mining industry which dates back almost 120 years. Mining activities in South Africa mainly take place in Gauteng Province. Every year million of tons of rocks are taken from underground, milled and processed to extract gold. The uranium bearing tailings are disposed in dumpsites. These tailings dumps contain considerable amounts of radium ({sup 226}Ra) and have therefore been identified as large sources of radon ({sup 222}Rn). Radon is a noble gas formed by the decay of radium which in turn is derived from the radioactive decay of uranium ({sup 238}U). Radon release from these tailings dumps pose health concerns for the surrounding communities. Radon soil gas concentrations and exhalations from a non-operational mine dump (Kloof) which belongs to Carletonville Gold Field, Witwatersrand, South Africa have been investigated. The continuous radon monitor, the Durridge RAD7 was used to measure {sup 222}Rn soil gas concentration in the tailings dump at five different spots. The radon soil gas concentration levels were measured at depths starting from 30 cm below ground/air interface up to 110 cm at intervals of 20 cm. The concentrations recorded ranged from 26±1 to 472±23 kBq.m{sup -3}. Furthermore, thirty four soil samples were taken from the spots where radon soil gas measurements were measured for laboratory-based measurement using the low background Hyper Pure Germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray detector available at the Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory (ERL), iThemba LABS, Western Cape Province. The soil samples were collected in the depth range 0-30 cm. After analysis the weighted average activity concentrations in the soils samples were 308±7 Bq.kg{sup -1}, 255±5 Bq.kg{sup -1} and 18±1 Bq.kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, {sup 40}K and {sup 232}Th, respectively. A number of factors such as the radium activity concentration and its distribution in soil grains, soil grain size, soil porosity

  15. Estimation of radon concentration in soil and groundwater samples of Northern Rajasthan, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Mittal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, analysis of radon concentration in 20 water and soil samples collected from different locations of Bikaner and Jhunjhunu districts of Rajasthan, India has been carried out by using RAD7 an electronic Radon detector. The measured radon concentration in water samples lies in the range from 0.50 to 22 Bq l−1 with the mean value of 4.42 Bq l−1, which lies within the safe limit from 4 to 40 Bq l−1 recommended by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR, 2008. The total annual effective dose estimated due to radon concentration in water ranges from 1.37 to 60.06 μSV y−1 with the mean value of 12.08 μSV y−1, which is lower than the safe limit 0.1 mSv y−1 as set by World Health Organization (WHO, 2004 and European Council (EU, 1998. Radon measurement in soil samples varies from 941 to 10,050 Bq m−3 with the mean value of 4561 Bq m−3, which lies within the range reported by other investigators. It was observed that the soil and water of Bikaner and Jhunjhunu districts are suitable for drinking and construction purpose without posing any health hazard.

  16. Analysis of radon concentration in drinking water in Baoji (China) and the associated health effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xinwei, L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the results of radon concentration measurements in drinking water from the municipal water supply system and private wells located in Baoji (China)). The measurements were carried out on 69 samples. The mean values of tap water and well water were found to be 12 kBq m -3 with a maximum of 18 kBq m -3 and 41 kBq m -3 with a maximum of 127 kBq m -3 , respectively. The well water samples obtained from different depth-well (water-bearing levels), i.e. shallow well (well depth under 10 m) water, middle well (well depth 10-30 m) water and deep well water, have respective mean values of 24, 34 and 56 kBq m -3 . The contributions of the observed radon concentration in drinking water to indoor radon account for 2.8-13.2% of the mean value of Shaanxi indoor radon concentration and the effective dose to the dweller owing to inhalation of radon emanating from household water is 0.03-0.14 mSv y -1 . (authors)

  17. The study of thoron and radon progeny concentrations in dwellings in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Q.; Shimo, M.; Ikebe, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Ths paper aims to make a comparison of different concentrations of thoron ( 220 Rn) progeny and radon ( 222 Rn) progeny in different kinds of dwellings. The potential alpha energy concentrations and the effective dose equivalent caused by thoron and radon progeny, respectively, have also been estimated. The measurements were carried out in 23 dwellings. The results indicate that thoron progeny concentrations indoors might be strongly affected by the type of building material used. Traditional Japanese buildings made with mud may have high thoron progeny concentrations of about 3.52 Bq.m -3 and a concentration ratio of thoron progeny to radon progeny of about 0.5, whereas in concrete dwellings thoron progeny concentrations are about 0.72 Bq.m -3 and the concentration ratio of thoron progeny to radon progeny is about 0.1. The annual effective dose equivalent of thoron progeny is 1.23 mSv in mud dwellings and 0.25 mSv in concrete dwellings. (author)

  18. Concentration levels of radon in air, indoors and outdoors in houses of Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena Garcia, P.

    1992-01-01

    Concentration levels of radon in air, indoors and outdoors have been obtained in houses from Mexico City, with the purpose of relating them with the local environment. Measurements were performed both outdoors and indoors in 60 unifamiliar houses. Track detectors, LR-115, Type II, were used in several detection arrangements during four recording periods with times of exposure of three months each, with the purpose of analyzing the fluctuations due to seasonal changes. Data were obtained about the construction materials were the detection systems were located in order to establish a correlation of radon levels with the climatic parameters and the construction materials. The results of radon concentrations both indoors or outdoors were lower than the international recommendations (148 Bq/m 3 ) (Author)

  19. Measurement of radon concentration in air employing Lucas chamber; Pomiar koncentracji radonu za pomoca komory Lucasa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaj, B.

    1997-12-31

    The results of investigations aimed to determine the main features of radon concentration gauge in air, employing 0.17 L Lucas chamber, and air sample forced by an air pump are presented. For two hour sampling and measuring cycle time the dynamic error in the worst case (first read out) equals 5 % relative to the step jump of radon concentration. This is due to the increase of activity of the decay products in the chamber. It was observed that the short lived radon decay products (Po-218, Pb-214, Bi-214) are depositing on the walls of the chamber and they are not removed by flushing the chamber with air. (author). 4 refs, 19 figs, 2 tabs.

  20. Ventilation systems as an effective tool for control of radon daughter concentration in mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, A.B.

    1981-10-01

    Experience in mines shows that a very high concentration of radon daughters builds up in an unventilated dead end heading. Even minimal air movement results in a drastic reduction in radon daughter concentration. Designing the ventilation system to provide an optimized flow of fresh air into the workplace results in acceptable climatic conditions and radon daughter levels. The example of the Director fluorospar mine in Newfoundland is used to illustrate the actual design and operation of a ventilation system that provided effective radon daughter control. It was found at this mine that the age of the air underground should be kept as low as possible; that no areas of the mine should be left unventilated unless they could be kept at negative pressure; that a comparatively simple remote control and monitoring system helped stabilize ventilation and detected upsets; that the ventilation system should operate continuously, even when the mine is shut down for short periods; and that pressurization of the mine seemed to inhibit radon influx

  1. Determination of the radon concentration in soil and ground water and its association with the seismicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N.; Azorin, J.

    2003-01-01

    The coast of the Mexican Pacific is one of the seismic areas more active of the world due to the subduction of the badges of Coconuts and Rivera under the badge of North America. The earthquakes that happen in this part of Mexico they are of great magnitude and they affect to the central plateau of the country where finds the biggest population density. On the other hand the coast of the Gulf of Mexico presents one relatively low seismic activity. It is in this region where it is the nuclear plant of Laguna Verde (PNLV) and the studies of seismicity of the area should be carried out for questions of nuclear security. One carries out a study of fluctuations of the concentration of the radon in floor and it dilutes underground in the mentioned areas using accustomed to detectors of nuclear appearances (LR-115). Possibly they were also used detecting automatic (Clipperton sounds out). In some cases it was analysed the gamma radiation in soil using thermoluminescent dosemeters (CaSO 4 : Dy + Ptfe). The mineralogical composition of rock samples was obtained, by means of technical conventional and Electron scanning microscopy and an X-ray diffractometer. The study one carries out along the coast of Guerrero, from Guacamayas, Mich. until Marquelia, Gro., of 1993 at 1998 and in the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, in the PNLV and their surroundings, of 1994 at 1996. The fluctuations of the radon concentration and of the gamma radiation, were analysed in function of the local seismic activity, the meteorological parameters and those characteristic geologic. In the area of the PNLV, the results showed that in general the averages of those value of the radon concentration, as much in floor as in water, they were low. A station located in a flaw area (New Ranch) the one that I present the values was but high of radon concentration, corresponding those but first floor to the PNLV. The seismic activity during the one period of sampling was sporadic and of low intensity and alone one

  2. Optimized measurement of radium-226 concentration in liquid samples with radon-222 emanation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Aupiais, Jean; Girault, Frédéric; Przylibski, Tadeusz A; Bouquerel, Hélène

    2016-06-01

    Measuring radium-226 concentration in liquid samples using radon-222 emanation remains competitive with techniques such as liquid scintillation, alpha or mass spectrometry. Indeed, we show that high-precision can be obtained without air circulation, using an optimal air to liquid volume ratio and moderate heating. Cost-effective and efficient measurement of radon concentration is achieved by scintillation flasks and sufficiently long counting times for signal and background. More than 400 such measurements were performed, including 39 dilution experiments, a successful blind measurement of six reference test solutions, and more than 110 repeated measurements. Under optimal conditions, uncertainties reach 5% for an activity concentration of 100 mBq L(-1) and 10% for 10 mBq L(-1). While the theoretical detection limit predicted by Monte Carlo simulation is around 3 mBq L(-1), a conservative experimental estimate is rather 5 mBq L(-1), corresponding to 0.14 fg g(-1). The method was applied to 47 natural waters, 51 commercial waters, and 17 wine samples, illustrating that it could be an option for liquids that cannot be easily measured by other methods. Counting of scintillation flasks can be done in remote locations in absence of electricity supply, using a solar panel. Thus, this portable method, which has demonstrated sufficient accuracy for numerous natural liquids, could be useful in geological and environmental problems, with the additional benefit that it can be applied in isolated locations and in circumstances when samples cannot be transported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Determination of radon concentration in water using RAD7 with RAD H2O accessories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, M. F. I.; Rabaiee, N. A.; Jaafar, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, the radon issue has become one of the major problems of radiation protection. Radon exposure occurs when using water for showering, washing dishes, cooking and drinking water. RAD7 and Rad H20 accessories were used in order to measure radon concentration in water sample. In this study, four types of water were concerns which are reverse osmosis (drinking water), mineral water, tap water and well water. Reverse osmosis (drinking water) and mineral water were bought from the nearest supermarket while tap water and well water were taken from selected areas of Pulau Pinang and Kedah. Total 20 samples were taken with 5 samples for each type of water. The measured radon concentration ranged from 2.9±2.9 to 79.5±17 pCi/L, 2.9±2.9 to 67.8±16 pCi/L, 15.97±7 to 144.25±24 pCi/L and 374.89±37 to 6409.03±130 pCi/L in reverse osmosis (drinking water), mineral water, tap water and well water. Well water has the highest radon compared to others. It was due to their geological element such as granite. Results for all types of water are presented and compared with maximum contamination limit (MCL) recommended by United State Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) which is 300pCi/L. Reverse osmosis water, mineral water and tap water were fall below MCL. However, well water was exceeded maximum level that was recommended. Thus, these findings were suggested that an action should be taken to reduce radon concentration level in well water as well as reduce a health risk towards the public

  4. Influence of shallow mine-workings on the radon concentrations in houses: a problem of old mining regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, R.; Czarwinski, R.

    1994-01-01

    In some regions of the German New Federal Lands, residues from early mining characterise the radiological situation and can also influence the radon concentration in buildings. Construction on waste rock with increased radium concentration, the use of waste rock as building material and construction above shallow mine shafts and adits are important in this connection. In Saxony, for instance, one has to reckon with probably hundreds of buildings that may be influenced by radon from shallow mine workings. Very short-term changes of radon concentrations in buildings over several orders of magnitude as well as their close temporal correlation with the underground airflow clearly indicate influences from underground. In Schneeberg and Schlema, fluctuations of radon concentration in buildings of several 10,000 Bq.m -3 within one hour were observed. In Schneeberg, the old mine was ventilated artificially by installing a ventilator with an output volume of 500 m 3 .min -1 . Thus the radon concentration in buildings of the central city area has been reduced. In Schlema, the radon-rich shafts of early mining are ventilated at present by the still active ventilation system of the suspended uranium ore mining. In 1992, during the first 4.5 x 10 9 m 3 of mine air with a radon activity of 6.3 x 10 14 Bq were extracted from the mine. If the mine ventilators are switched off, radon concentration in buildings over mine shaft increases sharply by two orders of magnitude. (author)

  5. Systematic measurements of the radon concentration indoor from Remetea, Harghita county

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csegzi, Sandor

    2000-01-01

    Primary goal of the Remetea radon program was to carry out an indoor radon survey. The program can be applied too, in other places of the country. Remetea was built on volcanic rocks, where aligning of mineral water springs tells about the existence of geologic faulting. The 1992 census counted 2406 houses and 6550 residents of the village. The sample consisted of 120 houses chosen randomly from the entire stock. A hypergeometric statistical model has been used for sampling. Measurements were done in bedrooms at pillow level using etched track type Radamon radon detectors. Exposure lasted from January 1999 to July 1999. From the measurements it can be stated that the number of houses with radon concentration exceeding 200 Bq/m 3 is around 82. A high precision determination of activity has been done (errors under 3 %). Mapping indoor radon levels resembles the fault location that is indicated by springs and exhibited by geological studies. Particular points of the program were the soulful and self-aware approach the more than 30 schoolboys and girls participated, and the fact that the program met with a warm response from the public. (author)

  6. High concentrations of radon. Specifically affected buildings; Hohe Radonkonzentrationen. Besonders betroffene Gebaeudetypen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Winfried [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The paper presents a concept for the prognosis of exceeding probabilities of thresholds of radon in dwellings in different building types. A transfer model for the interface subsoil - building was used as a basis. The partial datasets obtained by stratification of five relevant building characteristics can be de-scribed by a 3-parametric-lognormal distribution good in most times. The available data permit statistical predictions to 60 combinations of building characteristics for the region ''east'' and 85 combinations of building characteristics for the region ''West''. The uncertainties for the probability of exceeding a threshold were estimated from the data with bootstrapping. The importance of different building characteristics for the presence of enhanced radon concentrations can be predicted from the results of this estimation. Therefore, targeting of affected buildings is possible on this basis. Regional prognoses of exceeding probabilities for building types with high presence can also be created by the use of transfer factors. A Strategy to reduce the health risk from radon in the long run might be derived, where alongside the delineation of radon prone areas, special attention should be paid to a set out building characteristics, also outside the radon prone areas.

  7. Measurement of radon concentration in drinking water in coastal regions of Uttara Kannada District, Karnataka, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suresh, S.; Rangaswamy, D.R.; Sannappa, J.; Srinivasa, E.

    2018-01-01

    Water is absolutely needed for most life on this earth. Quality of drinking water is the need of the hour for person's health and environmental studies rather it is consumed and transported pollutant in the environment. The most commonly occurring radionuclides in natural water Rn, that cause risk to human health are 222 Rn, 226 Ra and 228 Ra. They emit alpha particles and their inhalation and ingestion may results in high radioactive dose to sensitive cells of lungs, digestive tract and other organs of the human bodies. Radon enriched drinking water poses a potential health risk in two ways: first, transfer of radon from water to indoor air and its inhalation and secondly, through ingestion. Radon monitoring has been increasingly conducted worldwide because of the hazardous effects of radon on the health of human beings. The aim of the present study is to measure radon concentration and to estimate the annual effective dose in drinking water samples in coastal regions of Uttara Kannada district

  8. Seasonal variation of indoor air radon concentration in schools in Kosovo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahtijari, M. [Faculty of Education, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Stegnar, P. [Randon Center, Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljublajna (Slovenia); Shemsidini, Z. [Faculty of Education, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Ajazaj, H. [Faculty of Education, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Halimi, Y. [Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Vaupotic, J. [Randon Center, Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljublajna (Slovenia); Kobal, I. [Randon Center, Jozef Stefan Institute, P.O. Box 3000, 1001 Ljublajna (Slovenia)]. E-mail: ivan.kobal@ijs.si

    2007-02-15

    Indoor air radon (Rn222) concentrations were measured in March, May, August and December in 15 rooms of five elementary and in six rooms of one high school in Sharr, Kosovo, using alpha scintillation cells. Only in one room did the value exceed 200Bqm{sup -3}. Values decreased from December to August, and from basement to first floor.

  9. Comparative measurements of soil gas radon concentration using thermoluminescent and track detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turek, Karel; Gelev, M.; Dimov, I.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 38, spec. iss. (2004), s. 843-846 ISSN 1350-4487 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : soil gas * radon concentration * thermoluminescent detectors Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 0.664, year: 2004

  10. Radon concentration variations detected in a room during integrated long-time measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, P.; Steger, F.

    1995-01-01

    Integrated long-time measurements (3 months, track-etch) of the radon concentrations in one of the rooms of an old residential building in Vienna revealed variations up to a factor of 4 when measurements were repeated at three-year intervals. (orig.) [de

  11. Development and calibration of a portable radon sampling system for groundwater 222Rn activity concentration measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Fabio de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Igor José Chaves; Ribeiro, Fernando Brenha

    2009-10-01

    The assembling of a system for field sampling and activity concentration measurement of radon dissolved in groundwater is described. Special attention is given in presenting the calibration procedure to obtain the radon activity concentration in groundwater from the raw counting rate registered in a portable scintillation detector and in establishing the precision of the activity concentration measurements. A field procedure was established and the system tested during one year of monthly observations of (222)Rn activity concentration in groundwater drawn from two wells drilled on metamorphic rocks exposed at Eastern São Paulo State, Brazil. The observed mean (222)Rn activity concentrations are 374Bq/dm(3) in one well and about 1275Bq/dm(3) in the other one. In both wells the (222)Rn activity concentrations showed a seasonal variation similar to variations previously reported in the literature for the same region.

  12. Kinetics of the water/air phase transition of radon and its implication on detection of radon-in-water concentrations: practical assessment of different on-site radon extraction methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Michael; Paschke, Albrecht; Bednorz, Denise; Bürkin, Walter; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2012-08-21

    The on-site measurement of radon-in-water concentrations relies on extraction of radon from the water followed by its detection by means of a mobile radon-in-air monitor. Many applications of radon as a naturally occurring aquatic tracer require the collection of continuous radon concentration time series, thus necessitating the continuous extraction of radon either from a permanent water stream supplied by a water pump or directly from a water body or a groundwater monitoring well. Essentially, three different types of extraction units are available for this purpose: (i) a flow-through spray chamber, (ii) a flow-through membrane extraction module, and (iii) a submersible (usually coiled) membrane tube. In this paper we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these three methodical approaches with particular focus on their individual response to instantaneously changing radon-in-water concentrations. After a concise introduction into theoretical aspects of water/air phase transition kinetics of radon, experimental results for the three types of extraction units are presented. Quantitative suggestions for optimizing the detection setup by increasing the water/air interface and by reducing the air volume circulating through the degassing unit and radon detector are made. It was shown that the flow-through spray chamber and flow-through membrane perform nearly similarly, whereas the submersible membrane tubing has a significantly larger delay in response to concentration changes. The flow-through spray chamber is most suitable in turbid waters and to applications where high flow rates of the water pump stream can be achieved (e.g., where the power supply is not constrained by field conditions). The flow-through membrane is most suited to radon extraction from clear water and in field conditions where the power supply to a water pump is limited, e.g., from batteries. Finally, the submersible membrane tube is most suitable if radon is to be extracted in situ without

  13. Influence of source type and air exchange on variations of indoor radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Winqvist, K.

    1986-04-01

    The model relates radon concentration to source strength and its variations, air exchange rate and meteorological factors. Two types of sources have been studied. The pressure difference dependent source is made up of radon transported with soil pore air and driven by pressure difference due to the stack effect. The constant source is made up of radon transported by diffusion from building materials or from soil. The air exchange rate depends exponentially on indoor-outdoor temperature difference and linearly on wind speed. These two inputs have been summed in quadrature. In a house with a constant source radon concentration decreases when the air exchange rate increases due to the increasing temperature difference, whereas the pressure difference dependent source causes an increasing concentration. This is due to the fact that the effect of the source strength increase is stronger than the decreasing effect of air exchange on concentration. The winter-summer concentration ratio depends on the combination of the two types of source. A pure pressure dependent source leads to the winter-summer ratio of 2-3.5 (winter -5 deg C, summer +15 deg C, wind speed 3 m/s). A strong contribution of a constant source is needed to cause a summer concentration higher than the winter concentration. The model is in agreement with the winter-summer concentration ratios measured. This ratio increases with the increasing winter concentration. The measured ratio was near 1.0 for houses with winter concentration of 200 Bq m''3 or less and near 2.0 with concentration of 1000 Bq m''3. In a house with a constant source, the diurnal maximum occurs in the afternoon, while in houses with a pressure difference dependent source the time of maximum is early in the morning

  14. Radon as an environmental risk: concentration measurements in family buildings at Cordoba city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonzi, A.; Murua, C.; Martin, H.R.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of radon concentration at homes are usual activities in the last years at the countries with uranium in their soils. On the other hand, the man's radiological protection about radiation is related to the environmental actions for a healthy life, but not much known for a public. The great quantities of ore with uranium can be an important source of irradiation when they are used as building materials. The soils are important too for the emanations of radon in the interior of buildings and for these reasons, the radon concentration measurements in Cordoba familiar houses were implemented in the summer of 1991. The Alpha Track Technique and the results obtained indicate the need of other measurements and a winter measurement for investigation variations of radon concentration. The typical values measured were low, about 4.13 Bq/m 3 if they are compared with other Argentine values measured. This paper discusses the procedure, techniques and criteria used in the work held in Cordoba city, Argentina. (Author)

  15. Evaluation of radon concentration in well and tap waters in Bursa (Turkey)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akar Tarim, U.; Gurler, O.; Akkaya, G.; Kilic, N.; Yalcin, S.; Kaynak, G.; Gundogdu, O.

    2012-01-01

    222 Rn measurements in water samples collected from 27 wells and 19 taps that were supplied from the investigated wells were conducted using the AlphaGUARD PQ 2000PRO radon gas analyser at sites across several geologic formations within the city of Bursa (Turkey). The measured radon concentrations ranged from 1.46 to 53.64 Bq l -1 for well water and from 0.91 to 12.58 Bq l -1 for tap water. Of the 27 sites sampled, only 7 had radon levels above the safe limit of 11.1 Bq l -1 recommended by the USEPA. In general, all determined concentrations were well below the 100 Bq l -1 revised reference level proposed by the European Union. These values of radon concentrations in water samples are compared with those reported from other countries. Doses resulting from the consumption of these waters were calculated. The minimum and the maximum annual mean effective doses due to 222 Rn intake through water consumption were 0.02 μSv a -1 and 1.11 μSv a -1 , respectively. (authors)

  16. Assessment of radon concentration and heavy metal contamination in groundwater of Udhampur district, Jammu & Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Sharma, Sumit; Mehra, Rohit; Kanwar, Priya; Mishra, Rosaline; Kaur, Inderpreet

    2018-04-01

    Radon concentration was measured in water samples of 41 different locations from Udhampur district of Jammu & Kashmir, India, by using RAD7 and Smart RnDuo monitor. The variation of radon concentration in water ranged from 1.44 ± 0.31 to 63.64 ± 2.88 Bq L -1 , with a mean value of 28.73 Bq L -1 using RAD7 and 0.64 ± 0.28 to 52.65 ± 2.50 Bq L -1 , with a mean value of 20.30 Bq L -1 using Smart RnDuo monitor, respectively. About 17.07% of the studied water samples recorded to display elevated radon concentration above the reference range suggested by United Nation Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiations (UNSCEAR). The mean annual effective dose of these samples was determined, and 78.95% samples were found to be within the safe limits set by World Health Organisation (WHO) and European Council (EU). The study revealed good agreement between the values obtained with two methods. Heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Fe, Cu, Ni, As, Hg, Co, Pb and Cr) were determined in water samples by microwave plasma atomic emission spectrometer, and their correlation with radon content was also analysed.

  17. The effect of temperature and humidity on the outdoor 222 radon concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalhaes, M.H.; Sachett, I.A.; Amaral, E.C.S.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Meteorological conditions and soil characteristics are the important factors which affect the behaviour of the radon and its short lived daughters concentration in the environment. Tropical climates present extreme conditions for those characteristics and so a strong variability on the radon and its short lived daughters concentration is expected to occur on a daily and seasonally basis. This work will present some preliminary data obtained at a seaside region in Rio de Janeiro. Continuous sampling of the radon short lived daughters were performed at 1 m above the ground using the WLM (Working Level Monitor) where a alpha spectrometry was simultaneously carried out. Temperature and humidity were hourly registered. The results pretended concentrations ranging from 2 to 30 Bq/m 3 depending on the time of the day and on the period of the year with a strong relationship with the meteorological conditions. The highest values were observed in the morning and the lowest at the late afternoon. It was also observed a direct relationship with the humidity and inverse correlation with the temperature. This pattern influence the dynamic of radon between indoors and outdoors environment. The knowledge of this dynamic is very important on the sampling and interpretation of dose results

  18. INDOOR RADON, THORON AND THEIR PROGENY CONCENTRATIONS IN HIGH THORON RURAL SERBIA ENVIRONMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunic, Zora S; Stojanovska, Z; Veselinovic, N; Mishra, R; Yarmoshenko, I V; Sapra, B K; Ishikawa, T; Omori, Y; Curguz, Z; Bossew, P; Udovicic, V; Ramola, R C

    2017-11-01

    This article deals with the variation of radon (Rn), thoron (Tn) and their progeny concentrations expressed in terms of equilibrium equivalent concentrations (EERC and EETC), in 40 houses, in four villages of Sokobanja municipality, Southern Serbia. Two types of passive detectors were used: (1) discriminative radon-thoron detector for simultaneous Rn and Tn gases measurements and (2) direct Tn and Rn progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS) for measuring Rn and Tn progeny concentrations. Detectors were exposed simultaneously for a single period of 12 months. Variations of Tn and EETC appear higher than those of Rn and EERC. Analysis of the spatial variation of the measured concentrations is also reported. This work is part of a wider survey of Rn, Tn and their progeny concentrations in indoor environments throughout the Balkan region started in 2011 year. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Lung cancer mortality and radon concentration in a chronically exposed neighborhood in Chihuahua, Mexico: a geospatial analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa de la Garza, Octavio R; Sanín, Luz H; Montero Cabrera, María Elena; Serrano Ramirez, Korina Ivette; Martínez Meyer, Enrique; Reyes Cortés, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study correlated lung cancer (LC) mortality with statistical data obtained from government public databases. In order to asses a relationship between LC deaths and radon accumulation in dwellings, indoor radon concentrations were measured with passive detectors randomly distributed in Chihuahua City. Kriging (K) and Inverse-Distance Weighting (IDW) spatial interpolations were carried out. Deaths were georeferenced and Moran's I correlation coefficients were calculated. The mean values (over n = 171) of the interpolation of radon concentrations of deceased's dwellings were 247.8 and 217.1 Bq/m(3), for K and IDW, respectively. Through the Moran's I values obtained, correspondingly equal to 0.56 and 0.61, it was evident that LC mortality was directly associated with locations with high levels of radon, considering a stable population for more than 25 years, suggesting spatial clustering of LC deaths due to indoor radon concentrations.

  20. Lung Cancer Mortality and Radon Concentration in a Chronically Exposed Neighborhood in Chihuahua, Mexico: A Geospatial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa de la Garza, Octavio R.; Sanín, Luz H.; Montero Cabrera, María Elena; Serrano Ramirez, Korina Ivette; Martínez Meyer, Enrique; Reyes Cortés, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This study correlated lung cancer (LC) mortality with statistical data obtained from government public databases. In order to asses a relationship between LC deaths and radon accumulation in dwellings, indoor radon concentrations were measured with passive detectors randomly distributed in Chihuahua City. Kriging (K) and Inverse-Distance Weighting (IDW) spatial interpolations were carried out. Deaths were georeferenced and Moran's I correlation coefficients were calculated. The mean values (over n = 171) of the interpolation of radon concentrations of deceased's dwellings were 247.8 and 217.1 Bq/m3, for K and IDW, respectively. Through the Moran's I values obtained, correspondingly equal to 0.56 and 0.61, it was evident that LC mortality was directly associated with locations with high levels of radon, considering a stable population for more than 25 years, suggesting spatial clustering of LC deaths due to indoor radon concentrations. PMID:25165752

  1. Radon campaigns. Status report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Valmari, T.; Reisbacka, H.; Niemelae, H.; Oinas, T.; Maekelaeinen, I.; Laitinen-Sorvari, R.

    2008-12-01

    Radon campaigns aim at activating citizens to make indoor radon measurements and remediation as well as increasing the common awareness of indoor radon questions. Indoor radon increases the risk of lung cancer. Through radon campaigns Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) also promotes the attainment of those goals that the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health has set for municipal authorities in Finland for prevention of the harmful effects of radon. The Ministry of Social Affairs and Health supports this campaign. Radon campaigns were started in autumn 2003. By autumn 2008 the campaigns have been organised already in 64 regions altogether in 160 municipalities. In some municipalities they have already arranged two campaigns. Altogether 14 100 houses have been measured and in 2 100 of these the action limit of radon remediation 400 Bq / m 3 has been exceeded. When participating in radon campaigns the house owners receive a special offer on radon detectors with a reduced price. In 2008 a new practice was introduced where the campaign advertisements were distributed by mail to low-rise residential houses in a certain region. The advertisement includes an order / deposit slip with postage paid that the house owner can send directly to STUK to easily make an order for radon measurement. In the previous radon campaigns in 2003 - 2007 the municipal authorities collected the orders from house owners and distributed later the radon detectors. The radon concentrations measured in the campaign regions have exceeded the action limit of 400 Bq / m 3 in 0 - 39% of houses, depending on the region. The total of 15% of all measurements made exceeded this limit. The remediation activities have been followed by sending a special questionnaire on remedies performed to the house owners. In 2006 - 2007 a questionnaire was sent to those households where the radon concentration of 400 Bq / m 3 was exceeded during the two first campaign seasons. Among the households that replied

  2. Role of vegetation in enhancing radon concentration and ion production in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaratne, E R; Ling, X; Morawska, L

    2011-08-01

    The role of ions in the production of atmospheric particles has gained wide interest due to their profound impact on climate. Away from anthropogenic sources, molecules are ionized by alpha radiation from radon exhaled from the ground and cosmic γ radiation from space. These molecular ions quickly form into "cluster ions", typically smaller than about 1.5 nm. Using our measurements and the published literature, we present evidence to show that cluster ion concentrations in forest areas are consistently higher than outside. Owing to the low range of alpha particles, radon present deep in the ground cannot directly contribute to the measured cluster ion concentrations. We propose an additional mechanism whereby radon, which is water-soluble, is brought up by trees and plants through the uptake of groundwater and released into the atmosphere by transpiration. We estimate that, in a forest comprising eucalyptus trees spaced 4 m apart, trees may account for up to 37% of the radon that is released from the ground during the middle of the day when transpiration rates are high. The corresponding percentage on an annual basis is 4.1%. Considering that 24% of the earth's land area is still covered in forests; these findings have potentially important implications for atmospheric aerosol formation and climate.

  3. Shallow circulation groundwater – the main type of water containing hazardous radon concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Przylibski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The main factors affecting the value of 222Rn activity concentration in groundwater are the emanation coefficient of reservoir rocks (Kem, the content of parent 226Ra in these rocks (q, changes in the volume and flow velocity as well as the mixing of various groundwater components in the circulation system. The highest values of 222Rn activity concentration are recorded in groundwaters flowing towards an intake through strongly cracked reservoir rocks undergoing weathering processes. Because of these facts, waters with hazardous radon concentration levels, i.e. containing more than 100 Bq dm−3 222Rn, could be characterised in the way that follows. They are classified as radon waters, high-radon waters and extreme-radon waters. They belong to shallow circulation systems (at less than a few dozen metres below ground level and are contemporary infiltration waters, i.e. their underground flow time ranges from several fortnights to a few decades. Because of this, these are usually poorly mineralised waters (often below 0.2–0.5 g dm−3. Their resources are renewable, but also vulnerable to contamination.

    Waters of this type are usually drawn from private intakes, supplying water to one or at most a few households. Due to an increased risk of developing lung tumours, radon should be removed from such waters when still in the intake. To achieve this aim, appropriate legislation should be introduced in many countries.

  4. Influence of ventilation strategies on indoor radon concentrations based on a semiempirical model for Florida-style houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintenlang, D.E.; Al-Ahmady, K.K.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements in a full-scale experimental facility are used to benchmark a semiempirical model for predicting indoor radon concentrations for Florida-style houses built using slab-on-grade construction. The model is developed to provide time-averaged indoor radon concentrations from quantitative relationships between the time-dependent radon entry and elimination mechanisms that have been demonstrated to be important for this style of residential construction. The model successfully predicts indoor radon concentrations in the research structure for several pressure and ventilation conditions. Parametric studies using the model illustrate how different ventilation strategies affect indoor radon concentrations. It is demonstrated that increasing house ventilation rates by increasing the effective leakage area of the house shell does not reduce indoor radon concentrations as effectively as increasing house ventilation rates by controlled duct ventilation associated with the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning system. The latter strategy provides the potential to minimize indoor radon concentrations while providing positive control over the quality of infiltration air. 9 refs., 5 figs

  5. An overview of Ireland's National Radon Policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, S.; Fenton, D.

    2011-01-01

    In Ireland radon is a significant public health issue and is linked to 150-200 lung cancer deaths each year. Irish National Radon Policy aims to reduce individual risk by identifying and remediating buildings with high radon concentrations and also to reduce collective dose through radon prevention as required by revised building regulations. Achievements to date are significant and include the completion of the National Radon Survey, the testing of every school in Ireland, the on-going testing of social housing, collaboration between the public health and radiation protection authorities and the inclusion of radon in inspections of workplaces. However, this work now needs to be drawn together centrally to comprehensively address the radon problem. The RPII and the relevant central governing department, the Dept. of Environment, Heritage and Local Government are currently working to constitute a group of key experts from relevant public authorities to drive the development of a National Radon Control Strategy. (authors)

  6. Radon daughter concentrations in and around dwellings in the northern part of the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfs, F.; Hofstede, H.; Meijer, R.J. de; Put, L.W. (Rijksuniversiteit Groningen (Netherlands). Kernfysisch Versneller Inst.)

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of radon daughters in and around 80 dwellings located in the northern part of the Netherlands has been determined using a one-filter method. Median values of 2.0 and 0.4 mWL were measured for the indoor and outdoor concentrations, respectively. The average outdoor concentration was about an order of magnitude higher for wind directions between SE-SW than for SW-NW. On average, dwellings with double pane windows and/or concrete floors were found to have significantly higher radon concentrations than those with single pane windows and/or wooden floors. For the living room of a particular dwelling, 18 measurements were carried out. The data for this dwelling indicate a linear relation between the concentration indoors and outdoors with a slope of 3.8 +- 2.0. This unexpected behaviour is thought to be related to ventilation via the crawl space. Measurements of ventilation patterns and measurements of radon concentrations in the living room and the crawl space are consistent with this picture.

  7. Hierarchical modeling of indoor radon concentration: how much do geology and building factors matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgoni, Riccardo; De Francesco, Davide; De Bartolo, Daniela; Tzavidis, Nikos

    2014-12-01

    Radon is a natural gas known to be the main contributor to natural background radiation exposure and only second to smoking as major leading cause of lung cancer. The main concern is in indoor environments where the gas tends to accumulate and can reach high concentrations. The primary contributor of this gas into the building is from the soil although architectonic characteristics, such as building materials, can largely affect concentration values. Understanding the factors affecting the concentration in dwellings and workplaces is important both in prevention, when the construction of a new building is being planned, and in mitigation when the amount of Radon detected inside a building is too high. In this paper we investigate how several factors, such as geologic typologies of the soil and a range of building characteristics, impact on indoor concentration focusing, in particular, on how concentration changes as a function of the floor level. Adopting a mixed effects model to account for the hierarchical nature of the data, we also quantify the extent to which such measurable factors manage to explain the variability of indoor radon concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Radon daughter concentrations in and around dwellings in the northern part of the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfs, F.; Hofstede, H.; Meijer, R.J. de; Put, L.W.

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of radon daughters in and around 80 dwellings located in the northern part of the Netherlands has been determined using a one-filter method. Median values of 2.0 and 0.4 mWL were measured for the indoor and outdoor concentrations, respectively. The average outdoor concentration was about an order of magnitude higher for wind directions between SE-SW than for SW-NW. On average, dwellings with double pane windows and/or concrete floors were found to have significantly higher radon concentrations than those with single pane windows and/or wooden floors. For the living room of a particular dwelling, 18 measurements were carried out. The data for this dwelling indicate a linear relation between the concentration indoors and outdoors with a slope of 3.8 +- 2.0. This unexpected behaviour is thought to be related to ventilation via the crawl space. Measurements of ventilation patterns and measurements of radon concentrations in the living room and the crawl space are consistent with this picture. (author)

  9. Indoor radon activity concentration measurements in the great historical museums of University of Naples, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Maria; Pugliese, Mariagabriella; Loffredo, Filomena; La Verde, Giuseppe; Roca, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Indoor radon activity concentrations were measured in seven Museums of University of Naples, very old buildings of great historical value. The measurements were performed using a time-integrated technique based on LR-115 solid-state nuclear track detectors. The annual average concentrations were found to range from 40 up to 1935 Bq m(-3) and in 26 % of measurement sites, the values were higher than 500 Bq m(-3) which is the limit value of Italian legislation for workplace. Moreover, we analysed the seasonal variations of radon concentrations observing the highest average in cold weather than in warm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Modeling radon transport in multistory residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persily, A.K.

    1993-01-01

    Radon concentrations have been studied extensively in single-family residential buildings, but relatively little work has been done in large buildings, including multistory residential buildings. The phenomena of radon transport in multistory residential buildings is made more complicated by the multizone nature of the airflow system and the numerous interzone airflow paths that must be characterized in such a system. This paper presents the results of a computer simulation of airflow and radon transport in a twelve-story residential building. Interzone airflow rates and radon concentrations were predicted using the multizone airflow and contaminant dispersal program (CON-TAM88). Limited simulations were conducted to study the influence of two different radon source terms, indoor-outdoor temperature difference and exterior wall leakage values on radon transport and radon concentration distributions

  11. Variation of indoor radon concentrations in two-storey houses in Nowshera District, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, F; Wazir, Z; Tufail, M; Nusrat, M

    2015-01-01

    A study was performed for the measurement of indoor radon concentration in two-storey houses in district Nowshera in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. This area was not previously surveyed for such kind of study. The aim was to find some correlation of radon levels in first and second storey houses in the area. The measurements were carried out for 1 y from 1 December 2012 to 30 November 2013 using CR-39 detector. The area was divided into four parts, namely, Jhangera, Nowshera city, Akora Khattak and Pabbi. In the first storey houses, radon concentration ranged from 29 to 103 Bq m(-3) with the mean value of 64 ± 12 Bq m(-3) and that in the second storey houses ranged from 25 to 92 Bq m(-3) with the mean value of 56 ± 11 Bq m(-3). Relatively higher values of indoor radon levels in the first stories than the second stories were observed in all four parts of the study area. The effective doses received by the residents of the area were estimated for each part. The mean annual effective doses received by the inhabitants of the area from indoor radon ranged from 0.68 to 2.88 mSv with the mean value of 1.68 ± 0.32 mSv. The doses received by the people of the area were within the ICRP-65 recommended range (3-10 mSv). © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Seismo-volcanic monitoring at Furnas Volcano (Azores): radon (222Rn) concentration in groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Catarina; Virgílio Cruz, José; Ferreira, Teresa; Viveiros, Fátima; Freire, Pedro; Allard, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    environmental conditions as soil temperature, rainfall and soil water content, rather than by volcanic activity, with the exception of one spring where radon activity seems to change more closely relate to the seismic activity of Furnas Volcano. Because some of the surveyed waters are often drunk by the local population and tourists, our results are also useful in a public health perspective. We conclude that the measured radon activities do not pose any health problem, as they remain under the safety threshold (100 Bq/L) defined by the World Health Organization. The research performed allowed to define the radon background for each one of the groundwater discharges sampled and to identify the environmental parameters that can influence the radon concentration in the groundwater of Furnas Volcano, allowing more easily to identify a future reactivation of this volcanic system.

  13. Distribution of soil gas radon concentration in the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil and correlations with lithologies and pedologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Evelise G.; Santos, Talita de O.; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete; Miguel, Ronaldo Araujo; Dutra Neto, Aimore; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C., E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: dutraa@cdtn.br, E-mail: ram@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The assessment of data from a previous study of radon in indoor air of about 500 built 'slab-on-grade' dwellings in the metropolitan area of Belo Horizonte, RMBH, Brazil, showed some statistical correlations with lithologies and pedologies. Forty-five measurements of radon concentration in soil gases were performed at selected points according to population density, gamma radiation background and measurements results of the mentioned indoor radon concentrations study. This paper presents the distribution of radon concentration in soil gas in the same area, where it ranges from 7 - 93 kBq.m{sup -3}, highlighting the areas of high radon concentration in soil gas, which suggests occurrence of radon prone areas. In this regard, this work looking for correlation of radon concentrations in soil gas with lithologies and pedologies. The measurements were performed by using AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO SAPHYMO GmbH. The results of a radon survey in this areas has indicated that in the region radon prone areas may occur. Radon concentration measurements in soil gas are also being carried out to obtain higher statistical significance data for correlations and for comparison between equipment and probes from different systems suppliers like RTM 1688 of SARAD GmbH and RAD7 Electronic Radon Detector of DURRIDGE Company Inc. Thus, this research will represent the initial contribution to establish classification criteria, for radon in soil gas in a tropical climate similar to the Swedish criteria established by Akerblom. (author)

  14. Distribution of soil gas radon concentration in the metropolitan region of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil and correlations with lithologies and pedologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Evelise G.; Santos, Talita de O.; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of data from a previous study of radon in indoor air of about 500 built 'slab-on-grade' dwellings in the metropolitan area of Belo Horizonte, RMBH, Brazil, showed some statistical correlations with lithologies and pedologies. Forty-five measurements of radon concentration in soil gases were performed at selected points according to population density, gamma radiation background and measurements results of the mentioned indoor radon concentrations study. This paper presents the distribution of radon concentration in soil gas in the same area, where it ranges from 7 - 93 kBq.m -3 , highlighting the areas of high radon concentration in soil gas, which suggests occurrence of radon prone areas. In this regard, this work looking for correlation of radon concentrations in soil gas with lithologies and pedologies. The measurements were performed by using AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO SAPHYMO GmbH. The results of a radon survey in this areas has indicated that in the region radon prone areas may occur. Radon concentration measurements in soil gas are also being carried out to obtain higher statistical significance data for correlations and for comparison between equipment and probes from different systems suppliers like RTM 1688 of SARAD GmbH and RAD7 Electronic Radon Detector of DURRIDGE Company Inc. Thus, this research will represent the initial contribution to establish classification criteria, for radon in soil gas in a tropical climate similar to the Swedish criteria established by Akerblom. (author)

  15. Variation of radon concentrations in soil and groundwater and its correlation with radon exhalation rate from soil in Budhakedar, Garhwal Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Ganesh; Prasad, Yogesh; Gusain, G. S.; Badoni, Manjari; Rana, J. M. S.; Ramola, R. C.

    2009-06-01

    Radon was measured in soil-gas and groundwater in the Budhakedar area of Tehri Garhwal, India in summer and winter to obtain the seasonal variation and its correlation with radon exhalation rate. The environmental surface gamma dose rate was also measured in the same area. The radon exhalation rate in the soil sample collected from different geological unit of Budhakedar area was measured using plastic track detector (LR-115 type II) technique. The variation in the radon concentration in soil-gas was found to vary from 1098 to 31,776 Bq.m-3 with an average of 7456 Bq.m-3 in summer season and 3501 to 42883 Bq.m-3 with an average of 17148 Bq.m-3 in winter season. In groundwater, it was found to vary from 8 to 3047 Bq.l-1 with an average value 510 Bq.l-1 in summer and 26 to 2311 Bq.l-1 with an average value 433 Bq.L-1 in winter. Surface gamma dose rate in the study area varied from 32.4 to 83.6 μR.h-1 with an overall mean of 58.7 μ-R.h-1 in summer and 34.6 to 79.3 μR.h-1 with an average value 58.2 μR.h-1 in winter. Radon exhalation rate from collected soil samples was found to vary from 0.1 × 10-5 to 5.7 × 10-5 Bq.kg-1.h-1 with an average of 1.5 × 10-5 Bq.kg-1.h-1 in summer season and 1.7 × 10-5 to 9.6 × 10-5 Bq.kg-1.h-1 with an average of 5.5 × 10-5 Bq.kg-1.h-1. A weak negative correlation was observed between radon exhalation rate from soil and radon concentration in the soil. Radon exhalation rate from the soil was also not found to be correlated with the gamma dose rate, while it shows a positive correlation with radon concentration in water in summer season. Inter-correlations among various parameters are discussed in detail.

  16. Measurement of radon concentration for assessment of the radiological hazard in the Chakwal coalmines of the Salt Range, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, Arif; Tufail, M

    2011-01-01

    Radon and its progeny are prevalent everywhere on the lithosphere especially in the mining environment. Coal exists in the Salt Range that passes through Pakistan. The aim of the present study was to measure radon concentration and assess the associated radiological hazard in the coalmines developed in that portion of the Salt Range which passes through the district of Chakwal in Pakistan. Among the various coalmines in the coalfield, five were selected for radon survey. A passive integrated technique consisting of SSNTDs (solid state nuclear track detectors) was employed for the measurement of radon concentration in these coalmines. Box type dosimeters containing CN-85 detectors were placed for three months at six locations in every selected coalmine. After removing the dosimeters, the CN-85 detectors were etched in alkaline solution to enlarge the alpha tracks in the detectors and counted under an optical microscope. The track densities were converted to radon concentration. The average concentration of radon in the coalmines varied in the range 50-114 Bq m -3 . Radon exhalation rates from the samples of coal and shale collected from the coalmines were determined to be respectively 934 (830-1010) and 1302 (1020-1580) mBq m -2 h -1 . The radiation dose and corresponding health risk for the mine workers were also estimated.

  17. An Alpha spectrometer for measuring radon daughter individual activity concentration; Spettrometro Alfa per la misura delle concentrazioni individuali in attivita' della progenie del radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Div. Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche E. Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Mariotti, F. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    In the frame of the program of the Institute for Radiation Protection of ENEA, related to the evaluation of dose from radon and thoron progeny, an alpha spectrometer for the continuous air monitoring (CAM type) of radon and thoron has been realized. The constructive characteristics of the device are here presented together with energy and efficiency calibration. The device allows, by means of a screen type diffusion battery and a filter, to determinate the single radioactivity of each radionuclide of the progeny selecting them in relation to their diffusive behaviour (dichotomous particle size selection). The three-count filter method has been employed to measure the concentrations of {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi in air. Radon and thoron effective doses using a dosimetric, instead of an epidemiologic approach, will be then evaluated. [Italian] Presso l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione, nell'ambito del programma di valutazione di dose da radon e' stato progettato e realizzato uno spettrometro alfa per il monitoraggio continuo in aria (CAM) della progenie del radon e del toron. Le caratteristiche costruttive dello strumento permettono, tramite l'utilizzo di batterie a diffusione a reti, di determinare l'attivita' individuale della progenie per diverse dimensioni granulometriche in particolare per la frazione attaccata e non al particolato amosferico con un taglio granulometrico di qualche nanometro. E' stato inoltre applicato un metodo spettrometrico a tre conteggi per il calcolo delle concentrazioni individuali della progenie del radon, {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi, effettuando un conteggio alfa di {sup 218}Po e due conteggi alfa di {sup 214}Po. Tale informazione consentira' una valutazione della dose di radon utilizzando il modello dosimetrico in alternativa a quello epidemiologico.

  18. The concentrations and exposure doses of radon and thoron in residences of the rural areas of Kosovo and Metohija

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milic, Gordana; Jakupi, Bajram [Faculty of Natural Sciences Kosovska Mitrovica, University of Pristina, Lole Ribara 29, 28000 Kosovska Mitrovica (Serbia); Tokonami, Shinji [National Institute for Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Trajkovic, Radmila [Faculty of Natural Sciences Kosovska Mitrovica, University of Pristina, Lole Ribara 29, 28000 Kosovska Mitrovica (Serbia); Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute for Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Celikovic, Igor, E-mail: icelikovic@vinca.r [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , ECELab, P.O. Box 522, 1001 Belgrade (Serbia); Ujic, Predrag; Cuknic, Olivera [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , ECELab, P.O. Box 522, 1001 Belgrade (Serbia); Yarmoshenko, Ilia [Institute of Industrial Ecology of Ural Branch of Academy of Sciences of Russia, S. Kovalevskoy Str., 20A, 620219 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kosanovic, Katica; Adrovic, Feriz [Faculty of Natural Sciences Kosovska Mitrovica, University of Pristina, Lole Ribara 29, 28000 Kosovska Mitrovica (Serbia); Sahoo, Sarat K. [National Institute for Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Veselinovic, Nenad; Zunic, Zora S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' Vinca' , ECELab, P.O. Box 522, 1001 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2010-01-15

    This paper deals with the results of indoor radon and thoron concentrations and exposure doses obtained for 63 dwellings out of the 14 rural communities of Central Kosovo, North Kosovo and Prizren region. These research activities are part of overall radiological research that has systematically been carried out since 1986, particularly in Kosovo and Metohija regions. Passive radon/thoron discriminative detectors, exposed for three months, were used. The arithmetic mean concentrations of indoor radon and thoron are C{sub Rn} = 429 Bq m{sup -3}C{sub Tn} = 85 Bq m{sup -3}.

  19. The concentrations and exposure doses of radon and thoron in residences of the rural areas of Kosovo and Metohija

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milic, Gordana; Jakupi, Bajram; Tokonami, Shinji; Trajkovic, Radmila; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Celikovic, Igor; Ujic, Predrag; Cuknic, Olivera; Yarmoshenko, Ilia; Kosanovic, Katica; Adrovic, Feriz; Sahoo, Sarat K.; Veselinovic, Nenad; Zunic, Zora S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the results of indoor radon and thoron concentrations and exposure doses obtained for 63 dwellings out of the 14 rural communities of Central Kosovo, North Kosovo and Prizren region. These research activities are part of overall radiological research that has systematically been carried out since 1986, particularly in Kosovo and Metohija regions. Passive radon/thoron discriminative detectors, exposed for three months, were used. The arithmetic mean concentrations of indoor radon and thoron are C Rn = 429 Bq m -3 C Tn = 85 Bq m -3 .

  20. The reduction of radon hazard in smoke-free working environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.N.; Young, E.C.M.; Guan, Z.J.; Liu, X.W.

    1996-01-01

    The variations in a number of properties related to radon as a result of the presence of cigarette smoke have been investigated in an unventilated room. These properties include the radon concentration, the total potential alpha energy concentration of radon daughters, the equilibrium factor and the fraction of unattached radon daughters. From the data collected, a sample calculation of the reduction of the radon dose in smoke-free working environments has been carried out. (Author)

  1. Indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-12-01

    The radon, a natural radioactive gas, is present almost everywhere on the earth's surface. It can be accumulated at high concentration in confined spaces (buildings, mines, etc). In the last decades many studies conducted in several countries showed that inhaling important amounts of radon rises the risk of lung cancer. Although, the radon is a naturally appearing radioactive source, it may be the subject of a human 'enhancement' of concentration. The increasing radon concentration in professional housing constitutes an example of enhanced natural radioactivity which can induce health risks on workers and public. Besides, the radon is present in the dwelling houses (the domestic radon). On 13 May 1996, the European Union Council issued the new EURATOM Instruction that establishes the basic standards of health protection of population and workers against the ionizing radiation hazards (Instruction 96/29/EURATOM, JOCE L-159 of 29 June 1996). This instruction does not apply to domestic radon but it is taken into consideration by another EURATOM document: the recommendation of the Commission 90/143/EURATOM of 21 February 1990 (JOCE L-80 of 27 March 1990). The present paper aims at establishing in accordance to European Union provisions the guidelines for radon risk management in working places, as well as in dwelling houses, where the implied risk is taken into account. This document does not deal with cases of high radon concentration on sites where fabrication, handling or storage of radium sources take place. These situations must be treated by special studies

  2. Radon chamber for soil gas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, P.

    1987-01-01

    Swedish Geological Co (SGAB) has designed and constructed a chamber for the calibration of detectors and instruments intended for the measurement of radon-222 in soil gas. In the chamber radon detectors may be exposed in a model environment which simulates ground conditions with respect to radon concentration, temperature and humidity. Also included in the research project is the development of methods for calibration procedures, together with test measurements. In general, these measurements indicate that the radon detectors tested are sufficiently accurate and reliable for radon measurements in Swedish soils if they are calibrated in an environment which simulates ground conditions. (orig./HP)

  3. Measurements of the radon-222 concentration in residences of Lima - Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereyra, P.; Lopez, M. E.; Perez, B.

    2014-08-01

    The measurement of the Radon-222 levels was realized in the first semester of 2013 in residences corresponding to 16 districts of the metropolitan area of Lima, including to the zones North, Center and South of the city, during one period of 3 to 6 months in continuous form, with measurement periods of 1 to 2 months. The houses where the measurements were made were selected considering diverse variables as antiquity, construction materials, coatings, soil type, occupational use of the monitored rooms, etc. The measurements were realized in basements, first and second floor of the residences. For the Radon-222 measurements passive detectors of cellulose nitrate (Lr-115) were used. The procedure of data collection, dosimeters reading and the measurement results are shown in this work; this monitoring is the first one that is carried out in this city. The results are only indicators of the present radon rate, by the detectors type not is possible to discriminate the presence of the Radon-222 descendants. (Author)

  4. Health effects of radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Easterly, C.

    1994-01-01

    Exposure of people to radon has taken on increased interest during the last decade because of the understanding that buildings can serve to trap radon and its daughters, and thereby build up undesirable concentrations of these radioactive elements. Numerous studies of underground miners (often uranium miners) have shown an increased risk of lung cancer in comparison with nonexposed populations. Laboratory animals exposed to radon daughters also develop lung cancer. The abundant epidemiological and experimental data have established the carcinogenicity of radon progeny. Those observations are of considerable importance, because uranium, from which radon and its progeny arise, is ubiquitous in the earth's crust, including coal mines. Risk estimates of the health effects of long-term exposures at relatively low levels require continued development, especially to address the potential health effects of radon and radon daughters in homes and occupational settings where the exposure levels are less than levels in underground uranium and other metal mines that have been the subject of epidemiological studies. Two approaches can be used to characterize the lung-cancer risks associated with radon-daughter exposure: mathematical representations of the respiratory tract that model radiation doses to target cells and epidemiological investigation of exposed populations, mainly underground uranium miners. The mathematically-based dosimetric approach provides an estimate of lung cancer risk related to radon-daughter exposure based specifically on modeling of the dose to target cells. The various dosimetric models all require assumptions, some of which are not subject to direct verification, as to breathing rates; the deposition of radon daughters in the respiratory tract; and the type, nature, and location of the target cells for cancer induction. The most recent large committee effort drawn together to evaluate this issue was sponsored by the National Research Council

  5. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso; Boev, Blazo; Zunic, Zora S.; Ivanova, Kremena; Tsenova, Martina; Ristova, Mimoza; Ajka, Sorsa; Bossew, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m 3 for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported. (orig.)

  6. Variation of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in different outdoor and indoor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanovska, Zdenka; Janevik, Emilija; Taleski, Vaso [Goce Delcev University, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Stip (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Boev, Blazo [Goce Delcev University, Faculty of Natural and Technical Sciences, Stip (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Zunic, Zora S. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Nuclear Sciences ' ' Vinca' ' , Belgrade (Serbia); Ivanova, Kremena; Tsenova, Martina [National Center of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, Sofia (Bulgaria); Ristova, Mimoza [University in Ss. Cyril and Methodius, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematic, Institute of Physics, Skopje (Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of); Ajka, Sorsa [Croatian Geological Survey, Zagreb (Croatia); Bossew, Peter [German Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Subject of this study is an investigation of the variations of indoor radon concentration and ambient dose equivalent rate in outdoor and indoor environments of 40 dwellings, 31 elementary schools and five kindergartens. The buildings are located in three municipalities of two, geologically different, areas of the Republic of Macedonia. Indoor radon concentrations were measured by nuclear track detectors, deployed in the most occupied room of the building, between June 2013 and May 2014. During the deploying campaign, indoor and outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were measured simultaneously at the same location. It appeared that the measured values varied from 22 to 990 Bq/m{sup 3} for indoor radon concentrations, from 50 to 195 nSv/h for outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates, and from 38 to 184 nSv/h for indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. The geometric mean value of indoor to outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates was found to be 0.88, i.e. the outdoor ambient dose equivalent rates were on average higher than the indoor ambient dose equivalent rates. All measured can reasonably well be described by log-normal distributions. A detailed statistical analysis of factors which influence the measured quantities is reported. (orig.)

  7. determination of radon gas and respirable ore dust concentrations in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    µm and d ≤ 10 µm (PM2.5, PM4 and PM10) (TSI. 2012). Measurement of dust concentrations was carried out for eight working hours for four days in each camp site. The dust concentration measurements can be categorized to drilling, three hours after blasting, normal operations and in offices. The statistical analysis of ...

  8. Concentration of Radon Progeny in Air by Alpha Spectrometry Measurement; Medida de los descendientes del radon en aire por Espectrometria Alfa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acena, M. L.; Crespo, M. T.

    1989-07-01

    The concentration of radon progeny in air has been determined by alpha spectrometry measurement of 214 Po and 318 Po. A known volume of air was passed through a filter, then the alpha activity was directly measured on this filter. (Author) 15 refs.

  9. Radon concentration in dwellings in Aomori Prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyogi, T.; Ueda, S.; Hisamatsu, S.; Kondo, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Tsuji, N.; Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Kobe

    2002-01-01

    To obtain an average dose from 222 Rn to the people in Aomori Prefecture where the first Japan's nuclear fuel cycling facilities are now under construction, we surveyed 222 Rn concentrations in 109 dwellings in the Prefecture from 1992 to 1996. The outdoor 222 Rn concentrations were also measured in gardens of 15 dwellings. The 222 Rn concentrations were measured with passive 222 Rn detectors which used a polycarbonate film for counting α-ray and could separate concentrations of 222 Rn from 220 Rn. Counting efficiencies of the detectors were calibrated with a standard 222 Rn chamber in the Environmental Measurement Laboratory in USA and in the National Radiological Protection Board in UK. Geometric means of 222 Rn concentration were 13 and 4.4 Bq x m -3 in the dwellings and outdoor, respectively. These values were consistent to nationwide survey results in Japan. The 222 Rn concentrations in the dwellings depended on their age. The concentrations were higher in recent dwellings than in older ones. The radiation dose from 222 Rn was estimated, taking into account the occupancy factor for inside and outside of dwellings. The annual dose was 0.32 mSv x y -1 , and 99% of the dose came from the exposure to 222 Rn inside the dwelling. (author)

  10. Evaluation of radon-222 concentrations levels at workplaces of Curitiba, PR, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Claro, Flavia; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Correa, Janine N.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F.N.; Reque, Marilson; Martins Neto, Manoel R., E-mail: flavia_delclaro@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba - PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe (FPP), Curitiba - PR (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The radon is noble radioactive gas, which when inhaled and undergoing spontaneous decay emits alpha particles that interacting with the cells of biological tissue stimulates the development of lung cancer. The isotope {sup 222}Rn is responsible for approximately half of the effective dose received by the population from natural radiation sources. Current work is focused at the evaluation of the radon concentration levels in air of different workplaces at Curitiba-PR. For this purpose 126 track-etched detectors CR-39 were mounted inside the diffusion chambers that were distributed at workplaces of three enterprises environments for a period of three months approximately. The diffusion chambers were protected by a borosilicate glass fiber filters. After the exposition in air the detectors were submitted to chemical etching using a solution of 6.25M NaOH at 70°C during 14 hours. Such chemical treatment enables to count alpha particle track using an optical microscope with 100x objective magnification. The density of alpha particle tracks in CR-39 was converted to the radon activity concentration in air using the results of previous calibration performed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in Japan. Obtained results show that the concentration of {sup 222}Rn in air at studied workplaces varied from 16±2 Bq/m³ to 78±9 Bq/m³. These values are considered within the limits established by international regulatory agencies such as EPA and ICRP, which consider as normal the radon activity up to 200 Bq/m³ and 148 Bq/m³, respectively. (author)

  11. Does balneotherapy with low radon concentration in water influence the endocrine system? A controlled non-randomized pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Katalin; Berhés, István; Kovács, Tibor; Kávási, Norbert; Somlai, János; Bender, Tamás

    2009-08-01

    Radon bath is a well-established modality of balneotherapy for the management of degenerative musculoskeletal disorders. The present study was conducted to ascertain whether baths of relatively low (80 Bq/l) radon concentration have any influence on the functioning of the endocrine system. In the study, a non-randomized pilot study, 27 patients with degenerative musculoskeletal disorders received 30-min radon baths (of 31-32 degrees C temperature and 80 Bq/l average radon concentration) daily, for 15 days. Twenty-five patients with matching pathologies were subjected to balneotherapy according to the same protocol, using thermal water with negligible radon content (6 Bq/l). Serum thyroid stimulating hormone, prolactin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and dehydroepiandrosterone levels were measured before and after a balneotherapy course of 15 sessions. Comparison of the accumulated data using the Wilcoxon test did not reveal any significant difference between pre- and post-treatment values or between the two patient groups. It is noted that while the beneficial effects of balneotherapy with radon-containing water on degenerative disorders is widely known, only few data have been published in the literature on its effect on endocrine functions. The present study failed to demonstrate any substantial effect of thermal water with relatively low radon content on the functioning of the endocrine system.

  12. Experimental procedures for the calibration of scintillation cells used in the determination of radon gas concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, M; Bigu, J.

    1982-02-01

    Experimental and analytical procedures are described for the calibration of scintillation cells used for the determination of radon gas concentration. In-house designed and built scintillation cells, used routinely in the monitoring of radon gas in uranium mine underground environments and in the laboratory, were calibrated. The cells had a volume of approximately 158 cm 3 and an α-counting efficiency ranging from 50% to 64%. Calibration factors for the cells were determined. Values ranged approximately from 0.177 cpm/pCiL -1 (4.77 cpm/BqL -1 ) to 0.224 cpm/pCiL -1 (6.05 cpm/BqL -1 ). The calibration facilities at the Elliot Lake Laboratory are briefly described

  13. Determination of concentration of radon, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and water chemistry in springs near to Popocatepetl volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N.; Lopez M, B.E.; Cisniega, G.; Valdes, C.; Armienta, M.A.; Mena, M.

    2004-01-01

    Popocatepetl volcano is a high-risk active volcano in Central Mexico where the highest population density in the country is settled. Radon in the soil and groundwater together with water chemistry from samples of nearby springs is analysed as a function of the 2002-2003 volcanic activity. Soil radon indicated fluctuations related both the meteorological parameters and sporadic explosive events. Groundwater radon showed essentially differences in concentration due to the specific characteristics of the studied springs. Water chemistry showed stability along the monitoring period indicating also differences between springs. No anthropogenic pollution from volatile organic compounds was observed. (Author)

  14. Soil-gas radon concentration monitoring in an active granite quarry from Central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Luís.; Barbosa, Susana; Pereira, Alcides; Aumento, Fabrizio

    2010-05-01

    This study was carried out in an active quarry located nearby the town of Nelas (Central Portugal), with the primary objective of assessing the effect of regular explosions on soil-gas radon concentrations. Here, a late-orogenic Hercynian porphyritic biotite granite occurs and is exploited for the production of high quality aggregates for different building purposes. This granite is part of the Beiras batholiths, being a geochemically moderately evolved rock, slightly peraluminous, and widely known by the frequent occurrence of associated uranium mineralizations. In fact, more than 4000t of U3O8 was produced from 60 mines of the Beiras region in the last century, over a wide area of more than 10.000 km2, and thousands of anomalies related with the local accumulation of uranium in fault filling materials, metasedimentary enclaves and doleritic veins were recognized during prospecting works. The heterogeneity of uranium distribution in this rock is reflected at the test site; indeed, a gamma ray survey shows that some of the faults that occur in the quarry are slightly mineralized. A total of 7 radon monitoring stations were implemented in the quarry, at a typical depth comprised between 1 and 2 meters, in holes drilled for the purpose. Aware RM-70 pancake GM detectors were used, sensitive to alpha, beta and gamma/X-rays above 10 keV, connected to palmtop computers for data registration (1 minute interval) and power supplied by batteries. Monitoring was carried out during 6 months, in Spring/Summer conditions and the exact time of each explosion was registered manually. Several problems of data loss and power supply affected the stations during the experiment, leading to discontinuities in the records. Still the available data showed important differences in the soil-gas radon concentrations between stations, which can be explained by the heterogeneity of uranium distribution in the rock and increased local permeability. Furthermore, all stations showed a clear daily

  15. A nationwide radon concentration survey project in Japan. Outdoor and workplaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, S.; Kanno, N.; Ohashi, N.; Abukawa, J.

    2003-01-01

    Nationwide survey for outdoor and workplace radon ( 222 Rn) concentration in Japan were carried out to evaluate the effective dose to the general public due to 222 Rn and its progeny. The 222 Rn concentration was measured by using passive-type radon/thoron discriminative monitor equipped with polycarbonate films. Concentration of 222 Rn was calculated from etch pit counts appeared on the polycarbonate film after chemical and electrochemical etching. For outdoor 222 Rn survey, the monitors were installed at about 700 points throughout Japan on every quarters of the fiscal year 1997 to 1999. The mean concentration of outdoor 222 Rn concentration was 6.1 Bq m -3 from the results of 696 measurement points. Seasonal variation of outdoor 222 Rn was found to be minimal in July to September, and maximal in October to December. For workplace 222 Rn survey, the monitors were installed at about 700 points in four categories (office, factory, school and hospital) on every quarters of the fiscal year 2000 to 2002. Nationwide mean 222 Rn concentration in workplaces was found to be 22.7 Bq m -3 for 2000 and 20.7 Bq m -3 for 2001, respectively. Seasonal variation of 222 Rn concentration measured at office, factory, school and hospital were also found to be minimal in July to September, and maximal in October to December. (author)

  16. Concentration distributions of thoron and radon near the ground surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katase, Akira [Tohwa Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-12-01

    One dimensional diffusion model with a constant diffusion coefficient is applied to the thoron concentration distributions in air above the ground. The experimental distributions are well described by the exponential function obtained from the model. Diffusion coefficients and thoron exhalation rates are estimated from the measured distributions, which are the average values for three months. The present values of thoron exhalation are however several times as small as those measured by other researchers. (author)

  17. Radon: Not so Noble

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    water supplies. Uranium miners and residents of houses built on uranium bearing rocks or soils are exposed to high concentrations of radon. Continuous exposure to radon causes lung cancer in human beings. Chemistry of Radon ..... physical state, and low solubility in the body fluid, radon itself does not pose much of a ...

  18. Levels of radon gas concentration and progeny in homes of Potosi City, Bolivia to 4000 m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamani M, R.; Claros J, J.; Vasquez A, R.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: In this work the presence of radon gas was determined, which is a radioactive contaminant that comes from underground, able to penetrate the houses. The danger is that when mixed air and when inhaled can cause serious damage to the lungs, for the short life time that has radon and progeny for decay, damaging the pulmonary alveoli and reducing breathing capacity of the habitants, then causing polycythemia in some cases. The study was carried out in homes in the city of Potosi, Bolivia located at 4000 m. The quantification of radon gas and progeny was performed with the equipment Alpha-Zaeller-2 (Az-2), quantification was realized in 6 zones of the city of Potosi, chosen randomly. In each zone were carried out measurements in 40 homes (2 rooms more permanent), both day and night, for a period of 3 days in two different seasons and with concentrations of average humidity of 20, 50 and 80%. The values obtained for each period vary depending on the season and 30 to 50% of the allowable values given by the EPA and Who for housing. (Author)

  19. Indoor randon concentration. Temperature and wind effects; Concentrazione di radon indoor. Effetto del vento e della temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesana, L.; Benigni, S. [Milan Univ., Milan (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Generale Applicata

    2000-12-01

    The present study analyses and discusses the behaviour of the indoor radon concentration in a research house. Hourly measurements were carried out in the basement of the house from November 1998 up to June 1999. In many sequences of days radon concentration in the room under analysis shows strong variation all day long with accumulation in the evening and overnight and decrease in the morning and in the afternoon. Measurements of wind velocity, indoor and outdoor temperatures and outdoor-indoor pressure difference were performed and their trend is compared with the observed radon concentration. The exhalation of radon from walls, floor and ceiling and the pressure difference driven exhalation from the soil are discussed, particularly the relation with the temperature differences. The air exchange rates between the house and the outdoor air are studied. [Italian] Si analizza e si discute il comportamento della concentrazione di radon indoor nel seminterrato di una casa di ricerca. Misure orarie sono state effettuate da novembre 1998 a giugno 1999. In molte sequenze di giorni la concentrazione del radon nel locale in analisi presenta forti variazioni nel corso della giornata con un accumulo notturno e decrescita nelle ore diurne. Sono state eseguite misure della velocita' del vento, delle temperature outdoor e indoor e della differenza di pressione outdoor-indoor e il loro andamento e' stato confrontato con quello della concentrazione del radon. Vengono discusse l'esalazione del radon dalle pareti, dal pavimento e dal soffitto e l'esalazione pressure difference driven dal suolo. Il rateo dei ricambi d'aria tra il locale e l'aria outdoor e' studiato.

  20. Estimation of the variations of ventilation rate and indoor radon concentration using the observed wind velocity and indoor-outdoor temperature difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Katsuhiro; Inose, Yuichi; Kojima, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    The indoor radon concentration in the building depends on the ventilation rate. Measurement results of indoor-outdoor pressure difference showed the ventilation rate correlated closely with the indoor-outdoor pressure difference. The observation results showed that one of factor of indoor-outdoor pressure difference was the wind velocity. When the wind velocity is small, the ventilation rate is affected by the indoor-outdoor temperature difference and the effect depends on the wind velocity. The temporal variation of indoor radon concentration was predicted by the time depending indoor radon balance model and the ventilation rate estimated from the wind velocity and the indoor-outdoor temperature difference. The temporal variations of predicted radon concentration gave good agreement with the experimental values. The measurement method, indoor radon concentration and ventilation rate, factors of temporal variation of ventilation rate, and prediction of indoor radon concentration are reported. (S.Y.)

  1. Temporal variability of atmospheric radon-222 concentration at Gosan Station, Jeju Island, Korea, during 2009-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jung Min; Kim, Won Hyung; Kang, Chang Hee; Lee, Hae Young; Lee, Chul Kyu; Chambers, S.; Williams, A. G.

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric radon-222 (radon) measurements were made from 2009 to 2013 at the Gosan station of Jeju Island, one of the cleanest regions in Korea, in order to characterize the temporal variability (on diurnal, seasonal, and annual scales) and analyze the influence of changing air mass transport pathways on observed radon concentrations. The mean hourly radon concentration over the whole period was 2441 ± 1037 mBq/m 3 . The seasonal cycle of radon at the Gosan station was characterized by a fall maximum and summer minimum, consistent with a reduction in nonfrozen terrestrial fetch from fall to summer. In order, the seasonal mean radon concentrations were 2962 mBq/m 3 (fall) >2907 mBq/m 3 (winter) >2219 mBq/m 3 (spring) >1756 mBq/m 3 (summer). Based on a 5-year composite, the maximum mean monthly radon concentration in October (3100 mBq/m 3 ) was more than twice the July minimum (1471 mBq/m 3 ). Diurnal composite radon concentrations for the whole period increased throughout the night to a maximum of 2788 mBq/m 3 at around 7 a.m., and then gradually decreased to a minimum of 2050 mBq/m 3 at around 3 p.m. The winter diurnal cycle had a small amplitude due to the low variability in atmospheric mixing depth associated with recent air mass fetch over the Yellow Sea. The diurnal cycle in summer, however, exhibited a relatively large amplitude due to changes in atmospheric mixing depth associated with recent fetch over Jeju Island. Back trajectory analysis showed that high radon events were typically associated with long-term air mass fetch over continental Asia. Specifically, the average radon concentration of air masses originating from China was about 2.4 times higher than that of air masses originating from the North Pacific Ocean

  2. The correlations between Radon in soil gas and its exhalation and concentration in air in the southern part of Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shweikani, R.; Hushari, M.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to measure the concentration of the radon ( 222 Rn) in soil air, 222 Rn exhalation from soil and 222 Rn in outdoor air which may have great influence on 222 Rn levels in houses. 222 Ra activity concentrations were also determined in soil samples. The studied areas are located in southern part of Syria. The common bed rock of this area is black and massive granite which are poor in uranium content [Jubeli Y.M., 1990. Uranium exploration in Syria. Internal Technical Report, vol. 1 (in English), vol. 2 (in Arabic), SAEC, Damascus; Technoexport (USSR), 1966. In: Ponikarov (Ed.), The Geological Map of Syria Scale: 1:200.000, Ministry of Industry, Damascus, Syria]. Results showed that the maximum measurement in all areas was 32500Bqm -3 in soil air with an exhalation rate of 9Bqm -2 s -1 in Darra region and 66.43Bqm -3 of radon in open air, with 77Bqkg -1 of radium content in soil (Damascus suburb). In addition, correlations between Rn in soil and exhalation of Radon from soil and radon in houses were found in some areas (Sweda and Darra), while, no correlations were found in other studied areas. Moreover, no correlation between radon in houses and radon measurements in soil and in outdoors were found. This was attributed to the methodology used and the influence of building design and inhabitants behavior

  3. Measurement of radon progeny concentrations in air by alpha-particle spectrometey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.

    1975-07-01

    A technique is presented for measuring air concentrations of the short-lived progeny of radon-222 by the use of alpha spectrometry. In this technique, the concentration of RaA, RaB, and RaC are calculated from one integral count of the RaA and two integral counts of the RaC' alpha-particle activity collected on a filter with an air sampling device. The influence of air sampling and counting intervals of time on the accuracy of the calculated concentrations is discussed in the report. A computer program is presented for use with this technique. It is written in the BASIC language. The program will calculate the air concentrations of RaA, RaB, and RaC, and will estimate the accuracy in these calculated concentrations. (U.S.)

  4. Indoor radon regulation using tabulated values of temporal radon variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin

    2018-03-01

    Mass measurements of indoor radon concentrations have been conducted for about 30 years. In most of the countries, a national reference/action/limit level is adopted, limiting the annual average indoor radon (AAIR) concentration. However, until now, there is no single and generally accepted international protocol for determining the AAIR with a known confidence interval, based on measurements of different durations. Obviously, as the duration of measurements increases, the uncertainty of the AAIR estimation decreases. The lack of the information about the confidence interval of the determined AAIR level does not allow correct comparison with the radon reference level. This greatly complicates development of an effective indoor radon measurement protocol and strategy. The paper proposes a general principle of indoor radon regulation, based on the simple criteria widely used in metrology, and introduces a new parameter - coefficient of temporal radon variation K V (t) that depends on the measurement duration and determines the uncertainty of the AAIR. An algorithm for determining K V (t) based on the results of annual continuous radon monitoring in experimental rooms is proposed. Included are indoor radon activity concentrations and equilibrium equivalent concentration (EEC) of radon progeny. The monitoring was conducted in 10 selected experimental rooms located in 7 buildings, mainly in the Moscow region (Russia), from 2006 to 2013. The experimental and tabulated values of K V (t) and also the values of the coefficient of temporal EEC variation depending on the mode and duration of the measurements were obtained. The recommendations to improve the efficiency and reliability of indoor radon regulation are given. The importance of taking into account the geological factors is discussed. The representativity of the results of the study is estimated and the approach for their verification is proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Measurements of Radon Concentration in Several Wards of the University Clinical Center of Kosovo...

    OpenAIRE

    , Y. Halimi; , S. Kadiri; , G. Hodolli; , B. Xhafa; , A. Jonuzaj

    2016-01-01

    Understanding that what’s the level of environment pollution from radioactive pollutant in some wards of UCCK (University Clinical Center of Kosovo) in Prishtina are made measurements of α radiation which is the product of 222Rn and have been read doses of TLD to some staff workers in three wards of UCCK. All this is done to see the risk level of possible pollution. Concentration of radon 222Rn is measured with device CRM-510 portable instruments. During the measurements the apparatus has rec...

  6. The concentration of radon in a town where radium-activated paints were used

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauffenburger, T.; Auf der Maur, A.

    1984-01-01

    In a particular town in the Swiss Jura, important for its watch industry, probably 20 workshops existed between 1920 and 1963, where dials and faces were painted with radium-activated paints. Some workshops produced even their own paints. After removal of the radium and complete decontamination of such workshops, which presents its own problems, one sometimes still finds a high radon concentration in the cellar of such a workshop. Similar high values are sometimes found also in adjacent houses. In that particular town, however, a larger area was concerned. (orig.)

  7. Determination of soil gas radon concentration from some locations of Gedarif town, Sudan, by using CR-39

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzain Abd-Elmoniem Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the results of the study of radon concentration in soil gas for 187 measurements of soil samples collected from different locations of Gedarif town in Sudan using the can technique, containing CR-39. From in this work, the soil gas radon concentrations were ranged from 4.20 ± 0.61 kBqm-3 to 15.15 ± 1.62 kBqm-3 with an average of (9.10 ± 1.31 kBqm-3. The annual effective dose was calculated that ranged from 18.71 ± 2.73 mSv to 67.53 ± 7.22 mSv, with an average value of 40.57 ± 5.86 mSv. A good correlation was observed between the radon concentration and soil depth. It was found that soil radon gas concentration increased with depth. The radon concentrations in the soil samples were found to be larger than the allowed limit from the World Health Organization. The results of this work were compared with national and worldwide results.

  8. Temporal variations of radon concentration in the saturated soil of Alpine grassland: the role of groundwater flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Richon, Patrick; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe

    2009-03-15

    Radon concentration has been monitored from 1995 to 1999 in the soil of the Sur-Frêtes ridge (French Alps), covered with snow from November to April. Measurements were performed at 70 cm depth, with a sampling time of 1 h, at two points: the summit of the ridge, at an altitude of 1792 m, and the bottom of the ridge, at an altitude of 1590 m. On the summit, radon concentration shows a moderate seasonal variation, with a high value from October to April (winter), and a low value from May to September (summer). At the bottom of the ridge, a large and opposite seasonal variation is observed, with a low value in winter and a high value in summer. Fluctuations of the radon concentration seem to be associated with temperature variations, an effect which is largely delusory. Indeed, these variations are actually due to water infiltration. A simplified mixing model is used to show that, at the summit of the ridge, two effects compete in the radon response: a slow infiltration response, rich in radon, with a typical time scale of days, and a fast infiltration of radon-poor rainwater. At the bottom of the ridge, similarly, two groundwater contributions compete: one slow infiltration response, similar to the response seen at the summit, and an additional slower response, with a typical time scale of about a month. This second slower response can be interpreted as the aquifer discharge in response to snow melt. This study shows that, while caution is necessary to properly interpret the various effects, the temporal variations of the radon concentration in soil can be understood reasonably well, and appear to be a sensitive tool to study the subtle interplay of near surface transfer processes of groundwater with different transit times.

  9. Temporal variations of radon concentration in the saturated soil of Alpine grassland: The role of groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrier, Frederic; Richon, Patrick; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Radon concentration has been monitored from 1995 to 1999 in the soil of the Sur-Fretes ridge (French Alps), covered with snow from November to April. Measurements were performed at 70 cm depth, with a sampling time of 1 h, at two points: the summit of the ridge, at an altitude of 1792 m, and the bottom of the ridge, at an altitude of 1590 m. On the summit, radon concentration shows a moderate seasonal variation, with a high value from October to April (winter), and a low value from May to September (summer). At the bottom of the ridge, a large and opposite seasonal variation is observed, with a low value in winter and a high value in summer. Fluctuations of the radon concentration seem to be associated with temperature variations, an effect which is largely delusory. Indeed, these variations are actually due to water infiltration. A simplified mixing model is used to show that, at the summit of the ridge, two effects compete in the radon response: a slow infiltration response, rich in radon, with a typical time scale of days, and a fast infiltration of radon-poor rainwater. At the bottom of the ridge, similarly, two groundwater contributions compete: one slow infiltration response, similar to the response seen at the summit, and an additional slower response, with a typical time scale of about a month. This second slower response can be interpreted as the aquifer discharge in response to snow melt. This study shows that, while caution is necessary to properly interpret the various effects, the temporal variations of the radon concentration in soil can be understood reasonably well, and appear to be a sensitive tool to study the subtle interplay of near surface transfer processes of groundwater with different transit times

  10. Analytical method for evaluating (and correcting) the impact of outdoor radon concentration on the estimates of percentage of dwellings exceeding reference levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antignani, S; Venoso, G; Carpentieri, C; Bochicchio, F

    2018-02-02

    Outdoor radon concentration contributes to indoor radon levels, generally causing a shift from lognormal distribution of measured radon concentration data distribution, and it makes more challenging the estimation of radon distribution parameters on the basis of the lognormal assumption. In particular, lognormal assumption with no correction could lead to a significantly biased estimate of the percentage of dwellings exceeding a certain level, e.g. a reference level (RL), since this is based on biased estimates of geometric mean (GM) and geometric standard deviation (GSD) of radon concentration distribution. Subtracting to each measured data a constant outdoor radon level can usually compensate data distribution departure from log-normality (except for low radon levels), if the appropriate outdoor level value is chosen by means of a lognormal fit of the data. This approach - already (but not always) used in literature - cannot be applied in cases where all the data of radon concentrations are not available (e.g., for a review study). For these cases, this work presents an analytical method to quantitatively evaluate and correct the impact of outdoor on the lognormal distribution parameter estimates and, in particular, on the percentages of dwellings exceeding radon reference levels. The proposed method is applied to a number of possible situations, with different values of outdoor radon level, GM and GSD. The results show that outdoor radon levels generally produce an underestimation of the actual GSD parameter, which increases as the outdoor level increases, and in the worse cases, could lead to an underestimation higher than 50%. Consequently, if the outdoor contribution is not properly taken into account, the percentage of dwellings exceeding a certain RL is almost always underestimated, even by 80%-90% for RL equal to 300 Bq/m 3 . This could have implications for the classification of areas as regards radon concentration and for the estimation of avertable lung

  11. Measurement of radon concentration in old metalliferous mines in San Luis, Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjos, Roberto M.; Lacerda, Tiago; Rosas, Juan P. de [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoata, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Da Silva, Almy A.R. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Gal Milton Tavares de Souza, s/no, Gragoata, 24210-346, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, P. O. Box 66318, 05314-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rizzotto, Marcos; Valladares, Diego L.; Velasco, Hugo [GEA, Instituto de Matematica Aplicada San Luis (IMASL), Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Ej. de los Andes 950, D5700HHW San Luis (Argentina); Yoshimura, Elisabeth M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, P. O. Box 66318, 05314-970, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Radon levels in two old mines in San Luis, Argentina, were measured and analyzed. La Carolina gold mine and Los Condores tungsten mine are today used as tourism mines. CR-39 nuclear track detectors were used for this purpose. Measurements were performed during both winter and summer seasons. The findings show that in these environments, significant radon concentrations are subject to large seasonal fluctuations, due to the strong dependence on natural ventilation with the outside temperature variations. For both mines, high concentration values of {sup 222}Rn were observed in summer and low values in winter; with an extreme ratio of 2.5 times between summer and winter seasons for Los Condores mine. The radiation dose and environmental health risk of {sup 222}Rn concentrations to both guides and visitors were estimated for both seasons and compared with dose and action level values recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The radon contribution to the effective dose rate for visitors has been previously assessed for the warm season. The values are 0.38±0.07 mSv y{sup -1} and 0.05±0.02 mSv y{sup -1} for La Carolina and Los Condores, respectively. These values were obtained assuming an accumulated annual time underground of 20 h. For the guides these values are 11±2 mSv y{sup -1} and 1.45±0.5 mSv y{sup -1} for La Carolina and Los Condores, respectively, assuming an accumulated annual time underground of 600 h. The occupational dose rate limit suggested by the ICRP is 20 mSv y{sup -1}. As these values indicate the dose is an order of magnitude lower in Los Condores than La Carolina mine. This is because this mine, due to its characteristics, is more ventilated than La Carolina mine. This is important because actions can be taken to lower the radon accumulation in La Carolina gold mine, for example by opening new ducts to increase air circulation. Finally, in this work, seasonal variations of the dose rate are assessed and

  12. Measurements of the radon-222 concentration in residences of Lima - Peru; Mediciones de la concentracion de radon 222 en residencias de Lima - Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra, P.; Lopez, M. E.; Perez, B., E-mail: ppereyr@pucp.edu.pe [Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Seccion Fisica, Av. Universitaria 1801, Lima (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    The measurement of the Radon-222 levels was realized in the first semester of 2013 in residences corresponding to 16 districts of the metropolitan area of Lima, including to the zones North, Center and South of the city, during one period of 3 to 6 months in continuous form, with measurement periods of 1 to 2 months. The houses where the measurements were made were selected considering diverse variables as antiquity, construction materials, coatings, soil type, occupational use of the monitored rooms, etc. The measurements were realized in basements, first and second floor of the residences. For the Radon-222 measurements passive detectors of cellulose nitrate (Lr-115) were used. The procedure of data collection, dosimeters reading and the measurement results are shown in this work; this monitoring is the first one that is carried out in this city. The results are only indicators of the present radon rate, by the detectors type not is possible to discriminate the presence of the Radon-222 descendants. (Author)

  13. Indoor radon concentration levels in Mexican caves, using nuclear track methodology, and the relationship with living habits of the bats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Vega-Orihuela, E.; Morales-Malacara, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents the results of a study of the radon levels in four caves in Mexico: Los Riscos Cave and El Judio Cave in the State of Queretaro, and Coyozochico Cave and Karmidas Cave in the State of Puebla. The measurements were made using the passive closed-end cup system, with CR-39 (Lantrack R ) as detection material, and following protocols established for the measurement of indoor radon, developed at the Dosimetry Applications Project of the Physics Institute of the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. The radon concentration at one location with Karmidas Cave reached more than 60,000 Bq/m 3 , while concentrations in the other three caves varied from 83.1-1216.0 Bq/m 3 , was found. During the study was observed an interesting coincidence between the radon concentration distribution inside the caves, and the bat colonies location. In general, the bat colonies are located at the medium or low radon concentration levels zones. (author)

  14. Measurements of radon concentration levels in drinking water at urban area of Curitiba, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, Janine Nicolosi; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Schelin, Hugo R.; Barbosa, Laercio; Sadula, Tatyana; Matsuzaki, Cristiana A.

    2009-01-01

    Current work presents the results of more than 100 measurements of 222 Rn activity in drinking water collected at artesian bores at Curitiba region during the period of 2008 - 2009. The measurements were performed at the Laboratory of Applied Nuclear Physics of the Federal University of Technology in cooperation with the Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN) of Brazilian Nuclear Energy Committee (CNEN). Experimental setup was based on the Professional Radon Monitor (ALPHA GUARD) connected to specific kit of glass vessels Aqua KIT through the air pump. The equipment was adjusted with air flow of 0.5 L/min. The 222 Rn concentration levels were detected and analyzed by the computer every 10 minutes using the software DataEXPERT by GENITRON Instruments. Collected average levels of 222 Rn concentration were processed taking into account the volume of water sample and its temperature, atmospheric pressure and the total volume of the air in the vessels. Collected samples of water presented the average 222 Rn activity about 57.70 Bq/L which is almost 5 times more than maximum level of 11.1 Bq/L recommended by the USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency). It has to be noted that many artesian drillings presented the radon activity in the range of 100 - 200 Bq/L. Further measurements are planned to be performed at other regions of Parana State and will involve the mineral water sources, explored artesian drillings as well as soil samples. (author)''

  15. Temporal and spatial changes of radon concentration in borehole water (Little Carpathians Mts., Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Smetanová

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The 222Rn activity concentration in ground water from four boreholes was investigated from January 2006 to June 2008. The boreholes are situated in the region of the Astronomical and Geophysical Observatory in Modra-Piesok (Little Carpathians Mts., 40 km NW from Bratislava, Slovakia. Three boreholes have been drilled in Lower Triassic quartzite. Another borehole has been drilled in granodiorite of the Modra massif in which the quartzite is folded. Temporal and spatial differences in radon concentration were observed. Significant short-term variations were noticed in all boreholes. Precipitation caused the changes of water level and strongly affected the values of 222Rn activity concentration in less deep boreholes. The measured activities in boreholes ranged approximately over 1–240 kBq/m3.

  16. Measurement of Natural Radioactive Nuclide Concentrations and the Dose Estimation of Workers Originated from Radon in Manganese Ore Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, N.A.; Hassan, N.M.; Blasy, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Manganese ore is widely used in many industries. Such as ore contain natural radioactive nuclides at various concentrations. If this ore contain high concentrations of natural radioactive nuclides, workers handling them might be exposed to significant levels of radiation. Therefore it is important to determine the radioactive nuclides in this ore. Also the regulation of radon concentration at workplaces has gained an accentuated importance in all countries. Nevertheless, at this time there is no globally accepted workplace protocol that sets out safe radon concentration values. In this study the radon concentration measured by using an Alpha Guard radon monitor, the equilibrium factor which was greater than the value given in literature, effective radiation dose, which are necessary for the exact estimation of the radiation dose originating from radon. The regulation of radon concentration at workplaces has gained an accentuated importance in all countries. Approach: The natural radionuclides ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) contents of manganese ore samples collected from Umm Bogma, southwest Sinai and from the mountain access Hamid South Eastern Desert, Egypt have been determined by low background spectroscopy using hyper-pure germanium (HPGe) detector. Results: The mean activities due to the three radionuclides ( 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K) were found to be 1500±65, 490±65 and 364±45 Bqkg -1 , respectively. The absorbed dose rate due to the natural radioactivity in samples under investigation ranged from 1522±45 → 1796±43 nGyh -1 . The radium equivalent activity varied from 3807±114→ 4446±133 Bqkg -1 .The representative external hazard index values for the corresponding samples are also estimated. Conclusion: The results of this assessment obtained by the gamma-ray spectroscopic analysis, have indicated that the levels of natural radioactivity were lower than the international recommended limits.

  17. Evaluation of radon-222 concentration in air of workplaces at Curitiba/PR, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Claro, Flavia; Correa, Janine N.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F.N.; Reque, Marilson; Denyak, Valeriy; Rocha, Zildete; Santos, Talita O.

    2013-01-01

    The isotope Rn-222 is a noble gas that is responsible for approximately half of the effective annual dose received by the world population, and has very high probability to induce the lung cancer. The goal of present research is to evaluate the activity concentration of Rn-222 in the air of workplaces at Curitiba, Parana State. Simultaneously there were performed the measurements of Rn-222 emanation from soil and building materials occurred at evaluated workplaces. Indoor measurements of Rn-222 activity were performed using CR-39 detectors. The instant radon detector AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) was used in the measurements of the average concentrations of Rn-222 in soil gas and building materials. The average concentration of indoor Rn-222 obtained in the measurements of workplaces vary between 36+/-49 Bq/m³ and 164+/-51 Bq/m³. These values are considered within the reference limit of 200 Bq/m³ established by international agencies such as the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and the International Commission on Radiological Protection, but slightly above the limit of 148 Bq/m³ established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The measurements involving building materials presented the concentration values of Rn-222 in a range from 427+/-310 Bq/m³ to 2053+/-700 Bq/m³. The Rn-222 concentrations in soil ranged from 31+/-2 kBq/m³ to 35+/-4 kBq/m³ and the average values of Rn-220 are found in a range of 41+/-6 kBq/m³ and 25+/-11 kBq/m³, thus the concentrations of radon gas soil are below the swedish criterion of 50 kBq/m³ that represent the minimum value for high-risk situation. (author)

  18. Evaluation of radon-222 concentration in air of workplaces at Curitiba/PR, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Claro, Flavia; Correa, Janine N.; Paschuk, Sergei A.; Kappke, Jaqueline; Perna, Allan F.N.; Reque, Marilson, E-mail: flaviadelclaro@gmail.com, E-mail: spaschuk@gmail.com, E-mail: janine_nicolosi@hotmail.com [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Denyak, Valeriy, E-mail: denyak@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe (IPPP), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Rocha, Zildete; Santos, Talita O., E-mail: rocha@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The isotope Rn-222 is a noble gas that is responsible for approximately half of the effective annual dose received by the world population, and has very high probability to induce the lung cancer. The goal of present research is to evaluate the activity concentration of Rn-222 in the air of workplaces at Curitiba, Parana State. Simultaneously there were performed the measurements of Rn-222 emanation from soil and building materials occurred at evaluated workplaces. Indoor measurements of Rn-222 activity were performed using CR-39 detectors. The instant radon detector AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) was used in the measurements of the average concentrations of Rn-222 in soil gas and building materials. The average concentration of indoor Rn-222 obtained in the measurements of workplaces vary between 36+/-49 Bq/m³ and 164+/-51 Bq/m³. These values are considered within the reference limit of 200 Bq/m³ established by international agencies such as the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation and the International Commission on Radiological Protection, but slightly above the limit of 148 Bq/m³ established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency. The measurements involving building materials presented the concentration values of Rn-222 in a range from 427+/-310 Bq/m³ to 2053+/-700 Bq/m³. The Rn-222 concentrations in soil ranged from 31+/-2 kBq/m³ to 35+/-4 kBq/m³ and the average values of Rn-220 are found in a range of 41+/-6 kBq/m³ and 25+/-11 kBq/m³, thus the concentrations of radon gas soil are below the swedish criterion of 50 kBq/m³ that represent the minimum value for high-risk situation. (author)

  19. The latest trend of the research on radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Hiroshi [Science Univ. of Tokyo, Noda, Chiba (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1996-12-01

    In June, 1995, the international conference of sixth Natural Radiation Environment was held in Montreal. More than 80% of more than 200 published researches were concerned with radon and thoron. The participants came from 32 countries. The classification of the research on radon and the number of the publication are shown. The contents of the researches in respective items of measuring method, concentration level and dose evaluation, indoor model and indoor and outdoor radon balance, the countermeasures for reducing indoor radon, radon potential, dose evaluation model, the particle size distribution of aerosol including the particle size distribution of free daughter nuclides and radon in the atmosphere are described. The research on the radon in water is excluded. The most remarkable trend is the theme of radon potential. The trend of connecting the research on radon in soil and the research on dissipation rate to radon potential and the forecast of indoor and outdoor radon concentration seems to become stronger. As to the research on concentration level, the detection of hot spots and the supplementary measurement for clarifying cause are carried out in the advanced countries concerning radon based on the results of survey in whole country. The researches in schools are conspicuous. (K.I.)

  20. Indoor radon level in schools of Shillong, Meghalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, A.; Sharma, Y.; Maibam, D.; Walia, D.; Diengdoh, E.

    2010-01-01

    Radon ( 222 Rn) in the atmosphere is the most important contributor to human exposure from natural sources. Radon is a noble inert gas; and it decays to radionuclides that are chemically active and relatively short lived. Inhalation of the short lived radon progeny imparts a radiation dose to the lung, to which an increased risk of lung cancer is attributed due to the alpha particle irradiation of the secretory and basal cells of the respiratory tract. The indoor radon concentration is dependent on the texture, porosity, permeability, water content of the soil underlying the structure and the radon behaviour in soils on aspects of geology and climate. The direct cause of high radon entry rates into structures exhibiting high indoor radon concentrations are fractures in bedrock formations, cracks in the soil, and similar inhomogeneities in the materials of the foundation of the structures. Other factors influencing indoor radon concentration includes exhalations from the walls and ceilings, building design and material, cracks and openings in the foundation of the buildings. The geological factors in the study area promote radon accumulation especially in buildings and dwellings. The world average annual effective dose in the indoor environments is 1.01 mSv.y -1 . The importance of radon level measurements in school buildings is of interest as children are more sensitive to radon exposure than adults. Hence, radon measurements in 10 schools have been undertaken in the present study

  1. Life time fatality risk assessment due to variation of indoor radon concentration in dwellings in western Haryana, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansal, Sandeep; Mehra, Rohit; Singh, N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor radon measurements in 60 dwellings belonging to 12 villages of Sirsa, Fatehbad and Hisar districts of western Haryana, India, have been carried out, using LR-115 type II cellulose nitrate films in the bare mode. The annual average indoor radon value in the studied area varies from 76.00 to 115.46 Bq m −3 , which is well within the recommended action level 200–300 Bq m −3 (). The winter/summer ratio of indoor radon ranges from 0.78 to 2.99 with an average of 1.52. The values of annual average dose received by the residents and Life time fatality risk assessment due to variation of indoor radon concentration in dwellings of studied area suggests that there is no significance threat to the human beings due to the presence of natural radon in the dwellings. - Highlights: ► The radon concentration values in the dwellings are 2–3 times more than the world average of 40 Bq m −3 . ► These values are lower than the recommended action level of 200–300 Bq m −3 (). ► The annual effective dose is less than the recommended action level of 3–10 mSv per year (). ► The values of life time fatality risk determined for the studied area are within safe standards. ► There is no significant threat to the human beings due to the presence of natural radon in the dwellings.

  2. Radon exhalation rates of some granites used in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Mladen D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to address concern about radon exhalation in building material, radon exhalation rate was determined for different granites available on Serbian market. Radon exhalation rate, along with mass exhalation rate and effective radium content were determined by closed chamber method and active continuous radon measurement technique. For this research, special chambers were made and tested for back diffusion and leakage, and the radon concentrations measured were included in the calculation of radon exhalation. The radon exhalation rate ranged from 0.161 Bq/m2h to 0.576 Bq/m2h, the mass exhalation rate from 0.167 Bq/kgh to 0.678 Bq/kgh, while the effective radium content was found to be from 12.37 Bq/kg to 50.23 Bq/kg. The results indicate that the granites used in Serbia have a low level of radon exhalation.

  3. Radon reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    During a radon gas screening program, elevated levels of radon gas were detected in homes on Mackinac Island, Mich. Six homes on foundations with crawl spaces were selected for a research project aimed at reducing radon gas concentrations, which ranged from 12.9 to 82.3 pCi/l. Using isolation and ventilation techniques, and variations thereof, radon concentrations were reduced to less than 1 pCi/l. This paper reports that these reductions were achieved using 3.5 mil cross laminated or 10 mil high density polyethylene plastic as a barrier without sealing to the foundation or support piers, solid and/or perforated plastic pipe and mechanical fans. Wind turbines were found to be ineffective at reducing concentrations to acceptable levels. Homeowners themselves installed all materials

  4. Uranium-238 and thorium-232 series concentrations in soil, radon-222 indoor and drinking water concentrations and dose assessment in the city of Alameda, Chihuahua, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colmenero Sujo, L.; Montero Cabrera, M.E. E-mail: elena.montero@cimav.edu.mx; Villalba, L.; Renteria Villalobos, M.; Torres Moye, E.; Garcia Leon, M.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Mireles Garcia, F.; Herrera Peraza, E.F.; Sanchez Aroche, D

    2004-07-01

    High-resolution gamma spectrometry was used to determine the concentration of {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series in soil samples taken from areas surrounding the city of Aldama, in Chihuahua. Results of indoor air short-time sampling, with diffusion barrier charcoal detectors, revealed relatively high indoor radon levels, ranging from 29 to 422 Bq/m{sup 3}; the radon concentrations detected exceeded 148 Bq/m{sup 3} in 76% of the homes tested. Additionally, liquid scintillation counting showed concentrations of radon in drinking water ranging from 4.3 to 42 kBq/m{sup 3}. The high activity of {sup 238}U in soil found in some places may be a result of the uranium milling process performed 20 years ago in the area. High radon concentrations indoor and in water may be explained by assuming the presence of uranium-bearing rocks underneath of the city, similar to a felsic dike located near Aldama. The estimated annual effective dose of gamma radiation from the soil and radon inhalation was 3.83 mSv.

  5. Uranium-238 and thorium-232 series concentrations in soil, radon-222 indoor and drinking water concentrations and dose assessment in the city of Aldama, Chihuahua, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenero Sujo, L; Montero Cabrera, M E; Villalba, L; Rentería Villalobos, M; Torres Moye, E; García León, M; García-Tenorio, R; Mireles García, F; Herrera Peraza, E F; Sánchez Aroche, D

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution gamma spectrometry was used to determine the concentration of 40K, 238U and 232Th series in soil samples taken from areas surrounding the city of Aldama, in Chihuahua. Results of indoor air short-time sampling, with diffusion barrier charcoal detectors, revealed relatively high indoor radon levels, ranging from 29 to 422 Bq/m3; the radon concentrations detected exceeded 148 Bq/m3 in 76% of the homes tested. Additionally, liquid scintillation counting showed concentrations of radon in drinking water ranging from 4.3 to 42 kBq/m3. The high activity of 238U in soil found in some places may be a result of the uranium milling process performed 20 years ago in the area. High radon concentrations indoor and in water may be explained by assuming the presence of uranium-bearing rocks underneath of the city, similar to a felsic dike located near Aldama. The estimated annual effective dose of gamma radiation from the soil and radon inhalation was 3.83 mSv.

  6. Radon concentrations inside public and commercial buildings in the Pittsburgh area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B L; Kulwicki, D R; Warner, K R; Grassi, C L

    1984-09-01

    Radon concentrations in ambient air from numerous schools, stores and other public and commercial buildings in the Pittsburgh, PA, area were measured by grab sampling. This is more appropriate than using long-term integrating monitors because of the correlation between times of occupancy and Rn levels. Results indicate that Rn concentrations in these buildings are nearly an order of magnitude less than in homes, and not much higher than outdoors. Variations among sites is also much less than for homes, probably because there is less variability in ventilation and building maintenance practices. Colleges and universities have somewhat higher Rn levels and a larger degree of variability than commercial buildings or hospitals. There was no indication of higher Rn levels in cold weather than in warm weather, or of correlations with the age of the building.

  7. The natural radionuclide concentration and radon exhalation rate of Turkish natural stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasar, O.; Yaprak, G.; Guer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Geological materials usually contaminated with naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have become a focus great attention. These NORM under certain conditions can reach hazardous contamination levels. Some contamination levels may be sufficiently severe that precautions must be taken. The Turkey has very important natural stones potential with over 5 billion m 3 marble reserves. According to 2002 giving data the number of Turkish stones export is 303 million US Dollars. In this regards, the present study deals with 120 Turkish natural stones. The studied samples were analyzed and the concentrations in Bq/kg dry weight of radioisotopes were determined by gamma-ray spectrometry using HPGe defector in Bq/kg dry weight. For the measurement of the radon exhalation rate, the 'can technique' using sensitive alpha sensitive LR-115 type II plastic defectors were used. The radium equivalent activity varied from 285 Bq/kg to 325 Bq/kg for granite samples and from 2 Bq/kg to 32 Bq/kg for marble samples. The value of radon exhalation rate ranged from 0.06 Bq/m 2 h - 1 to 0.46 Bq/m 2 h - 1 for garnite samples and from 0.006 Bq/m 2 h - 1 to 0.011 Bq/m 2 h - 1 for marble samples. According to the recommended values and the calculated external hazard index values the samples are acceptable for use as building materials and decoration

  8. Radon dynamics in underwater thermal radon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettner, H.; Hofmann, W.; Winkler, R.; Rolle, R.; Foisner, W.

    1998-01-01

    At a facility for underwater thermal radon therapy in Bad Hofgastein, experiments were carried out with the aim of establishing radon in the air exhaled by the treated patients and of radon decay products on the skin of the patients. The time course of radon concentration in the exhaled air shows a maximum a few minutes after entering the bath, then the Rn concentration remains constant over the remaining time spent in the bath. Taking into account several simplifying assumptions, the average dose to the epidermis from radon daughters is about 50 μGy. (A.K.)

  9. 100 kBq m-3 Radon Activity Concentration in the Atmosphere of a Bathroom Supplied with Groundwater From A Gneissic Rock Area with Consanguineous Intrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søstrand, Per; Sverre, Langård; Danielsen, Tor Erik

    2016-12-01

    Inhalation of escaping radon from groundwater comprises the largest part of radiological hazard from groundwater radionuclides in the uranium and thorium series. Groundwater containing 1.5 mg dm uranium and 3 kBq dm radon activity concentration supplied an ordinary bathroom of 15 m in a home. Using the showerhead, atmospheric levels of radon activity in the bathroom exceeded 100 kBq m within a period of about 1 h.

  10. Radon as an Anthropogenic Indoor Air Pollutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Crockett, Robin

    2016-04-01

    Radon is generally regarded as a naturally occurring radiological hazard but we report here measurements of significant, hazardous radon concentrations that arise from man-made sources, including granite ornaments/artefacts, uranium glass and glazed objects as well radium dial watches. This presentation concerns an examination and assessment of health risks from radium and uranium found in historical artefacts, many of which were once viewed as everyday items, and the radon that emanates from them. Such objects were very popular in industrialised countries such as the USA, UK and European countries) particularly between and including the two World Wars but are still readily available. A watch collection examined gave rise to a hazardous radon concentration of 13.24 kBq•m-3 approximately 67 times the Domestic Action Level of 200 Bq•m-3.The results for an aircraft altimeter are comparable to those of the watches, indicating radon activity equivalent to several watches, and also indicate an equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room ca. 33 times the UK domestic Action Level. Results from a granite block indicate a radon emanation of 19.7 Bq•kg-1, but the indicated equilibrium concentration in the 16.3 m3 room is only ca. 1.7% of the UK domestic Action Level. Uranium-glazed crockery and green uranium glass were scoped for radon activity. The former yielded a radon concentration of ca. 44 Bq•m-3 in a small (7 L) sealed container. The latter yielded a lower radon concentration in a larger (125 L) sealed container of ca. 6 Bq•m-3. This is barely above the background radon concentration in the laboratory, which was typically ca. 1-2 Bq•m-3. Individual items then are capable of giving rise to radon concentrations in excess of the UK Domestic Action Level in rooms in houses, particularly if poorly ventilated. We highlight the gap in the remediation protocols, which are focused on preventing radon entering buildings from outside, with regard to internally

  11. Determination of radon-222 concentration in inside environments of the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouvea, Vandir de Azevedo; Cardoso, Domingos d'Oliveira; Castro, Carlos Alberto Carvalho

    2000-01-01

    The gotten concentrations of radon-222 in the installations of the IEN had been determined using the active and passive methods. The active method consisted on the use of the alpha spectrometry with a portable equipment Tracerlab Instruments WLM- Plus. In the determination for the passive method, one used detectors of nuclear strokes of type LEXAN. The raised values had been gotten in the wastes deposit and its annexes, room of the press and laboratory of wastes handling. It was observed, in this sector, an instantaneous measure of alpha spectrometry, concentrations around 1000 Bq.m-3, which had over all to the function of storage, the sector, a great volume of natural radioactive materials, especially of radium-226. This determination was carried through in an extreme situation of ventilation zero, where the gates had been kept closed during the execution of the same one. It was observed, however, a considerable fall, with values ten times inferior, after to submit the environment to a ventilation forced by means of fans and exhaust fans. The results gotten in the alpha spectrometry had been confirmed by the detectors of strokes, over all in that it says respect ace trends of storage of the gas in environments little ventilated. Some suggestions had been made on procedures to be adopted, aiming at the security of the people in these environments. The other places studied in the IEN had been, the room of the Argonauta reactor, laboratories and caves of the Cyclotron, diverse laboratories of the sector of chemistry and rooms of staff. The present study it objectified the establishment of a methodology of inquiry of the radon in occupational areas, besides considering solutions for the minimization of the concentrations of the gas, in similar environments of work to the ones of the IEN

  12. Radon in water aeration system operational performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamarre, B.L.

    1990-01-01

    North East Environmental Products, Inc. is a manufacturer of residential scale aeration systems for removal of radon and volatile organic chemicals from private water supplies. This paper is a review of the operational history of residential scale point of entry (POE) radon aeration systems. Emphasis is placed on the difficulties and solutions encountered in actual installations caused by both mechanical difficulties and water quality parameters. A summary of radon reduction efficiency is presented for wells with radon concentrations from 21,000 to 2,600,000 pCi/L. A discussion of customer concerns and attitudes is presented along with other areas for further technical improvement. Training techniques for dealers and installers are also discussed. An update of the current status of the radon in water industry includes current sales volumes as compared to the potential market and an update on the radon in water MCL standard setting process from an industry perspective

  13. A finite element model development for simulation of the impact of slab thickness, joints, and membranes on indoor radon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, E; Frutos, B; Olaya, M; Sánchez, J

    2017-10-01

    The focus of this study is broadly to define the physics involved in radon generation and transport through the soil and other materials using different parameter-estimation tools from the literature. The effect of moisture in the soil and radon transport via water in the pore space was accounted for with the application of a porosity correction coefficient. A 2D finite element model is created, which reproduces the diffusion and advection mechanisms resulting from specified boundary conditions. A comparison between the model and several analytical and numerical solutions obtained from the literature and field studies validates the model. Finally, the results demonstrate that the model can predict radon entry through different building boundary conditions, such as concrete slabs with or without joints, variable slab thicknesses and diffusion coefficients, and the use of several radon barrier membranes. Cracks in the concrete or the radon barrier membrane have been studied to understand how indoor concentration is affected by these issues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation in Germany. - Radon concentrations in buildings of the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Will, W.; Borsdorf, K.H.; Lehmann, R.; Kemski, J.; Siehl, A.

    1997-11-01

    1. Part: The dose rate of terrestrial gamma radiation was measured in a narrow grid for West Germany between 1972 and 1974 and for East Germany between 1994 and 1996. The results were now connected to a survey for all Germany. The average population weighted dose rate (photon dose equivalent rate) of terrestrial gamma radiation outdoors amounts to 57 nSv/h. 2. Part: Since the 70ies, investigations on the determination's exposure to radiation by radon and its progeny have been carried out in Germany. Of topical interest is the radon concentration in buildings and especially in dependence on the radon potential in the geological subsoil. Abstracts for two separate articles are prepared. (orig./SR) [de

  15. Impact of ventilation systems and energy savings in a building on the mechanisms governing the indoor radon activity concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignan, Bernard; Powaga, Emilie

    2017-11-23

    For a given radon potential in the ground and a given building, the parameters affecting the indoor radon activity concentration (IRnAC) are indoor depressurization of a building and its air change rate. These parameters depend mainly on the building characteristics, such as airtightness, and on the nature and performances of the ventilation system. This study involves a numerical sensitivity assessment of the indoor environmental conditions on the IRnAC in buildings. A numerical ventilation model has been adapted to take into account the effects of variations in the indoor environmental conditions (depressurization and air change rate) on the radon entry rate and on the IRnAC. In the context of the development of a policy to reduce energy consumption in a building, the results obtained showed that IRnAC could be strongly affected by variations in the air permeability of the building associated with the ventilation regime. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Long-term measurements of radon concentrations in the living environments in Japan: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyama, T.; Yonehara, H.; Sakanove, M.; Kobayashi, S.; Iwasaki, T.; Mifune, M.; Radford, E.P.; Kato, H.

    1987-01-01

    Measurements of indoor radon (Rn-222) concentrations were carried out using bare track detectors (CR-39) in Mihama, Misasa, Hiroshima and Nagasaki for one year and using Terradex SF detectors in Hokkaido for a winter. The highest median value, 31.2 Bq/m/sup 3/, was from the Mihama survey and the lowest, 10.2 Bq/m/sup 3/ was obtained from Nagasaki. The median value for Misasa (a radioactive spa area) was 24.2 Bq/m/sup 3/ and that for Hiroshima was 23.10 Bq/m/sup 3/. The values for Japanese traditional wooden houses were unexpectedly higher than these for ferro-concrete and prefabricated houses. The difference between the first and upper floors was modest. The median value obtained from personal monitoring of 25 people living in Missasa was 23.0 Bq/m/sup 3/, very close to the value found in dwellings in this area

  17. Comparison of indoor radon and thoron concentrations in the urban and rural dwellings of Chhattisgarh state of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhar, M.S.K.; Kher, R.S.; Rathore, V.B.; Pandey, S.; Ramachandran, T.V.

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of nationwide radon/thoron monitoring program, indoor radon/thoron and their progeny concentrations have been estimated for 210 dwellings situated in 8 towns (urban) and 9 villages (rural) of Chhattisgarh state of India. The measurement has been made on quarterly integrating cycle for one full year in each dwelling. Twin chamber dosimeter cup with LR-115 Type-II Solid State Nuclear Track Detector was used for the measurement of indoor radon/thoron concentration. The results show that the geometric mean of indoor thoron concentration in urban dwellings varies from 11.57 to 25.88Bqm -3 with an overall geometric mean value of 16.65Bqm -3 , while in rural dwellings it varies from 12.50 to 30.08Bqm -3 with an overall geometric mean value of 19.00Bqm -3 . The potential alpha energy concentration (PAEC) levels of thoron in the urban and rural dwellings are found to be 2.58 and 4.57 mWL, respectively. Similarly, the geometric mean of indoor radon concentrations in urban dwellings is found to vary from 20.20 to 30.13Bqm -3 with an overall geometric mean value of 25.28Bqm -3 , while in rural dwellings it varies from 15.50 to 36.05Bqm -3 with an overall geometric mean value of 27.32Bqm -3 . The PAEC levels of radon in the urban and rural dwellings are found to be 1.50 and 1.87 mWL, respectively. The dose contribution of thoron and progeny in total inhalation dose has been found to be more than 20% in all the surveyed places that show the necessity to pay attention to the presence of thoron and progeny from public health point of view

  18. The Influence of Aerosol Concentration on Changes in the Volumetric Activities of Indoor Radon Short-Term Decay Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Politova

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the influence of aerosol concentration on changes in the volumetric activities of indoor radon short-term decay products. The concentration of aerosol in the air, equilibrium factors and unattached fraction were measured under normal living conditions when the concentration of aerosol increases, i.e. burning a candle or frankincense in accommodations, smoke-filled accommodations, a steamy kitchen etc. It has been established that when the concentration of aerosol in the air rises, the number of free atoms of radon short-term decay products attached to aerosol particles also increases, and therefore higher volumetric activity of alpha particles is fixed. A tight positive connection of the correlation between equilibrium factor (F and aerosol particle concentration in the air of accommodations as well as a negative correlation between unattached fraction and an equilibrium factor have been determined.Article in Lithuanian

  19. Radon concentration measurements for determination of radiation dose and assessment of cancer risk in the premises of some colleges in Lahore, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood, A.; Tufail, M.; Iqbal, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    Radon concentration has been measured in campus and hostel buildings of some colleges in the city of Lahore. The technique of passive radon measurements was employed using CN-85 etched track detectors in the box type dosimeters. The observed radon concentration in different parts of monitored buildings was within the range 18-61 Bq m/sup -3/. The cause of radon in college buildings may be the construction materials, drinking water, natural gas, drainage, sewerage pipes, etc. Moving fans, open doors and windows in summer season diluted the radon concentration, while the air tight arrangement in the winter enhanced the radon concentration level. Alpha dose from radon to the students and supporting staff was estimated as 0.34 and 0.91 mSv y/sup -1/ in campus and hostel buildings respectively. The corresponding excess lifetime cancer risk attributed to the students and staff in the college campuses was found to be 0.20 %, while the staff and students residing in the hostels of the colleges received the excess lifetime risk of cancer 0.53 % due to radon progenies. (author)

  20. Residential radon exposure and brain cancer: an ecological study in a radon prone area (Galicia, Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Aragonés, Nuria; Kelsey, Karl T; Pérez-Ríos, Mónica; Piñeiro-Lamas, María; López-Abente, Gonzalo; Barros-Dios, Juan M

    2017-06-15

    We aimed to know if radon concentration is associated with municipal mortality due to brain cancer in Galicia, Spain. We designed an ecological study taking as study unit Galician municipalities. To be included, municipalities had to have at least three radon measurements. We correlated radon concentrations with municipal mortality due to these malignant tumors during the period 1999-2008. We calculated the relative risk of dying of brain cancers for each municipality and correlated this value with municipal radon concentration using Spearman's Rho. 251 municipalities were included, with close to 3,500 radon measurements and an average of 14 radon measurements at each municipality. We observed a significant correlation between residential radon with brain cancer mortality for males and females and the intensity of the correlation was higher for females. These results were reinforced when the analysis was restricted to municipalities with more than 5 radon measurements: Spearman's Rho 0.286 (p-value < 0.001) and Spearman's Rho 0.509 (p-value < 0.001) for males and females, respectively. These results suggest an association between residential radon and brain cancer mortality. More research using more robust epidemiological designs is needed to confirm these findings.

  1. Determination of concentration of radon, volatile organic compounds (VOC) and water chemistry in springs near to Popocatepetl volcano; Determinacion de la concentracion de radon, VOCs y Quimica del agua en manantiales cercanos al volcan Popocatepetl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N.; Lopez M, B.E.; Cisniega, G. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Valdes, C.; Armienta, M.A.; Mena, M. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Popocatepetl volcano is a high-risk active volcano in Central Mexico where the highest population density in the country is settled. Radon in the soil and groundwater together with water chemistry from samples of nearby springs is analysed as a function of the 2002-2003 volcanic activity. Soil radon indicated fluctuations related both the meteorological parameters and sporadic explosive events. Groundwater radon showed essentially differences in concentration due to the specific characteristics of the studied springs. Water chemistry showed stability along the monitoring period indicating also differences between springs. No anthropogenic pollution from volatile organic compounds was observed. (Author)

  2. Assessment of indoor radon, thoron concentrations, and their relationship with seasonal variation and geology of Udhampur district, Jammu & Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Sharma, Sumit; Mehra, Rohit; Narang, Saurabh; Mishra, Rosaline

    2018-03-15

    Background The inhalation doses resulting from the exposure to radon, thoron, and their progeny are important quantities in estimating the radiation risk for epidemiological studies as the average global annual effective dose due to radon and its progeny is 1.3 mSv as compared to that of 2.4 mSv due to all other natural sources of ionizing radiation. Objectives The annual inhalation dose has been assessed with an aim of investigating the health risk to the inhabitants of the studied region. Methods Time integrated deposition based 222 Rn/ 220 Rn sensors have been used to measure concentrations in 146 dwellings of Udhampur district, Jammu and Kashmir. An active smart RnDuo monitor has also been used for comparison purposes. Results The range of indoor radon/thoron concentrations is found to vary from 11 to 58 Bqm -3 with an average value of 29 ± 9 Bqm -3 and from 25 to 185 Bqm -3 with an average value of 83 ± 32 Bqm -3 , respectively. About 10.7% dwellings have higher values than world average of 40 Bqm -3 prescribed by UNSCEAR. The relationship of indoor radon and thoron levels with different seasons, ventilation conditions, and different geological formations have been discussed. Conclusions The observed values of concentrations and average annual effective dose due to radon, thoron, and its progeny in the study area have been found to be below the recommended level of ICRP. The observed concentrations of 222 Rn and 220 Rn measured with active and passive techniques are found to be in good agreement.

  3. Measurements of radon daughter concentrations in structures built on or near uranium mine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haywood, F.F.; Kerr, G.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Perdue, P.T.; Thorngate, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    A technique is discussed that has been used to measure air concentrations of short-lived daughters of 222 Rn in residential and commercial structures built on or near uranium mill tailings in the western part of the United States. In this technique, the concentrations of RaA, RaB, and RaC are calculated from one integral count of the RaA and two integral counts of the RaC' alpha-particle activity collected on a filter with an air sampling device. A computer program is available to calculate the concentrations of RaA, RaB, and RaC in air and to estimate the accuracy in these calculated concentrations. This program is written in the BASIC language. Also discussed in this paper are the alpha-particle spectrometer used to count activity on the air filters and the results of our radon daughter measurements in Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico. These results and results of other measurements discussed in a companion paper are now being used in a comprehensive study of potential radiation exposures to the public from uranium mill tailing piles

  4. Radon concentration in drinking water and supplementary exposure in Baita-Stei mining area, Bihor county (Romania).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Mircea; Nita, Dan Constantin; Cucos-Dinu, Alexandra; Dicu, Tiberius; Bican-Brisan, Nicoleta; Cosma, Constantin

    2014-03-01

    The radon concentration was measured in the drinking water of public water supply and private wells located in the mining area of BăiŢa-Ştei, Bihor County, Romania. The measurements were performed using the LUK-VR system based on radon gas measurement with Lucas cell. The results show that the radon concentrations are within the range of 1.9-134.3 kBq m(-3) with an average value of 35.5 kBq m(-3) for well water, 18.5 kBq m(-3) for spring water and 6.9 kBq m(-3) for tap water. Comparing with previous data from the whole of Transylvania, the average value is two times higher, proving this zone to be a radon-prone area. From the results of this study the effective dose to the population is between 4.78 and 338.43 µSv y(-1). These doses are within the recommended limits of the world organisations.

  5. Radon problem in uranium industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.H.; Raghavayya, M.

    1991-01-01

    Radon emission is invariably associated with the mining and processing of uranium ores. Radon (sup(222)Rn) enters mine atmosphere through diffusion from exposed ore body, fractures and fissures in the rocks and is also brought in by ground water. Being the progenitor of a series of short lived radioisotopes it contributes over 70% of the radiation dose to mine workers and thus accounts for nearly 30% of the total radiation doses received by workers in the whole nuclear industry. This paper summarises the data on radon emanation from the ore body, backfilled sands and mine water. Radon and its progeny concentrations in different haulage levels and stopes of the Jaduguda uranium mine are presented to emphasise the need for a well planned ventilation system to control radiation exposure of miners. Results of radon monitoring from a few exploratory uranium mines are included to indicate the need for a good ventilation system from inception of the mining operations. Relative contribution of mine exhaust and tailings surfaces to the environmental radon are also given. Some instruments developed locally for monitoring of radon and its progeny in mines and in the environment are briefly described to indicate the progress made in this field. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  6. Radon in workplaces: First results of an extensive survey and comparison with radon in homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucci, S.; Pratesi, G.; Viti, M. L.; Pantani, M.; Bochicchio, F.; Venoso, G.

    2011-01-01

    Extensive radon surveys have been carried out in many countries only in dwellings, whereas surveys in workplaces are rather sparse and generally restricted to specific workplaces/activities, e.g. schools, spas and caves. Moreover, radon-prone areas are generally defined on the basis of radon surveys in dwellings, while radon regulations use this concept to introduce specific requirements in workplaces in such areas. This approach does not take into account that work activities and workplace characteristics can significantly affect radon concentration. Therefore, an extensive survey on radon in different workplaces have been carried out in a large region of Italy (Tuscany), in order to evaluate radon distribution in workplaces over the whole territory and to identify activities and workplace characteristics affecting radon concentration. The results of this extensive survey are compared with the results of the survey carried out in dwellings in the same period. The workplaces monitored were randomly selected among the main work activities in the region, including both public and industrial buildings. The survey monitored over 3500 rooms in more than 1200 buildings for two consecutive periods of ∼6 months. Radon concentration was measured by means of passive nuclear track detectors. (authors)

  7. Measurements of indoor radon concentrations in the Santiago de Compostela area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortina, D.; Duran, I. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Grupo Experimental de Nucleos y Particulas (GENP), Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Llerena, J.J. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Grupo Experimental de Nucleos y Particulas (GENP), Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain)], E-mail: jjllerena@usc.es

    2008-10-15

    Galician soils are among those with the highest {sup 222}Rn exhalation rates in Spain. A year-round study of the indoor {sup 222}Rn concentration in buildings in the Santiago de Compostela area (Galicia, Northwest of Spain) was performed. The study is based on systematic samplings with active charcoal canisters, following a modified EPA 520/5-87-005 protocol. These measurements were complemented by others obtained using etched track dosimeters. Each data set follows a log-normal distribution, with a geometric mean of (253 {+-} 3) Bq m{sup -3} for charcoal canisters and (285 {+-} 2.5) Bq m{sup -3} for etched track detectors. After correcting for the different measuring conditions, the mean value of both methods differed by only 2%. A careful analysis of the seasonal dependence of our measurements did not reveal any significant seasonal variations in the {sup 222}Rn concentration. Parallel to these measurements, different meteorological parameters were recorded, which revealed a direct correlation between the indoor radon concentration and the outdoor temperature derivative with respect to time.

  8. Radon in dwellings the national radon survey Galway and Mayo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, A.T.; Fennell, S.G.; Mackin, G.M.; Madden, J.S.; O'Colmain, M.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents the results of the final phase of the National Radon Survey carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland. The counties included in this phase are Galway and Mayo. The average radon concentrations for the houses measured in these counties were 112 Bq/m 3 and 100 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The measurement data were grouped on the basis of the 10 km grid squares of the Irish National Grid System and used to predict the percentage of dwellings in each grid square which exceeds the Reference Level of 200 Bq/m 3 . Grid squares where this percentage is predicted to be 10% or higher are designated High Radon Areas. The health effects of exposure to high radon levels are discussed and recommendations are made regarding both new and existing dwellings. (author)

  9. Radon in dwellings the national radon survey Cork and Kerry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, A.T.; Fennell, S.G.; Mackin, G.M.; Madden, J.S.

    1998-07-01

    This report presents the results of the third phase of the National Radon Survey carried out by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland. The counties included in this phase are Cork and Kerry. The average radon concentrations for the houses measured in these counties were 76 Bq/m 3 and 70 Bq/m 3 . The measurement data were grouped on the basis of the 10 km grid squares of the Irish National Grid System and used to predict the percentage of dwellings in each grid square which exceeds the Reference Level of 200 Bq/m 3 . Grid squares where this percentage is predicted to be 10% or higher are designated High Radon Areas. The health effects of exposure to high radon levels are discussed and recommendations are made regarding both new and existing dwellings. (author)

  10. Protocol proposal for radon concentration mensuration from granitic rocks in marble factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Claro, Flavia

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), its decay products and other elements from the radioactive series of uranium ( 238 U and 235 U) and thorium ( 232 Th) are an important source of human exposure to natural radioactivity. The worldwide evaluation of health radiobiological effects and risks from population exposure to natural radionuclides is a growing concern. Radionuclides such as radon ( 222 Rn), the thoron ( 220 Rn), radio ( 2 '2'6Ra), thorium ( 23 '2Th) and potassium ( 40 K) may occur in materials commonly used in construction of dwellings and buildings. Thus, the radioactivity from marbles and granites is of importance, so that under certain conditions these materials radioactivity levels can be hazardous requiring the implementation of mitigation measurements. This research presents a technical protocol marble factories for the control human exposure to natural radioactivity exhaled from granitic rocks. The protocol was based on measurements of the 222 Rn and 220 Rn concentration in Brazilian granite rocks commonly nationally and exported. The 222 Rn and 220 Rn measurements were done using the AlphaGUARD (Saphymo GmbH) and RAD7 (Durridge Company) apparatus, respectively. The samples of granite were sealed in glass jars for 40 days in to achieve secular equilibrium between 226 Ra and 222 Rn radionuclides. The measurements were performed on Applied Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the Federal Technological University of Parana. Also, solid-state nuclear track detectors CR-39 were installed in a marble factory environments located in Curitiba - Parana for the evaluation of 222 Rn concentrations in workplaces. The CR-39 detectors were exposed for about 90 days and submitted to etching process. The alpha particle tracks were observed using an optical microscope. Some granite samples analyzed presented 222 Rn concentrations of attention, since the average values ranged from 3 ± 1 Bq/m 3 to 2087 ± 19 Bq/m 3 . The results obtained

  11. Exploration of radon affected work and living places and methods for the reduction of the radon exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streil, T

    2000-01-01

    High radon concentration in work and living places are caused by a high geological radon potential of the soil, by technological processes, the use of building materials with high uranium, thorium and radium content and the building construction. Further the influence of the working and living conditions on the dose estimation is very important. Especially the equilibrium factor and the unattached fraction are influenced by the working and living conditions. Further we report on radon risk mapping, the search for radon affected work and living places and the experiences to propose the remedial action or radon protected building construction resulting from the radon risk of the soil. Further the quality control of this remediation or construction process respectively the efficiency of the radon protection will be presented. But not in all situations are remedial actions possible. Therefore is for exposure reduction a radon personal dosimetry necessary for a limitation and optimization the working or living time under high radon concentration. The personal radon dosimetry on workplaces, for instance water works, mines, show caves and other work places with high radon levels is up to now not sufficient resolved. The possibility to include alert functions, the signalisation of high dose rate and also the time resolute dose determination give new chances for a real online dosimetry in such very dangerous places. (author)

  12. High annual radon concentration in dwellings and natural radioactivity content in nearby soil in some rural areas of Kosovo and Metohija

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulan Ljiljana R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some previous studies on radon concentration in dwellings of some areas of Kosovo and Metohija have revealed a high average radon concentration, even though the detectors were exposed for three months only. In order to better design a larger study in this region, the annual measurements in 25 houses were carried out as a pilot study. For each house, CR-39-based passive devices were exposed in two rooms for the two consecutive six-month periods to account for seasonal variations of radon concentration. Furthermore, in order to correlate the indoor radon with radium in nearby soil and to improve the knowledge of the natural radioactivity in the region, soil samples near each house were collected and 226Ra, 232Th, 40K activity concentration were measured. The indoor radon concentration resulted quite high from the average (163 Bq/m3 and generally it did not differ considerably between the two rooms and the two six-month periods. The natural radionuclides in soil resulted to be distributed quite uniformly. Moreover, the correlation between the226Ra content in soil and radon concentration in dwellings resulted to be low (R2=0.26. The annual effective dose from radon and its short-lived progeny (5.5 mSv, in average was calculated by using the last ICRP dose conversion factors. In comparison, the contribution to the annual effective dose of outdoor gamma exposure from natural radionuclides in soil is nearly negligible (66 mSv. In conclusion, the observed high radon levels are only partially correlated with radium in soil; moreover, a good estimate of the annual average of radon concentration can be obtained from a six-month measurement with a proper choice of exposure period, which could be useful when designing large surveys.

  13. Environmental and indoor study of Radon concentration in San Joaquin area, Queretaro, Mexico, first results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojo Alonso, N.A.; Kotsarenko, A.; Yutsis, V.; Hernandez Silva, G.; Perego, P.; Fazio, M.; Grimalsky, V.; Koshevaya, S.; Foglia, F.; Cortes Silva, A.; García Martínez, R.; Martínez Reyes, J.; Norini, G.; Groppelli, G.

    2013-01-01

    A highly contaminated zone with a maximum over 57,000 Bq/m 3 was discovered in a populated community “Agua de Venados” during the 2009–2011 soil Radon survey in San Joaquin, Queretaro State, Mexico. The indoor Radon monitoring accomplished in 2 different époques in a nearby 4 dwellings has shown an increased Radon hazard in 1 of the 4 buildings (about 300 Bq/m 3 ) during a rainy season and highly elevated indoor Radon levels (over 400 Bq/m 3 ) already in 3 buildings during a dry season. The averaged diurnal indoor Radon variations are in a correlation with the atmospheric pressure and the air humidity and are independent on the air temperature. The maximum indoor Radon hazard for dwellings is estimated for the morning interval 5–10 a.m. - Highlights: ► Emanative zone of 57,000 Bq/m 3 was found in area “Agua de Venados”. ► Indoor Radon level in a nearby dwellings elevates during a dry season. ► Maximum risk for residents was estimated during the daily interval 5–10 a.m

  14. Effect of ventilation on concentrations of indoor radon- and thoron-progeny: Experimental verification of a simple model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheets, R.W.; Thompson, C.C.

    1993-01-01

    Different models relating the dependence of radon ( 222 Rn)- and thoron ( 220 Rn)-progeny activities on room ventilation rates are presented in the literature. Some of these models predict that, as the rate of ventilation increases, activities of thoron progeny decrease more rapidly than those of radon progeny. Other models predict the opposite trend. In this study alpha activities of the radon progeny, 218 Po, 214 Pb, and 214 Bi, together with the thoron progeny 212 Pb, were measured over periods of several days in two rooms of a closed, heated house. Effective ventilation rates were calculated from measured 214 Pb/ 214 Bi ratios. A simple model in which progeny concentrations decrease by radioactive decay and by dilution with outside air has been used to calculate 212 Pb/ 214 Pb ratios as a function of ventilation rate. Calculated ratios are found to correlate significantly with experimentally-determined ratios (R 2 ∼ 0.5--0.8 at p < 0.005) confirming that, for this house, thoron progeny activities decrease faster than radon progeny activities with increasing rates of ventilation

  15. Do the earth tides have an influence on short-term variations in radon concentration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnet, I.; Prochazka, J.; Skalsky, L.

    1997-01-01

    The short term (diurnal) indoor radon variations are often explained as a result of temperature and air pressure changes inside a dwelling (the so-called stack effect). The observations of indoor and soil gas radon variations related to the temperature and pressure variations in a test dwelling at Lipova, Northern Bohemia, have not proved the expected correlation between the radon and climatic parameters. The stack effect was clearly observed at the beginning of the four week cycles, when the indoor temperature growth was obvious. However, the indoor radon variations were of the same range or higher than at the beginning of the cycles during the whole week cycles, even when the temperature changes were of the 1-3 o C range. A theory is therefore presented, supported by the known fluctuations of the groundwater level caused by the Earth tides, and the widely observed free air radon variations. According to this theory, the Earth tides lead to the compression of the aquifers and synchronous rise of the groundwater level, which displaces the soil gas with radon into the atmosphere or dwellings. The Earth tide components were calculated for the studied locality and time intervals. The very good phase fit of the amplitudes of gravity variations, vertical and volume strain and vertical displacement with the indoor radon variations was found. This agreement leads to the conclusion that the Earth tides can be considered as one of the causes of the indoor radon variations. This conclusion is also supported by the observations of the radon variations in the underground unventilated spaces under constant temperature and air pressure conditions. (Author)

  16. Protection of workers in radon-rich atmospheres: the mandate for quick determination of radon-daughter concentrations and a solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shreve, J.D. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The elementary observation of near-constancy of the sum of alpha and beta activity on a air sampling filter has led to a novel instrument. By exploiting this observation, a good working level determination can be made in a total time of 3.5 minutes. Second cycling and a total elapsed time of 7.5 minutes permits two determinations on the same filter, the second of which is more indifferent to daughter equilibration factors than either the 3.5 minute value or that defined by the Kusnetz method. This instrument and auxiliaries, designed by Kerr-McGee Corporation and licensed to MDA Scientific, Inc. for manufacturing and marketing, also permit estimates of external gamma radiation present at the uranium mine site, the equilibration factor of the radon daughters and the radon concentration itself. Its capacity to reduce exposure of underground workers via quicker detection and correction of high radiation areas is unmatched in a portable device. It has been found to at least double the efficiency of ventilation technicians. This sum of attributes is unobtainable in any other known instrument marketed in the world today

  17. Radon and its decay products in living spaces: estimation of radiation exposure and risks for radon levels measured in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, W.

    1984-03-01

    After a general introduction to radiation levels, radon and its daughter products are considered. Radon in living spaces is discussed, in particular the radon concentration in family houses. The influence of energy saving characteristics on the radon concentration in the indoor air includes a 'matched pair' analysis and ventilation installations and dwell duration of indoor air noxious agents. Estimation of the radiation risks are determined, including risks of lung cancer, human epidemiological investigations (miners and radiation levels in living spaces), and possible results of energy saving characteristics. Finally characteristics and recommendations in general are given. (A.N.K.)

  18. EMISSION OF SOIL GAS RADON CONCENTRATION AROUND MAIN CENTRAL THRUST IN UKHIMATH (RUDRAPRAYAG) REGION OF GARHWAL HIMALAYA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswal, Sunita; Kandari, Tushar; Sahoo, B K; Bourai, A A; Ramola, R C

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the result of systematic measurement of the soil gas radon concentrations is discussed and the background values are defined along and around the Main Central Thrust (MCT) in Ukhimath region of Garhwal Himalaya, India. The Ukhimath region is being subjected to intense neotectonic activities like earthquake and landslide. For the systematic study, the measurement has been done in grid pattern form along and across the MCT. The soil gas radon concentrations were measured using RAD7 with appropriate accessories and followed proper protocol proposed by the manufacturer. The soil gas concentration was measured at different depths 10, 30 and 50 cm with a wide range of different points from the MCT. At 10 cm depth, the soil gas radon concentration was found to vary from 125 to 800 Bq m -3 with an average of 433 Bq m -3 ; at 30 cm, it was found to vary from 203 to 32 500 Bq m -3 with an average of 2387 Bq m -3 ; and at 50 cm, it was found to vary from 1330 to 46 000 Bq m -3 with an average of 15 357 Bq m -3 The data analysis clearly reveals anomalous values along the fault. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Emission of soil gas radon concentration around main central thrust in Ukhimath (Rudraprayag) region of Garhwal Himalaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aswal, Sunita; Kandari, Tushar; Bourai, A.A.; Ramola, R.C.; Sahoo, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the result of systematic measurement of the soil gas radon concentrations is discussed and the background values are defined along and around the Main Central Thrust (MCT) in Ukhimath region of Garhwal Himalaya, India. The Ukhimath region is being subjected to intense neotectonic activities like earthquake and landslide. For the systematic study, the measurement has been done in grid pattern form along and across the MCT. The soil gas radon concentrations were measured using RAD7 with appropriate accessories and followed proper protocol proposed by the manufacturer. The soil gas concentration was measured at different depths 10, 30 and 50 cm with a wide range of different points from the MCT. At 10 cm depth, the soil gas radon concentration was found to vary from 125 to 800 Bq m -3 with an average of 433 Bq m -3 ; at 30 cm, it was found to vary from 203 to 32 500 Bq m -3 with an average of 2387 Bq m -3 ; and at 50 cm, it was found to vary from 1330 to 46 000 Bq m -3 with an average of 15 357 Bq m -3 . The data analysis clearly reveals anomalous values along the fault. (authors)

  20. Seasonal and diurnal variation of outdoor radon (222Rn) concentrations in urban and rural area with reference to meteorological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podstawczynska, A.; Pawlak, W.; Kozak, K.; Mazur, J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate temporal variability of outdoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentration registered in the center of Lodz (urban station), at Ciosny (rural station) and Krakow (suburban station) in relation to meteorological parameters (i.e. air temperature, temperature vertical gradient, wind speed, soil heat flux, volumetric water content in soil) with special consideration of urban-rural differences. Continuous measurements of 222 Rn concentration (at 60 min intervals) were performed at a height of 2 m above the ground using AlphaGUARD PQ2000PRO (ionization chamber) from January 2008 to May 2009. 222 Rn levels were characterized by a diurnal cycle with an early morning maximum and a minimum in the afternoon. The well-marked 24 h pattern of radon concentration occurred in summer at anticyclonic weather with cloudless sky, light wind and large diurnal temperature ranges. The urban measurement site was characterized by the lowest atmospheric 222 Rn concentration and an urban-rural differences of radon levels increased from winter to summer and during the nighttime periods. The maximum contrasts of 222 Rn levels between Lodz and Ciosny, reaching - 30 Bq m -3 , were registered in June and July during the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon (a positive thermal anomaly of a city if compared to rural area) and strong thermal inversion near the ground in the rural area. (authors)

  1. On the applicability of short time measurements to the determination of annual average of radon concentration in dwelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loskiewicz, J.; Olko, P.; Swakon, J.; Bogacz, J.; Janik, M.; Mazur, D.; Mazur, J.

    1998-01-01

    The variation of radon concentration in some houses in the Krakow region was investigated in order to compare results obtained using various measuring techniques. It is concluded that short-term measurements should last at least 4 days to avoid errors exceeding 30%; that weather parameters and human activity during the measurement should be recorded; that measurements should be repeated several times under various weather conditions; that seasonal variation in the region should be taken into account. (A.K.)

  2. Study of radon concentration and toxic elements in drinking and irrigated water and its implications in Sungai Petani, Kedah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisar Ahmad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The radon activity concentration and toxic elements have been assessed in drinking and irrigated water samples collected from different locations of Sungai Petani, Kedah, Malaysia. The water samples were collected from wells, streams and taps. A calibrated alpha spectrometer RAD-7 (Model 2890 and Atomic Absorption Spectrometers (Perkin–Elmer, Model AAnalyst 200, Shimadzu, Model AA-700 were used to estimate radon activity concentration and toxic elements, respectively. Maximum average value of radon concentration among the various types of water sources was found 14.7 ± 1.44 Bq/l in well water used for drinking and irrigation and minimum was found 5.37 ± 0.58 Bq/l in tap water used for drinking. Contribution of radon in drinking water to indoor air and age dependent associated annual effective doses were calculated from the measured radon concentration and were found less than lower limit of recommended action level. The activity concentrations of Ni > Pb > Cd > As > Cr were found higher for streams water as compared to wells and tap water. Values of radon concentration in well water were found higher than EPA recommended level and lower than WHO action level while the annual effective doses and level of toxic elements in water reported in this study were found lower than recommended level.

  3. Project radon final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekholm, S.; Rossby, U.

    1990-01-01

    The main radiation problem in Sweden is due to radon in dwellings. At the Swedish State Power Board, R, D and D about radon has been going on since 1980. The work has concentrated on the important questions: How to find building with enhanced radon levels?; How to accurately decide on measures that will give adequate cleaning-up results, using appropriate measurement procedures; What cleaning-up effect is possible to achieve with an electro-filter?; and What cleaning-up effects are possible to achieve with different types of ventilation systems? The R, D and D-work, has been pursued in cooperation with universities of technology in Denmark and Finland, equipment manufacturers, consultants and authorities concerned. It was decided in December 1986 to give an offer to some SSPB-employees to investigate the radon situation of their dwellings, in order to test methods of measurement and cleaning-up under realistic conditions and to develop the methods to commercial maturity. The investigation was named 'Project Radon' and was carried out in three years with costs amounting to 1 M dollars. During the project less comprehensive radon measurements, named 'trace-measurements' were undertaken in about 1300 dwellings and more elaborate measurements, leading to suggestions of actions to be taken, in about 400 dwellings. Out of the suggestions, about 50 are carried out including control measurement after actions taken. The control measurement have shown that the ability to suggest appropriate actions is very successful - in just one case was a minor additional action necessary. The high reliability is achieved by always doing elaborate measurements before suggested mitigation method is decided on. (authors)

  4. Predictive analysis and mapping of indoor radon concentrations in a complex environment using kernel estimation: An application to Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropat, Georg, E-mail: georg.kropat@chuv.ch [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Rue du Grand-Pré 1, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Bochud, Francois [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Rue du Grand-Pré 1, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Jaboyedoff, Michel [Faculty of Geosciences and Environment, University of Lausanne, GEOPOLIS — 3793, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Laedermann, Jean-Pascal [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Rue du Grand-Pré 1, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Murith, Christophe; Palacios, Martha [Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Schwarzenburgstrasse 165, 3003 Berne (Switzerland); Baechler, Sébastien [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Rue du Grand-Pré 1, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Schwarzenburgstrasse 165, 3003 Berne (Switzerland)

    2015-02-01

    . - Highlights: • Kernel regression was used to map indoor radon concentration in Switzerland. • Our model explains 28% of the variations of radon concentration data. • Maps were generated considering different architectural elements and geology. • Maps showing the local probability to exceed 300 Bq/m3 were proposed. • We developed a confidence index to assess the reliability of the probability map.

  5. World Health Organization's International Radon Project 2005-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, Zhanat; Shannoun, Ferid; Zielinski, Jan M.

    2008-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies of people exposed to indoor radon have confirmed that radon in homes is a serious health hazard that can be easily mitigated. To address the issue at an international level, the World Health Organization (WHO) established the International Radon Project (IRP). The project was launched in January 2005 with its first meeting attended by 36 experts representing 17 countries. The project's scope and the key objectives were outlined at this meeting and later refined: 1-) To identify effective strategies for reducing the health impact of radon; 2-) To promote sound policy options, prevention and mitigation programs (including monitoring and evaluation of programs; 3-) To raise public, political and economical awareness about the consequences of exposure to radon (including financial institutions as target group); 4-) To estimate the global health impact of exposure to residential radon using available data on radon worldwide. WHO and its member states strive through the WHO-IRP to succeed in putting indoor radon on the environmental health agenda in countries with lower awareness of radon as a health problem and in strengthening local and national radon-related activities in countries with ongoing radon programs. Two subsequent working meetings were held: in March, 2006 in Geneva with 63 participants from 25 countries, along with representatives of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and European Commission (EC); and in March 2007 in Munich with 61 participants from 27 countries. Both meetings reviewed the IRP progress and focused on the two main outputs: 'The WHO Report on the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) due to Radon' and 'The WHO Radon Handbook'. The former applies the WHO methodology for GBD assessment and considers ways to graphically map residential radon concentrations

  6. Studies on 222Rn concentration in ground water using smart radon monitor and assessment of the radiation dose to the population of Mysuru city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrashekara, M.S.; Pruthvi Rani, K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive elements originate from the earth's crust and make their way into air, water, food and eventually in to the living system. Even though 75% of the Earth's surface is covered by water, only about 0.3 % of the total water on the Earth is available for public use. The ground water contains trace amounts of radioactive elements and these radionuclides contribute significant amount of dose to living beings, through intake of water into the human body. Radon dissolved in water is released into air when it is used for cooking, drinking, bathing and washing purposes. Exposure of population to higher concentrations of radon and its progeny for a long time causes occurrence of lung cancer and pathological effects like respiratory functional changes. Radon is a main source of ionizing radiation of natural origin and the studies on radon concentrations in drinking water are of importance. A systematic study of 226 Ra and 222 Rn concentration in the drinking water samples was carried out in Mysuru city. The concentration of 226 Ra and 222 Rn was estimated in water samples using emanometry method employing scintillation cells and alpha counting system. The 222 Rn concentration in water was also measured using a Smart Radon Monitor (SRM) for comparison of the results. SRM is a technologically advanced real time, portable, radon monitor developed at BARC, Mumbai

  7. Radon and its decay products in indoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazaroff, W.W.; Nero, A.V. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    This book is a substantive review of the current understanding of radon and its decay products in indoor air. More than 1,000 citations to the literature are included. The book is structured to examine the current state of knowledge of all aspects of the indoor radon problem. The first chapter is an overview of radon and its decay products in indoor air. The other 11 chapters are divided into four major parts. The first is concerned with sources and transport process, i.e., the generation and migration of radon in source materials, and its entry into building. The second part deals with the physical and chemical behavior of radon and radon decay products in indoor air. The third part presents evidence pertaining to the health effects and risk of exposure to radon decay products. The final part deals with both strategic and technical aspects of controlling exposures. Other topics covered include soil as a source of indoor radon (including generation, migration, and entry), techniques for modeling indoor concentration of radon, lung dosimetry, and a comprehensive strategy for control of indoor radon

  8. Contribution of radon in natural gas to the dose from aiborne radon-daughters in homes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, C.J.; Moore, R.E.; Rohwer, P.S.

    1973-01-01

    Data have been obtained on the radon concentration in natural gas supplied to several metropolitan areas in the United States. The average value of 20 pCi/l was selected to estimate the contribution of this source of natural radioactivity to doses from radon-daughters received by individuals in homes. Radon-daughter concentrations in the home atmosphere were calculated by use of computer programs for an 8000 ft 3 house in which 27 ft 3 of gas per day was used for cooking in an unvented kitchen range. The total estimated dose to the bronchial epithelium included contributions from radon plus daughters in the outside ventilation air, each of which was assumed to be present at a concentration of 0.13 pCi/l, and from the radon plus daughters in the natural gas. The latter contribution averaged approximately 3 percent of the total dose. There was a 3.5 percent decrease in the estimated total dose when the air change rate increased from 0.25 to 2.0 per hour. We conclude that radon and radon-daughters entering the home with natural gas produce a negligible fraction of the total dose to the respiratory system of home occupants from airborne radon-daughters

  9. Mapping of groundwater radon potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aekerblom, G.; Lindgren, J.

    1997-01-01

    The domestic use of water with elevated radon concentration may represent a public health hazard, partly due to the release of radon to the indoor air. While only a limited number of countries have implemented regulations with respect to radon in water, many more are considering doing so. The compulsory limits proposed by Swedish authorities are 100 Bq/1 for public water, while water from private wells is not to exceed 1000 Bq/1. Furthermore, it is recommended that water with a radon content above 500 Bq/1 should not be given to children under five years of age. In Sweden, the estimated number of wells with radon levels above 1000 Bq/1 exceeds 10,000, with a considerable amount in excess of 10,000 Bq/1. The highest radon concentration in a well supplying drinking water encountered so far is 57,000 Bq/1. Radon levels exceeding 500 Bq/1 are almost exclusively found in wells drilled into bedrock and in springs with intramontaneous water. Elevated ground water radon levels require that the water has passed through bedrock with elevated concentration of uranium, or through fractures with coatings of minerals containing enhanced concentrations of radium-226. Intramontaneous water from areas with uranium-bearing rock types (e.g. uranium-rich granites, pegmatites and vulcanites) often manifests elevated radon levels. Routines for the establishment of risk maps focusing on water are currently under development. The backbone of the process is the access to high spatial resolution radiometric information together with bedrock and soil information on a detailed scale (1:50,000). This information is available from the Geological Survey of Sweden, which is routinely carrying out airborne measurements at an altitude of 30 m and a line spacing of 200 m. While some 60% of Sweden is covered up to now, 75 % is expected to be covered within the next ten years. Other available databases utilized in the risk mapping process include radon measurements in wells, geochemical data from

  10. An affordable proxy of representative national survey on radon concentration in dwellings: Design, organisation and preliminary evaluation of representativeness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antignani, Sara; Carelli, Vinicio; Cordedda, Carlo; Zonno, Fedele; Ampollini, Marco; Carpentieri, Carmela; Venoso, Gennaro; Bochicchio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Representative national surveys in dwellings are important to unbiasedly evaluate the exposure of the general population to radon. In Italy, a representative national survey was conducted from 1989 to 1996, which involved about 5600 dwellings in 232 towns. Later on, some Regions carried out more detailed surveys, but a new national survey in dwellings is necessary in order to obtain a more thorough estimate of radon concentration distribution over the Italian territory. The need to make this survey in an affordable way led to implement a new approach based on the collaboration between the Istituto Superiore di Sanità and a national company with workplaces and employees' homes throughout the country. The intent is to carry out a proxy of a population representative survey by measuring radon concentration in the homes of a random sample of the company employees. The realisation of this survey was affordable, thanks to the availability of corporate e-mail for each employee, intranet service, and company internal mail service. A dedicated web procedure and e-questionnaires allowed to automatically manage the contact with employees and to collect their data, which were both cost- and time-saving. Using this e-mail contact approach, 53% of contacted employees consented to participate in the survey. Radon concentration passive measuring devices were distributed to about 7000 dwellings, using about 14000 CR-39 detectors (two measured rooms per dwelling). In order to reduce costs, the devices were exposed for 12 months instead of two consecutive 6-month periods (as with the former national survey). A first checking of the actual representativeness of the sample was done by comparing characteristics of dwellings and occupants in the sample with corresponding data from the latest National Census. This was accomplished thanks to the fact that the questions in the survey questionnaire were tailored to the categories adopted for the Census questionnaire. A preliminary

  11. 30 CFR 57.5046 - Protection against radon gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Protection against radon gas. 57.5046 Section... Protection against radon gas. Where radon daughter concentrations exceed 10 WL, respirator protection against radon gas shall be provided in addition to protection against radon daughters. Protection against radon...

  12. Seasonal variation of radon daughters concentrations in the atmosphere and in precipitation at the Japanese coast of the Sea of Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, T.; Okabe, S.; Aoki, M.

    1988-01-01

    The atmospheric radon daughters concentration at Fukui in the Japanese coastal region of the Sea of Japan shows a seasonal variation whose high values appear in summer and low values in winter. On the other hand, the radon daughters concentration in precipitation at Fukui and that in the maritime atmosphere over the Sea of Japan are high in winter and low in summer. It is concluded from these phenomena that the greater part of the continental radon and its daughters are transported by seasonal winds from Siberia and China to Japan across the Sea of Japan in winter. However, when the air masses approach the shore, the cumulonimbus grows and the heavy snowfall scavenges out the radon daughters from the air masses in large quantities at the Japanese coastal region of the Sea of Japan. (author)

  13. Study of the influence of the geological and meteorological conditions and pollution on radon and thoron concentrations in outdoor air in Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amrane, M.; Misdaq, A.; Oufni, L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Radon and thoron concentrations were measured in the outdoor air in different cities in Morocco by using a method based on determining the mean critical angles of etching of the CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors. Alpha-and beta-activities due to the radon and thoron series were evaluated in the same locations. The influence of the geological and meteorological conditions as well as pollution on the radon and thoron concentrations in the outdoor air of studied areas was investigated. Continuous measurements of radon in the studied areas were performed and data obtained were compared with results obtained by using and AlphaGuard counter

  14. Computations of concentration of radon and its decay products against time. Computer program; Obliczanie koncentracji radonu i jego produktow rozpadu w funkcji czasu. Program komputerowy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machaj, B. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1996-12-31

    This research is aimed to develop a device for continuous monitoring of radon in the air, by measuring alpha activity of radon and its short lived decay products. The influence of alpha activity variation of radon and its daughters on the measured results is of importance and requires a knowledge of this variation with time. Employing the measurement of alpha radiation of radon and of its short lived decay products, require knowledge of radon concentration variation and its decay products against the time. A computer program in Turbo Pascal language was therefore developed performing the computations employing the known relations involved, the program being adapted for IBM PC computers. The presented program enables computation of activity of {sup 222}Rn and its daughter products: {sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb, {sup 214}Bi and {sup 214}Po every 1 min within the period of 0-255 min for any state of radiation equilibrium between the radon and its daughter products. The program permits also to compute alpha activity of {sup 222}Rn + {sup 218}Po + {sup 214}Po against time and the total alpha activity at selected interval of time. The results of computations are stored on the computer hard disk in ASCII format and are used a graphic program e.g. by DrawPerfect program to make diagrams. Equations employed for computation of the alpha activity of radon and its decay products as well as the description of program functions are given. (author). 2 refs, 4 figs.

  15. Determination of the speed of gases in the subsoil by means of method based on the variations of the concentration of the gas radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Vindas, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper a theoretic model is proposed to calculate the gas velocity in the subsoil based on radon concentration variations. The general transport equation for radon in a homogeneous soil with constant porosity is assumed. The diffusion coefficient and the gas velocity being constant. In order to illustrate the model, three geological areas were considered: the Irazu and Arenal volcanoes, situated in the volcanic range in costa Rica, and the Agua Caliente fault located in San Jose, Costa Rica. (Author) [es

  16. The significance of radon in radioactive pollution of environment. Pt. 2. Radon effect on living organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossakowski, S.; Dziura, A.; Kossakowski, A.

    1998-01-01

    Authors review the history of radon monitoring. Epidemiological studies of lung cancer and its correlation to radon concentration in mines and buildings are described. The influence of radon on animals living in the buildings built from waste materials is described. Authors review plans concerning creation of radon monitoring system in Poland. The necessity of monitoring influence of radon on animals is described

  17. Dynamics of soil gas radon concentration in a highly permeable soil based on a long-term high temporal resolution observation series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Katalin Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Horváth, Ákos; Szabó, Csaba

    2013-10-01

    This paper studies the temporal variation of soil gas radon activity concentration in a highly permeable (k = 2.0E-11 m(2)) sandy-gravelly soil in order to understand if temporal variation of soil gas radon activity concentration can affect geogenic radon potential determination. Geogenic radon potential provides information about the potential risk from radon. Its calculation takes into account the equilibrium, saturated at infinite depth, soil gas radon activity concentration (c∞). This concentration may vary at annual time scale due to the environmental conditions. A long-term (yearly) and high temporal resolution (15 min) observation, applied in this study, reveal various temporal features such as long-term trend, seasonality, daily periodicity and sudden events in soil gas radon time series. Results show seasonal and daily periodical variation of the measured soil gas radon activity concentration (csoilRn) in a highly permeable sandy-gravelly soil with definite seasons without obvious long transitional periods. The winter (from October 2010 to April 2011) is characterized by 2.5 times higher average soil gas radon activity concentration (median is 7.0 kBq m(-3)) than the summer (August, September 2010 and May, June, July 2011) (median is 2.8 kBq m(-3)). Daily periodicity, which is much less than the seasonal one, controls the soil gas radon activity concentration mainly in the summer season. Average (AM) value of csoilRn is higher at night than in the daytime with about 18% and 3.8% in summer and in winter, respectively. As a conclusion, in case of single csoilRn measurement on a highly permeable (k ≥ 2.0E-11 m(2)) soil, similar to our test site, csoilRn should be corrected according to the seasons for calculating the equilibrium activity concentration c∞ value. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Methods of radon remediation in Finnish dwellings; Asuntojen radonkorjauksen menetelmaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arvela, H.

    1995-12-01

    A study was made of remedial measures taken in dwellings with high indoor radon concentrations and the results obtained. The data regarding the remedial measures taken in 400 dwellings was obtained from a questionnaire study. The mean annual average indoor radon concentration before the remedies was 1.500 Bq/m{sup 3}, the concentration exceeding in nearly every house the action level of 400 Bq/m{sup 3}. After the measures were taken the mean indoor radon concentration was 500 Bq/m{sup 3}. The resulting indoor radon concentration was less than 400 Bq/m{sup 3} in 60 percent of the dwellings. The best results were achieved using sub-slab-suction and radon well. These methods effectively decrease both the flow of radon bearing air from soil into dwellings and the radon concentration of leakage air. Typical reduction rates in radon concentration were 70-95 percent. The action level was achieved in more than 70 percent of the houses. Sealing the entry routes and improvement of the ventilation resulted typically in reduction rates of 10-50 percent. The goal of the report is to give useful information for the house owners, the do-it-yourself-mitigators, the mitigation firms and the local authorities. The report includes practical guidance, price information and examples of remedial measures. (13 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.).

  19. Determination of the radon concentration in soil and ground water and its association with the seismicity; Determinacion de la concentracion del radon en suelo y agua subterranea y su asociacion con la sismicidad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, P.; Segovia, N. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Azorin, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The coast of the Mexican Pacific is one of the seismic areas more active of the world due to the subduction of the badges of Coconuts and Rivera under the badge of North America. The earthquakes that happen in this part of Mexico they are of great magnitude and they affect to the central plateau of the country where finds the biggest population density. On the other hand the coast of the Gulf of Mexico presents one relatively low seismic activity. It is in this region where it is the nuclear plant of Laguna Verde (PNLV) and the studies of seismicity of the area should be carried out for questions of nuclear security. One carries out a study of fluctuations of the concentration of the radon in floor and it dilutes underground in the mentioned areas using accustomed to detectors of nuclear appearances (LR-115). Possibly they were also used detecting automatic (Clipperton sounds out). In some cases it was analysed the gamma radiation in soil using thermoluminescent dosemeters (CaSO{sub 4}: Dy + Ptfe). The mineralogical composition of rock samples was obtained, by means of technical conventional and Electron scanning microscopy and an X-ray diffractometer. The study one carries out along the coast of Guerrero, from Guacamayas, Mich. until Marquelia, Gro., of 1993 at 1998 and in the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, in the PNLV and their surroundings, of 1994 at 1996. The fluctuations of the radon concentration and of the gamma radiation, were analysed in function of the local seismic activity, the meteorological parameters and those characteristic geologic. In the area of the PNLV, the results showed that in general the averages of those value of the radon concentration, as much in floor as in water, they were low. A station located in a flaw area (New Ranch) the one that I present the values was but high of radon concentration, corresponding those but first floor to the PNLV. The seismic activity during the one period of sampling was sporadic and of low intensity and alone

  20. Measurements of indoor radon and radon progeny in Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.S.; Rodriguez, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Indoor radon has been a public concern associated with increased lung cancer risks. Radon decay products interact with indoor aerosols to form progeny with different size distributions, which may influence the lung dosimetry when the progeny are inhaled. Air pollution in Mexico City is a serious problems with high particulate concentrations, but there are few reports of indoor radon measurement. The purposes of this study were to measure the aerosol concentration, radon concentration, and radon activity size distribution in the living area of three houses in Mexico City. The radon concentration was monitored by a RGM-3 radon gas monitor (Eberline, Inc., Santa Fe, NM). A graded diffusion battery was used to determine the progeny concentration and activity size distribution. The concentration and size distribution of the indoor aerosols were monitored by a quartz, crystal microbalance cascade impactor. Our measurements showed high concentrations of indoor aerosols (20-180 gg m -3 ). However, the radon concentrations-were low ( -1 ), but showed a clear diurnal pattern with peak concentrations from 2-10 AM. The activity size distributions of radon progeny were trimodal, with peaks of 0.6 nm, 4-5 nm, and 100 rim. Most activities were associated with large particle sizes. Our results indicated that indoor radon concentration was not high, due in part to a relatively high air exchange with outdoor air. The high aerosol concentration may also play an important part in the activity size distribution of radon progeny

  1. Radon in Norwegian dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strand, T.; Green, B.M.R; Lomas, P.R.; Mangnus, K.; Stranden, E.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of radon in indoor air have been made in a total of about 7500 randomly selected dwellings in Norway from all parts of the country. The number of selected dwellings in each municipality is about proportional to its population, except for the two largest municipalities, Oslo and Bergen, where somewhat smaller samples were taken due to the higher population density. The measurements were performed by nuclear track detectors from the National Radiological Protection Boards in United Kingdom, and the integration time for the measurements was 6 months. The detectors were spread evenly over all seasons of the year to eliminate influence from seasonal variation in the radon level. One single measurement was performed in each dwelling: in the main bedroom. The results shows that the distribution of radon concentrations in Norwegian bedrooms is log-normal. The aritmetic mean of the measurements, including all categories of dwellings, is calculated to be 51 Bq/m 3 and the corresponding geometric mean to be 26 Bq/m 3 . In a large proportion of single-family houses the living room and the kitchen are located on the ground floor while the bedrooms are located one floor higher. The results of the study shows that the radon level is somewhat higher at the ground floor than on the first floor, and higher in the basement than on the first floor. Taking this into account, and assuming that measurements in bedrooms on the first floor is a representative average for living room and kitchen, the average radon concentration for Norwegian dwellings is estimated to be between 55-65 Bq/m 3 . In this estimate, possible influences of the fact that the winters 87/88 and 88/89 were much warmer than normal and may therefor have lowered the results, has been taken into account. 15 refs., 9 figs., 15 tabs

  2. Study of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentration levels in the surrounding areas of Mangaldoi, Assam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deka, P.C.; Sarkar, S.; Goswami, T.D.; Sarma, B.K.

    2006-01-01

    Natural sources contribute a significant percentage of radiation towards the total radiation exposure that humans receive. The majority of this natural radiation is harmless to humans in the ambient environment. However, radon, a major component of the natural radiation that humans are exposed to (greater than sixty percent), can pose a threat to the public health when radon gas accumulates in poorly ventilated residential and occupational settings. Measurements of concentration of radon, thoron and their decay products in various indoor environment covering four seasons of a year were carried out using the passive time-integrated method by employing LR-15 type II detectors in plastic twin-chamber dosimeter cups. The estimated indoor radon levels for well ventilated houses varied from a minimum value of 25.2 Bq.m -3 to a maximum of 80J Bq.m -3 with an annual geometric mean of 46.9 Bq.m -3 and that for poorly ventilated houses varied from a minimum value of 46.8 Bq.m -3 to a maximum of 146.8 Bq.m -3 with the annual geometric mean of 82 .2 Bq.m -3 . The thoron levels in well ventilated houses were also varied from a minimum value of 4.9 Bq.m -3 to a maximum of 21.5 Bq.m -3 with an annual geometric mean of 10.5 Bq.m -3 and that for poorly ventilated houses varied from a minimum of 6.3 Bq.m -3 to a maximum value of 29.2 Bq.m -3 with the annual geometric mean of 14.1 Bq.m -3 . Thus it is seen that both radon and thoron levels are higher in poorly ventilated houses than in well-ventilated houses. The ranges of radon and thoron progeny levels for well ventilated houses were 0.10 mWL to 0.58 mWL with an annual geometric mean of 0.21 mWL and 0.01 mWL to 0.06 mWL with an annual geometric mean of 0.03 mWL respectively. Similar variation was also observed in poorly ventilated houses. In poorly ventilated houses, the radon and thoron progeny levels varied between 0.16 mWL and 1.61 mWL with an annual geometric mean of 0.41 mWL and 0.02 to 029 mWL with the annual geometric mean

  3. Radon in public buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Hartmut; Sperrhacke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    In the years 2005 to 2008, the Radon situation and the relevant processes in different public buildings have been investigated. The results confirm that the Radon concentrations in times of using can be quite different from that of non-using periods. This is mainly caused by the differing conditions of air changement. Because of the narrow connection between the interior Radon concentration and air changement it is obvious to consider in complex the Radon situation together with measures for interior hygiene and energy saving. (orig.)

  4. Measurement of underground contamination of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) on the basis of the radon concentration in ground level air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, M.

    2001-01-01

    It was investigated whether measurements of radon concentrations in ground level air are a suitable method of detecting sub-surface soil contamination with non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The working postulation was that, due to the very high solubility of radon in NAPLs, and the resulting accumulation of radon in NAPLs, radon exhalation to the ground level air in the proximity of such NAPL contamination should be locally reduced, thus indicating contamination of sub-surface soils with NAPLs. The research work reported was to verify the working theory by way of experiments, and to finally develop a reliable detection method for NAPL contaminations. The investigations comprised theoretical studies, laboratory experiments, experiments in defined soil columns, and extensive field studies [de

  5. A search profile for dwellings with elevated radon levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, A.; Andersen, C.E.; Majborn, B.

    1996-01-01

    A search profile for dwellings with elevated radon levels has been employed to investigate possibly radon-prone areas in Denmark and to find houses suitable for radon mitigation studies. The profile is defined as dwellings which are single-family houses with slab-on-grade foundation or partly...... basement/slab-on-grade foundation built on either fractured granitic basement rocks, or fractured limestone. Clayey till areas were also included in the profile in order to confirm earlier findings. Three areas representing these surface geologies were selected for indoor radon measurements with CR-39...... track detectors, and a total of 200 houses matching the profile underwent radon measurements during the winter 1994-95. The distribution of the measured radon concentrations were found in most cases to comply with log-normal distributions. Measurements in the living rooms of houses in each of the three...

  6. Development of calibration facility for radon and its progenies at NIM (China)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J.C.; Liu, H.R.; Zhang, M.; Zheng, P.H.; Guo, Q.J.; Yang, Z.J.; Li, Z.S.; Zhang, L.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate measurement of radon and its progenies is the basis to control the radon dose and reduce the risk of lung cancer caused. The precise calibration of measuring instrument is an important part of the quality control of measurements of the concentration of radon and radon progenies. To establish Chinese national standards and realise reliable calibrations of measuring instrument for radon and its progenies, a radon chamber with regulation capability of environmental parameters, aerosol and radon concentrations was designed and constructed at National Institute of Metrology (NIM). The chamber has a total volume of ∼20 m 3 including an exposure volume of 12.44 m 3 . The radon concentration can be controlled from 12 Bq m -3 to the maximum of 232 kBq m -3 . The regulation range of temperature, relative humidity and aerosol are 0.66-44.39 deg. C, 16.4-95 %RH and 10 2 -10 6 cm -3 , respectively. The main advantages of the NIM radon chamber with respect to maintaining a stable concentration and equilibrium factor of radon progenies in a wide range through automatic regulation and control of radon and aerosol are described. (authors)

  7. Spatio-temporal variation in radon concentration in groundwater with respect to rock types: a case study from Chitradurga district, Karnataka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravikumar, P.; Davis, Deljo; Mathew, Sharika; Somashekar, R.K.; Prakash, K.L.

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made in the present study to delineate how the radon concentrations vary with respect to different geological formations and to evaluate annual effective dose exposure due to ingestion of radon. A total of 60 groundwater samples were collected from layered sequential aquifers in Chitradurga district having major rock types such as Bababudan Group, Charnockite, Chitradurga Group, Closepet granite, migmatites and granodiorite - tonalitic gneisses and Sargur Schist complex during pre-monsoon and post-season of the year 2011. Radon measurement was made using Durridge RAD-7 radon-in-air monitor, connected to RAD H 2 O accessory with closed loop aeration concept. In the present study, the radon activity ranged from 0 to 186.6 Bq/L and 0 to 150.6 Bq/L during pre- and post-monsoon seasons of the year 2011, with 56.67 % (17 samples) of samples during both the seasons exceeding the EPA's MCL value of 11.1 Bq/L. The annual mean radon activity in the groundwater was higher in the area having Chitradurga rock group formations (78.1 Bq/L) followed by Sargur-Satyamangalam schist complex group (56.8 bq/L), migmatites and granodiorite-tonalitic Gneisses group (56.3 Bq/L), Closepet granite (42.7 Bq/L), Charnonkite (29.1 Bq/L) and Bababudan Group (22.2 Bq/L). It is inferred that radon concentration found to depend on the tectonic structure, geology of the area and on the presence of uranium minerals in these rocks. The annual effective dose resulting from radon in groundwater in the Chitradurga district were significantly lower than UNSCEAR and WHO recommended limit of 1 mSv/y. (author)

  8. Radon and the environment - 222Rn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-06-01

    After having presented some physical and chemical characteristics of radon 222, this report describes the presence of radon in the environment (in the atmosphere and in soft waters), discusses the radio-toxic effect of radon on human health (exposure, epidemiology, dose calculation, share of radon in population exposure to ionizing radiations), comments the presence of radon in buildings, briefly describes actions aimed at reducing radon concentration within buildings, briefly addresses the issue of professional exposure to radon, evokes regulatory aspects (at the international level, in France, in Switzerland), and comments principles and practices of radon measurement in buildings, water, and underground cavities

  9. Effect of spring water on the radon concentration in the air at Masutomi spa in Yamanashi Prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Masayo; Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    The concentrations of 222 Rn existing in air have been studied by using a convenient and highly sensitive Pico-rad detector system at Masutomi spa in Yamanashi Prefecture, Japan. The measurements in air were carried out indoors and outdoors during the winter of 2000 and the summers of 1999 and 2005. The concentrations of 222 Rn in spring water in this region were measured by the liquid scintillation method. The concentrations of natural radionuclides contained in soils surrounding spa areas were also examined by means of the γ-ray energy spectrometry technique using a Ge diode detector to investigate the correlation between the radionuclides contents and 222 Rn concentrations in air at each point of interest. The atmospheric 222 Rn concentrations in these areas were high, ranging from 5 Bq/m 3 to 2676 Bq/m 3 . The radon concentration at each hotel was high in the order of the bath room, the dressing room, the lobby, and the outdoor area near the hotel, with averages and standard deviations of the concentration of 441 ± 79 Bq/m 3 , 351 ± 283 Bq/m 3 , 121 ± 5 Bq/m 3 , and 23 ± 1 Bq/m 3 , respectively. The source of 222 Rn in the air in the bath room is more likely to be the spring water than the soil. The spring water plays carries the radon to the atmosphere. Our measurements indicated that the 222 Rn concentration in the air was affected by the 222 Rn concentration in spring water rather than that in soil. (author)

  10. Contribution to the characterization of 222-radon concentrations variability in water to the understanding of an aquifer behaviour in fractured medium: example of the Ploemeur site, Morbihan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Druillennec, Th.

    2007-06-01

    Heterogeneous fractured aquifers which developed in crystalline rocks, such as schist or granite, supply 20% of tap water production of Brittany. These fractured media present a large range of permeability. In these aquifers, fluid flow and transport of elements dissolved in water are strongly related on the geometry of the fractured network. Increasing the knowledge of the hydrogeological behaviour of the aquifer is fundamental for the management and the protection of the groundwater resources. Radon-222 is a radioactive noble gas produced from radium-226 further to the radioactive decay of uranium-238; it occurs naturally in ground waters and derives primarily from U-rich rocks and minerals that have been in contact with water. Radon-222 concentrations in waters are liable to provide significant and relevant information on both the geometry of a fracture network and the flow distribution. Furthermore, radon may also be used as a tracer in the aquifer of water exchanges between zones of variable permeability. Three main results were obtained in this study: 1. An accurate characterisation of the radon concentrations in water was carried out in the Ploemeur aquifer (Brittany, France). These results highlight the variability in the spatial and vertical distributions of 222 Rn activity in groundwater together with a wide range of concentrations extending from 0 to 1 500 Bq.L -1 . 2. The influence of fracture aperture on radon content in groundwater has been demonstrated with the modelling of radon concentration. Indeed, the satisfactory results obtained with a simple crack model highlight that the geometry of the fracture network controls the radon activity in groundwater. 3. Thus, the results of pumping tests performed in the boreholes improved our understanding of the system. After the pumping test, an increase of the radon content in groundwater occurred and evidenced a contribution of a radon-rich water to supply the flow rate that seems to come from the low

  11. Indoor radon and earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saghatelyan, E.; Petrosyan, L.; Aghbalyan, Yu.; Baburyan, M.; Araratyan, L.

    2004-01-01

    For the first time on the basis of the Spitak earthquake of December 1988 (Armenia, December 1988) experience it is found out that the earthquake causes intensive and prolonged radon splashes which, rapidly dispersing in the open space of close-to-earth atmosphere, are contrastingly displayed in covered premises (dwellings, schools, kindergartens) even if they are at considerable distance from the earthquake epicenter, and this multiplies the radiation influence on the population. The interval of splashes includes the period from the first fore-shock to the last after-shock, i.e. several months. The area affected by radiation is larger vs. Armenia's territory. The scale of this impact on population is 12 times higher than the number of people injured in Spitak, Leninakan and other settlements (toll of injured - 25 000 people, radiation-induced diseases in people - over 300 000). The influence of radiation directly correlates with the earthquake force. Such a conclusion is underpinned by indoor radon monitoring data for Yerevan since 1987 (120 km from epicenter) 5450 measurements and multivariate analysis with identification of cause-and-effect linkages between geo dynamics of indoor radon under stable and conditions of Earth crust, behavior of radon in different geological mediums during earthquakes, levels of room radon concentrations and effective equivalent dose of radiation impact of radiation dose on health and statistical data on public health provided by the Ministry of Health. The following hitherto unexplained facts can be considered as consequences of prolonged radiation influence on human organism: long-lasting state of apathy and indifference typical of the population of Armenia during the period of more than a year after the earthquake, prevalence of malignant cancer forms in disaster zones, dominating lung cancer and so on. All urban territories of seismically active regions are exposed to the threat of natural earthquake-provoked radiation influence

  12. Distribution of indoor radon levels in Mexico

    CERN Document Server

    Espinosa, G; Rickards, J; Gammage, R B

    1999-01-01

    Our laboratory has carried out a systematic monitoring and evaluation of indoor radon concentration levels in Mexico for ten years. The results of the distribution of indoor radon levels for practically the entire country are presented, together with information on geological characteristics, population density, socioeconomic levels of the population, and architectural styles of housing. The measurements of the radon levels were made using the passive method of nuclear tracks in solids with the end-cup system. CR-39 was used as the detector material in combination with a one-step chemical etching procedure and an automatic digital- image counting system. Wherever a high level was measured, a confirming measurement was made using a dynamic method. The results are important for future health studies, including the eventual establishment of patterns for indoor radon concentration, as it has been done in the USA and Europe.

  13. Distribution of indoor radon levels in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J.I.; Rickards, J.; Gammage, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    Our laboratory has carried out a systematic monitoring and evaluation of indoor radon concentration levels in Mexico for ten years. The results of the distribution of indoor radon levels for practically the entire country are presented, together with information on geological characteristics, population density, socioeconomic levels of the population, and architectural styles of housing. The measurements of the radon levels were made using the passive method of nuclear tracks in solids with the end-cup system. CR-39 was used as the detector material in combination with a one-step chemical etching procedure and an automatic digital- image counting system. Wherever a high level was measured, a confirming measurement was made using a dynamic method. The results are important for future health studies, including the eventual establishment of patterns for indoor radon concentration, as it has been done in the USA and Europe

  14. Elevated radon and thoron concentrations from natural radioactivity in building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.; Vivyurka, A.

    1980-01-01

    Radon levels in excess of 20 mWL were observed in an apartment building under construction in Elliot Lake. Tracer studies showed ventilation periods as long as 29 hours since the ventilation system of the building was not yet working. It was concluded that, once the contribution from thoron daughters was taken into account, the natural radioactivity of the concrete and other building materials was sufficient to produce the observed levels of radioactivity

  15. Short-term temporal variations of soil gas radon concentration and comparison of measurement techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Neznal, M.; Matolín, M.; Just, G.; Turek, Karel

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 108, č. 1 (2004), s. 55-63 ISSN 0144-8420 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK2067107; GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Grant - others:Projekt SÚJB(CZ) R/2/2000 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1048901 Keywords : radon * soil gas * temporal variations Subject RIV: DL - Nuclear Waste, Radioactive Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 0.617, year: 2003

  16. Developmental toxicology of radon exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikov, M.R.; Cross, F.T.; Mast, T.J.; Palmer, H.E.; James, A.C.; Thrall, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    Concerns about hazards associated with radon exposure in dwellings may be especially relevant to pregnant women, many of whom spend substantial amounts of time in their homes. There are few data concerning the placental transfer and fetoplacental distribution of inhaled radon and decay products or their effects on the conceptus. We performed a study in rats to determine if prenatal effects could be produced by prolonged inhalation exposures to high concentrations of radon throughout gestation. A group of 43 pregnant rats was exposed 18 h d -1 , at a rate of 124 working level months (WLM) per day, from 6 to 19 days of gestation (dg), of radon and daughters adsorbed onto ore dust. A group of 26 pregnant rats from the same shipment was exposed to a filtered-air atmosphere as controls. At 20 dg, the rats were removed from the chambers, killed, and necropsied. The fetuses were evaluated for the presence of toxic effects, which included detailed teratology protocols. These exposures did not produce detectable reproductive toxicity nor teratogenic change. Two other rats were removed from the radon chambers during the last day of exposure, and their tissues were analyzed to determine the distribution of radioactivity and for dosimetry. Samples from these rats suggested that the dose rates to the placenta were roughly threefold those to the fetus but were similar to those to the liver and femur of the pregnant rats. These data indicate that the dose to the conceptus from the decay of placentally transferred radon and its progeny is more important than the contribution of translocated decay products. Translocated radon decay products are an important source of radiation doses to placental structures, however, and may have most of the radioactivity content at birth

  17. Development of a radon chamber and measurement of the radon solubility in tissues; Entwicklung einer Radonkammer und Messung der Radonloeslichkeit in Gewebe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Andreas

    2015-04-22

    Every year thousands of patients with inflammatory diseases of the musculoskeletal system undergo radon therapy, but the molecular mechanism and the risk of this therapy are not understood. To study the effects of radon exposure in vitro and in vivo we constructed a radon exposure chamber in the framework of the GREWIS project. With this device we are able to expose samples under controlled and reproducible conditions including the radon galleries in Austria and Germany. Adjustable parameters are radon activity-concentration, temperature, humidity and exposure time. These parameters are permanently monitored and controlled. During experiments with cell cultures it is also possible to adjust the CO{sub 2}-concentration. In addition, experiments with mice can be performed with this setup. To measure the radon kinetics in different types of tissue we exposed tissue samples like fat or muscle and mice in the radonchamber. Afterwards we measured the -spectra of the short living radon decay products lead-214 and bismuth-214 in the exposed samples with a HPGe-Detector. We recorded the spectra at different time points after exposure and calculated the initial amount of radon at the end of the exposure period in the sample and investigated the diffusion of the radon out of it. We compared the results from different types of tissue but also activated coal. In an activated coal sample the radon is bound to it via Van-der-Waals-force and the decay spectra are governed by the life time of the bound radon (3,8 days). In contrast in the biological samples the primary radon diffuses out of the samples in less than 20 minutes and the spectra follow the kinetics of the decay of the daughter products. These measurements where performed for the first time under therapy conditions like in radon galleries and also with higher radon concentration. In our experiments we could see an enhanced accumulation of radon and its decay products in fatty tissue compared to muscle tissue. Also in

  18. Comparison of seasonal variability in European domestic radon measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves-Kirkby, C. J.; Denman, A. R.; Phillips, P. S.; Crockett, R. G. M.; Sinclair, J. M.

    2010-03-01

    Analysis of published data characterising seasonal variability of domestic radon concentrations in Europe and elsewhere shows significant variability between different countries and between regions where regional data is available. Comparison is facilitated by application of the Gini Coefficient methodology to reported seasonal variation data. Overall, radon-rich sedimentary strata, particularly high-porosity limestones, exhibit high seasonal variation, while radon-rich igneous lithologies demonstrate relatively constant, but somewhat higher, radon concentrations. High-variability regions include the Pennines and South Downs in England, Languedoc and Brittany in France, and especially Switzerland. Low-variability high-radon regions include the granite-rich Cornwall/Devon peninsula in England, and Auvergne and Ardennes in France, all components of the Devonian-Carboniferous Hercynian belt.

  19. Comparison of seasonal variability in European domestic radon measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Groves-Kirkby

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of published data characterising seasonal variability of domestic radon concentrations in Europe and elsewhere shows significant variability between different countries and between regions where regional data is available. Comparison is facilitated by application of the Gini Coefficient methodology to reported seasonal variation data. Overall, radon-rich sedimentary strata, particularly high-porosity limestones, exhibit high seasonal variation, while radon-rich igneous lithologies demonstrate relatively constant, but somewhat higher, radon concentrations. High-variability regions include the Pennines and South Downs in England, Languedoc and Brittany in France, and especially Switzerland. Low-variability high-radon regions include the granite-rich Cornwall/Devon peninsula in England, and Auvergne and Ardennes in France, all components of the Devonian-Carboniferous Hercynian belt.

  20. Radon-in-breath measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, V.A.

    1981-01-01

    A review of literature on the area of radon breath measurements has shown that respiratory factors have been largely ignored. The history of breathing room-air radon concentrations and the variations in respiratory parameters for each individual have been the major contributing factors for poor reproducibility in radon breath measurements performed by past researchers

  1. Geographical Correlations between Indoor Radon Concentration and Risks of Lung Cancer, Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, and Leukemia during 1999-2008 in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Mina; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Kang, Sungchan; Park, No-Wook; Chang, Byung-Uck; Kim, Yongjae

    2017-03-24

    Indoor radon is the second most important risk factor for lung cancer and may also be a risk factor for hematopoietic cancers, particularly in children and adolescents. The present study measured indoor radon concentration nationwide at 5553 points during 1989-2009 and spatially interpolated using lognormal kriging. The incidences of lung cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and leukemia, stratified by sex and five-year age groups in each of the 234 administrative regions in the country during 1999-2008, were obtained from the National Cancer Registry and used to calculate the standardized incidence ratios. After considering regional deprivation index values and smoking rates by sex in each region as confounding variables, the cancer risks were estimated based on Bayesian hierarchical modeling. We found that a 10 Bq/m³ increase in indoor radon concentration was associated with a 1% increase in the incidence of lung cancer in male and a 7% increase in NHL in female children and adolescents in Korea aged less than 20 years. Leukemia was not associated with indoor radon concentration. The increase in NHL risk among young women requires confirmation in future studies, and the radon control program should consider children and adolescents.

  2. Daily changes of radon concentration in soil gas under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara, Evelise G.; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de, E-mail: evelise.lara@gmail.com, E-mail: heeren@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Rocha, Zildete; Rios, Francisco Javier, E-mail: rochaz@cdtn.br, E-mail: javier@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This work aims at relating the daily change in the radon concentration in soil gas in a Red Yellow Acrisol (SiBCS) under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity. The {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, U content and permeability were also performed. The measurements of radon soil gas were carried out by using an AlphaGUARD monitor. The {sup 226}Ra activity concentration was made by Gamma Spectrometry (HPGe); the permeability was carried out using the RADON-JOK permeameter and ICP-MS analysis to {sup 232}Th and U content. The soil permeability is 5.0 x 10{sup -12}, which is considered average. The {sup 226}Ra (22.2 ± 0.3 Bq.m{sup -3}); U content (73.4 ± 3.6 Bq.kg{sup -1}) and {sup 232}Th content (55.3 ± 4.0 Bq.kg{sup -1}) were considered above of average concentrations, according to mean values for soils typical (~ 35.0 Bq.kg{sup -1}) by UNSCEAR. The results showed a difference of 26.0% between the highest and the lowest concentration of radon in soil gas: at midnight (15.5 ± 1.0 kBq.m{sup -3}) and 3:00 pm, the highest mean radon concentration (21.0 ± 1.0 kBq.m{sup -3}). The room temperature and surface soil temperature showed equivalent behavior and the surface soil temperature slightly below room temperature during the entire monitoring time. Nevertheless, the relative humidity showed the highest cyclical behavior, showing a higher relationship with the radon concentration in soil gas. (author)

  3. Daily changes of radon concentration in soil gas under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Evelise G.; Oliveira, Arno Heeren de

    2015-01-01

    This work aims at relating the daily change in the radon concentration in soil gas in a Red Yellow Acrisol (SiBCS) under influence of atmospheric factors: room temperature, soil surface temperature and relative humidity. The 226 Ra, 232 Th, U content and permeability were also performed. The measurements of radon soil gas were carried out by using an AlphaGUARD monitor. The 226 Ra activity concentration was made by Gamma Spectrometry (HPGe); the permeability was carried out using the RADON-JOK permeameter and ICP-MS analysis to 232 Th and U content. The soil permeability is 5.0 x 10 -12 , which is considered average. The 226 Ra (22.2 ± 0.3 Bq.m -3 ); U content (73.4 ± 3.6 Bq.kg -1 ) and 232 Th content (55.3 ± 4.0 Bq.kg -1 ) were considered above of average concentrations, according to mean values for soils typical (~ 35.0 Bq.kg -1 ) by UNSCEAR. The results showed a difference of 26.0% between the highest and the lowest concentration of radon in soil gas: at midnight (15.5 ± 1.0 kBq.m -3 ) and 3:00 pm, the highest mean radon concentration (21.0 ± 1.0 kBq.m -3 ). The room temperature and surface soil temperature showed equivalent behavior and the surface soil temperature slightly below room temperature during the entire monitoring time. Nevertheless, the relative humidity showed the highest cyclical behavior, showing a higher relationship with the radon concentration in soil gas. (author)

  4. Indoor radon; Le radon dans les batiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The radon, a natural radioactive gas, is present almost everywhere on the earth's surface. It can be accumulated at high concentration in confined spaces (buildings, mines, etc). In the last decades many studies conducted in several countries showed that inhaling important amounts of radon rises the risk of lung cancer. Although, the radon is a naturally appearing radioactive source, it may be the subject of a human 'enhancement' of concentration. The increasing radon concentration in professional housing constitutes an example of enhanced natural radioactivity which can induce health risks on workers and public. Besides, the radon is present in the dwelling houses (the domestic radon). On 13 May 1996, the European Union Council issued the new EURATOM Instruction that establishes the basic standards of health protection of population and workers against the ionizing radiation hazards (Instruction 96/29/EURATOM, JOCE L-159 of 29 June 1996). This instruction does not apply to domestic radon but it is taken into consideration by another EURATOM document: the recommendation of the Commission 90/143/EURATOM of 21 February 1990 (JOCE L-80 of 27 March 1990). The present paper aims at establishing in accordance to European Union provisions the guidelines for radon risk management in working places, as well as in dwelling houses, where the implied risk is taken into account. This document does not deal with cases of high radon concentration on sites where fabrication, handling or storage of radium sources take place. These situations must be treated by special studies.

  5. Indoor radon levels in Greek schools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clouvas, A.; Xanthos, S.; Takoudis, G.

    2011-01-01

    Radon and gamma dose rate measurements were performed in 512 schools in 8 of the 13 regions of Greece. The distribution of radon concentration was well described by a lognormal distribution. Most (86%) of the radon concentrations were between 60 and 250 Bq m -3 with a most probable value of 135 Bq m -3 . The arithmetic and geometric means of the radon concentration are 149 Bq m -3 and 126 Bq m -3 respectively. The maximum measured radon gas concentration was 958 Bq m -3 . As expected, no correlation between radon gas concentration and indoor gamma dose rate was observed. However, if only mean values for each region are considered, a linear correlation between radon gas concentration and gamma dose rate is apparent. Despite the fact that the results of radon concentration in schools cannot be applied directly for the estimation of radon concentration in homes, the results of the present survey indicate that it is desirable to perform an extended survey of indoor radon in homes for at least one region in Northern Greece. - Highlights: → Radon detectors installed in 512 schools in 8 of 13 regions of Greece. → Most (86%) of the radon concentrations are between 60 and 250 Bq m -3 . → The arithmetic and geometric mean radon concentration is 149 Bq m -3 and 126 Bq m -3 . → Linear correlation between mean radon gas concentration and mean gamma dose rate.

  6. Modeling of indoor radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschoa, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on models for radon, which are developed not only to describe the behavior of radon and daughters since the moment that radon is created in natural sources by the alpha decay of 226 Ra up to the point that doses to humans are estimated based on the inhalation of radon and its progeny. The objective of a model should be determinant in defining the model structure and boundaries. Modeling indoors radon is particularly useful when the 226 Ra concentration in building materials and soils can be known before a house will be built with such 226 Ra bearing materials and over 226 Ra rich soils. The reported concentrations of 226 Ra in building materials range from 0.3 Bq · kg -1 in wood to about 2.6 x 10 3 Bq · kg -1 in aerated concrete based on alum shale. 30 In addition, when a house is built on a soil containing a high 226 Ra concentration, radon exhalation from the soil contributes to increase radon concentration indoors. The reported radon exhalation from soils range from 3.4 Bq · m -2 · s -1 in latosolic soil from Osaka, Japan to about 53 mBq · m -2 · s -1 in chernozemic soil from Illinois

  7. Radon Measurements in Egypt using passive etched track detectors. A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomaa, M.A.; Hussein, A.S.; El-Arabi, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Radon and its progeny may cause serious radiation harm to human health such as lung cancer and other types. Radon measurements based on alpha particles etched track detectors (LR-115, CR-39) are very attractive for assessment of radon exposure. This is due to their high sensitivity, low cost, easy to handle and retain a permanent record of data. Also these detectors can incorporate the effects of seasonal and diurnal fluctuation of radon activity concentrations due to physical, geological and meteorological factors. The present review is based mainly on the topic of passive etched track detectors for the measurements of radon in Egypt in the recent years. Published papers includes the measurements of radon in dwellings, working places, Cairo Metro stations, ancient Pharaonic places and uranium exploration galleries as well as assessment of radon in drinking water

  8. Development of measure methods of radon in indoor air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaginuma, L.T.; Pela, C.A.; Navas, E.A.; Ghilardi, A.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The development of some conventional measuring methods, aiming obtain an estimation of radon concentration in air, mainly in indoor air is described, including the charcoal absorption collector, Lucas cell and thermoluminescent dosemeters. (C.G.C)

  9. The Correlation of Radon Concentration with Various Building Attributes at U.S. Air Force Bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    these daughter products that continue to decay giving off radiation which can then lead to the development of lung cancer . The United States Air Force...USAF) is concerned about the increased risk of developing lung cancer by persons exposed to elevated levels of radon in their domiciles and in their...CONOM 0 S * 0 0 a N&NO.)C Nowfum - a w em C mec0- C Mama - 00 4.4 .Q0 0 40 VO O 02ýCt > a MW 0 5 O 0 500 0 ’-ONM > Co S- -W N 00l 0 N 0 O--0 CPe go - Na Wm

  10. Radon migration in the ground: a supplementary review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, A.B.

    1980-01-01

    Water is the most important agent in enabling radon isotopes to escape from solid material: Water absorbs kinetic energy of the recoil atom of radon; it is an active agent in altering and hydrating mineral surfaces, thus enhancing their emanating power; and it decreases the adsorption of radon on mineral surfaces. Once in rock and soil pores, radon atoms migrate by diffusion and by transport in varying proportions. In diffusion and transport calculations, it is desirable to use the radon concentration in the interstitial fluid as the concentration parameter and to include porosity explicity. The transport component is important in dry, permeable soils in the upper layers but is much reduced below depths of several tens of meters. Research in disequilibriums in radionuclides of the uranium and thorium series suggests that much assumed migration of 222 Rn is, in fact, a more general migration of uranium and radium isotopes

  11. Radon Monitoring and Early Low Background Counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Mei, D.-M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

    2011-01-01

    Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m 3 , based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m 3 based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m 3 . Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

  12. Radon monitoring and early low background counting at the Sanford Underground Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, K.J.; Mei, D.M.; Heise, J.; Durben, D.; Salve, R.

    2010-09-01

    Radon detectors have been deployed underground at the Sanford Underground Laboratory at the site of the former Homestake Mine in Lead, SD. Currently, no radon mitigation measures are in place in the underground environment, and the continuing evolution of the facility ventilation systems has led to significant variations in early airborne radon concentrations. The average radon concentration measured near the primary ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Yates shaft) is 391 Bq/m{sup 3}, based on approximately 146 days of data. The corresponding average radon concentration near the other main ventilation intake for the 4850-ft level (Ross shaft) is 440 Bq/m{sup 3} based on approximately 350 days of data. Measurements have also been collected near the 1250-ft level Ross shaft, with average radon concentrations at 180 Bq/m{sup 3}. Secondary factors that may increase the baseline radon level underground include the presence of iron oxide and moisture, which are known to enhance radon emanation. The results of the current radon monitoring program will be used for the planning of future measurements and any potential optimization of ventilation parameters for the reduction of radon in relevant areas underground.

  13. Radon and its measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penzo, Silvia

    2006-03-01

    The work reviews the topics concerning the problem of the indoor radon and its measurement. The initial stage deals with the general features of radon, from the historical remarks about its discovery to the formation mechanisms in the soil, then passing to describe the transport processes that lead the radon to enter into the buildings. The mean radon concentration distribution among the Italian regions is reported and compared with the situation in the other countries of the world. A particular importance is given to present the national law concerning the radioprotection from the natural sources of ionizing radiations; a paragraph is completely devoted to this argument and to discuss the differences between the Italian approach and the regulations applied in the Test of Europe for both workplaces and dwellings. Chapter 3 describes the different detectors and methods to measure the radon and its short mean live decay products concentrations, together with the operative procedures and guides provided by the Italian law and by the international bodies. As an example of typical radon passive measurement device. the new ENEA detector developed at the Institute of Radioprotection is presented and discussed. Appendix 1 is entirely devoted to discuss the main remedial actions for decreasing the radon indoor concentration both for old and new buildings; appendix 2 reports the main quantities related to radon and radioprotection [it

  14. Monitoring network of atmospheric Radon-222 concentration in East Asia and backward trajectory analysis of Radon-222 concentration trend at a small solitary island on pacific ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohkura, Takehisa; Yamazawa, Hiromi; Moriizumi, Jun; Hirao, Shigekazu; Iida, Takao; Guo Qiuju; Tohjima, Yasunori

    2009-01-01

    A monitoring network of atmospheric 222 Rn concentration as a tracer for long-range transport in East Asia was established. Atmospheric 222 Rn concentration at Beijing, which is located on China Continent was 10-20 Bq m -3 , at Nagoya, which is located on edge of terrestrial area was 3-10 Bq m -3 and at Hachijo-jima and Hateruma-jima, which are solitary islands in Pacific Ocean was 0.5-3 Bq m -3 , respectively. The atmospheric 222 Rn concentration variations were different from sites. The 222 Rn concentration was the lowest in the summer and the highest in the winter except Nagoya where the highest was observed in the autumn and the lowest in the spring. Diurnal variations were measured at Beijing and Nagoya. In contrast, diurnal variations were not measured but several-day-cycle variations were measured at Hachijo-jima and Hateruma-jima. It was pointed out by this study that the several-day-cycle variations at Hachijo-jima were dependent on synoptic-scale atmospheric disturbance. 222 Rn concentration increased rapidly after a cold front passed through Hachijo-jima. Backward trajectory analysis of the relationship between atmospheric 222 Rn concentrations at Hachijo-jima and transport pathway of air mass indicates that air mass transported from China and Siberia has high concentration 222 Rn and air mass transported from Pacific Ocean has low concentration 222 Rn. In winter, atmospheric 222 Rn concentrations at Hachijo-jima is dependent on vertical transport pathway rather than horizontal transport pathway. (author)

  15. Comparison of four types of passive and integrated and sensitive radon monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao Gui Zhi

    2002-01-01

    In order to improve the sensitivity of radon measurement method, Fast and Multi-functional Radon Monitor with Electret, Sensitive Miner Radon Monitor, fast and Multifunctional Radon Monitor with High Voltage and PCMR-1 Passive and Continuous Radon Monitor were developed. Except Sensitive Miner Radon Monitor suits for radon concentration measurement only, the others can be used to measure both radon concentration and radon flux rate. Their measurement principles. specifications, quality assurance system, advantages and disadvantages are introduced. The simultaneous measurement results indicate that the errors among them are less than 5% and 10%, respectively, for the average radon concentration measurement and for the average radon flux rate measurement

  16. Radon in Syrian houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Othman, I.; Hushari, M.; Raja, G.; Alsawaf, A.

    1996-01-01

    A nationwide investigation of radon levels in Syrian houses was carried out during the period 1991-1993. Passive radon diffusion dosemeters using polycarbonate detectors were distributed in houses all over Syria. Detectors were subjected to electrochemical etching to reveal latent tracks of alpha particles. The mean radon concentration in Syrian houses was found to be 45 Bq m -3 with some values several times higher. This investigation indicated that there were a few houses in Syria that require remedial action. Most houses that have high levels of radon were found in the southern area, especially in the Damascus governorate. The study also indicated that radon concentrations were higher in old houses built from mud with no tiling. (author)

  17. Water chemistry and radon concentrations of thermal springs in Bastak area, south of Persia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirhosseini, S.M.; Moattar, F.; Karbassi, A.R.

    2015-01-01

    Physicochemical factors, major and some minor ions and 222 Rn concentration was measured in Todruyeh, Fotuyeh and Sanguyeh thermal balneutherapy springs in Bastak, south of Iran. Water type of these springs is Na-Cl and water-mixing phenomena seem possible in them. The average of U concentration in Fatuyeh's, Sanguyeh's and Todruyeh's water are 2.2, 1.1, 0.306 ppb, respectively, and the concentration of heavy metals such as Ag, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn varies from 1 to 10 ppb. The concentration of 222 Rn in the water of Fotuyeh, Sanguyeh and Todruyeh Springs includes 125-253, 53-104, and 7.4-134.7 kBq/m 3 , respectively. Values of mean annual effective doses for inhalation from these waters are below the reference level recommended by WHO. (author)

  18. Psychosocial aspects of Czech Radon Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fojtikova, I.; Neznal, M.; Hrdy, L.

    2004-01-01

    In November 1999 a radon awareness survey was conducted among Czech republic residents to evaluate their general awareness and the factual knowledge about radon, radon measurements and radon mitigation. This survey, however, did not provide any detailed information on whether the respondents' knowledge is deep and structured or it is just a chaotic mixture of impressions. Therefore, a new survey was conducted from May to November 2001. About 20 respondents, in whose houses the long term testing for radon levels had just been finished, were interviewed. The in-depth interviews had several main aims: a) to obtain a more detailed understanding of their general awareness and factual knowledge about radon; b) to learn more about the sources of their knowledge and of their perception of the radon risk; c) to get information as to whether householders accept radon remediation, and to identify any personal, attitudinal or other variables that can influence the householder's decision; and d) to experience the direct risk communication and conceive its effectiveness. The interviews confirmed some results of the former quantitative study, e.g. increasing knowledge correlating with increasing education level. They showed that the public, overloaded with information, is not disposed to search actively for other information sources (e.g. on the Internet). People perceive their knowledge as adequate and sufficient. Their approach to gathering information is very passive. Therefore, to enhance public understanding of radiation phenomena it is necessary to make efforts, including the use of public media, otherwise radioactivity will remain shrouded in myths. These myths often lead to underestimation of the radon risk. A typical example of such underestimation is a contention that there exist long-aged healthy people who live in extreme radon concentrations. Together with the interviews, a questionnaire describing 11 presumably risky situations or practices was used. Among other

  19. Search for radon sources in buildings--kindergartens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupotic, J

    2002-01-01

    In ten high radon level kindergartens, radon sources were sought by applying a combination of several radon measuring techniques: etched track detectors to obtain average indoor air radon concentration, continuous devices to record radon concentration and see its diurnal variation, and alpha scintillation cells to determine radon concentration in the air entering a room from cracks, holes and sinks in the floor and from under-floor channels. In three cases, a strong local radon source was identified while, in the others, the bad quality of the basic concrete slab was responsible for the high indoor radon concentration.

  20. Radon in Ingleborough / Clapham Cave, North Yorkshire, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gavin

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric radon concentration was measured at Ingleborough Cave, North Yorkshire during the summer of 2004, and the autumn / winter of 2004/5. Significantly, Ingleborough Cave forms part of a larger system which includes the world famous Gaping Gill pothole. This plunges 105 m (334 ft), contains the tallest unbroken waterfall in England and one of the largest known underground chambers in the UK. Measurements were taken to assess the effects of seasonal and spatial variation, elevation and ventilation on radon concentration in Ingleborough. In this study personal dose exposures for three groups of cave user were identified, and the performance of a variety of radon detection systems evaluated. Summer radon concentrations inside the cave peaked at around 7,000 Bq m-3, although average concentrations were less than 5,000 Bq m-3. During the winter measurement period, average concentrations were around 100 Bq m-3, and a winter / summer ration therefore of 47,4. The average annual radon concentration exceeded the legislative limitations for the workplace of 400 Bq m-3 due in part to a failed fan in the ventilation system. When the fan was running we noted an 80% reduction in radon concentrations although reliability of the fan was problematic due to extensive but relatively rare flooding of the cave system. The radon dose experienced by cave workers and guides in this study exceeded the Ionisation Radiation Regulations limit of 5 mSv/annum, and highlighted that for health and safety reasons the ventilation system should be fully operational during the high radon concentration summer months. Keywords: Radon, Cave, Ingleborough, Detection methods

  1. Dose assessment from exposure to radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations in the dwellings of sub-mountainous region of Jammu and Kashmir, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, M.; Dr. B. R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar, Punjab; Kumar, A.; Mehra, R.; Mishra, R.

    2018-01-01

    The present work deals with the assessment of annual inhalation dose due to exposure of indoor radon, thoron and their progeny concentrations in the villages situated in sub-mountainous region of Jammu and Kashmir, India. The distribution of the data and the homogeneity of medians among different seasons and dwellings were assessed with the Shapiro-Wilk test and the Mann-Whitney test. The estimated total annual inhalation dose in these villages varied from 0.5 to 1.9 mSv year -1 which is less than the prescribed limit by ICRP (2008). Thus, the investigated area is safe from irradiation of radon, thoron and their progeny. (author)

  2. Determination of enrichment processes and radon concentration in underground mines of fluorite and coal in Santa Catarina state: criteria for radiation risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Carlos Eduardo Lima dos

    2008-01-01

    The inhalation of radon present in underground mines can imply in the deposition of its descendants in the lungs, which may cause harm to the lungs tissues and induce cancer. Concentration of radon not greater than 500 Bq/m 3 in the environment of underground mines is considered to be acceptable internationally and concentrations above 1500 Bq/m 3 require protective measures for the miners. The objectives of this research work are to determine the enrichment processes and the concentrations of radon in air, as well as the resulting doses due to the presence of this radionuclide in three underground mines of fluorite and three underground mines of coal in the State of Santa Catarina. The concentration of radon was measured employing two types of detectors of nuclear tracks (SSNTD), the LEXAN and the CR-39. This detection method consists in counting, with the help of a microscope, tracks resulting from the interaction of alpha particles with the film, due to the penetration of Rn-222 in the interior of the detector chamber and its decaying process. Contents of radium in collected samples of rocks, minerals and underground water were determined and compared with the corresponding radon concentration found in the underground air. It was observed that the coal mines showed low concentrations of radon, which can be explained by the low concentration of radium in rocks (sandstones and siltites in the foot wall and hang wall) and in the coal that composes the mining environment or, yet still, due to the good ventilation system. The average dose to the workers of the coal mines was estimated as 0.7 mSv/a, value inferior to the limit of 1 mSv/a established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for members of the public, and corresponding to a risk of fatal cancer after 50 years of work under this condition of 0.2%. On the other hand, the fluorite mines showed much higher concentrations of radon and superior to 1000 Bq/m 3 . The inefficiency of the ventilation

  3. Determination of enrichment processes and the concentrations of radon in underground mines of fluorite and coal in Santa Catarina state: criteria for evaluation of radiological risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Carlos Eduardo Lima dos

    2008-01-01

    The inhalation of radon present in underground mines can imply in the deposition of its descendent in the lungs, which may cause harm to the lungs tissues and induce cancer. Concentration of radon not greater than 500 Bq/m3 in the environment of underground mines is considered to be acceptable internationally and concentrations above 1500 Bq/m3 require protective measures for the miners. The objectives of this research work are to determine the enrichment processes and the concentrations of radon in air, as well as the resulting doses due to the presence of this radionuclide in three underground mines of fluorite and three underground mines of coal in the State of Santa Catarina. The concentration of radon was measured employing two types of detectors of nuclear tracks (SSNTD), the LEXAN and the CR-39. This detection method consists in counting, with the help of a microscope, tracks resulting from the interaction of alpha particles with the film, due to the penetration of Rn-222 in the interior of the detector chamber and its decaying process. Contents of radium in collected samples of rocks, minerals and underground water were determined and compared with the corresponding radon concentration found in the underground air. It was observed that the coal mines showed low concentrations of radon, which can be explained by the low concentration of radium in rocks (sandstones and siltites in the footwall and hang wall) and in the coal that composes the mining environment or, yet still, due to the good ventilation system. The average dose to the workers of the coal mines was estimated as 0.7 mSv/a, value inferior to the limit of 1 mSv/a established by the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) for members of the public, and corresponding to a risk of fatal cancer after 50 years of work under this condition of 0.2%. On the other hand, the fluorite mines showed much higher concentrations of radon and superior to 1000 Bq/m3. The inefficiency of the ventilation system

  4. Radon programme in Czech Republic. Results, experience and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulka, J.; Thomas, J.; Fojtikova, I.; Vlcek, J.; Moucka, L.; Fronka, A.; Jilek, K.; Heribanova, A.; Slovak, J.; Barnet, I.; Burian, I.; Jiranek, M.; Cechak, T.

    2004-01-01

    The beginning of the radon programme in the Czech republic dates back to the early 1980s. Incorporated in national legislation (Atomic Act, Radiation Protection Decree), the programme includes now both preventive measures and interventions. Preventive measures are based on the control of major potential radon sources (soil gas, building material and supplied water) to prevent construction of new houses where the recommended indoor radon level of 200 Bq/m 3 would be exceeded. Radon risk (index) assessment of the individual building site bedrock in the case of new house siting and building protection as stipulated by the technical building code are obligatory. The estimation of the radon-related index of building sites is based on a standard method involving a set of radon soil and soil permeability measurements. In addition, producers of building materials are obligated to monitor natural radioactivity in their products. The activity index (including 40 K, 226 Ra and 232 Th) is used as a screening level for regulation of the potential indoor gamma dose rate, and the 226R a mass activity is used as a limiting value for radon exhalation. A similar regulatory system is in place for public water supplies based on obligatory radon, total alpha and total beta measurements. A survey of effectiveness of the preventive measures was carried out during the past years. It appeared, however, that the indoor radon level of 200 Bq/m 3 is exceeded in some 20 % of new houses. An unexpectedly low air exchange rate in modern energy-saving houses seems to be among the reasons. Remedial actions are aimed at promoting targeted indoor radon survey in existing buildings and helping owners to put reasonable remedial measures into effect. Governmental activities include representative and targeted indoor radon survey, subsidies for remediation measures and test measurements, and improving the level of public awareness of the radon issue. Indoor radon survey is targeted on radon-prone areas

  5. Indoor air radon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cothern, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    This review concerns primarily the health effects that result from indoor air exposure to radon gas and its progeny. Radon enters homes mainly from the soil through cracks in the foundation and other holes to the geologic deposits beneath these structures. Once inside the home the gas decays (half-life 3.8 d) and the ionized atoms adsorb to dust particles and are inhaled. These particles lodge in the lung and can cause lung cancer. The introduction to this review gives some background properties of radon and its progeny that are important to understanding this public health problem as well as a discussion of the units used to describe its concentrations. The data describing the health effects of inhaled radon and its progeny come both from epidemiological and animal studies. The estimates of risk from these two data bases are consistent within a factor of two. The epidemiological studies are primarily for hard rock miners, although some data exist for environmental exposures. The most complete studies are those of the US, Canadian, and Czechoslovakian uranium miners. Although all studies have some deficiencies, those of major importance include uranium miners in Saskatchewan, Canada, Swedish iron miners, and Newfoundland fluorspar miners. These six studies provide varying degrees of detail in the form of dose-response curves. Other epidemiological studies that do not provide quantitative dose-response information, but are useful in describing the health effects, include coal, iron ore and tin miners in the UK, iron ore miners in the Grangesburg and Kiruna, Sweden, metal miners in the US, Navajo uranium miners in the US, Norwegian niobian and magnitite miners, South African gold and uranium miners, French uranium miners, zinc-lead miners in Sweden and a variety of small studies of environmental exposure. An analysis of the epidemiological studies reveals a variety of interpretation problem areas.172 references

  6. The use of volunteer radon measurements for radon mapping purposes: an examination of sampling bias issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Orlaith; Murphy, Patrick

    2011-09-01

    National and regional radon surveys are used in many nations to produce maps detailing the spatial variation of indoor radon concentrations. National surveys which are designed to be representative use either a geographically-weighted or a population-weighted sampling scheme. Additionally, many countries collect a large number of data on indoor radon concentrations from volunteers who have chosen to have the indoor radon concentration measured in their own dwellings. This work examines the representativeness of volunteer-based samples in radon measurement and explores the effect of potential volunteer bias on radon mapping results. We also investigate the influence that media attention has on volunteer sampling of indoor radon concentrations. The result of our work indicates that volunteer measurements are biased due to over-sampling of high radon areas. Consequently such volunteer radon measurements should not be used for radon mapping purposes.

  7. Parameters that characterize the radon hazard of soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blue, T.E.; Mervis, J.A.; Jarzemba, M.S.; Carey, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    It has been observed that the radon concentration in homes does not depend solely on the steady-state 222 Rn concentration in the soil. An explanation for the lack of correlation between radon concentrations in the soil and in adjacent homes includes factors such as the construction of the homes, their heating systems, and the habits of their occupants. Another explanation, which is proposed in this paper, is that the steady-state concentration of radon in the pore gas does not fully characterize the soil as a radon hazard. Other soil properties, such as its diffusion length for radon and its porosity, may be important. In this paper, the authors have identified the soil properties important in radon transport into the basement of a home by mathematically modeling ventilated basement air enclosed in basement walls and surrounded by soil and by solving the model equations to determine an expression for the basement air radon concentration as a function of the properties of the soil and basement wall

  8. Understanding the origin of radon indoors: Building a predictive capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sextro, R.G.

    1985-12-01

    Indoor radon concentrations one to two orders of magnitude higher than the US average of ∼60 Bq m -3 (∼1.5 pCi L -1 ) are not uncommon, and concentrations greater than 4000 Bq m -3 have been observed in houses in areas with no known artificially-enhanced radon sources. In general, source categories for indoor radon are well known: soil, domestic water, building materials, outdoor air, and natural gas. Soil is thought to be a major source of indoor radon, either through molecular diffusion (usually a minor component) or convective flow of soil gas. While soil gas flow into residences has been demonstrated, no detailed understanding of the important factors affecting the source strength of radon from soil has yet emerged. Preliminary work in this area has identified a number of likely issues, including the concentration of radium in the soil, the emanating fraction, soil type, soil moisture content, and other factors that would influence soil permeability and soil gas transport. Because a significant number of dwellings are expected to have indoor radon concentrations above guideline levels, a predictive capability is needed that would help identify geographical areas having the potential for high indoor concentrations. This paper reviews the preliminary work that has been done to identify important soil and building characteristics that influence the migration of radon and outlines the areas of further research necessary for development of a predictive method. 32 refs., 4 figs

  9. Measurements of seasonal and daily radon daughter concentration fluctuations in National Park Service caves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarborough, K.A.

    1977-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) is studying levels of airborne alpha radiation from radon and thoron in all NPS administered caves in which tours for visitors are regularly conducted. The NPS research has the dual but complementary objectives of safeguarding health at the NPS administered caves, and to develop data on alpha radiation levels and on natural airflows in NPS caves. The results reported here for NPS caves describe concepts hypothesized for the objectives. In addition the data can be used by various agencies to clarify health standards for exposures to low airborne alpha radiation levels in cave environments. These results show daily and seasonal trends and the influence of natural ventilation by air circulation for each cave investigated

  10. Radon in the Exhaled Air of Patients in Radon Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lettner, Herbert; Hubmer, Alexander; Hofmann, Werner; Landrichinger, Julia; Gaisberger, Martin; Winkler-Heil, Renate

    2017-11-01

    In the Gastein valley, numerous facilities use radon for the treatment of various diseases either by exposure to radon in air or in radon rich thermal water. In this study, six test persons were exposed to radon thermal water in a bathtub and the time-dependent radon activity concentration in the exhaled air was recorded. At temperatures between 38°C and 40°C, the radon activity concentration in the water was about 900 kBq/m3 in a total volume of 600 l, where the patients were exposed for 20 min, while continuously sampling the exhaled air during the bathing and 20 min thereafter. After entering the bath, the exhaled radon activity concentration rapidly increased, reaching some kind of saturation after 20 min exposure. The radon activity concentration in the exhaled air was about 8000 Bq/m3 at the maximum, with higher concentrations for male test persons. The total radon transfer from water to the exhaled air was between 480 and 1000 Bq, which is equivalent to 0.08% and 0.2% of the radon in the water. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Indoor radon mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Reisbacka, H.

    2009-06-01

    The action limit for indoor radon concentration in Finnish dwellings is 400 Bq/m 3 which is exceeded in 50.000 dwellings. In these dwellings indoor radon mitigation is needed. The most important reason for high concentration is the soil air with high radon concentrations that flows into living spaces through openings and gaps in the building foundation. Slab on-ground is the most prevalent type of foundation in Finnish single family houses. Without preventive measures, this type of foundation promotes the flow of radon-bearing soil air into living spaces. In the second popular foundation type, hill-side houses, the flow of soil air through the walls backing soil still increases radon leakages. The key aim of indoor radon mitigation is to prevent or decrease the harmful flows of radon-bearing soil air into dwellings. This guide gives the basic information on Finnish regulations on indoor radon, leakage routes, effect of air exchange and underpressure as well as pre-mitigation studies of houses. The results on the efficiency of various mitigation methods are based on a questionnaire study in 400 Finnish dwellings and on-site studies in numerous houses. In the case of sub-slab-suction the Finnish guide published by the Ministry of Environment has also been utilized. Best mitigation efficiency has been achieved using sub-slab-suction and radon well. Typical reduction factors for both methods are 70 - 90%, and the best results are above 95%. Sub-slab-suction can be implemented through both floor slab and foundation wall. An exhaust fan coupled to suction pit and exhaust piping creates underpressure and ventilation beneath the slab. In case of a radon well an exhaust fan sucks air from the soil and ventilates the soil air volume through a well construction placed outside the house. The depth of a radon well is 3 - 5 metres. A single radon well can reduce radon concentration in many dwellings at the distance up to 20 - 30 metres. Mitigation work based on ventilation aims

  12. Indoor radon mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvela, H.; Reisbacka, H.

    2008-09-01

    The action limit for indoor radon concentration in Finnish dwellings is 400 Bq/m 3 which is exceeded in 50.000 dwellings. In these dwellings indoor radon mitigation is needed. The most important reason for high concentration is the soil air with high radon concentrations that flows into living spaces through openings and gaps in the building foundation. Slab on-ground is the most prevalent type of foundation in Finnish single family houses. Without preventive measures, this type of foundation promotes the flow of radon-bearing soil air into living spaces. In the second popular foundation type, hill-side houses, the flow of soil air through the walls backing soil still increases radon leakages. The key aim of indoor radon mitigation is to prevent or decrease the harmful flows of radon-bearing soil air into dwellings. This guide gives the basic information on Finnish regulations on indoor radon, leakage routes, effect of air exchange and underpressure as well as pre-mitigation studies of houses. The results on the efficiency of various mitigation methods are based on a questionnaire study in 400 Finnish dwellings and on-site studies in numerous houses. In the case of sub-slab-suction the Finnish guide published by the Ministry of Environment has also been utilized. Best mitigation efficiency has been achieved using sub-slab-suction and radon well. Typical reduction factors for both methods are 70-90%, and the best results are above 95%. Sub-slab-suction can be implemented through both floor slab and foundation wall. An exhaust fan coupled to suction pit and exhaust piping creates underpressure and ventilation beneath the slab. In case of a radon well an exhaust fan sucks air from the soil and ventilates the soil air volume through a well construction placed outside the house. The depth of a radon well is 3-5 metres. A single radon well can reduce radon concentration in many dwellings at the distance up to 20-30 metres. Mitigation work based on ventilation aims at

  13. Radon turnover in water supply facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hingmann, H.; Korte, T.; Peeck, D.A.; Weber, U.

    1998-01-01

    In three Hessian waterworks facilities concentrations of Radon and Radon decay products were measured. Both, the concentrations in indoor air resulting in radiation exposure of workers, and the concentration in ground water at different stages of processing were determined. Furthermore, parameters on exposure other than Radon concentration are considered. Due to the minor yields of Radon there is no need for radiation protection recommendations with respect to occupational safety. (orig.) [de

  14. Radon in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Search Radon Contact Us Share Radon in Schools Related Information Managing Radon in Schools Radon Measurement ... Radon Could Be a Serious Threat to Your School Chances are you've already heard of radon - ...

  15. Radon diagnosis based on investigation of radon sources and radon entry in houses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robe, M.C.; Le Bronec, J.; Rannou, A.; Tymen, G.

    1992-01-01

    The search for practical techniques to reduce radon levels in dwellings led to the development of a method for identifying radon sources and pathways of transfer to upper floors. A pilot study in Britanny was carried out in some houses with relatively high radon levels. This study involved measurements of radon gas concentrations in the air, radon exhalation rates from the soil and walls (indoors and outdoors), the potential alpha energy concentration of radon daughters, and the ventilation rate. The structural characteristics of dwellings and the influence of the lifestyle of the occupants were examined. Analysis of the results shows that a limited number of parameters can be selected for use in rapid radon diagnosis. (author)

  16. Seasonal Variability in European Radon Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves-Kirkby, C. J.; Denman, A. R.; Phillips, P. S.; Crockett, R. G. M.; Sinclair, J. M.

    2009-04-01

    correlations between published datasets and local geographic/geological conditions. Available data included regional SCF figures from the United Kingdom and from France, together with nationally-consolidated results from a number of other European countries. Analysis of this data shows significant variability between different countries and from region to region within those countries where regional data is available. Overall, radon-rich sedimentary geologies, particularly high porosity limestones etc., exhibit high seasonal variation, while radon-rich igneous geologies demonstrate relatively constant, albeit somewhat higher, radon concentration levels. Examples of the former can be found in the Pennines and South Downs in England, Languedoc and Brittany in France. Greatest variability is found in Switzerland, still subject to the ongoing Alpine orogeny, where the inhabited part of the country is largely overlain with recently-deposited light, porous sediments. Low-variability high-radon regions include the granite-rich Cornwall/Devon peninsular in England, and Auvergne and the Ardennes in France, all components of the Devonian-Carboniferous Hercynian belt, which extends from the Iberian peninsular through South-West Ireland and South-West England to France and Germany.

  17. Concentration of heavy metal As, Pb, Mn, Ni, Sn, Zn, Cr, Fe and radon gas in bottom sediment from abandoned tin mines in the Phuket Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suteerasak, T.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at analyzing the heavy metals: As, Pb, Mn, Ni, Sn, Zn, Cr, Fe, and radon gas emission in bottom sediment from six abandoned tin mines in Phuket Province. Fe, Mn, and Sn were found in higher concentrations (but non-polluting than Cr and Ni. As, Pb, and Zn were polluting at lower levels. The concentration ranges for As, Pb, and Zn were 75.3-169, 98.6-547.5, and 120.4-323.3 mg/kg respectively. The activity of radon gas emission from bottom sediment from an abandoned tin mine in Amphur Muang was in the range of 162-212 Bq/kg., in the Amphur Katoo mine the range was 122-266 Bq/kg. and in the Amphur Talang mine the range was 180-263 Bq/kg. All these sites have higher concentrations of radon gas emissions than other similar sites. The heavy metals and radon gas come from geochemical materials such as soil and granite rock, found around the abandoned tin mines.

  18. Radon studies in Indian dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The indoor radon ( 222 Rn) concentration has been measured by Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) in large number of Indian dwellings. Radon concentrations were measured in different parts of the country. In the first study, radon concentrations were measured in 143 dwellings of Udaipur, Bikaner and Banswara towns of Rajasthan province. The distributions of the time-averaged indoor radon concentration in these three towns of the Rajasthan fit an approximately log normal distribution. The geometric mean (GM) values of radon concentrations in these three places were found to be 74 Bq m -3 , 46 Bq m -3 and 66 Bq m -3 with a geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 2.2, 2.2 and 2.5 respectively. In another study, radon concentrations were measured in about 150 dwellings of hilly regions of the country. The measurements were carried out in Kohima (Nagaland), Baijnath and Palampur (Himachal Pradesh). The distribution of radon concentration in Kohima dwellings was found to be approximately log normal, however, the radon distribution in Baijnath and Palampur dwellings seems to be bimodal. The GM values of the radon concentrations for 65 dwellings in Kohima and 43 dwellings in Baijnath and Palampur were 88 Bq m -3 and 134 Bq m -3 with GSD of 1.7 and 2.5 respectively. The results are discussed in detail. (author)

  19. Radon in public buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, H.; Flesch, K.; Hermann, E.; Loebner, W.; Leissring, B.

    2009-01-01

    From the Free State of Saxony, a study was commissioned to survey how reliable measurements to characterize the radon situation in public buildings at a reasonable financial and human effort can be carried out to reduce radiation exposure in public buildings. The study approach was for 6 objects. To characterize the radon situation the time evolution measurement of radon concentrations of more than 1 to 2 weeks turned out to be sufficient. A novel data analysis enables the identification of a ''typical daily alteration of the radon concentration'' depending on the ventilation conditions and the daily use of the offices or class rooms. The identification of typical diurnal radon variations for the working time and weekends or holidays is of fundamental importance for assessing the exposure situation in public buildings. It was shown that the radon concentration during working time are in general much lower than in the times when the buildings (offices) are unused. It turned out that the long-term radon measurements with nuclear track detectors within distinct time regimes (day / night, working hours / leisure time) by utilizing switch modules are very efficient to estimate the actual exposure. (orig.)

  20. Comparative Study of Radon Concentration with Two Techniques and Elemental Analysis in Drinking Water Samples of the Jammu District, Jammu and Kashmir, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Kaur, Manpreet; Mehra, Rohit; Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Mishra, Rosaline

    2017-10-01

    The level of radon concentration has been assessed using the Advanced SMART RnDuo technique in 30 drinking water samples from Jammu district, Jammu and Kashmir, India. The water samples were collected from wells, hand pumps, submersible pumps, and stored waters. The randomly obtained 14 values of radon concentration in water sources using the SMART RnDuo technique have been compared and cross checked by a RAD7 device. A good positive correlation (R = 0.88) has been observed between the two techniques. The overall value of radon concentration in various water sources has ranged from 2.45 to 18.43 Bq L, with a mean value of 8.24 ± 4.04 Bq L, and it agreed well with the recommended limit suggested by the European Commission and UNSCEAR. However, the higher activity of mean radon concentration was found in groundwater drawn from well, hand and submersible pumps as compared to stored water. The total annual effective dose due to radon inhalation and ingestion ranged from 6.69 to 50.31 μSv y with a mean value of 22.48 ± 11.03 μSv y. The total annual effective dose was found to lie within the safe limit (100 μSv y) suggested by WHO. Heavy metal analysis was also carried out in various water sources by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS), and the highest value of heavy metals was found mostly in groundwater samples. The obtained results were compared with Indian and International organizations like WHO and the EU Council. Among all the samples, the elemental analysis is not on the exceeding side of the permissible limit.

  1. Radon in soil gas in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikaj, Dafina; Jeran, Zvonka; Bahtijari, Meleq; Stegnar, Peter

    2016-11-01

    An assessment of the radiological situation due to exposure to radon and gamma emitting radionuclides was conducted in southern Kosovo. This study deals with sources of radon in soil gas. A long-term study of radon concentrations in the soil gas was carried out using the SSNTDs (CR-39) at 21 different locations in the Sharr-Korabi zone. The detectors were exposed for an extended period of time, including at least three seasonal periods in a year and the sampling locations were chosen with respect to lithology. In order to determine the concentration of the natural radioactive elements 238 U and 226 Ra, as a precursor of 222 Rn, soil samples were collected from each measuring point from a depth of 0.8 m, and measured by gamma spectrometry. The levels (Bq kg -1 ) of naturally occurring radionuclides and levels (kBq m -3 ) of radon in soil gas obtained at a depth 0.8 m of soil were: 21-53 for 226 Ra, 22-160 for 238 U and 0.295-32 for 222 Rn. With respect to lithology, the highest value for 238 U and 226 Ra were found in limestone and the highest value for 222 Rn was found in metamorphic rocks. In addition, the results showed seasonal variations of the measured soil gas radon concentrations with maximum concentration in the spring months. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dosimetry of inhaled radon and thoron progeny

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.C.

    1994-06-01

    This chapter reviews recent developments in modeling doses received by lung tissues, with particular emphasis on application of ICRP's new dosimetric model of the respiratory tract for extrapolating to other environments the established risks from exposure to radon progeny in underground mines. Factors discussed include: (1) the influence of physical characteristics of radon progeny aerosols on dose per unit exposure, e.g., the unattached fraction, and the activity-size distributions of clustered and attached progeny; (2) the dependence of dose on breathing rate, and on the exposed subject (man, woman or child); (3) the variability of dose per unit exposure in a home when exposure is expressed in terms of potential α energy or radon gas concentration; (4) the comparative dosimetry of thoron progeny; and (5) the effects of air-cleaning on lung dose. Also discussed is the apparent discrepancy between lung cancer risk estimates derived purely from dosimetry and the lung cancer incidence observed in the epidemiological studies of radon-exposed underground miners. Application of ICRP's recommended risk factors appears to overestimate radon lung-cancer risk for miners by a factor of three. ''Normalization'' of the calculated effective dose is therefore needed, at least for α dose from radon and thoron progeny, in order to obtain a realistic estimate of lung cancer risk

  3. Radon in your dwellings - problems and mitigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of radon in dwellings gained importance in 1984 after the Stanely Watra's house incidence in Pennsylvania USA. Since then several radon measuring techniques have been identified and instrumentations developed. National survey programs were started for monitoring radon levels in dwellings by Government authorities in all developed and developing countries including India. Successively, the measurement of thoron levels was also found desirable especially in high radiation background areas. A lot of work has been done since then by scientists and university researches and thousands of publications have been made in this field. Several developed countries have given guide lines for initiating action to reduce radon levels in dwellings if it is beyond 200-400 Bq/m 2 . The recommended 'action level' is found to depend upon the authorities making the recommendations. This talk is aimed to produce public awareness about the health hazard posed by concentration of naturally occurring radon gas in our dwellings, the sources of its production and mitigation of radon problem. The matter will be discussed in a general way using ppt presentation. (author)

  4. Measurements of radon-daughter concentrations in and around dwellings in the northern part of the Netherlands; a search for the influences of building materials, construction and ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfs, F.; Hofstede, H.; De Meijer, R.J.; Put, L.W.

    1984-08-01

    The concentration of radon daughters has been determined in and around 80 dwellings located in the northern part of the Netherlands by using a one-filter method. Median values of 2.0 and 0.4 mWL were measured for the indoor and outdoor concentrations, respectively. On the average, dwellings with double-pain windows and/or concrete floors were to have significantly higher radon concentrations than those with single-pane windows and/or wooden floors. For the living room of a particular dwelling 18 measurements were carrried out. The data for this dwelling indicate a linear relation between the concentration indoors and outdoors with a slope of 3.8 +/- 2.0. This unexpected behaviour is thought to be related to ventilation via the crawl space.

  5. Estimation of Indoor Radon from Concrete Blocks Used In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Radon gas is the most important source of natural radiation. Indoor radon concentration is the main path of human exposure to high radon concentration. Radon contribution from concrete block walls of typical Nigerian dwellings has been estimated from gamma ray spectroscopy measurements of radium concentration ...

  6. The use of mapped geology as a predictor of radon potential in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Robin J; Smethurst, Mark A; Ganerød, Guri V; Finne, Ingvild; Rudjord, Anne Liv

    2017-01-01

    Radon exposure is considered to cause several hundred fatalities from lung-cancer each year in Norway. A national map identifying areas which are likely to be exposed to elevated radon concentrations would be a useful tool for decision-making authorities, and would be particularly important in areas where only few indoor radon measurements exist. An earlier Norwegian study (Smethurst et al. 2008) produced radon hazard maps by examining the relationship between airborne gamma-ray spectrometry, bedrock and drift geology, and indoor radon. The study was limited to the Oslo region where substantial indoor radon and airborne equivalent uranium datasets were available, and did not attempt to test the statistical significance of relationships, or to quantify the confidence of its predictions. While it can be anticipated that airborne measurements may have useful predictive power for indoor radon, airborne measurement coverage in Norway is at present sparse; to provide national coverage of radon hazard estimates, a good understanding of the relationship between geology and indoor radon is therefore important. In this work we use a new enlarged (n = 34,563) form of the indoor radon dataset with national coverage, and we use it to examine the relationship between geology and indoor radon concentrations. We use this relationship to characterise geological classes by their radon potential, and we produce a national radon hazard map which includes confidence limits on the likelihood of areas having elevated radon concentrations, and which covers the whole of mainland Norway, even areas where little or no indoor radon data are available. We find that bedrock and drift geology classes can account for around 40% of the total observed variation in radon potential. We test geology-based predictions of RP (radon potential) against locally-derived estimates of RP, and produce classification matrices with kappa values in the range 0.37-0.56. Our classifier has high predictive value

  7. Use of a geographic information system (GIS) for targeting radon screening programs in South Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J; Whetstone, Zachary D; Rafique Mir, Khwaja M

    2016-01-01

    Because (222)Rn is a progeny of (238)U, the relative abundance of uranium may be used to predict the areas that have the potential for high indoor radon concentration and therefore determine the best areas to conduct future surveys. Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping software was used to construct maps of South Dakota that included levels of uranium concentrations in soil and stream water and uranium deposits. Maps of existing populations and the types of land were also generated. Existing data about average indoor radon levels by county taken from a databank were included for consideration. Although the soil and stream data and existing recorded average indoor radon levels were sparse, it was determined that the most likely locations of elevated indoor radon would be in the northwest and southwest corners of the state. Indoor radon levels were only available for 9 out of 66 counties in South Dakota. This sparcity of data precluded a study of correlation of radon to geological features, but further motivates the need for more testing in the state. Only actual measurements should be used to determine levels of indoor radon because of the strong roles home construction and localized geology play in radon concentration. However, the data visualization method demonstrated here is potentially useful for directing resources relating to radon screening campaigns. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  8. Use of a geographic information system (GIS) for targeting radon screening programs in South Dakota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearfott, Kimberlee J.; Whetstone, Zachary D.; Mir, Khwaja M. Rafique

    2016-01-01

    Because 222 Rn is a progeny of 238 U, the relative abundance of uranium may be used to predict the areas that have the potential for high indoor radon concentration and therefore determine the best areas to conduct future surveys. Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping software was used to construct maps of South Dakota that included levels of uranium concentrations in soil and stream water and uranium deposits. Maps of existing populations and the types of land were also generated. Existing data about average indoor radon levels by county taken from a databank were included for consideration. Although the soil and stream data and existing recorded average indoor radon levels were sparse, it was determined that the most likely locations of elevated indoor radon would be in the northwest and southwest corners of the state. Indoor radon levels were only available for 9 out of 66 counties in South Dakota. This sparcity of data precluded a study of correlation of radon to geological features, but further motivates the need for more testing in the state. Only actual measurements should be used to determine levels of indoor radon because of the strong roles home construction and localized geology play in radon concentration. However, the data visualization method demonstrated here is potentially useful for directing resources relating to radon screening campaigns. (author)

  9. [Residential radon and lung cancer. An ecologic study in Galicia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa-Lorenzo, Raquel; Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Cerdeira Caramés, Sara; Barros-Dios, Juan Miguel

    2015-04-08

    Residential radon is the second cause of lung cancer and the first in never smokers. Galicia is a high radon emission area. The objective of this study is to analyze the relationship between municipal lung cancer mortality and residential radon in Galician municipalities. We performed an ecologic study including 192 municipalities with at least 3 residential radon measurements. The observed number of lung cancer deaths was obtained from the Galician Mortality Registry. Afterwards, we calculated the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) of lung cancer for males and females for the period comprising 1980-2009. Median municipal residential radon concentrations were correlated with lung cancer SMRs. Median residential radon concentration for the included municipalities was 75 Bq/m(3), with an interquartile range of 40.7 to 154 Bq/m(3). The correlation between lung cancer SMRs and municipal radon concentration was statistically significant for males (P=.023) whereas it did not reach statistical significance for females (P=.087). There exists an association between municipal residential radon and lung cancer mortality in Galicia for males, though for women the association is not statistically significant. These results suggest that residential radon could raise the risk of lung cancer in males, though for females no association is evident. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Levels of radon gas concentration and progeny in homes of Potosi City, Bolivia to 4000 m; Niveles de concentracion de gas radon y progenie en viviendas de la Ciudad de Potosi, Bolivia a 4000 msnm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamani M, R. [Universidad Autonoma Tomas Frias, Carrera de Fisica, Av. del maestro s/n, Edif. Central Potosi, Villa Imperial de Potosi (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Claros J, J. [Universidad Autonoma Tomas Frias, Facultad de Minas Potosi, Centro de Investigacion, Av. Serrudo y Arce s/n, Villa Imperial de Potosi (Bolivia, Plurinational State of); Vasquez A, R., E-mail: raulm2k13@hotmail.com [Instituto Boliviano de Biologia de Altura, Calle Hoyos 953, La Paz (Bolivia, Plurinational State of)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: In this work the presence of radon gas was determined, which is a radioactive contaminant that comes from underground, able to penetrate the houses. The danger is that when mixed air and when inhaled can cause serious damage to the lungs, for the short life time that has radon and progeny for decay, damaging the pulmonary alveoli and reducing breathing capacity of the habitants, then causing polycythemia in some cases. The study was carried out in homes in the city of Potosi, Bolivia located at 4000 m. The quantification of radon gas and progeny was performed with the equipment Alpha-Zaeller-2 (Az-2), quantification was realized in 6 zones of the city of Potosi, chosen randomly. In each zone were carried out measurements in 40 homes (2 rooms more permanent), both day and night, for a period of 3 days in two different seasons and with concentrations of average humidity of 20, 50 and 80%. The values obtained for each period vary depending on the season and 30 to 50% of the allowable values given by the EPA and Who for housing. (Author)

  11. Comparison of radon and radon-daughter grab samples obtained during the winter and summer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, K.E.

    1987-08-01

    The Technical Measurements Center (TMC), under the auspices of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) program, is investigating short-term methods for estimating annual average indoor radon-daughter concentrations (RDC). A field study at 40 sample locations in 26 residential structures in Grand Junction, Colorado, was conducted once in the winter and once in the summer. The short-term methods investigated as part of this study include ten-minute radon and radon-daughter grab sampling and hourly RDC measurements. The results of the field study indicate that ten-minute radon grab samples from basement locations are reproducible over different seasons during controlled sampling conditions. Nonbasement radon and RDC grab samples are highly variable even when the use of the location by the occupant is controlled and the ventilation rate is restricted. The grab sampling was performed under controlled occupied conditions. These results confirm that a short-term radon or RDC measurement in a nonbasement location in a house is not a standardized measurement that can be used to infer an annual average concentration. The hourly RDC measurements were performed under three sets of conditions over a 72-hour period. The three sets of conditions were uncontrolled occupied, controlled occupied, and controlled unoccupied. These results indicate that it is not necessary to relocate the occupants during the time of grab sampling. 8 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs

  12. Groundwater flow analysis using radon-222 existing in environment as an indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komae, Takami

    1996-01-01

    Several kinds of isotopes have been used to trace water movement in the hydrology including surface and ground water as indicators. But those are not effective to analyze the contaminant movement with groundwater though short distance in short time owing to long life. Radon ( 222 Rn) existing in environment was chosen for this purpose as an short-lived indicator. Radon is a radioactive gas, with a half life of 3.8 days, generated from radium ( 226 Ra) in strata. Radon concentration in groundwater increases to reach an equilibrated value within about three weeks after infiltrating underground. The equilibrated concentration becomes an own value of the aquifer depending on the radium content, the grain size and porosity of aquifer. The characteristic makes it able to identify aquifers and sub basins. Since radon concentration in groundwater is 100 to 1000 times as high as that in surface water, groundwater and surface water interaction is quantitatively analyzed. A liquid scintillation counter was employed to measure radon concentration after extracting radon in water to toluene. We applied those advantage of radon-222 to various field investigations and discussed the applicability. It was really possible to analyze the groundwater flow. Monitoring radon concentration in pumped water, occurrences of squeeze and leakage from the different aquifer were detected. Main aquifer was easily determined from the vertical distribution of radon concentration in bore hole. In the injection test using surface water, the spread of injected water was confirmed by the decrease of radon concentration in bore hole water. The radon method was useful to analyze the dam leakage, effluent seepage of groundwater in river, influent seepage of river water underground, and groundwater recharge with irrigation water through unsaturated zone. (author)

  13. Measurements of the atmospheric concentration of radon in Israel and assessment of its impact on the health of the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaliot, M.

    1993-08-01

    We have developed a new method for the examination of the SSNTD foil, which utilizes laser scanning of the foil. The examination consists of examining the scattering pattern of the laser beam in the various regions of the SSNTD foil. This method (patented - US Pat 5,117,120 of 05-26-1992) enables fast and reliable reading of large numbers of SSNTD foils. An apparatus built according to this method was applied to sampling radon measurements conducted in the various regions of Israel, within the framework of the present work. The results of these measurements indicate that the average radon level to which Israel population is exposed is approximately 40 Bq/m3. The resulting equivalent radiation dose was calculated. From that, the health hazard to the population was derived, using the updated risk coefficients, which link radon exposure to increased morbidity and mortality from lung cancer. It was concluded that about 80 cases of death from lung cancer per year, out of an annual total of about 750 in Israel, can be attributed to radon It was also found that the radon level distribution in dwellings in Israel can be described best by the log-normal distribution. The tools developed in this work, combined with the actual experience with large-scale radon measurements, serve as a basis for a future full-scale radon survey in Israel. (authors) 11 tabs., 35 figs., 96 refs

  14. Measured radon inside housings the Republic Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canoba, A.; Arnaud, M.; Lopez, F.; Oliveira, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    They have been measured the radon concentration in houses in different city's in Argentina Republic. For they were used it as method mensuration detectors appearances nuclear detecting electrets and detectors based on the adsorption radon in activated carbon

  15. Measure of exposure of short-lived radon products using an alpha spectrometer for measuring indoor aerosol activity concentration and dose evaluation; Misure di esposizione ai prodotti di decadimento del radon a breve vita tramite uno spettrometro alfa per la misura dell'attivita' del particolato atmosferico indoor e valutazioni dosimetriche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berico, M.; Castellani, C.M.; Formignani, M. [ENEA, Divisione Protezione dell' Uomo e degli Ecosistemi, Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy); Mariotti, F. [Bologna Univ., Bologna (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica

    2001-07-01

    A new italian law introduces the regulation of occupational exposure to radon. To evaluate the inhalation of radon daughters by the workers a sampling device has been assembled with the aim of evaluation of unattached and aerosol attached radon daughters' fractions. The instrument, based on selection of the aerosuspended particles by means of a wire screen type battery and subsequent collection on a total filter, allows to describe the behaviour of both fractions using defined temporal pattern of collecting particles and counting them by alpha spectroscopy. A measurement campaign to test the radon daughter dichotomous spectrometer in comparison with a commercial Radon Working Level meter, has been performed in a research laboratory of central Italy affected by high radon concentrations. The radon concentration during the measurement campaign has been also measured. The equilibrium factor F{sub e}q ad the attachment factor fp have been evaluated during 3 days campaign. Using the measured mean parameters (radon concentration, F{sub e}q, f{sub p}) the dose evaluation for workers using dosimetric approach has been performed. A comparison between the epidemiologic approach, based on the radon concentration, and dosimetric approach is also presented. [Italian] L'esposizione a radon in ambiente lavorativo e la conseguente inalazione dei suoi prodotti di decadimento in forma particolata e' oggetto di una recente normativa italiana in materia di protezione dalle radiazioni ionizzanti. Per rispondere a questa necessita', presso l'Istituto per la Radioprotezione dell'ENEA di Bologna e' stato progettato e realizzato uno spettrometro alfa per la misura della progenie del radon con la finalita' di valutare, su brevi periodi di tempo, la concentrazione individuale dei suoi prodotti di decadimento e, con l'impiego di batterie a diffusione a reti, consentire inoltre la discriminazione della concentrazione della frazione attaccata e non

  16. Radon levels inside residences in Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, G.

    1990-01-01

    Levels of radon were measured during winter and spring seasons inside 55 colonial and modern houses and 30 multi-family apartment buildings representative of middle and upper income families. The modern houses and apartment buildings in the southern section of the city had average radon levels exceeding 150 Bq.m -3 with a maximum single measurement of 458 Bq.m -3 . The colonial houses in the central downtown section had radon levels nearly all averaging below 100 Bq.m -3 . Between the ground and third floor of the apartment buildings, radon levels diminished tenfold, indicating that entry of radon-bearing soil gas was largely responsible for the elevated concentrations of radon. The radon levels in winter exceeded by about 30% the radon levels during spring. The potentially adverse health effects of these radon levels may be exacerbated by the quality of air in Mexico City which is often highly polluted during winter. (author)

  17. Radon levels inside residences in Mexico City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, G.

    1989-01-01

    Levels of radon were measured during winter and spring seasons inside 55 colonial and modern houses and 30 multifamily apartment buildings representative of middle and upper income families. The modern houses and apartment buildings in the southern section of the city had average radon levels exceeding 150 Bq m -3 with a maximum single measurement of 458 Bq m -3 . The colonial houses in the central downtown section had radon levels nearly all averaging below 100 Bq m -3 . Between the ground and third floor of the apartment buildings, radon levels diminished by tenfold indicating that entry of radon-bearing soil gas was largely responsible for the elevated concentrations of radon. The radon levels in winter exceeded by about 30% the radon levels during spring. The potentially adverse health effects of these radon levels may be exacerbated by the quality of air in Mexico City which during winter is often highly polluted. 7 refs., 2 figs

  18. Mine test of thermoluminescence energy discriminatory track etch personal dosemeters in uranium mines having nearly equal concentrations of radon and thoron daughters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pai, H.L.; Jokura, K.; Phillips, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    Energy discrimin