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Sample records for included quantitative atomic

  1. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, L J; D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M; Stemmer, S

    2012-01-01

    In scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is possible to operate the microscope in bright-field mode under conditions which, by the quantum mechanical principle of reciprocity, are equivalent to those in conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). The results of such an experiment will be presented which are in excellent quantitative agreement with theory for specimens up to 25 nm thick. This is at variance with the large contrast mismatch (typically between two and five) noted in equivalent CTEM experiments. The implications of this will be discussed.

  2. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative measurements of shear displacement using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wenbo; Wu, Weida; Sun, Ying; Zhao, Yonggang

    2016-01-01

    We report a method to quantitatively measure local shear deformation with high sensitivity using atomic force microscopy. The key point is to simultaneously detect both torsional and buckling motions of atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers induced by the lateral piezoelectric response of the sample. This requires the quantitative calibration of torsional and buckling response of AFM. This method is validated by measuring the angular dependence of the in-plane piezoelectric response of a piece of piezoelectric α-quartz. The accurate determination of the amplitude and orientation of the in-plane piezoelectric response, without rotation, would greatly enhance the efficiency of lateral piezoelectric force microscopy.

  4. HAADF–STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefebvre, W., E-mail: williams.lefebvre@univ-rouen.fr; Hernandez-Maldonado, D.; Moyon, F.; Cuvilly, F.; Vaudolon, C.; Shinde, D.; Vurpillot, F.

    2015-12-15

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (<20 nm), tips display a curved surface and a significantly larger thickness. As far as a correlative approach aims at analysing the same specimen by both techniques, it is mandatory to explore the limits and advantages imposed by the particular geometry of atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography. - Highlights: • Quantitative correlative microscopy by APT and STEM is considered. • The particular geometry of atom probe tomography (APT) specimens is considered. • HAADF–STEM image simulations were applied. • The possibility of atom counting is demonstrated for protuberant particles.

  5. FOHI-D: An iterative Hirshfeld procedure including atomic dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldof, D.; Krishtal, A.; Blockhuys, F.; Van Alsenoy, C.

    2014-04-01

    In this work, a new partitioning method based on the FOHI method (fractional occupation Hirshfeld-I method) will be discussed. The new FOHI-D method uses an iterative scheme in which both the atomic charge and atomic dipole are calculated self-consistently. In order to induce the dipole moment on the atom, an electric field is applied during the atomic SCF calculations. Based on two sets of molecules, the atomic charge and intrinsic atomic dipole moment of hydrogen and chlorine atoms are compared using the iterative Hirshfeld (HI) method, the iterative Stockholder atoms (ISA) method, the FOHI method, and the FOHI-D method. The results obtained are further analyzed as a function of the group electronegativity of Boyd et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 110, 4182 (1988); Boyd et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 114, 1652 (1992)] and De Proft et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 97, 1826 (1993)]. The molecular electrostatic potential (ESP) based on the HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D charges is compared with the ab initio ESP. Finally, the effect of adding HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D atomic dipoles to the multipole expansion as a function of the precision of the ESP is analyzed.

  6. FOHI-D: An iterative Hirshfeld procedure including atomic dipoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geldof, D.; Blockhuys, F.; Van Alsenoy, C.; Krishtal, A.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a new partitioning method based on the FOHI method (fractional occupation Hirshfeld-I method) will be discussed. The new FOHI-D method uses an iterative scheme in which both the atomic charge and atomic dipole are calculated self-consistently. In order to induce the dipole moment on the atom, an electric field is applied during the atomic SCF calculations. Based on two sets of molecules, the atomic charge and intrinsic atomic dipole moment of hydrogen and chlorine atoms are compared using the iterative Hirshfeld (HI) method, the iterative Stockholder atoms (ISA) method, the FOHI method, and the FOHI-D method. The results obtained are further analyzed as a function of the group electronegativity of Boyd et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 110, 4182 (1988); Boyd et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 114, 1652 (1992)] and De Proft et al. [J. Phys. Chem. 97, 1826 (1993)]. The molecular electrostatic potential (ESP) based on the HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D charges is compared with the ab initio ESP. Finally, the effect of adding HI, ISA, FOHI, and FOHI-D atomic dipoles to the multipole expansion as a function of the precision of the ESP is analyzed

  7. Limit of quantitation in atomic spectrometry: An unambiguous concept?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mermet, Jean-Michel

    2008-01-01

    This document presents a tutorial description of several concepts and definitions of limits of quantitation, such as the so-called 10 s, the RSD net , the method limit, the lower limit of the calibration graph and the uncertainty approaches. Use, advantages, limitations and complexity of the various approaches are illustrated with some examples taken from atomic spectrometry, using ICP-AES, ICP-MS and LIBS. Information that can be deduced from the calibration graph is emphasized

  8. Comparison of the quantitative analysis performance between pulsed voltage atom probe and pulsed laser atom probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, J., E-mail: takahashi.3ct.jun@jp.nssmc.com [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation, 20-1 Shintomi, Futtsu-city, Chiba 293-8511 (Japan); Kawakami, K. [Advanced Technology Research Laboratories, Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation, 20-1 Shintomi, Futtsu-city, Chiba 293-8511 (Japan); Raabe, D. [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Department for Microstructure Physics and Alloy Design, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • Quantitative analysis in Fe-Cu alloy was investigated in voltage and laser atom probe. • In voltage-mode, apparent Cu concentration exceeded actual concentration at 20–40 K. • In laser-mode, the concentration never exceeded the actual concentration even at 20 K. • Detection loss was prevented due to the rise in tip surface temperature in laser-mode. • Preferential evaporation of solute Cu was reduced in laser-mode. - Abstract: The difference in quantitative analysis performance between the voltage-mode and laser-mode of a local electrode atom probe (LEAP3000X HR) was investigated using a Fe-Cu binary model alloy. Solute copper atoms in ferritic iron preferentially field evaporate because of their significantly lower evaporation field than the matrix iron, and thus, the apparent concentration of solute copper tends to be lower than the actual concentration. However, in voltage-mode, the apparent concentration was higher than the actual concentration at 40 K or less due to a detection loss of matrix iron, and the concentration decreased with increasing specimen temperature due to the preferential evaporation of solute copper. On the other hand, in laser-mode, the apparent concentration never exceeded the actual concentration, even at lower temperatures (20 K), and this mode showed better quantitative performance over a wide range of specimen temperatures. These results indicate that the pulsed laser atom probe prevents both detection loss and preferential evaporation under a wide range of measurement conditions.

  9. Comparison of the quantitative analysis performance between pulsed voltage atom probe and pulsed laser atom probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, J; Kawakami, K; Raabe, D

    2017-04-01

    The difference in quantitative analysis performance between the voltage-mode and laser-mode of a local electrode atom probe (LEAP3000X HR) was investigated using a Fe-Cu binary model alloy. Solute copper atoms in ferritic iron preferentially field evaporate because of their significantly lower evaporation field than the matrix iron, and thus, the apparent concentration of solute copper tends to be lower than the actual concentration. However, in voltage-mode, the apparent concentration was higher than the actual concentration at 40K or less due to a detection loss of matrix iron, and the concentration decreased with increasing specimen temperature due to the preferential evaporation of solute copper. On the other hand, in laser-mode, the apparent concentration never exceeded the actual concentration, even at lower temperatures (20K), and this mode showed better quantitative performance over a wide range of specimen temperatures. These results indicate that the pulsed laser atom probe prevents both detection loss and preferential evaporation under a wide range of measurement conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that gas-phase OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming gas-phase Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux to the Arctic of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by

  11. Pulmonary nodule characterization, including computer analysis and quantitative features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholmai, Brian J; Koo, Chi Wan; Johnson, Geoffrey B; White, Darin B; Raghunath, Sushravya M; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Moynagh, Michael R; Lindell, Rebecca M; Hartman, Thomas E

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary nodules are commonly detected in computed tomography (CT) chest screening of a high-risk population. The specific visual or quantitative features on CT or other modalities can be used to characterize the likelihood that a nodule is benign or malignant. Visual features on CT such as size, attenuation, location, morphology, edge characteristics, and other distinctive "signs" can be highly suggestive of a specific diagnosis and, in general, be used to determine the probability that a specific nodule is benign or malignant. Change in size, attenuation, and morphology on serial follow-up CT, or features on other modalities such as nuclear medicine studies or MRI, can also contribute to the characterization of lung nodules. Imaging analytics can objectively and reproducibly quantify nodule features on CT, nuclear medicine, and magnetic resonance imaging. Some quantitative techniques show great promise in helping to differentiate benign from malignant lesions or to stratify the risk of aggressive versus indolent neoplasm. In this article, we (1) summarize the visual characteristics, descriptors, and signs that may be helpful in management of nodules identified on screening CT, (2) discuss current quantitative and multimodality techniques that aid in the differentiation of nodules, and (3) highlight the power, pitfalls, and limitations of these various techniques.

  12. Atomic structure of large angle grain boundaries determined by quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Sass, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to determine the atomic structure of the Σ = 5 and 13 [001] twist boundaries in Au with a resolution of 0.09 Angstrom or better. The reciprocal lattices of these boundaries were mapped out using synchrotron radiation. The atomic structures were obtained by testing model structures against the intensity observations with a chi square analysis. The boundary structure were modeled using polyhedra, including octahedra, special configurations of tetrahedra and Archimedian anti-prisms, interwoven together by the boundary symmetry. The results of this work point to the possibility of obtaining general rules for grain boundary structure based on X-ray diffraction observations that give the atomic positions with high resolution

  13. Attosecond-Resolved Electron Dynamics in Many-Electron Atoms: Quantitative Theory and Comparison with Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleanthes Anthony Nicolaides

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A variety of processes originating from the interaction of atomic or molecular N-electron states with strong and/or hypershort radiation pulses can be understood quantitatively only by first determining with good accuracy the solutions of the many-electron time-dependent Schrödinger equation (METDSE that describe the corresponding physics. The METDSE is solvable nonperturbatively via the state-specific expansion approach (SSEA. SSEA solutions have been used, or can be used, for quantitative explanation and numerically reliable predictions of quantities that have been measured or are measurable in modern laser-driven experiments that can track, with hypershort (attosecond time resolution, the effects of electron rearrangements in atoms and molecules. The calculations take into account in a transparent way the interplay between the phenomena and the electronic structures of the physically significant states in discrete and multichannel continuous spectra, including multiply- and inner-hole–excited resonance states. The discussion focuses on novel topics of time-resolved many-electron physics and includes a comparison of our predictions to recent quantitative measurements of attosecond-resolved generation of the profile of the doubly excited resonance state of helium during photoionization and of the relative time delay in photoemission of the (2s,2p electrons of neon.

  14. Quantitative determination of impurities in nuclear grade aluminum by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jat, J.R.; Nayak, A.K.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Ravindra, H.R.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with quantitative determination of impurity elements in nuclear grade aluminum, used as fin tubes in research reactors, by Flame-Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (F-AAS). The results have been compared with those obtained by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) method. Experimental conditions used in both the methods are given in the paper. (author)

  15. Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms: Progress toward a quantitative technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calaway, W.F.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Whitten, J.E.; Gruen, D.M.; Coon, S.R.; Texas Univ., Austin, TX; Wiens, R.C.; Burnett, D.S.; Stingeder, G.; Grasserbauer, M.

    1992-01-01

    The combination of RIMS and ion sputtering has been heralded as the ideal means of quantitatively probing the surface of a solid. While several laboratories have demonstrated the extreme sensitivity of combining RIMS with sputtering, less effort has been devoted to the question of accuracy. Using the SARISA instrument developed at Argonne National Laboratory, a number of well-characterized metallic samples have been analyzed. Results from these determinations have been compared with data obtained by several other analytical methods. One significant finding is that impurity measurements down to ppb levels in metal matrices can be made quantitative by employing polycrystalline metal foils as calibration standards. This discovery substantially reduces the effort required for quantitative analysis since a single standard can be used for determining concentrations spanning nine orders of magnitude

  16. Quantitative structure determination of nanostructured materials using the atomic pair distribution function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadeh, Ahmad Salah

    The employed experimental method in this Ph.D. dissertation research is the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) technique specializing in high real space resolution local structure determination. The PDF is obtained via Fourier transform from powder total scattering data including the important local structural information in the diffuse scattering intensities underneath, and in-between, the Bragg peaks. Having long been used to study liquids and amorphous materials, the PDF technique has been recently successfully applied to highly crystalline materials owing to the advances in modern X-ray and neutron sources and computing power. The conventional XRD experiments probe for the presence of periodic structure which are reflected in the Bragg peaks. Local structural deviations or disorder mainly affect the diffuse scattering background. In order to have information about both long-range order and local structure disorder, a technique that takes both Bragg and diffuse scattering need to be used, such as the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) technique. This Ph.D. work introduces a PDF based methodology to quantitatively study nanostructure materials in general. The introduced methodology have been applied to a size-dependent structural study on CdSe nanoparticles (NPs). Quantitative structural information about structure, crystallinity level, core size, NP size, and inhomogeneous internal strain in the studied NPs have been obtained. This method is generally applicable to the characterization of the nano-scale solid, many of which may exhibit complex disorder and strain. The introduced methodology have been also applied on technologically important system, ultra-small CdSe NPs.

  17. Atomic-resolution environmental TEM for quantitative in-situ microscopy in materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Seiji; Yoshida, Hideto

    2013-02-01

    We have compiled our recent in-situ quantitative environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) studies on typical gold nanoparticulate catalysts for the low-temperature oxidation of CO to describe the issues surrounding the application of ETEM, with a special regard to catalyst chemistry. Thanks to the recent development of high-resolution environmental transmission electron microscopes that can work robustly to accumulate observation data in controlled environments, we can deal with the electron irradiation effects and heterogeneity of real catalysts. We established a structural evolution diagram that summarizes the structure of catalysts under electron irradiation as a function of the electron current density ϕ and the electron dose, D. By extrapolating to ϕ = 0, D = 0, we could deduce the intrinsic catalysis structure (without electron irradiation) in various environments, including reaction environments. By numerically and statistically analyzing a substantial number of ETEM images of gold nanoparticles, we established a morphology phase diagram that summarizes how the majority of gold nanoparticles change their morphology systematically as a function of the partial pressures of CO and O(2). Similar diagrams will be helpful in elucidating the phenomena that directly correlate with the catalytic activity determined from ETEM observations. Using these quantitative analyses, we could analyze Cs-corrected ETEM images of the catalysts. The surfaces of gold nanoparticles were structurally reconstructed under reaction conditions, via interactions with CO molecules. CO molecules were observed on the surfaces of catalysts under reaction conditions using high-resolution ETEM. Finally, we discuss the potential of environmental transmission electron microscopy for quantitative in-situ microscopy at the atomic scale.

  18. Representation-free description of light-pulse atom interferometry including non-inertial effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinert, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.kleinert@uni-ulm.de [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Kajari, Endre; Roura, Albert [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Schleich, Wolfgang P. [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Texas A& M University Institute for Advanced Study (TIAS), Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering (IQSE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States)

    2015-12-30

    Light-pulse atom interferometers rely on the wave nature of matter and its manipulation with coherent laser pulses. They are used for precise gravimetry and inertial sensing as well as for accurate measurements of fundamental constants. Reaching higher precision requires longer interferometer times which are naturally encountered in microgravity environments such as drop-tower facilities, sounding rockets and dedicated satellite missions aiming at fundamental quantum physics in space. In all those cases, it is necessary to consider arbitrary trajectories and varying orientations of the interferometer set-up in non-inertial frames of reference. Here we provide a versatile representation-free description of atom interferometry entirely based on operator algebra to address this general situation. We show how to analytically determine the phase shift as well as the visibility of interferometers with an arbitrary number of pulses including the effects of local gravitational accelerations, gravity gradients, the rotation of the lasers and non-inertial frames of reference. Our method conveniently unifies previous results and facilitates the investigation of novel interferometer geometries.

  19. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study Using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H.A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from currentless plasmas of the Large Helical Device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines of W 24+ to W 33+ ions are very sensitive to electron temperature (Te) and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. Based on the first quantitative analysis of measured spatial profile of W 44+ ion, the tungsten concentration is determined to be n(W 44+ )/n e = 1.4x10 -4 and the total radiation loss is estimated as ∼4 MW, of which the value is roughly half the total NBI power. (author)

  20. Des atomes d'antihydrogene produits en quantites substantielles au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Sevestre, G

    2002-01-01

    "Des quantites relativement substantielles d'atomes d'antihydrogene a basse temperature ont ete produites cet ete au Laboratoire europeen de physique des particules, le CERN a Geneve, ouvrant la voie a une etude approfondie de cette antimatiere qui pourrait remettre en cause les theories actuelles, a annonce mercredi sur le site Internet de la revue Nature une equipe internationale de chercheurs" (1 page).

  1. Development of a quantitative safety assessment method for nuclear I and C systems including human operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Man Cheol

    2004-02-01

    Conventional PSA (probabilistic safety analysis) is performed in the framework of event tree analysis and fault tree analysis. In conventional PSA, I and C systems and human operators are assumed to be independent for simplicity. But, the dependency of human operators on I and C systems and the dependency of I and C systems on human operators are gradually recognized to be significant. I believe that it is time to consider the interdependency between I and C systems and human operators in the framework of PSA. But, unfortunately it seems that we do not have appropriate methods for incorporating the interdependency between I and C systems and human operators in the framework of Pasa. Conventional human reliability analysis (HRA) methods are not developed to consider the interdependecy, and the modeling of the interdependency using conventional event tree analysis and fault tree analysis seem to be, event though is does not seem to be impossible, quite complex. To incorporate the interdependency between I and C systems and human operators, we need a new method for HRA and a new method for modeling the I and C systems, man-machine interface (MMI), and human operators for quantitative safety assessment. As a new method for modeling the I and C systems, MMI and human operators, I develop a new system reliability analysis method, reliability graph with general gates (RGGG), which can substitute conventional fault tree analysis. RGGG is an intuitive and easy-to-use method for system reliability analysis, while as powerful as conventional fault tree analysis. To demonstrate the usefulness of the RGGG method, it is applied to the reliability analysis of Digital Plant Protection System (DPPS), which is the actual plant protection system of Ulchin 5 and 6 nuclear power plants located in Republic of Korea. The latest version of the fault tree for DPPS, which is developed by the Integrated Safety Assessment team in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), consists of 64

  2. Quantitative atomic resolution mapping using high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Aert, S.; Verbeeck, J.; Erni, R.; Bals, S.; Luysberg, M.; Dyck, D. Van; Tendeloo, G. Van

    2009-01-01

    A model-based method is proposed to relatively quantify the chemical composition of atomic columns using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. The method is based on a quantification of the total intensity of the scattered electrons for the individual atomic columns using statistical parameter estimation theory. In order to apply this theory, a model is required describing the image contrast of the HAADF STEM images. Therefore, a simple, effective incoherent model has been assumed which takes the probe intensity profile into account. The scattered intensities can then be estimated by fitting this model to an experimental HAADF STEM image. These estimates are used as a performance measure to distinguish between different atomic column types and to identify the nature of unknown columns with good accuracy and precision using statistical hypothesis testing. The reliability of the method is supported by means of simulated HAADF STEM images as well as a combination of experimental images and electron energy-loss spectra. It is experimentally shown that statistically meaningful information on the composition of individual columns can be obtained even if the difference in averaged atomic number Z is only 3. Using this method, quantitative mapping at atomic resolution using HAADF STEM images only has become possible without the need of simultaneously recorded electron energy loss spectra.

  3. Quantum-mechanical theory including angular momenta analysis of atom-atom collisions in a laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1978-01-01

    The problem of two atoms colliding in the presence of an intense radiation field, such as that of a laser, is investigated. The radiation field, which couples states of different electronic symmetry, is described by the number state representation while the electronic degrees of freedom (plus spin-orbit interaction) are discussed in terms of a diabatic representation. The total angular momentum of the field-free system and the angular momentum transferred by absorption (or emission) of a photon are explicitly considered in the derivation of the coupled scattering equations. A model calculation is discussed for the Xe + F collision system.

  4. BROMOCEA Code: An Improved Grand Canonical Monte Carlo/Brownian Dynamics Algorithm Including Explicit Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Carlos J F; Pothula, Karunakar R; Prajapati, Jigneshkumar D; De Biase, Pablo M; Noskov, Sergei Yu; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2016-05-10

    All-atom molecular dynamics simulations have a long history of applications studying ion and substrate permeation across biological and artificial pores. While offering unprecedented insights into the underpinning transport processes, MD simulations are limited in time-scales and ability to simulate physiological membrane potentials or asymmetric salt solutions and require substantial computational power. While several approaches to circumvent all of these limitations were developed, Brownian dynamics simulations remain an attractive option to the field. The main limitation, however, is an apparent lack of protein flexibility important for the accurate description of permeation events. In the present contribution, we report an extension of the Brownian dynamics scheme which includes conformational dynamics. To achieve this goal, the dynamics of amino-acid residues was incorporated into the many-body potential of mean force and into the Langevin equations of motion. The developed software solution, called BROMOCEA, was applied to ion transport through OmpC as a test case. Compared to fully atomistic simulations, the results show a clear improvement in the ratio of permeating anions and cations. The present tests strongly indicate that pore flexibility can enhance permeation properties which will become even more important in future applications to substrate translocation.

  5. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  6. Elements including metals in the atomizer and aerosol of disposable electronic cigarettes and electronic hookahs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Williams

    Full Text Available Our purpose was to quantify 36 inorganic chemical elements in aerosols from disposable electronic cigarettes (ECs and electronic hookahs (EHs, examine the effect of puffing topography on elements in aerosols, and identify the source of the elements.Thirty-six inorganic chemical elements and their concentrations in EC/EH aerosols were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, and their source was identified by analyzing disassembled atomizers using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.Of 36 elements screened, 35 were detected in EC/EH aerosols, while only 15 were detected in conventional tobacco smoke. Some elements/metals were present in significantly higher concentrations in EC/EH aerosol than in cigarette smoke. Concentrations of particular elements/metals within EC/EH brands were sometimes variable. Aerosols generated at low and high air-flow rates produced the same pattern of elements, although the total element concentration decreased at the higher air flow rate. The relative amount of elements in the first and last 60 puffs was generally different. Silicon was the dominant element in aerosols from all EC/EH brands and in cigarette smoke. The elements appeared to come from the filament (nickel, chromium, thick wire (copper coated with silver, brass clamp (copper, zinc, solder joints (tin, lead, and wick and sheath (silicon, oxygen, calcium, magnesium, aluminum. Lead was identified in the solder and aerosol of two brands of EHs (up to 0.165 μg/10 puffs.These data show that EC/EH aerosols contain a mixture of elements, including heavy metals, with concentrations often significantly higher than in conventional cigarette smoke. While the health effects of inhaling mixtures of heated metals is currently not known, these data will be valuable in future risk assessments involving EC/EH elements/metals.

  7. Elements including metals in the atomizer and aerosol of disposable electronic cigarettes and electronic hookahs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Monique; Bozhilov, Krassimir; Ghai, Sanjay; Talbot, Prue

    2017-01-01

    Our purpose was to quantify 36 inorganic chemical elements in aerosols from disposable electronic cigarettes (ECs) and electronic hookahs (EHs), examine the effect of puffing topography on elements in aerosols, and identify the source of the elements. Thirty-six inorganic chemical elements and their concentrations in EC/EH aerosols were determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, and their source was identified by analyzing disassembled atomizers using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Of 36 elements screened, 35 were detected in EC/EH aerosols, while only 15 were detected in conventional tobacco smoke. Some elements/metals were present in significantly higher concentrations in EC/EH aerosol than in cigarette smoke. Concentrations of particular elements/metals within EC/EH brands were sometimes variable. Aerosols generated at low and high air-flow rates produced the same pattern of elements, although the total element concentration decreased at the higher air flow rate. The relative amount of elements in the first and last 60 puffs was generally different. Silicon was the dominant element in aerosols from all EC/EH brands and in cigarette smoke. The elements appeared to come from the filament (nickel, chromium), thick wire (copper coated with silver), brass clamp (copper, zinc), solder joints (tin, lead), and wick and sheath (silicon, oxygen, calcium, magnesium, aluminum). Lead was identified in the solder and aerosol of two brands of EHs (up to 0.165 μg/10 puffs). These data show that EC/EH aerosols contain a mixture of elements, including heavy metals, with concentrations often significantly higher than in conventional cigarette smoke. While the health effects of inhaling mixtures of heated metals is currently not known, these data will be valuable in future risk assessments involving EC/EH elements/metals.

  8. Quantitative atom probe analysis of nanostructure containing clusters and precipitates with multiple length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marceau, R.K.W.; Stephenson, L.T.; Hutchinson, C.R.; Ringer, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    A model Al-3Cu-(0.05 Sn) (wt%) alloy containing a bimodal distribution of relatively shear-resistant θ' precipitates and shearable GP zones is considered in this study. It has recently been shown that the addition of the GP zones to such microstructures can lead to significant increases in strength without a decrease in the uniform elongation. In this study, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the GP zones and the solute distribution in the bimodal microstructure as a function of applied plastic strain. Recent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis has clearly shown strain-induced dissolution of the GP zones, which is supported by the current APT data with additional spatial information. There is significant repartitioning of Cu from the GP zones into the solid solution during deformation. A new approach for cluster finding in APT data has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the sizes and shapes of the Cu containing features in the solid solution solute as a function of applied strain. -- Research highlights: → A new approach for cluster finding in atom probe tomography (APT) data has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the sizes and shapes of the Cu containing features with multiple length scales. → In this study, a model Al-3Cu-(0.05 Sn) (wt%) alloy containing a bimodal distribution of relatively shear-resistant θ' precipitates and shearable GP zones is considered. → APT has been used to quantitatively characterise the evolution of the GP zones and the solute distribution in the bimodal microstructure as a function of applied plastic strain. → It is clearly shown that there is strain-induced dissolution of the GP zones with significant repartitioning of Cu from the GP zones into the solid solution during deformation.

  9. A new look on the formation and interaction of elementary particles in atoms and molecules including photoreaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvalov, V A

    2008-01-01

    Possible role of high-energy bosons (virtual photons) is discussed with respect to the formation of elementary particles and their interaction in nucleus, many-electron atom, and molecule including photoreaction centers. Using properties of the photons, the expressions for calculations of the mass of particles, of the energy of electrons and their distances from nucleus in atoms, of the dissociation energy and distances between atoms in molecules were found which give results in good agreement with experimental data. This approach allows doing calculations in rather complicated system like photoreaction centers in which chlorophyll molecules form electron transfer chain.

  10. Development of quantitative atomic modeling for tungsten transport study using LHD plasma with tungsten pellet injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, I.; Sakaue, H. A.; Suzuki, C.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Tamura, N.; Sudo, S.; Morita, S.

    2015-09-01

    Quantitative tungsten study with reliable atomic modeling is important for successful achievement of ITER and fusion reactors. We have developed tungsten atomic modeling for understanding the tungsten behavior in fusion plasmas. The modeling is applied to the analysis of tungsten spectra observed from plasmas of the large helical device (LHD) with tungsten pellet injection. We found that extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission of W24+ to W33+ ions at 1.5-3.5 nm are sensitive to electron temperature and useful to examine the tungsten behavior in edge plasmas. We can reproduce measured EUV spectra at 1.5-3.5 nm by calculated spectra with the tungsten atomic model and obtain charge state distributions of tungsten ions in LHD plasmas at different temperatures around 1 keV. Our model is applied to calculate the unresolved transition array (UTA) seen at 4.5-7 nm tungsten spectra. We analyze the effect of configuration interaction on population kinetics related to the UTA structure in detail and find the importance of two-electron-one-photon transitions between 4p54dn+1- 4p64dn-14f. Radiation power rate of tungsten due to line emissions is also estimated with the model and is consistent with other models within factor 2.

  11. Quantitative characterization of the atomic-scale structure of oxyhydroxides in rusts formed on steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, M.; Suzuki, S.; Kimura, M.; Suzuki, T.; Kihira, H.; Waseda, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray structural analysis coupled with anomalous X-ray scattering has been used for characterizing the atomic-scale structure of rust formed on steel surfaces. Samples were prepared from rust layers formed on the surfaces of two commercial steels. X-ray scattered intensity profiles of the two samples showed that the rusts consisted mainly of two types of ferric oxyhydroxide, α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH. The amounts of these rust components and the realistic atomic arrangements in the components were estimated by fitting both the ordinary and the environmental interference functions with a model structure calculated using the reverse Monte Carlo simulation technique. The two rust components were found to be the network structure formed by FeO 6 octahedral units, the network structure itself deviating from the ideal case. The present results also suggest that the structural analysis method using anomalous X-ray scattering and the reverse Monte Carlo technique is very successful in determining the atomic-scale structure of rusts formed on the steel surfaces

  12. Quantitative measurements of ground state atomic oxygen in atmospheric pressure surface micro-discharge array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Kong, M. G.; Britun, N.; Snyders, R.; Leys, C.; Nikiforov, A.

    2017-06-01

    The generation of atomic oxygen in an array of surface micro-discharge, working in atmospheric pressure He/O2 or Ar/O2 mixtures, is investigated. The absolute atomic oxygen density and its temporal and spatial dynamics are studied by means of two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. A high density of atomic oxygen is detected in the He/O2 mixture with up to 10% O2 content in the feed gas, whereas the atomic oxygen concentration in the Ar/O2 mixture stays below the detection limit of 1013 cm-3. The measured O density near the electrode under the optimal conditions in He/1.75% O2 gas is 4.26  ×  1015 cm-3. The existence of the ground state O (2p 4 3 P) species has been proven in the discharge at a distance up to 12 mm away from the electrodes. Dissociative reactions of the singlet O2 with O3 and deep vacuum ultraviolet radiation, including the radiation of excimer \\text{He}2\\ast , are proposed to be responsible for O (2p 4 3 P) production in the far afterglow. A capability of the surface micro-discharge array delivering atomic oxygen to long distances over a large area is considered very interesting for various biomedical applications.

  13. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  14. Toward quantitative estimation of material properties with dynamic mode atomic force microscopy: a comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosal, Sayan; Gannepalli, Anil; Salapaka, Murti

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we explore methods that enable estimation of material properties with the dynamic mode atomic force microscopy suitable for soft matter investigation. The article presents the viewpoint of casting the system, comprising of a flexure probe interacting with the sample, as an equivalent cantilever system and compares a steady-state analysis based method with a recursive estimation technique for determining the parameters of the equivalent cantilever system in real time. The steady-state analysis of the equivalent cantilever model, which has been implicitly assumed in studies on material property determination, is validated analytically and experimentally. We show that the steady-state based technique yields results that quantitatively agree with the recursive method in the domain of its validity. The steady-state technique is considerably simpler to implement, however, slower compared to the recursive technique. The parameters of the equivalent system are utilized to interpret storage and dissipative properties of the sample. Finally, the article identifies key pitfalls that need to be avoided toward the quantitative estimation of material properties.

  15. Quantitative assessment of contact and non-contact lateral force calibration methods for atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been widely used for measuring friction force at the nano-scale. However, one of the key challenges faced by AFM researchers is to calibrate an AFM system to interpret a lateral force signal as a quantifiable force. In this study, five rectangular cantilevers were used to quantitatively compare three different lateral force calibration methods to demonstrate the legitimacy and to establish confidence in the quantitative integrity of the proposed methods. The Flat-Wedge method is based on a variation of the lateral output on a surface with flat and changing slopes, the Multi-Load Pivot method is based on taking pivot measurements at several locations along the cantilever length, and the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method is based on determining the optical lever sensitivity from the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode with a known torsional spring constant from the Sader method. The results of the calibration using the Flat-Wedge and Multi-Load Pivot methods were found to be consistent within experimental uncertainties, and the experimental uncertainties of the two methods were found to be less than 15%. However, the lateral force sensitivity determined by the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method was found to be 8–29% smaller than those obtained from the other two methods. This discrepancy decreased to 3–19% when the torsional mode correction factor for an ideal cantilever was used, which suggests that the torsional mode correction should be taken into account to establish confidence in Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method. - Highlights: • Quantitative assessment of three lateral force calibration methods for AFM. • Advantages and disadvantages of three different lateral force calibration method. • Implementation of Multi-Load Pivot method as non-contact calibration technique. • The torsional mode correction for Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method.

  16. Quantitative assessment of contact and non-contact lateral force calibration methods for atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Chung, Koo-Hyun, E-mail: khchung@ulsan.ac.kr

    2016-02-15

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been widely used for measuring friction force at the nano-scale. However, one of the key challenges faced by AFM researchers is to calibrate an AFM system to interpret a lateral force signal as a quantifiable force. In this study, five rectangular cantilevers were used to quantitatively compare three different lateral force calibration methods to demonstrate the legitimacy and to establish confidence in the quantitative integrity of the proposed methods. The Flat-Wedge method is based on a variation of the lateral output on a surface with flat and changing slopes, the Multi-Load Pivot method is based on taking pivot measurements at several locations along the cantilever length, and the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method is based on determining the optical lever sensitivity from the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode with a known torsional spring constant from the Sader method. The results of the calibration using the Flat-Wedge and Multi-Load Pivot methods were found to be consistent within experimental uncertainties, and the experimental uncertainties of the two methods were found to be less than 15%. However, the lateral force sensitivity determined by the Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method was found to be 8–29% smaller than those obtained from the other two methods. This discrepancy decreased to 3–19% when the torsional mode correction factor for an ideal cantilever was used, which suggests that the torsional mode correction should be taken into account to establish confidence in Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method. - Highlights: • Quantitative assessment of three lateral force calibration methods for AFM. • Advantages and disadvantages of three different lateral force calibration method. • Implementation of Multi-Load Pivot method as non-contact calibration technique. • The torsional mode correction for Lateral AFM Thermal-Sader method.

  17. Concentration dependence of alpha-synuclein fibril length assessed by quantitative atomic force microscopy and statistical-mechanical theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raaij, Martijn E; van Gestel, Jeroen; Segers-Nolten, Ine M J; de Leeuw, Simon W; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2008-01-01

    The initial concentration of monomeric amyloidogenic proteins is a crucial factor in the in vitro formation of amyloid fibrils. We use quantitative atomic force microscopy to study the effect of the initial concentration of human alpha-synuclein on the mean length of mature alpha-synuclein fibrils,

  18. Quantitative analysis of Si/SiGeC superlattices using atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estivill, Robert; Grenier, Adeline; Duguay, Sébastien; Vurpillot, François; Terlier, Tanguy; Barnes, Jean-Paul; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Blavette, Didier

    2015-12-01

    SiGe and its alloys are used as key materials in innovative electronic devices. The analysis of these materials together with the localisation of dopants and impurities on a very fine scale is of crucial importance for better understanding their electronic properties. The quantification of carbon and germanium in an as-grown Si/SiGeC superlattice has been investigated using Atom Probe Tomography as a function of analysis conditions and sample anneal temperature. The mass spectrum is heavily influenced by the analysis conditions and chemical identification is needed. It was found that quantitative results are obtained using a intermediate electric field. The evaporation of carbon ions shows a strong spatial and temporal correlation. A series of annealed samples have been analysed, presenting an inhomogeneous carbon distribution, appearing in the shape of small clusters. These findings confirm previous results and give a better understanding of the processes occurring in these technologically important materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Producing high-accuracy lattice models from protein atomic coordinates including side chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Martin; Saunders, Rhodri; Smith, Cameron; Backofen, Rolf; Deane, Charlotte M

    2012-01-01

    Lattice models are a common abstraction used in the study of protein structure, folding, and refinement. They are advantageous because the discretisation of space can make extensive protein evaluations computationally feasible. Various approaches to the protein chain lattice fitting problem have been suggested but only a single backbone-only tool is available currently. We introduce LatFit, a new tool to produce high-accuracy lattice protein models. It generates both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models in any user defined lattice. LatFit implements a new distance RMSD-optimisation fitting procedure in addition to the known coordinate RMSD method. We tested LatFit's accuracy and speed using a large nonredundant set of high resolution proteins (SCOP database) on three commonly used lattices: 3D cubic, face-centred cubic, and knight's walk. Fitting speed compared favourably to other methods and both backbone-only and backbone-side-chain models show low deviation from the original data (~1.5 Å RMSD in the FCC lattice). To our knowledge this represents the first comprehensive study of lattice quality for on-lattice protein models including side chains while LatFit is the only available tool for such models.

  20. Quantitative nanohistological investigation of scleroderma: an atomic force microscopy-based approach to disease characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strange AP

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adam P Strange,1 Sebastian Aguayo,1 Tarek Ahmed,1 Nicola Mordan,1 Richard Stratton,2 Stephen R Porter,3 Susan Parekh,4 Laurent Bozec1 1Department of Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, 2Centre for Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Diseases, Royal Free Hospital, UCL Medical School, 3UCL Eastman Dental Institute, 4Department of Pediatrics, UCL Eastman Dental Institute, London, UK Abstract: Scleroderma (or systemic sclerosis, SSc is a disease caused by excess crosslinking of collagen. The skin stiffens and becomes painful, while internally, organ function can be compromised by the less elastic collagen. Diagnosis of SSc is often only possible in advanced cases by which treatment time is limited. A more detailed analysis of SSc may provide better future treatment options and information of disease progression. Recently, the histological stain picrosirius red showing collagen register has been combined with atomic force microscopy (AFM to study SSc. Skin from healthy individuals and SSc patients was biopsied, stained and studied using AFM. By investigating the crosslinking of collagen at a smaller hierarchical stage, the effects of SSc were more pronounced. Changes in morphology and Young’s elastic modulus were observed and quantified; giving rise to a novel technique, we have termed “quantitative nanohistology”. An increase in nanoscale stiffness in the collagen for SSc compared with healthy individuals was seen by a significant increase in the Young’s modulus profile for the collagen. These markers of stiffer collagen in SSc are similar to the symptoms experienced by patients, giving additional hope that in the future, nanohistology using AFM can be readily applied as a clinical tool, providing detailed information of the state of collagen. Keywords: rheumatology, adjunct diagnosis, picrosirius red, collagen, nanohistology

  1. Novel atomic absorption spectrometric and rapid spectrophotometric methods for the quantitation of paracetamol in saliva: application to pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, M M; Nejem, R M; El-Abadla, N S; Al-Kholy, M; Saleh, Akila A

    2008-01-01

    A novel atomic absorption spectrometric method and two highly sensitive spectrophotometric methods were developed for the determination of paracetamol. These techniques based on the oxidation of paracetamol by iron (III) (method I); oxidation of p-aminophenol after the hydrolysis of paracetamol (method II). Iron (II) then reacts with potassium ferricyanide to form Prussian blue color with a maximum absorbance at 700 nm. The atomic absorption method was accomplished by extracting the excess iron (III) in method II and aspirates the aqueous layer into air-acetylene flame to measure the absorbance of iron (II) at 302.1 nm. The reactions have been spectrometrically evaluated to attain optimum experimental conditions. Linear responses were exhibited over the ranges 1.0-10, 0.2-2.0 and 0.1-1.0 mug/ml for method I, method II and atomic absorption spectrometric method, respectively. A high sensitivity is recorded for the proposed methods I and II and atomic absorption spectrometric method value indicate: 0.05, 0.022 and 0.012 mug/ml, respectively. The limit of quantitation of paracetamol by method II and atomic absorption spectrometric method were 0.20 and 0.10 mug/ml. Method II and the atomic absorption spectrometric method were applied to demonstrate a pharmacokinetic study by means of salivary samples in normal volunteers who received 1.0 g paracetamol. Intra and inter-day precision did not exceed 6.9%.

  2. Quantitative chemical-structure evaluation using atom probe tomography: Short-range order analysis of Fe-Al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marceau, R K W; Ceguerra, A V; Breen, A J; Raabe, D; Ringer, S P

    2015-10-01

    Short-range-order (SRO) has been quantitatively evaluated in an Fe-18Al (at%) alloy using atom probe tomography (APT) data and by calculation of the generalised multicomponent short-range order (GM-SRO) parameters, which have been determined by shell-based analysis of the three-dimensional atomic positions. The accuracy of this method with respect to limited detector efficiency and spatial resolution is tested against simulated D03 ordered data. Whilst there is minimal adverse effect from limited atom probe instrument detector efficiency, the combination of this with imperfect spatial resolution has the effect of making the data appear more randomised. The value of lattice rectification of the experimental APT data prior to GM-SRO analysis is demonstrated through improved information sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative chemical-structure evaluation using atom probe tomography: Short-range order analysis of Fe–Al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marceau, R.K.W., E-mail: r.marceau@deakin.edu.au [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216 (Australia); Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Ceguerra, A.V.; Breen, A.J. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Raabe, D. [Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck-Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Ringer, S.P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2015-10-15

    Short-range-order (SRO) has been quantitatively evaluated in an Fe–18Al (at%) alloy using atom probe tomography (APT) data and by calculation of the generalised multicomponent short-range order (GM-SRO) parameters, which have been determined by shell-based analysis of the three-dimensional atomic positions. The accuracy of this method with respect to limited detector efficiency and spatial resolution is tested against simulated D0{sub 3} ordered data. Whilst there is minimal adverse effect from limited atom probe instrument detector efficiency, the combination of this with imperfect spatial resolution has the effect of making the data appear more randomised. The value of lattice rectification of the experimental APT data prior to GM-SRO analysis is demonstrated through improved information sensitivity. - Highlights: • Short-range-order (SRO) is quantitatively evaluated using atom probe tomography data. • Chemical species-specific SRO parameters have been calculated. • The accuracy of this method is tested against simulated D0{sub 3} ordered data. • Imperfect spatial resolution combined with finite detector efficiency causes a randomising effect. • Lattice rectification of the data prior to GM-SRO analysis is demonstrated to improve information sensitivity.

  4. Atomic absorption spectrometry and other instrumental methods for quantitative measurements of arsenic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, R.R.; Ryan, D.E.; Zhang, H.

    1981-01-01

    Progress in instrumental methods for quantification of arsenic during the past decade is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on atomic absorption spectrometry, where major progress has been made in flame methods in conjunction with hydride generation procedures and in electrothermal methods with the graphite furnace. Specific materials in which arsenic is quantified by atomic absorption techniques are also listed. Progress in the application of neutron activation-γ-spectrometry, emission spectrometry, electrometric methods, X-ray procedures and atomic fluorescence spectrometry is also reviewed. The limits of detection and time requirements of all the techniques are compared. (Auth.)

  5. Quantitative study of two- and three-dimensional strong localization of matter waves by atomic scatterers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antezza, Mauro; Castin, Yvan; Hutchinson, David A. W.

    2010-01-01

    We study the strong localization of atomic matter waves in a disordered potential created by atoms pinned at the nodes of a lattice, for both three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) systems. The localization length of the matter wave, the density of localized states, and the occurrence of energy mobility edges (for the 3D system), are numerically investigated as a function of the effective scattering length between the atomic matter wave and the pinned atoms. Both positive and negative matter wave energies are explored. Interesting features of the density of states are discovered at negative energies, where maxima in the density of bound states for the system can be interpreted in terms of bound states of a matter wave atom with a few pinned atomic scatterers. In 3D we found evidence of up to three mobility edges, one at positive energies, and two at negative energies, the latter corresponding to transitions between extended and localized bound states. In 2D, no mobility edge is found, and a rapid exponential-like increase of the localization length is observed at high energy.

  6. Advanced All-Gas Chemical Generation of Atomic Iodine for a COIL, and Testing the COIL Operation Including This Method of Atomic Iodine Generation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kodymova, Jarmila; Spalek, Otomar; Jirasek, Vit; Censky, Miroslav

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking Academy of Sciences as follows: The Grantee will investigate advanced methods for chemical generation of atomic iodine for a Chemical Oxygen-Iodine Laser (COIL...

  7. Quantitative characterization of new supramolecular synthons involving fluorine atoms in the crystal structures of di- and tetrafluorinated benzamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pradip Kumar; Yadav, Hare Ram; Choudhury, Angshuman Roy; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-10-01

    Strong hydrogen bonds play a significant role in crystal packing. In particular, the involvement of interactions involving fluorine in controlling the crystal packing requires appropriate attention, especially in the presence of other strong hydrogen bonds. In the present study, a detailed quantitative assessment has been performed of the nature, energetics and topological properties derived from the electron density in model compounds based on fluorinated benzamides (a total of 46 fluorine-substituted benzamides containing multiple fluorine atoms) in the solid state. The primary motivation in the design of such molecules is to enhance the acidity of the interacting H atoms in the presence of an increasing number of F atoms on the molecular scaffold, resulting in increased propensity towards the formation of intermolecular interactions involving organic fluorine. This exercise has resulted in the identification of new and frequently occurring supramolecular synthons involving F atoms in the packing of molecules in the solid state. The energetics associated with short and directional intermolecular Csp 2 -H...F-Csp 2 interactions with significantly high electrostatic contributions is noteworthy, and the topological analysis reveals the bonding character of these ubiquitous interactions in crystal packing in addition to the presence of Csp 2 -F...F-Csp 2 contacts.

  8. Quantitative size-dependent structure and strain determination of CdSe nanoparticles using atomic pair distribution function analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masadeh, A. S.; Bozin, E. S.; Farrow, C. L.; Paglia, G.; Juhas, P.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Karkamkar, A.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2007-01-01

    The size-dependent structure of CdSe nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 2 to 4 nm, has been studied using the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) method. The core structure of the measured CdSe nanoparticles can be described in terms of the wurtzite atomic structure with extensive stacking faults. The density of faults in the nanoparticles is ∼50%. The diameter of the core region was extracted directly from the PDF data and is in good agreement with the diameter obtained from standard characterization methods, suggesting that there is little surface amorphous region. A compressive strain was measured in the Cd-Se bond length that increases with decreasing particle size being 0.5% with respect to bulk CdSe for the 2 nm diameter particles. This study demonstrates the size-dependent quantitative structural information that can be obtained even from very small nanoparticles using the PDF approach

  9. Quantitative size-dependent structure and strain determination of CdSe nanoparticles using atomic pair distribution function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masadeh, A. S.; Božin, E. S.; Farrow, C. L.; Paglia, G.; Juhas, P.; Billinge, S. J. L.; Karkamkar, A.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2007-09-01

    The size-dependent structure of CdSe nanoparticles, with diameters ranging from 2to4nm , has been studied using the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) method. The core structure of the measured CdSe nanoparticles can be described in terms of the wurtzite atomic structure with extensive stacking faults. The density of faults in the nanoparticles is ˜50% . The diameter of the core region was extracted directly from the PDF data and is in good agreement with the diameter obtained from standard characterization methods, suggesting that there is little surface amorphous region. A compressive strain was measured in the Cd-Se bond length that increases with decreasing particle size being 0.5% with respect to bulk CdSe for the 2nm diameter particles. This study demonstrates the size-dependent quantitative structural information that can be obtained even from very small nanoparticles using the PDF approach.

  10. Quantitative studies of electric field intensity on atom diffusion of Cu/Ta/Si stacks during annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lei, E-mail: ray521252@gmail.com [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Stomatology Department, Nanjing General Hospital, Nanjing University, Medical School, Nanjing, 210002 (China); Asempah, Isaac; Dong, Song-Tao; Yin, Pian-Pian [Institute of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003 (China); Jin, Lei, E-mail: ljin@nju.edu.cn [Stomatology Department, Nanjing General Hospital, Nanjing University, Medical School, Nanjing, 210002 (China)

    2017-03-31

    Highlights: • The electric field intensity accelerates the atom diffusion of Cu/Ta/Si stacks at 650 °C. • The acceleration effect is enhanced with an increment of electric field intensity. • An acceleration factor (1 + a·a{sup E/0.8}){sup 2} accelerating diffusion coefficient is determined by quantitative analysis. - Abstract: It has been shown that enhanced electric field intensity (0–4.0 kV/cm) has an obvious effect on accelerating atom diffusion in Cu/Ta/Si interconnect stacks at 650 °C. The theoretical deduction proves that diffusion coefficient is accelerated proportional to an acceleration factor (1 + a·α{sup E/0.8}){sup 2}. The analysis indicates that the accelerating effect is mainly attributed to the perturbation of the electric state of the defects and enhanced vacancy and dislocation densities.

  11. Quantitativeness in laser-assisted atom probe analysis of boron and carbon codoped in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinno, Teruyuki; Sasaki, Tomokazu; Tomita, Mitsuhiro; Ohkubo, Tadakatsu

    2017-11-01

    Boron and carbon codoped in polysilicon thin films and carbon implanted in silicon substrates have been examined by laser-assisted atom probe tomography (La-APT). Clusters of dopants were observed in annealed samples. Compared with the results obtained by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), significant miscounts of both boron and carbon were found in La-APT results. On the basis of measurements using two different La-APT systems, it was suggested that the insufficiency of the multihit capability of the detection systems is an important origin of the miscounts.

  12. Atomizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fixed stereo electroacoustic music, included in Robert Voisey’s (Curator) VoxNovus 60×60 Dance, 60×60 2010 International Mix and 60×60 Sanguine Mix projects. Performed internationally, including Stratford Circus, London, UK. Full performance listings and press available online....

  13. On the non-linear spectroscopy including saturated absorption and four-wave mixing in two and multi-level atoms: a computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M.; De Jager, G.; Nkosi, Z.; Wyngaard, A.; Govender, K.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we report on the study of two and multi-level atoms interacting with multiple laser beams. The semi-classical approach is used to describe the system in which the atoms are treated quantum mechanically via the density matrix operator, while the laser beams are treated classically using Maxwells equations. We present results of a two level atom interacting with single and multiple laser beams and demonstrate Rabi oscillations between the levels. The effects of laser modulation on the dynamics of the atom (atomic populations and coherences) are examined by solving the optical Bloch equations. Plots of the density matrix elements as a function of time are presented for various parameters such as laser intensity, detuning, modulation etc. In addition, phase-space plots and Fourier analysis of the density matrix elements are provided. The atomic polarization, estimated from the coherence terms of the density matrix elements, is used in the numerical solution of Maxwells equations to determine the behaviour of the laser beams as they propagate through the atomic ensemble. The effects of saturation and hole-burning are demonstrated in the case of two counter propagating beams with one being a strong beam and the other being very weak. The above work is extended to include four-wave mixing in four level atoms in a diamond configuration. Two co-propagating beams of different wavelengths drive the atoms from a ground state |1〉 to an excited state |3〉 via an intermediate state |2〉. The atoms then move back to the ground state via another intermediate state |4〉, resulting in the generation of two additional correlated photon beams. The characteristics of these additional photons are studied.

  14. Quantitative dopant distributions in GaAs nanowires using atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Sichao; Burgess, Timothy; Gault, Baptiste; Gao, Qiang; Bao, Peite; Li, Li; Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Liu, Hongwei; Yao, Lan; Ceguerra, Anna V.; Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati; Ringer, Simon P.; Zheng, Rongkun

    2013-01-01

    Controllable doping of semiconductor nanowires is critical to realize their proposed applications, however precise and reliable characterization of dopant distributions remains challenging. In this article, we demonstrate an atomic-resolution three-dimensional elemental mapping of pristine semiconductor nanowires on growth substrates by using atom probe tomography to tackle this major challenge. This highly transferrable method is able to analyze the full diameter of a nanowire, with a depth resolution better than 0.17 nm thanks to an advanced reconstruction method exploiting the specimen's crystallography, and an enhanced chemical sensitivity of better than 8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. - Highlights: ► Probing pristine semiconductor NWs from growth substrate has been demonstrated. ► Analyzing the full diameter of a nanowire has been achieved. ► A spatial resolution better than 0.17 nm in depth has been obtained for GaAs. ► An enhanced SNR 100:2 has been achieved

  15. Quantitative dopant distributions in GaAs nanowires using atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Sichao [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Burgess, Timothy [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Gault, Baptiste [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S4L8 (Canada); Gao, Qiang [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Bao, Peite; Li, Li [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cui, Xiangyuan; Kong Yeoh, Wai; Liu, Hongwei; Yao, Lan [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Ceguerra, Anna V. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hoe Tan, Hark; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Ringer, Simon P. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Zheng, Rongkun, E-mail: rongkun.zheng@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Controllable doping of semiconductor nanowires is critical to realize their proposed applications, however precise and reliable characterization of dopant distributions remains challenging. In this article, we demonstrate an atomic-resolution three-dimensional elemental mapping of pristine semiconductor nanowires on growth substrates by using atom probe tomography to tackle this major challenge. This highly transferrable method is able to analyze the full diameter of a nanowire, with a depth resolution better than 0.17 nm thanks to an advanced reconstruction method exploiting the specimen's crystallography, and an enhanced chemical sensitivity of better than 8-fold increase in the signal-to-noise ratio. - Highlights: ► Probing pristine semiconductor NWs from growth substrate has been demonstrated. ► Analyzing the full diameter of a nanowire has been achieved. ► A spatial resolution better than 0.17 nm in depth has been obtained for GaAs. ► An enhanced SNR 100:2 has been achieved.

  16. A study on the quantitative evaluation for the software included in digital systems of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. K.; Sung, T. Y.; Eom, H. S.; Jeong, H. S.; Kang, H. G.; Lee, K. Y.; Park, J. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    In general, probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) has been used as one of the most important methods to evaluate the safety of NPPs. The PSA, because most of NPPs have been installed and used analog I and C systems, has been performed based on the hardware perspectives. In addition, since the tendency to use digital I and C systems including software instead of analog I and C systems is increasing, the needs of quantitative evaluation methods so as to perform PSA are also increasing. Nevertheless, several reasons such as software did not aged and it is very perplexed to estimate software failure rate due to its non-linearity, make the performance of PSA difficult. In this study, in order to perform PSA including software more efficiently, test-based software reliability estimation methods are reviewed to suggest a preliminary procedure that can provide reasonable guidances to quantify software failure rate. In addition, requisite activities to enhance applicability of the suggested procedure are also discussed. 67 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  17. Ab initio effective core potentials including relativistic effects and their application to the electronic structure calculations of heavy atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.S.

    1977-11-01

    The effects of the 4f shell of electrons and the relativity of valence electrons are compared. The effect of 4f shell (lanthanide contraction) is estimated from the numerical Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations of pseudo-atoms corresponding to Hf, Re, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi without 4f electrons and with atomic numbers reduced by 14. The relativistic effect estimated from the numerical Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) calculations of those atoms is comparable in the magnitude with that of the 4f shell of electrons. Both are larger for 6s than for 5d or 6p electrons. The various relativistic effects on valence electrons are discussed in detail to determine the proper level of the approximation for the valence electron calculations of systems with heavy elements. An effective core potential system has been developed for heavy atoms in which relativistic effects are included in the effective potentials.

  18. Accurate Bond Lengths to Hydrogen Atoms from Single-Crystal X-ray Diffraction by Including Estimated Hydrogen ADPs and Comparison to Neutron and QM/MM Benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, Birger; Lübben, Jens; Mebs, Stefan; Wagner, Armin; Luger, Peter; Flaig, Ralf

    2017-04-03

    Amino acid structures are an ideal test set for method-development studies in crystallography. High-resolution X-ray diffraction data for eight previously studied genetically encoding amino acids are provided, complemented by a non-standard amino acid. Structures were re-investigated to study a widely applicable treatment that permits accurate X-H bond lengths to hydrogen atoms to be obtained: this treatment combines refinement of positional hydrogen-atom parameters with aspherical scattering factors with constrained "TLS+INV" estimated hydrogen anisotropic displacement parameters (H-ADPs). Tabulated invariom scattering factors allow rapid modeling without further computations, and unconstrained Hirshfeld atom refinement provides a computationally demanding alternative when database entries are missing. Both should incorporate estimated H-ADPs, as free refinement frequently leads to over-parameterization and non-positive definite H-ADPs irrespective of the aspherical scattering model used. Using estimated H-ADPs, both methods yield accurate and precise X-H distances in best quantitative agreement with neutron diffraction data (available for five of the test-set molecules). This work thus solves the last remaining problem to obtain such results more frequently. Density functional theoretical QM/MM computations are able to play the role of an alternative benchmark to neutron diffraction. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Rapid quantitative analysis of magnesium stearate in pharmaceutical powders and solid dosage forms by atomic absorption: method development and application in product manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugisawa, Keiichi; Kaneko, Takashi; Sago, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Tomonobu

    2009-04-05

    The distribution of magnesium stearate (MgSt) in tablet granule has a significant impact on the compression process. A rapid quantitative method for evaluating magnesium stearate content by atomic absorption was established. The MgSt was extracted from the granule in 0.1 mol/L nitric acid and the resulting free magnesium ion quantitated by atomic absorption. The total analysis time was significantly shortened in comparison to the previously used sample ignition method. This newly established method was evaluated with several drug products and several types of blender. The analytical method was also applied to tablets with poor compression (rough tablet surface). The MgSt content in these rough surface tablets was significantly lower than in tablets with smooth surfaces from the same batch. From these results, this atomic absorption method is considered to be an accurate and useful method for evaluating MgSt distribution and can be applied to tablet manufacturing process validation.

  20. Atomic compressibility and reversible insertion of atoms into solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connerade, J.P.; Semaoune, R.

    2000-01-01

    We developed a theoretical model to investigate the compressibility of atoms. Atoms are confined inside a spherical cavity, simulated numerically by a finite repulsive potential barrier. The energy levels and wavefunctions of confined atoms are determined by solving, for different cavity radii, the relativistic Dirac-Fock equations, including formally the repulsive barrier. The changes in the atomic size and in the ground-state energy level allow one to define a positive isotropic pressure exerted on the confined atom. The model is applied to atomic caesium and it is demonstrated quantitatively that the remarkable compressibility of caesium originates from a purely atomic mechanism, namely the pressure-induced collapse of the 5d orbital. We propose that this mechanism can also drive, at an atomic level, a reversible insertion of atoms into solids. Applications to lithium-ion batteries are briefly discussed at the end of this paper. (author)

  1. Quantitative analysis of doped/undoped ZnO nanomaterials using laser assisted atom probe tomography: Influence of the analysis parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirifar, Nooshin; Lardé, Rodrigue; Talbot, Etienne; Pareige, Philippe; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Mancini, Lorenzo; Houard, Jonathan; Castro, Celia; Sallet, Vincent; Zehani, Emir; Hassani, Said; Sartel, Corine; Ziani, Ahmed; Portier, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    In the last decade, atom probe tomography has become a powerful tool to investigate semiconductor and insulator nanomaterials in microelectronics, spintronics, and optoelectronics. In this paper, we report an investigation of zinc oxide nanostructures using atom probe tomography. We observed that the chemical composition of zinc oxide is strongly dependent on the analysis parameters used for atom probe experiments. It was observed that at high laser pulse energies, the electric field at the specimen surface is strongly dependent on the crystallographic directions. This dependence leads to an inhomogeneous field evaporation of the surface atoms, resulting in unreliable measurements. We show that the laser pulse energy has to be well tuned to obtain reliable quantitative chemical composition measurements of undoped and doped ZnO nanomaterials.

  2. HIV-1 Capsid Function is Regulated by Dynamics: Quantitative Atomic-Resolution Insights by Integrating Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR, QM/MM, and MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huilan; Hou, Guangjin; Lu, Manman; Ahn, Jinwoo; Byeon, In-Ja L; Langmead, Christopher J; Perilla, Juan R; Hung, Ivan; Gor'kov, Peter L; Gan, Zhehong; Brey, William W; Case, David A; Schulten, Klaus; Gronenborn, Angela M; Polenova, Tatyana

    2016-10-05

    HIV-1 CA capsid protein possesses intrinsic conformational flexibility, which is essential for its assembly into conical capsids and interactions with host factors. CA is dynamic in the assembled capsid, and residues in functionally important regions of the protein undergo motions spanning many decades of timescales. Chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) tensors, recorded in magic-angle-spinning NMR experiments, provide direct residue-specific probes of motions on nano- to microsecond timescales. We combined NMR, MD, and Density-Functional-Theory calculations, to gain quantitative understanding of internal backbone dynamics in CA assemblies, and found that the dynamically averaged 15 N CSA tensors calculated by this joined protocol are in remarkable agreement with experiment. Thus, quantitative atomic-level understanding of the relationships between CSA tensors, local backbone structure and motions in CA assemblies is achieved, demonstrating the power of integrating NMR experimental data and theory for characterizing atomic-resolution dynamics in biological systems.

  3. Atomic-scale structure of the glassy Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change material: A quantitative assessment via first-principles molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Assil; Ori, Guido; Boero, Mauro; Lampin, Evelyne; Massobrio, Carlo

    2017-12-01

    The amorphous structure of the phase change material Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) has been the object of controversial structural models. By employing first-principles molecular dynamics within density functional theory, we are able to obtain quantitative agreement with experimental structural findings for the topology of glassy GST. To this end, we take full advantage of a thoughtful, well established choice of the exchange-correlation (XC) functional (Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr, BLYP), combined with appropriate options for the nonlocal part in the pseudopotential construction for Ge. Results obtained by using the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) XC functional and a similar strategy for the Ge pseudopotential constructions are also presented, since they are very valuable and worthy of consideration. The atomic structure of glassy GST is characterized by Ge atoms lying in a predominant tetrahedral network, albeit a non-negligible fraction of Ge atoms are also found in defective octahedra.

  4. Imaging and quantitative data acquisition of biological cell walls with Atomic Force Microscopy and Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tittmann, B. R. [Penn State; Xi, X. [Penn State

    2014-09-01

    This chapter demonstrates the feasibility of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and High Frequency Scanning Acoustic Microscopy (HF-SAM) as tools to characterize biological tissues. Both the AFM and the SAM have shown to provide imaging (with different resolution) and quantitative elasticity measuring abilities. Plant cell walls with minimal disturbance and under conditions of their native state have been examined with these two kinds of microscopy. After descriptions of both the SAM and AFM, their special features and the typical sample preparation is discussed. The sample preparation is focused here on epidermal peels of onion scales and celery epidermis cells which were sectioned for the AFM to visualize the inner surface (closest to the plasma membrane) of the outer epidermal wall. The nm-wide cellulose microfibrils orientation and multilayer structure were clearly observed. The microfibril orientation and alignment tend to be more organized in older scales compared with younger scales. The onion epidermis cell wall was also used as a test analog to study cell wall elasticity by the AFM nanoindentation and the SAM V(z) feature. The novelty in this work was to demonstrate the capability of these two techniques to analyze isolated, single layered plant cell walls in their natural state. AFM nanoindentation was also used to probe the effects of Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and calcium ion treatment to modify pectin networks in cell walls. The results suggest a significant modulus increase in the calcium ion treatment and a slight decrease in EDTA treatment. To complement the AFM measurements, the HF-SAM was used to obtain the V(z) signatures of the onion epidermis. These measurements were focused on documenting the effect of pectinase enzyme treatment. The results indicate a significant change in the V(z) signature curves with time into the enzyme treatment. Thus AFM and HF-SAM open the door to a systematic nondestructive structure and mechanical property

  5. Quantitative analysis of hydrogen in SiO2/SiN/SiO2 stacks using atom probe tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yorinobu Kunimune

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We have demonstrated that it is possible to reproducibly quantify hydrogen concentration in the SiN layer of a SiO2/SiN/SiO2 (ONO stack structure using ultraviolet laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT. The concentration of hydrogen atoms detected using APT increased gradually during the analysis, which could be explained by the effect of hydrogen adsorption from residual gas in the vacuum chamber onto the specimen surface. The amount of adsorbed hydrogen in the SiN layer was estimated by analyzing another SiN layer with an extremely low hydrogen concentration (<0.2 at. %. Thus, by subtracting the concentration of adsorbed hydrogen, the actual hydrogen concentration in the SiN layer was quantified as approximately 1.0 at. %. This result was consistent with that obtained by elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA, which confirmed the accuracy of the APT quantification. The present results indicate that APT enables the imaging of the three-dimensional distribution of hydrogen atoms in actual devices at a sub-nanometer scale.

  6. Including screening in van der Waals corrected density functional theory calculations: The case of atoms and small molecules physisorbed on graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestrelli, Pier Luigi; Ambrosetti, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The Density Functional Theory (DFT)/van der Waals-Quantum Harmonic Oscillator-Wannier function (vdW-QHO-WF) method, recently developed to include the vdW interactions in approximated DFT by combining the quantum harmonic oscillator model with the maximally localized Wannier function technique, is applied to the cases of atoms and small molecules (X=Ar, CO, H 2 , H 2 O) weakly interacting with benzene and with the ideal planar graphene surface. Comparison is also presented with the results obtained by other DFT vdW-corrected schemes, including PBE+D, vdW-DF, vdW-DF2, rVV10, and by the simpler Local Density Approximation (LDA) and semilocal generalized gradient approximation approaches. While for the X-benzene systems all the considered vdW-corrected schemes perform reasonably well, it turns out that an accurate description of the X-graphene interaction requires a proper treatment of many-body contributions and of short-range screening effects, as demonstrated by adopting an improved version of the DFT/vdW-QHO-WF method. We also comment on the widespread attitude of relying on LDA to get a rough description of weakly interacting systems

  7. Atomic force microscopy for the determination of refractive index profiles of optical fibres and waveguides: a quantitative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huntington, S.T.; Mulvaney, P.; Roberts, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    The use of preferential etching and atomic force microscopy to measure refractive index profiles of optical fibres is investigated. Both the etch rate and the position of lateral features are shown to be independent of etch time. An elliptical core fibre has been studied and the resultant profile found to be in qualitative agreement with the preform index profile. It is shown, however, that the ellipticity of the core has changed during the drawing process. The method has been extended to fluorine and germanium doped planar waveguides and the results correlated with the fabrication process

  8. Accurate Bond Lengths to Hydrogen Atoms from Single?Crystal X?ray Diffraction by Including Estimated Hydrogen ADPs and Comparison to Neutron and QM/MM Benchmarks

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, Birger; L?bben, Jens; Mebs, Stefan; Wagner, Armin; Luger, Peter; Flaig, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Amino acid structures are an ideal test set for method?development studies in crystallography. High?resolution X?ray diffraction data for eight previously studied genetically encoding amino acids are provided, complemented by a non?standard amino acid. Structures were re?investigated to study a widely applicable treatment that permits accurate X?H bond lengths to hydrogen atoms to be obtained: this treatment combines refinement of positional hydrogen?atom parameters with aspherical s...

  9. Semi-quantitative metabolic values on FDG PET/CT including extracardiac sites of disease as a predictor of treatment course in patients with cardiac sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Mitsutomi; Soine, Laurie A; Vesselle, Hubert J

    2017-08-18

    Cardiac sarcoidosis is associated with major adverse cardiac events including cardiac arrest, for which anti-inflammatory treatment is indicated. Oral corticosteroid is the mainstay among treatment options; however, adverse effects are a major concern with long-term use. It would be beneficial for providers to predict treatment response and prognosis for proper management strategy of sarcoidosis, though it remains challenging. Fluorine (F)-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography(PET)/computed tomography(CT) has an advantage over anatomical imaging in providing semi-quantitative functional parameters such as standard uptake value (SUV), metabolic volume, and total lesion glycolysis (TLG), which are well-established biomarkers in oncology. However, the relationship between these parameters and treatment response has not been fully investigated in cardiac sarcoidosis. Also, the prognostic value of extracardiac active inflammation noted on FDG-PET/CT in the setting of cardiac sarcoidosis is unclear. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the prognostic value of semi-quantitative values of both cardiac and extracardiac disease sites derived from FDG-PET/CT in predicting treatment course in cardiac sarcoidosis. Sixteen consecutive patients with suspected cardiac sarcoidosis, who demonstrated abnormal myocardial activity on cardiac-inflammation FDG-PET/CT encompassing the entire chest/upper abdomen and subsequently underwent corticosteroid therapy for diagnosis of active cardiac sarcoidosis, were included. Semi-quantitative values of hypermetabolic lesions were derived from all visualized organ system and were compared to daily corticosteroid dose at 6 months.  Of the 16 patients, 81.3% (13/16) of the patients showed extracardiac involvement. The lesion with the greatest SUV was identified in the heart in 11 patients (68.7%), in the liver in 1 patient (6.3%), and in lymph nodes in 4 patients (25%). The maximum SUV across all visualized

  10. Comparison of a neural network with multiple linear regression for quantitative analysis in ICP-atomic emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schierle, C.; Otto, M.

    1992-01-01

    A two layer perceptron with backpropagation of error is used for quantitative analysis in ICP-AES. The network was trained by emission spectra of two interfering lines of Cd and As and the concentrations of both elements were subsequently estimated from mixture spectra. The spectra of the Cd and As lines were also used to perform multiple linear regression (MLR) via the calculation of the pseudoinverse S + of the sensitivity matrix S. In the present paper it is shown that there exist close relations between the operation of the perceptron and the MLR procedure. These are most clearly apparent in the correlation between the weights of the backpropagation network and the elements of the pseudoinverse. Using MLR, the confidence intervals over the predictions are exploited to correct for the optical device of the wavelength shift. (orig.)

  11. Effects of detector dead-time on quantitative analyses involving boron and multi-hit detection events in atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisenkothen, Frederick; Steel, Eric B; Prosa, Ty J; Henry, Karen T; Prakash Kolli, R

    2015-12-01

    In atom probe tomography (APT), some elements tend to field evaporate preferentially in multi-hit detection events. Boron (B) is one such element. It is thought that a large fraction of the B signal may be lost during data acquisition and is not reported in the mass spectrum or in the 3-D APT reconstruction. Understanding the relationship between the field evaporation behavior of B and the limitations for detecting multi-hit events can provide insight into the signal loss mechanism for B and may suggest ways to improve B detection accuracy. The present work reports data for nominally pure B and for B-implanted silicon (Si) (NIST-SRM2137) at dose levels two-orders of magnitude lower than previously studied by Da Costa, et al. in 2012. Boron concentration profiles collected from SRM2137 specimens qualitatively confirmed a signal loss mechanism is at work in laser pulsed atom probe measurements of B in Si. Ion correlation analysis was used to graphically demonstrate that the detector dead-time results in few same isotope, same charge-state (SISCS) ion pairs being properly recorded in the multi-hit data, explaining why B is consistently under-represented in quantitative analyses. Given the important role of detector dead-time as a signal loss mechanism, the results from three different methods of estimating the detector dead-time are presented. The findings of this study apply to all quantitative analyses that involve multi-hit data, but the dead-time will have the greatest effect on the elements that have a significant quantity of ions detected in multi-hit events. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Atomic force microscopy of photosystem II and its unit cell clustering quantitatively delineate the mesoscale variability in Arabidopsis thylakoids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Onoa

    Full Text Available Photoautotrophic organisms efficiently regulate absorption of light energy to sustain photochemistry while promoting photoprotection. Photoprotection is achieved in part by triggering a series of dissipative processes termed non-photochemical quenching (NPQ, which depend on the re-organization of photosystem (PS II supercomplexes in thylakoid membranes. Using atomic force microscopy, we characterized the structural attributes of grana thylakoids from Arabidopsis thaliana to correlate differences in PSII organization with the role of SOQ1, a recently discovered thylakoid protein that prevents formation of a slowly reversible NPQ state. We developed a statistical image analysis suite to discriminate disordered from crystalline particles and classify crystalline arrays according to their unit cell properties. Through detailed analysis of the local organization of PSII supercomplexes in ordered and disordered phases, we found evidence that interactions among light-harvesting antenna complexes are weakened in the absence of SOQ1, inducing protein rearrangements that favor larger separations between PSII complexes in the majority (disordered phase and reshaping the PSII crystallization landscape. The features we observe are distinct from known protein rearrangements associated with NPQ, providing further support for a role of SOQ1 in a novel NPQ pathway. The particle clustering and unit cell methodology developed here is generalizable to multiple types of microscopy and will enable unbiased analysis and comparison of large data sets.

  13. Beyond nutrient-based food indices: a data mining approach to search for a quantitative holistic index reflecting the degree of food processing and including physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardet, Anthony; Lakhssassi, Sanaé; Briffaz, Aurélien

    2018-01-24

    Processing has major impacts on both the structure and composition of food and hence on nutritional value. In particular, high consumption of ultra-processed foods (UPFs) is associated with increased risks of obesity and diabetes. Unfortunately, existing food indices only focus on food nutritional content while failing to consider either food structure or the degree of processing. The objectives of this study were thus to link non-nutrient food characteristics (texture, water activity (a w ), glycemic and satiety potentials (FF), and shelf life) to the degree of processing; search for associations between these characteristics with nutritional composition; search for a holistic quantitative technological index; and determine quantitative rules for a food to be defined as UPF using data mining. Among the 280 most widely consumed foods by the elderly in France, 139 solid/semi-solid foods were selected for textural and a w measurements, and classified according to three degrees of processing. Our results showed that minimally-processed foods were less hyperglycemic, more satiating, had better nutrient profile, higher a w , shorter shelf life, lower maximum stress, and higher energy at break than UPFs. Based on 72 food variables, multivariate analyses differentiated foods according to their degree of processing. Then technological indices including food nutritional composition, a w , FF and textural parameters were tested against technological groups. Finally, a LIM score (nutrients to limit) ≥8 per 100 kcal and a number of ingredients/additives >4 are relevant, but not sufficient, rules to define UPFs. We therefore suggest that food health potential should be first defined by its degree of processing.

  14. Improving fundamental abilities of atomic force microscopy for investigating quantitative nanoscale physical properties of complex biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X.

    Measurements of local material properties of complex biological systems (e.g. live cells and viruses) in their respective physiological conditions are extremely important in the fields of biophysics, nanotechnology, material science, and nanomedicine. Yet, little is known about the structure-function-property relationship of live cells and viruses. In the case of live cells, the measurements of progressive variations in viscoelastic properties in vitro can provide insight to the mechanistic processes underpinning morphogenesis, mechano-transduction, motility, metastasis, and many more fundamental cellular processes. In the case of living viruses, the relationship between capsid structural framework and the role of the DNA molecule interaction within viruses influencing their stiffness, damping and electrostatic properties can shed light in virological processes like protein subunits assembly/dissassembly, maturation, and infection. The study of mechanics of live cells and viruses has been limited in part due to the lack of technology capable of acquiring high-resolution (nanoscale, subcellular) images of its heterogeneous material properties which vary widely depending on origin and physical interaction. The capabilities of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for measuring forces and topography with sub-nm precision have greatly contributed to research related to biophysics and biomechanics during the past two decades. AFM based biomechanical studies have the unique advantage of resolving/mapping spatially the local material properties over living cells and viruses. However, conventional AFM techniques such as force-volume and quasi-static force-distance curves are too low resolution and low speed to resolve interesting biophysical processes such as cytoskeletal dynamics for cells or assembly/dissasembly of viruses. To overcome this bottleneck, a novel atomic force microscopy mode is developed, that leads to sub-10-nm resolution and sub-15-minutes mapping of local

  15. Laser cooling of CaBr molecules and production of ultracold Br atoms: A theoretical study including spin-orbit coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Mingkai; Ma, Haitao; Cao, Jianwei; Bian, Wensheng

    2017-04-07

    Owing to the exciting potential applications of ultracold atoms and molecules in many fields, developing new cooling schemes has attracted great interests in recent years. Here, we investigate laser cooling of CaBr molecules and design a photonic scheme for the production of ultracold Br atoms using the highly accurate ab initio and dynamical methods. We find that the AΠ1/22(ν ' =0)→X 2 Σ 1/2 + (ν=0) transition for CaBr features a large vibrational branching ratio, a significant photon-scattering rate, and no intermediate electronic-state interference, indicating that the ultracold CaBr could be produced through a three-laser cooling scheme. Moreover, an efficient four-pulse excitation scheme from the ground rovibrational level of the cooled CaBr molecules is proposed to yield ultracold Br atoms, in which a few spin-orbit excited states are utilized as the intermediate states. The importance of the spin-orbit coupling is underscored in this work.

  16. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  17. Renner-Teller effect in linear tetra-atomic molecules. I. Variational method including couplings between all degrees of freedom on six-dimensional potential energy surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutier, L.; Léonard, C.; Gatti, F.

    2009-04-01

    For electronically degenerate states of linear tetra-atomic molecules, a new method is developed for the variational treatment of the Renner-Teller and spin-orbit couplings. The approach takes into account all rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, the dominant couplings between the corresponding angular momenta as well as the couplings with the electronic and electron spin angular momenta. The complete rovibrational kinetic energy operator is expressed in Jacobi coordinates, where the rovibrational angular momenta ĴN have been replaced by L̂ez-Ŝ and the spin-orbit coupling has been described by the perturbative term ASO×L̂ezṡŜz. Attention has been paid on the electronic wave functions, which require additional phase for linear tetra-atomic molecules. Our implemented rovibrational basis functions and the integration of the different parts of the total Hamiltonian operator are described. This new variational approach is tested on the electronic ground state X Π2u of HCCH+ for which new six-dimensional potential energy surfaces have been computed using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction method and the cc-pV5Z basis set. The calculated rovibronic energies and their comparisons with previous theoretical and experimental works are presented in the next paper.

  18. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Research activities in atomic physics at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during 1976 are described. Topics covered include: experiments on stored ions; test for parity violation in neutral weak currents; energy conservation and astrophysics; atomic absorption spectroscopy, atomic and molecular detectors; theoretical studies of quantum electrodynamics and high-z ions; atomic beam magnetic resonance; radiative decay from the 2 3 Po, 2 levels of helium-like argon; quenching of the metastable 2S/sub 1/2/ state of hydrogen-like argon in an external electric field; and lifetime of the 2 3 Po level of helium-like krypton

  19. Atomic scale structure of the 5-fold surface of an AlPdMn quasicrystal: A quantitative X-Ray photoelectron diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jin-Cheng; Huan, C.H.A.; Wee, A.T.S.; Van Hove, M.A.; Fadley, C.S.; Shi, F.J.; Rotenberg, E.; Barman, S.R.; Paggel, J.J.; Horn, K.; Ebert, Ph.; Urban, K.

    2004-02-11

    The atomic scale structure of the 5-fold symmetric surface of an AlPdMn quasicrystal is investigated quantitatively by comparing x-ray photoelectron diffraction (XPD) simulations to experiment. The observed 5-fold symmetry of the diffraction patterns indicates that the surface is quasicrystalline with no hint of a reconstruction from the bulk structure. In analyzing the experimental data, many possible bulk terminations have been tested. Those few that fit best to the data have in common that they contain an Al-rich surface layer followed by a dense mixed Al/Pd/Mn layer. These best terminations, while not identical to each other, are suggested to form terraces coexisting on a real surface. Structural relaxations of the quasicrystal surface are also analyzed: mixing several best-fit terminations gives average best-fit interlayer spacing changes of Dd12 = -0.057 Angstrom, Dd24 = +0.159 Angstrom. These results are in good agreement with a prior structure determination by LEED on a sample that was prepared in a different manner.

  20. Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis of ROS-Mediated Oridonin-Induced Oesophageal Cancer KYSE-150 Cell Apoptosis by Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Pi

    Full Text Available High levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in cells is recognized as one of the major causes of cancer cell apoptosis and has been developed into a promising therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. However, whether apoptosis associated biophysical properties of cancer cells are related to intracellular ROS functions is still unclear. Here, for the first time, we determined the changes of biophysical properties associated with the ROS-mediated oesophageal cancer KYSE-150 cell apoptosis using high resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM. Oridonin was proved to induce ROS-mediated KYSE-150 cell apoptosis in a dose dependent manner, which could be reversed by N-acetylcysteine (NAC pretreatment. Based on AFM imaging, the morphological damage and ultrastructural changes of KYSE-150 cells were found to be closely associated with ROS-mediated oridonin-induced KYSE-150 cell apoptosis. The changes of cell stiffness determined by AFM force measurement also demonstrated ROS-dependent changes in oridonin induced KYSE-150 cell apoptosis. Our findings not only provided new insights into the anticancer effects of oridonin, but also highlighted the use of AFM as a qualitative and quantitative nanotool to detect ROS-mediated cancer cell apoptosis based on cell biophysical properties, providing novel information of the roles of ROS in cancer cell apoptosis at nanoscale.

  1. Quantitative analysis of mechanical and electrostatic properties of poly(lactic) acid fibers and poly(lactic) acid—carbon nanotube composites using atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iqbal, Qais; Bernstein, Peter; Zhu, Yazhe; Rahamim, Joseph; Cebe, Peggy; Staii, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    We use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to perform a systematic quantitative characterization of the elastic modulus and dielectric constant of poly(L-lactic acid) electrospun nanofibers (PLLA), as well as composites of PLLA fibers with 1.0 wt% embedded multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs–PLLA). The elastic moduli are measured in the fiber skin region via AFM nanoindentation, and the dielectric constants are determined by measuring the phase shifts obtained via electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). We find that the average value for the elastic modulus for PLLA fibers is (9.8 ± 0.9) GPa, which is a factor of 2 larger than the measured average elastic modulus for MWCNT–PLLA composites (4.1 ± 0.7) GPa. We also use EFM to measure dielectric constants for both types of fibers. These measurements show that the dielectric constants of the MWCNT–PLLA fibers are significantly larger than the corresponding values obtained for PLLA fiber. This result is consistent with the higher polarizability of the MWCNT–PLLA composites. The measurement methods presented are general, and can be applied to determine the mechanical and electrical properties of other polymers and polymer nanocomposites. (paper)

  2. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  3. Quantitative composition determination at the atomic level using model-based high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, G T; Rosenauer, A; De Backer, A; Verbeeck, J; Van Aert, S

    2014-02-01

    High angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF STEM) images provide sample information which is sensitive to the chemical composition. The image intensities indeed scale with the mean atomic number Z. To some extent, chemically different atomic column types can therefore be visually distinguished. However, in order to quantify the atomic column composition with high accuracy and precision, model-based methods are necessary. Therefore, an empirical incoherent parametric imaging model can be used of which the unknown parameters are determined using statistical parameter estimation theory (Van Aert et al., 2009, [1]). In this paper, it will be shown how this method can be combined with frozen lattice multislice simulations in order to evolve from a relative toward an absolute quantification of the composition of single atomic columns with mixed atom types. Furthermore, the validity of the model assumptions are explored and discussed. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Modification of two capripoxvirus quantitative real-time PCR assays to improve diagnostic sensitivity and include beta-actin as an internal positive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Amaresh; Deng, Ming Y; Babiuk, Shawn; McIntosh, Michael T

    2017-05-01

    Capripoxviruses (CaPVs), consisting of Sheeppox virus (SPV), Goatpox virus (GPV), and Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) species, cause economically significant diseases in sheep, goats, and cattle, respectively. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays are routinely used for rapid detection of CaPVs in surveillance and outbreak management programs. We further modified and optimized 2 previously published CaPV qPCR assays, referred to as the Balinsky and Bowden assays, by changing commercial PCR reagents used in the tests. The modified assays displayed 100% analytical specificity and showed no apparent changes in analytical sensitivities for detection of CaPVs compared with the original assays. Diagnostic sensitivities, assessed using 50 clinical reference samples from experimentally infected sheep, goats, and cattle, improved from 82% to 92% for the modified Balinsky assay and from 58% to 82% for the modified Bowden assay. The modified qPCR assays were multiplexed for detection of beta-actin as an indicator for potential false-negative results. The multiplex modified qPCR assays exhibited the same diagnostic sensitivities as the singleplex assays suggesting their utility in the detection of CaPVs.

  5. Quantitative analysis of sodium di-uranate for Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na by flame-atomic absorption spectrometric method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jat, J.R.; Balaji Rao, Y.; Subba Rao, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Complex (NFC) receives Sodium Di-Uranate (SDU) from Uranium Corporation of India Limited (UCIL) for producing sinterable UO 2 pellets for manufacturing fuel sub assemblies. Several impurities present in ore find their way into SDU during its conversion. Stringent specification have been laid down by the reactor designs for achieving the optimum performance of the fuel and several impurity element like Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na among others affects severely performance of UO 2 fuel. Most of the impurity including the above mentioned elements are generally analysed by ICP-OES method. However, determination of Al, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn and Na by ICP-OES requires lot of dilution as they are present at high levels in SDU. Apart from introducing dilution error, dilution process is very tedious and time consuming work and not a preferred choice in an industrial lab like control lab where large analytical load exists and time bound analysis is a requirement. To avoid these difficulties a simple and reliable Flame Atomic absorption spectrometric technique has been developed for regular analysis. Present method involves dissolution of SDU sample in Conc. HNO 3 and after the complete dissolution the sample solution has been evaporated to near dryness on a hot plate. Subsequently sample solution has been brought into 4N HNO 3 medium

  6. Atomic politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogmar, G.

    1979-01-01

    The authors basic point is that the military and civil sides of atomic energy cannot be separated. The general aim of the book is to analyze both the military and civil branches, and the interdependence between them, of American foreign policy in the atomic field. Atomic policy is seen as one of the most important imstruments of foreign policy which, in turn, is seen against the background of American imperialism in general. Firstly, the book investigates the most important means by which the United States has controlled the development in the nuclear field in other countries. These means include influencing the conditions of access to nuclear resources of various kinds, influencing the flow of technical-economic information and influencing international organizations and treaties bearing on atomic energy. The time period treated is 1945-1973. 1973 is chosen as the end-year of the study mainly because of the new conditions in the whole energy field initiated by the oil crisis in that year. The sources of the empirical work are mainly hearings before the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy of the U.S. Congress and legal material of various kinds. Secondly, the goals of the American policy are analyzed. The goals identified are armament effect, non-proliferation (horizontal), sales, and energy dependence. The relation between the main goals is discussed.The discussion is centered on the interdependence between the military and the civil aspects, conflict and coincidence of various goals, the relation between short-term and long-term goals, and the possibilities of using one goal as pretext for another. Thirdly, some causes of the changes in the atomic policy around 1953 and 1963 are identified. These are the strategic balance, the competitive situation, the capacity (of the American atomic productive apparatus), and the nuclear technological stage. The specific composition of these four factors at the two time-points can explain the changes of policy. (author)

  7. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  8. Atom dynamics in laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Su; Mi, No Gin

    2004-12-01

    This book introduces coherent dynamics of internal state, spread of atoms wave speed, semiclassical atoms density matrix such as dynamics equation in both still and moving atoms, excitation of atoms in movement by light, dipole radiating power, quantum statistical mechanics by atoms in movement, semiclassical atoms in movement, atoms in movement in the uniform magnetic field including effects of uniform magnetic field, atom cooling using laser such as Doppler cooling, atom traps using laser and mirrors, radiant heat which particles receive, and near field interactions among atoms in laser light.

  9. Code ATOM for calculation of atomic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vainshtein, L.A.

    1990-01-01

    In applying atomic physics to problems of plasma diagnostics, it is necessary to determine some atomic characteristics, including energies and transition probabilities, for very many atoms and ions. Development of general codes for calculation of many types of atomic characteristics has been based on general but comparatively simple approximate methods. The program ATOM represents an attempt at effective use of such a general code. This report gives a brief description of the methods used, and the possibilities of and limitations to the code are discussed. Characteristics of the following processes can be calculated by ATOM: radiative transitions between discrete levels, radiative ionization and recombination, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, collisional excitation and ionization by point heavy particle (Born approximation only), dielectronic recombination, and autoionization. ATOM explores Born (for z=1) or Coulomb-Born (for z>1) approximations. In both cases exchange and normalization can be included. (N.K.)

  10. Atomic phenomena in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisheit, J.C.

    1981-03-01

    The following chapters are included: (1) the plasma environment, (2) perturbations of atomic structure, (3) perturbations of atomic collisions, (4) formation of spectral lines, and (5) dielectronic recombination

  11. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    2000-01-01

    This fifth volume of the successful series Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy continues to discuss and investigate the area of atomic spectroscopy.It begins with a description of the use of various atomic spectroscopic methods and applications of speciation studies in atomic spectroscopy. The emphasis is on combining atomic spectroscopy with gas and liquid chromatography. In chapter two the authors describe new developments in tunable lasers and the impact they will have on atomic spectroscopy. The traditional methods of detection, such as photography and the photomultiplier, and how they are being replaced by new detectors is discussed in chapter three. The very active area of glow discharge atomic spectrometry is presented in chapter four where, after a brief introduction and historical review, the use of glow discharge lamps for atomic spectroscopy and mass spectrometry are discussed. Included in this discussion is geometry and radiofrequency power. The future of this source in atomic spectroscopy is also dis...

  12. Relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensor using the regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component. III. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaya, S; Maeda, H; Funaki, M; Fukui, H

    2008-12-14

    The relativistic calculation of nuclear magnetic shielding tensors in hydrogen halides is performed using the second-order regular approximation to the normalized elimination of the small component (SORA-NESC) method with the inclusion of the perturbation terms from the metric operator. This computational scheme is denoted as SORA-Met. The SORA-Met calculation yields anisotropies, Delta sigma = sigma(parallel) - sigma(perpendicular), for the halogen nuclei in hydrogen halides that are too small. In the NESC theory, the small component of the spinor is combined to the large component via the operator sigma x piU/2c, in which pi = p + A, U is a nonunitary transformation operator, and c approximately = 137.036 a.u. is the velocity of light. The operator U depends on the vector potential A (i.e., the magnetic perturbations in the system) with the leading order c(-2) and the magnetic perturbation terms of U contribute to the Hamiltonian and metric operators of the system in the leading order c(-4). It is shown that the small Delta sigma for halogen nuclei found in our previous studies is related to the neglect of the U(0,1) perturbation operator of U, which is independent of the external magnetic field and of the first order with respect to the nuclear magnetic dipole moment. Introduction of gauge-including atomic orbitals and a finite-size nuclear model is also discussed.

  13. Atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V. I.; Jhe, W.

    1999-01-01

    Atom optics, in analogy to neutron and electron optics, deals with the realization of as a traditional elements, such as lenes, mirrors, beam splitters and atom interferometers, as well as a new 'dissipative' elements such as a slower and a cooler, which have no analogy in an another types of optics. Atom optics made the development of atom interferometer with high sensitivity for measurement of acceleration and rotational possible. The practical interest in atom optics lies in the opportunities to create atom microprobe with atom-size resolution and minimum damage of investigated objects. (Cho, G. S.)

  14. Validation of the methodology for the quantitative determination of lead in cosmetics dyes available in the national market by atomic absorption spectroscopy with flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Trejos, Paulina

    2008-01-01

    The analytical methodology was validated to quantify lead in cosmetics dyes available on the national market, by the method of atomic absorption spectroscopy with flame. The samples were digested by wet digestion with HNO 3 to 65% m/m in a microwave oven, the percentage of recovery for the digestion of samples of 0,25 g and 0,45 g in 5,00 mL was of 100,5±0,5. The field of optimal linearity detection limit was 5,0 mg/L with a correlation coefficient of 0,9998. The limits of detection and quantification limits determined graphically by the method of row errors for linear regression of 0,12±0,02 mg/L and 0,21±0,02 mg/L, respectively. Precision was evaluated determining the repeatability as standard deviation of five replicas of a positive dye for lead, according to the definition of the ISO, 2√2*, and obtained a value of 2,3. The veracity was determined through percentages of recovery assessed, adding aliquots of lead patterns to dye samples and compared with the same mass to which they are not make additions. The dye samples were obtained at point of sale, such as pharmacies, beauty suppliers, supermarkets, sales of natural products and the central market of San Jose. The dyes tested contain lead acetates active ingredient, these are: Doni, Mont D'Or, Matador y Siempre Joven; they are produced locally, Youthair brand and American manufacturing. (author) [es

  15. Qualitative and Quantitative Content Determination of Macro-Minor Elements in Bryonia Alba L. Roots using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiuk, Uliana Vladimirovna; Al Azzam, Khaldun Mohammad; Abudayeh, Zead Helmi Mahmoud; Kislichenko, Viktoria; Naddaf, Ahmad; Cholak, Irina; Yemelianova, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    To determine the elements in Bryonia alba L. roots, collected from the Crimean Peninsula region in Ukraine. Dry ashing was used as a flexible method and all elements were determined using atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) equipped with flame and graphite furnace. The average concentrations of the determined elements, expressed as mg/100 g dry weight of the sample, were as follow: 13.000 for Fe, 78.000 for Si, 88.000 for P, 7.800 for Al, 0.130 for Mn, 105.000 for Mg, 0.030 for Pb, 0.052 for Ni, 0.030 for Mo, 210.000 for Ca, 0.130 for Cu, 5.200 for Zn, 13.000 for Na, 1170.000 for K, 0.780 for Sr, 0.030 for Co, 0.010 for Cd, 0.010 for As, and 0.010 for Hg. Toxic elements such as Cd and Pb were also found but at very low concentration. Among the analyzed elements, K was the most abundant followed by Ca, Mg, P, Si, Fe, Na, and Zn, whereas Hg, As, Cd, Co, Mo, and Pb were found in low concentration. The results suggest that the roots of Bryonia alba L. plant has potential medicinal property through their high element contents present. Moreover, it showed that the AAS method is a simple, fast, and reliable for the determination of elements in plant materials. The obtained results of the current study provide justification for the usage of such fruit in daily diet for nutrition and for medicinal usage in the treatment of various diseases.

  16. Atom-replaced pins in a Y-based superconductor—single-crystalline perovskite structure including both PrBa2Cu3O7‑x and YBa2Cu3O7‑y

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Mariko; Araki, Takeshi; Ishii, Hirotaka; Nishijima, Gen; Matsumoto, Akiyoshi

    2018-05-01

    Metal organic deposition using trifluoroacetates (TFA-MOD) provides many uniform superconductors on long metal tapes. The large numbers of long wires have been applied for power grids or superconducting fault current limiters. The related applications worked for a long time without fatal trouble. The quasi-liquid produced during the firing process assisted the perfectly uniform structure in TFA-MOD. On the other hand, when it was desired to introduce artificial pinning centers, the quasi-liquid also enlarged the diameter of the artificial pinning centers to several tens of nanometers. In other words, due to the nature of TFA-MOD, there is very little chance of using TFA-MOD to prepare several nm-sized artificial pinning centers. By proposing atom-replaced pins (ARPs), we aim to overcome the impasse. ARPs are realized by replacing yttrium (Y) with praseodymium (Pr) whose valence number changes from 3+ to approximately 4+. Analytical results suggested that Pr makes pinning centers on a PrBa2Cu3O7‑x (PrBCO) unit cell, and the weak-linked superconductivity derived from PrBCO extends to the adjacent unit cells in the a/b-plane. J c decrease by Pr is five times as large as the volume fraction of Pr in the Y-site of the perovskite structure. On the other hand, T c does not show large degradation in YBCO including 10% PrBCO. These results suggest that PrBCO unit cells are fully dispersed in YBa2Cu3O7‑y matrix. With regard to J c in the magnetic field, (Y0.98, Pr0.02)BCO has been slightly improved compared with pure YBCO only in the region of high temperature and low magnetic field of less than 1 T.

  17. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  18. Cold Atom Interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan Mingsheng; Li Ke; Wang Ping; Kong Lingbo; Wang Xiaorui; Li Runbing; Tu Xianhua; He Lingxiang; Wang Jin; Lu Baolong

    2007-01-01

    In this article the recent experimental works on cold atoms carried out at Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics (WIPM) are reported. These include the experimental realization of Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), different type of cold atom interferometers, and bichromatic electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). We have realized Bose-Einstein condensates of 87 Rb dilute atomic gases. The apparatus consists of two horizontally mounted magneto-optic-traps (MOTs) and a QUIC magnetic trap. Nearly 3x10 8 atoms were trapped in the second MOT, and up to 1.2x10 8 atoms were adiabatically transferred to the QUIC trap. A pure condensate with about 1.1x10 5 atoms at about 30 nK was achieved. We also demonstrated two type of cold atom interferometers, the Sagnac and Ramsey interference fringes were recorded with contrast of up to 37%

  19. Atomic absorption spectrophotometry in perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffiantini, V.

    1981-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectrophotometry is essentially an analytical technique used for quantitative trace metal analysis in a variety of materials. The speed and specificity of the technique is its greatest advantage over other analytical techniques. What atomic absorption spectrophotometry can and cannot do and its advantages and disadvantages are discussed, a summary of operating instructions are given, as well as a summary of analytical interferences. The applications of atomic absorption spectrophotometry are also shortly discussed

  20. A Comparison between Elementary School Students' Mental Models and Visualizations in Textbooks for the Concept of Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polat-Yaseen, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed for two major goals, which are to describe students' mental models about atom concept from 6th to 8th grade and to compare students' mental models with visual representations of atom in textbooks. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected with 4 open-ended questions including drawings which were quantified using the…

  1. Atomic collisions research with excited atomic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoogerland, M.D.; Gulley, R.J.; Colla, M.; Lu, W.; Milic, D.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Buckman, S.J.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements and calculations of fundamental atomic collision and spectroscopic properties such as collision cross sections, reaction rates, transition probabilities etc. underpin the understanding and operation of many plasma and gas-discharge-based devices and phenomena, for example plasma processing and deposition. In almost all cases the complex series of reactions which sustains the discharge or plasma, or produces the reactive species of interest, has a precursor electron impact excitation, attachment, dissociation or ionisation event. These processes have been extensively studied in a wide range of atomic and molecular species and an impressive data base of collision cross sections and reaction rates now exists. However, most of these measurements are for collisions with stable atomic or molecular species which are initially in their ground electronic state. Relatively little information is available for scattering from excited states or for scattering from unstable molecular radicals. Examples of such species would be metastable excited rare gases, which are often used as buffer gases, or CF 2 radicals formed by electron impact dissociation in a CF 4 plasma processing discharge. We are interested in developing experimental techniques which will enable the quantitative study of such exotic atomic and molecular species. In this talk I would like to outline one such facility which is being used for studies of collisions with metastable He(2 3 S) atoms

  2. Atomic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Mitroy, J.; Clark, Charles W.; Kozlov, M. G.

    2015-01-01

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed

  3. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  4. Small amplitude atomic force spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beer, Sissi; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Ebeling, Daniel; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Bhushan, Bharat

    2011-01-01

    Over the years atomic force microscopy has developed from a pure imaging technique to a tool that can be employed for measuring quantitative tip–sample interaction forces. In this chapter we provide an overview of various techniques to extract quantitative tip–sample forces focusing on both

  5. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  6. Atomic and molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    The theoretical atomic and molecular physics program at Rice University addresses basic questions about the collision dynamics of electrons, atoms, ions and molecules, emphasizing processes related to possible new energy technologies and other applications. The program focuses on inelastic collision processes that are important in understanding energy and ionization balance in disturbed gases and plasmas. Emphasis is placed on systems and processes where some experimental information is available or where theoretical results may be expected to stimulate new measurements. Examples of current projects include: excitation and charge-transfer processes; orientation and alignment of excited states following collisions; Rydberg atom collisions with atoms and molecules; Penning ionization and ion-pair formation in atom-atom collisions; electron-impact ionization in dense, high-temperature plasmas; electron-molecule collisions; and related topics

  7. Modern atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2015-01-01

    Much of our understanding of physics in the last 30-plus years has come from research on atoms, photons, and their interactions. Collecting information previously scattered throughout the literature, Modern Atomic Physics provides students with one unified guide to contemporary developments in the field. After reviewing metrology and preliminary material, the text explains core areas of atomic physics. Important topics discussed include the spontaneous emission of radiation, stimulated transitions and the properties of gas, the physics and applications of resonance fluorescence, coherence, cooling and trapping of charged and neutral particles, and atomic beam magnetic resonance experiments. Covering standards, a different way of looking at a photon, stimulated radiation, and frequency combs, the appendices avoid jargon and use historical notes and personal anecdotes to make the topics accessible to non-atomic physics students. Written by a leader in atomic and optical physics, this text gives a state-of-the...

  8. Theoretical atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Harald

    2017-01-01

    This expanded and updated well-established textbook contains an advanced presentation of quantum mechanics adapted to the requirements of modern atomic physics. It includes topics of current interest such as semiclassical theory, chaos, atom optics and Bose-Einstein condensation in atomic gases. In order to facilitate the consolidation of the material covered, various problems are included, together with complete solutions. The emphasis on theory enables the reader to appreciate the fundamental assumptions underlying standard theoretical constructs and to embark on independent research projects. The fourth edition of Theoretical Atomic Physics contains an updated treatment of the sections involving scattering theory and near-threshold phenomena manifest in the behaviour of cold atoms (and molecules). Special attention is given to the quantization of weakly bound states just below the continuum threshold and to low-energy scattering and quantum reflection just above. Particular emphasis is laid on the fundamen...

  9. Atomic Physics 16: Sixteenth International Conference on Atomic Physics. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylis, W.E.; Drake, G.W.

    1999-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 16th International Conference on Atomic Physics held in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, in August, 1998. The topics discussed included a wide array of subjects in atomic physics such as atom holography, alignment in atomic collisions, coulomb-interacting particles, muon experiments, x-rays from comets, atomic electron collisions in intense laser fields, spectroscopy of trapped ions, and Bose-Einstein condensates. This conference represents the single most important meeting world wide on fundamental advances in atomic physics. There were 30 papers presented at the conference,out of which 4 have been abstracted for the Energy, Science and Technology database

  10. Symmetric Atom–Atom and Ion–Atom Processes in Stellar Atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Srećković

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the influence of two groups of collisional processes (atom–atom and ion–atom on the optical and kinetic properties of weakly ionized stellar atmospheres layers. The first type includes radiative processes of the photodissociation/association and radiative charge exchange, the second one the chemi-ionisation/recombination processes with participation of only hydrogen and helium atoms and ions. The quantitative estimation of the rate coefficients of the mentioned processes were made. The effect of the radiative processes is estimated by comparing their intensities with those of the known concurrent processes in application to the solar photosphere and to the photospheres of DB white dwarfs. The investigated chemi-ionisation/recombination processes are considered from the viewpoint of their influence on the populations of the excited states of the hydrogen atom (the Sun and an M-type red dwarf and helium atom (DB white dwarfs. The effect of these processes on the populations of the excited states of the hydrogen atom has been studied using the general stellar atmosphere code, which generates the model. The presented results demonstrate the undoubted influence of the considered radiative and chemi- ionisation/recombination processes on the optical properties and on the kinetics of the weakly ionized layers in stellar atmospheres.

  11. Mining information from atom probe data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairney, Julie M.; Rajan, Krishna; Haley, Daniel; Gault, Baptiste; Bagot, Paul A.J.; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Felfer, Peter J.; Ringer, Simon P.; Marceau, Ross K.W.; Moody, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Whilst atom probe tomography (APT) is a powerful technique with the capacity to gather information containing hundreds of millions of atoms from a single specimen, the ability to effectively use this information creates significant challenges. The main technological bottleneck lies in handling the extremely large amounts of data on spatial–chemical correlations, as well as developing new quantitative computational foundations for image reconstruction that target critical and transformative problems in materials science. The power to explore materials at the atomic scale with the extraordinary level of sensitivity of detection offered by atom probe tomography has not been not fully harnessed due to the challenges of dealing with missing, sparse and often noisy data. Hence there is a profound need to couple the analytical tools to deal with the data challenges with the experimental issues associated with this instrument. In this paper we provide a summary of some key issues associated with the challenges, and solutions to extract or “mine” fundamental materials science information from that data. - Highlights: • Overview of the newest developments in techniques to extract information from atom probe data. • As well as reviewing existing approaches, improvements and new approaches are presented. • Techniques covered include tests for randomness, short range order and crystallography. • Methods for interfacial excess mapping and spectral decomposition are also covered.

  12. Mining information from atom probe data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairney, Julie M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Rajan, Krishna [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Haley, Daniel [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Max Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Gault, Baptiste; Bagot, Paul A.J. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Choi, Pyuck-Pa [Max Planck Institut für Eisenforschung GmbH, Max-Planck Straße 1, 40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Felfer, Peter J.; Ringer, Simon P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical, Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Marceau, Ross K.W. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong Technology Precinct, 75 Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Moody, Michael P. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    Whilst atom probe tomography (APT) is a powerful technique with the capacity to gather information containing hundreds of millions of atoms from a single specimen, the ability to effectively use this information creates significant challenges. The main technological bottleneck lies in handling the extremely large amounts of data on spatial–chemical correlations, as well as developing new quantitative computational foundations for image reconstruction that target critical and transformative problems in materials science. The power to explore materials at the atomic scale with the extraordinary level of sensitivity of detection offered by atom probe tomography has not been not fully harnessed due to the challenges of dealing with missing, sparse and often noisy data. Hence there is a profound need to couple the analytical tools to deal with the data challenges with the experimental issues associated with this instrument. In this paper we provide a summary of some key issues associated with the challenges, and solutions to extract or “mine” fundamental materials science information from that data. - Highlights: • Overview of the newest developments in techniques to extract information from atom probe data. • As well as reviewing existing approaches, improvements and new approaches are presented. • Techniques covered include tests for randomness, short range order and crystallography. • Methods for interfacial excess mapping and spectral decomposition are also covered.

  13. Early Atomism

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/015/10/0905-0925. Keywords. Atomic theory; Avogadro's hypothesis; atomic weights; periodic table; valence; molecular weights; molecular formula; isomerism. Author Affiliations. S Ramasesha1. Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  14. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1969-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  15. Exotic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backenstoss, G.

    1986-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of exotic atoms are presented. The improved quality of accelerator facilities and experimental techniques leads to a more precise determination of data. This opens new fields in nuclear and particle physics to which exotic atoms may contribute valuable knowledge. (author)

  16. Atomic Fock State Preparation Using Rydberg Blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Ebert, Matthew; Gill, Alexander; Gibbons, Michael; Zhang, Xianli; Saffman, Mark; Walker, Thad G.

    2013-01-01

    We use coherent excitation of 3-16 atom ensembles to demonstrate collective Rabi flopping mediated by Rydberg blockade. Using calibrated atom number measurements, we quantitatively confirm the expected $\\sqrt{N}$ Rabi frequency enhancement to within 4%. The resulting atom number distributions are consistent with essentially perfect blockade. We then use collective Rabi $\\pi$ pulses to produce ${\\cal N}=1,2$ atom number Fock states with fidelities of 62% and 48% respectively. The ${\\cal N}=2$ ...

  17. Atomic diffusion in stars

    CERN Document Server

    Michaud, Georges; Richer, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    This book gives an overview of atomic diffusion, a fundamental physical process, as applied to all types of stars, from the main sequence to neutron stars. The superficial abundances of stars as well as their evolution can be significantly affected. The authors show where atomic diffusion plays an essential role and how it can be implemented in modelling.  In Part I, the authors describe the tools that are required to include atomic diffusion in models of stellar interiors and atmospheres. An important role is played by the gradient of partial radiative pressure, or radiative acceleration, which is usually neglected in stellar evolution. In Part II, the authors systematically review the contribution of atomic diffusion to each evolutionary step. The dominant effects of atomic diffusion are accompanied by more subtle effects on a large number of structural properties throughout evolution. One of the goals of this book is to provide the means for the astrophysicist or graduate student to evaluate the importanc...

  18. Superradiators created atom by atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meschede, Dieter

    2018-02-01

    High radiation rates are usually associated with macroscopic lasers. Laser radiation is “coherent”—its amplitude and phase are well-defined—but its generation requires energy inputs to overcome loss. Excited atoms spontaneously emit in a random and incoherent fashion, and for N such atoms, the emission rate simply increases as N. However, if these atoms are in close proximity and coherently coupled by a radiation field, this microscopic ensemble acts as a single emitter whose emission rate increases as N2 and becomes “superradiant,” to use Dicke's terminology (1). On page 662 of this issue, Kim et al. (2) show the buildup of coherent light fields through collective emission from atomic radiators injected one by one into a resonator field. There is only one atom ever in the cavity, but the emission is still collective and superradiant. These results suggest another route toward thresholdless lasing.

  19. Physics of atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bransden, B.H.; Joachain, C.J.

    1983-01-01

    This book presents a unified account of the physics of atoms and molecules at a level suitable for second- and third-year undergraduate students of physics and physical chemistry. Following a brief historical introduction to the subject the authors outline the ideas and approximation methods of quantum mechanics to be used later in the book. Six chapters look at the structure of atoms and the interactions between atoms and electromagnetic radiation. The authors then move on to describe the structure of molecules and molecular spectra. Three chapters deal with atomic collisions, the scattering of electrons by atoms and the scattering of atoms by atoms. The concluding chapter considers a few of the many important applications of atomic physics within astrophysics, laser technology, and nuclear fusion. Problems are given at the end of each chapter, with hints at the solutions in an appendix. Other appendices include various special topics and derivations together with useful tables of units. (author)

  20. Atomic inner-shell physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses: relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects on atomic inner shells; relativistic calculation of atomic transition probabilities; many-body effects in energetic atomic transitions; Auger Electron spectrometry of core levels of atoms; experimental evaluation of inner-vacancy level energies for comparison with theory; mechanisms for energy shifts of atomic K-X rays; atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation; investigations of inner-shell states by the electron energy-loss technique at high resolution; coherence effects in electron emission by atoms; inelastic X-ray scattering including resonance phenomena; Rayleigh scattering: elastic photon scattering by bound electrons; electron-atom bremsstrahlung; X-ray and bremsstrahlung production in nuclear reactions; positron production in heavy-ion collisions, and X-ray processes in heavy-ion collisions

  1. Experimental atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental atomic physics program within the physics division is carried out by two groups, whose reports are given in this section. Work of the accelerator atomic physics group is centered around the 6.5-MV EN tandem accelerator; consequently, most of its research is concerned with atomic processes occurring to, or initiated by, few MeV/amu heavy ions. Other activities of this group include higher energy experiments at the Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility (HHIRF), studies of electron and positron channeling radiation, and collaborative experiments at other institutions. The second experimental group concerns itself with lower energy atomic collision physics in support of the Fusion Energy Program. During the past year, the new Electron Cyclotron Resonance Source has been completed and some of the first data from this facility is presented. In addition to these two activities in experimental atomic physics, other chapters of this report describe progress in theoretical atomic physics, experimental plasma diagnostic development, and atomic data center compilation activities

  2. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  3. Atomic Fock State Preparation Using Rydberg Blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Matthew; Gill, Alexander; Gibbons, Michael; Zhang, Xianli; Saffman, Mark; Walker, Thad G.

    2014-01-01

    We use coherent excitation of 3-16 atom ensembles to demonstrate collective Rabi flopping mediated by Rydberg blockade. Using calibrated atom number measurements, we quantitatively confirm the expected √N Rabi frequency enhancement to within 4%. The resulting atom number distributions are consistent with an essentially perfect blockade. We then use collective Rabi π pulses to produce N =1, 2 atom number Fock states with fidelities of 62% and 48%, respectively. The N=2 Fock state shows the collective Rabi frequency enhancement without corruption from atom number fluctuations.

  4. FAC: Flexible Atomic Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ming Feng

    2018-02-01

    FAC calculates various atomic radiative and collisional processes, including radiative transition rates, collisional excitation and ionization by electron impact, energy levels, photoionization, and autoionization, and their inverse processes radiative recombination and dielectronic capture. The package also includes a collisional radiative model to construct synthetic spectra for plasmas under different physical conditions.

  5. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Held, B.

    1991-01-01

    This general book describes the change from classical physics to quantum physics. The first part presents atom evolution since antiquity and introduces fundamental quantities and elements of relativity. Experiments which have contributed to the evolution of knowledge on matter are analyzed in the second part. Applications of wave mechanics to the study of matter properties are presented in the third part [fr

  6. Atomic Power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Atomic Power. By Denis Taylor: Dr. Taylor was formerly Chief UNESCO Advisor at the University. College, Nairobi, Kenya and is now Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Uni- versity of Strachlyde, Scotland. He is a leading scientist in the electronics field. He was among the British scientists who developed radar during ...

  7. Atomic Power

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that atom-produced electricity began to be more economic than electricity produced by conventional means. In the A.G.R., the uranium metal fuel elements are replaced by uranium dioxide, the higher gas temperatures permitting a more efficient steam cycle and allowing several economies. Initially a reactor of this type was ...

  8. Atomic Warrior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 9. Atomic Warrior. Shabhana Narasimhan. Book Review Volume 6 Issue 9 September 2001 pp 106-109. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/09/0106-0109. Author Affiliations.

  9. Synchrotron radiation in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.

    1998-01-01

    Much of present understanding of atomic and molecular structure and dynamics was gained through studies of photon-atom interactions. In particular, observations of the emission, absorption, and scattering of X rays have complemented particle-collision experiments in elucidating the physics of atomic inner shells. Grounded on Max von Laue's theoretical insight and the invention of the Bragg spectrometer, the field's potential underwent a step function with the development of synchrotron-radiation sources. Notably current third-generation sources have opened new horizons in atomic and molecular physics by producing radiation of wide tunability and exceedingly high intensity and polarization, narrow energy bandwidth, and sharp time structure. In this review, recent advances in synchrotron-radiation studies in atomic and molecular science are outlined. Some tempting opportunities are surveyed that arise for future studies of atomic processes, including many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interactions, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. (author)

  10. Atomic Structure Theory Lectures on Atomic Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Walter R

    2007-01-01

    Atomic Structure Theory is a textbook for students with a background in quantum mechanics. The text is designed to give hands-on experience with atomic structure calculations. Material covered includes angular momentum methods, the central field Schrödinger and Dirac equations, Hartree-Fock and Dirac-Hartree-Fock equations, multiplet structure, hyperfine structure, the isotope shift, dipole and multipole transitions, basic many-body perturbation theory, configuration interaction, and correlation corrections to matrix elements. Numerical methods for solving the Schrödinger and Dirac eigenvalue problems and the (Dirac)-Hartree-Fock equations are given as well. B-spline basis sets are used to carry out sums arising in higher-order many-body calculations. Illustrative problems are provided, together with solutions. FORTRAN programs implementing the numerical methods in the text are included.

  11. Examining social competence, self-perception, quality of life, and internalizing and externalizing symptoms in adolescent females with and without autism spectrum disorder: a quantitative design including between-groups and correlational analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamison, T Rene; Schuttler, Jessica Oeth

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent females with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are an understudied population, yet are also quite vulnerable, due to the increased complexities of social interaction and increased risk for internalizing symptoms in adolescence. Most research literature currently focuses on males with ASD, limiting our understanding of social experiences for females with ASD, and thus the potential to better inform supports and intervention to promote social-emotional functioning. This study examined similarities and differences in selected indicators of social-emotional health (social competence, self-perception, quality of life) and problematic behaviors such as externalizing and internalizing symptoms for adolescent females with and without ASD. This study employed a quantitative design utilizing correlational analysis as well as t test comparisons to examine selected indicators of social-emotional health and problematic symptoms using the Social Skills Improvement System (SSIS), Youth Quality of Life Instrument (YQOL), and the Self-Perceptions Profile for Adolescents (SPPA) for adolescent females with ASD in relation to their typically developing peers. Significant differences were found between females with and without ASD in terms of their self-ratings of social-emotional health and problematic behaviors. The no-ASD group rated themselves higher across all areas of social-emotional health. Findings also suggest strong relationships between these constructs, especially for females without ASD. Parent reports of autism symptoms and social-emotional health indicated that as symptoms of autism are more severe, so too was the impact on individuals' social competence. Adolescent females with ASD perceive themselves as having lower social competence, self-worth, and quality of life and higher levels of internalizing and externalizing symptoms as compared to their typically developing peers. Parent ratings indicate that higher levels of autism symptoms relate to lower

  12. Local crystallography analysis for atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Wenzhi; Li, Qing; Belianinov, Alexei; Gai, Zheng; Baddorf, Arthur P; Pan, Minghu; Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V; Sales, Brian C; Sefat, Athena

    2013-01-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful and flexible tool for atomically resolved imaging of surface structures. However, due to the amount of information extracted, in many cases the interpretation of such data is limited to being qualitative and semi-quantitative in nature. At the same time, much can be learned from local atom parameters, such as distances and angles, that can be analyzed and interpreted as variations of local chemical bonding, or order parameter fields. Here, we demonstrate an iterative algorithm for indexing and determining atomic positions that allows the analysis of inhomogeneous surfaces. This approach is further illustrated by local crystallographic analysis of several real surfaces, including highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and an Fe-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 . This study provides a new pathway to extract and quantify local properties for scanning probe microscopy images. (paper)

  13. Atom-surface potentials and atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babb, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    Long-range atom-surface potentials characterize the physics of many actual systems and are now measurable spectroscopically in deflection of atomic beams in cavities or in reflection of atoms in atomic fountains. For a ground state, spherically symmetric atom the potential varies as -1/R 3 near the wall, where R is the atom-surface distance. For asymptotically large distances the potential is weaker and goes as -1/R 4 due to retardation arising from the finite speed of light. This diminished interaction can also be interpreted as a Casimir effect. The possibility of measuring atom-surface potentials using atomic interferometry is explored. The particular cases studied are the interactions of a ground-state alkali-metal atom and a dielectric or a conducting wall. Accurate descriptions of atom-surface potentials in theories of evanescent-wave atomic mirrors and evanescent wave-guided atoms are also discussed. (author)

  14. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Walker, T.G.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n»1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n4 and radiative lifetimes that scale as n3. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom...... of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing....

  15. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Roger C.; Reynolds, John M.

    1991-01-01

    The passive Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0034, Atomic Oxygen Simulated Outgassing, consisted of two identical one-sixth tray modules, exposing selected thermal control coatings to atomic oxygen and the combined space environment on the leading edge and, for reference, to the relative wake environment on the trailing edge. Optical mirrors were included adjacent to the thermal coatings for deposition of outgassing products. Ultraviolet grade windows and metal covers were provided for additional assessment of the effects of the various environmental factors. Preliminary results indicate that orbital atomic oxygen is both a degrading and a optically restorative factor in the thermo-optical properties of selected thermal coatings. There is evidence of more severe optical degradation on collector mirrors adjacent to coatings that were exposed to the RAM-impinging atomic oxygen. This evidence of atomic oxygen stimulated outgassing is discussed in relation to alternative factors that could affect degradation. The general effects of the space environment on the experiment hardware as well as the specimens are discussed.

  17. Hot atom chemistry of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.

    1975-01-01

    The chemistry of energetic carbon atoms is discussed. The experimental approach to studies that have been carried out is described and the mechanistic framework of hot carbon atom reactions is considered in some detail. Finally, the direction that future work might take is examined, including the relationship of experimental to theoretical work. (author)

  18. Atomic and molecular theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inokuti, Mitio.

    1990-01-01

    The multifaceted role of theoretical physics in understanding the earliest stages of radiation action is discussed. Scientific topics chosen for the present discourse include photoabsorption, electron collisions, and ionic collisions, and electron transport theory, Connections of atomic and molecular physics with condensed-matter physics are also discussed. The present article includes some historical perspective and an outlook for the future. 114 refs., 3 figs

  19. Atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  20. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  1. Screened Coulomb interactions in metallic alloys. II. Screening beyond the single-site and atomic-sphere approximations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, Andrei; Simak, S.I.; Korzhavyi, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    -electron potential and energy. In the case of a random alloy such interactions can be accounted for only by lifting the atomic-sphere and single-site approximations, in order to include the polarization due to local environment effects. Nevertheless, a simple parametrization of the screened Coulomb interactions......A quantitative description of the configurational part of the total energy of metallic alloys with substantial atomic size difference cannot be achieved in the atomic-sphere approximation: It needs to be corrected at least for the multipole-moment interactions in the Madelung part of the one...

  2. Atomic processes relevant to polarization plasma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, T.; Koike, F.; Sakimoto, K.; Okasaka, R.; Kawasaki, K.; Takiyama, K.; Oda, T.; Kato, T.

    1992-04-01

    When atoms (ions) are excited anisotropically, polarized excited atoms are produced and the radiation emitted by these atoms is polarized. From the standpoint of plasma spectroscopy research, we review the existing data for various atomic processes that are related to the polarization phenomena. These processes are: electron impact excitation, excitation by atomic and ionic collisions, photoexcitation, radiative recombination and bremsstrahlung. Collisional and radiative relaxation processes of atomic polarization follow. Other topics included are: electric-field measurement, self alignment, Lyman doublet intensity ratio, and magnetic-field measurement of the solar prominence. (author)

  3. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De wael, Annelies, E-mail: annelies.dewael@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); De Backer, Annick [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, OX1 3PH Oxford (United Kingdom); Van Aert, Sandra, E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2017-06-15

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials. - Highlights: • A hybrid method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images is introduced. • Image simulations are incorporated into a statistical framework in a reliable manner. • Limits of the existing methods for atom-counting are far exceeded. • Reliable counting results from an experimental low dose image are obtained. • Progress towards reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials is made.

  4. Quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Roger

    2015-04-01

    This article describes the basic tenets of quantitative research. The concepts of dependent and independent variables are addressed and the concept of measurement and its associated issues, such as error, reliability and validity, are explored. Experiments and surveys – the principal research designs in quantitative research – are described and key features explained. The importance of the double-blind randomised controlled trial is emphasised, alongside the importance of longitudinal surveys, as opposed to cross-sectional surveys. Essential features of data storage are covered, with an emphasis on safe, anonymous storage. Finally, the article explores the analysis of quantitative data, considering what may be analysed and the main uses of statistics in analysis.

  5. Bremsstrahlung in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amus'ya, M.Y.; Kuchiev, M.Y.; Solov'ev, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    It is shown that in the collision of a fast atom with a target atom when the frequencies are on the order of the potentials or higher, there arises bremsstrahlung comparable in intensity with the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron with the same velocity in the field of the target atom. The mechanism by which bremsstrahlung is produced in atom-atom collisions is elucidated. Results of specific calculations of the bremsstrahlung spectra are given for α particles and helium atoms colliding with xenon

  6. Electromagnetic transitions in the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulehla, I.; Suk, M.; Trka, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Methods to achieve excitation of atoms are outlined and conditions necessary for the occurrence of electromagnetic transitions in the atomic shell are given. Radiative transitions between the energy states of the atom include stimulated absorption, spontaneous emission, and stimulated emission. Selection rules applying to the majority of observed transitions are given. The parity concept is explained. It is shown how the electromagnetic field and its interaction with the magnetic moment of the atom lead to a disturbance of the energy states of the atom and the occurrence of various electro-optical and magneto-optical phenomena. The Stark effect and electron spin resonance are described. X-rays and X-ray spectra, the Auger effect and the internal photoeffect are also dealt with. The principle of the laser is explained. (M.D.). 22 figs., 1 tab

  7. Exotic objects of atomic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eletskii, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    There has been presented a short survey of physical properties, methods of production and exploration as well as directions of practical usage of the objects of atomic physics which are not yet described in detail in modern textbooks and manuals intended for students of technical universities. The family of these objects includes negative and multicharged ions, Rydberg atoms, excimer molecules, clusters. Besides of that, in recent decades this family was supplemented with new nanocarbon structures such as fullerenes, carbon nanotubes and graphene. The textbook “Exotic objects of atomic physics” [1] edited recently contains some information on the above-listed objects of the atomic physics. This textbook can be considered as a supplement to classic courses of atomic physics teaching in technical universities.

  8. Curious behavior of optically trapped neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, C.; Walker, T.; Sesko, D.; Monroe, C.

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the behavior of clouds of neutral atoms contained in a spontaneous force optical trap. Because of the low temperatures of the atoms ( 5 atoms. These include the expansion of the cloud as the number is increased and dramatic changes in the distribution of the atoms at higher numbers. We can explain much of the collective behavior using a simple model that includes a 1/r 2 force between the atoms arising from the multiple scattering of photons. Finally, we discuss the optical trapping of atoms directly from a low pressure vapor in a small glass cell. We have used these optically trapped atoms to load a magnetostatic trap in the same cell. This provided a high density sample of atoms with a temperature of less than 2 μK

  9. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  10. Relativistic elementary atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrowczynski, S.

    1989-01-01

    The physics of relativistic elementary atoms,i.e. of Coulomb bound states of elementary particles, like positronium, pionium or an atom of μ + π - , is presented. The atom lifetimes and processes, in which the atoms are produced, are discussed. The interaction of the atoms with matter is also described. A simple derivation of most results is given. 33 refs. (author)

  11. Numerical simulations for quantitative analysis of electrostatic interaction between atomic force microscopy probe and an embedded electrode within a thin dielectric: meshing optimization, sensitivity to potential distribution and impact of cantilever contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azib, M.; Baudoin, F.; Binaud, N.; Villeneuve-Faure, C.; Bugarin, F.; Segonds, S.; Teyssedre, G.

    2018-04-01

    Recent experimental results demonstrated that an electrostatic force distance curve (EFDC) can be used for space charge probing in thin dielectric layers. A main advantage of the method is claimed to be its sensitivity to charge localization, which, however, needs to be substantiated by numerical simulations. In this paper, we have developed a model which permits us to compute an EFDC accurately by using the most sophisticated and accurate geometry for the atomic force microscopy probe. To avoid simplifications and in order to reproduce experimental conditions, the EFDC has been simulated for a system constituted of a polarized electrode embedded in a thin dielectric layer (SiN x ). The individual contributions of forces on the tip and on the cantilever have been analyzed separately to account for possible artefacts. The EFDC sensitivity to potential distribution is studied through the change in electrode shape, namely the width and the depth. Finally, the numerical results have been compared with experimental data.

  12. Atom lasers and nonlinear atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Lu

    2000-01-01

    Two recent experimental breakthroughs in the field of atomic physics are reported: the realization of a well-collimated, widely tunable, quasi-continuous wave atom laser, and the generation of matter waves via coherent multi-wave mixing. The former is a critical step towards a continuous wave, high brightness atom laser while the latter has opened a new field of research: nonlinear atom optics

  13. Atomic weight versus atomic mass controversy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holden, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    A problem for the Atomic Weights Commission for the past decade has been the controversial battle over the names ''atomic weight'' and ''atomic mass''. The Commission has considered the arguments on both sides over the years and it appears that this meeting will see more of the same discussion taking place. In this paper, I review the situation and offer some alternatives

  14. Teach us atom structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Suh Yeon

    2006-08-15

    This book is written to teach atom structure in very easy way. It is divided into nine chapters, which indicates what is the components of matter? when we divide matter continuously, it becomes atom, what did atom look like? particles comprised of matter is not only atom, discover of particles comprised of atom, symbol of element, various radiation, form alchemy to nuclear transmutation, shape of atom is evolving. It also has various pictures in each chapters to explain easily.

  15. Highly excited atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Littman, M.G.; Zimmerman, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    Highly excited atoms are often called Rydberg atoms. These atoms have a wealth of exotic properties which are discussed. Of special interest, are the effects of electric and magnetic fields on Rydberg atoms. Ordinary atoms are scarcely affected by an applied electric or magnetic field; Rydberg atoms can be strongly distorted and even pulled apart by a relatively weak electric field, and they can be squeezed into unexpected shapes by a magnetic field. Studies of the structure of Rydberg atoms in electric and magnetic fields have revealed dramatic atomic phenomena that had not been observed before

  16. Laser-assisted atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussel, F.

    1984-01-01

    The basic layer-assisted atom-atom collision processes are reviewed in order to get a simpler picture of the main physical facts. The processes can be separated into two groups: optical collisions where only one atom is changing state during the collision, the other acting as a spectator atom, and radiative collisions where the states of the two atoms are changing during the collision. All the processes can be interpreted in terms of photoexcitation of the quasimolecule formed during the collisional process. (author)

  17. Nuclear and atomic physics at one gigaflop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    A three-day workshop on problems in atomic and nuclear physics which depend on and are, at present, severely limited by access to supercomputing at effective rates of one gigaflop or more, was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, April 14-16, 1988. The participants comprised researchers from universities, industries and laboratories in the United States and Europe. In this volume are presented talks from that meeting on atomic and nuclear physics topics and on modern parallel processing concepts and hardware. The physics topics included strong fields in atomic and nuclear physics, the role of quarks in nuclear physics, the nuclear few-body problem, relativistic descriptions of heavy-ion collisions, nuclear hydrodynamics, Monte Carlo techniques for many-body problems, precision calculation of atomic QED effects, classical simulation of atomic processes, atomic structure, atomic many-body perturbation theory, quantal studies of small and large molecular systems, and multi-photon atomic and molecular problems

  18. Atom probe tomography analysis of WC powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidow, Jonathan

    2013-09-01

    A tantalum doped tungsten carbide powder, (W,Ta)C, was prepared with the purpose to maximise the amount of Ta in the hexagonal mixed crystal carbide. Atom probe tomography (APT) was considered to be the best technique to quantitatively measure the amount of Ta within this carbide. As the carbide powder consisted in the form of very small particles (WC-Co based cemented carbide specimen. With the use of a laser assisted atom probe, it was shown that the method is working and the Ta content of the (W,Ta)C could be measured quantitatively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. PubChem atom environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hähnke, Volker D; Bolton, Evan E; Bryant, Stephen H

    2015-01-01

    Atom environments and fragments find wide-spread use in chemical information and cheminformatics. They are the basis of prediction models, an integral part in similarity searching, and employed in structure search techniques. Most of these methods were developed and evaluated on the relatively small sets of chemical structures available at the time. An analysis of fragment distributions representative of most known chemical structures was published in the 1970s using the Chemical Abstracts Service data system. More recently, advances in automated synthesis of chemicals allow millions of chemicals to be synthesized by a single organization. In addition, open chemical databases are readily available containing tens of millions of chemical structures from a multitude of data sources, including chemical vendors, patents, and the scientific literature, making it possible for scientists to readily access most known chemical structures. With this availability of information, one can now address interesting questions, such as: what chemical fragments are known today? How do these fragments compare to earlier studies? How unique are chemical fragments found in chemical structures? For our analysis, after hydrogen suppression, atoms were characterized by atomic number, formal charge, implicit hydrogen count, explicit degree (number of neighbors), valence (bond order sum), and aromaticity. Bonds were differentiated as single, double, triple or aromatic bonds. Atom environments were created in a circular manner focused on a central atom with radii from 0 (atom types) up to 3 (representative of ECFP_6 fragments). In total, combining atom types and atom environments that include up to three spheres of nearest neighbors, our investigation identified 28,462,319 unique fragments in the 46 million structures found in the PubChem Compound database as of January 2013. We could identify several factors inflating the number of environments involving transition metals, with many

  20. Transition from LEDCOP to ATOMIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, N.H.; Abdallah, J.; Colgan, J.; Hakel, P.; Kilcrease, D.P.; Mazevet, S.; Sherrill, M.E.; Fontes, C.J.; Zhang, H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of the ATOMIC code, a new low to mid Z opacity code, which will replace the current Los Alamos low Z opacity code LEDCOP. The ATOMIC code is based on the FINE code, long used by the Los Alamos group for spectral comparisons in local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and for non-LTE calculations, both utilizing the extensive databases from the atomic physics suite of codes based on the work of R.D. Cowan. Many of the plasma physics packages in LEDCOP, such as line broadening and free-free absorption, are being transferred to the new ATOMIC code. A new equation of state (EOS) model is being developed to allow higher density calculations than were possible with either the FINE or LEDCOP codes. Extensive modernization for both ATOMIC and the atomic physics code suites, including conversion to Fortran 90 and parallelization, are underway to speed up the calculations and to allow the use of expanded databases for both the LTE opacity tables and the non-LTE calculations. Future plans for the code will be outlined, including considerations for new generation opacity tables.

  1. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  2. Three-atom clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pen'kov, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Born-Oppenheimer approximation is used to obtain an equation for the effective interaction in three atoms bound by a single electron. For low binding energies in an 'electron + atom' pair, long-range forces arise between the atoms, leading to bound states when the size of the three-atom cluster is a few tens of angstrom. A system made of alkali-metal atoms is considered as an example

  3. Stable atomic hydrogen: Polarized atomic beam source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinikoski, T.O.; Penttilae, S.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have carried out experiments with stable atomic hydrogen with a view to possible applications in polarized targets or polarized atomic beam sources. Recent results from the stabilization apparatus are described. The first stable atomic hydrogen beam source based on the microwave extraction method (which is being tested ) is presented. The effect of the stabilized hydrogen gas density on the properties of the source is discussed. (orig.)

  4. High data-rate atom interferometers through high recapture efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; Rakholia, Akash Vrijal; McGuinness, Hayden

    2015-01-27

    An inertial sensing system includes a magneto-optical trap (MOT) that traps atoms within a specified trapping region. The system also includes a cooling laser that cools the trapped atoms so that the atoms remain within the specified region for a specified amount of time. The system further includes a light-pulse atom interferometer (LPAI) that performs an interferometric interrogation of the atoms to determine phase changes in the atoms. The system includes a controller that controls the timing of MOT and cooling laser operations, and controls the timing of interferometric operations to substantially recapture the atoms in the specified trapping region. The system includes a processor that determines the amount inertial movement of the inertial sensing system based on the determined phase changes in the atoms. Also, a method of inertial sensing using this inertial sensing system includes recapture of atoms within the MOT following interferometric interrogation by the LPAI.

  5. Nanomechanical characterization of living mammary tissues by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plodinec, Marija; Lim, Roderick Y H

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of living cells and tissues are important for a variety of functional processes in vivo, including cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. Changes in mechano-cellular phenotype, for instance, are associated with cancer progression. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an enabling technique that topographically maps and quantifies the mechanical properties of complex biological matter in physiological aqueous environments at the nanometer length scale. Recently we applied AFM to spatially resolve the distribution of nanomechanical stiffness across human breast cancer biopsies in comparison to healthy tissue and benign tumors. This led to the finding that AFM provides quantitative mechano-markers that may have translational significance for the clinical diagnosis of cancer. Here, we provide a comprehensive description of sample preparation methodology, instrumentation, data acquisition and analysis that allows for the quantitative nanomechanical profiling of unadulterated tissue at submicron spatial resolution and nano-Newton (nN) force sensitivity in physiological conditions.

  6. Atomic data for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A.; Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research

  7. Atomic data for fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, H.T.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.; Phaneuf, R.A. (eds.); Barnett, C.F.

    1990-07-01

    This report provides a handbook of recommended cross-section and rate-coefficient data for inelastic collisions between hydrogen, helium and lithium atoms, molecules and ions, and encompasses more than 400 different reactions of primary interest in fusion research. Published experimental and theoretical data have been collected and evaluated, and the recommended data are presented in tabular, graphical and parametrized form. Processes include excitation and spectral line emission, charge exchange, ionization, stripping, dissociation and particle interchange reactions. The range of collision energies is appropriate to applications in fusion-energy research.

  8. Atomic and molecular manipulation

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    Work with individual atoms and molecules aims to demonstrate that miniaturized electronic, optical, magnetic, and mechanical devices can operate ultimately even at the level of a single atom or molecule. As such, atomic and molecular manipulation has played an emblematic role in the development of the field of nanoscience. New methods based on the use of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) have been developed to characterize and manipulate all the degrees of freedom of individual atoms and molecules with an unprecedented precision. In the meantime, new concepts have emerged to design molecules and substrates having specific optical, mechanical and electronic functions, thus opening the way to the fabrication of real nano-machines. Manipulation of individual atoms and molecules has also opened up completely new areas of research and knowledge, raising fundamental questions of "Optics at the atomic scale", "Mechanics at the atomic scale", Electronics at the atomic scale", "Quantum physics at the atomic sca...

  9. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  10. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-01-01

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the 'field-independent 0-0 frequency' of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs

  11. Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglin, J. R.; Ketterle, W.

    2003-01-01

    The early experiments on Bose-Einstein condensation in dilute atomic gases accomplished three longstanding goals. First, cooling of neutral atoms into their motional state, thus subjecting them to ultimate control, limited only by Heisenberg uncertainty relation. Second, creation of a coherent sample of atoms, in which all occupy the same quantum states, and the realization of atom lasers - devices that output coherent matter waves. And third, creation of gaseous quantum fluid, with properties that are different from the quantum liquids helium-3 and helium-4. The field of Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases has continued to progress rapidly, driven by the combination of new experimental techniques and theoretical advances. The family of quantum degenerate gases has grown, and now includes metastable and fermionic atoms. condensates have become an ultralow-temperature laboratory for atom optics, collisional physics and many-body physics, encompassing phonons, superfluidity, quantized vortices, Josephson junctions and quantum phase transitions. (author)

  12. Atomic Fuel, Understanding the Atom Series. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogerton, John F.

    This publication is part of the "Understanding the Atom" series. Complete sets of the series are available free to teachers, schools, and public librarians who can make them available for reference or use by groups. Among the topics discussed are: What Atomic Fuel Is; The Odyssey of Uranium; Production of Uranium; Fabrication of Reactor…

  13. Atomic Fisher information versus atomic number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, A.; Sen, K.D.

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that the Thomas-Fermi Fisher information is negative. A slightly more sophisticated model proposed by Gaspar provides a qualitatively correct expression for the Fisher information: Gaspar's Fisher information is proportional to the two-third power of the atomic number. Accurate numerical calculations show an almost linear dependence on the atomic number

  14. Applied atomic collision physics. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C.F.; Harrison, M.F.A.

    1984-01-01

    This volume brings together papers on atomic processes that have been important in fusion research during the past 30 years. Topics include: Atomic radiation from low density plasma; Properties of magnetically confined plasmas in tokomaks; Diagnostics and; Heating by energetic particles. Each chapter includes references

  15. Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhturova, N.F.; Yudelevich, I.G.

    1975-01-01

    Atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry, a comparatively new method for the analysis of trace quantities, has developed rapidly in the past ten years. Theoretical and experimental studies by many workers have shown that atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry (AFS) is capable of achieving a better limit than atomic absorption for a large number of elements. The present review examines briefly the principles of atomic-fluorescence spectrophotometry and the types of fluorescent transition. The excitation sources, flame and nonflame atomizers, used in AFS are described. The limits of detection achieved up to the present, using flame and nonflame methods of atomization are given

  16. PHYSICS: Toward Atom Chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortágh, József; Zimmermann, Claus

    2005-02-11

    As a novel approach for turning the peculiar features of quantum mechanics into practical devices, researchers are investigating the use of ultracold atomic clouds above microchips. Such "atom chips" may find use as sensitive probes for gravity, acceleration, rotation, and tiny magnetic forces. In their Perspective, Fortagh and Zimmermann discuss recent advances toward creating atom chips, in which current-carrying conductors in the chips create magnetic microtraps that confine the atomic clouds. Despite some intrinsic limits to the performance of atom chips, existing technologies are capable of producing atom chips, and many possibilities for their construction remain to be explored.

  17. THE ORNL ATOM PROBE

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, M.

    1986-01-01

    The ORNL Atom Probe is a microanalytical tool for studies in materials science. The instrument is a combination of a customized version of the vacuum system of the VG FIM-100 atom probe, an ORNL-designed microcomputer-controlled digital timing system, and a double curved CEMA Imaging Atom Probe detector. The atom probe combines four instruments into one - namely a field ion microscope, an energy compensated time-of-flight mass spectrometer, an imaging atom probe, and a pulsed laser atom probe.

  18. Hot atom chemistry of sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovski, D. S.; Koleva, D. P.

    1982-01-01

    An attempt to cover all papers dealing with the hot atom chemistry of sulpphur is made. Publications which: a) only touch the problem, b) contain some data, indirectly connected with sulphur hot atom chemistry, c) deal with 35 S-production from a chloride matrix, are included as well. The author's name and literature source are given in the original language, transcribed, when it is necessary, in latine. A number of primery and secondary documents have been used including Chemical Abstracts, INIS Atomindex, the bibliographies of A. Siuda and J.-P. Adloff for 1973 - 77, etc. (authors)

  19. Quantitative ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gries, W.H.

    1976-06-01

    This is a report of the study of the implantation of heavy ions at medium keV-energies into electrically conducting mono-elemental solids, at ion doses too small to cause significant loss of the implanted ions by resputtering. The study has been undertaken to investigate the possibility of accurate portioning of matter in submicrogram quantities, with some specific applications in mind. The problem is extensively investigated both on a theoretical level and in practice. A mathematical model is developed for calculating the loss of implanted ions by resputtering as a function of the implanted ion dose and the sputtering yield. Numerical data are produced therefrom which permit a good order-of-magnitude estimate of the loss for any ion/solid combination in which the ions are heavier than the solid atoms, and for any ion energy from 10 to 300 keV. The implanted ion dose is measured by integration of the ion beam current, and equipment and techniques are described which make possible the accurate integration of an ion current in an electromagnetic isotope separator. The methods are applied to two sample cases, one being a stable isotope, the other a radioisotope. In both cases independent methods are used to show that the implantation is indeed quantitative, as predicted. At the same time the sample cases are used to demonstrate two possible applications for quantitative ion implantation, viz. firstly for the manufacture of calibration standards for instrumental micromethods of elemental trace analysis in metals, and secondly for the determination of the half-lives of long-lived radioisotopes by a specific activity method. It is concluded that the present study has advanced quantitative ion implantation to the state where it can be successfully applied to the solution of problems in other fields

  20. A Single Atom Antenna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trinter, Florian; Williams, Joshua B; Weller, Miriam; Waitz, Markus; Pitzer, Martin; Voigtsberger, Jörg; Schober, Carl; Kastirke, Gregor; Müller, Christian; Goihl, Christoph; Burzynski, Phillip; Wiegandt, Florian; Wallauer, Robert; Kalinin, Anton; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Schöffler, Markus S; Jahnke, Till; Dörner, Reinhard; Chiang, Ying-Chih; Gokhberg, Kirill

    2015-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the smallest possible implementation of an antenna-receiver complex which consists of a single (helium) atom acting as the antenna and a second (neon) atom acting as a receiver. (paper)

  1. Deep Space Atomic Clock

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC) project will develop a small, low mass atomic clock based on mercury-ion trap technology and demonstrate it in space providing the...

  2. Inelastic processes in atomic, molecular and chemical physics (in honour of Andrey K. Belyaev)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklem, Paul S.; Tscherbul, Timur V.

    2015-11-01

    This Special Issue is dedicated to Professor Andrey K. Belyaev, on the occasion of his 60th birthday and in celebration of his productive career in theoretical atomic, molecular, and chemical physics. It brings together 12 research studies of Inelastic Processes in Atomic, Molecular and Chemical Physics, a research area where Andrey himself made significant contributions. Inelastic processes are central to many different areas of physics, including atmospheric physics, astrophysics, and plasma physics to name a few, as well as in related technological applications such as lasers and fusion reactors. Quantitative understanding of the mechanisms of inelastic processes in atoms and molecules is therefore a problem of fundamental importance in physics, astrophysics, and chemistry. It is precisely this challenging problem that Andrey's research addresses using a broad arsenal of theoretical tools and techniques.

  3. The quantitative Morse theorem

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Ta Le; Phien, Phan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we give a proof of the quantitative Morse theorem stated by {Y. Yomdin} in \\cite{Y1}. The proof is based on the quantitative Sard theorem, the quantitative inverse function theorem and the quantitative Morse lemma.

  4. Navigation with Atom Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Navigation with Atom Interferometers Mary F. Locke and Frank A. Narducci Avionics Department Naval Air Systems Command Patuxent River, Md...20670 Abstract: In this article, we review the basic physics of an atom interferometer. We highlight the usefulness of atom interferometers for...inertial navigation due to their high phase sensitivity to both linear acceleration and angular rotation, but also the drawback that a single atom

  5. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    OpenAIRE

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-01-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where an atomic wave-packet, moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  6. Atomic Energy Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This act provides for the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The board is responsible for the control and supervision of the development, application and use of atomic energy. The board is also considered necessary to enable Canada to participate effectively in measures of international control of atomic energy

  7. Atomic Spectra Database (ASD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 78 NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD) (Web, free access)   This database provides access and search capability for NIST critically evaluated data on atomic energy levels, wavelengths, and transition probabilities that are reasonably up-to-date. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center has carried out these critical compilations.

  8. Atom-atom collision cascades localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsanov, V.V.

    1980-01-01

    The presence of an impurity and thermal vibration influence on the atom-atom collision cascade development is analysed by the computer simulation method (the modificated dynamic model). It is discovered that the relatively low energetic cascades are localized with the temperature increase of an irradiated crystal. On the basis of the given effect the mechanism of splitting of the high energetic cascades into subcascades is proposed. It accounts for two factors: the primary knocked atom energy and the irradiated crystal temperature. Introduction of an impurity also localizes the cascades independently from the impurity atom mass. The cascades localization leads to intensification of the process of annealing in the cascades and reduction of the post-cascade vacancy cluster sizes. (author)

  9. Mesonic atoms. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunselman, R.

    1981-01-01

    Research on mesic atoms during 1981 is reported. This includes measurement of x-rays from pionic hydrogen and pionic deuterium; muonic K, L, and M x-ray spectra of mercury 199 and mercury 201; and pionic chromium 54, scandium 45, vanadium 51, manganese 55, and iron

  10. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  11. Applied quantitative finance

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Cathy; Overbeck, Ludger

    2017-01-01

    This volume provides practical solutions and introduces recent theoretical developments in risk management, pricing of credit derivatives, quantification of volatility and copula modeling. This third edition is devoted to modern risk analysis based on quantitative methods and textual analytics to meet the current challenges in banking and finance. It includes 14 new contributions and presents a comprehensive, state-of-the-art treatment of cutting-edge methods and topics, such as collateralized debt obligations, the high-frequency analysis of market liquidity, and realized volatility. The book is divided into three parts: Part 1 revisits important market risk issues, while Part 2 introduces novel concepts in credit risk and its management along with updated quantitative methods. The third part discusses the dynamics of risk management and includes risk analysis of energy markets and for cryptocurrencies. Digital assets, such as blockchain-based currencies, have become popular b ut are theoretically challenging...

  12. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  13. Artificial Atoms: from Quantum Physics to Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this workshop is to survey the most recent advances of technologies enabling single atom- and artificial atom-based devices. These include the assembly of artificial molecular structures with magnetic dipole and optical interactions between engineered atoms embedded in solid-state lattices. The ability to control single atoms in diamond or similar solids under ambient operating conditions opens new perspectives for technologies based on nanoelectronics and nanophotonics. The scope of the workshop is extended towards the physics of strong coupling between atoms and radiation field modes. Beyond the traditional atom-cavity systems, artificial dipoles coupled to microwave radiation in circuit quantum electrodynamics is considered. All these technologies mutually influence each other in developing novel devices for sensing at the quantum level and for quantum information processing.

  14. Manipulating Atoms with Light Achievements and Perspectives

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    During the last few decades spectacular progress has been achieved in the control of atomic systems by light. It will be shown how it is possible to use the basic conservation laws in atom-photon interactions for polarizing atoms, for trapping them, for cooling them to extremely low temperatures, in the microkelvin, and even in the nanokelvin range. A review will be given of recent advances in this field and of new applications, including atomic clocks with very high relative stability and accuracy, atomic interferometers allowing precise measurement of rotation speeds and gravitational fields, the realization of new states of matter such as Bose-Einstein condensates, matter waves and atom lasers, ultracold molecules. New perspectives opened by these results will be also briefly discussed.

  15. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  16. Atomic Physics, Science (Experimental): 5318.42.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Ralph E.

    Presented is the study of modern and classical concepts of the atom; the structure of the atom as a mass-energy relationship; practical uses of radioactivity; isotopes; and the strange particles. Performance objectives (16) are included as well as a detailed course outline. Experiments, demonstrations, projects and reports to enhance student…

  17. Atoms in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, P. A.

    1976-01-01

    Aspects of electromagnetic radiation and atomic physics needed for an understanding of astronomical applications are explored. Although intended primarily for teachers, this brochure is written so that it can be distributed to students if desired. The first section, Basic Topics, is suitable for a ninth-grade general science class; the style is simple and repetitive, and no mathematics or physics background is required. The second section, Intermediate and Advanced Topics, requires a knowledge of the material in the first section and assumes a generally higher level of achievement and motivation on the part of the student. These latter topics might fit well into junior-level physics, chemistry, or earth-science courses. Also included are a glossary, a list of references and teaching aids, class exercises, and a question and answer section.

  18. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, S.K.; Felfer, P.J.; Araullo-Peters, V.J. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cao, Y.; Liao, X.Z. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cairney, J.M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. - Highlights: ► New data treatment methods allow delineation of grain boundaries, even without segregation. ► Proxigrams calculated from the surfaces accurately show the extent of segregation. ► Tessellation of the data volume can be used to map the Gibbsian interfacial excess.

  19. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samudrala, S.K.; Felfer, P.J.; Araullo-Peters, V.J.; Cao, Y.; Liao, X.Z.; Cairney, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. - Highlights: ► New data treatment methods allow delineation of grain boundaries, even without segregation. ► Proxigrams calculated from the surfaces accurately show the extent of segregation. ► Tessellation of the data volume can be used to map the Gibbsian interfacial excess

  20. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, S K; Felfer, P J; Araullo-Peters, V J; Cao, Y; Liao, X Z; Cairney, J M

    2013-09-01

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Laser guiding of cold atoms in photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasishin, A V; Magnitskiy, Sergey A; Shuvaev, V A; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2000-01-01

    The possibility of using photonic crystals with a lattice defect for the laser guiding of cold atoms is analysed. We have found a configuration of a photonic-crystal lattice and a defect ensuring the distribution of a potential in the defect mode of the photonic crystal allowing the guiding of cold atoms along the defect due to the dipole force acting on atoms. Based on quantitative estimates, we have demonstrated that photonic crystals with a lattice defect permit the guiding of atoms with much higher transverse temperatures and a much higher transverse localisation degree than in the case of hollow-core fibres. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy

  3. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  4. Atoms for peace and war, 1953-1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewlett, R.G.; Holl, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports on nuclear power for the marketplace, pursuit of the peaceful atom, safeguards, EORATOM, and the international agency. Nuclear issues include the presidential campaign of 1956, politics of the peaceful atom and a nuclear test moratorium.

  5. Atoms - molecules - nuclei. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otter, G.; Honecker, R.

    1993-01-01

    This first volume covers the following topics: Wave-particle dualism, classical atomic physics; the Schroedinger equation, angular momentum in quantum physics, one-electron atoms and many-electron atoms with atomic structure, atomic spectra, exotic atoms, influence of electric and magnetic fields

  6. Atomic Power Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John F

    1964-01-01

    This booklet is condensed from a larger publication, -Background Information on Atomic Power Safety-, published in January 1964, by the .Atomic Industrial Forum. That publication and this abridgment were produced in recognition of the emergence of commercial atomic power as an important factor in our national economy, and of the resulting need for readily available information in nontechnical form on the characteristics of nuclear power plants and on the various measures taken during their design, construction, and operation for public safety.

  7. Atomic physics made clear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhold, H.

    1980-01-01

    This book is a popular introduction into the foundations of atomic physics und quantum mechanics. Starting from some phenomenological concepts Bohr's model and the construction of the periodic system regarding the shell structure of atoms are introduced. In this framework the selection rules and magnetic moments of atomic electrons are considered. Finally the wave-particle dualism is considered. In the appendix some mathematical methods are described which are useful for a deeper penetration into the considered ideas. (HSI)

  8. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  9. Excited-state hydrogen atom abstraction initiates the photochemistry of β-2′-deoxycytidine† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Including relevant preliminary results as well as illustrations and geometrical parameters of selected structures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc03761h Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Jesús; Šponer, Judit E.; Šponer, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the effects of ultraviolet radiation on nucleotides in solution is an important step towards a comprehensive description of the photochemistry of nucleic acids and their constituents. Apart from having implications for mutagenesis and DNA photoprotection mechanisms, the photochemistry of cytidines is a central element in UV-assisted syntheses of pyrimidine nucleotides under prebiotically plausible conditions. In this contribution, we present UV-irradiation experiments of β-2′-deoxycytidine in aqueous solution involving H–D exchange followed by NMR spectroscopic analysis of the photoproducts. We further elucidate the outcome of these experiments by means of high-level quantum chemical calculations. In particular, we show that prolonged UV-irradiation of cytidine may lead to H–C1′ hydrogen atom abstraction by the carbonyl oxygen atom of cytosine. This process may enable photoanomerisation and nucleobase loss, two previously unexplained photoreactions observed in pyrimidine nucleotides. PMID:27182431

  10. Single atom spintronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M. R.; Armstrong, J. N.; Hua, S. Z.; Chopra, H. D.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Single atom spintronics (SASS) represents the ultimate physical limit in device miniaturization. SASS is characterized by ballistic electron transport, and is a fertile ground for exploring new phenomena. In addition to the 'stationary' (field independent) scattering centers that have a small and fixed contribution to total transmission probability of electron waves, domain walls constitute an additional and enhanced source of scattering in these magnetic quantum point contacts (QPCs), the latter being both field and spin-dependent. Through the measurement of complete hysteresis loops as a function of quantized conductance, we present definitive evidence of enhanced backscattering of electron waves by atomically sharp domain walls in QPCs formed between microfabricated thin films [1]. Since domain walls move in a magnetic field, the magnitude of spin-dependent scattering changes as the QPC is cycled along its hysteresis loop. For example, as shown in the inset in Fig. 1, from zero towards saturation in a given field direction, the resistance varies as the wall is being swept away, whereas the resistance is constant upon returning from saturation towards zero, since in this segment of the hysteresis loop no domain wall is present across the contact. The observed spin-valve like behavior is realized by control over wall width and shape anisotropy. This behavior also unmistakably sets itself apart from any mechanical artifacts; additionally, measurements made on single atom contacts provide an artifact-free environment [2]. Intuitively, it is simpler to organize the observed BMR data according to all possible transitions between different conductance plateaus, as shown by the dotted line in Fig. 1; the solid circles show experimental data for Co, which follows the predicted scheme. Requisite elements for the observation of the effect will be discussed in detail along with a review of state of research in this field. Practically, the challenge lies in making

  11. Atomic hydrogen reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massip de Turville, C.M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Methods are discussed of generating heat in an atomic hydrogen reactor which involve; the production of atomic hydrogen by an electrical discharge, the capture of nascent neutrons from atomic hydrogen in a number of surrounding steel alloy tubes having a high manganese content to produce 56 Mn, the irradiation of atomic hydrogen by the high energy antineutrinos from the beta decay of 56 Mn to yield nascent neutrons, and the removal of the heat generated by the capture of nascent neutrons by 55 Mn and the beta decay of 56 Mn. (U.K.)

  12. Method and apparatus for quantum information processing using entangled neutral-atom qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan Yu; Biedermann, Grant; Deutsch, Ivan

    2018-04-03

    A method for preparing an entangled quantum state of an atomic ensemble is provided. The method includes loading each atom of the atomic ensemble into a respective optical trap; placing each atom of the atomic ensemble into a same first atomic quantum state by impingement of pump radiation; approaching the atoms of the atomic ensemble to within a dipole-dipole interaction length of each other; Rydberg-dressing the atomic ensemble; during the Rydberg-dressing operation, exciting the atomic ensemble with a Raman pulse tuned to stimulate a ground-state hyperfine transition from the first atomic quantum state to a second atomic quantum state; and separating the atoms of the atomic ensemble by more than a dipole-dipole interaction length.

  13. Toward the Atomic-Level Mass Analysis of Biomolecules by the Scanning Atom Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Osamu; Taniguchi, Masahiro

    2017-04-01

    In 1994, a new type of atom probe instrument, named the scanning atom probe (SAP), was proposed. The unique feature of the SAP is the introduction of a small extraction electrode, which scans over a specimen surface and confines the high field, required for field evaporation of surface atoms in a small space, between the specimen and the electrode. Thus, the SAP does not require a sharp specimen tip. This indicates that the SAP can mass analyze the specimens which are difficult to form in a sharp tip, such as organic materials and biomolecules. Clean single wall carbon nanotubes (CNT), made by high-pressure carbon monoxide process are found to be the best substrates for biomolecules. Various amino acids and dipeptide biomolecules were successfully mass analyzed, revealing characteristic clusters formed by strongly bound atoms in the specimens. The mass analysis indicates that SAP analysis of biomolecules is not only qualitative, but also quantitative.

  14. Analysis at the atomic level: The atom probe field-ion microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    The atom probe field-ion microscope (APFIM) is a unique analytical instrument that can analyze metals and semiconducting materials on the atomic scale. In recent years, the atom probe has developed into one of the most powerful instruments available for routine microstructural and microchemical analysis of materials. The types of investigations that have been performed have encompassed many diverse metallurgical subjects including phase transformations, segregation, diffusion, catalysis, and radiation damage. 3 refs., 3 figs

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Computational Atomic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Douglass E.

    1998-02-01

    The primary purpose of `Computational Atomic Structure' is to give a potential user of the Multi-Configuration Hartree-Fock (MCHF) Atomic Structure Package an outline of the physics and computational methods in the package, guidance on how to use the package, and information on how to interpret and use the computational results. The book is successful in all three aspects. In addition, the book provides a good overview and review of the physics of atomic structure that would be useful to the plasma physicist interested in refreshing his knowledge of atomic structure and quantum mechanics. While most of the subjects are covered in greater detail in other sources, the book is reasonably self-contained, and, in most cases, the reader can understand the basic material without recourse to other sources. The MCHF package is the standard package for computing atomic structure and wavefunctions for single or multielectron ions and atoms. It is available from a number of ftp sites. When the code was originally written in FORTRAN 77, it could only be run on large mainframes. With the advances in computer technology, the suite of codes can now be compiled and run on present day workstations and personal computers and is thus available for use by any physicist, even those with extremely modest computing resources. Sample calculations in interactive mode are included in the book to illustrate the input needed for the code, what types of results and information the code can produce, and whether the user has installed the code correctly. The user can also specify the calculational level, from simple Hartree-Fock to multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock. The MCHF method begins by finding approximate wavefunctions for the bound states of an atomic system. This involves minimizing the energy of the bound state using a variational technique. Once the wavefunctions have been determined, other atomic properties, such as the transition rates, can be determined. The book begins with an

  16. On-line system for investigation of atomic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amus'ya, M.Ya.; Chernysheva, L.V.

    1983-01-01

    A description of the on-line ATOM system is presented that enables to investigate the structure of atomic electron shells and their interactions with different scattering particles-electrons, positronse photons, mesons - with the use of computerized numerical solutions. The problem is stated along with mathematical description of atomic properties including theoretical and numerical models for each investigated physical process. The ATOM system structure is considered. The Hartree-Fock method is used to determine the wave functions of the ground and excited atomic states. The programs are written in the ALGOL langauge. Different atomic characteristics were possible to be calculated for the first time with an accuracy exceeding an experimental one

  17. Electron correlation for helium-like atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, U. [Visvabharati Univ., Santiniketan (India). Dept. of Comput. Sci.; Talukdar, B. [Visvabharati Univ., Santiniketan (India). Dept. of Physics

    1999-02-01

    A recently proposed analytical approach to the ground-state energy of helium atom is generalised to study the effect of electron-electron correlation on the properties of helium isoelectronic sequence. The expectation values of the Hamiltonian and some important functions of radial distances are expressed in terms of derivatives of Lewis integrals which not only permit the straightforward variational calculation to get numerical results but also help one derive interesting recurrence relations for radial expectation values. The results presented for atoms from H{sup -} to Si{sup 12+} indicate that the present analytical model will have quantitative applicability for the study of electronic correlation in high-Z helium-like atoms within the framework of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. (orig.) 22 refs.

  18. Atomic Ferris wheel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, Vasileios E.

    2017-07-01

    We study the generation of atom vortex beams in the case where a Bose-Einstein condensate, released from a trap and moving in free space, is diffracted from a properly tailored light mask with a spiral transverse profile. We show how such a diffraction scheme could lead to the production of an atomic Ferris wheel beam.

  19. Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackman, N.S.; Gummer, W.K.

    1982-02-01

    This paper has been prepared to provide an overview of the responsibilities and activities of the Atomic Energy Control Board. It is designed to address questions that are often asked concerning the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board, its enabling legislation, licensing and compliance activities, federal-provincial relationships, international obligations, and communications with the public

  20. Beyond the Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, John

    2011-08-01

    1. Introduction - the atom in the seventies; 2. The vacuum tube; 3. The new rays; 4. The new substances; 5. Disintegration; 6. A family tree; 7. Verifications and results; 8. The objective reality of molecules; 9. The new atom; Bibliography; Index.

  1. Atoms, Molecules, and Compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Manning, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Explores the atoms that govern chemical processes. This book shows how the interactions between simple substances such as salt and water are crucial to life on Earth and how those interactions are predestined by the atoms that make up the molecules.

  2. Atoms, Molecules and Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Applications of Quantum Mechanics to 'Atoms, Molecules and Radiation' will be held at the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore from December 8 to 20. 2014. The Course is primarily aimed at teachers teaching quantum mechanics and/ or atomic and molecular physics at the UG / PG level.

  3. When Atoms Want

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talanquer, Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Chemistry students and teachers often explain the chemical reactivity of atoms, molecules, and chemical substances in terms of purposes or needs (e.g., atoms want or need to gain, lose, or share electrons in order to become more stable). These teleological explanations seem to have pedagogical value as they help students understand and use…

  4. Zeeman atomic absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loos-Vollebregt, M.T.C. de.

    1980-01-01

    A new method of background correction in atomic absorption spectroscopy has recently been introduced, based on the Zeeman splitting of spectral lines in a magnetic field. A theoretical analysis of the background correction capability observed in such instruments is presented. A Zeeman atomic absorption spectrometer utilizing a 50 Hz sine wave modulated magnetic field is described. (Auth.)

  5. Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.

    1984-10-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1983. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory

  6. 1985 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howald, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J. (comps.)

    1986-06-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1985. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  7. 1984 Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.

    1985-04-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1984. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory

  8. Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; McKnight, R.H.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J.; Phaneuf, R.A. (comps.)

    1984-10-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1983. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  9. 1984 Bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Griffin, P.M.; Havener, C.C.; Howard, A.M.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J. (comps.)

    1985-04-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1984. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  10. 1985 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, C.F.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.

    1986-06-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1985. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory

  11. 1982 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, C.F.; Crandall, D.H.; Gilbody, H.B.; Gregory, D.C.; Kirkpatrick, M.I.; McDaniel, E.W.; McKnight, R.H.; Meyer, F.W.; Morgan, T.J.; Phaneuf, R.A. (comps.)

    1984-05-01

    This annotated bibliography includes papers on atomic and molecular processes published during 1982. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing, the entries are indexed according to the categories and according to reactants within each subcategory.

  12. Quantitative EPR A Practitioners Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Eaton, Gareth R; Barr, David P; Weber, Ralph T

    2010-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive yet practical guide for people who perform quantitative EPR measurements. No existing book provides this level of practical guidance to ensure the successful use of EPR. There is a growing need in both industrial and academic research to provide meaningful and accurate quantitative EPR results. This text discusses the various sample, instrument and software related aspects required for EPR quantitation. Specific topics include: choosing a reference standard, resonator considerations (Q, B1, Bm), power saturation characteristics, sample positioning, and finally, putting all the factors together to obtain an accurate spin concentration of a sample.

  13. Antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batty, C.J.

    1989-07-01

    Experimental studies of antiprotonic-hydrogen atoms have recently made great progress following the commissioning of the low energy antiproton facility (LEAR) at CERN in 1983. At the same time our understanding of the atomic cascade has increased considerably through measurements of the X-ray spectra. The life history of the p-bar-p atom is considered in some detail, from the initial capture of the antiproton when stopping in hydrogen, through the atomic cascade with the emission of X-rays, to the final antiproton annihilation and production of mesons. The experiments carried out at LEAR are described and the results compared with atomic cascade calculations and predictions of strong interaction effects. (author)

  14. Atom Pairing in Optical Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangara, J; Cheng, Chingyun; Pegahan, S; Arakelyan, I; Thomas, J E

    2018-02-23

    We study the pairing of fermions in a one-dimensional lattice of tunable double-well potentials using radio-frequency spectroscopy. The spectra reveal the coexistence of two types of atom pairs with different symmetries. Our measurements are in excellent quantitative agreement with a theoretical model, obtained by extending the Green's function method of Orso et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 060402 (2005)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.060402] to a bichromatic 1D lattice with nonzero harmonic radial confinement. The predicted spectra comprise hundreds of discrete transitions, with symmetry-dependent initial state populations and transition strengths. Our work provides an understanding of the elementary pairing states in a superlattice, paving the way for new studies of strongly interacting many-body systems.

  15. Taming light with cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vestergaard Hau, Lene

    2002-01-01

    Much of the extraordinary progress of developments in communication (e-mail, and/or internet) has been achieved due to improvements in optical communication. This paper describes a new approach which could improve the speed of communication. The ability to stop light in its tracks by passing it through a cloud of ultracold atoms could lead to new techniques for optical storage. The described slow-light experiments have triggered new physics both on the experimental and theoretical fronts. The cold atom system allows the steepest possible refractive index profiles, and therefore the most dramatic effects, as Doppler effects are eliminated. Furthermore, cold atoms provide maximum flexibility in the choice of beam geometry. This is important for the storage and retrieval of multiple pulses of optical information in an atomic medium, as it would allow individual pulses to be selectively addressed. Slow and stopped light have many potential applications in optical communication and processing, including optical information storage, ultra-sensitive optical switches, and optical delay lines. It could also be used in quantum-information processing, in which quantum-mechanical information is used for computing and communication purposes. On a very different front, slow light provides us with a totally new way of probing the unusual properties of Bose-Einstein condensates

  16. Background of SAM atom-fraction profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Atom-fraction profiles acquired by SAM (scanning Auger microprobe) have important applications, e.g. in the context of alloy surface engineering by infusion of carbon or nitrogen through the alloy surface. However, such profiles often exhibit an artifact in form of a background with a level that anti-correlates with the local atom fraction. This article presents a theory explaining this phenomenon as a consequence of the way in which random noise in the spectrum propagates into the discretized differentiated spectrum that is used for quantification. The resulting model of “energy channel statistics” leads to a useful semi-quantitative background reduction procedure, which is validated by applying it to simulated data. Subsequently, the procedure is applied to an example of experimental SAM data. The analysis leads to conclusions regarding optimum experimental acquisition conditions. The proposed method of background reduction is based on general principles and should be useful for a broad variety of applications. - Highlights: • Atom-fraction–depth profiles of carbon measured by scanning Auger microprobe • Strong background, varies with local carbon concentration. • Needs correction e.g. for quantitative comparison with simulations • Quantitative theory explains background. • Provides background removal strategy and practical advice for acquisition

  17. Quantitative graph theory mathematical foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The first book devoted exclusively to quantitative graph theory, Quantitative Graph Theory: Mathematical Foundations and Applications presents and demonstrates existing and novel methods for analyzing graphs quantitatively. Incorporating interdisciplinary knowledge from graph theory, information theory, measurement theory, and statistical techniques, this book covers a wide range of quantitative-graph theoretical concepts and methods, including those pertaining to real and random graphs such as:Comparative approaches (graph similarity or distance)Graph measures to characterize graphs quantitat

  18. Catalyst support structure, catalyst including the structure, reactor including a catalyst, and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norman, Staci A.; Aston, Victoria J.; Weimer, Alan W.

    2017-05-09

    Structures, catalysts, and reactors suitable for use for a variety of applications, including gas-to-liquid and coal-to-liquid processes and methods of forming the structures, catalysts, and reactors are disclosed. The catalyst material can be deposited onto an inner wall of a microtubular reactor and/or onto porous tungsten support structures using atomic layer deposition techniques.

  19. Atomic energy indemnification system in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, Eiichi

    1980-01-01

    The Japanese legislation on the indemnification by atomic energy enterprisers for atomic energy damages, published in 1961 and enforced in 1962, includes the law concerning indemnification for atomic energy damages and the law concerning atomic energy damage indemnification contracts (hereafter referred to as ''the law concerning indemnification contracts''). While the Japanese laws are same as the foreign legislation in the provisions of the responsibility of atomic energy damages without the error of atomic energy enterprisers, exemption reasons are more important in this respect. When damages are due to exceptionally grave natural disasters or social disturbances, atomic energy enterprisers are exempted from the responsibility. Indemnification amounts are determined, but the Japanese laws do not limit then, different from the foreign regulations. The periods for demanding indemnification are not defined particularly in the law concerning indemnification contracts, and the general basic rules of the civil law are applied. As a result, the demand right terminates in 3 years after the injured persons find damage and offenders, and in 20 years since the unlawful act (Article 724, Civil law). The indemnification liability for atomic energy damages is focused on atomic energy enterprisers concerned in the same way as the foreign laws. The measures for assuring the execution of indemnification responsibility consist in principle of the firm conbination of the liability insurance contracts with private insurance companies and the indemnification contracts for atomic energy damages with the state. The damages of employes suffered in works are excluded from indemnification, which has been the main issue of discussion since the enactment of atomic energy laws. (Okada, K.)

  20. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  1. Atomic Energy Law with ordinances. 9. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The revised edition of the text is due to a variety of major changes in, and amendments to, the German Atomic Energy Law. This book includes the current version of the Atomic Energy Law which has been changed several times, the 1982-version of the ordinace concerning procedures laid down in the Atomic Energy Law, the 1976 radiation protection ordinance together with recent amendments, the 1973 X-ray ordinance, the 1977 financial security ordinance laid down in the Atomic Energy Law, the 1981 ordinance concerning costs, the ordinance concerning performance in anticipation of ultimate disposal. The book is a compilation of the basic Atomic Energy Law which is needed mostly for imminent practical requirements. (orig./HSCH) [de

  2. High-magnetic field atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter discusses both the traditional developments of Zeeman techniques at strong fields and the fundamental concepts of diamagnetism. Topics considered include historical aspects, the production of high fields, the atom in a magnetic field (Hamiltonian and symmetries, the various magnetic regimes in atomic spectra), applications of the Zeeman effect at strong B fields, the Landau regime for loosely bound particles, theoretical concepts of atomic diamagnetism, and the ultra-high-field regime and quantum electrodynamics. It is concluded that the wide implications of the problem of the strongly magnetized hydrogen atom in various domains of physics and its conceptual importance concerning theoretical methods of classical and quantum mechanics justify the experimental and theoretical efforts in atomic physics

  3. Atomic excitation and recombination in external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayfeh, M.H.; Clark, C.W.

    1985-01-01

    This volume offers a timely look at Rydberg states of atoms in external fields and dielectronic recombination. Each topic provides authoritative coverage, presents a fresh account of a flourishing field of current atomic physics and introduces new opportunities for discovery and development. Topics considered include electron-atom scattering in external fields; observations of regular and irregular motion as exemplified by the quadratic zeeman effect and other systems; Rydberg atoms in external fields and the Coulomb geometry; crossed-field effects in the absorption spectrum of lithium in a magnetic field; precise studies of static electric field ionization; widths and shapes of stark resonances in sodium above the saddle point; studies of electric field effects and barium autoionizing resonances; autoionization and dielectronic recombination in plasma electric microfields; dielectronic recombination measurements on multicharged ions; merged beam studies of dielectronic recombination; Rydberg atoms and dielectronic recombination in astrophysics; and observations on dielectronic recombination

  4. Energy storage possibilities of atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etters, R. D.; Dugan, J. V., Jr.; Palmer, R.

    1976-01-01

    Several recent experiments designed to produce and store macroscopic quantities of atomic hydrogen are discussed. The bulk, ground state properties of atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium systems are calculated assuming that all pair interactions occur via the atomic triplet potential. The conditions required to obtain this system, including inhibition of recombination through the energetically favorable singlet interaction, are discussed. The internal energy, pressure, and compressibility are calculated applying the Monte Carlo technique with a quantum mechanical variational wavefunction. The system studied consisted of 32 atoms in a box with periodic boundary conditions. Results show that atomic triplet hydrogen and deuterium remain gaseous at 0 K; i.e., the internal energy is positive at all molar volumes considered.

  5. Atomic Energy Act 1953-1966

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Act 1953-1966 establishes the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and lays down its powers, duties, rules of procedure and financing. The members of the Commission are appointed by the Governor-General. It is responsible, inter alia, for all activities covering uranium research, mining and trading as well as for atomic energy development and nuclear plant construction and operation. Its duties also include training of scientific research workers and collection and dissemination of information on atomic energy. For purposes of security, the Act further-more prescribes sanctions in relation to unauthorised acquisition or communication of information on this subject. Finally, the Act repeals the Atomic Energy (Control of Materials) Act 1946 and 1952. (NEA) [fr

  6. Atoms as many-body systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M Ya

    2011-01-01

    Contrary to common wisdom, not everything is clear and simple in the structure of many-electron atoms. Complexity in atoms is mainly a result of interelectron interaction that leads to rather unusual behaviour. Most transparently this is manifested in photo-ionization processes of many-electron atoms and some multi-atomic objects e.g. endohedrals. Particular attention will be given to the approach describing the interaction of photons with many-electron atoms in the frame of the many-body theory based on the Feynman diagrams technique. As a suitable one-electron approximation the Hartree - Fock (HF) approach will be presented. On its ground we will include the so-called electron correlation effects and discuss the frequently used Random Phase Approximation with Exchange - RPAE. Some results of recent calculations will be presented.

  7. Atoms as many-body systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amusia, M Ya, E-mail: amusia@vms.huji.ac.il [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel); Ioffe Physical-technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-16

    Contrary to common wisdom, not everything is clear and simple in the structure of many-electron atoms. Complexity in atoms is mainly a result of interelectron interaction that leads to rather unusual behaviour. Most transparently this is manifested in photo-ionization processes of many-electron atoms and some multi-atomic objects e.g. endohedrals. Particular attention will be given to the approach describing the interaction of photons with many-electron atoms in the frame of the many-body theory based on the Feynman diagrams technique. As a suitable one-electron approximation the Hartree - Fock (HF) approach will be presented. On its ground we will include the so-called electron correlation effects and discuss the frequently used Random Phase Approximation with Exchange - RPAE. Some results of recent calculations will be presented.

  8. 'Atomic Bremsstrahlung': Retrospectives, current status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    2006-01-01

    We describe here the 'Atomic bremsstrahlung' (AB)-emission of continuous spectrum electromagnetic radiation, which is generated in collisions of particles that have internal deformable structure that includes positively and negatively charged constituents. The deformation of one or both colliding partners induces multiple, mainly dipole, time-dependent electrical moments that become a source of radiation. The history of AB invention is presented and its unusual in comparison to ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) properties, are discussed. As examples, fast electron atom, non-relativistic and relativistic collisions are considered. Attention is given to ion-atom and atom-atom collisions. Specifics of 'elastic' and 'inelastic' (i.e. radiation accompanied by destruction of collision partners) AB will be mentioned. Attention will be given to possible manifestation of AB in nature and in some exotic systems, for instance scattering of electrons upon muonic hydrogen. Some cooperative effects connected to AB will be considered. New classical schemes similar to AB will be presented

  9. Electron scattering by hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, D.H.

    1981-02-01

    A variational method to calculate the differential cross section of the electron-hydrogen atom scattering process is presented. The second Born approximation is calculated, through a variational calculation using the energy and electronic charge simultaneously as parameters, in order to calculate the differential cross section which is written in a fractional form according to the Schwinger variational principle. Effects due to the electron change are included in the calculations. (L.C.) [pt

  10. Dressed-state perturbation theory for multiphoton ionization of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, L.; Sundaram, B.; Armstrong, L. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    We introduce a perturbation theory using dressed bound states to include higher-order transition processes in the calculation of atomic multiphoton ionization. We calculate the ionization probability of hydrogen atoms using this theory and compare the results with the lowest-order perturbation result. We also calculate the shift of the hydrogen atom's ground state that is due to the external field

  11. Two atoms scattering at low and cold energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A modified static-exchange model is developed to study the collision of an atom with another atom. It includes the effect of long-range dipole–dipole van der Waals interaction between two atoms in addition to the exact effect of short-range force due to Coulomb exchange between two system electrons. Both these ...

  12. Atomic force microscopy. A new method for atom identification and manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Masayuki; Sugimoto, Yoshiaki; Morita, Seizo

    2007-01-01

    Frequency modulation atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM) is a scanning probe technique that detects the interaction forces between the outermost atom of a sharp tip and the atoms at a surface to image the sample surface. It is expected that the FM-AFM can cover the research field which scanning tunneling microscopy does not provide. In this article, we would introduce FM-AFM experiments applied to site-specific force measurements and atom manipulation, including how to solve the problems to achieve precise FM-AFM measurements. (author)

  13. Controlling stray electric fields on an atom chip for experiments on Rydberg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davtyan, D.; Machluf, S.; Soudijn, M. L.; Naber, J. B.; van Druten, N. J.; van Linden van den Heuvell, H. B.; Spreeuw, R. J. C.

    2018-02-01

    Experiments handling Rydberg atoms near surfaces must necessarily deal with the high sensitivity of Rydberg atoms to (stray) electric fields that typically emanate from adsorbates on the surface. We demonstrate a method to modify and reduce the stray electric field by changing the adsorbate distribution. We use one of the Rydberg excitation lasers to locally affect the adsorbed dipole distribution. By adjusting the averaged exposure time we change the strength (with the minimal value less than 0.2 V /cm at 78 μ m from the chip) and even the sign of the perpendicular field component. This technique is a useful tool for experiments handling Rydberg atoms near surfaces, including atom chips.

  14. Evaluating excited state atomic polarizabilities of chromophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Esther; Hunt, Patricia A; Schröder, Christian

    2018-03-28

    Ground and excited state dipoles and polarizabilities of the chromophores N-methyl-6-oxyquinolinium betaine (MQ) and coumarin 153 (C153) in solution have been evaluated using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). A method for determining the atomic polarizabilities has been developed; the molecular dipole has been decomposed into atomic charge transfer and polarizability terms, and variation in the presence of an electric field has been used to evaluate atomic polarizabilities. On excitation, MQ undergoes very site-specific changes in polarizability while C153 shows significantly less variation. We also conclude that MQ cannot be adequately described by standard atomic polarizabilities based on atomic number and hybridization state. Changes in the molecular polarizability of MQ (on excitation) are not representative of the local site-specific changes in atomic polarizability, thus the overall molecular polarizability ratio does not provide a good approximation for local atom-specific polarizability changes on excitation. Accurate excited state force fields are needed for computer simulation of solvation dynamics. The chromophores considered in this study are often used as molecular probes. The methods and data reported here can be used for the construction of polarizable ground and excited state force fields. Atomic and molecular polarizabilities (ground and excited states) have been evaluated over a range of functionals and basis sets. Different mechanisms for including solvation effects have been examined; using a polarizable continuum model, explicit solvation and via sampling of clusters extracted from a MD simulation. A range of different solvents have also been considered.

  15. Line splitting and modified atomic decay of atoms coupled with N quantized cavity modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yifu

    1992-05-01

    We study the interaction of a two-level atom with N non-degenerate quantized cavity modes including dissipations from atomic decay and cavity damps. In the strong coupling regime, the absorption or emission spectrum of weakly excited atom-cavity system possesses N + 1 spectral peaks whose linewidths are the weighted averages of atomic and cavity linewidths. The coupled system shows subnatural (supernatural) atomic decay behavior if the photon loss rates from the N cavity modes are smaller (larger) than the atomic decay rate. If N cavity modes are degenerate, they can be treated effectively as a single mode. In addition, we present numerical calculations for N = 2 to characterize the system evolution from the weak coupling to strong coupling limits.

  16. Quantum correlations between each two-level system in a pair of atoms and general coherent fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Abdel-Khalek

    Full Text Available The quantitative description of the quantum correlations between each two-level system in a two-atom system and the coherent fields initially defined in a coherent state in the framework of power-law potentials (PLPCSs is considered. Specifically, we consider two atoms locally interacting with PLPCSs and take into account the different terms of interactions, the entanglement and quantum discord are studied including the time-dependent coupling and photon transition effects. Using the monogamic relation between the entanglement of formation and quantum discord in tripartite systems, we show that the control and preservation of the different kinds of quantum correlations greatly benefit from the combination of the choice of the physical quantities. Finally, we explore the link between the dynamical behavior of quantum correlations and nonclassicality of the fields with and without atomic motion effect. Keywords: Quantum correlations, Monogamic relation, Coherent states, Power-law potentials, Wehrl entropy

  17. Division of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroell, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Division of Atomic Physics, Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), is responsible for the basic physics teaching in all subjects at LTH and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and Laser Physics. The Division has research activities in basic and applied optical spectroscopy, to a large extent based on lasers. It is also part of the Physics Department, Lund University, where it forms one of eight divisions. Since the beginning of 1980 the research activities of our division have been centred around the use of lasers. The activities during the period 1991-1992 is described in this progress reports

  18. Atomic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz-Medel, A.

    1997-01-01

    The elemental inorganic analysis seems to be dominated today by techniques based on atomic spectrometry. After an evaluation of advantages and limitations of using mass analysers (ion detectors) versus conventional photomultipliers (photon detector) a brief review of the more popular techniques of the emerging Atomic Mass spectrometry is carried out. Their huge potential for inorganic trace analysis is such that in the future we could well witness how this end of the century and millennium marked the fall of the photons empire in Analytical Atomic Spectrometry. (Author)

  19. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  20. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  1. Section of Atomic Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenyi, D.; Biri, S.; Gulyas, L.; Juhasz, Z.; Kover, A.; Orban, A.; Palinkas, J.; Papp, T.; Racz, R.; Ricz, S.

    2009-01-01

    The Section of Atomic Collisions is a research unit with extended activity in the field of atomic and molecular physics. Starting from the study of atomic processes at the beamlines of nuclear physics accelerators in the seventies, our research community became one of the centers of fundamental research in Atomki. We also have a strong connection to materials sciences especially along the line of electron and ion spectroscopy methods. Our present activity covers a wide range of topics from atomic collision mechanisms of fundamental interest, to the complex interactions of electrons, ions, photons and antiparticles with atoms, molecules, surfaces, and specific nanostructures. In the last few years, an increasing fraction of our present topics has become relevant for applications, e.g., molecular collision studies for the radiation therapy methods of tumors, or ion-nanostructure interactions for the future construction of small ion-focusing elements. Our section belongs to the Division of Atomic Physics. The other unit of the Division is the Section of Electron Spectroscopy and Materials Sciences. There are traditionally good connections and a strong collaboration between the groups of the two sections in many fields. From the very beginning of our research work in atomic collisions, external collaborations were of vital importance for us. We regularly organize international workshops in the field of fast ion-atom collisions and related small conferences in Debrecen from 1981. Recently, we organized the Conference on Radiation Damage in Biomolecular Systems (RADAM 2008, Debrecen), and coorganized the Conference on Elementary Processes in Atomic Systems (CEPAS 2008, Cluj). We have access to several large scale facilities in Europe within the framework of formal and informal collaborations. The next themes are in this article: Forward electron emission from energetic atomic collisions; Positron-atom collisions; Photon-atom interactions; Interference effects in electron

  2. Ionic liquids, electrolyte solutions including the ionic liquids, and energy storage devices including the ionic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, Kevin L.; Harrup, Mason K.; Rollins, Harry W.

    2015-12-08

    An ionic liquid including a phosphazene compound that has a plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units and at least one pendant group bonded to each phosphorus atom of the plurality of phosphorus-nitrogen units. One pendant group of the at least one pendant group comprises a positively charged pendant group. Additional embodiments of ionic liquids are disclosed, as are electrolyte solutions and energy storage devices including the embodiments of the ionic liquid.

  3. Atomic Energy Authority Bill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, J.H.N.; Stoddart, D.L.; Sinclair, R.M.; Ezra, D.

    1985-01-01

    The House, in Committee, discussed the following matters in relation to the Atomic Energy Authority Bill; financing; trading; personnel conditions of employment; public relations; organization; research programmes; fuels; energy sources; information dissemination. (U.K.)

  4. Atomic Interferometry, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) is a new technology which can be used for developing high performance laser components for atom-based sensors...

  5. Atomic bomb cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraeda, Kanji

    1992-01-01

    Eye disturbance caused by atomic bomb radiation can be divided into three groups: direct injury immediately after exposure, eye lesions associated with radiation syndrome, and delayed disturbance. The crystalline lens of the eye is the most radiosensitive. Atomic bomb cataract has been investigated in a number of studies. The first section of this chapter discusses radiation cataract in terms of the incidence and characteristics. The second section deals with atomic bomb cataract, which can be diagnosed based on the four criteria: (1) opacity of the crystalline lens, (2) a history of proximal exposure, (3) lack of eye disease complicating cataract, and (4) non-exposure to radiation other than atomic bombing. The prevalence of cataract and severity of opacity are found to correlate with exposure doses and age at the time of exposure. Furthermore, it is found to correlate with distance from the hypocenter, the condition of shielding, epilation, and the presence or absence or degree of radiation syndrome. (N.K.)

  6. Atoms at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    This illustrated booklet discusses the following: atoms; fission of uranium; nuclear power plants; reactor types; plutonium (formation, properties, uses); radioactive waste (fuel cycle, reprocessing, waste management); nuclear fusion; fusion reactors; radiation; radioisotopes and their uses. (U.K.)

  7. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  8. Atomic and Molecular Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on Atomic and Molecular Interactions was held at Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI. Emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field

  9. The Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doern, G.B.

    1976-01-01

    This study describes and assesses the regulatory and administrative processes and procedures of the Atomic Energy Control Board, the AECB. The Atomic Energy Control Act authorized the AECB to control atomic energy materials and equipment in the national interest and to participate in measures for the international control of atomic energy. The AECB is authorized to make regulations to control atomic energy materials and equipment and to make grants in support of atomic energy research. (author)

  10. Electromagnetic neutron-atom interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sears, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    In the collision of a neutron with an atom there exists, in addition to the strong interaction with the nucleus and the magnetic dipole interaction with the magnetic electrons, a number of secondary electromagnetic interactions. The latter interactions include the spin-orbit (or Schwinger) interaction, the Foldy interaction, the nuclear magnetic dipole interaction, and interactions arising from the electric polarizability and the finite intrinsic charge radius of the neutron. We present in this paper a comprehensive review of the electromagnetic neutron-atom interactions with particular emphasis on the question of the extent to which the secondary interactions are already included implicitly in the scattering lengths obtained from accurate neutron optical measurements, which one finds listed in data tables, and the conditions under which explicit corrections for the residual secondary interactions are required in the analysis of neutron diffraction and inelastic scattering data for condensed matter. The main conclusion is that, except for the lightest atoms, the current habit of neglecting the secondary interactions can lead to significant systematic errors of up to 2 to 3% in neutron scattering experiments which extend over a wide range of momentum transfers. (orig.)

  11. Atoms, molecules & elements

    CERN Document Server

    Graybill, George

    2007-01-01

    Young scientists will be thrilled to explore the invisible world of atoms, molecules and elements. Our resource provides ready-to-use information and activities for remedial students using simplified language and vocabulary. Students will label each part of the atom, learn what compounds are, and explore the patterns in the periodic table of elements to find calcium (Ca), chlorine (Cl), and helium (He) through hands-on activities.

  12. Harnessing the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Splitting the atom has had a major impact on the history of the latter part of the 20th century. This film depicts the many benefits - and also drawbacks - of nuclear technology, and describes how the International Atomic Energy Agency performs its various tasks. It touches on challenges such as the choice between major energy sources, growing concerns about the global climate, and prospects for nuclear arms control and disarmament

  13. Optical atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  14. Atom probe crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P.; Cairney, Julie M.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of “atom probe crystallography”, a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic structure at the atomic scale. This information is crucial for the manipulation of microstructure for the design of both structural and functional materials with optimized mechanical, electric, optoelectronic, magnetic, or superconducting properties that will find application in, for example, nan...

  15. Atomic Energy Act 1946

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1946-01-01

    This Act provides for the development of atomic energy in the United Kingdom and for its control. It details the duties and powers of the competent Minister, in particular his powers to obtain information on and to inspect materials, plant and processes, to control production and use of atomic energy and publication of information thereon. Also specified is the power to search for and work minerals and to acquire property. (NEA) [fr

  16. Hirshfeld atom refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Silvia C; Bürgi, Hans-Beat; Dittrich, Birger; Grabowsky, Simon; Jayatilaka, Dylan

    2014-09-01

    Hirshfeld atom refinement (HAR) is a method which determines structural parameters from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data by using an aspherical atom partitioning of tailor-made ab initio quantum mechanical molecular electron densities without any further approximation. Here the original HAR method is extended by implementing an iterative procedure of successive cycles of electron density calculations, Hirshfeld atom scattering factor calculations and structural least-squares refinements, repeated until convergence. The importance of this iterative procedure is illustrated via the example of crystalline ammonia. The new HAR method is then applied to X-ray diffraction data of the dipeptide Gly-l-Ala measured at 12, 50, 100, 150, 220 and 295 K, using Hartree-Fock and BLYP density functional theory electron densities and three different basis sets. All positions and anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are freely refined without constraints or restraints - even those for hydrogen atoms. The results are systematically compared with those from neutron diffraction experiments at the temperatures 12, 50, 150 and 295 K. Although non-hydrogen-atom ADPs differ by up to three combined standard uncertainties (csu's), all other structural parameters agree within less than 2 csu's. Using our best calculations (BLYP/cc-pVTZ, recommended for organic molecules), the accuracy of determining bond lengths involving hydrogen atoms from HAR is better than 0.009 Å for temperatures of 150 K or below; for hydrogen-atom ADPs it is better than 0.006 Å(2) as judged from the mean absolute X-ray minus neutron differences. These results are among the best ever obtained. Remarkably, the precision of determining bond lengths and ADPs for the hydrogen atoms from the HAR procedure is comparable with that from the neutron measurements - an outcome which is obtained with a routinely achievable resolution of the X-ray data of 0.65 Å.

  17. Relativistic collisions of structured atomic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voitkiv, A.; Ullrich, J.

    2008-01-01

    The book reviews the progress achieved over the last decade in the study of collisions between an ion and an atom in which both the atomic particles carry electrons and can undergo transitions between their internal states - including continua. It presents the detailed considerations of different theoretical approaches, that can be used to describe collisions of structured atomic particles for the very broad interval of impact energies ranging from 0.5-1 MeV/u till extreme relativistic energies where the collision velocity very closely approaches the speed of light. (orig.)

  18. 1980 bibliography of atomic and molecular processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    This annotated bibliography lists 2866 works on atomic and molecular processes reported in publications dated 1980. Sources include scientific journals, conference proceedings, and books. Each entry is designated by one or more of the 114 categories of atomic and molecular processes used by the Controlled Fusion Atomic Data Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, to classify data. Also indicated is whether the work was experimental or theoretical, what energy range was covered, what reactants were investigated, and the country of origin of the first author. Following the bibliographical listing are indexes of reactants and authors

  19. Programmable solid state atom sources for nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Han; Imboden, Matthias; Stark, Thomas; Del Corro, Pablo G.; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian A.; Lally, Richard W.; Bishop, David J.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques.In this paper we discuss the development of a MEMS-based solid state atom source that can provide controllable atom deposition ranging over eight orders of magnitude, from ten atoms per square micron up to hundreds of atomic layers, on a target ~1 mm away. Using a micron-scale silicon plate as a thermal evaporation source we demonstrate the deposition of indium, silver, gold, copper, iron, aluminum, lead and tin. Because of their small sizes and rapid thermal response times, pulse width modulation techniques are a powerful way to control the atomic flux. Pulsing the source with precise voltages and timing provides control in terms of when and how many atoms get deposited. By arranging many of these devices into an array, one has a multi-material, programmable solid state evaporation source. These micro atom sources are a complementary technology that can enhance the capability of a variety of nano-fabrication techniques. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A document containing further information about device characterization

  20. The self-splitting atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenn, T.J.

    1977-01-01

    The book describes the collaboration between Ernest Rutherford and Frederick Soddy at McGill University on the study of radioactivity. Their hypothesis of spontaneous atomic disintegration, which represented the first case of an atomic process completely specified in its time relationships by a probability constant, was extremely fruitful. This concept became the paradigm of a host of other quantized processes in high-energy or elementary particle physics involving a single system in isolation. This achievement did not emerge in a single moment of inspiration but passed dialectically through several, not always coherent, stages of experiment and theory. Hitherto unpublished material has been incorporated in the account, including evidence from the original laboratory notebooks. (U.K.)

  1. Atom trap loss, elastic collisions, and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, James

    2012-10-01

    The study of collisions and scattering has been one of the most productive approaches for modern physics, illuminating the fundamental structure of crystals, surfaces, atoms, and sub-atomic particles. In the field of cold atoms, this is no less true: studies of cold atom collisions were essential to the production of quantum degenerate matter, the formation of cold molecules, and so on. Over the past few years it has been my delight to investigate elastic collisions between cold atoms trapped in either a magneto-optical trap (MOT) or a magnetic trap with hot, background gas in the vacuum environment through the measurement of the loss of atoms from the trap. Motivated by the goal of creating cold atom-based technology, we are deciphering what the trapped atoms are communicating about their environment through the observed loss rate. These measurements have the advantages of being straightforward to implement and they provide information about the underlying, fundamental inter-atomic processes. In this talk I will present some of our recent work, including the observation of the trap depth dependence on loss rate for argon-rubidium collisions. The data follow the computed loss rate curve based on the long-range Van der Waals interaction between the two species. The implications of these findings are exciting: trap depths can be determined from the trap loss measurement under controlled background density conditions; observation of trap loss rate in comparison to models for elastic, inelastic, and chemical processes can lead to improved understanding and characterization of these fundamental interactions; finally the marriage of cold atoms with collision modeling offers the promise of creating a novel pressure sensor and pressure standard for the high and ultra-high vacuum regime.

  2. Stimulated transitions in resonant atom Majorana mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabéu, José; Segarra, Alejandro

    2018-02-01

    Massive neutrinos demand to ask whether they are Dirac or Majorana particles. Majorana neutrinos are an irrefutable proof of physics beyond the Standard Model. Neutrinoless double electron capture is not a process but a virtual Δ L = 2 mixing between a parent A Z atom and a daughter A ( Z - 2) excited atom with two electron holes. As a mixing between two neutral atoms and the observable signal in terms of emitted two-hole X-rays, the strategy, experimental signature and background are different from neutrinoless double beta decay. The mixing is resonantly enhanced for almost degeneracy and, under these conditions, there is no irreducible background from the standard two-neutrino channel. We reconstruct the natural time history of a nominally stable parent atom since its production either by nature or in the laboratory. After the time periods of atom oscillations and the decay of the short-lived daughter atom, at observable times the relevant "stationary" states are the mixed metastable long-lived state and the non-orthogonal short-lived excited state, as well as the ground state of the daughter atom. We find that they have a natural population inversion which is most appropriate for exploiting the bosonic nature of the observed atomic transitions radiation. Among different observables of the atom Majorana mixing, we include the enhanced rate of stimulated X-ray emission from the long-lived metastable state by a high-intensity X-ray beam: a gain factor of 100 can be envisaged at current XFEL facilities. On the other hand, the historical population of the daughter atom ground state can be probed by exciting it with a current pulsed optical laser, showing the characteristic absorption lines: the whole population can be excited in a shorter time than typical pulse duration.

  3. On the bosonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amusia, M. Ya.; Chernysheva, L. V.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate ground state properties of atoms, in which substitute fermions - electrons by bosons, namely π --mesons. We perform some calculations in the frame of modified Hartree-Fock (HF) equation. The modification takes into account symmetry, instead of anti-symmetry of the pair identical bosons wave function. The modified HF approach thus enhances (doubles) the effect of self-action for the boson case. Therefore, we accordingly modify the HF equations by eliminating the self-action terms "by hand". The contribution of meson-meson and meson-nucleon non-Coulomb interaction is inessential at least for atoms with low and intermediate nuclear charge, which is our main subject. We found that the binding energy of pion negative ions A π - , pion atoms A π , and the number of extra bound pions ΔN π increases with the growth of nuclear charge Z. For e.g. Xe ΔN π = 4. As an example of a simple process with a pion atom, we consider photoionization that differs essentially from that for electron atoms. Namely, it is not monotonic decreasing from the threshold but has instead a prominent maximum above threshold. We study also elastic scattering of pions by pion atoms.

  4. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T.

    1991-01-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5∼0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author)

  5. FAO and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    During the past six years FAO has become more engaged in work concerned with atomic energy. In 1957 it established an Atomic Energy Branch. The new forces and new tools which have become available for use in the fight against poverty, disease and malnutrition can be of the greatest assistance in FAO's work in nearly all phases of the production, storage and distribution of food and other agricultural products. The Organization promotes their use to improve the standards of feeding, clothing and housing throughout the world. Another side of work related to atomic energy is concerned with combating contamination from the use of atomic energy for power production and other purposes. This raises considerable problems for food and agriculture, so that FAO also has a responsibility for assisting Governments in safeguarding their food and food-producing resources from contamination. FAO is essentially concerned with fostering wider knowledge of the many contributions that atomic science can make to agriculture, forestry, fisheries and nutrition. It is also concerned in assisting governments to establish sound programmes for applying atomic science in food and agriculture. One way of spreading such knowledge is through the publication of documents and reports

  6. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, M.; Tomonaga, M.; Amenomori, T.; Matsuo, T. (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-12-01

    Characteristic features of the leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. Dose estimates of atomic bomb radiation were based on T65D, but the new dosimetry system DS86 was used for some analyses. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic to atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. The threshold of CML occurrence in Hiroshima is likely to be between 0.5{approx}0.09 Gy. However, the threshold of acute leukemia appears to be nearly 1 Gy. In the distribution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subtypes by French-American-British classification, there was no M3 case in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Although aplastic anemia has not increased as a late effect of the atomic bomb radiation exposure, many atypical leukemia or other myeloproliferative diseases who had been diagnosed as aplastic anemia or its related diseases have been experienced among atomic bomb survivors. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral T-cells in several atomic bomb survivors. (author).

  7. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    This Act provides for the transfer of property, rights, liabilities and obligations of parts of the undertaking of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Autority, to two new Compagnies set up for this purpose: the Bristish Nuclear Fuels Limited, and the Radiochemical Centre Limited. Patents licences and registered designs owned by the Autority at the time of the transfer are not included therein. The Act also includes amendments to the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, notably as regards permits to operate granted to a body corporate. Finally, the Schedule to this Act lays down a certain number of provisions relating to security and the preservation of secrets. (NEA) [fr

  8. Molecule-specific determination of atomic polarizabilities with the polarizable atomic multipole model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo Kim, Hyun; Rhee, Young Min

    2012-07-30

    Recently, many polarizable force fields have been devised to describe induction effects between molecules. In popular polarizable models based on induced dipole moments, atomic polarizabilities are the essential parameters and should be derived carefully. Here, we present a parameterization scheme for atomic polarizabilities using a minimization target function containing both molecular and atomic information. The main idea is to adopt reference data only from quantum chemical calculations, to perform atomic polarizability parameterizations even when relevant experimental data are scarce as in the case of electronically excited molecules. Specifically, our scheme assigns the atomic polarizabilities of any given molecule in such a way that its molecular polarizability tensor is well reproduced. We show that our scheme successfully works for various molecules in mimicking dipole responses not only in ground states but also in valence excited states. The electrostatic potential around a molecule with an externally perturbing nearby charge also exhibits a near-quantitative agreement with the reference data from quantum chemical calculations. The limitation of the model with isotropic atoms is also discussed to examine the scope of its applicability. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Index to the Understanding the Atom Series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    The U. S. Atomic Energy Commission publishes the Understanding the Atom Series of educational booklets for high school science students and their teachers. This series explains many aspects of nuclear science including its history and applications. Because these 51 booklets cover such a variety of scientific fields, this index was prepared to help the reader find quickly those booklets that contain the information he needs.

  10. Crystalline thin films: The electrochemical atomic layer deposition (ECALD) view

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical atomic layer deposition technique is selected as one of the methods to prepare thin films for various applications, including electrocatalytic materials and compound....

  11. Recognizing nitrogen dopant atoms in graphene using atomic force microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heijden, Nadine J.; Smith, Daniel; Calogero, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    as a benchmark, we show that the position of the dopant atoms can be determined using atomic force microscopy. Specifically, the frequency shift-distance curves Delta f(z) acquired above a N atom are significantly different from the curves measured over a C atom. Similar behavior was found for N-doped graphene...

  12. Atomic Covalent Functionalization of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, James E.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    Conspectus Although graphene’s physical structure is a single atom thick, two-dimensional, hexagonal crystal of sp2 bonded carbon, this simple description belies the myriad interesting and complex physical properties attributed to this fascinating material. Because of its unusual electronic structure and superlative properties, graphene serves as a leading candidate for many next generation technologies including high frequency electronics, broadband photodetectors, biological and gas sensors, and transparent conductive coatings. Despite this promise, researchers could apply graphene more routinely in real-world technologies if they could chemically adjust graphene’s electronic properties. For example, the covalent modification of graphene to create a band gap comparable to silicon (~1 eV) would enable its use in digital electronics, and larger band gaps would provide new opportunities for graphene-based photonics. Towards this end, researchers have focused considerable effort on the chemical functionalization of graphene. Due to its high thermodynamic stability and chemical inertness, new methods and techniques are required to create covalent bonds without promoting undesirable side reactions or irreversible damage to the underlying carbon lattice. In this Account, we review and discuss recent theoretical and experimental work studying covalent modifications to graphene using gas phase atomic radicals. Atomic radicals have sufficient energy to overcome the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers associated with covalent reactions on the basal plane of graphene but lack the energy required to break the C-C sigma bonds that would destroy the carbon lattice. Furthermore, because they are atomic species, radicals substantially reduce the likelihood of unwanted side reactions that confound other covalent chemistries. Overall, these methods based on atomic radicals show promise for the homogeneous functionalization of graphene and the production of new classes of two

  13. Quantitative investment analysis

    CERN Document Server

    DeFusco, Richard

    2007-01-01

    In the "Second Edition" of "Quantitative Investment Analysis," financial experts Richard DeFusco, Dennis McLeavey, Jerald Pinto, and David Runkle outline the tools and techniques needed to understand and apply quantitative methods to today's investment process.

  14. Simple atoms: QED tests and fundamental constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karshenboim, S.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Study of simple atoms can be performed theoretically and experimentally with a high accuracy and a comparison of theory and experiment provide us with several high precision tests of bound state QED. Theory cannot actually leads to a figure to compare with experiment, but it only can present some measurable quantities in terms of fundamental and auxiliary constants. That offers an opportunity to obtain new accurate values of some fundamental constants. Theory of simple atoms is based on Quantum electrodynamics but also involves an essential part of nuclear and particle physics. A significant part of experiments are related to high-resolution laser spectroscopy. Present status of the precision physics of simple atoms is presented in detail. We overview a comparison of the theory of such atoms, bound state QED, and the experiment. In particular, we consider the hyperfine structure in light atoms and the g-factor of a bound electron in hydrogen-like ions at low and medium Z. We discuss a project on optical measurement of of 2s hyperfine interval in atomic hydrogen. We also pay attention to determination of the fundamental constants from study of simple atoms. The constants under consideration includes alpha, electron-to-proton mass ratio and electron-to-muon mass ratio

  15. Hard and soft acids and bases: atoms and atomic ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, James L

    2008-07-07

    The structural origin of hard-soft behavior in atomic acids and bases has been explored using a simple orbital model. The Pearson principle of hard and soft acids and bases has been taken to be the defining statement about hard-soft behavior and as a definition of chemical hardness. There are a number of conditions that are imposed on any candidate structure and associated property by the Pearson principle, which have been exploited. The Pearson principle itself has been used to generate a thermodynamically based scale of relative hardness and softness for acids and bases (operational chemical hardness), and a modified Slater model has been used to discern the electronic origin of hard-soft behavior. Whereas chemical hardness is a chemical property of an acid or base and the operational chemical hardness is an experimental measure of it, the absolute hardness is a physical property of an atom or molecule. A critical examination of chemical hardness, which has been based on a more rigorous application of the Pearson principle and the availability of quantitative measures of chemical hardness, suggests that the origin of hard-soft behavior for both acids and bases resides in the relaxation of the electrons not undergoing transfer during the acid-base interaction. Furthermore, the results suggest that the absolute hardness should not be taken as synonymous with chemical hardness but that the relationship is somewhat more complex. Finally, this work provides additional groundwork for a better understanding of chemical hardness that will inform the understanding of hardness in molecules.

  16. Rigour in quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claydon, Leica Sarah

    2015-07-22

    This article which forms part of the research series addresses scientific rigour in quantitative research. It explores the basis and use of quantitative research and the nature of scientific rigour. It examines how the reader may determine whether quantitative research results are accurate, the questions that should be asked to determine accuracy and the checklists that may be used in this process. Quantitative research has advantages in nursing, since it can provide numerical data to help answer questions encountered in everyday practice.

  17. Atom probe tomography analysis of WC powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidow, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.weidow@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, A-1060 Wien (Austria)

    2013-09-15

    A tantalum doped tungsten carbide powder, (W,Ta)C, was prepared with the purpose to maximise the amount of Ta in the hexagonal mixed crystal carbide. Atom probe tomography (APT) was considered to be the best technique to quantitatively measure the amount of Ta within this carbide. As the carbide powder consisted in the form of very small particles (<1 μm), a method to produce APT specimens of such a powder was developed. The powder was at first embedded in copper and a FIB-SEM workstation was used to make an in-situ lift-out from a selected powder particle. The powder particle was then deposited on a post made from a WC-Co based cemented carbide specimen. With the use of a laser assisted atom probe, it was shown that the method is working and the Ta content of the (W,Ta)C could be measured quantitatively. - Highlights: ► Method for producing atom probe tomography specimens of powders was developed. ► Method was successfully implemented on (W,Ta)C powder. ► Method can possibly be implemented on completely other powders.

  18. Quantitative Algebraic Reasoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mardare, Radu Iulian; Panangaden, Prakash; Plotkin, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    We develop a quantitative analogue of equational reasoning which we call quantitative algebra. We define an equality relation indexed by rationals: a =ε b which we think of as saying that “a is approximately equal to b up to an error of ε”. We have 4 interesting examples where we have a quantitative...

  19. Hot hydrogen atom reactions moderated by H2 and He

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, S.; Scattergood, T.; Flores, J.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    Photolysis experiments were performed on the H2-CD4-NH3 and He-CD4-NH3 systems. The photolysis (1849 A) involved only NH3. Mixtures of H2:CD4:NH3 included all combinations of the ratios (200,400,800):(10,20,40):4. Two He:CD4:NH3 mixtures were examined where the ratios equalled the combinations 100:(10,20):4. Abstraction of a D from CD4 by the photolytically produced hot hydrogen from ammonia was monitored by mass spectrometric determination of HD. Both experiment and semiempirical hot-atom theory show that H2 is a very poor thermalizer of hot hydrogens with excess kinetic energy of about 2 eV. Applications of the hard-sphere collision model to the H2-CD4-NH3 system resulted in predicted ratios of net HD production to NH3 decomposition that were two orders of magnitude smaller than the experimental ratios. On the other hand, helium is found to be a very efficient thermalizer; here, the classical model yields reasonable agreement with experiments. Application of a semiempirical hot-atom program gave quantitative agreement with experiment for either system.

  20. Compilation of data from hadronic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poth, H.

    1979-01-01

    This compilation is a survey of the existing data of hadronic atoms (pionic-atoms, kaonic-atoms, antiprotonic-atoms, sigmonic-atoms). It collects measurements of the energies, intensities and line width of X-rays from hadronic atoms. Averaged values for each hadronic atom are given and the data are summarized. The listing contains data on 58 pionic-atoms, on 54 kaonic-atoms, on 23 antiprotonic-atoms and on 20 sigmonic-atoms. (orig./HB) [de

  1. Accelerators for atomic energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Tokushi

    1999-01-01

    The research and educational activities accomplished using accelerators for atomic energy research were studied. The studied items are research subjects, facility operation, the number of master theses and doctor theses on atomic energy research using accelerators and the future role of accelerators in atomic energy research. The strategy for promotion of the accelerator facility for atomic energy research is discussed. (author)

  2. Atomic nucleus and elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrzewski, J.

    1976-01-01

    Negatively charged leptons and hadrons can be incorporated into atomic shells forming exotic atoms. Nucleon resonances and Λ hyperons can be considered as constituents of atomic nuclei. Information derived from studies of such exotic systems enriches our knowledge of both the interactions of elementary particles and of the structure of atomic nuclei. (author)

  3. Spectroscopic studies of light target atoms by heavy ion impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.; Beyer, H.F.; Folkmann, F.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for the investigation of inner-shell excited atomic states are reviewed. The problem of overlapping of spectral lines can be eliminated using highly ionized atoms carrying only few electrons. The processes resulting in such atomic states including collisions of high energetic highly charged heavy ions with light or medium target atoms or molecules are reviewed. Experimental results on K-Auger electron and K-X-ray emission spectra of different highly stripped target atoms and molecules are described. (D.Gy.)

  4. Atomic Mass and Nuclear Binding Energy for Cf-252 (Californium)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhoruchkin, S. I.; Soroko, Z. N.

    This document is part of the Supplement containing the complete sets of data of Subvolume B `Nuclei with Z = 55 - 100' of Volume 22 `Nuclear Binding Energies and Atomic Masses' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group I `Elementary Particles, Nuclei and Atoms', and additionally including data for nuclei with Z = 101 - 130. It provides atomic mass, mass excess, nuclear binding energy, nucleon separation energies, Q-values, and nucleon residual interaction parameters for atomic nuclei of the isotope Cf-252 (Californium, atomic number Z = 98, mass number A = 252).

  5. Hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from ADF STEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wael, Annelies; De Backer, Annick; Jones, Lewys; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    A hybrid statistics-simulations based method for atom-counting from annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) images of monotype crystalline nanostructures is presented. Different atom-counting methods already exist for model-like systems. However, the increasing relevance of radiation damage in the study of nanostructures demands a method that allows atom-counting from low dose images with a low signal-to-noise ratio. Therefore, the hybrid method directly includes prior knowledge from image simulations into the existing statistics-based method for atom-counting, and accounts in this manner for possible discrepancies between actual and simulated experimental conditions. It is shown by means of simulations and experiments that this hybrid method outperforms the statistics-based method, especially for low electron doses and small nanoparticles. The analysis of a simulated low dose image of a small nanoparticle suggests that this method allows for far more reliable quantitative analysis of beam-sensitive materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rydberg atoms in strong fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleppner, D.; Tsimmerman, M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical achievements in studying Rydberg atoms in external fields are considered. Only static (or quasistatic) fields and ''one-electron'' atoms, i.e. atoms that are well described by one-electron states, are discussed. Mainly behaviour of alkali metal atoms in electric field is considered. The state of theoretical investigations for hydrogen atom in magnetic field is described, but experimental data for atoms of alkali metals are presented as an illustration. Results of the latest experimental and theoretical investigations into the structure of Rydberg atoms in strong fields are presented

  7. Thoughts on Documentation of Atomic Power Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Hee Won; Song, Ki Chan

    2012-01-01

    Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has accumulated a number of technology development and research outcomes, including its representative achievements such as atomic energy technology independence and the first export of atomic energy system, since it was established in 1959. With its long history of over 50 years, KAERI has produced a large amount of information and explicit knowledge such as experiment data, database, design data, report, instructions, and operation data at each stage of its research and development process as it has performed various researches since its establishment. Also, a lot of tacit knowledge has been produced both knowingly and not unknowingly based on the experience of researchers who have participated in many projects. However, in the research environment in Korea where they focus overly on the output, tacit knowledge has not been managed properly compared to explicit knowledge. This tacit knowledge is as an important asset as explicit knowledge for an effective research and development. Moreover, as the first generation of atomic energy independence and research manpower retire, their accumulated experience and knowledge are in danger of disappearing. Therefore, in this study, we sought how to take a whole view and to document atomic energy technology researched and developed by KAERI, from the background to achievement of each field of the technology. Comprehensive and systematic documentation of atomic energy technology will establish a comprehensive management system of national atomic energy technology record to make a foundation of technical advancement and development of atomic energy technology. Also, it is expected to be used as an important knowledge and information resource of atomic energy knowledge management system

  8. Thoughts on Documentation of Atomic Power Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Hee Won; Song, Ki Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has accumulated a number of technology development and research outcomes, including its representative achievements such as atomic energy technology independence and the first export of atomic energy system, since it was established in 1959. With its long history of over 50 years, KAERI has produced a large amount of information and explicit knowledge such as experiment data, database, design data, report, instructions, and operation data at each stage of its research and development process as it has performed various researches since its establishment. Also, a lot of tacit knowledge has been produced both knowingly and not unknowingly based on the experience of researchers who have participated in many projects. However, in the research environment in Korea where they focus overly on the output, tacit knowledge has not been managed properly compared to explicit knowledge. This tacit knowledge is as an important asset as explicit knowledge for an effective research and development. Moreover, as the first generation of atomic energy independence and research manpower retire, their accumulated experience and knowledge are in danger of disappearing. Therefore, in this study, we sought how to take a whole view and to document atomic energy technology researched and developed by KAERI, from the background to achievement of each field of the technology. Comprehensive and systematic documentation of atomic energy technology will establish a comprehensive management system of national atomic energy technology record to make a foundation of technical advancement and development of atomic energy technology. Also, it is expected to be used as an important knowledge and information resource of atomic energy knowledge management system

  9. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  10. US Atomic Energy Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This is a new volume follows in the series supplementing the volumes 11 and 12 published in 1965 and 1966, updating the collection of Federal Acts and Executive Orders of the President of the United States of America relating to atomic energy legislation. Since the publication of volumes 11 and 12, the US Atomic Energy Act of 1954 alone has been amended 25 times, mainly as a consequence of by the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act, both of 1978. The Atomic Energy Act of 1954 is supplemented by a selection of the most important Federal Acts, Executive Orders of the President and Resolutions of the Congress. (orig./HSCH) [de

  11. CP violation in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barr, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Electric dipole moments of large atoms are an excellent tool to search for CP violation beyond the Standard Model. These tell us about the electron EDM but also about CP-violating electron-nucleon dimension-6 operators that arise from Higgs-exchange. Rapid strides are being made in searches for atomic EDMs. Limits on the electron EDM approaching the values which would be expected from Higgs-exchange mediated CP violation have been achieved. It is pointed out that in this same kind of model if tan β is large the effects in atoms of the dimension-6 e - n operators may outweigh the effect of the electron EDM. (author) 21 refs

  12. Atoms in Slovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danis, D.; Feik, K.; Florek, M.; Kmosena, J.; Chrapan, J.; Morovic, M.; Slugen, V.; Seliga, M.; Valovic, J.

    2006-01-01

    In this book the history of development of using of nuclear energy in the Slovak Republic as well as in the Czechoslovakia (before 1993 year) is presented. The aim of the book is to preserve the memory of the period when the creation and development of nuclear physics, technology, nuclear medicine, radioecology and energetics in Slovakia occurred - as witnessed by people who experienced this period and to adapt it to future generations. The Editorial board of the SNUS collected the views of 60 contributors and distinguished workers - Slovakian experts in nuclear science, education and technology. Calling upon a wide spectrum of experts ensured an objective historical description of the period. A huge amount of subjective views on recent decades were collected and supported by a wealth of photographic documentation. This created a synthesised reflection on the history of the 'atoms' in Slovakia. The book contains 15 tables, 192 black and white and 119 colour pictures from around the world and from places involved in the compilation of the study and with the study of atomic science in Slovakia. The main chapters are as follows: Atoms in the world, Atoms in Slovakia, Atoms in the educational system, Atoms in health services (Radiology, Nuclear medicine, Radiation protection, the Cyclotron centre of the Slovak Republic), Radioecology, Other applications of irradiation, Nuclear energetics (Electric energy in the second half of the 20 th century, NPP Bohunice, NPP Mochovce, the back-end of Nuclear energetics, Big names in Nuclear energetics in Slovakia), Chronology and an Appendix entitled 'Slovak companies in nuclear energetics'

  13. Atomic and Molecular Photodetachment Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Christophe

    2004-05-01

    Detachment from a negative ion leads to the emission of a nearly unperturbed free electron wave. Detachment in the presence of an electric field thus gives a unique opportunity to study the propagation of a matter wave submitted to uniform acceleration from a pointlike source. As the expression of the corresponding Green function shows, spatially resolved detection of the detached electron should reveal the existence of interference fringes, which can be interpreted as the interference between the well-known pairs of parabolic trajectories of elementary ballistics. Whereas no real free-fall experiment has been able yet to materialize those fringes, photodetachment microscopy experiments carried out since 1996 have now produced electron interference patterns from five different atomic anions. The orders of magnitude of the fringe interval and the spatial resolution of electron detectors are such that these interference patterns can be observed only in relatively weak electric fields and at low energies above the detachment thresholds. The sensitivity of the pattern with respect to the ejection energy of the electron is an interferometric way for measuring the energy brought in excess by the detaching photon, and the electron affinity of the parent neutral itself. The free-electron approximation used to analyze photodetachment microscopy images can be questioned when one deals with a big atom or a molecular anion. The first molecular photodetachment microscopy experiments were carried out recently on OH^-. They still show an observable electron interference pattern, even though OH can be left in a high angular momentum state. On a quantitative basis, the electron interferograms still appear very robust with respect to either internal or external perturbations, which should make it possible to compress the error bars on electron affinities well below 1 μeV, even in the molecular case.

  14. Quantitative Risk Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helms, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-10

    The US energy sector is vulnerable to multiple hazards including both natural disasters and malicious attacks from an intelligent adversary. The question that utility owners, operators and regulators face is how to prioritize their investments to mitigate the risks from a hazard that can have the most impact on the asset of interest. In order to be able to understand their risk landscape and develop a prioritized mitigation strategy, they must quantify risk in a consistent way across all hazards their asset is facing. Without being able to quantitatively measure risk, it is not possible to defensibly prioritize security investments or evaluate trade-offs between security and functionality. Development of a methodology that will consistently measure and quantify risk across different hazards is needed.

  15. Quantitative analysis in megageomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, L.

    1985-01-01

    Megageomorphology is the study of regional topographic features and their relations to independent geomorphic variables that operate at the regional scale. These independent variables can be classified as either tectonic or climatic in nature. Quantitative megageomorphology stresses the causal relations between plate tectonic factors and landscape features or correlations between climatic factors and geomorphic processes. In addition, the cumulative effects of tectonics and climate on landscape evolution that simultaneously operate in a complex system of energy transfer is of interst. Regional topographic differentiation, say between continents and ocean floors, is largely the result of the different densities and density contrasts within the oceanic and continental lithosphere and their isostatic consequences. Regional tectonic processes that alter these lithospheric characteristics include rifting, collision, subduction, transpression and transtension.

  16. Atomic energy control board. History backgrounder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is a regulatory agency set up by the Government of Canada under the Atomic Energy Control Act of 1946 to assist the Government in its efforts to make provision for the control and supervision of the development, application and use of atomic energy and to enable Canada to participate effectively in measures of international control of atomic energy. It is also responsible for the administration of the Nuclear Liability Act, including the designation of nuclear installations and the prescription of basic insurance to be carried by the operators of such nuclear installations. An overview is presented of the AECB's evolution in chronological form, its major current activities, and some of the challenges expected in the next decade

  17. Coherence effects in atomic impact processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, K.

    1980-01-01

    The author considers excitation of target atoms by projectile particles and the coincident detection of the scattered projectiles and the photons emitted in the subsequent decay by the target atoms. The observation is restricted to radiation emitted by those atoms only which 'scattered' the projectiles with a given energy in a given direction defined by the particle detector. Thus, a certain subensemble of atoms is selected in the experiment. The author reviews the theoretical scheme used for the description of the excited subensemble with the emphasis on the coherence properties. The author reviews developments of the Fano-Macek theory concerning the description of coherently excited states with different angular momenta and parities. A comprehensive expression for the angular distribution of the emitted radiation, including all possible interference terms is given. (Auth.)

  18. Parity nonconserving optical rotation in atomic lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmons, T.P. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A measurement of parity nonconserving optical rotation has been performed on the 1.28 μm atomic lead magnetic dipole transition. Although the technique used in this measurement was similar to that used in earlier measurements done on the 0.876 μm line in atomic bismuth, important differences exist. These are discussed in detail. Since the accuracy of this measurement is limited by systematic errors, a complete analysis of the data is included with a lengthy discussion of systematic effects. The final value obtained for the optical rotation is given. This agrees with atomic calculations based on the Weinberg-Salam-Galshow model for weak interactions. A discussion of the limits on weak interaction theories placed by all the atomic parity nonconservation experiments appears in the conclusion

  19. Polarized atomic beams for targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grueebler, W.

    1984-01-01

    The basic principle of the production of polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium beams are reviewed. The status of the present available polarization, density and intensity are presented. The improvement of atomic beam density by cooling the hydrogen atoms to low velocity is discussed. The possible use of polarized atomic beams as targets in storage rings is shown. It is proposed that polarized atomic beams can be used to produce polarized gas targets with high polarization and greatly improved density

  20. Stationary Electron Atomic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, David E.

    1998-04-01

    I will present a novel theory concerning the position and nature of the electron inside the atom. This new concept is consistant with present experimental evidence and adheres strictly to the valence-shell electron-pair repulsion (VSEPR) model presently used in chemistry for predicting the shapes of molecules and ions. In addition, I will discuss the atomic model concept as being a true harmonic oscillator, periodic motion at resonant frequency which produces radiation at discrete frequencies or line spectra is possible because the electron is under the action of two restoring forces, electrostatic attraction and superconducting respulsion of the electron's magnetic field by the nucleus.

  1. Warm Vapor Atom Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; Wheeler, David; Jau, Yuan-Yu; McGuinness, Hayden

    2014-05-01

    We present a light pulse atom interferometer using room temperature rubidium vapor. Doppler sensitive stimulated Raman transitions forming the atom optical elements inherently select a cold velocity group for the interferometer. The interferometer is configured to be sensitive to accelerations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Atomic Force Microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, R.D.; Russell, P.E.

    1988-12-01

    The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) is a recently developed instrument that has achieved atomic resolution imaging of both conducting and non- conducting surfaces. Because the AFM is in the early stages of development, and because of the difficulty of building the instrument, it is currently in use in fewer than ten laboratories worldwide. It promises to be a valuable tool for obtaining information about engineering surfaces and aiding the .study of precision fabrication processes. This paper gives an overview of AFM technology and presents plans to build an instrument designed to look at engineering surfaces.

  3. Korean atomic bomb victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamoto, Yukuo

    2009-01-01

    After colonizing Korea, Japan invaded China, and subsequently initiated the Pacific War against the United States, Britain, and their allies. Towards the end of the war, U.S. warplanes dropped atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, which resulted in a large number of Koreans who lived in Hiroshima and Nagasaki suffering from the effects of the bombs. The objective of this paper is to examine the history of Korea atomic bomb victims who were caught in between the U.S., Japan, the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (North Korea).

  4. Atomic bomb and leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimaru, Michito; Tomonaga, Masao; Amenomori, Tatsuhiko; Matsuo, Tatsuki (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-03-01

    Characteristic features of leukemia among atomic bomb survivors were studied. The ratio of a single leukemia type to all leukemias was highest for CML in Hiroshima, and the occurrence of CML was thought to be most characteristic for atomic bomb radiation induced leukemia. In the distribution of AML subtypes of FAB classification, there was no M3 cases in 1 Gy or more group, although several atypical AML cases of survivors were observed. Chromosome study was conducted using colony forming cells induced by hemopoietic stem cells of peripheral blood of proximal survivors. Same chromosome aberrations were observed in colony forming cells and peripheral blood of proximal survivors. (author).

  5. Atoms in Agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborne, Thomas S. [University of Tennessee

    1965-01-01

    Agriculture benefits from the applications of research. Radioactive techniques have been used to study soils, plants, microbes, insects, farm animals, and new ways to use and preserve foodstuffs. Radioactive atoms are not used directly by farmers but are used in research directed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture and Atomic Energy Commission, by the agricultural experiment stations of the various states, and by numerous public and private research institutions. From such research come improved materials and methods which are used on the farm.

  6. Optically pumped atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Happer, William; Walker, Thad

    2010-01-01

    Covering the most important knowledge on optical pumping of atoms, this ready reference is backed by numerous examples of modelling computation for optical pumped systems. The authors show for the first time that modern scientific computing software makes it practical to analyze the full, multilevel system of optically pumped atoms. To make the discussion less abstract, the authors have illustrated key points with sections of MATLAB codes. To make most effective use of contemporary mathematical software, it is especially useful to analyze optical pumping situations in the Liouville spa

  7. Amplitudes and state parameters from ion- and atom-atom excitation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, T.; Horsdal-Pedersen, E.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter examines single collisions between two atomic species, one of which is initially in a 1 S state (there is only one initial spin channel). The collisions are characterized by a definite scattering plane and a definite orientation. Topics considered include an angular correlation between scattered particles and autoionization electrons or polarized photons emitted from states excited in atomic collisions (photon emission, electron emission, selectivity excited target atoms), experimental methods for obtaining information on the alignment and orientation parameters of atoms or ions excited in specific collisions, results of experiments and numerical calculations (quasi-oneelectron systems, He + -He collisions, other collision systems), and future aspects and possible applications of the polarizedphoton, scattered-particle coincidence techniques to atomic spectroscopy

  8. Site-selective substitutional doping with atomic precision on stepped Al (111) surface by single-atom manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang; Zhang, Jinhu; Dong, Guofeng; Shao, Hezhu; Ning, Bo-Yuan; Zhao, Li; Ning, Xi-Jing; Zhuang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    In fabrication of nano- and quantum devices, it is sometimes critical to position individual dopants at certain sites precisely to obtain the specific or enhanced functionalities. With first-principles simulations, we propose a method for substitutional doping of individual atom at a certain position on a stepped metal surface by single-atom manipulation. A selected atom at the step of Al (111) surface could be extracted vertically with an Al trimer-apex tip, and then the dopant atom will be positioned to this site. The details of the entire process including potential energy curves are given, which suggests the reliability of the proposed single-atom doping method.

  9. Spatially resolved photoionization of ultracold atoms on an atom chip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, S.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.; Zimmermann, C.

    2007-01-01

    We report on photoionization of ultracold magnetically trapped Rb atoms on an atom chip. The atoms are trapped at 5 μK in a strongly anisotropic trap. Through a hole in the chip with a diameter of 150 μm, two laser beams are focused onto a fraction of the atomic cloud. A first laser beam with a wavelength of 778 nm excites the atoms via a two-photon transition to the 5D level. With a fiber laser at 1080 nm the excited atoms are photoionized. Ionization leads to depletion of the atomic density distribution observed by absorption imaging. The resonant ionization spectrum is reported. The setup used in this experiment is suitable not only to investigate mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates and ions but also for single-atom detection on an atom chip

  10. Atomic collisions related to atomic laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Takemasa

    1995-01-01

    Atomic collisions are important in various places in atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS). At a vaporization zone, many atomic collisions due to high density have influence on the atomic beam characteristics such as velocity distribution and metastable states' populations at a separation zone. In the separation zone, a symmetric charge transfer between the produced ions and the neutral atoms may degrade selectivity. We have measured atomic excitation temperatures of atomic beams and symmetric charge transfer cross sections for gadolinium and neodymium. Gadolinium and neodymium are both lanthanides. Nevertheless, results for gadolinium and neodymium are very different. The gadolinium atom has one 5d electron and neodymium atom has no 5d electron. It is considered that the differences are due to existence of 5d electron. (author)

  11. Mining information from atom probe data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairney, Julie M; Rajan, Krishna; Haley, Daniel; Gault, Baptiste; Bagot, Paul A J; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Felfer, Peter J; Ringer, Simon P; Marceau, Ross K W; Moody, Michael P

    2015-12-01

    Whilst atom probe tomography (APT) is a powerful technique with the capacity to gather information containing hundreds of millions of atoms from a single specimen, the ability to effectively use this information creates significant challenges. The main technological bottleneck lies in handling the extremely large amounts of data on spatial-chemical correlations, as well as developing new quantitative computational foundations for image reconstruction that target critical and transformative problems in materials science. The power to explore materials at the atomic scale with the extraordinary level of sensitivity of detection offered by atom probe tomography has not been not fully harnessed due to the challenges of dealing with missing, sparse and often noisy data. Hence there is a profound need to couple the analytical tools to deal with the data challenges with the experimental issues associated with this instrument. In this paper we provide a summary of some key issues associated with the challenges, and solutions to extract or "mine" fundamental materials science information from that data. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Dye lasers in atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.; Luther, J.; Steudel, A.

    1974-01-01

    The properties of dye lasers which are relevant to atomic spectroscopy are discussed. Several experiments made possible by tunable dye lasers are discussed. Applications of high spectral density dye lasers are covered in areas such as absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, photoionization and photodetachment, and two- and multi-photon processes. Applications which take advantage of the narrow bandwidth of tunable dye lasers are discussed, including saturation spectroscopy, fluorescence line narrowing, classic absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, nonoptical detection of optical resonances, heterodyne spectroscopy, and nonlinear coherent resonant phenomena. (26 figures, 180 references) (U.S.)

  13. Atomic correlations in non-periodic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, T.

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the methods of structural analysis, in particular the use of particle accelerators to produce pulsed neutrons and synchrotron radiation, have greatly improved our ability to describe the atomic structure of non-periodic matter quantitatively using the atomic pair distribution analysis, or the real-space method of powder diffraction. The method can now be applied to crystalline or nearly crystalline solids as well to describe deviations from perfect periodicity with a sufficient accuracy. We discuss the fundamental issues pertaining to the use of this technique, and review some of the recent results obtained by this method in the fields of high-T c oxide superconductors, quasicrystals and metallic glasses. (author) 76 refs

  14. Non-local effects in kaonic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.; Florkowski, W.

    2000-04-01

    Optical potentials with non-local (gradient) terms are used to describe the spectra of kaonic atoms. The strength of the non-local terms is determined from a many-body calculation of the kaon self-energy in nuclear matter. The optical potentials show strong non-linearities in the nucleon density and sizeable non-local terms. We find that the non-local terms are quantitatively important and the results depend strongly on the way the gradient terms are arranged. Phenomenologically successful fits are obtained for p-wave like optical potentials. It is suggested that the microscopic form of the non-local interaction terms is obtained systematically by means of a semi-classical expansion of the nucleus structure. We conclude that a microscopic description of kaonic atom data requires further detailed studies of the microscopic K - nuclear dynamics. (orig.)

  15. The Harnessed Atom: Nuclear Energy & Electricity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    This document is part of a nuclear energy curriculum designed for grades six through eight. The complete kit includes a written text, review exercises, activities for the students, and a teachers guide. The 19 lessons in the curriculum are divided into four units including: (1) "Energy and Electricity"; (2) "Understanding Atoms and Radiation"; (3)…

  16. Observation of dynamic atom-atom correlation in liquid helium in real space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmowski, W; Diallo, S O; Lokshin, K; Ehlers, G; Ferré, G; Boronat, J; Egami, T

    2017-05-04

    Liquid 4 He becomes superfluid and flows without resistance below temperature 2.17 K. Superfluidity has been a subject of intense studies and notable advances were made in elucidating the phenomenon by experiment and theory. Nevertheless, details of the microscopic state, including dynamic atom-atom correlations in the superfluid state, are not fully understood. Here using a technique of neutron dynamic pair-density function (DPDF) analysis we show that 4 He atoms in the Bose-Einstein condensate have environment significantly different from uncondensed atoms, with the interatomic distance larger than the average by about 10%, whereas the average structure changes little through the superfluid transition. DPDF peak not seen in the snap-shot pair-density function is found at 2.3 Å, and is interpreted in terms of atomic tunnelling. The real space picture of dynamic atom-atom correlations presented here reveal characteristics of atomic dynamics not recognized so far, compelling yet another look at the phenomenon.

  17. Atomic spectrum of neptunium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred, M.; Tomkins, F.S.; Blaise, J.E.; Camus, P.; Verges, J.

    1976-05-01

    A description and interpretation of the atomic spectrum of neptunium are given. Wavelengths were measured for 6096 spectrum lines in the range 3793 to 38,812 cm -1 (26,353 to 2575 A), of which 2526 were classified as transitions between 329 odd levels and 130 even levels of neutral neptunium (Np I). The data are presented in five tables

  18. Atoms in Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Paul A.

    This booklet is part of an American Astronomical Society curriculum project designed to provide teaching materials to teachers of secondary school chemistry, physics, and earth science. A Basic Topics section discusses atomic structure, emphasizing states of matter at high temperature and spectroscopic analysis of light from the stars. A section…

  19. Deep diode atomic battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, T.R.; Cline, H.E.

    1977-01-01

    A deep diode atomic battery is made from a bulk semiconductor crystal containing three-dimensional arrays of columnar and lamellar P-N junctions. The battery is powered by gamma rays and x-ray emission from a radioactive source embedded in the interior of the semiconductor crystal

  20. Atomic transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freyss, M.

    2015-01-01

    As presented in the first chapter of this book, atomic transport properties govern a large panel of nuclear fuel properties, from its microstructure after fabrication to its behaviour under irradiation: grain growth, oxidation, fission product release, gas bubble nucleation. The modelling of the atomic transport properties is therefore the key to understanding and predicting the material behaviour under irradiation or in storage conditions. In particular, it is noteworthy that many modelling techniques within the so-called multi-scale modelling scheme of materials make use of atomic transport data as input parameters: activation energies of diffusion, diffusion coefficients, diffusion mechanisms, all of which are then required to be known accurately. Modelling approaches that are readily used or which could be used to determine atomic transport properties of nuclear materials are reviewed here. They comprise, on the one hand, static atomistic calculations, in which the migration mechanism is fixed and the corresponding migration energy barrier is calculated, and, on the other hand, molecular dynamics calculations and kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations, for which the time evolution of the system is explicitly calculated. (author)

  1. The atomic society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallerbach, J.; Hinz, M.O.; Huebner, H.; Huelsmann, H.; Krusewitz, K.; Mechels, E.; Moneta, J.; Mossmann, W.; Reuleaux, F.

    1978-01-01

    Nuclear power and social progress. Analyses and alternative. Organisation and development of the electric power industry. Conflicts in trade unions and churches. Processes of learning in court and in the science business. Materials, data, and figures on the development of power machinery and international atomic policy. Songs of the anti-nuclear movement. (orig.) [de

  2. Observational Evidence for Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edwin R., Jr.; Childers, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the development of the concept of atomicity and some of the many which can be used to establish its validity. Chemical evidence, evidence from crystals, Faraday's law of electrolysis, and Avogadro's number are among the areas which show how the concept originally developed from a purely philosophical idea. (JN)

  3. Spectra of alkali atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoso, Budi; Arumbinang, Haryono.

    1981-01-01

    Emission spectra of alkali atoms has been determined by using spectrometer at the ultraviolet to infra red waves range. The spectra emission can be obtained by absorption spectrophotometric analysis. Comparative evaluations between experimental data and data handbook obtained by spark method were also presented. (author tr.)

  4. Experimental atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.; Elston, S.B.; Forester, J.P.; Liao, K.H.; Pegg, D.J.; Peterson, R.S.; Thoe, R.S.; Hayden, H.C.; Griffin, P.M.

    1976-01-01

    The atomic structure and collision phenomena of highly stripped ions in the range Z = 6 to 35 were studied. Charge-transfer and multiple-electron-loss cross sections were determined. Absolute x-ray-production cross sections for incident heavy ions were measured. 10 figures, 1 table

  5. Atomic Particle Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Hal

    1970-01-01

    This booklet tells how scientists observe the particles and electromagnetic radiation that emerges from an atomic nucleus. The equipment used falls into two general categories: counters which count each particle as it passes by, and track detectors, which make a photographic record of the particle's track.

  6. Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

    2010-08-05

    The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to real-world materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

  7. An atom counting and electrophilicity based QSTR approach

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantitative-structure-toxicity-relationship (QSTR) models are developed for predicting the toxicity (pIGC50) of 252 aliphatic compounds on Tetrahymena pyriformis. The single parameter models with a simple molecular descriptor, the number of atoms in the molecule, provide reasonable results. Better QSTR models with ...

  8. Pattern recognition approach to quantify the atomic structure of graphene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, Jens; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    We report a pattern recognition approach to detect the atomic structure in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images of graphene. The approach provides quantitative information such as carbon-carbon bond lengths and bond length variations on a global and local scale alike. © 2014...

  9. Containerless high temperature property measurements by atomic fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordine, P. C.; Schiffman, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence techniques were developed for the containerless study of high temperature processes, material properties, levitation, and heating techniques for containerless earth-based experimentation. Experiments were performed in which fluorescence of atomic aluminum, mercury, or tungsten were studied. These experiments include measurements of: (1) Al atom evaporation from CW CO2 laser heated and aerodynamically levitated sapphire and alumina spheres, and self-supported sapphire filaments, (2) Al atom reaction with ambient oxygen in the wake of a levitated specimen, (3) Hg atom concentrations in the wake of levitated alumina and sapphire spheres, relative to the ambient Hg atom concentration, (4) Hg atom concentrations in supersonic levitation jets, and (5) metastable, electronically excited W atom concentrations produced by evaporation of an electrically heated tungsten filament.

  10. Atomic process modeling based on nearest neighbor approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    An atomic modeling based on the nearest neighbor approximation (NNA) to solove atomic process in plasmas was considered. In the atomic modeling, it includes the plasma effect to the electron state densities of the atom or ion as the potential due to the nearest neighbor atom or ion. Using the modeling, I was able to compute the ionization degrees of hydrogen plasmas without any ad hoc assumption adopted in the atomic modeling based on the plasma microfield. In order to apply the NNA to the plasmas of near and above solid density, three adequate treatments were required to obtain physically acceptable results. The first one was the Coulomb interaction between pairs of ions. The second one was the modification of the Saha equation. The third one was the adequate treatment of the neutral atom's contribution to the potential distribution as the nearest neighbor particle. (author)

  11. Non-Local Effects in Kaonic Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lutz, M.; Florkowski, W.

    2000-01-01

    Optical potentials with non-local (gradient) terms are used to describe the spectra of kaonic atoms. The strength of the non-local terms is determined from a many-body calculation of the kaon self energy in nuclear matter. We find that the non-local terms are quantitatively important and the results depend strongly on the way the gradient terms are arranged. Phenomenologically successful description is obtained for p-wave like optical potentials. It is suggested that the microscopic form of the non-local interaction terms is obtained systematically by means of a semi-classical expansion of the nucleus structure. (author)

  12. Quantitative Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted A.G. Steemers

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral imaging is a non-destructive optical analysis technique that can for instance be used to obtain information from cultural heritage objects unavailable with conventional colour or multi-spectral photography. This technique can be used to distinguish and recognize materials, to enhance the visibility of faint or obscured features, to detect signs of degradation and study the effect of environmental conditions on the object. We describe the basic concept, working principles, construction and performance of a laboratory instrument specifically developed for the analysis of historical documents. The instrument measures calibrated spectral reflectance images at 70 wavelengths ranging from 365 to 1100 nm (near-ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared. By using a wavelength tunable narrow-bandwidth light-source, the light energy used to illuminate the measured object is minimal, so that any light-induced degradation can be excluded. Basic analysis of the hyperspectral data includes a qualitative comparison of the spectral images and the extraction of quantitative data such as mean spectral reflectance curves and statistical information from user-defined regions-of-interest. More sophisticated mathematical feature extraction and classification techniques can be used to map areas on the document, where different types of ink had been applied or where one ink shows various degrees of degradation. The developed quantitative hyperspectral imager is currently in use by the Nationaal Archief (National Archives of The Netherlands to study degradation effects of artificial samples and original documents, exposed in their permanent exhibition area or stored in their deposit rooms.

  13. Role of atoms in atomic gravitational-wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norcia, Matthew A.; Cline, Julia R. K.; Thompson, James K.

    2017-10-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that space-based atomic sensors may be used to detect gravitational waves. These proposals describe the sensors either as clocks or as atom interferometers. Here, we seek to explore the fundamental similarities and differences between the two types of proposals. We present a framework in which the fundamental mechanism for sensitivity is identical for clock and atom interferometer proposals, with the key difference being whether or not the atoms are tightly confined by an external potential. With this interpretation in mind, we propose two major enhancements to detectors using confined atoms, which allow for an enhanced sensitivity analogous to large momentum transfer used in atom interferometry (though with no transfer of momentum to the atoms), and a way to extend the useful coherence time of the sensor beyond the atom's excited-state lifetime.

  14. Ionization of highly excited atoms by atomic particle impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, B.M.

    1976-01-01

    The ionization of a highly excited atom by a collision with an atom or molecule is considered. The theory of these processes is presented and compared with experimental data. Cross sections and ionization potential are discussed. 23 refs

  15. Quantitative analysis chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Wansuk; Lee, Choongyoung; Jun, Kwangsik; Hwang, Taeksung

    1995-02-01

    This book is about quantitative analysis chemistry. It is divided into ten chapters, which deal with the basic conception of material with the meaning of analysis chemistry and SI units, chemical equilibrium, basic preparation for quantitative analysis, introduction of volumetric analysis, acid-base titration of outline and experiment examples, chelate titration, oxidation-reduction titration with introduction, titration curve, and diazotization titration, precipitation titration, electrometric titration and quantitative analysis.

  16. Absorption imaging of ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, David A.; Aigner, Simon; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Imaging ultracold atomic gases close to surfaces is an important tool for the detailed analysis of experiments carried out using atom chips. We describe the critical factors that need be considered, especially when the imaging beam is purposely reflected from the surface. In particular we present...... methods to measure the atom-surface distance, which is a prerequisite for magnetic field imaging and studies of atom surface-interactions....

  17. Angular momentum coupling in atom-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosser, J.

    1986-01-01

    The coupling between the electronic angular momentum and the rotating atom-atom axis in the initial or the final phase of an atom-atom collision is discussed, making use of the concepts of radial and rotational (Coriolis) coupling between different molecular states. The description is based on a limited number of well-understood approximations, and it allows an illustrative geometric representation of the transition from the body fixed to the space fixed motion of the electrons. (orig.)

  18. Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J; Safronova, M S; Clark, Charles W

    2010-01-01

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initio calculations of atomic structures using explicitly correlated wavefunctions, interferometry with atom beams and velocity changes of laser cooled atoms induced by an electric field. This review examines existing theoretical methods of determining atomic and ionic polarizabilities, and discusses their relevance to various applications with particular emphasis on cold-atom physics and the metrology of atomic frequency standards. (topical review)

  19. Theory and applications of atomic and ionic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitroy, J [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Safronova, M S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Clark, Charles W, E-mail: jxm107@rsphysse.anu.edu.a, E-mail: msafrono@udel.ed, E-mail: charles.clark@nist.go [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8410 (United States)

    2010-10-28

    Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics. The dielectric constant and refractive index of any gas are examples of macroscopic properties that are largely determined by the dipole polarizability. When it comes to microscopic phenomena, the existence of alkaline-earth anions and the recently discovered ability of positrons to bind to many atoms are predominantly due to the polarization interaction. An imperfect knowledge of atomic polarizabilities is presently looming as the largest source of uncertainty in the new generation of optical frequency standards. Accurate polarizabilities for the group I and II atoms and ions of the periodic table have recently become available by a variety of techniques. These include refined many-body perturbation theory and coupled-cluster calculations sometimes combined with precise experimental data for selected transitions, microwave spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms and ions, refractive index measurements in microwave cavities, ab initio calculations of atomic structures using explicitly correlated wavefunctions, interferometry with atom beams and velocity changes of laser cooled atoms induced by an electric field. This review examines existing theoretical methods of determining atomic and ionic polarizabilities, and discusses their relevance to various applications with particular emphasis on cold-atom physics and the metrology of atomic frequency standards. (topical review)

  20. Correlation effects in electron scattering and attachment by open-shell atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesbet, R.K.

    1977-01-01

    Low energy scattering or attachment of an electron by a neutral atom is dominated by the polarization potential, formally an electronic correlation effect. Special problems arise in the quantitative theory of this effect for open-shell atoms. These problems are analyzed, and recent progress in resolving them is discussed

  1. Simulation of FRET dyes allows quantitative comparison against experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinartz, Ines; Sinner, Claude; Nettels, Daniel; Stucki-Buchli, Brigitte; Stockmar, Florian; Panek, Pawel T.; Jacob, Christoph R.; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Schuler, Benjamin; Schug, Alexander

    2018-03-01

    Fully understanding biomolecular function requires detailed insight into the systems' structural dynamics. Powerful experimental techniques such as single molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) provide access to such dynamic information yet have to be carefully interpreted. Molecular simulations can complement these experiments but typically face limits in accessing slow time scales and large or unstructured systems. Here, we introduce a coarse-grained simulation technique that tackles these challenges. While requiring only few parameters, we maintain full protein flexibility and include all heavy atoms of proteins, linkers, and dyes. We are able to sufficiently reduce computational demands to simulate large or heterogeneous structural dynamics and ensembles on slow time scales found in, e.g., protein folding. The simulations allow for calculating FRET efficiencies which quantitatively agree with experimentally determined values. By providing atomically resolved trajectories, this work supports the planning and microscopic interpretation of experiments. Overall, these results highlight how simulations and experiments can complement each other leading to new insights into biomolecular dynamics and function.

  2. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  3. Atomic Act amended

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper by the chairwoman of the Czech nuclear regulatory authority, the history of Czech nuclear legislation is outlined, the reasons for the amendment of the Atomic Act (Act No. 18/1997) are explained, and the amendments themselves are highlighted. The Act No. 13/2002 of 18 December 2001 is reproduced from the official Collection of Acts of the Czech Republic in the facsimile form. The following acts were thereby amended: Atomic Act No. 18/1997, Metrology Act No. 505/1990, Public Health Protection Act No. 258/2000, and Act No. 2/1969 on the Establishment of Ministries and Other Governmental Agencies of the Czech Republic. (P.A.)

  4. Atomic assistance in 1961

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    More than 100 experts provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency will be working in different parts of the world this year, assisting the Agency's Member States in building up their national programs of peaceful atomic development. The total allocation of EPTA funds to the Agency for the two-year period 1961-62 is $1 393 600 (of which approximately half is available in 1961), and is meant not only for the provision of experts and equipment but also for training fellowships and regional projects. The countries which will receive Agency assistance in the form of experts and equipment this year are: Afghanistan, Argentina, Austria, Brazil, Burma, Ceylon, Chile, the Republic of China, Denmark, Greece, Guatemala, Iceland, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Pakistan, the Philippines, Senegal, the Sudan, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey, the United Arab Republic, Vietnam and Yugoslavia

  5. Atomicity for XML Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Debmalya; Jiwane, Ashwin; Genest, Blaise

    With more and more data stored into XML databases, there is a need to provide the same level of failure resilience and robustness that users have come to expect from relational database systems. In this work, we discuss strategies to provide the transactional aspect of atomicity to XML databases. The main contribution of this paper is to propose a novel approach for performing updates-in-place on XML databases, with the undo statements stored in the same high level language as the update statements. Finally, we give experimental results to study the performance/storage trade-off of the updates-in-place strategy (based on our undo proposal) against the deferred updates strategy to providing atomicity.

  6. Elementary relativistic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemenov, L.

    2001-01-01

    The Coulomb interaction which occurs in the final state between two particles with opposite charges allows for creation of the bound state of these particles. In the case when particles are generated with large momentum in lab frame, the Lorentz factors of the bound state will also be much larger than one. The relativistic velocity of the atoms provides the opportunity to observe bound states of (π + μ - ), (π + π - ) and (π + K - ) with a lifetime as short as 10 -16 s, and to measure their parameters. The ultrarelativistic positronium atoms (A 2e ) allow us to observe the e.ect of superpenetration in matter, to study the effects caused by the formation time of A 2e from virtual e + e - pairs and to investigate the process of transformation of two virtual particles into the bound state

  7. Atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haswell, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy is now well established and widely used technique for the determination of trace and major elements in a wide range analyte types. There have been many advances in the atomic spectroscopy over the last decade and for this reason and to meet the demand, it was felt that there was a need for an updated book. Whilst interest in instrumental design has tended to dominate the minds of the spectrocopist, the analyst concerned with obtaining reliable and representative data, in diverse areas of application, has been diligently modifying and developing sample treatment and instrumental introduction techniques. Such methodology is de fundamental part of analysis and form the basis of the fourteen application chapters of this book. The text focuses in the main on AAS; however, the sample handling techniques described are in many cases equally applicable to ICP-OES and ICP-MS analysis. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  8. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  9. Glossary of atomic terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This glossary (of about 400 terms) has been compiled to help people outside the atomic energy industry to understand what those inside it are saying. It is not intended to be a definitive dictionary of scientific or technical terms, nor does it aim to cover terms that are in general use in science and technology. A list of some initials and acronyms is appended. (author)

  10. Glossary of atomic terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This glossary, containing almost 400 terms, has been compiled to help people outside the atomic energy industry to understand what those inside it are saying. It is not intended to be a definitive dictionary of scientific or technical terms, nor does it aim to cover terms that are in general use in science and technology. A list of about 100 initials and acronyms will be found at the end. (author)

  11. Atomic physics issues in fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    Atomic physics issues have played a large role in controlled fusion research. A general introduction to the present role of atomic processes in both inertial and magnetic controlled fusion work is presented. (Auth.)

  12. Real and Hybrid Atomic Orbitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D. B.; Fowler, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that the Schrodinger equation for the hydrogenlike atom separates in both spheroconal and prolate spheroidal coordinates and that these separations provide a sound theoretical basis for the real and hybrid atomic orbitals. (Author/SK)

  13. Electromagnetic trapping of cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V.I.; Minogin, V.G.; Letokhov, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    This review describes the methods of trapping cold atoms in electromagnetic fields and in the combined electromagnetic and gravity fields. We discuss first the basic types of the dipole radiation forces used for cooling and trapping atoms in the laser fields. We outline next the fundamentals of the laser cooling of atoms and classify the temperature limits for basic laser cooling processes. The main body of the review is devoted to discussion of atom traps based on the dipole radiation forces, dipole magnetic forces, combined dipole radiation-magnetic forces, and the forces combined of the dipole radiation-magnetic and gravity forces. Physical fundamentals of atom traps operating as waveguides and cavities for cold atoms are also considered. The review ends with the applications of cold and trapped atoms in atomic, molecular and optical physics. (author)

  14. Evaporative cooling of trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketterle, W.; Van Druten, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on evaporative cooling of trapped atoms: Theoretical models for evaporative cooling; the role of collisions for real atoms; experimental techniques and summary of evaporative cooling experiments. 166 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Into the atom and beyond

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    Magnifying an atom to football pitch size. The dense nucleus, carrying almost all the atomic mass, is much smaller than the ball. The players (the electrons) would see something about the size of a marble!

  16. A new atomic model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrescu, Florian Ion

    2012-01-01

    The movement of an electron around the atomic nucleus has today a great importance in many engineering fields. Electronics, aeronautics, micro and nanotechnology, electrical engineering, optics, lasers, nuclear power, computing, equipment and automation, telecommunications, genetic engineering, bioengineering, special processing, modern welding, robotics, energy and electromagnetic wave field is today only a few of the many applications of electronic engineering. This book presents, shortly, a new and original relation (20 and 20') who determines the radius with that, the electron is running around the nucleus of an atom. One utilizes, two times the Lorenz relation, the Niels Bohr generalized equation, and a mass relation, which was deduced from the kinematics energy relation written in two modes: classical and Coulombian. Equalizing the mass relation with Lorenz relation one obtains a form which is a relation between the squared electron speed (v 2 ) and the radius (r). The second relation between v 2 and r was obtained by equalizing the mass of Bohr equation and the mass of Lorenz relation. For a Bohr energetically level (n=a constant value), one determines now two energetically below levels, which form an electronic layer. The author realizes by this a new atomic model, or a new quantum theory, which explains the existence of electron-clouds without spin.Writing the kinematics energy relation in two modes, classical and Coulombian one determines a relation, from which explicitely the mass of the electron is determined.

  17. Australia's atomic conspiracy theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binnie, A.

    2001-01-01

    The author questions claims by the Newcastle University historian Wayne Reynolds in his book 'Australia's Bid for the Bomb', that the impetus behind the Snowy Mountains Scheme was to provide a secure source of power for the enrichment of uranium and production of heavy water so that Australia could produce its own atomic bombs. Reynolds also argued that the Australian Atomic Energy Commission (AAEC) was set up so that Australia had a trained scientific workforce to produce plutonium for the bomb. While the book is well researched, Reynolds does not seem to understand the principles of basic science and engineering. After the Second World War, a manufacturing and industrial base with a skilled and trained workforce was needed so it could be converted to war or defence manufacturing when the need arose. This new manufacturing community would require electrical power to sustain it. Hydroelectricity and atomic energy could help provide these needs. Even though war was still raging, Prime Minister John Curtin looked ahead and set up a Department of Post-War Reconstruction. It was through this department that the Snowy Mountains Scheme would be established. Curtin did not live to see this. He died in 1945 but his successor, Ben Chifley, continued the vision. The author believes, an understanding of the science behind these developments and an appreciation of how how humans interact with each others when it comes to getting something they want is likely to give a more balanced view of the past

  18. Relativistic correlations in atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietz, K.

    1987-01-01

    Atoms are particularly well-suited objects when it comes to testing certain concepts of many-body theories. They play a unique role in this respect because of two constructively interfering reasons: first of all, the laws describing the interactions of their constituents are the ones best known in all of Physics; secondly, their structure is comparatively simple and amenable to concise theoretical treatment. Because of these two reasons, physically motivated many-body approximation schemes, ordered in a systematic hierarchy of precision, can be carefully tested; discrepancies between theory and experiment are due to many-body effects and are never masked by uncertainties in the constituent-interaction (needless to say, the very small hadronic contributions to atomic structure is left out. Many-body effects in atoms are solely produced by the electron-electron interaction which derives from the laws of Quantum Electrodynamics or, in a very good approximation from the repulsive Coulomb potential; in the general nomenclature they are named correlations. The material is organized in two chapters: chapter 1 deals with a general introduction and discussion of g-Hartree mean-field theories, chapter 2 deals with applications. The role of vacuum fluctuations and deformations of the Dirac sea in a consistent construction of mean-fields is emphasized and their explicit form in the g-Hartree theory is given. 21 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  19. New sources of cold atoms for atomic clocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aucouturier, E.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this doctoral work is the realisation of new sources of cold cesium atoms that could be useful for the conception of a compact and high-performance atomic clock. It is based on experiences of atomic physics using light induced atomic manipulation. We present here the experiences of radiative cooling of atoms that have been realised at the Laboratoire de l'Horloge Atomique from 1993 to 1996. Firstly, we applied the techniques of radiative cooling and trapping of atoms in order to create a three-dimensional magneto-optical trap. For this first experience, we developed high quality laser sources, that were used for other experiments. We imagined a new configuration of trapping (two-dimensional magneto-optical trap) that was the basis for a cold atom source. This design gives the atoms a possibility to escape towards one particular direction. Then, we have extracted the atoms from this anisotropic trap in order to create a continuous beam of cold atoms. We have applied three methods of extraction. Firstly, the launching of atoms was performed by reducing the intensity of one of the cooling laser beams in the desired launching direction. Secondly, a frequency detuning between the two laser laser beams produced the launching of atoms by a so-called 'moving molasses'. The third method consisted in applying a static magnetic field that induced the launching of atoms in the direction of this magnetic field. At the same time, another research on cold atoms was initiated at the I.H.A. It consisted in cooling a large volume of atoms from a cell, using an isotropic light. This offers an interesting alternative to the traditional optical molasses. (author)

  20. Self-lacing atomic chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; van Houselt, Arie; Poelsema, Bene

    2009-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of self-lacing atomic chains on Pt modified Ge(001) surfaces have been studied using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy. The self-lacing chains have a cross section of only one atom, are perfectly straight, thousands of atoms long

  1. Atomic Energy Commission Act, 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    Promulgated in 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission Act (204) established and vested in the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission the sole responsibility for all matters relating to the peaceful uses of atomic energy in the country. Embodied in the Act are provisions relating to the powers, duties, rights and liabilities of the Commission. (EAA)

  2. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  3. Breaking the atom with Samson

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Väänänen, J.; Coecke, B.; Ong, L.; Panangaden, P.

    2013-01-01

    The dependence atom =(x,y) was introduced in [11]. Here x and y are finite sets of attributes (or variables) and the intuitive meaning of =(x,y) is that the attributes x completely (functionally) determine the attributes y. One may wonder, whether the dependence atom is truly an atom or whether it

  4. Polarizational radiation or 'atomic' bremsstrahlung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ya Amusia, M.

    1992-01-01

    It is demonstrated that a new kind of continuum spectrum radiation exists, where the mechanism of formation is quite different from that of ordinary bremsstrahlung. The latter originates due to slowing down of the charged projectile in the target field, while the former, called polarization radiation or 'atomic' bremsstrahlung, is a result of radiation either of the target or the projectile particles dipolarly polarized during the collision process. Not only general formulae, but also results of concrete calculations are presented. These demonstrate, that for electron-atom collisions the atomic contribution to the total bremsstrahlung spectrum becomes dominant for photon energies near and above the atomic ionization potential. As to atom-atom or ion-atom collisions, the bremsstrahlung spectrum is completely determined by the atomic contribution. The specific features of the case when the incoming particles are relativistic are discussed at length. A number of examples of colliding pairs are considered, for which the atomic bremsstrahlung process is quite essential: A bare nucleus and an atom, pair of atoms, at least one of which is excited, electron, or atom interacting with a molecule. The same mechanism is essential also in formation of radiation in nuclear and elementary particle collisions. (orig.)

  5. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.; Bannister, M.E.; Delcroix, J.L.; Fuhr, J.

    2001-06-01

    This bulletin comprises updated atomic and molecular data for fusion. It includes the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the IAEA. It contains two parts: a bibliographic database for atomic and molecular data for fusion research, and numerical databases of recommended and evaluated atomic, molecular and plasma-surface interaction data. The indexed papers are also listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions

  6. On correspondence between atomic volume and atomic radius in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyuchkov, O.T.

    1980-01-01

    Atomic radii for 68 metals and their allotropic modifications are calculated according to proposed carlier technique for recalculation of real structure to structures with coordination number 12. The comparison of obtained values with published data confirms the supposition on proportionality of the dependence between atomic volume and atomic radius. Atomic number is more sensitive to structural transformations than atomic radius and it can better characterize a tendency in electronic structure modification of a substance during phase transistions. Taking into considerations that in different structure modifications both the value of atomic volume and the correlation between the volume of ''rigid ball'' and peripherical part of atomic volume change, these changes can be used for qualitative assesment of a number of parameters of electronic structure of metals, alloys and compounds [ru

  7. Armor systems including coated core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Henry S [Idaho Falls, ID; Lillo, Thomas M [Idaho Falls, ID; McHugh, Kevin M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-31

    An armor system and method involves providing a core material and a stream of atomized coating material that comprises a liquid fraction and a solid fraction. An initial layer is deposited on the core material by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is less than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis. An outer layer is then deposited on the initial layer by positioning the core material in the stream of atomized coating material wherein the solid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material is greater than the liquid fraction of the stream of atomized coating material on a weight basis.

  8. Atoms, molecules and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hertel, Ingolf V

    2015-01-01

    This is the first volume of textbooks on atomic, molecular and optical physics, aiming at a comprehensive presentation of this highly productive branch of modern physics as an indispensable basis for many areas in physics and chemistry as well as in state of the art bio- and material-sciences. It primarily addresses advanced students (including PhD students), but in a number of selected subject areas the reader is lead up to the frontiers of present research. Thus even the active scientist is addressed. This volume 1 provides the canonical knowledge in atomic physics together with basics of modern spectroscopy. Starting from the fundamentals of quantum physics, the reader is familiarized in well structured chapters step by step with the most important phenomena, models and measuring techniques. The emphasis is always on the experiment and its interpretation, while the necessary theory is introduced from this perspective in a compact and occasionally somewhat heuristic manner, easy to follow even for beginner...

  9. Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms: The interplay between hot atom chemistry and gas kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms illustrate the power of an experimental approach to the solution of complex mechanistic problems that combines the study of the reactions of recoiling atoms with conventional gas kinetic techniques. Included will be the reactions of 11 C atoms with anisole, addressing the question whether an aromatic pi-electron system can compete as a reactive site with carbon-hydrogen bonds

  10. Quantitative Reasoning Learning Progressions for Environmental Science: Developing a Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Mayes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative reasoning is a complex concept with many definitions and a diverse account in the literature. The purpose of this article is to establish a working definition of quantitative reasoning within the context of science, construct a quantitative reasoning framework, and summarize research on key components in that framework. Context underlies all quantitative reasoning; for this review, environmental science serves as the context.In the framework, we identify four components of quantitative reasoning: the quantification act, quantitative literacy, quantitative interpretation of a model, and quantitative modeling. Within each of these components, the framework provides elements that comprise the four components. The quantification act includes the elements of variable identification, communication, context, and variation. Quantitative literacy includes the elements of numeracy, measurement, proportional reasoning, and basic probability/statistics. Quantitative interpretation includes the elements of representations, science diagrams, statistics and probability, and logarithmic scales. Quantitative modeling includes the elements of logic, problem solving, modeling, and inference. A brief comparison of the quantitative reasoning framework with the AAC&U Quantitative Literacy VALUE rubric is presented, demonstrating a mapping of the components and illustrating differences in structure. The framework serves as a precursor for a quantitative reasoning learning progression which is currently under development.

  11. Quantitative Electron Nanodiffraction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spence, John [Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States)

    2015-01-30

    This Final report summarizes progress under this award for the final reporting period 2002 - 2013 in our development of quantitive electron nanodiffraction to materials problems, especially devoted to atomistic processes in semiconductors and electronic oxides such as the new artificial oxide multilayers, where our microdiffraction is complemented with energy-loss spectroscopy (ELNES) and aberration-corrected STEM imaging (9). The method has also been used to map out the chemical bonds in the important GaN semiconductor (1) used for solid state lighting, and to understand the effects of stacking sequence variations and interfaces in digital oxide superlattices (8). Other projects include the development of a laser-beam Zernike phase plate for cryo-electron microscopy (5) (based on the Kapitza-Dirac effect), work on reconstruction of molecular images using the scattering from many identical molecules lying in random orientations (4), a review article on space-group determination for the International Tables on Crystallography (10), the observation of energy-loss spectra with millivolt energy resolution and sub-nanometer spatial resolution from individual point defects in an alkali halide, a review article for the Centenary of X-ray Diffration (17) and the development of a new method of electron-beam lithography (12). We briefly summarize here the work on GaN, on oxide superlattice ELNES, and on lithography by STEM.

  12. Topics in atomic collision theory

    CERN Document Server

    Geltman, Sydney; Brueckner, Keith A

    1969-01-01

    Topics in Atomic Collision Theory originated in a course of graduate lectures given at the University of Colorado and at University College in London. It is recommended for students in physics and related fields who are interested in the application of quantum scattering theory to low-energy atomic collision phenomena. No attention is given to the electromagnetic, nuclear, or elementary particle domains. The book is organized into three parts: static field scattering, electron-atom collisions, and atom-atom collisions. These are in the order of increasing physical complexity and hence necessar

  13. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, Herbert; Walther, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    This series, established in 1965, is concerned with recent developments in the general area of atomic, molecular, and optical physics. The field is in a state of rapid growth, as new experimental and theoretical techniques are used on many old and new problems. Topics covered also include related applied areas, such as atmospheric science, astrophysics, surface physics, and laser physics.

  14. Concepts in atomic and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.

    1988-01-01

    This report consists of lecture notes treating a number of concepts from atomic- and nuclear physics, which could belong to the ready knowledge of a radiation-protection specialist. The text includes some problems and exercises which are elaborated in a separate report. (H.W.). 19 refs.; 36 figs.; 12 tabs

  15. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    CERN Document Server

    Olivares, I E

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the sup 6 LiD sub 2 and the sup 7 LiD sub 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  16. Atomic lithium vapor laser isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivares, I.E.; Rojas, C.

    2002-01-01

    An atomic vapor laser isotope separation in lithium was performed using tunable diode lasers. The method permits also the separation of the isotopes between the 6 LiD 2 and the 7 LiD 1 lines using a self-made mass separator which includes a magnetic sector and an ion beam designed for lithium. (Author)

  17. Philippine Atomic Energy Commission: Annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This publication gives the highlights of the research and development projects of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission in agriculture and food, nuclear fuels and power system technology, medicine, public health and nutrition, environmental surveillance, supportive basic research, social response to nuclear technology, nuclear licensing and safeguards, supportive technology and international and local linkages including manpower development. (ELC)

  18. Cold atoms: optical gratings and atomic clocks; Atomes froids: reseaux optiques et horloges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leduc, M. [Lab. Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, 75 - Paris (France); Lemonde, P. [Syrte, Observatoire de Paris, 75 - Paris (France)

    2010-10-15

    The domain of cold atoms is flourishing. The light-matter interaction allows a gas to be cooled below 10{sup -6} K and to be trapped in vacuum. Atoms lasers are based on Bose-Einstein condensates. Trapped in optical gratings by stationary waves, ultra-cold fermionic atoms can be considered as models for the understanding of condensed matter physics

  19. Operation of the computer model for direct atomic oxygen exposure of Earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gruenbaum, P. E.; Gillis, J. R.; Hargraves, C. R.

    1995-01-01

    One of the primary causes of material degradation in low Earth orbit (LEO) is exposure to atomic oxygen. When atomic oxygen molecules collide with an orbiting spacecraft, the relative velocity is 7 to 8 km/sec and the collision energy is 4 to 5 eV per atom. Under these conditions, atomic oxygen may initiate a number of chemical and physical reactions with exposed materials. These reactions contribute to material degradation, surface erosion, and contamination. Interpretation of these effects on materials and the design of space hardware to withstand on-orbit conditions requires quantitative knowledge of the atomic oxygen exposure environment. Atomic oxygen flux is a function of orbit altitude, the orientation of the orbit plan to the Sun, solar and geomagnetic activity, and the angle between exposed surfaces and the spacecraft heading. We have developed a computer model to predict the atomic oxygen exposure of spacecraft in low Earth orbit. The application of this computer model is discussed.

  20. Superconducting microtraps for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufnagel, C.

    2011-01-01

    Atom chips are integrated devices in which atoms and atomic clouds are stored and manipulated in miniaturized magnetic traps. State of the art fabrication technologies allow for a flexible design of the trapping potentials and consequently provide extraordinary control over atomic samples, which leads to a promising role of atom chips in the engineering and investigation of quantum mechanical systems. Naturally, for quantum mechanical applications, the atomic coherence has to be preserved. Using room temperature circuits, the coherence time of atoms close to the surface was found to be drastically limited by thermal current fluctuations in the conductors. Superconductors offer an elegant way to circumvent thermal noise and therefore present a promising option for the coherent manipulation of atomic quantum states. In this thesis trapping and manipulation of ultracold Rubidium atoms in superconducting microtraps is demonstrated. In this connection the unique properties of superconductors are used to build traps based on persistent currents, the Meissner effect and remanent magnetization. In experiment it is shown, that in superconducting atom chips, thermal magnetic field noise is significantly reduced. Furthermore it is demonstrated, that atomic samples can be employed to probe the properties of superconducting materials. (author) [de

  1. Cavity QED with atomic mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D. E.; Jiang, L.; Gorshkov, A. V.; Kimble, H. J.

    2012-06-01

    A promising approach to merge atomic systems with scalable photonics has emerged recently, which consists of trapping cold atoms near tapered nanofibers. Here, we describe a novel technique to achieve strong, coherent coupling between a single atom and photon in such a system. Our approach makes use of collective enhancement effects, which allow a lattice of atoms to form a high-finesse cavity within the fiber. We show that a specially designated ‘impurity’ atom within the cavity can experience strongly enhanced interactions with single photons in the fiber. Under realistic conditions, a ‘strong coupling’ regime can be reached, wherein it becomes feasible to observe vacuum Rabi oscillations between the excited impurity atom and a single cavity quantum. This technique can form the basis for a scalable quantum information network using atom-nanofiber systems.

  2. Heat transport through atomic contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosso, Nico; Drechsler, Ute; Menges, Fabian; Nirmalraj, Peter; Karg, Siegfried; Riel, Heike; Gotsmann, Bernd

    2017-05-01

    Heat transport and dissipation at the nanoscale severely limit the scaling of high-performance electronic devices and circuits. Metallic atomic junctions serve as model systems to probe electrical and thermal transport down to the atomic level as well as quantum effects that occur in one-dimensional (1D) systems. Whereas charge transport in atomic junctions has been studied intensively in the past two decades, heat transport remains poorly characterized because it requires the combination of a high sensitivity to small heat fluxes and the formation of stable atomic contacts. Here we report heat-transfer measurements through atomic junctions and analyse the thermal conductance of single-atom gold contacts at room temperature. Simultaneous measurements of charge and heat transport reveal the proportionality of electrical and thermal conductance, quantized with the respective conductance quanta. This constitutes a verification of the Wiedemann-Franz law at the atomic scale.

  3. Towards quantum magnetism with ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weld, David M; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    At ICAP we presented the efforts and progress at MIT towards using ultracold atoms for the realization of various forms of quantum magnetism. These efforts include a study of fermions with strong repulsive interactions in which we obtained evidence for a phase transition to itinerant ferromagnetism, the characterization of cold atom systems by noise measurements, and a new adiabatic gradient demagnetization cooling scheme which has enabled us to realize temperatures of less than 350 picokelvin and spin temperatures of less than 50 picokelvin in optical lattices. These are the lowest temperatures ever measured in any physical system.

  4. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.; Wuilleumier, F.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter discusses applications of synchrotron light in atomic and molecular physics. Use of the radiation from storage rings has expanded and lent access to new areas of absorption and photoemission spectroscopy and scattering experiments. Techniques applied in connection with synchrotron radiation are discussed including absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Problem areas that are being studied by the techniques mentioned above are discussed. Synchrotron radiation has provided the means for measuring the threshold-excitation and interference effects that signal the breakdown of the two-step model of atomic excitation/deexcitation. Synchrotron radiation provides more means of excited-state photoionization measurements

  5. Offshore atomic power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    Various merits of offshore atomic power plants are illustrated, and their systems are assessed. The planning of the offshore atomic power plants in USA is reviewed, and the construction costs of the offshore plant in Japan were estimated. Air pollution problem may be solved by the offshore atomic power plants remarkably. Deep water at low temperature may be advantageously used as cooling water for condensers. Marine resources may be bred by building artificial habitats and by providing spring-up equipments. In the case of floating plants, the plant design can be standardized so that the construction costs may be reduced. The offshore plants can be classified into three systems, namely artificial island system, floating system and sea bottom-based system. The island system may be realized with the present level of civil engineering, but requires the development of technology for the resistance of base against earthquake and its calculation means. The floating system may be constructed with conventional power plant engineering and shipbuilding engineering, but the aseismatic stability of breakwater may be a problem to be solved. Deep water floating system and deep water submerging system are conceivable, but its realization may be difficult. The sea bottom-based system with large caissons can be realized by the present civil engineering, but the construction of the caissons, stability against earthquake and resistance to waves may be problems to be solved. The technical prediction and assessment of new plant sites for nuclear power plants have been reported by Science and Technology Agency in 1974. The construction costs of an offshore plant has been estimated by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry to be yen71,026/kW as of 1985. (Iwakiri, K.)

  6. Boron atom reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estes, R.; Tabacco, M.B.; Digiuseppe, T.G.; Davidovits, P.

    1982-01-01

    The reaction rates of atomic boron with various epoxides have been measured in a flow tube apparatus. The bimolecular rate constants, in units of cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , are: 1,2-epoxypropane (8.6 x 10 -11 ), 1,2-epoxybutane (8.8 x 10 -11 ), 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane (5.5 x 10 -11 ), 1-chloro-2,3-epoxypropane (5.7 x 10 -11 ), and 1,2-epoxy-3,3,3-trichloropropane (1.5 x 10 -11 ). (orig.)

  7. Atom and Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The object of this colloquium is a thought about the means, for a democracy to adapt the process of decisions and the methods of communication with public opinion in order that the profits derived from atom go on to be larger than the risks. The questions of low doses, the nuclear safety, the underground laboratories for radioactive wastes, are studied in relation with public opinion, the question itself of public opinion is studied, the history of nuclear energy in France through the weapons and the nuclear power plants is evoked and gives an explanation of the situation of nuclear controversy. (N.C.)

  8. Atomic mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    MacPherson, A K

    1990-01-01

    This volume brings together some of the presently available theoretical techniques which will be useful in the design of solid-state materials. At present, it is impossible to specify the atomic composition of a material and its macroscopic physical properties. However, the future possibilities for such a science are being laid today. This is coming about due to the development of fast, cheap computers which will be able to undertake the calculations which are necessary.Since this field of science is fairly new, it is not yet quite clear which direction of analysis will eventually prov

  9. Chameleon Induced Atomic Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  10. Chameleon induced atomic afterglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter. (orig.)

  11. Chameleon induced atomic afterglow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brax, Philippe; Burrage, Clare

    2010-01-01

    The chameleon is a scalar field whose mass depends on the density of its environment. Chameleons are necessarily coupled to matter particles and will excite transitions between atomic energy levels in an analogous manner to photons. When created inside an optical cavity by passing a laser beam through a constant magnetic field, chameleons are trapped between the cavity walls and form a standing wave. This effect will lead to an afterglow phenomenon even when the laser beam and the magnetic field have been turned off, and could be used to probe the interactions of the chameleon field with matter.

  12. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  13. Cold atoms in singular potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denschlag, J. P.

    1998-09-01

    We studied both theoretically and experimentally the interaction between cold Li atoms from a magnetic-optical trap (MOT) and a charged or current-carrying wire. With this system, we were able to realize 1/r 2 and 1/r potentials in two dimensions and to observe the motion of cold atoms in both potentials. For an atom in an attractive 1/r 2 potential, there exist no stable trajectories, instead there is a characteristic class of trajectories for which atoms fall into the singularity. We were able to observe this falling of atoms into the center of the potential. Moreover, by probing the singular 1/r 2 potential with atomic clouds of varying size and temperature we extracted scaling properties of the atom-wire interaction. For very cold atoms, and very thin wires the motion of the atoms must be treated quantum mechanically. Here we predict that the absorption cross section for the 1/r 2 potential should exhibit quantum steps. These quantum steps are a manifestation of the quantum mechanical decomposition of plane waves into partial waves. For the second part of this work, we realized a two dimensional 1/r potential for cold atoms. If the potential is attractive, the atoms can be bound and follow Kepler-like orbits around the wire. The motion in the third dimension along the wire is free. We were able to exploit this property and constructed a novel cold atom guide, the 'Kepler guide'. We also demonstrated another type of atom guide (the 'side guide'), by combining the magnetic field of the wire with a homogeneous offset magnetic field. In this case, the atoms are held in a potential 'tube' on the side of the wire. The versatility, simplicity, and scaling properties of this guide make it an interesting technique. (author)

  14. Atomic Energy Control Act, c A.19, s.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Revised Statutes of Canada 1985 entered into force on 12 December 1988, revoking the previous Atomic Energy Control Act and replacing it with a new version. The new Act (Chapter A-16 of the Revised Statutes) updates the previous text and makes some linguistic corrections. The Atomic Energy Control Act establishes the Atomic Energy Control Board and sets out its duties and powers which include, in particular, the making of regulations for developing, controlling and licensing the production, application and use of atomic energy [fr

  15. Laser spectroscopy and laser isotope separation of atomic gadolinium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y. W.; Yamanaka, C.; Nomaru, K.; Kou, K.; Niki, H.; Izawa, Y.; Nakai, S.

    1994-01-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a process which uses intense pulsed lasers to selectively photoionize one isotopic species of a chemical element, after which these ions are extracted electromagnetically. The AVLIS has several advantages over the traditional methods based on the mass difference, such as high selectivity, low energy consumption, short starting time and versatility to any atoms. The efforts for atomic vapor laser isotope separation at ILT and ILE, Osaka University have been concentrated into the following items: 1) studies on laser spectroscopy and laser isotope separation of atomic gadolinium, 2) studies on interaction processes including coherent dynamics, propagation effects and atom-ion collision in AVLIS system, 3) development of laser systems for AVLIS. In this paper, we present experimental results on the laser spectroscopy and laser isotope separation of atomic gadolinium.

  16. Detection of single atoms by resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurst, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    Rutherford's idea for counting individual atoms can, in principle, be implemented for nearly any type of atom, whether stable or radioactive, by using methods of resonance ionization. With the RIS technique, a laser is tuned to a wavelength which will promote a valence electron in a Z-selected atom to an excited level. Additional resonance or nonresonance photoabsorption steps are used to achieve nearly 100% ionization efficiencies. Hence, the RIS process can be saturated for the Z-selected atoms; and since detectors are available for counting either single electrons or positive ions, one-atom detection is possible. Some examples are given of one-atom detection, including that of the noble gases, in order to show complementarity with AMS methods. For instance, the detection of 81 Kr using RIS has interesting applications for solar neutrino research, ice-cap dating, and groundwater dating. 39 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Externalities of energy and atomic power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-09-01

    Energy technology ensures not only energy supply but also has great impacts on society and environments. Economical value and effect evaluation alone doesn't mean appropriate so the evaluation of 'externalities' should be appreciated. In order to assess atomic power in this context, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan set up a research committee on 'externalities of energy and atomic power' from April 2002 to March 2006, whose activities were described in this report. In addition to environmental effects and environmental externalities, four areas were newly studied as follows: (1) biological effects of low dose rate exposure and externalities, (2) externalities as social/economical effects including stable supply and security, (3) energy technologies evaluation and (4) social choice and decision-making. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Atomic power in the CMEA countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshin, Vladimir

    1990-01-01

    The role of atomic power in the power supply to individual countries and regions, including the CMEA countries, will increase. Water-moderated power reactors having improved reliability and safety will spread in the CMEA countries, and nuclear power will be used for the purposes of centralized heat supply. At present the share of atomic power plants (APP) in the total volume of the energy production in Bulgaria and Czechoslovakia exceeds 25 per cent, and in Hungary it approaches 40 per cent. Atomic power in the CMEA countries develops on the basis of mutual cooperation. In 1986 a new joint programme of building atomic power plants and atomic heat plants for the period up to the year 2000 was adopted. One of the important ways of implementing that programme is to expand cooperation in the acceleration of scientific and technological progress. Nevertheless, so far no effective mechanism for mutual cooperation, making it possible to combine efforts for a fruitful solution of the problems of scientific and technological progress, has been created in the CMEA countries. (author)

  19. Multichannel atomic scattering and confinement-induced resonances in waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melezhik, V.S.; Saeidian, S.; Schmelcher, P. . Author

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Pair atomic collisions in restricted geometry principally differ from the conventional two- body free-space scattering. The restricted geometry leads to quantization of the atomic motion in the direction of confinement. Another nontrivial effect for two distinguishable quantum particles in a transverse harmonic trap is the confinement induced nonseparability of the center-of-mass (CM) and the relative motions. These effects can have experimental mesoscopic developments for ultracold atoms in optical traps and atomic chips. However, only simple analytical estimates were performed for the special case when identical atoms occupy lowest quantum states of a confining trap. In this zero-energy limit the total atom-atom reflection has been predicted for the case of confinement-induced resonance (CIR). The origin of the CIR is a virtual transition from the ground transverse state of the confining potential to the closed excited state during the collision. We have investigated what happens if the energy range of colliding atoms encompasses several quantum states of the confining potential. The developed method permits to analyze the transverse excitations/deexcitains and optimal conditions for avoiding decoherence-inducing mechanisms at atomic collisions in waveguides. Special attention was paid to the analysis of the CIRs for non-zero collision energies in the multimode regimes. We have suggested a nontrivial extension of the CIRs theory developed so far only for the single-mode regime at zero-energy limit. We have also fully taken into account the coupling between the CM and the relative motions in case of distinguishable atoms. Specifically we explore in detail the recently discovered dual CIR which is based on a destructive interference mechanism leading to complete transmission in the waveguide although the corresponding scattering in free space-exhibits strong s and p wave scattering. Possible applications include, e.g., cold and ultracold atom-atom

  20. Evolution of the atomic and molecular gas content of galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popping, Gergö; Somerville, Rachel S.; Trager, Scott C.

    We study the evolution of atomic and molecular gas in galaxies in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation that include new modelling of the partitioning of cold gas in galactic discs into atomic, molecular, and ionized phases. We adopt two scenarios for the formation of molecules: one pressure

  1. Operation of the computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, R. J.; Gillis, J. R.; Gruenbaum, P. E.

    1995-01-01

    A computer model for microenvironment atomic oxygen exposure has been developed to extend atomic oxygen modeling capability to include shadowing and reflections. The model uses average exposure conditions established by the direct exposure model and extends the application of these conditions to treat surfaces of arbitrary shape and orientation.

  2. Atoms in the developing nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The history of political and technological developments of nuclear energy in Brazil is traced and arguments presented for pursuing nuclear energy only in those nations with a democratic form of government. Nuclear physics research in Brazil dates back to the 1940s. Its significance was acknowledged with the creation of the National Research Council in 1951. Cooperation with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, which would have included the export of thorium-rich minerals to the U.S. in exchange for information and assistance with nuclear power plants in Brazil, was precluded by the McMahon Act. This led to liaisons with West Germany and France in the 1950s. Events since then are outlined in terms of the impact of Brazil's political and economic crises. A nuclear sales agreement with Germany in 1975 has prompted concern over matters of independence and the threat of proliferation

  3. Neuromorphic atomic switch networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius V Avizienis

    Full Text Available Efforts to emulate the formidable information processing capabilities of the brain through neuromorphic engineering have been bolstered by recent progress in the fabrication of nonlinear, nanoscale circuit elements that exhibit synapse-like operational characteristics. However, conventional fabrication techniques are unable to efficiently generate structures with the highly complex interconnectivity found in biological neuronal networks. Here we demonstrate the physical realization of a self-assembled neuromorphic device which implements basic concepts of systems neuroscience through a hardware-based platform comprised of over a billion interconnected atomic-switch inorganic synapses embedded in a complex network of silver nanowires. Observations of network activation and passive harmonic generation demonstrate a collective response to input stimulus in agreement with recent theoretical predictions. Further, emergent behaviors unique to the complex network of atomic switches and akin to brain function are observed, namely spatially distributed memory, recurrent dynamics and the activation of feedforward subnetworks. These devices display the functional characteristics required for implementing unconventional, biologically and neurally inspired computational methodologies in a synthetic experimental system.

  4. Determining the location and nearest neighbours of aluminium in zeolites with atom probe tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea, Daniel E.; Arslan, Ilke; Liu, Jia; Ristanović, Zoran; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Zeolite catalysis is determined by a combination of pore architecture and Brønsted acidity. As Brønsted acid sites are formed by the substitution of AlO4 for SiO4 tetrahedra, it is of utmost importance to have information on the number as well as the location and neighbouring sites of framework aluminium. Unfortunately, such detailed information has not yet been obtained, mainly due to the lack of suitable characterization methods. Here we report, using the powerful atomic-scale analysis technique known as atom probe tomography, the quantitative spatial distribution of individual aluminium atoms, including their three-dimensional extent of segregation. Using a nearest-neighbour statistical analysis, we precisely determine the short-range distribution of aluminium over the different T-sites and determine the most probable Al–Al neighbouring distance within parent and steamed ZSM-5 crystals, as well as assess the long-range redistribution of aluminium upon zeolite steaming. PMID:26133270

  5. Experiments with cold hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonas, V.B.

    1981-01-01

    Numerous investigations of atomic processes in Waseous phase on the surface with participation of ''cold'' hydrogen atoms, made during the last years, are considered. The term ''cold atom'' means the range of relative collision energies E<10 MeV (respectively 'ultracold ' atoms at E< or approximately 1 MeV) which corresponds to the range of temperatures in tens (units) of K degrees. Three main ranges of investigations where extensive experimental programs are realized are considered: study of collisional processes with hydrogen atom participation, hydrogen atoms being of astrophysical interest; study of elastic atom-molecular scattering at superlow energies and studies on the problem of condensed hydrogen. Hydrogen atoms production is realized at dissociation in non-electrode high-frequency or superhigh-frequency discharge. A method of hydrogen quantum generator and of its modifications appeared to be rather an effective means to study collisional changes of spin state of hydrogen atoms. First important results on storage and stabilization of the gas of polarized hydrogen atoms are received

  6. Two-electron atomic systems confined within spheroidal boxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corella-Madueno, A.; Rosas, R.A.; Marin, J.L.; Riera, R.

    2000-03-15

    The direct variational method is used to estimate some interesting physical properties of the He atom and the Li{sup +} ion confined within impenetrable spheroidal boxes. A comparative investigation f the ground=state energy, pressure, polarizability, dipole, and quadrupole moments with those of the He atom inside boxes with paraboloidal walls is made. The overall results show a similar qualitative behavior. However, for Li{sup +} there are quantitative differences on such properties due to its major nuclear charge, as expected. The trial wave function is constructed as a product of two hydrogenic wave functions adapted to the geometry of the confining boxes.

  7. Atom probe tomography of lithium-doped network glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiwe, Gerd-Hendrik; Balogh, Zoltan; Schmitz, Guido

    2014-06-01

    Li-doped silicate and borate glasses are electronically insulating, but provide considerable ionic conductivity. Under measurement conditions of laser-assisted atom probe tomography, mobile Li ions are redistributed in response to high electric fields. In consequence, the direct interpretation of measured composition profiles is prevented. It is demonstrated that composition profiles are nevertheless well understood by a complex model taking into account the electronic structure of dielectric materials, ionic mobility and field screening. Quantitative data on band bending and field penetration during measurement are derived which are important in understanding laser-assisted atom probe tomography of dielectric materials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The Atomic Energy Commission's Annual Report to Congress for 1961. Major Activities in the Atomic Energy Programs, January - December 1961

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seaborg, Glenn T.

    1962-01-31

    The document represents the 1961 Annual Report of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to Congress. This year's report consists of four parts: Part One, The Atomic Energy Industry for 1961 and Related Activities; Part Two, Nuclear Power Programs for 1961; Part Three, Major Activities in Atomic Energy Programs; and Part Four, Regulatory Activities. Sixteen appendices are also included.

  9. The Atomic Energy Commission's Annual Report to Congress for 1959. Major Activities in the Atomic Energy Programs, January - December 1959

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCone, John A.

    1960-01-31

    The document represents the first annual reporting versus semiannual reporting of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) to Congress. The report consists of three parts: Part One, The Atomic Energy Industry in 1959 and Related Activities; Part Two, Major Activities in Atomic Energy Programs; and Part Three, Management of Radioactive Wastes. Nineteen appendices are also included.

  10. Can atom-surface potential measurements test atomic structure models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonij, Vincent P A; Klauss, Catherine E; Holmgren, William F; Cronin, Alexander D

    2011-06-30

    van der Waals (vdW) atom-surface potentials can be excellent benchmarks for atomic structure calculations. This is especially true if measurements are made with two different types of atoms interacting with the same surface sample. Here we show theoretically how ratios of vdW potential strengths (e.g., C₃(K)/C₃(Na)) depend sensitively on the properties of each atom, yet these ratios are relatively insensitive to properties of the surface. We discuss how C₃ ratios depend on atomic core electrons by using a two-oscillator model to represent the contribution from atomic valence electrons and core electrons separately. We explain why certain pairs of atoms are preferable to study for future experimental tests of atomic structure calculations. A well chosen pair of atoms (e.g., K and Na) will have a C₃ ratio that is insensitive to the permittivity of the surface, whereas a poorly chosen pair (e.g., K and He) will have a ratio of C₃ values that depends more strongly on the permittivity of the surface.

  11. The Chocolate Shop and Atomic Orbitals: A New Atomic Model Created by High School Students to Teach Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Atomic orbital theory is a difficult subject for many high school and beginning undergraduate students, as it includes mathematical concepts not yet covered in the school curriculum. Moreover, it requires certain ability for abstraction and imagination. A new atomic orbital model "the chocolate shop" created "by" students…

  12. The time-dependent close-coupling method for atomic and molecular collision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pindzola, M S [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Robicheaux, F [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Loch, S D [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Berengut, J C [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Topcu, T [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL (United States); Colgan, J [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Foster, M [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Griffin, D C [Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL (United States); Ballance, C P [Department of Physics, Rollins College, Winter Park, FL (United States); Schultz, D R [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Minami, T [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Badnell, N R [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Witthoeft, M C [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Plante, D R [Department of Mathematics, Stetson University, Deland, FL (United States); Mitnik, D M [Department of Physics, University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ludlow, J A [Department of Applied Mathematics, Queen' s University, Belfast (United Kingdom); Kleiman, U [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Dresden (Germany)

    2007-04-14

    We review the development of the time-dependent close-coupling method to study atomic and molecular few body dynamics. Applications include electron and photon collisions with atoms, molecules, and their ions. (topical review)

  13. Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) Automated Task Order Management System (ATOMS) Operation Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Shawn; Fikes, Lou A.

    2016-01-01

    This document describes operational aspects of the ATOMS system. The information provided is limited to the functionality provided by ATOMS and does not include information provided in the contractor's proprietary financial and task management system.

  14. Analytical Model of the Nonlinear Dynamics of Cantilever Tip-Sample Surface Interactions for Various Acoustic-Atomic Force Microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantrell, John H., Jr.; Cantrell, Sean A.

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical model of the interaction of the cantilever tip of the atomic force microscope (AFM) with the sample surface is developed that accounts for the nonlinearity of the tip-surface interaction force. The interaction is modeled as a nonlinear spring coupled at opposite ends to linear springs representing cantilever and sample surface oscillators. The model leads to a pair of coupled nonlinear differential equations that are solved analytically using a standard iteration procedure. Solutions are obtained for the phase and amplitude signals generated by various acoustic-atomic force microscope (A-AFM) techniques including force modulation microscopy, atomic force acoustic microscopy, ultrasonic force microscopy, heterodyne force microscopy, resonant difference-frequency atomic force ultrasonic microscopy (RDF-AFUM), and the commonly used intermittent contact mode (TappingMode) generally available on AFMs. The solutions are used to obtain a quantitative measure of image contrast resulting from variations in the Young modulus of the sample for the amplitude and phase images generated by the A-AFM techniques. Application of the model to RDF-AFUM and intermittent soft contact phase images of LaRC-cp2 polyimide polymer is discussed. The model predicts variations in the Young modulus of the material of 24 percent from the RDF-AFUM image and 18 percent from the intermittent soft contact image. Both predictions are in good agreement with the literature value of 21 percent obtained from independent, macroscopic measurements of sheet polymer material.

  15. Quantitative Imaging Biomarkers of NAFLD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinner, Sonja; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional imaging modalities, including ultrasonography (US), computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR), play an important role in the diagnosis and management of patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by allowing noninvasive diagnosis of hepatic steatosis. However, conventional imaging modalities are limited as biomarkers of NAFLD for various reasons. Multi-parametric quantitative MRI techniques overcome many of the shortcomings of conventional imaging and allow comprehensive and objective evaluation of NAFLD. MRI can provide unconfounded biomarkers of hepatic fat, iron, and fibrosis in a single examination—a virtual biopsy has become a clinical reality. In this article, we will review the utility and limitation of conventional US, CT, and MR imaging for the diagnosis NAFLD. Recent advances in imaging biomarkers of NAFLD are also discussed with an emphasis in multi-parametric quantitative MRI. PMID:26848588

  16. Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in a pressure-controlled electrothermal atomizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonardo, R F; Yuzefovsky, A I; Irwin, R L; Michel, R G

    1996-02-01

    A theoretical model was developed to describe the loss of analyte atoms in graphite furnaces during atomization. The model was based on two functions, one that described the supply of analyte by vaporization, and another that described the removal of the analyte by diffusion. Variation in working pressure was shown to affect the competition between these two processes. Optimal atomization efficiency was predicted to occur at a pressure where the supply of the analyte was maximized, and gas phase interactions between the analyte and matrix were minimized. Experiments to test the model included the direct determination of phosphorus and tellurium in nickel alloys and of cobalt in glass. In all cases, reduction in working pressure from atmospheric pressure to 7 Pa decreased sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude, but improved temporal peak shape. For the atomization of tellurium directly from a solid nickel alloy, and the atomization of cobalt from an aqueous solution, no change in sensitivity was observed as the working pressure was reduced from atmospheric pressure to approximately 70 kPa. If a reduction in working pressure affected only the diffusion of the analyte, poorer sensitivity should have been obtained. Only a commensurate increase in analyte vaporization could account for maintained sensitivity at lower working pressures. Overall, analyte vaporization was not dramatically improved at reduced working pressures, and maximum atomization efficiency was found to occur near atmospheric pressure.

  17. Spectroscopy of highly ionized atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, A.E.

    1987-01-01

    The atomic structure and decay characteristics of excited states in multiply ionized atoms represent a fertile testing ground for atomic calculations ranging from accurate ab initio theory for few-electron systems to practical semi-empirical approaches for many-electron species. Excitation of fast ions by thin foils generally produces the highest ionization stages for heavy ions in laboratory sources. The associated characteristics of spectroscopic purity and high time resolution provide unique capabilities for studying the atomic properties of highly-ionized atoms. This report is limited to a brief discussion of three classes of atomic systems that are experiencing current theoretical and experimental interest: precision structure of helium-like ions, fine structure of doubly-excited states, and lifetimes of metastable states. Specific measurements in each of these types of systems are mentioned, with emphasis on the relation to studies involving slow, highly-charged ions

  18. Self-lacing atom chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zandvliet, Harold J W; Van Houselt, Arie; Poelsema, Bene

    2009-01-01

    The structural and electronic properties of self-lacing atomic chains on Pt modified Ge(001) surfaces have been studied using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy. The self-lacing chains have a cross section of only one atom, are perfectly straight, thousands of atoms long and virtually defect free. The atomic chains are composed of dimers that have their bonds aligned in a direction parallel to the chain direction. At low temperatures the atomic chains undergo a Peierls transition: the periodicity of the chains doubles from a 2 x to a 4 x periodicity and an energy gap opens up. Furthermore, at low temperatures (T<80 K) novel quasi-one-dimensional electronic states are found. These quasi-one-dimensional electronic states originate from an electronic state of the underlying terrace that is confined between the atomic chains.

  19. Study of Characterization Methods to Evaluate Atomic Layer Deposited Coatings Including the Application on Complex Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Wegler, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    X-ray imaging is one of the most important diagnostic tools in everyday clinical practice, be it conventional shadow imaging or sophisticated computed tomography (CT). The detection of x-rays is in a rapidly growing number of cases realized with pixel detectors, i.e. arrays of multiple single scintillators and photo detectors in order to obtain high resolution digital picture data. Cesium iodide (CsI) is a widely used scintillating material as it features high conversion effici...

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. Publications catalogue 2001-2002, including IAEA technical documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA issued and forthcoming between January 2001 and September 2002. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. The lists all publications by subject category, in alphabetical order within each category

  1. Effect of neurosteroids on a model lipid bilayer including cholesterol: An Atomic Force Microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Mattia; Balleza, Daniel; Vena, Giulia; Puia, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Alessandrini, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Amphiphilic molecules which have a biological effect on specific membrane proteins, could also affect lipid bilayer properties possibly resulting in a modulation of the overall membrane behavior. In light of this consideration, it is important to study the possible effects of amphiphilic molecule of pharmacological interest on model systems which recapitulate some of the main properties of the biological plasma membranes. In this work we studied the effect of a neurosteroid, Allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or Allo), on a model bilayer composed by the ternary lipid mixture DOPC/bSM/chol. We chose ternary mixtures which present, at room temperature, a phase coexistence of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains and which reside near to a critical point. We found that Allo, which is able to strongly partition in the lipid bilayer, induces a marked increase in the bilayer area and modifies the relative proportion of the two phases favoring the Ld phase. We also found that the neurosteroid shifts the miscibility temperature to higher values in a way similarly to what happens when the cholesterol concentration is decreased. Interestingly, an isoform of Allo, isoAllopregnanolone (3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or isoAllo), known to inhibit the effects of Allo on GABAA receptors, has an opposite effect on the bilayer properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Atomic war field Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calder, N.

    1980-01-01

    Progressive atomic weapons, results of a perfect and perfidious technology face each other in the centre of a possible crisis - in Europe. The strategists of the Warszhaw Pact and of Nato seem very optimistic, which they owe to their professions, the population's increasing fear of a war, however, can no longer be denied. Nervous military personnel, political and religions fanatics and perplexed politicians sit at the switches of fear - without a concept and without alternatives. Despite this alarming conditions, Nigel Calder who has investigated in the USA and in the USSR, and in Europe, managed to remain a calm spectator of the imminent apocalypse. Without compromises and clearly he analyses the nearly hopeless consequences resulting from the changed world-political situation, the tremendously fast development of the arms technology, and the crazy strategical doctrines in East and West and in the Third World. (orig./UA) [de

  3. Atomic Basic Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  4. Atomic energy law Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof, W.

    1976-01-01

    The volume contains the valid national legal regulations of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in the field of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy as per October 1st, 1975. These regulations are arranged according to the following subjects: 1) general atomic energy law and organization; 2) liability; 3) nuclear facilities, reactor ships, fissionable material and ores; 4) radiation protection; 5) carriage; 6) import and export; 7) international agreements. Within these subject groups the regulations are presented chronologically. They have consecutive numbers, printed at the top of the margins for easier location. As a rule, the full text of the laws, royal ordonances and ministerial orders is given. However, in the case of regulations only containing in parts stipulations concerning nuclear law, only the pertinent texts have been considered. (orig./HP) [de

  5. Atomic iodine laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisk, G.A.; Gusinow, M.A.; Hays, A.K.; Padrick, T.D.; Palmer, R.E.; Rice, J.K.; Truby, F.K.; Riley, M.E.

    1978-05-01

    The atomic iodine photodissociation laser has been under intensive study for a number of years. The physics associated with this system is now well understood and it is possible to produce a 0.1 nsec (or longer) near-diffraction-limited laser pulse which can be amplified with negligible temporal distortion and little spatial deformation. The output of either a saturated or unsaturated amplifier consists of a high-fidelity near-diffraction-limited, energetic laser pulse. The report is divided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is a survey of the important areas affecting efficient laser operation and summarizes the findings of Chap. 2. Chapter 2 presents detailed discussions and evaluations pertinent to pumps, chemical regeneration, and other elements in the overall laser system. Chapter 3 briefly discusses those areas that require further work and the nature of the work required to complete the full-scale evaluation of the applicability of the iodine photodissociation laser to the inertial confinement program.

  6. A review on laser diagnostics on atomization and evaporation of liquid fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuyin; Li, Shiyan; Lin, Baiyang; Liu, Yang; Wu, Jian; Xu, Bin

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the atomization and evaporation processes of liquid fuel, there are several laser diagnostics available in present. In this paper, the recent progress in laser diagnostics for atomization and evaporation will be introduced, as two categories: atomization and evaporation. The diagnostics for the former includes the primary breakup from liquid jet to ligaments or droplets and the secondary atomization from a bigger droplet to a smaller one, and the latter includes the droplet evaporation and the vapor distributions in a spray.

  7. Atomic Australia: 1944-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cawte, Alice.

    1992-01-01

    This book tells how successive Australian governments pursued the elusive uranium dream. With Australian uranium committed to the West's atomic arsenals, Australia seemed set to become a nation powered by the atom. But by the mid-1950 the Australian government learnt that their expectations were premature, if not unrealistic. The background of the creation of the Australian Atomic Energy Commission is also given along with the examination of the uranium controversies of the 1970s and 1980s. 150 refs

  8. Molecular invariants: atomic group valence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mundim, K.C.; Giambiagi, M.; Giambiagi, M.S. de.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular invariants may be deduced in a very compact way through Grassman algebra. In this work, a generalized valence is defined for an atomic group; it reduces to the Known expressions for the case of an atom in a molecule. It is the same of the correlations between the fluctions of the atomic charges qc and qd (C belongs to the group and D does not) around their average values. Numerical results agree with chemical expectation. (author) [pt

  9. Study on laser atomic spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Min; Song, Kyu Seok; Jeong, Do Young; Kim, Chul Joong; Han, Phil Soon

    1992-01-01

    Electric discharge type atomic vaporizer is developed for the spectroscopic study on actinide elements. Laser induced fluorescence study on actinide elements is performed by using this high temperature type atomizer. For the effective photoionization of elements, copper vapor laser pumped dye laser and electron beam heating type atomic vaporizer are built and their characteristics are measured. In addition, resonance ionization mass spectroscopic analysis for lead sample as well as laser induced fluorescence study on uranium sample in solution phase is made. (Author)

  10. Giant atoms cast long shadow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amato, I.

    1996-01-01

    Atoms swollen with energy can serve as supersensitive detectors. They also probe the shadow realm where the quantum world of the atom gives way to the familiar classical world. Created in the laboratory, where they live for a few milliseconds inside vacuum chambers, Rydberg atoms acquire their girth when one or sometimes two of their electrons are excited to very high energy levels, displacing them far from the nuclear core. This article describes the atoms, the history of their identification, and future possibilities. 2 figs

  11. The Belgian repository of fundamental atomic data and stellar spectra (BRASS). I. Cross-matching atomic databases of astrophysical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverick, M.; Lobel, A.; Merle, T.; Royer, P.; Martayan, C.; David, M.; Hensberge, H.; Thienpont, E.

    2018-04-01

    with different retrieved literature log(gf) values, and discuss the impact of these uncertain log(gf) values on quantitative spectroscopy. All cross-matched atomic data and duplicate transition pairs are available to download at http://brass.sdf.org

  12. Efficiency of entanglement of distant atoms by projective measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivares Renteria, Georgina; Zippilli, Stefano; Morigi, Giovanna [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Rohde, Felix; Schuck, Carsten; Eschner, Juergen [ICFO - Institut de CIencies Fotoniques, 08860 Castelldefels, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-07-01

    We compare the efficiency of two schemes for the preparation of entangled states of distant atoms. In these proposals the atoms do not interact and the entanglement is realized by means of the measurement of the scattered field which project the two atoms into the desired state. We quantify the efficiency of the schemes using the fidelity between the state of the system after the detection of a photon and an ideal entangled state of the two atoms. In the first scheme the atoms interact with two optical cavities and the enhanced probability of emission into the cavities allows for high detection efficiency. This scheme is limited by the finite probability of emission of two photons. Thus, even under the assumption of perfect detection efficiency, the fidelity of the scheme never reaches unity. In the second scheme emission of two photons is suppressed by low excitation strength, but the detection efficiency is low since the atoms scatter into free space and only a small fraction of the photons is measured. In this case the fidelity is conditioned on single-photon detection and results to be higher. The comparison is quantitatively evaluated for an ongoing experiment with two distant trapped single Ca+ ions.

  13. Atomic masses 1995. The 1995 atomic mass evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audi, G.; Wapstra, A.H.

    1995-01-01

    The 1995 atomic mass evaluation by G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra is documented. The resulting data files containing recommended values of atomic masses, obtained by experiment or systematics, and related data such as reaction and separation energies are described. The data files can be obtained through online services from several nuclear data centers or on magnetic tape, free of charge. (author)

  14. Systematics of atom-atom collision strengths at high speeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillespie, G.H.; Inokuti, M.

    1980-01-01

    The collision strengths for atom-atom collisions at high speeds are calculated in the first Born approximation. We studied four classes of collisions, distinguished depending upon whether each of the collision partners becomes excited or not. The results of numerical calculations of the collision strengths are presented for all neutral atoms with Z< or =18. The calculations are based on atomic form factors and incoherent scattering functions found in the literature. The relative contribution of each class of collision processes to the total collision cross section is examined in detail. In general, inelastic processes dominate for low-Z atoms, while elastic scattering is more important for large Z. Other systematics of the collision strengths are comprehensively discussed. The relevant experimental literature has been surveyed and the results of this work for the three collision systems H-He, He-He, and H-Ar are compared with the data for electron-loss processes. Finally, suggestions are made for future work in measurements of atom-atom and ion-atom collision cross sections

  15. Atomic Force Microscopy and Real Atomic Resolution. Simple Computer Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsos, V.; Manias, E.; Brinke, G. ten; Hadziioannou, G.

    1994-01-01

    Using a simple computer simulation for AFM imaging in the contact mode, pictures with true and false atomic resolution are demonstrated. The surface probed consists of two f.c.c. (111) planes and an atomic vacancy is introduced in the upper layer. Changing the size of the effective tip and its

  16. Atomic masses 1993. The 1993 atomic mass evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audi, G.; Wapstra, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    The 1993 atomic mass evaluation by G. Audi and A.H. Wapstra is documented. The resulting data files containing recommended values of atomic masses, obtained by experiment of systematics, and related data such as reaction and separation energies are described. The data files can be obtained through online services from several nuclear data centers or on magnetic tape, free of charge. (author)

  17. prepared via atom transfer radical polymerization, reverse atom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesis and characterization of poly(2-ethylhexyl acrylate) prepared via atom transfer radical polymerization, reverse atom transfer radical polymerization and ... Zydex Industries, 25-A Gandhi Oil Mill Compound, Gorwa, Vadodara 390 016, India; Rubber Technology Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, ...

  18. Non-Elastic Processes in Atom Rydberg-Atom Collisions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Inour previous research, it has been demonstrated that inelastic processes in atom Rydberg-atom collisions, such as chemi-ionization and ( n − n ′ ) mixing, should be considered together. Here we will review the present state-of-the-art and the actual problems. In this context, we will consider the influence ...

  19. Concept of effective states of atoms in compounds to describe properties determined by the densities of valence electrons in atomic cores

    OpenAIRE

    Titov, Anatoly V.; Lomachuk, Yuriy V.; Skripnikov, Leonid V.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for describing the effective electronic states of "atoms in compounds" to study the properties of molecules and condensed matter which are circumscribed by the operators heavily concentrated in atomic cores is proposed. Among the properties are hyperfine structure, space parity (P) and time reversal invariance (T) nonconservation effects, chemical shifts of x-ray emission lines (XES), M\\"{o}ssbauer effect, etc. Advantage of the approach is that a good quantitative agreement of ...

  20. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  1. Quantitative episode trees

    OpenAIRE

    Nanni, Mirco; Rigotti, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Among the family of the local patterns, episodes are com- monly used when mining a single or multiple sequences of discrete events. An episode re?ects a qualitative relation is-followed-by over event types, and the re?nement of episodes to incorporate quantitative temporal in- formation is still an on going research, with many application opportu- nities. In this paper, focusing on serial episodes, we design such a re?ne- ment called quantitative episodes and give a corresponding extraction a...

  2. Ultrafast quantitative time-stretch imaging flow cytometry of phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Queenie T. K.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive quantification of phytoplankton abundance, sizes and other parameters, e.g. biomasses, has been an important, yet daunting task in aquatic sciences and biofuel research. It is primarily because of the lack of effective tool to image and thus accurately profile individual microalgae in a large population. The phytoplankton species are highly diversified and heterogeneous in terms of their sizes and the richness in morphological complexity. This fact makes time-stretch imaging, a new ultrafast real-time optical imaging technology, particularly suitable for ultralarge-scale taxonomic classification of phytoplankton together with quantitative image recognition and analysis. We here demonstrate quantitative imaging flow cytometry of single phytoplankton based on quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) - a new time-stretch imaging modality for label-free quantitative phase imaging without interferometric implementations. Sharing the similar concept of Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM accesses multiple phase-gradient contrasts of each single phytoplankton, from which the quantitative phase profile is computed. We employ such system to capture, at an imaging line-scan rate of 11.6 MHz, high-resolution images of two phytoplankton populations (scenedesmus and chlamydomonas) in ultrafast microfluidic flow (3 m/s). We further perform quantitative taxonomic screening analysis enabled by this technique. More importantly, the system can also generate quantitative phase images of single phytoplankton. This is especially useful for label-free quantification of biomasses (e.g. lipid droplets) of the particular species of interest - an important task adopted in biofuel applications. Combining machine learning for automated classification, Q-ATOM could be an attractive platform for continuous and real-time ultralarge-scale single-phytoplankton analysis.

  3. Young students's opinion about atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barroso, Belen; Martin, Hugo R.

    2006-01-01

    The present research work was performed in answer to a requirement that the CNEA-RC made to students of the Public and Institutional Relations Degree of the UES21, as a part of activities carried out in the framework of the Academic Cooperation Agreement between both institutions. In this case the students had to attend the Professional Practical course during the first semester of 2006, which included a short period in some company or organization. The Degree of Knowledge and the Opinion of the students from the Cycle of Specialization of the Province of Cordoba Educational System (ages between 15 and 17 years old), on the activities that are made in the site of CNEA-RC and DIOXITEK SA at Alta Cordoba neighborhood in Cordoba city has been analyzed. The same aspects were analyzed for Dioxitek's activities (equipment, raw materials, risk performance, etc.). Although the activities made at CNEA-RC involved during 2005/6 about 4000 students, due to the short time available for the practical part only the data of two schools located near the facilities were processed. Three aspects of the space conformed between the public and the general opinion were analyzed: the customs, the stereotypes and the attitudes of the people. These aspects were taken as the characteristics to describe to the opinions, their direction and intensity. The analysis was based on an exploratory investigation of type, characterized by its flexibility. The field work was of quantitative character. The surveys were structured with closed questions (categories of answers delimited previously on which the students must answer). For its design we used diverse sources of intelligence, such as pages of Internet, pamphlets, magazines, annual balances of the organizations, etc. The main results were the following: 1) The greater percentage of students declared to have little information on Atomic Energy. Only 4% declared to have abundant knowledge on the subject. 2) A 38% of the students indicated that

  4. Characteristics of single-atom trapping in a magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Seokchan; Choi, Youngwoon; Park, Sangbum; Ji, Wangxi; Lee, Jai-Hyung; An, Kyungwon

    2007-01-01

    A quantitative study on characteristics of a magneto-optical trap with a single or a few atoms is presented. A very small number of 85 Rb atoms were trapped in a micron-size magneto-optical trap with a high magnetic-field gradient. In order to find the optimum condition for a single-atom trap, we have investigated how the number of atoms and the size of atomic cloud change as various experimental parameters, such as a magnetic-field gradient and the trapping laser intensity and detuning. The averaged number of atoms was measured very accurately with a calibration procedure based on the single-atom saturation curve of resonance fluorescence. In addition, the number of atoms in a trap could be controlled by suppressing stochastic loading events by means of a real-time active feedback on the magnetic-field gradient

  5. Antitumor activity of 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene derivatives and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jukić, Marijana; Rastija, Vesna; Opačak-Bernardi, Teuta; Stolić, Ivana; Krstulović, Luka; Bajić, Miroslav; Glavaš-Obrovac, Ljubica

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate nine newly synthesized amidine derivatives of 3,4- ethylenedioxythiophene (3,4-EDOT) for their cytotoxic activity against a panel of human cancer cell lines and to perform a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis for the antitumor activity of a total of 27 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene derivatives. Induction of apoptosis was investigated on the selected compounds, along with delivery options for the optimization of activity. The best obtained QSAR models include the following group of descriptors: BCUT, WHIM, 2D autocorrelations, 3D-MoRSE, GETAWAY descriptors, 2D frequency fingerprint and information indices. Obtained QSAR models should be relieved in elucidation of important physicochemical and structural requirements for this biological activity. Highly potent molecules have a symmetrical arrangement of substituents along the x axis, high frequency of distance between N and O atoms at topological distance 9, as well as between C and N atoms at topological distance 10, and more C atoms located at topological distances 6 and 3. Based on the conclusion given in the QSAR analysis, a new compound with possible great activity was proposed.

  6. Development of indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer for producing metal powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, K.K.; Qasim, A.M.; Ahmed, P.

    2011-01-01

    Gas atomization is one of the methods for production of clean metal powders at relatively moderate cost. A laboratory scale gas atomizer was designed and fabricated indigenously to produce metal powders with a batch capacity of 500 g of copper (Cu). The design includes several features regarding fabrication and operation to provide optimum conditions for atomization. The inner diameter of atomizing chamber is 440 mm and its height is 1200 mm. The atomizing nozzle is of annular confined convergent type with an angle of 25 degree. Argon gas at desired pressure has been used for atomizing the metals to produce relatively clean powders. A provision has also been made to view the atomization process. The indigenous laboratory scale gas atomizer was used to produce tin (Sn) and copper (Cu) powders with different atomizing gas pressures ranging from 2 to 10 bar. The particle size of different powders produced ranges from 40 to 400 im. (author)

  7. Sensitive Detection of Individual Neutral Atoms in a Strong Coupling Cavity QED System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Peng-Fei; Zhang Yu-Chi; Li Gang; Du Jin-Jin; Zhang Yan-Feng; Guo Yan-Qiang; Wang Jun-Min; Zhang Tian-Cai; Li Wei-Dong

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate real-time detection of individual cesium atoms by using a high-finesse optical micro-cavity in a strong coupling regime. A cloud of cesium atoms is trapped in a magneto-optical trap positioned at 5 mm above the micro-cavity center. The atoms fall down freely in gravitation after shutting off the magneto-optical trap and pass through the cavity. The cavity transmission is strongly affected by the atoms in the cavity, which enables the micro-cavity to sense the atoms individually. We detect the single atom transits either in the resonance or various detunings. The single atom vacuum-Rabi splitting is directly measured to be Ω = 2π × 23.9 MHz. The average duration of atom-cavity coupling of about 110 μs is obtained according to the probability distribution of the atom transits. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  8. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume of Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion is devoted to atomic collision processes of helium atoms and of beryllium and boron atoms and ions in fusion plasmas. Most of the articles included in this volume are extended versions of the contributions presented at the IAEA experts' meetings on Atomic Data for Helium Beam Fusion Alpha Particle Diagnostics and on the Atomic Database for Beryllium and Boron, held in June 1991 at the IAEA headquarters in Vienna, or have resulted from the cross-section data analyses and evaluations performed by the working groups of these meetings. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Polymorphism of dislocation core structures at the atomic scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongchang; Saito, Mitsuhiro; McKenna, Keith P; Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Dislocation defects together with their associated strain fields and segregated impurities are of considerable significance in many areas of materials science. However, their atomic-scale structures have remained extremely challenging to resolve, limiting our understanding of these ubiquitous defects. Here, by developing a complex modelling approach in combination with bicrystal experiments and systematic atomic-resolution imaging, we are now able to pinpoint individual dislocation cores at the atomic scale, leading to the discovery that even simple magnesium oxide can exhibit polymorphism of core structures for a given dislocation species. These polymorphic cores are associated with local variations in strain fields, segregation of defects, and electronic states, adding a new dimension to understanding the properties of dislocations in real materials. The findings advance our fundamental understanding of basic behaviours of dislocations and demonstrate that quantitative prediction and characterization of dislocations in real materials is possible.

  10. Atomic absorption instrument functional description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystroff, R.I.; Boyle, W.G. Jr.; Barton, G.W. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    This report describes a proposed system for automating atomic absorption analysis. The system consists of two atomic absorption instruments and an automatic sampler that can be attached to either instrument. A computer program controls the sampling and gathers data. The program then uses the data to perform bookkeeping, data processing, and report writing

  11. Electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is a new branch of applied physics that has potential for application in many areas. The authors present an introduction to laser cooling and magnetic trapping. Some basic ideas and fundamental limitations are discussed, and the first successful experiments are reviewed. Trapping a neutral object depends on the interaction between an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and a multiple moment that results in the exchange of kinetic for potential energy. In neutral atom traps, the potential energy must be stored as internal atomic energy, resulting in two immediate and extremely important consequences. First, the atomic energy levels will necessarily shift as the atoms move in the trap, and, second, practical traps for ground state neutral atoms atr necessarily very shallow compared to thermal energy. This small depth also dictates stringent vacuum requirements because a trapped atom cannot survive a single collision with a thermal energy background gas molecule. Neutral trapping, therefore, depends on substantial cooling of a thermal atomic sample and is inextricably connected with the cooling process

  12. High efficiency atomic hydrogen source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagomarsino, V.; Bassi, D.; Bertok, E.; De Paz, M.; Tommasini, F.

    1974-01-01

    This work presents preliminary results of research intended to produce a M.W. discharge atomic hydrogen source with good dissociation at pressures larger than 10 torr. Analysis of the recombination process at these pressures shows that the volume recombination by three body collisions may be more important than wall recombination or loss of atoms by diffusion and flow outside the discharge region

  13. Stopping atoms with diode lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, R.N.; Wieman, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    The use of light pressure to cool and stop neutral atoms has been an area of considerable interest recently. Cooled neutral atoms are needed for a variety of interesting experiments involving neutral atom traps and ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. Laser cooling of sodium has previously been demonstrated using elegant but quite elaborate apparatus. These techniques employed stabilized dye lasers and a variety of additional sophisticated hardware. The authors have demonstrated that a frequency chirp technique can be implemented using inexpensive diode lasers and simple electronics. In this technique the atoms in an atomic beam scatter resonant photons from a counterpropagating laser beam. The momentum transfer from the photons slows the atoms. The primary difficulty is that as the atoms slow their Doppler shift changes, and so they are no longer in resonance with the incident photons. In the frequency chirp technique this is solved by rapidly changing the laser frequency so that the atoms remain in resonance. To achieve the necessary frequency sweep with a dye laser one must use an extremely sophisticated high-speed electrooptic modulator. With a diode laser, however, the frequency can be smoothly and rapidly varied over many gigahertz simply by changing the injection current

  14. Atomic toposes and countable categoricity

    OpenAIRE

    Caramello, Olivia

    2008-01-01

    We give a model-theoretic characterization of the class of geometric theories classified by an atomic topos having enough points; in particular, we show that every complete geometric theory classified by an atomic topos is countably categorical. Some applications are also discussed.

  15. Laser cooling of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    A qualitative description of laser cooling of neutral atoms is given. Two of the most important mechanisms utilized in laser cooling, the so-called Doppler Cooling and Sisyphus Cooling, are reviewed. The minimum temperature reached by the atoms is derived using simple arguments. (Author) 7 refs

  16. Bohmian picture of Rydberg atoms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Unlike the previous theoretical results based on standard quantum mechanics that established the nearly elliptical shapes for the centre-of-mass motion in Rydberg atoms using numerical simulations, we show analytically that the Bohmian trajectories in Rydberg atoms are nearly elliptical.

  17. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1954-01-01

    This Act provides for the setting up of an Atomic Energy Authority for the United Kingdom. It also makes provision for the Authority's composition, powers, duties, rights and liabilities, and may amend, as a consequence of the establishment of the Authority and in connection therewith, the Atomic Energy Act, 1946, the Radioactive Substances Act 1948 and other relevant enactments. (NEA) [fr

  18. Extending Quantitative Easing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallett, Andrew Hughes; Fiedler, Salomon; Kooths, Stefan

    The notes in this compilation address the pros and cons associated with the extension of ECB quantitative easing programme of asset purchases. The notes have been requested by the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs as an input for the February 2017 session of the Monetary Dialogue....

  19. Quantitative Compositional Reasoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatterjee, K.; de Alfaro, L.; Faella, M.; Henzinger, T.A.; Majumdar, R.; Stoelinga, Mariëlle Ida Antoinette

    We present a compositional theory of system verifica tion, where specifications assign real-numbered costs to systems. These costs can express a wide variety of quantitative system properties, such as resource consumption, price or a measure of how well a system satisfies its specification. The

  20. Quantitative AES at Interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lejček, Pavel; Hofmann, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2011), s. 241-246 ISSN 1341-1756 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/08/0369 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : quantitative AES * interfaces * grain boundaries * fracture surfaces Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  1. Cold atoms close to surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Wildermuth, Stephan; Hofferberth, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic atom optical devices integrated on atom chips allow to precisely control and manipulate ultra-cold (T atoms and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) close to surfaces. The relevant energy scale of a BEC is extremely small (down to ... be utilized as a sensor for variations of the potential energy of the atoms close to the surface. Here we describe how to use trapped atoms as a measurement device and analyze the performance and flexibility of the field sensor. We demonstrate microscopic magnetic imaging with simultaneous high spatial...... variations of the current flow direction, resulting from local properties of the wire. These disorder potentials found near lithographically fabricated wires are two orders of magnitude smaller than those measured close to electroplated conductors....

  2. Atomic spectroscopy and radiative processes

    CERN Document Server

    Landi Degl'Innocenti, Egidio

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the basic physical principles of atomic spectroscopy and the absorption and emission of radiation in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. It summarizes the basics of electromagnetism and thermodynamics and then describes in detail the theory of atomic spectra for complex atoms, with emphasis on astrophysical applications. Both equilibrium and non-equilibrium phenomena in plasmas are considered. The interaction between radiation and matter is described, together with various types of radiation (e.g., cyclotron, synchrotron, bremsstrahlung, Compton). The basic theory of polarization is explained, as is the theory of radiative transfer for astrophysical applications. Atomic Spectroscopy and Radiative Processes bridges the gap between basic books on atomic spectroscopy and the very specialized publications for the advanced researcher: it will provide under- and postgraduates with a clear in-depth description of theoretical aspects, supported by practical examples of applications.

  3. ILO and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    The work of the International Labour Organisation in the field of atomic energy has been concerned primarily with the protection of the worker against radiation; in this respect it developed the work carried out before the war on the occupational pathology of roentgen ray operators, radium and radioactive substances and uranium. In view of the extremely serious consequences to society and the individual that would result from a neglect of the essential precautions, the ILO has to adopt international standards setting out the essential precautions that should be observed in a work which may entail a radiation hazard. The 44th International Labour Conference, meeting in the summer of 1960, adopted a convention and recommendation on this subject. The Convention applies to all activities involving exposure of workers to ionizing radiations in the course of their work and provides that each Member of the ILO which ratifies it shall undertake to give effect to it by means of laws or regulations, codes of practice or other appropriate means. It further provides that the necessary steps taken at the national level to ensure effective protection should be progressively brought in line with the provisions of the Convention after its ratification

  4. Atoms in astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Eissner, W; Hummer, D; Percival, I

    1983-01-01

    It is hard to appreciate but nevertheless true that Michael John Seaton, known internationally for the enthusiasm and skill with which he pursues his research in atomic physics and astrophysics, will be sixty years old on the 16th of January 1983. To mark this occasion some of his colleagues and former students have prepared this volume. It contains articles that de­ scribe some of the topics that have attracted his attention since he first started his research work at University College London so many years ago. Seaton's association with University College London has now stretched over a period of some 37 years, first as an undergraduate student, then as a research student, and then, successively, as Assistant Lecturer, Lecturer, Reader, and Professor. Seaton arrived at University College London in 1946 to become an undergraduate in the Physics Department, having just left the Royal Air Force in which he had served as a navigator in the Pathfinder Force of Bomber Command. There are a number of stories of ho...

  5. Safeguards for the atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Concern over the destructive potentialities of nuclear energy has grown all over the world. In fact, it was this concern, coupled with an awareness of the equally great potentialities for peaceful prosperity, that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency. That nuclear energy should be used solely for peaceful purposes is an ideal to which all people would subscribe. Realization of this ideal, however, is dependent on many complex factors which are outside the scope of the Agency. In its own limited sphere, however, the Agency has the responsibility to ensure that in its efforts to promote the peaceful uses it does not in any way increase the potentiality of military use. The possibility of military application is not the only danger that the Agency must guard against, it has a further function arising from the nature of the materials needed in atomic energy work. Since the basic materials are radioactive and since all ionizing radiation is potentially dangerous, the Agency must ensure that in helping its Member States to develop the peaceful uses of atomic energy it does not increase the hazards of nuclear radiation or radioactive contamination. It must establish standards of safe practice for activities carried out under its auspices or with its assistance. Since the safeguards will have two distinct objectives, a distinction can be made between those which will be designed to prevent the diversion of Agency assistance to military use and those against health and safety hazards. So far as the health and safety measures are concerned, a good deal of work has already been done in determining the standards of safe practice which will be the basis for the relevant rules. The Agency has published the first in its series of safety manuals, 'Safe Handling of Radioisotopes', which deals with such standards. Safeguards against the diversion or loss of nuclear materials and facilities are more difficult to devise. It is not considered feasible for

  6. (including travel dates) Proposed itinerary

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashok

    31 July to 22 August 2012 (including travel dates). Proposed itinerary: Arrival in Bangalore on 1 August. 1-5 August: Bangalore, Karnataka. Suggested institutions: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore. St Johns Medical College & Hospital, Bangalore. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre, Bangalore. 6-8 August: Chennai, TN.

  7. The 1986-87 atomic mass predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haustein, P. E.

    1987-12-01

    A project to perform a comprehensive update of the atomic mass predictions has recently been concluded and will be published shortly in Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables. The project evolved from an ongoing comparison between available mass predictions and reports of newly measured masses of isotopes throughout the mass surface. These comparisons have highlighted a variety of features in current mass models which are responsible for predictions that diverge from masses determined experimentally. The need for a comprehensive update of the atomic mass predictions was therefore apparent and the project was organized and began at the last mass conference (AMCO-VII). Project participants included: Pape and Anthony; Dussel, Caurier and Zuker; Möller and Nix; Möller, Myers, Swiatecki and Treiner; Comay, Kelson, and Zidon; Satpathy and Nayak; Tachibana, Uno, Yamada and Yamada; Spanier and Johansson; Jänecke and Masson; and Wapstra, Audi and Hoekstra. An overview of the new atomic mass predictions may be obtained by written request.

  8. Recent Developments in the NIST Atomic Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramida, Alexander

    2011-05-01

    New versions of the NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD, v. 4.0) and three bibliographic databases (Atomic Energy Levels and Spectra, v. 2.0, Atomic Transition Probabilities, v. 9.0, and Atomic Line Broadening and Shapes, v. 3.0) have recently been released. In this contribution I will describe the main changes in the way users get the data through the Web. The contents of ASD have been significantly extended. In particular, the data on highly ionized tungsten (W III-LXXIV) have been added from a recently published NIST compilation. The tables for Fe I and Fe II have been replaced with newer, much more extensive lists (10000 lines for Fe I). The other updated or new spectra include H, D, T, He I-II, Li I-III, Be I-IV, B I-V, C I-II, N I-II, O I-II, Na I-X, K I-XIX, and Hg I. The new version of ASD now incorporates data on isotopes of several elements. I will describe some of the issues the NIST ASD Team faces when updating the data.

  9. Recent Developments in the NIST Atomic Databases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramida, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    New versions of the NIST Atomic Spectra Database (ASD, v. 4.0) and three bibliographic databases (Atomic Energy Levels and Spectra, v. 2.0, Atomic Transition Probabilities, v. 9.0, and Atomic Line Broadening and Shapes, v. 3.0) have recently been released. In this contribution I will describe the main changes in the way users get the data through the Web. The contents of ASD have been significantly extended. In particular, the data on highly ionized tungsten (W III-LXXIV) have been added from a recently published NIST compilation. The tables for Fe I and Fe II have been replaced with newer, much more extensive lists (10000 lines for Fe I). The other updated or new spectra include H, D, T, He I-II, Li I-III, Be I-IV, B I-V, C I-II, N I-II, O I-II, Na I-X, K I-XIX, and Hg I. The new version of ASD now incorporates data on isotopes of several elements. I will describe some of the issues the NIST ASD Team faces when updating the data.

  10. Human factors in atomic power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Ryutaro

    1997-01-01

    To ensure safety should have priority over all other things in atomic power plants. In Chernobyl accident, however, various human factors including the systems for bulb check after inspection and communication, troubles in the interface between hardwares such as warning speakers and instruments, and their operators, those in education and training for operators and those in the general management of the plant have been pointed out. Therefore, the principles and the practical measures from the aspect of human factors in atomic power plants were discussed here. The word, ''human factor'' was given a definition in terms of the direct cause and the intellectual system. An explanatory model for human factors, model SHEL constructed by The Tokyo Electric Power Co., Ltd., Inc. was presented; the four letter mean software(S), hardware(H), environment(E) and liveware(L). In the plants of the company, systemic measures for human error factors are taken now in all steps not only for design, operation and repairing but also the step for safety culture. Further, the level required for the safety against atomic power is higher in the company than those in other fields. Thus, the central principle in atomic power plants is changing from the previous views that technology is paid greater importance to a view regarding human as most importance. (M.N.)

  11. Atomic Configuration and Conductance of Tantalum Single-Atom Contacts and Single-Atom Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizuka, Tokushi; Murata, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    The tensile deformation and successive fracture process of tantalum (Ta) nanocontacts (NCs) while applying various bias voltages was observed in situ by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy using a picometer-precision dual-goniometer nanotip manipulation technique. Simultaneously, the variation in the conductance of the contacts was measured. The NCs were thinned atom by atom during mechanical elongation, resulting in the formation of two types of single-atom cross-sectional contacts: single-atom contacts (SACs) and single-atom wires (SAWs), in which two electrodes, typically nanotips, are connected by a single shared atom or a one-line array of single atoms, respectively. When the bias voltage was 11 mV, Ta SACs were formed during tensile deformation; however, elongation of the single-atom cross-sectional part did not occur. In contrast, when the bias voltage was increased to 200 mV, Ta SACs were first formed during the tensile deformation, followed by elongation of the single-atom cross section up to a length of three atoms, i.e., the formation of SAWs. Thus, the present observation shows that Ta SAWs are stable even at such a high bias voltage. The conductance of the SACs was approximately 0.10G0 (G0 = 2e2/h, where e is the electron charge and h is Planck’s constant), whereas the conductance of the three-atom-long SAWs ranged from 0.01G0 to 0.22G0. Lower conductances were observed for linear SAWs, whereas higher conductances resulted from kinked SAWs.

  12. Atomic force microscopy-based shape analysis of heart mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Ja; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has become an important medical and biological tool for the noninvasive imaging of cells and biomaterials in medical, biological, and biophysical research. The major advantages of AFM over conventional optical and electron microscopes for bio-imaging include the facts that no special coating is required and that imaging can be done in all environments-air, vacuum, or aqueous conditions. In addition, it can also precisely determine pico-nano Newton force interactions between the probe tip and the sample surface from force-distance curve measurements.It is widely known that mitochondrial swelling is one of the most important indicators of the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore. As mitochondrial swelling is an ultrastructural change, quantitative analysis of this change requires high-resolution microscopic methods such as AFM. Here, we describe the use of AFM-based shape analysis for the characterization of nanostructural changes in heart mitochondria resulting from myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  13. Optimal allocation of international atomic energy agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Each year the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to confirm that nuclear materials and facilities are employed for peaceful purposes. Because of limited inspection resources, however, the IAEA cannot fully attain its safeguards goals either quantitatively as measured by the inspection effort negotiated in the facility attachments or qualitatively as measured by the IAEA criteria for evaluating attainment of safeguards goals. Under current IAEA procedures the allocation of inspection resources assigns essentially equal inspection effort to facilities of the same type. An alternative approach would incorporate consideration of all material categories and facilities to be assigned inspection resources when allocating effort to a particular facility. One such method for allocating inspection resources is based on the IAEA criteria. The criteria provide a framework for allocating inspection effort that includes a ranking of material types according to their safeguards importance, an implicit definition of inspection activities for each material and facility type, and criteria for judging the attainment of safeguards goals in terms of the quality and frequency of these inspection activities. This framework is applicable to resource allocation for an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  14. Critical Quantitative Inquiry in Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stage, Frances K.; Wells, Ryan S.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter briefly traces the development of the concept of critical quantitative inquiry, provides an expanded conceptualization of the tasks of critical quantitative research, offers theoretical explanation and justification for critical research using quantitative methods, and previews the work of quantitative criticalists presented in this…

  15. Optically polarized atoms understanding light-atom interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Auzinsh, Marcis; Rochester, Simon M

    2010-01-01

    This book is addressed at upper-level undergraduate and graduate students involved in research in atomic, molecular, and optical Physics. It will also be useful to researchers practising in this field. It gives an intuitive, yet sufficiently detailed and rigorous introduction to light-atom interactions with a particular emphasis on the symmetry aspects of the interaction, especially those associated with the angular momentum of atoms and light. The book will enable readers to carryout practical calculations on their own, and is richly illustrated with examples drawn from current research topic

  16. Quantitative evaluation of surveillance test intervals including test-caused risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.; Martorell, S.; Vesely, W.E.

    1992-02-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the adverse safety impact of surveillance testing and generally overburdensome surveillance requirements. To evaluate these concerns, the risk-effectiveness with the beneficial risk impact. This report defines the adverse effects of surveillance testing from a risk perspective, and then presents the methodology by which the adverse risk impact can be quantified, focusing on two important kinds of adverse risk impact of surveillance testing: risk impact of test-caused trips and risk impact of test-caused equipment wear. Using the methodology presented, these risk impacts are evaluated for a selected set of surveillance tests for demonstration examples. The results of the risk-effectiveness evaluation are provided along with the insights from the sensitivity analyses

  17. Modeling Solar Atmospheric Phenomena with AtomDB and PyAtomDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Marcus; Foster, Adam

    2018-01-01

    Taking advantage of the modeling tools made available by PyAtomDB (Foster 2015), we evaluated the impact of changing atomic data on solar phenomena, in particular their effects on models of coronal mass ejections (CME). Intitially, we perform modifications to the canonical SunNEI code (Murphy et al. 2011) in order to include non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) processes that occur in the CME modeled in SunNEI. The methods used involve the consideration of radiaitive cooling as well as ion balance calculations. These calculations were subsequently implemented within the SunNEI simulation. The insertion of aforementioned processes and parameter customizaton produced quite similar results of the original except for the case of iron. These differences were traced to inconsistencies in the recombination rates for Argon-like iron ions between the CHIANTI and AtomDB databases, even though they in theory use the same data. The key finding was that theoretical models are greatly impacted by the relative atomic database update cycles.Following the SunNEI comparison, we then use the AtomDB database to model the time depedencies of intensity flux spikes produced by a coronal shock wave (Ma et al. 2011). We produced a theretical representation for an ionizing plasma that interpolated over the intensity in four Astronomical Imaging Assembly (AIA) filters. Specifically, the 171 A (Fe IX) ,193 A (Fe XII, FeXXIV),211 A (Fe XIV),and 335 A (Fe XVI) wavelengths in order to assess the comparative spectral emissions between AtomDB and the observed data. The results of the theoretical model, in principle, shine light on both the equilibrium conditions before the shock and the non-equilibrium response to the shock front, as well as discrepancies introduced by changing the atomic data.

  18. AtomDB: Expanding an Accessible and Accurate Atomic Database for X-ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Randall

    Since its inception in 2001, the AtomDB has become the standard repository of accurate and accessible atomic data for the X-ray astrophysics community, including laboratory astrophysicists, observers, and modelers. Modern calculations of collisional excitation rates now exist - and are in AtomDB - for all abundant ions in a hot plasma. AtomDB has expanded beyond providing just a collisional model, and now also contains photoionization data from XSTAR as well as a charge exchange model, amongst others. However, building and maintaining an accurate and complete database that can fully exploit the diagnostic potential of high-resolution X-ray spectra requires further work. The Hitomi results, sadly limited as they were, demonstrated the urgent need for the best possible wavelength and rate data, not merely for the strongest lines but for the diagnostic features that may have 1% or less of the flux of the strong lines. In particular, incorporation of weak but powerfully diagnostic satellite lines will be crucial to understanding the spectra expected from upcoming deep observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton, as well as the XARM and Athena satellites. Beyond incorporating this new data, a number of groups, both experimental and theoretical, have begun to produce data with errors and/or sensitivity estimates. We plan to use this to create statistically meaningful spectral errors on collisional plasmas, providing practical uncertainties together with model spectra. We propose to continue to (1) engage the X-ray astrophysics community regarding their issues and needs, notably by a critical comparison with other related databases and tools, (2) enhance AtomDB to incorporate a large number of satellite lines as well as updated wavelengths with error estimates, (3) continue to update the AtomDB with the latest calculations and laboratory measurements, in particular velocity-dependent charge exchange rates, and (4) enhance existing tools, and create new ones as needed to

  19. A rational approach to heavy-atom derivative screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyce, M. Gordon; Radaev, Sergei; Sun, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    In order to overcome the difficulties associated with the ‘classical’ heavy-atom derivatization procedure, an attempt has been made to develop a rational crystal-free heavy-atom-derivative screening method and a quick-soak derivatization procedure which allows heavy-atom compound identification. Despite the development in recent times of a range of techniques for phasing macromolecules, the conventional heavy-atom derivatization method still plays a significant role in protein structure determination. However, this method has become less popular in modern high-throughput oriented crystallography, mostly owing to its trial-and-error nature, which often results in lengthy empirical searches requiring large numbers of well diffracting crystals. In addition, the phasing power of heavy-atom derivatives is often compromised by lack of isomorphism or even loss of diffraction. In order to overcome the difficulties associated with the ‘classical’ heavy-atom derivatization procedure, an attempt has been made to develop a rational crystal-free heavy-atom derivative-screening method and a quick-soak derivatization procedure which allows heavy-atom compound identification. The method includes three basic steps: (i) the selection of likely reactive compounds for a given protein and specific crystallization conditions based on pre-defined heavy-atom compound reactivity profiles, (ii) screening of the chosen heavy-atom compounds for their ability to form protein adducts using mass spectrometry and (iii) derivatization of crystals with selected heavy-metal compounds using the quick-soak method to maximize diffraction quality and minimize non-isomorphism. Overall, this system streamlines the process of heavy-atom compound identification and minimizes the problem of non-isomorphism in phasing

  20. Manipulating Neutral Atoms in Chip-Based Magnetic Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Yu, Nan; Kohel, James

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques for manipulating neutral atoms (more precisely, ultracold clouds of neutral atoms) in chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides have been demonstrated. Such traps and waveguides are promising components of future quantum sensors that would offer sensitivities much greater than those of conventional sensors. Potential applications include gyroscopy and basic research in physical phenomena that involve gravitational and/or electromagnetic fields. The developed techniques make it possible to control atoms with greater versatility and dexterity than were previously possible and, hence, can be expected to contribute to the value of chip-based magnetic traps and atomic waveguides. The basic principle of these techniques is to control gradient magnetic fields with suitable timing so as to alter a trap to exert position-, velocity-, and/or time-dependent forces on atoms in the trap to obtain desired effects. The trap magnetic fields are generated by controlled electric currents flowing in both macroscopic off-chip electromagnet coils and microscopic wires on the surface of the chip. The methods are best explained in terms of examples. Rather than simply allowing atoms to expand freely into an atomic waveguide, one can give them a controllable push by switching on an externally generated or a chip-based gradient magnetic field. This push can increase the speed of the atoms, typically from about 5 to about 20 cm/s. Applying a non-linear magnetic-field gradient exerts different forces on atoms in different positions a phenomenon that one can exploit by introducing a delay between releasing atoms into the waveguide and turning on the magnetic field.