WorldWideScience

Sample records for included pressure temperature

  1. High temperature pressure gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echtler, J. Paul; Scandrol, Roy O.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature pressure gauge comprising a pressure gauge positioned in fluid communication with one end of a conduit which has a diaphragm mounted in its other end. The conduit is filled with a low melting metal alloy above the diaphragm for a portion of its length with a high temperature fluid being positioned in the remaining length of the conduit and in the pressure gauge.

  2. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  3. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2016-12-13

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  4. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Geohegan, David B.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  5. Effect of ambient pressure on Leidenfrost temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orejon, Daniel; Sefiane, Khellil; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2014-11-01

    The accurate prediction and control of the interaction of liquids with hot surfaces is paramount in numerous areas, including cooling applications. We present results illustrating the effect of ambient pressure on the temperature required for a droplet to levitate over a hot surface, i.e., the Leidenfrost temperature. In the present study the dependence of wetting and levitating temperatures on ambient pressure in a range of subatmospheric pressures is reported. Experimental data indicate that the Leidenfrost temperature decreases with decreasing pressure at subatmospheric pressures. A physical approach for the dependence of Leidenfrost temperature on ambient pressure, based on an analogy with saturation pressure dependence, is proposed. Furthermore, previous literature data for pressures above atmospheric are also included in the analysis to support and validate the proposed approach. In addition, the effect of substrate material, substrate roughness, and type of fluid on the Leidenfrost temperature is discussed.

  6. Composite Pressure Vessel Including Crack Arresting Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLay, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A pressure vessel includes a ported fitting having an annular flange formed on an end thereof and a tank that envelopes the annular flange. A crack arresting barrier is bonded to and forming a lining of the tank within the outer surface thereof. The crack arresting barrier includes a cured resin having a post-curing ductility rating of at least approximately 60% through the cured resin, and further includes randomly-oriented fibers positioned in and throughout the cured resin.

  7. Superconducting critical temperature under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Pedreros, G. I.; Baquero, R.

    2018-05-01

    The present record on the critical temperature of a superconductor is held by sulfur hydride (approx. 200 K) under very high pressure (approx. 56 GPa.). As a consequence, the dependence of the superconducting critical temperature on pressure became a subject of great interest and a high number of papers on of different aspects of this subject have been published in the scientific literature since. In this paper, we calculate the superconducting critical temperature as a function of pressure, Tc(P), by a simple method. Our method is based on the functional derivative of the critical temperature with the Eliashberg function, δTc(P)/δα2F(ω). We obtain the needed coulomb electron-electron repulsion parameter, μ*(P) at each pressure in a consistent way by fitting it to the corresponding Tc using the linearized Migdal-Eliashberg equation. This method requires as input the knowledge of Tc at the starting pressure only. It applies to superconductors for which the Migdal-Eliashberg equations hold. We study Al and β - Sn two weak-coupling low-Tc superconductors and Nb, the strong coupling element with the highest critical temperature. For Al, our results for Tc(P) show an excellent agreement with the calculations of Profeta et al. which are known to agree well with experiment. For β - Sn and Nb, we found a good agreement with the experimental measurements reported in several works. This method has also been applied successfully to PdH elsewhere. Our method is simple, computationally light and gives very accurate results.

  8. High pressure and high temperature apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, Oleg A.

    2005-09-13

    A design for high pressure/high temperature apparatus and reaction cell to achieve .about.30 GPa pressure in .about.1 cm volume and .about.100 GPa pressure in .about.1 mm volumes and 20-5000.degree. C. temperatures in a static regime. The device includes profiled anvils (28) action on a reaction cell (14, 16) containing the material (26) to be processed. The reaction cell includes a heater (18) surrounded by insulating layers and screens. Surrounding the anvils are cylindrical inserts and supporting rings (30-48) whose hardness increases towards the reaction cell. These volumes may be increased considerably if applications require it, making use of presses that have larger loading force capability, larger frames and using larger anvils.

  9. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganley, Jason C. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Howard University, 2013 Lewis K. Downing Hall, 2300 6th Street NW, Washington, DC 20059 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    This paper describes experimental work involving the direct-current electrolysis of highly concentrated potassium hydroxide solutions at high temperatures (up to 400 C) and under various pressures. A high-temperature alkaline electrolysis cell resistant to chemical attack from the highly corrosive electrolyte solution and capable of high-pressure operation was designed and tested. The cell was constructed with a Monel {sup registered} alloy housing and cathode, while various anode materials were compared. The anode materials tested included nickel, Monel alloy, lithiated nickel, and cobalt-plated nickel. The advantages of operating an alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperatures include increasing the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte and enhancing the rates of electrochemical reactions at the electrode surfaces. Cell operation with increasing steam partial pressure over the solution is also shown to enhance cell performance. The prudent selection of anode material also impacts the required terminal potential for a given current density, and consequently the cell's electric power efficiency. The best cell performance was achieved using a cobalt-plated nickel anode at a temperature of 400 C and a steam partial pressure of 8.7 MPa. (author)

  10. Enhanced battery model including temperature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosca, B.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-01-01

    Within electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries are used to provide/buffer the energy required for driving. However, battery performance varies throughout the temperature range specific to automotive applications, and as such, models that describe this behaviour are required. This paper presents a

  11. Precision pressure/temperature logging tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henfling, J.A.; Normann, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Past memory logging tools have provided excellent pressure/temperature data when used in a geothermal environment, and they are easier to maintain and deploy than tools requiring an electric wireline connection to the surface. However, they are deficient since the tool operator is unaware of downhole conditions that could require changes in the logging program. Tools that make ``decisions`` based on preprogrammed scenarios can partially overcome this difficulty, and a suite of such memory tools has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The first tool, which forms the basis for future instruments, measures pressure and temperature. Design considerations include a minimization of cost while insuring quality data, size compatibility with diamond-cored holes, operation in holes to 425 C (800 F), transportability by ordinary passenger air service, and ease of operation. This report documents the development and construction of the pressure/temperature tool. It includes: (1) description of the major components; (2) calibration; (3) typical logging scenario; (4) tool data examples; and (5) conclusions. The mechanical and electrical drawings, along with the tool`s software, will be furnished upon request.

  12. Flexible MOFs under stress: pressure and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearfield, Abraham

    2016-03-14

    In the recent past an enormous number of Metal-Organic Framework type compounds (MOFs) have been synthesized. The novelty resides in their extremely high surface area and the ability to include additional features to their structure either during synthesis or as additives to the MOF. This versatility allows for MOFs to be designed for specific applications. However, the question arises as to whether a particular MOF can withstand the stress that may be encountered in fulfillment of the designated application. In this study we describe the behavior of two flexible MOFs under pressure and several others under temperature increase. The pressure study includes both experimental and theoretical calculations. In the thermal processes evidence for colossal negative thermal expansion were encountered.

  13. Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pavese, Franco

    2013-01-01

    This 2nd edition volume of Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements follows the first publication in 1992. It collects a much larger set of information, reference data, and bibliography in temperature and pressure metrology of gaseous substances, including the physical-chemical issues related to gaseous substances. The book provides solutions to practical applications where gases are used in different thermodynamic conditions. Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements, 2nd edition is the only comprehensive survey of methods for pressure measurement in gaseous media used in the medium-to-low pressure range closely connected with thermometry. It assembles current information on thermometry and manometry that involve the use of gaseous substances which are likely to be valid methods for the future. As such, it is an important resource for the researcher. This edition is updated through the very latest scientific and technical developments of gas-based temperature and pressure measurem...

  14. Ion Based High-Temperature Pressure Sensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zdenek, Jeffrey S; Anthenien, Ralph A

    2004-01-01

    .... The environment encountered in such engines necessitates high temperature and durable (vibration resistant) devices. Traditional pressure sensors can be used, however thermal insulating materials must be used to protect the diaphragm...

  15. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Allebrod, Frank; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 ◦C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive......, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established...

  16. High Temperature and Pressure Alkaline Electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank

    temperatures and pressures. Aqueous potassium hydroxide immobilized electrolyte in porous SrTiO3 was used in those cells. Electrolysis cells with metal foam based gas diffusion electrodes and the immobilized electrolyte were successfully demonstrated at temperatures up to 250 °C and 40 bar. Different electro...

  17. Pressure sensor for high-temperature liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A pressure sensor for use with liquid metals (eg Na and K) over the pressure range 0 - 2MPa and temperature range 644 - 922'K is described. A soft diaphragm is exposed on one side to the fluid (liquid metal) and on the other to a first source of gas at a first gas pressure. A stiff diaphragm is exposed on one side to the first gas source and on the other side by a second source of gas at a second pressure. The stiff diaphragm is in pushing engagement with the soft diaphragm such that movement is transmitted to the stiff diaphragm when the pressure in the fluid exceeds the first and second gas pressures. The displacement of the stiff diaphragm is measured and is a function of the fluid pressure. Details of the measuring means are given. A version for insertion in a wall of a container to measure pressure in high temperature liquid metals in the container is described. It comprises an annular bellows connected by an outer peripheral edge to the wall of the container, a stiff disc connected at an outer edge to an inner edge of the bellows and forming therewith a soft diaphragm. The operation is similar to that previously described. Full details are given. (U.K.)

  18. Temperature control for high pressure processes up to 1400 MPa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reineke, K; Mathys, A; Knorr, D; Heinz, V

    2008-01-01

    Pressure- assisted sterilisation is an emerging technology. Hydrostatic high pressure can reduce the thermal load of the product and this allows quality retention in food products. To guarantee the safety of the sterilisation process it is necessary to investigate inactivation kinetics especially of bacterial spores. A significant roll during the inactivation of microorganisms under high pressure has the thermodynamic effect of the adiabatic heating. To analyse the individual effect of pressure and temperature on microorganism inactivation an exact temperature control of the sample to reach ideal adiabatic conditions and isothermal dwell times is necessary. Hence a heating/cooling block for a high pressure unit (Stansted Mini-Food-lab; high pressure capillary with 300 μL sample volume) was constructed. Without temperature control the sample would be cooled down during pressure built up, because of the non-adiabatic heating of the steel made vessel. The heating/cooling block allows an ideal adiabatic heat up and cooling of the pressure vessel during compression and decompression. The high pressure unit has a pressure build-up rate up to 250 MPa s -1 and a maximum pressure of 1400 MPa. Sebacate acid was chosen as pressure transmitting medium because it had no phase shift over the investigate pressure and temperature range. To eliminate the temperature difference between sample and vessel during compression and decompression phase, the mathematical model of the adiabatic heating/cooling of water and sebacate acid was implemented into a computational routine, written in Test Point. The calculated temperature is the setpoint of the PID controller for the heating/cooling block. This software allows an online measurement of the pressure and temperature in the vessel and the temperature at the outer wall of the vessel. The accurate temperature control, including the model of the adiabatic heating opens up the possibility to realise an ideal adiabatic heating and cooling

  19. Design and Construction of a Temperature and Pressure Data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, a temperature and pressure monitor is designed. The system takes in temperature and pressure readings from the temperature sensor (LM35) and the pressure sensor (MPX4115A) respectively. The temperature and pressure readings are processed by a microcontroller (PIC16F877A) and displayed on an LCD ...

  20. High Temperature Dynamic Pressure Measurements Using Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Meredith, Roger D.; Chang, Clarence T.; Savrun, Ender

    2014-01-01

    Un-cooled, MEMS-based silicon carbide (SiC) static pressure sensors were used for the first time to measure pressure perturbations at temperatures as high as 600 C during laboratory characterization, and subsequently evaluated in a combustor rig operated under various engine conditions to extract the frequencies that are associated with thermoacoustic instabilities. One SiC sensor was placed directly in the flow stream of the combustor rig while a benchmark commercial water-cooled piezoceramic dynamic pressure transducer was co-located axially but kept some distance away from the hot flow stream. In the combustor rig test, the SiC sensor detected thermoacoustic instabilities across a range of engine operating conditions, amplitude magnitude as low as 0.5 psi at 585 C, in good agreement with the benchmark piezoceramic sensor. The SiC sensor experienced low signal to noise ratio at higher temperature, primarily due to the fact that it was a static sensor with low sensitivity.

  1. 3He melting pressure temperature scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halperin, W.P.; Archie, C.N.; Richardson, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The latent heat for solidification of **3He has been measured along the **3He melting curve between 23 and 1 mK. A temperature scale is established which depends only on measurements of heat, pressure and volume, and on the condition that the entropy of solid **3He approaches R ln 2 at high...... temperatures. The A feature of the melting curve which suggests itself as a thermometric fixed point is found to be T//A equals 2. 75 plus or minus 0. 11 mK. The agreement between this value and independent measurements of T//A, based on nuclear or electronic paramagnetism, Johnson noise thermometry...

  2. High temperature and pressure electrochemical test station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzichristodoulou, C.; Allebrod, F.; Mogensen, M.

    2013-05-01

    An electrochemical test station capable of operating at pressures up to 100 bars and temperatures up to 400 °C has been established. It enables control of the partial pressures and mass flow of O2, N2, H2, CO2, and H2O in a single or dual environment arrangement, measurements with highly corrosive media, as well as localized sampling of gas evolved at the electrodes for gas analysis. A number of safety and engineering design challenges have been addressed. Furthermore, we present a series of electrochemical cell holders that have been constructed in order to accommodate different types of cells and facilitate different types of electrochemical measurements. Selected examples of materials and electrochemical cells examined in the test station are provided, ranging from the evaluation of the ionic conductivity of liquid electrolytic solutions immobilized in mesoporous ceramic structures, to the electrochemical characterization of high temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis cells and the use of pseudo-reference electrodes for the separation of each electrode contribution. A future perspective of various electrochemical processes and devices that can be developed with the use of the established test station is provided.

  3. Temperature, Humidity, Wind and Pressure Sensors (THWAPS) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2011-01-17

    The temperature, humidity, wind, and pressure system (THWAPS) provide surface reference values of these measurements for balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) launches. The THWAPS is located adjacent to the SONDE launch site at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility. The THWAPS system is a combination of calibration-quality instruments intended to provide accurate measurements of meteorological conditions near the surface. Although the primary use of the system is to provide accurate surface reference values of temperature, pressure, relative humidity (RH), and wind velocity for comparison with radiosonde readings, the system includes a data logger to record time series of the measured variables.

  4. High temperature and pressure alkaline electrolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    and pressures. Two measurement systems were built to perform measurements under high pressures and at elevated temperatures of up to 95 bar and 250 °C, respectively. The conductivity of aqueous KOH and aqueous KOH immobilized in a porous SrTiO3 structure were investigated at elevated temperatures and high...... concentrations of the electrolyte using the van der Pauw method in combination with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Conductivity values as high as 2.9 S cm-1 for 45 wt% KOH aqueous KOH and 0.84 S cm-1 for the immobilized KOH of the same concentration were measured at 200 °C. Porous SrTiO3 was used...... for immobilization of aqueous KOH solutions. Electrolysis cells with this electrolyte and metal foam based gas diffusion electrodes were successfully demonstrated at temperatures up to 250 °C at 40 bar. Different electro-catalysts were tested in order to reduce the oxygen and hydrogen overpotentials. Current...

  5. Temperature uniformity mapping in a high pressure high temperature reactor using a temperature sensitive indicator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grauwet, T.; Plancken, van der I.; Vervoort, L.; Matser, A.M.; Hendrickx, M.; Loey, van A.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, the first prototype ovomucoid-based pressure–temperature–time indicator (pTTI) for high pressure high temperature (HPHT) processing was described. However, for temperature uniformity mapping of high pressure (HP) vessels under HPHT sterilization conditions, this prototype needs to be

  6. Wax Spreading in Paper under Controlled Pressure and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Kanungo, Mandakini; Jia, Nancy; Dinsmore, Anthony D

    2018-01-09

    This work describes a novel rapid method to fabricate high-resolution paper-based microfluidic devices using wax-ink-based printing. This study demonstrates that both temperature and pressure are important knobs in controlling the device resolution. High-resolution lines and patterns were obtained by heating the paper asymmetrically from one side up to 110 °C while applying pressure up to 49 kPa. Starting with wax lines with an initial width of 130 μm, we achieve a thorough penetration through a 190 μm-thick paper with lateral spreading on the front as narrow as 90 μm. The role of temperature and pressure are systematically studied and compared with the prediction of the Lucas-Washburn equation. We found that the temperature dependence of spreading can be explained by the viscosity change of the wax, according to the Lucas-Washburn equation. The pressure dependence deviates from Lucas-Washburn behavior because of compression of the paper. An optimal condition for achieving full depth penetration of the wax yet minimizing lateral spreading is suggested after exploring various parameters including temperature, pressure, and paper type. These findings could lead to a rapid roll-to-roll fabrication of high-resolution paper-based diagnostic devices.

  7. Instationary pressure, pressure difference, and temperature curves in a full-pressure containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansfeld, G.

    1975-05-01

    The time dependent short-term pressure, temperature and pressure difference-time histories following a loss-of-coolant accident at the primary system in full pressure containments of water cooled nuclear power reactors, which are important for the design of such containments are treated. Therefore pressure, temperature and pressure difference-time histories calculated by the mathematical model and computer code ZOCO VI have been compared with the experiment C1 of the German research program RS 50 'Druckverteilung im Containment'. This comparison showed a partly good agreement between theory and experiemt and gave a first insight into the simulation of the physical phenomena occurring during this short-term behaviour. (orig.) [de

  8. Transient analysis of heat and mass transfer during heat treatment of wood including pressure equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younsi Ramdane

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, three-dimensional equations for coupled heat and mass conservation equations for wood are solved to study the transient heat and mass transfer during high thermal treatment of wood. The model is based on Luikov’s approach, including pressure. The model equations are solved numerically by the commercial package FEMLfor the temperature and moisture content histories under different treatment conditions. The simulation of the proposed conjugate problem allows the assessment of the effect of the heat and mass transfer within wood. A parametric study was also carried out to determine the effects of several parameters such as initial moisture content and the sample thickness on the temperature, pressure and moisture content distributions within the samples during heat treatment.

  9. EVAPORATION: a new vapour pressure estimation methodfor organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2011-09-01

    We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects), a method to predict (subcooled) liquid pure compound vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules that requires only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T) is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

  10. SURGTANK, Steam Pressure, Saturation Temperature or Reactor Surge Tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, D.J.; Gupta, R.K.

    2001-01-01

    the heat transferred to the walls and down into the liquid content of the tank is computed. The equation of state is utilized to obtain ambient temperature at the end of the interval. Deviations of the steam from perfect gas theory are taken into account. An energy balance is determined for the end of interval in keeping with the first law of thermodynamics. Any imbalance is designed as error, stored, and the procedure is repeated with a slightly higher assumed pressure. These calculations are repeated until a change in sign of the error is noted, and the exact pressure can be determined. The properties calculated for the end of the first level and time increment are used as the starting proper- ties of the second increment, etc. Calculations are terminated when the final level is reached. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The program was developed for predicting pressure behavior in vertical axis cylindrical tanks with spherical dome caps. It could be readily adapted to other geometries, such as spherical tanks (reference 2). Back-to-back insurges and outsurges cannot be treated since each must start from equilibrium conditions. The analysis does not include the effects of heaters, sprays, and safety valves. Possible modifications to include effects of sprays are discussed in reference 5

  11. Aqueous Geochemistry at High Pressures and High Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, Jay D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-05-21

    This project is aimed at experimental characterization of the sound velocities, equations of state (EOS), and derived physical and chemical properties of aqueous solutions and carbon dioxide at extreme pressure and temperature conditions relevant to processes occurring in the interior of the Earth. Chemical transport, phase changes (including melting), fluid-solid reactions, and formation of magmatic liquids at convergent plat boundaries are a key motivation for this project. Research in this area has long been limited by the extreme experimental challenges and lack of data under the appropriate pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions. The vast majority of studies of aqueous geochemistry relevant to terrestrial problems of fluid-rock interactions have been conducted at 0.3 GPa or less, and the widely used Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state for aqueous species is applicable only at ~ < 0.5 GPa. These limits are unfortunate because fluid flow and reactions plays a central role in many deeper environments. Recent efforts including our own, have resulted in new experimental techniques that now make it possible to investigate properties of homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria involving aqueous species and minerals over a much broader range of pressure and temperature appropriate for deep crustal and upper mantle processes involving water-rich fluids. We carried out 1) Brillouin scattering measurements of the equations of state and molar volume of water and carbon dioxide to over 10 GPa and 870K using precise resistance heating of samples under pressure in the diamond anvil cell, and 2) the phase diagrams of the water and CO2, and 3) Exploring new experimental approaches, including CO2 laser heating of samples in a diamond cell, to measurements of sound velocities, EOS, and phase relations by Brillouin scattering to far greater pressures and temperatures.

  12. Temperature-compensated pressure detectors and transmitter for use in hostile environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Noia, E.J.; Breunich, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    A pressure or differential pressure detector suitable for use in a hostile environment, for example, under high pressure, temperature, and radiation conditions in the containment vessel of a nuclear generating plant includes as a transducer a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) disposed within a detector housing designed to withstand temperatures of about 260 deg C. A signal detecting and conditioning circuit remote from the detector housing includes a demodulator for producing X and Y demodulated signals respectively from A and B secondary windings of the LVDT, a summing circuit for producing a temperature analog voltage X + Y, a subtractor for providing a differential pressure analog voltage X - Y, and a multiplier for multiplying the differential pressure analog voltage X - Y by a temperature compensation voltage X + Y - Ref based on the temperature analog voltage to provide a resulting temperature-compensated differential pressure analog signal. (author)

  13. New materials for temperature and pressure sensitive fluorescent paints

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the preparation and evaluation of new materials for imaging of barometric pressure and temperature using so-called luminescent paints. The historical background and the motivation for the research conducted are given in Chapter 1. Chapter 2 summarizes the basic principles of photoluminescence involved in imaging of partial oxygen pressure and temperature, the fundamentals of the design of pressure and temperature sensitive paints. It also summarizes the effects of lumine...

  14. Technology trends in high temperature pressure transducers: The impact of micromachining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallon, Joseph R., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the implications of micromachining technology on the development of high temperature pressure transducers. The introduction puts forth the thesis that micromachining will be the technology of choice for the next generation of extended temperature range pressure transducers. The term micromachining is defined, the technology is discussed and examples are presented. Several technologies for high temperature pressure transducers are discussed, including silicon on insulator, capacitive, optical, and vibrating element. Specific conclusions are presented along with recommendations for development of the technology.

  15. Pressure Controlled Heat Pipe for Precise Temperature Control, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research project will develop Pressure Controlled Heat Pipes (PCHPs) for precise temperature control (milli-Kelvin level). Several...

  16. PHOENIX MARS METEOROLOGICAL PRESSURE / TEMPERATURE RDR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The PHX METEOROLOGICAL DATA product contains calibrated temperature and pressure data. The temperature data was collected at 250, 500 and 1000mm above the Phoenix...

  17. 30 CFR 250.527 - What must I include in my casing pressure request?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... request? 250.527 Section 250.527 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Operations Casing Pressure Management § 250.527 What must I include in my casing pressure request? The following information must be included in the casing pressure request: (a) API number; (b) Lease number; (c...

  18. Failure maps for internally pressurized Zr-2.5% Nb pressure tubes with circumferential temperature variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewfelt, R.S.W.

    1986-01-01

    During some postulated loss-of-coolant accidents, the pressure tube temperature may rise before the internal pressure drops, causing the pressure tube to balloon. The temperature around the pressure tube circumference would likely be nonuniform, producing localized deformation that could possibly cause failure. The computer program, GRAD, was used to determine the circumferential temperature distribution required to cause an internally pressurized Zr-2.5% Nb pressure tube to fail before coming into full contact with its calandria tube. These results were used to construct failure maps. 7 refs

  19. Metal/Silicate Partitioning at High Pressures and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shofner, G.; Campbell, A.; Danielson, L.; Righter, K.; Rahman, Z.

    2010-01-01

    The behavior of siderophile elements during metal-silicate segregation, and their resulting distributions provide insight into core formation processes. Determination of partition coefficients allows the calculation of element distributions that can be compared to established values of element abundances in the silicate (mantle) and metallic (core) portions of the Earth. Moderately siderophile elements, including W, are particularly useful in constraining core formation conditions because they are sensitive to variations in T, P, oxygen fugacity (fO2), and silicate composition. To constrain the effect of pressure on W metal/silicate partitioning, we performed experiments at high pressures and temperatures using a multi anvil press (MAP) at NASA Johnson Space Center and laser-heated diamond anvil cells (LHDAC) at the University of Maryland. Starting materials consisted of natural peridotite mixed with Fe and W metals. Pressure conditions in the MAP experiments ranged from 10 to 16 GPa at 2400 K. Pressures in the LHDAC experiments ranged from 26 to 58 GPa, and peak temperatures ranged up to 5000 K. LHDAC experimental run products were sectioned by focused ion beam (FIB) at NASA JSC. Run products were analyzed by electron microprobe using wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. Liquid metal/liquid silicate partition coefficients for W were calculated from element abundances determined by microprobe analyses, and corrected to a common fO2 condition of IW-2 assuming +4 valence for W. Within analytical uncertainties, W partitioning shows a flat trend with increasing pressure from 10 to 16 GPa. At higher pressures, W becomes more siderophile, with an increase in partition coefficient of approximately 0.5 log units.

  20. The analytical calibration model of temperature effects on a silicon piezoresistive pressure sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Nie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Presently, piezoresistive pressure sensors are highly demanded for using in various microelectronic devices. The electrical behavior of these pressure sensor is mainly dependent on the temperature gradient. In this paper, various factors,which includes effect of temperature, doping concentration on the pressure sensitive resistance, package stress, and temperature on the Young’s modulus etc., are responsible for the temperature drift of the pressure sensor are analyzed. Based on the above analysis, an analytical calibration model of the output voltage of the sensor is proposed and the experimental data is validated through a suitable model.

  1. Colloquium: High pressure and road to room temperature superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gor'kov, Lev P.; Kresin, Vladimir Z.

    2018-01-01

    This Colloquium is concerned with the superconducting state of new high-Tc compounds containing hydrogen ions (hydrides). Recently superconductivity with the record-setting transition temperature of Tc=203 K was reported for sulfur hydrides under high pressure. In general, high pressure serves as a path finding tool toward novel structures, including those with very high Tc . The field has a rich and interesting history. Currently, it is broadly recognized that superconductivity in sulfur hydrides owes its origin to the phonon mechanism. However, the picture differs from the conventional one in important ways. The phonon spectrum in sulfur hydride is both broad and has a complex structure. Superconductivity arises mainly due to strong coupling to the high-frequency optical modes, although the acoustic phonons also make a noticeable contribution. A new approach is described, which generalizes the standard treatment of the phonon mechanism and makes it possible to obtain an analytical expression for Tc in this phase. It turns out that, unlike in the conventional case, the value of the isotope coefficient (for the deuterium-hydrogen substitution) varies with the pressure and reflects the impact of the optical modes. The phase diagram, that is the pressure dependence of Tc , is rather peculiar. A crucial feature is that increasing pressure results in a series of structural transitions, including the one which yields the superconducting phase with the record Tc of 203 K. In a narrow region near P ≈150 GPa the critical temperature rises sharply from Tc≈120 to ≈200 K . It seems that the sharp structural transition, which produces the high-Tc phase, is a first-order phase transition caused by interaction between the order parameter and lattice deformations. A remarkable feature of the electronic spectrum in the high-Tc phase is the appearance of small pockets at the Fermi level. Their presence leads to a two-gap spectrum, which can, in principle, be observed with the

  2. EVAPORATION: a new vapour pressure estimation methodfor organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Compernolle

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects, a method to predict (subcooled liquid pure compound vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules that requires only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA.

  3. Effects of pressure and temperature on gate valve unwedging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damerell, P.S.; Harrison, D.H.; Hayes, P.W.; Simons, J.W.; Walker, T.A.

    1996-12-01

    The stem thrust required to unwedge a gate valve is influenced by the pressure and temperature when the valve is closed and by the changes in these conditions between closure and opening. {open_quotes}Pressure locking{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}thermal binding{close_quotes} refer to situations where pressure and temperature effects cause the unwedging load to be much higher than normal. A model of these phenomena has been developed. Wedging (closure) is modeled as developing an {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} between the disk and its seat rings in the valve. The effects of pressure and temperature are analyzed to determine the change in this disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes}. Flexibilities, of the disk, body, stem and yoke strongly influence the unwedging thrust. Calculations and limited comparisons to data have been performed for a range of valve designs and scenarios. Pressure changes can increase the unwedging load when there is either a uniform pressure decrease, or a situation where the bonnet pressure exceeds the pressures in the adjacent piping. Temperature changes can increase the unwedging load when: (1) valve closure at elevated system temperature produces a delayed stem expansion, (2) a temperature increase after closure produces a bonnet pressure increase, or (3) a temperature change after closure produces an increase in the disk-to-seat {open_quotes}interference{close_quotes} or disk-to-seat friction.

  4. Effects of pressure and temperature on gate valve unwedging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damerell, P.S.; Harrison, D.H.; Hayes, P.W.; Simons, J.W.; Walker, T.A.

    1996-01-01

    The stem thrust required to unwedge a gate valve is influenced by the pressure and temperature when the valve is closed and by the changes in these conditions between closure and opening. open-quotes Pressure lockingclose quotes and open-quotes thermal bindingclose quotes refer to situations where pressure and temperature effects cause the unwedging load to be much higher than normal. A model of these phenomena has been developed. Wedging (closure) is modeled as developing an open-quotes interferenceclose quotes between the disk and its seat rings in the valve. The effects of pressure and temperature are analyzed to determine the change in this disk-to-seat open-quotes interferenceclose quotes. Flexibilities, of the disk, body, stem and yoke strongly influence the unwedging thrust. Calculations and limited comparisons to data have been performed for a range of valve designs and scenarios. Pressure changes can increase the unwedging load when there is either a uniform pressure decrease, or a situation where the bonnet pressure exceeds the pressures in the adjacent piping. Temperature changes can increase the unwedging load when: (1) valve closure at elevated system temperature produces a delayed stem expansion, (2) a temperature increase after closure produces a bonnet pressure increase, or (3) a temperature change after closure produces an increase in the disk-to-seat open-quotes interferenceclose quotes or disk-to-seat friction

  5. High pressure low temperature hot pressing method for producing a zirconium carbide ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cockeram, Brian V.

    2017-01-10

    A method for producing monolithic Zirconium Carbide (ZrC) is described. The method includes raising a pressure applied to a ZrC powder until a final pressure of greater than 40 MPa is reached; and raising a temperature of the ZrC powder until a final temperature of less than 2200.degree. C. is reached.

  6. Neutron diffraction under high pressure and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Kazuki

    2010-01-01

    Neutron diffraction study under high pressure and high temperature is reviewed from the technical point of view. Particularly, cell assembly for the high-PT neutron diffraction using a Paris-Edinburgh cell with the temperature calibration by neutron resonance spectroscopy is introduced. Notes on the errors relevant to high pressure and high temperature experiments in both monochromatic angle dispersive and time-of-flight methods are also discussed. (author)

  7. New Challenges for the Pressure Evolution of the Glass Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwester J. Rzoska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ways of portrayal of the pressure evolution of the glass temperature (Tg beyond the dominated Simon–Glatzel-like pattern are discussed. This includes the possible common description of Tg(P dependences in systems described by dTg/dP > 0 and dTg/dP < 0. The latter can be associated with the maximum of Tg(P curve hidden in the negative pressures domain. The issue of volume and density changes along the vitrification curve is also discussed. Finally, the universal pattern of vitrification associated with the crossover from the low density (isotropic stretching to the high density (isotropic compression systems is proposed. Hypothetically, it may obey any glass former, from molecular liquids to colloids.

  8. Temperature and pressure dependent osmotic pressure in liquid sodium-cesium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, R.I.M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The evaluation of the osmotic pressure in terms of the concentration fluctuations of mixtures and the equations of state of the pure liquids is considered. The temperature and pressure dependent experimentally measured concentration-concentration correlations in the long wavelength limit of liquid sodium-cesium alloys are used to demonstrate the appreciable dependence of the temperature and pressure on the osmotic pressure as a function of concentration. Introducing interchange energies as functions of temperature and pressure, our analysis is consistent with the Flory model. Thus, a formalism for evaluating the state dependent osmotic pressure is developed and our numerical work is considered to be an extension of the calculations of Rashid and March in the sense that a temperature and pressure dependent interchange energy parameter that more closely parameterizes the state dependent concentration fluctuations in the liquid alloys, is used. (author)

  9. Temperature noise characteristics of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Upadhyaya, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The core exit temperature noise RMS is linearly related to the core ΔT at a commercial PWR and LOFT. Test loop observations indicate that this linear behavior becomes nonlinear with blockages, boiling, or power skews. The linear neutron flux to temperature noise phase behavior is indicative of a pure time delay process, which has been shown to be related to coolant flow velocity in the core. Therefore, temperature noise could provide a valuable diagnostic tool for the detection of coolant blockages, boiling, and sensor malfunction under both normal and accident conditions in a PWR

  10. Compliant Foil Journal Bearing Performance at Alternate Pressures and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, Robert J.; Puleo, Bernadette J.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental test program has been conducted to determine the highly loaded performance of current generation gas foil bearings at alternate pressures and temperatures. Typically foil bearing performance has been reported at temperatures relevant to turbomachinery applications but only at an ambient pressure of one atmosphere. This dearth of data at alternate pressures has motivated the current test program. Two facilities were used in the test program, the ambient pressure rig and the high pressure rig. The test program utilized a 35 mm diameter by 27 mm long foil journal bearing having an uncoated Inconel X-750 top foil running against a shaft with a PS304 coated journal. Load capacity tests were conducted at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, and 21 krpm at temperatures from 25 to 500 C and at pressures from 0.1 to 2.5 atmospheres. Results show an increase in load capacity with increased ambient pressure and a reduction in load capacity with increased ambient temperature. Below one-half atmosphere of ambient pressure a dramatic loss of load capacity is experienced. Additional lightly loaded foil bearing performance in nitrogen at 25 C and up to 48 atmospheres of ambient pressure has also been reported. In the lightly loaded region of operation the power loss increases for increasing pressure at a fixed load. Knowledge of foil bearing performance at operating conditions found within potential machine applications will reduce program development risk of future foil bearing supported turbomachines.

  11. Room-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma plume for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.

    2005-01-01

    As low-temperature nonequilibrium plasmas come to play an increasing role in biomedical applications, reliable and user-friendly sources need to be developed. These plasma sources have to meet stringent requirements such as low temperature (at or near room temperature), no risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, preferably hand-held operation, low concentration of ozone generation, etc. In this letter, we present a device that meets exactly such requirements. This device is capable of generating a cold plasma plume several centimeters in length. It exhibits low power requirements as shown by its current-voltage characteristics. Using helium as a carrier gas, very little ozone is generated and the gas temperature, as measured by emission spectroscopy, remains at room temperature even after hours of operations. The plasma plume can be touched by bare hands and can be directed manually by a user to come in contact with delicate objects and materials including skin and dental gum without causing any heating or painful sensation

  12. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  13. Growth and Survivability of Microorganisms at Martian Temperatures and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickol, Rebecca Lynne

    The discovery of methane in the martian atmosphere via numerous ground- and space-based sources has prompted the study of methanogens as models for life on Mars. Methanogens are microorganisms within the domain Archaea, many of which utilize carbon dioxide (CO2) and hydrogen to produce methane. The non-photosynthetic nature of methanogens indicates that they could exist in sub-surface environments, protected from harmful UV and ionizing radiation on the surface of Mars. These organisms also do not require organics, which are sparse on the planet. Additionally, the wide variety of environments we find life in on Earth, as well as evidence for liquid brines on the surface of Mars, suggest that habitable environments may still exist on the planet. However, there are a variety of conditions that any extant life on Mars would need to endure, including wide variations in temperature over one sol, a low-pressure atmosphere, and a limited availability of liquid water, among others. This dissertation encompasses various experiments that examined the ability of four species of methanogens (Methanosarcina barkeri, Methanobacterium formicicum, Methanococcus maripaludis, and Methanothermobacter wolfeii) to survive and/or grow under 1) low-pressure conditions and 2) freeze/thaw cycles. Low pressure studies include both survival and active growth experiments conducted between 7 mbar (the average surface pressure on Mars) and 143 mbar. Freeze/thaw experiments utilized short- and long-term cycles varying in temperature between the organisms' growth temperatures (22 °C, M. maripaludis; 37 °C, M. barkeri and M. formicicum; 55 °C, M. wolfeii ) and -80 °C, encompassing Mars-relevant temperature changes. As a comparison to methanogen growth and survivability, additional experiments were conducted using a non-spore-forming bacterium, Serratia liquefaciens , previously shown capable of growth at 7 mbar, 0 °C and within an anoxic CO2 atmosphere. The experiments described here assessed

  14. CONTEMPT, LWR Containment Pressure and Temperature Distribution in LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargroves, D.W.; Metcalfe, L.J.; Cheng, Teh-Chin; Wheat, L.L.; Mings, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: CONTEMPT-LT was developed to predict the long-term behavior of water-cooled nuclear reactor containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. CONTEMPT-LT calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, mass and energy inventories, heat structure temperature distributions, and energy exchange with adjacent compartments. The program is capable of describing the effects of leakage on containment response. Models are provided for fan cooler and cooling spray engineered safety systems. One to four compartments can be modeled, and any compartment except the reactor system may have both a liquid pool region and an air-vapor atmosphere region above the pool. Each region is assumed to have a uniform temperature, but the temperatures of the two regions may be different. The user determines the compartments to be used, specifies input mass and energy additions, defines heat structure and leakage systems, and prescribes the time advancement and output control. CONTEMPT-LT/28-H (NESC0433/08) includes also models for hydrogen combustion. 2 - Method of solution: The initial conditions of the containment atmosphere are calculated from input values, and the initial temperature distributions through the containment structures are determined from the steady-state solution of the heat conduction equations. A time advancement proceeds as follows. The input water and energy rates are evaluated at the midpoint of a time interval and added to the containment system. Pressure suppression, spray system effects, and fan cooler effects are calculated using conditions at the beginning of a time-step. Leakage and heat losses or gains, extrapolated from the last time-step, are added to the containment system. Containment volume pressure and temperature are estimated by solving the mass, volume, and energy balance equations. Using these results as boundary conditions, the heat conduction equations

  15. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Poeggel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS. The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry–Perot interferometer (EFPI with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF acid and femtosecond (FS laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of \\(s_p\\ = 2–10 \\(\\frac{\\text{nm}}{\\text{kPa}}\\ and a resolution of better than \\(\\Delta P\\ = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H\\(_2\\O. A static pressure test in 38 cmH\\(_2\\O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H\\(_2\\O in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by \\(k=10.7\\ \\(\\frac{\\text{pm}}{\\text{K}}\\, which results in a temperature resolution of better than \\(\\Delta T\\ = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes.

  16. Recent Improvement of Medical Optical Fibre Pressure and Temperature Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeggel, Sven; Duraibabu, Dineshbabu; Kalli, Kyriacos; Leen, Gabriel; Dooly, Gerard; Lewis, Elfed; Kelly, Jimmy; Munroe, Maria

    2015-07-13

    This investigation describes a detailed analysis of the fabrication and testing of optical fibre pressure and temperature sensors (OFPTS). The optical sensor of this research is based on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) with integrated fibre Bragg grating (FBG) for simultaneous pressure and temperature measurements. The sensor is fabricated exclusively in glass and with a small diameter of 0.2 mm, making it suitable for volume-restricted bio-medical applications. Diaphragm shrinking techniques based on polishing, hydrofluoric (HF) acid and femtosecond (FS) laser micro-machining are described and analysed. The presented sensors were examined carefully and demonstrated a pressure sensitivity in the range of sp = 2-10 nm/kPa and a resolution of better than ΔP = 10 Pa protect (0.1 cm H2O). A static pressure test in 38 cm H2O shows no drift of the sensor in a six-day period. Additionally, a dynamic pressure analysis demonstrated that the OFPTS never exceeded a drift of more than 130 Pa (1.3 cm H2O) in a 12-h measurement, carried out in a cardiovascular simulator. The temperature sensitivity is given by k = 10.7 pm/K, which results in a temperature resolution of better than ΔT = 0.1 K. Since the temperature sensing element is placed close to the pressure sensing element, the pressure sensor is insensitive to temperature changes.

  17. Decomposition of silicon carbide at high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daviau, Kierstin; Lee, Kanani K. M.

    2017-11-01

    We measure the onset of decomposition of silicon carbide, SiC, to silicon and carbon (e.g., diamond) at high pressures and high temperatures in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. We identify decomposition through x-ray diffraction and multiwavelength imaging radiometry coupled with electron microscopy analyses on quenched samples. We find that B3 SiC (also known as 3C or zinc blende SiC) decomposes at high pressures and high temperatures, following a phase boundary with a negative slope. The high-pressure decomposition temperatures measured are considerably lower than those at ambient, with our measurements indicating that SiC begins to decompose at ~ 2000 K at 60 GPa as compared to ~ 2800 K at ambient pressure. Once B3 SiC transitions to the high-pressure B1 (rocksalt) structure, we no longer observe decomposition, despite heating to temperatures in excess of ~ 3200 K. The temperature of decomposition and the nature of the decomposition phase boundary appear to be strongly influenced by the pressure-induced phase transitions to higher-density structures in SiC, silicon, and carbon. The decomposition of SiC at high pressure and temperature has implications for the stability of naturally forming moissanite on Earth and in carbon-rich exoplanets.

  18. Design and Evaluation of a Pressure and Temperature Monitoring System for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farve Daneshvar Fard

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Pressure ulcers are tissue damages resulting from blood flow restriction, which occurs when the tissue is exposed to high pressure for a long period of time. These painful sores are common in patients and elderly, who spend extended periods of time in bed or wheelchair. In this study, a continuous pressure and temperature monitoring system was developed for pressure ulcer prevention. Materials and Methods The monitoring system consists of 64 pressure and 64 temperature sensors on a 40×50 cm2 sheet. Pressure and temperature data and the corresponding maps were displayed on a computer in real-time. Risk assessment could be performed by monitoring and recording absolute pressure and temperature values, as well as deviations over time. Furthermore, a posture detection procedure was proposed for sitting posture identification. Information about the patient’s movement history may help caregivers make informed decisions about the patient’s repositioning and ulcer prevention strategies. Results Steady temporal behaviour of the designed system and repeatability of the measurements were evaluated using several particular tests. The results illustrated that the system could be utilized for continuous monitoring of interface pressure and temperature for pressure ulcer prevention. Furthermore, the proposed method for detecting sitting posture was verified using a statistical analysis. Conclusion A continuous time pressure and temperature monitoring system was presented in this study. This system may be suited for pressure ulcer prevention given its feasibility for simultaneous monitoring of pressure and temperature and alarming options. Furthermore, a method for detecting different sitting postures was proposed and verified. Pressure ulcers in wheelchair-bound patients may be prevented using this sitting posture detection method.

  19. A method enabling simultaneous pressure and temperature measurement using a single piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frantlović, Miloš; Stanković, Srđan; Jokić, Ivana; Lazić, Žarko; Smiljanić, Milče; Obradov, Marko; Vukelić, Branko; Jakšić, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a high-performance, simple and low-cost method for simultaneous measurement of pressure and temperature using a single piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor. The proposed measurement method utilizes the parasitic temperature sensitivity of the sensing element for both pressure measurement correction and temperature measurement. A parametric mathematical model of the sensor was established and its parameters were calculated using the obtained characterization data. Based on the model, a real-time sensor correction for both pressure and temperature measurements was implemented in a target measurement system. The proposed method was verified experimentally on a group of typical industrial-grade piezoresistive sensors. The obtained results indicate that the method enables the pressure measurement performance to exceed that of typical digital industrial pressure transmitters, achieving at the same time the temperature measurement performance comparable to industrial-grade platinum resistance temperature sensors. The presented work is directly applicable in industrial instrumentation, where it can add temperature measurement capability to the existing pressure measurement instruments, requiring little or no additional hardware, and without adverse effects on pressure measurement performance. (paper)

  20. A high temperature high pressure cell for quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Kaplonski, J; Unruh, T; Mamontov, E; Meyer, A

    2011-08-01

    We present our recent development of a high temperature high pressure cell for neutron scattering. Combining a water cooled Nb1Zr pressure cell body with an internal heating furnace, the sample environment can reach temperatures of up to 1500 K at a pressure of up to 200 MPa at the sample position, with an available sample volume of about 700 mm(3). The cell material Nb1Zr is specifically chosen due to its reasonable mechanical strength at elevated temperatures and fairly small neutron absorption and incoherent scattering cross sections. With this design, an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio of about 10:1 can be achieved. This opens new possibilities for quasielastic neutron scattering studies on different types of neutron spectrometers under high temperature high pressure conditions, which is particularly interesting for geological research on, e.g., water dynamics in silicate melts.

  1. A system to control low pressure turbine temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    An improved system to control low pressure turbine cycle steam and metal temperatures by governing the heat transfer operation in a moisture separator-reheater is described. The use of the present invention in a pressurized water reactor or a boiling water reactor steam turbine system is demonstrated. (UK)

  2. Temperature effect compensation for fast differential pressure decay testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yan; Tong, Xiaomeng; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the long temperature recovery period with differential pressure decay for leak detection, a novel method with temperature effect compensation is proposed to improve the testing efficiency without full stabilization of temperature. The mathematical model of conventional differential pressure decay testing is established to analyze the changes of temperature and pressure during the measuring period. Then the differential pressure is divided into two parts: the exponential part caused by temperature recovery and the linear part caused by leak. With prior information obtained from samples, parameters of the exponential part can be identified precisely, and the temperature effect will be compensated before it fully recovers. To verify the effect of the temperature compensated method, chambers with different volumes are tested under various pressures and the experiments show that the improved method is faster with satisfactory precision, and an accuracy less than 0.25 cc min −1  can be achieved when the compensation time is proportional to four times the theoretical thermal-time constant. (paper)

  3. High-temperature transient creep properties of CANDU pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, R.W.L.; Chow, C.K.

    2002-06-01

    During a hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), the coolant flow would be reduced in some fuel channels and would stagnate and cause the fuel temperature to rise and overheat the pressure tube. The overheated pressure tube could balloon (creep radially) into contact with its moderator-cooled calandria tube. Upon contact, the stored thermal energy in the pressure tube is transferred to the calandria tube and into the moderator, which acts as a heat sink. For safety analyses, the modelling of fuel channel deformation behaviour during a large LOCA requires a sound knowledge of the high-temperature creep properties of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes. To this extent, a ballooning model to predict pressure-tube deformation was developed by Shewfelt et al., based on creep equations derived using uniaxial tensile specimens. It has been recognized, however, that there is an inherent variability in the high-temperature creep properties of CANDU pressure tubes. The variability, can be due to different tube-manufacturing practices, variations in chemical compositions, and changes in microstructure induced by irradiation during service in the reactor. It is important to quantify the variability of high-temperature creep properties so that accurate predictions on pressure-tube creep behaviour can be made. This paper summarizes recent data obtained from high-temperature uniaxial creep tests performed on specimens taken from both unirradiated (offcut) and irradiated pressure tubes, suggesting that the variability is attributed mainly to the initial differences in microstructure (grain size, shape and preferred orientation) and also from tube-to-tube variations in chemical composition, rather than due to irradiation exposure. These data will provide safety analysts with the means to quantify the uncertainties in the prediction of pressure-tube contact temperatures during a postulated large break LOCA. (author)

  4. Influence of temperature and pressure on the lethality of ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raso, J.; Pagan, R.; Condon, S.; Sala, F.J.

    1998-01-01

    A specially designed resistometer was constructed, and the lethal effect on Yersinia enterocolitica of ultrasonic waves (UW) at different static pressures (manosonication [MS]) and of combined heat-UW under pressure treatments (manothermosonication [MTS]) was investigated. During MS treatments at 30 degrees C and 200 kPa, the increase in the amplitude of UW of 20 kHz from 21 to 150 micrometers exponentially decreased decimal reduction time values (D(MS)) from 4 to 0.37 min. When pressure was increased from 0 to 600 kPa at a constant amplitude (150 micrometers) and temperature (30 degrees C), D(MS) values decreased from 1.52 to 0.20 min. The magnitude of this decrease in D(MS) declined progressively as pressure was increased. The influence of pressure on D(MS) values was greater with increased amplitude of UW. Pressure alone of as much as 600 kPa did not influence the heat resistance of Y. enterocolitica (D60 = 0.094; zeta = 5.65). At temperatures of as much as 58 degrees C, the lethality of UW under pressure was greater than that of heat treatment alone at the same temperature. At higher temperatures, this difference disappeared. Heat and UW under pressure seemed to act independently. The lethality of MTS treatments appeared to result from the added effects of UW under pressure and the lethal effect of heat. The individual contributions of heat and of UW under pressure to the total lethal effect of MTS depended on temperature. The inactivating effect of UW was not due to titanium particles eroded from the sonication horn. The addition to the MS media of cysteamine did not increase the resistance of Y. enterocolitica to MS treatment. MS treatment caused cell disruption

  5. Combined NMR moisture, temperature and pressure measurements during heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pel L.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available For model validation, quantitative measurements of the evolution of moisture, temperature, and pressure distributions in time are needed. For this purpose, we have developed an NMR setup to measure the moisture transport in heated building materials. The measured combined moisture content and temperature profiles give a unique insight in the moisture transport and dehydration kinetics inside concrete during fire. These measurements give the first quantitative proof for the build-up of a moisture peak due to the vapor pressure build-up. In this study we have also combined for the first time the measurement of the moisture and temperature profiles with the measurement of the pressure at one position, which show that the pressure build up is directly related to the moisture profiles.

  6. Temperature-insensitive fiber Bragg grating dynamic pressure sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tuan; Zhao, Qida; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Chunshu; Huang, Guiling; Xue, Lifang; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2006-08-01

    Temperature-insensitive dynamic pressure measurement using a single fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based on reflection spectrum bandwidth modulation and optical power detection is proposed. A specifically designed double-hole cantilever beam is used to provide a pressure-induced axial strain gradient along the sensing FBG and is also used to modulate the reflection bandwidth of the grating. The bandwidth modulation is immune to spatially uniform temperature effects, and the pressure can be unambiguously determined by measuring the reflected optical power, avoiding the complex wavelength interrogation system. The system acquisition time is up to 85 Hz for dynamic pressure measurement, and the thermal fluctuation is kept less than 1.2% full-scale for a temperature range of -10 degrees C to 80 degrees C.

  7. High-pressure-high-temperature treatment of natural diamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Royen, J V

    2002-01-01

    The results are reported of high-pressure-high-temperature (HPHT) treatment experiments on natural diamonds of different origins and with different impurity contents. The diamonds are annealed in a temperature range up to 2000 sup o C at stabilizing pressures up to 7 GPa. The evolution is studied of different defects in the diamond crystal lattice. The influence of substitutional nitrogen atoms, plastic deformation and the combination of these is discussed. Diamonds are characterized at room and liquid nitrogen temperature using UV-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectrometry. The economic implications of diamond HPHT treatments are discussed.

  8. High Pressure and High Temperature State of Oxygen Enriched Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, M.; Zhang, S.; Jeanloz, R.; Militzer, B.

    2016-12-01

    Interior models for Uranus and Neptune include a hydrogen/helium/water outer envelope and a core of rock and metal at the center, with superionic water-rich ice proposed as comprising an intermediate layer. Here we consider an oxygen-enriched ice, such as H2O2 hydrogen peroxide (± water), that could form through chemical reaction between water-rich and underlying rocky (i.e., oxygen-rich) layers. As oxygen and its compounds (e.g., H2O, SiO2) form metallic fluids at pressures above 100-150 GPa, the problem amounts to considering oxygen alloying of semiconducting or metallic water. The density of H2O2 is 1.45 g/cc at ambient pressure and 0° C, increasing to 1.71 g/cc in the solid state at about -20° C. There are no Hugoniot data beyond 30 GPa, so we estimated Hugoniots for H2O2 with different initial densities, using both a mixing model based on Hugoniot data for H2O2 and 1/2 O2 (molar volume summation under pressure) and ab initio calculations for unreacted H2O2. The results agree with each other to pressures of about 200 GPa, and the ab initio calculations show evidence of a superionic state at temperatures as low as 500 K, much lower than for water ice. Hydrogen peroxide is expected to be liquid along planetary isentropes for Uranus and Neptune, suggesting that H2O2 may not be present as a pure compound in these planets. Instead, oxygen-enriched H2O ice may be the relevant form of water and oxygen, and might be produced in the laboratory by way of dynamic compression of H2O2 or laser-heating of statically compressed H2O + O2 and/or H2O2.

  9. Decomposition reactions in RDX at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweigert, Igor

    2015-03-01

    Mechanisms and rates of elementary reactions controlling condensed-phase decomposition of RDX under elevated temperatures (up to 2000 K) and pressures (up to a few GPa) are not known. Global decomposition kinetics in RDX below 700 K has been measured; however, the observed global pathways result from complex manifolds of elementary reactions and are likely to be altered by elevated temperatures. Elevated pressures can further affect the condensed-phase kinetics and compete with elevated temperatures in promoting some elementary reactions and suppressing others. This presentation will describe density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamics simulations of crystalline and molten RDX aimed to delineate the effects of elevated temperatures and pressures on the mechanism of initial dissociation and the resulting secondary reactions. This work was supported by the Naval Research Laboratory, by the Office of Naval Research, and by the DOD High Performance Computing Modernization Program Software Application Institute for Multiscale Reactive Modeling of Insensitive Munitions.

  10. High pressure apparatus for neutron scattering at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munakata, Koji; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Aso, Naofumi

    2010-01-01

    Effects of pressure on the physical properties are very important for understanding highly correlated electron systems, in which pressure-induced attractive phenomena such as superconductivity and magnetically ordered non-Fermi liquid have been observed. Up to now, many scientists have developed a lot of high pressure apparatus for each purpose. The characteristic features of various materials and pressure transmitting media for use of high pressure apparatus are reported. Then, two kinds of clamp type high-pressure cell designed for low-temperature neutron diffraction measurements are shown; one is a piston cylinder type high-pressure cell which can be attached to the dilution refrigerator, and the other one is a newly-developed cubic anvil type high-pressure cell which can generate pressure above 7GPa. We also introduce the results of magnetic neutron scattering under pressure on a pressure-induced superconducting ferromagnet UGe 2 in use of the piston cylinder type clamp cell, and those on an iron arsenide superconductor SrFe 2 As 2 in use of the cubic anvil type clamp cell. (author)

  11. Passive Resistor Temperature Compensation for a High-Temperature Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zong; Liang, Ting; Jia, Pinggang; Hong, Yingping; Qi, Lei; Lei, Cheng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wangwang; Zhang, Diya; Xiong, Jijun

    2016-07-22

    The main limitation of high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors is the variation of output voltage with operating temperature, which seriously reduces their measurement accuracy. This paper presents a passive resistor temperature compensation technique whose parameters are calculated using differential equations. Unlike traditional experiential arithmetic, the differential equations are independent of the parameter deviation among the piezoresistors of the microelectromechanical pressure sensor and the residual stress caused by the fabrication process or a mismatch in the thermal expansion coefficients. The differential equations are solved using calibration data from uncompensated high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensors. Tests conducted on the calibrated equipment at various temperatures and pressures show that the passive resistor temperature compensation produces a remarkable effect. Additionally, a high-temperature signal-conditioning circuit is used to improve the output sensitivity of the sensor, which can be reduced by the temperature compensation. Compared to traditional experiential arithmetic, the proposed passive resistor temperature compensation technique exhibits less temperature drift and is expected to be highly applicable for pressure measurements in harsh environments with large temperature variations.

  12. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Structures Including Metallic Glass-Based Materials Using Low Pressure Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Douglas C. (Inventor); Kennett, Andrew (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    Systems and methods to fabricate objects including metallic glass-based materials using low-pressure casting techniques are described. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating an object that includes a metallic glass-based material includes: introducing molten alloy into a mold cavity defined by a mold using a low enough pressure such that the molten alloy does not conform to features of the mold cavity that are smaller than 100 microns; and cooling the molten alloy such that it solidifies, the solid including a metallic glass-based material.

  13. High-pressure and temperature investigations of energetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gump, J. C.

    2014-05-01

    Static high-pressure measurements are extremely useful for obtaining thermodynamic and phase stability information from a wide variety of materials. However, studying energetic materials can be challenging when extracting information from static high-pressure measurements. Energetic materials are traditionally C, H, N, O compounds with low crystalline symmetry, producing weak signal in commonly performed x-ray diffraction measurements. The small sample volume available in a static high-pressure cell exacerbates this issue. Additionally, typical hydrostatic compression media, such as methanol/ethanol, may react with many energetic materials. However, characterization of their thermodynamic parameters and phase stability is critical to understanding explosive performance and sensitivity. Crystalline properties, such as bulk modulus and thermal expansion, are necessary to accurately predict the behaviour of shocked solids using hydrodynamic codes. In order to obtain these values, equations of state of various energetic materials were investigated using synchrotron angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction experiments at static high-pressure and temperature. Intense synchrotron radiation overcomes the weak x-ray scattering of energetic materials in a pressure cell. The samples were hydrostatically compressed using a non-reactive hydrostatic medium and heated using a heated diamond anvil cell. Pressure - volume data for the materials were fit to the Birch-Murnaghan and Vinet formalisms to obtain bulk modulus and its first pressure derivative. Temperature - volume data at ambient pressure were fit to obtain the volume thermal expansion coefficient. Data from several energetic materials will be presented and compared.

  14. DDT in fuel air mixtures at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, J.; Rival, D.; Ciccarelli, G.

    2005-11-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in fuel air mixtures at initial temperatures up to 573 K and pressures up to 2 atm. The fuels investigated include hydrogen, ethylene, acetylene and JP-10 aviation fuel. The experiments were performed in a 3.1-m long, 10-cm inner-diameter heated detonation tube equipped with equally spaced orifice plates. Ionization probes were used to measure the flame time-of-arrival from which the average flame velocity versus propagation distance could be obtained. The DDT composition limits and the distance required for the flame to transition to detonation were obtained from this flame velocity data. The correlation developed by Veser et al. (run-up distance to supersonic flames in obstacle-laden tubes. In the proceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Hazards, Prevention and Mitigation of Industrial Explosions, France (2002)) for the flame choking distance proved to work very well for correlating the detonation run-up distance measured in the present study. The only exception was for the hydrogen air data at elevated initial temperatures which tended to fall outside the scatter of the hydrocarbon mixture data. The DDT limits obtained at room temperature were found to follow the classical d/λ = 1 correlation, where d is the orifice plate diameter and λ is the detonation cell size. Deviations found for the high-temperature data could be attributed to the one-dimensional ZND detonation structure model used to predict the detonation cell size for the DDT limit mixtures. This simple model was used in place of actual experimental data not currently available.

  15. Measurement of rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pincus, H.J.; Hoskins, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The papers in this volume were presented at an ASTM symposium held on 20 June 1983 in conjunction with the 24th Annual Rock Mechanics Symposium at Texas A and M University, College Station, TX. The purpose of these papers is to present recent developments in the measurement of rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures, and to examine and interpret the data produced by such measurement. The need for measuring rock properties at elevated pressures and temperatures has become increasingly important in recent years. Location and design of nuclear waste repositories, development of geothermal energy sites, and design and construction of deep excavations for civil, military, and mining engineering require significantly improved capabilities for measuring rock properties under conditions substantially different from those prevailing in most laboratory and in situ work. The development of high-pressure, high-temperature capabilities is also significant for the analysis of tectonic processes

  16. Alternating current calorimetry at very high pressure and low temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelm, H

    2002-01-01

    The specific heat of CePd sub 2 sub . sub 0 sub 2 Ge sub 1 sub . sub 9 sub 8 has been measured with an ac calorimetric technique up to 22 GPa for temperatures in the range 0.3 K <=T <=10 K. A thermocouple allowed the temperature oscillations to be read when an ac heating current was sent through the sample. The inverse of the thermovoltage V sub a sub c recorded at low temperature exhibits a pronounced anomaly as a function of pressure. It is shown that 1/V sub a sub c extrapolated to zero temperature is a measure of the Sommerfeld coefficient gamma.

  17. Burst pressure of super duplex stainless steel pipes subject to combined axial tension, internal pressure and elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasebikan, B.A.; Akisanya, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    The burst pressure of super duplex stainless steel pipe is measured under combined internal pressure, external axial tension and elevated temperature up to 160 °C. The experimental results are compared with existing burst pressure prediction models. Existing models are found to provide reasonable estimate of the burst pressure at room temperature but significantly over estimate the burst pressure at elevated temperature. Increasing externally applied axial stress and elevated temperature reduces the pressure capacity. - Highlights: • The burst pressure of super duplex steel is measured under combined loading. • Effect of elevated temperature on burst pressure is determined. • Burst pressure decreases with increasing temperature. • Existing models are reliable at room temperature. • Burst strength at elevated temperature is lower than predictions

  18. Sound pressure and temperature centering of material and sterilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klessiane Mendes de Fontes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gauge the sound pressure and temperature levels emitted by the equipment of the drying and sterilization rooms of the Material and Sterilization Center and compare them with the current legislation. Method: It is an experimental study with a quantitative approach, implemented in a school hospital in Joao Pessoa-PB. The data were obtained by a sound pressure meter and a thermal stress meter in September 2016. Results and Discussion: The data evidenced high sound pressure levels, reaching a mean of 71.25 and 76.25 dB (A, in the drying and sterilization rooms respectively. The levels found do not exceed that recommended by NR15 (Regulatory Norm 15 which is 85dB(A, but NBR 10152/87 (Brazilian Norm 10152/87 indicates levels between 45 and 55 dB(A for acoustic well-being. As for the temperature the measured mean ranged between 24.91 and 25.87 °C. Conclusion: The levels of sound pressure and temperatures found in the environment can cause physiopsychological changes in the professionals that works in this services. Keywords: Sound pressure; Temperature; Material and Sterilization Center

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTELLIGENT PRESSURE SENSOR WITH TEMPERATURE COMPENSATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VAEGAE NAVEEN KUMAR

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of an artificial neural network (ANN based intelligent pressure sensor to measure pressure in the range 0-100 psig with high accuracy and temperature compensation. A capacitive pressure sensor detects the applied pressure by means of elastic deflection of diaphragm. A Modified Schering Bridge Signal Conditioning Circuit (MSB-SCC converts the change in capacitance of the sensor into an equivalent voltage. The effect of change in environmental conditions, especially effect of ambient temperature on the pressure sensor and component drifts, stray effects associated with MSB-SCC introduce nonlinearity and cross-sensitivity errors in the output readout. The ANN trained with Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithm incorporates the intelligence into sensor signal conditioning circuit through a microcontroller unit to reduce the nonlinearity effects and compensate the cross-sensitivity errors.The LM algorithm shows better performance in terms of the linearity error in comparison with Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS and the Scaled Conjugate Gradient (SCG algorithms. The proposed method is experimentally verified at various temperatures and it provides voltage readout within ±0.8% of full-scale reading over a range of temperature variations from 10 °C to 35°C.

  20. Pressure and Temperature Sensors Using Two Spin Crossover Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin-Maricel Jureschi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of a new design concept for dual spin crossover based sensors for concomitant detection of both temperature and pressure is presented. It is conjectured from numerical results obtained by mean field approximation applied to a Ising-like model that using two different spin crossover compounds containing switching molecules with weak elastic interactions it is possible to simultaneously measure P and T. When the interaction parameters are optimized, the spin transition is gradual and for each spin crossover compounds, both temperature and pressure values being identified from their optical densities. This concept offers great perspectives for smart sensing devices.

  1. Pressure and temperature development in solar heating system during stagnation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon; Chen, Ziqian

    2010-01-01

    of the pipes of the solar collector loop. During the investigation the pre-pressure of the expansion vessel and system filling pressure was changed. The investigations showed that a large pressurised expansion vessel will protect the collector loop from critically high temperatures as long as the solar......This paper presents an investigation of stagnation in solar collectors and the effects it will have on the collector loop. At a laboratory test stand at the Technical University of Denmark, a pressurized solar collector loop was designed to test different numbers of collectors and different designs...

  2. High-pressure-low-temperature x-ray power diffractometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syassen, K; Holzapfel, W B

    1978-08-01

    A high-pressure technique for x-ray diffraction studies at low temperatures is described. The system consists of a Bridgman anvil type high-pressure device with either tungsten carbide or boron carbide anvils, a liquid He cryostat, and x-ray diffractometer operating in Debye-Scherrer geometry. The newly developed boron carbide anvil cell is capable of containing a liquid pressure transmitting medium. The precision of the lattice parameter determination is discussed and the effect of nonisostatic stress components on the diffraction pattern is examined.

  3. EVAPORATION: a new vapor pressure estimation method for organic molecules including non-additivity and intramolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compernolle, S.; Ceulemans, K.; Müller, J.-F.

    2011-04-01

    We present EVAPORATION (Estimation of VApour Pressure of ORganics, Accounting for Temperature, Intramolecular, and Non-additivity effects), a method to predict vapour pressure p0 of organic molecules needing only molecular structure as input. The method is applicable to zero-, mono- and polyfunctional molecules. A simple formula to describe log10p0(T) is employed, that takes into account both a wide temperature dependence and the non-additivity of functional groups. In order to match the recent data on functionalised diacids an empirical modification to the method was introduced. Contributions due to carbon skeleton, functional groups, and intramolecular interaction between groups are included. Molecules typically originating from oxidation of biogenic molecules are within the scope of this method: carbonyls, alcohols, ethers, esters, nitrates, acids, peroxides, hydroperoxides, peroxy acyl nitrates and peracids. Therefore the method is especially suited to describe compounds forming secondary organic aerosol (SOA).

  4. Microwave Wire Interrogation Method Mapping Pressure under High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyong Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that wireless reading for in-situ mapping of pressure under high-temperature environments is the most feasible method, because it is not subject to frequent heterogeneous jointing failures and electrical conduction deteriorating, or even disappearing, under heat load. However, in this article, we successfully demonstrate an in-situ pressure sensor with wire interrogation for high-temperature applications. In this proof-of-concept study of the pressure sensor, we used a microwave resonator as a pressure-sensing component and a microwave transmission line as a pressure characteristic interrogation tunnel. In the sensor, the line and resonator are processed into a monolith, avoiding a heterogeneous jointing failure; further, microwave signal transmission does not depend on electrical conduction, and consequently, the sensor does not suffer from the heat load. We achieve pressure monitoring under 400 °C when employing the sensor simultaneously. Our sensor avoids restrictions that exist in wireless pressure interrogations, such as environmental noise and interference, signal leakage and security, low transfer efficiency, and so on.

  5. Anharmonic Materials and Thermoelasticity at High Temperatures and Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlikowski, Daniel

    2005-03-01

    For large-scale constitutive strength models, the shear modulus is typically assumed to be linearly dependent on temperature. However, for materials compressed along or beyond the Hugoniot into high pressure and temperature regimes where there is no experimental measurement or very little, accurate and validated models must be used. To this end, we have investigated and compared, as a function of temperature (Steinberg-Guinan strength model. These results give an indication that anharmonic effects are negligible in tantalum but not in molybdenum for high pressures and temperatures up to melt. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  6. Laser-Machined Microcavities for Simultaneous Measurement of High-Temperature and High-Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengling Ran

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Laser-machined microcavities for simultaneous measurement of high-temperature and high-pressure are demonstrated. These two cascaded microcavities are an air cavity and a composite cavity including a section of fiber and an air cavity. They are both placed into a pressure chamber inside a furnace to perform simultaneous pressure and high-temperature tests. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the short air cavity are ~0.0779 nm/°C and ~1.14 nm/MPa, respectively. The thermal and pressure coefficients of the composite cavity are ~32.3 nm/°C and ~24.4 nm/MPa, respectively. The sensor could be used to separate temperature and pressure due to their different thermal and pressure coefficients. The excellent feature of such a sensor head is that it can withstand high temperatures of up to 400 °C and achieve precise measurement of high-pressure under high temperature conditions.

  7. Recommended reference materials for realization of physicochemical properties pressure-volume-temperature relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Herington, E F G

    1977-01-01

    Recommended Reference Materials for Realization of Physicochemical Properties presents recommendations of reference materials for use in measurements involving physicochemical properties, namely, vapor pressure; liquid-vapor critical temperature and critical pressure; orthobaric volumes of liquid and vapor; pressure-volume-temperature properties of the unsaturated vapor or gas; and pressure-volume-temperature properties of the compressed liquid. This monograph focuses on reference materials for vapor pressures at temperatures up to 770 K, as well as critical temperatures and critical pressures

  8. Pressure and temperature effects in homopolymer blends and diblock copolymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frielinghaus, H.; Schwahn, D.; Mortensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal composition fluctuations in homopolymer mer blends and diblock copolymers were studied with SANS in varying pressure and temperature fields. For homopolymers we find a quite consistent behavior: The dominating effect of compressibility or packing leads to a reduction of the entropic...

  9. Structural stability of high entropy alloys under pressure and temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmad, Azkar S.; Su, Y.; Liu, S. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The stability of high-entropy alloys (HEAs) is a key issue before their selection for industrial applications. In this study, in-situ high-pressure and high-temperature synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on three typical HEAs Ni20Co20Fe20Mn20Cr20, Hf25Nb25Zr25Ti...

  10. Static pressure and temperature coefficients of working standard microphones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Torras Rosell, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of measurement microphones is affected by changes in the environmental conditions, mainly temperature and static pressure. This rate of change has been the object of previous studies focused on Laboratory Standard microphones. The literature describes frequency dependent values fo...

  11. "Deflategate": Time, Temperature, and Moisture Effects on Football Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Jack; Beljak, Lauren; Macatangay, Dahlia-Marie; Helmuth-Malone, Lilly; McWilliams, Catharina; Raptis, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    In a recent paper in "The Physics Teacher (TPT)", DiLisi and Rarick used the National Football League "Deflategate" controversy to introduce to physics students the physics of a bouncing ball. In this paper, we measure and analyze the environmental effects of time, ambient temperature, and moisture on the internal pressure of…

  12. Phase diagram of Nitrogen at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenei, Zsolt; Lin, Jung-Fu; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2007-03-01

    Nitrogen is a typical molecular solid with relatively weak van der Waals intermolecular interactions but strong intramolecular interaction arising from the second highest binding energy of all diatomic molecules. The phase diagram of solid nitrogen is, however, complicated at high pressures, as inter-molecular interaction becomes comparable to the intra-molecular interaction. In this paper, we present an updated phase diagram of the nitrogen in the pressure-temperature region of 100 GPa and 1000 K, based on in-situ Raman and synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies using externally heated membrane diamond anvil cells. While providing an extension of the phase diagram, our results indicate a ``steeper'' slope of the δ/ɛ phase boundary than previously determined^1. We also studied the stability of the ɛ phase at high pressures and temperatures. Our new experimental results improve the understanding of the Nitrogen phase diagram. 1. Gregoryanz et al, Phys. Rev. B 66, 224108 (2002)

  13. Pressure-temperature stability, Ca2+ binding, and pressure-temperature phase diagram of cod parvalbumin: Gad m 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkuti, Judit; Bublin, Merima; Breiteneder, Heimo; Smeller, László

    2012-07-31

    Fish allergy is associated with IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to parvalbumins, which are small calcium-binding muscle proteins and represent the major and sole allergens for 95% of fish-allergic patients. We performed Fourier transform infrared and tryptophan fluorescence spectroscopy to explore the pressure-temperature (p-T) phase diagram of cod parvalbumin (Gad m 1) and to elucidate possible new ways of pressure-temperature inactivation of this food allergen. Besides the secondary structure of the protein, the Ca(2+) binding to aspartic and glutamic acid residues was detected. The phase diagram was found to be quite complex, containing partially unfolded and molten globule states. The Ca(2+) ions were essential for the formation of the native structure. A molten globule conformation appears at 50 °C and atmospheric pressure, which converts into an unordered aggregated state at 75 °C. At >200 MPa, only heat unfolding, but no aggregation, was observed. A pressure of 500 MPa leads to a partially unfolded state at 27 °C. The complete pressure unfolding could only be reached at an elevated temperature (40 °C) and pressure (1.14 GPa). A strong correlation was found between Ca(2+) binding and the protein conformation. The partially unfolded state was reversibly refolded. The completely unfolded molecule, however, from which Ca(2+) was released, could not refold. The heat-unfolded protein was trapped either in the aggregated state or in the molten globule state without aggregation at elevated pressures. The heat-treated and the combined heat- and pressure-treated protein samples were tested with sera of allergic patients, but no change in allergenicity was found.

  14. Vega Subsea Development - a high pressure et high temperature challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlandsen, Jostein

    2010-07-01

    The Vega subsea field, tied back to the Gjoea platform with a 51 kilometre single pipeline is one of the most challenging technology projects undertaken by Statoil. It is the combination of extremes rather than one record breaking achievement that set the Vega development apart. Production temperatures from -30 C to +135 C and flowing wellhead pressure up to 475 bars combined with high wax appearance temperature and low start-up temperatures expose Vega to both wax deposition and hydrates. New subsea metering systems have been developed due to coming led production from two licenses and two independent subsea MEG injection systems implemented. The paper will focus on the qualification process of barrier elements and the potential challenges related to qualification of complex production and safety critical systems such as the subsea production control system and the subsea instrumented pipeline pressure protection system (SIPPS). (Author)

  15. Slideline verification for multilayer pressure vessel and piping analysis including tangential motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Gulick, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    Nonlinear finite element method (FEM) computer codes with slideline algorithm implementations should be useful for the analysis of prestressed multilayer pressure vessels and piping. This paper presents closed form solutions including the effects of tangential motion useful for verifying slideline implementations for this purpose. The solutions describe stresses and displacements of a long internally pressurized elastic-plastic cylinder initially separated from an elastic outer cylinder by a uniform gap. Comparison of closed form and FEM results evaluates the usefulness of the closed form solution and the validity of the sideline implementation used

  16. High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. O' Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

    2012-09-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this

  17. PTAC: a computer program for pressure-transient analysis, including the effects of cavitation. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kot, C A; Youngdahl, C K

    1978-09-01

    PTAC was developed to predict pressure transients in nuclear-power-plant piping systems in which the possibility of cavitation must be considered. The program performs linear or nonlinear fluid-hammer calculations, using a fixed-grid method-of-characteristics solution procedure. In addition to pipe friction and elasticity, the program can treat a variety of flow components, pipe junctions, and boundary conditions, including arbitrary pressure sources and a sodium/water reaction. Essential features of transient cavitation are modeled by a modified column-separation technique. Comparisons of calculated results with available experimental data, for a simple piping arrangement, show good agreement and provide validation of the computational cavitation model. Calculations for a variety of piping networks, containing either liquid sodium or water, demonstrate the versatility of PTAC and clearly show that neglecting cavitation leads to erroneous predictions of pressure-time histories.

  18. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J. Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  19. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K; Ridley, Christopher J; Bocian, Artur; Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry; Azuma, Masaki; Attfield, J Paul; Kamenev, Konstantin V

    2014-04-01

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO3 have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  20. High-pressure cell for neutron diffraction with in situ pressure control at cryogenic temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobsen, Matthew K.; Ridley, Christopher J.; Bocian, Artur; Kamenev, Konstantin V., E-mail: k.kamenev@ed.ac.uk [School of Engineering and CSEC, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kirichek, Oleg; Manuel, Pascal; Khalyavin, Dmitry [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Azuma, Masaki [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Attfield, J. Paul [School of Chemistry and CSEC, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    Pressure generation at cryogenic temperatures presents a problem for a wide array of experimental techniques, particularly neutron studies due to the volume of sample required. We present a novel, compact pressure cell with a large sample volume in which load is generated by a bellow. Using a supply of helium gas up to a pressure of 350 bar, a load of up to 78 kN is generated with leak-free operation. In addition, special fiber ports added to the cryogenic center stick allow for in situ pressure determination using the ruby pressure standard. Mechanical stability was assessed using finite element analysis and the dimensions of the cell have been optimized for use with standard cryogenic equipment. Load testing and on-line experiments using NaCl and BiNiO{sub 3} have been done at the WISH instrument of the ISIS pulsed neutron source to verify performance.

  1. High Pressure Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessel (COPV) Development Tests at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, David M.; Greene, Nathanael J.; Revilock, Duane; Sneddon, Kirk; Anselmo, Estelle

    2008-01-01

    Development tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of 2 COPV designs at cryogenic temperatures. This allows for risk reductions for critical components for a Gaseous Helium (GHe) Pressurization Subsystem for an Advanced Propulsion System (APS) which is being proposed for NASA s Constellation project and future exploration missions. It is considered an advanced system since it uses Liquid Methane (LCH4) as the fuel and Liquid Oxygen (LO2) as the oxidizer for the propellant combination mixture. To avoid heating of the propellants to prevent boil-off, the GHe will be stored at subcooled temperatures equivalent to the LO2 temperature. Another advantage of storing GHe at cryogenic temperatures is that more mass of the pressurized GHe can be charged in to a vessel with a smaller volume, hence a smaller COPV, and this creates a significant weight savings versus gases at ambient temperatures. The major challenge of this test plan is to verify that a COPV can safely be used for spacecraft applications to store GHe at a Maximum Operating Pressure (MOP) of 4,500 psig at 140R to 160R (-320 F to -300 F). The COPVs for these tests were provided by ARDE , Inc. who developed a resin system to use at cryogenic conditions and has the capabilities to perform high pressure testing with LN2.

  2. Vibron Dynamics of Hydrogen at High Pressures and Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karl; Feldman, Joseph; Hemley, Russell

    2006-03-01

    There is currently great interest in the behavior of molecular hydrogen at high pressures and temperatures. The van Kranendonk theory of vibrons in solid hydrogen has been used previously to provide a description of the Raman response as a function of pressure and para-ortho concentrations at low temperature. Here we apply the same model to very different environments, namely to the solid at high P-T conditions, and, with less justification, to the dense fluid. The effect of temperature is presumed to be to renormalize the hopping parameter. Within our model of the vibrons and approximate harmonic lattice dynamics, a 1/R^6 dependence of the hopping parameter on intermolecular distance, R, gets averaged over fluctuations in the interatomic distance, and the average increases with temperature. Preliminary results using configurations obtained from hybrid path integral molecular dynamics calculations with empirical potentials suggest that there is very little change in the Raman peak upon melting at high pressure, in agreement with previous high P-T measurements.

  3. Distributed Control of Nonlinear Aircraft Structures Including Aerodynamic and Temperature Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tzou, H

    2004-01-01

    .... Distributed sensing/actuation, thermoelectromechanical/control equations and boundary conditions including elastic, temperature, and piezoelectric couplings are derived and applied to distributed...

  4. High pressure study of high-temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souliou, Sofia-Michaela

    2014-09-29

    The current thesis studies experimentally the effect of high external pressure on high-T{sub c} superconductors. The structure and lattice dynamics of several members of the high-T{sub c} cuprate and Fe-based superconductors families were investigated by means of Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction under well-controlled, hydrostatic high pressure and low temperature conditions. The lattice dynamics of the high-T{sub c} superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} have been investigated systematically by Raman spectroscopy as a function of doping (x = 0.95, 0.75, 0.60, 0.55, and 0.45) and external pressure. Under ambient pressure conditions, in addition to the Raman modes expected from group theory, we observe new Raman active phonons upon cooling the underdoped samples, at temperatures well above the superconducting transition temperature. The doping dependence and the onset temperatures of the new Raman features suggest that they are associated with the incommensurate charge density wave (CDW) state recently discovered in underdoped cuprates using synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques. Under high pressure conditions (from 2 to 12 GPa), our Raman measurements on highly ordered underdoped YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.55} samples do not show any of the new Raman phonons seen at ambient pressure. High pressure and low temperature Raman measurements have been performed on the underdoped superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8}. A clear renormalization of some of the Raman phonons is seen below T{sub c} as a result of the changes in the phonon self-energy upon the opening of the superconducting gap, with the most prominent one being that of the B{sub 1g}-like buckling phonon mode. The amplitude of this renormalization strongly increases with pressure, resembling the effect of hole doping in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x}. At ∝ 10 GPa, the system undergoes a reversible pressure-induced structural phase transition to a non-centrosymmmetric structure (space group

  5. Pressurized Recuperator For Heat Recovery In Industrial High Temperature Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil S.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recuperators and regenerators are important devices for heat recovery systems in technological lines of industrial processes and should have high air preheating temperature, low flow resistance and a long service life. The use of heat recovery systems is particularly important in high-temperature industrial processes (especially in metallurgy where large amounts of thermal energy are lost to the environment. The article presents the process design for a high efficiency recuperator intended to work at high operating parameters: air pressure up to 1.2 MPa and temperature of heating up to 900°C. The results of thermal and gas-dynamic calculations were based on an algorithm developed for determination of the recuperation process parameters. The proposed technical solution of the recuperator and determined recuperation parameters ensure its operation under maximum temperature conditions.

  6. Progress in understanding the mechanical behavior of pressure-vessel materials at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindeman, R.W.; Brinkman, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    Progress during the 1970's on the production of high-temperature mechanical properties data for pressure vessel materials was reviewed. The direction of the research was toward satisfying new data requirements to implement advances in high-temperature inelastic design methods. To meet these needs, servo-controlled testing machines and high-resolution extensometry were developed to gain more information on the essential behavioral features of high-temperature alloys. The similarities and differences in the mechanical response of various pressure vessel materials were identified. High-temperature pressure vessel materials that have received the most attention included Type 304 stainless steel, Type 316 stainless steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, alloy 800H, and Hastelloy X

  7. Interactions of high hydrostatic pressure, pressurization temperature and pH on death and injury of pressure-resistant and pressure-sensitive strains of foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpa, H; Kalchayanand, N; Bozoglu, F; Ray, B

    2000-09-15

    The objective of this study is to determine the interactions between high hydrostatic pressure, pressurization temperature, time and pH during pressurization on death and injury of pressure-resistant and pressure-sensitive strains of four foodborne pathogens: Staphylococcus aureus 485 and 765, Listeria ,monocytogenes CA and OH2, Escherichia coli O157:H7 933 and 931, Salmonella enteritidis FDA and Salmonella typhimurium E21274. Among these strains S. aureus 485, L. monocytogenes CA, E. coli O157:H7 933 and S. enteritidis FDA were reported to be more pressure-resistant than the respective strain of the same species (Alpas et al., 1999). In general, viability loss of all pathogens was enhanced significantly as the level of pressure and temperature were increased (P pasteurization applications to liquid foods that have low pH. reserved.

  8. High temperature deformation behavior of gradually pressurized zircaloy-4 tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoye

    1982-03-01

    In order to obtain preliminary perspectives on fuel cladding deformation behavior under changing temperature and pressure conditions in a hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident of PWR, a Zircaloy-4 tube burst test was conducted in both air and 99.97% Ar atomospheres. The tubes were directly heated by AC-current and maintained at various temperatures, and pressurized gradually until rupture occurred. Rupture circumferential strains were generally larger in Ar gas than in air and attained a maximum around 1100 K in both atmospheres. Some tube tested in air produced axially-extended long balloons, which proved not to be explained by such properties or ideas as effect of cooling on strain rate, superplasticity, geometrical plastic instability and stresses generated by surface oxide layer. A cause of the long balloon may be obtained in the anisotropy of the material structure. But even a qualitative analysis based on this property can not be made due to insufficient data of the anisotropy. (author)

  9. Relationship of pressure to temperature rise in overfilled cylinders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, E.J.

    1979-01-01

    Mild steel pressure vessels containing uranium hexafluoride are heated in 96-inch diameter autoclaves to allow the feed material to enter the gaseous diffusion process equipment for enrichment in the uranium 235 isotope. For purposes of safety analysis it is necessary to establish the ability of the instrumentation to shut off the steam supply to the autoclave prior to cylinder rupture if the cylinder has been overfilled. To make this determination requires estimates of the rate of change of pressure with respect to change of temperature at constant volume as a function of the temperature at which the ullage disappears. The paper presents the calculations for the estimation of this rate of change for liquid uranium hexafluoride using the ratio of the coefficients of expansion and compressibility using empirical liquid density data and the Eyring equation of state for liquids. 5 figs. (MB)

  10. Pressure and pressure derivative analysis for injection tests with variable temperature without type-curve matching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Freddy Humberto; Martinez, Javier Andres; Montealegre Matilde

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of injection tests under nonisothermic conditions is important for the accurate estimation of the reservoir permeability and the well's skin factor; since previously an isothermical system was assumed without taking into account a moving temperature front which expands with time plus the consequent changes in both viscosity and mobility between the cold and the hot zone of the reservoir which leads to unreliable estimation of the reservoir and well parameters. To construct the solution an analytical approach presented by Boughrara and Peres (2007) was used. That solution was initially introduced for the calculation of the injection pressure in an isothermic system. It was later modified by Boughrara and Reynolds (2007) to consider a system with variable temperature in vertical wells. In this work, the pressure response was obtained by numerical solution of the anisothermical model using the Gauss Quadrature method to solve the integrals, and assuming that both injection and reservoir temperatures were kept constant during the injection process and the water saturation is uniform throughout the reservoir. For interpretation purposes, a technique based upon the unique features of the pressure and pressure derivative curves were used without employing type-curve matching (TDS technique). The formulation was verified by its application to field and synthetic examples. As expected, increasing reservoir temperature causes a decrement in the mobility ratio, then estimation of reservoir permeability is some less accurate from the second radial flow, especially, as the mobility ratio increases

  11. Temperature and Pressure from Collapsing Pores in HMX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D. Barrett

    2017-06-01

    The thermal and mechanical response of collapsing voids in HMX is analyzed. In this work, the focus is simulating the temperature and pressure fields arising from isolated, idealized pores as they collapse in the presence of a shock. HMX slabs are numerically generated which contain a single pore, isolated from the boundaries to remove all wave reflections. In order to understand the primary pore characteristics leading to temperature rise, a series of 2D, plane strain simulations are conducted on HMX slabs containing both cylindrical and elliptical pores of constant size equal to the area of a circular pore with a 1 micron diameter. Each of these pore types is then subjected to shock pressures ranging from a weak shock that is unable to fully collapse the pore to a strong shock which overwhelms the tendency for localization. Results indicate that as shock strength increases, pore collapse phenomenology for a cylindrical pore transitions from a mode dominated by localized melt cracking to an idealized hydrodynamic pore collapse. For the case of elliptical pores, the orientation causing maximum temperature and pressure rise is found. The relative heating in elliptical pores is then quantified as a function of pore orientation and aspect ratio for a pore of a given area. Distribution A: Distribution unlimited. (96TW 2017-0036).

  12. Temperature Prediction for High Pressure High Temperature Condensate Gas Flow Through Chokes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjun Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study developed a theoretical model for predicting the downstream temperatures of high pressure high temperature condensate gas flowing through chokes. The model is composed of three parts: the iso-enthalpy choke model derived from continuity equation and energy conservation equation; the liquid-vapor equilibrium model based on the SRK equation of state (EoS; and the enthalpy model based on the Lee-Kesler EoS. Pseudocritical properties of mixtures, which are obtained by mixing rules, are very important in the enthalpy model, so the Lee-Kesler, Plocker-Knapp, Wong-Sandler and Prausnitz-Gunn mixing rules were all researched, and the combination mixing rules with satisfactory accuracy for high pressure high temperature condensate gases were proposed. The temperature prediction model is valid for both the critical and subcritical flows through different kinds of choke valves. The applications show the model is reliable for predicting the downstream temperatures of condensate gases with upstream pressures up to 85.54 MPa and temperatures up to 93.23 °C. The average absolute errors between the measured and calculated temperatures are expected for less than 2 °C by using the model.

  13. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathys, A; Knorr, D; Heinz, V

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of inactivation of bacterial spores by heat and pressure is still a matter of discussion. Obviously, the change of the dissociation equilibrium under pressure and temperature plays a dominant role in inactivation of microorganisms. Heat and pressure inactivation of Geobacillus. stearothermophilus spores at different initial pH-values in ACES and phosphate buffer confirmed this view. Thermal inactivation in ACES buffer at 122 deg. C resulted in higher logarithmic reductions. Contrary, after pressure treatment at 900 MPa with 80 deg. C phosphate buffer showed higher inactivation. These results indicated the different dissociation equilibrium shifts in buffer systems by heat and pressure. Due to preparation, storage and handling of highly concentrated spore suspensions the clumping and the formation of aggregates can hardly be avoided. Consequently, the impact of the agglomeration size distribution on the quantitative assessment of G. stearothermophilus spore inactivation was determined by using a three-fold dynamic optical backreflexion measurement. Two limiting cases have been discriminated in mathematical modelling: three dimensional, spherical packing for maximum spore count and two dimensional, circular packing for minimum spore count of a particular agglomerate. Thermal inactivation studies have been carried out in thin glass capillaries, where by using numerical simulations the non isothermal conditions were modelled and taken into account. It is shown that the shoulder formation often found in thermal spore inactivation can sufficiently be described by first-order inactivation kinetics when the agglomeration size is considered. In case of high pressure inactivation agglomerations could be strongly changed by high forces at compression and especially decompression phase. The physiological response of Bacillus licheniformis spores to high pressure was investigated using multiparameter flow cytometry. Spores were treated by high pressure at 150 MPa

  14. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, A.; Heinz, V.; Knorr, D.

    2008-07-01

    The mechanism of inactivation of bacterial spores by heat and pressure is still a matter of discussion. Obviously, the change of the dissociation equilibrium under pressure and temperature plays a dominant role in inactivation of microorganisms. Heat and pressure inactivation of Geobacillus. stearothermophilus spores at different initial pH-values in ACES and phosphate buffer confirmed this view. Thermal inactivation in ACES buffer at 122°C resulted in higher logarithmic reductions. Contrary, after pressure treatment at 900 MPa with 80°C phosphate buffer showed higher inactivation. These results indicated the different dissociation equilibrium shifts in buffer systems by heat and pressure. Due to preparation, storage and handling of highly concentrated spore suspensions the clumping and the formation of aggregates can hardly be avoided. Consequently, the impact of the agglomeration size distribution on the quantitative assessment of G. stearothermophilus spore inactivation was determined by using a three-fold dynamic optical backreflexion measurement. Two limiting cases have been discriminated in mathematical modelling: three dimensional, spherical packing for maximum spore count and two dimensional, circular packing for minimum spore count of a particular agglomerate. Thermal inactivation studies have been carried out in thin glass capillaries, where by using numerical simulations the non isothermal conditions were modelled and taken into account. It is shown that the shoulder formation often found in thermal spore inactivation can sufficiently be described by first-order inactivation kinetics when the agglomeration size is considered. In case of high pressure inactivation agglomerations could be strongly changed by high forces at compression and especially decompression phase. The physiological response of Bacillus licheniformis spores to high pressure was investigated using multiparameter flow cytometry. Spores were treated by high pressure at 150 MPa with 37

  15. New pressure and temperature effects on bacterial spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathys, A; Knorr, D [Berlin University of Technology, Department of Food Biotechnology and Food Process Engineering, Koenigin-Luise-Str. 22, D-14195 Berlin (Germany); Heinz, V [German Institute of Food Technology, p. o. box 1165, D-49601, Quackenbrueck (Germany)], E-mail: alexander.mathys@tu-berlin.de

    2008-07-15

    The mechanism of inactivation of bacterial spores by heat and pressure is still a matter of discussion. Obviously, the change of the dissociation equilibrium under pressure and temperature plays a dominant role in inactivation of microorganisms. Heat and pressure inactivation of Geobacillus. stearothermophilus spores at different initial pH-values in ACES and phosphate buffer confirmed this view. Thermal inactivation in ACES buffer at 122 deg. C resulted in higher logarithmic reductions. Contrary, after pressure treatment at 900 MPa with 80 deg. C phosphate buffer showed higher inactivation. These results indicated the different dissociation equilibrium shifts in buffer systems by heat and pressure. Due to preparation, storage and handling of highly concentrated spore suspensions the clumping and the formation of aggregates can hardly be avoided. Consequently, the impact of the agglomeration size distribution on the quantitative assessment of G. stearothermophilus spore inactivation was determined by using a three-fold dynamic optical backreflexion measurement. Two limiting cases have been discriminated in mathematical modelling: three dimensional, spherical packing for maximum spore count and two dimensional, circular packing for minimum spore count of a particular agglomerate. Thermal inactivation studies have been carried out in thin glass capillaries, where by using numerical simulations the non isothermal conditions were modelled and taken into account. It is shown that the shoulder formation often found in thermal spore inactivation can sufficiently be described by first-order inactivation kinetics when the agglomeration size is considered. In case of high pressure inactivation agglomerations could be strongly changed by high forces at compression and especially decompression phase. The physiological response of Bacillus licheniformis spores to high pressure was investigated using multiparameter flow cytometry. Spores were treated by high pressure at 150 MPa

  16. Temperature control of acid pressure leaching of uranium ores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, K.M.

    1984-01-01

    Studies that demonstrate the importance of the coordination of mine planning, blending schemes, metallurgical testwork and process design for the treatment of high-grade uranium ores (approx. 2% U 3 O 8 ) with a high arsenic content (> 1.5%) by acid pressure leaching are described. It is demonstrated that the control of leaching temperature is critical for an efficient and economic mill operation and that a thorough evaluation of theoretical temperature profiles in the leaching circuit as a function of mill feed, design and operating conditions is essential to the determination of an acceptable ore blend for the feed. This evaluation is required to ensure that the autogenous leaching temperature under the worst conditions would not exceed the optimum temperature of 70 deg C. In addition to feed composition the other important variables in plant operation that will affect the temperature are (1) the extent to which concentrated acid is diluted and cooled in a separate vessel before being fed into one of the leach autoclaves and (2) the variation of solids concentration in the pulp. For additional temperature control water-jacket cooling of the autoclaves can be used to good effect. (author)

  17. Determining noncondensible gas fractions at elevated temperatures and pressures using wet and dry bulb temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffith, P.; Bowman, J.

    1987-01-01

    The work reported in this note was undertaken to provide a method of determining the noncondensible gas fractions in a steam-gas mixture such as might be found in large reactor safety experiment like LOFT. In essence, the method used involves measuring the wet and dry bulb temperatures and using an algorithm, in place of the psychometric chart, to determine the partial pressure of the noncondensible gas in the mixture. In accomplishing this, the authors did the following: (1) extended the use of wet and dry-bulb temperature readings to determine mixture composition up to a temperature of 589 K and a pressure of 4.13 x 10 6 Pa. (2) developed an algorithm to reduce the data (3) found which materials would survive those temperatures

  18. Evaluation of oxidative behavior of polyolefin geosynthetics utilizing accelerated aging tests based on temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengjia

    Polyolefin geosynthetics are susceptible to oxidation, which eventually leads to the reduction in their engineering properties. In the application of polyolefin geosynthetics, a major issue is an estimate of the materials durability (i.e. service lifetime) under various aging conditions. Antioxidant packages are added to the polyolefin products to extend the induction time, during which antioxidants are gradually depleted and polymer oxidation reactions are prevented. In this PhD study, an improved laboratory accelerating aging method under elevated and high pressure environments was applied to evaluate the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the depletion of the antioxidants and the oxidation of polymers. Four types of commercial polyolefn geosynthetic materials selected for aging tests included HDPE geogrid, polypropylene woven and nonwoven geotextiles. A total of 33 different temperature/pressure aging conditions were used, with the incubation duration up to 24 months. The applied oven temperature ranged from 35°C to 105°C and the partial oxygen pressure ranged from 0.005 MPa to 6.3 MPa. Using the Oxidative Induction Time (OIT) test, the antioxidant depletion, which is correlated to the decrease of the OIT value, was found to follow apparent first-order decay. The OIT data also showed that, the antioxidant depletion rate increased with temperature according to the Arrhenius equation, while under constant temperatures, the rate increased exponentially with the partial pressure of oxygen. A modified Arrhenius model was developed to fit the antioxidant depletion rate as a function of temperature and pressure and to predict the antioxidant lifetime under various field conditions. This study has developed new temperature/pressure incubation aging test method with lifetime prediction models. Using this new technique, the antioxidant lifetime prediction results are close to regular temperature aging data while the aging duration can be reduced considerably

  19. Tantalum strength model incorporating temperature, strain rate and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hojun; Battaile, Corbett; Brown, Justin; Lane, Matt

    Tantalum is a body-centered-cubic (BCC) refractory metal that is widely used in many applications in high temperature, strain rate and pressure environments. In this work, we propose a physically-based strength model for tantalum that incorporates effects of temperature, strain rate and pressure. A constitutive model for single crystal tantalum is developed based on dislocation kink-pair theory, and calibrated to measurements on single crystal specimens. The model is then used to predict deformations of single- and polycrystalline tantalum. In addition, the proposed strength model is implemented into Sandia's ALEGRA solid dynamics code to predict plastic deformations of tantalum in engineering-scale applications at extreme conditions, e.g. Taylor impact tests and Z machine's high pressure ramp compression tests, and the results are compared with available experimental data. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of low pressure micro-resistojets with integrated heater and temperature measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cordeiro Guerrieri, D. C.; de Athayde Costa e Silva, Marsil A. C.; van Zeijl, H.W.; Cervone, A.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2017-01-01

    Three low pressure micro-resistojets (LPM) with integrated heater and temperature measurement were designed, manufactured and characterized at Delft university of technology. The devices were manufactured using silicon-based micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology including a heater

  1. Ultra-high temperature stability Joule-Thomson cooler with capability to accomodate pressure variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bard, Steven (Inventor); Wu, Jiunn-Jeng (Inventor); Trimble, Curtis A. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system capable of achieving high temperature stabilities in the presence of varying temperature, atmospheric pressure, and heat load is provided. The Joule-Thomson cryogenic refrigeration system includes a demand flow Joule-Thomson expansion valve disposed in a cryostat of the refrigeration system. The expansion valve has an adjustable orifice that controls the flow of compressed gas therethrough and induces cooling and partial liquefaction of the gas. A recuperative heat exchanger is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the expansion valve. A thermostatically self-regulating mechanism is disposed in the cryostat and coupled to the J-T expansion valve. The thermostatically self-regulating mechanism automatically adjusts the cross sectional area of the adjustable valve orifice in response to environmental temperature changes and changes in power dissipated at a cold head. A temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism is coupled to a cold head for adjusting the temperature of the cold head in response to the change in heat flow in the cold head. The temperature sensing and adjusting mechanism comprises a temperature sensitive diode, a wound wire heater, and an electrical feedback control circuit coupling the diode to the heater. An absolute pressure relief valve is interposed between the output of the cryostat and an exhaust port for maintaining a constant exhaust temperature in the refrigerating system, independent of the changes in atmospheric pressure.

  2. Environmental ambient temperature and blood pressure in adults: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Li, Changchang; Guo, Yanfang; Barnett, Adrian G; Tong, Shilu; Phung, Dung; Chu, Cordia; Dear, Keith; Wang, Xuemei; Huang, Cunrui

    2017-01-01

    Although many individual studies have examined the association between temperature and blood pressure (BP), they used different methods and also their results were somewhat inconsistent. The aims of this study are to quantitatively summarize previous studies and to systematically assess the methodological issues to make recommendations for future research. We searched relevant empirical studies published before January 2016 concerning temperature and BP among adults using the MEDLINE, Embase and PubMed databases. Mean changes in systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) per 1°C reduction in temperature were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. Of 23 studies included, 14 were used for meta-analysis. Consistent, statistically significant, inverse associations were observed between ambient temperature (mean, maximum, minimum outdoor temperature and indoor temperature) and BP. An 1°C decrease in mean daily outdoor temperature was associated with an increase in SBP and DBP of 0.26mmHg (95% CI: 0.18-0.33) and 0.13 (95% CI: 0.11-0.16), respectively. The increase was greater in people with conditions related to cardiovascular disease. An 1°C decrease in indoor temperature was associated with 0.38mmHg (0.18-0.58) increase in SBP, while the effects on DBP were not estimated due to limited studies. Among the previous studies on temperature-BP relationship, temperature and BP measurements are not accurate enough and statistical methods need to be improved. Lower ambient temperatures seem to increase adults' BP and people with conditions related to cardiovascular disease are more susceptible to drops in temperature. Indoor temperature appeared to have a stronger effect on BP than outdoor temperature. To understand temperature-BP relationship well, a study combining repeated personal temperature exposure and ambulatory BP monitoring, applying improved statistical methods to examine potential non-linear relationship is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  3. Elevated temperature and high pressure large helium gas loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasai, Minoru; Midoriyama, Shigeru; Miyata, Toyohiko; Nakase, Tsuyoshi; Izaki, Makoto

    1979-01-01

    The development of high temperature gas-cooled reactors especially aiming at the multi-purpose utilization of nuclear heat energy is carried out actively in Japan and West Germany. In Japan, the experimental HTGR of 50 MWt and 1000 deg C outlet temperature is being developed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and others since 1969, and the development of direct iron-making technology utilizing high temperature reducing gas was started in 1973 as the large project of Ministry of Internalional Trade and Industry. Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Has taken part in these development projects, and has developed many softwares for nuclear heat design, system design and safety design of nuclear reactor system and heat utilization system. In hardwares also, efforts have been exerted to develop the technologies of design and manufacture of high temperature machinery and equipments. The high temperature, high pressure, large helium gas loop is under construction in the technical research institute of the company, and it is expected to be completed in December, 1979. The tests planned are that of proving the dynamic performances of the loop and its machinery and equipments and the verification of analysis codes. The loop is composed of the main circulation system, the objects of testing, the helium gas purifying system, the helium supplying and evacuating system, instruments and others. (Kako, I.)

  4. Measurement of local void fraction at elevated temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, D.; Trabold, T.A.

    1993-03-01

    Significant advances have recently been made in analytical and computational methods for the prediction of local thermal-hydraulic conditions in gas/liquid two-phase flows. There is, however, a need for extensive experimental data, for the dual purposes of constitutive relation development and code qualification. There is especially true of systems involving complicated geometries and/or extreme flow conditions for which little, if any, applicable information exists in the open literature. For the tests described in the present paper, a novel electrical probe has been applied to measure the void fraction in atmospheric pressure air/water flows, and steam/water mixtures at high temperature and pressure. The data acquired in the latter experiments are compared with the results of a one-dimensional two-fluid computational analysis

  5. Photoelectron Spectroscopy under Ambient Pressure and Temperature Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogletree, D. Frank; Bluhm, Hendrik; Hebenstreit, Eleonore B.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-02-27

    We describe the development and applications of novel instrumentation for photoemission spectroscopy of solid or liquid surfaces in the presence of gases under ambient conditions or pressure and temperature. The new instrument overcomes the strong scattering of electrons in gases by the use of an aperture close to the surface followed by a differentially-pumped electrostatic lens system. In addition to the scattering problem, experiments in the presence of condensed water or other liquids require the development of special sample holders to provide localized cooling. We discuss the first two generations of Ambient Pressure PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (APPES) instruments developed at synchrotron light sources (ALS in Berkeley and BESSY in Berlin), with special focus on the Berkeley instruments. Applications to environmental science and catalytic chemical research are illustrated in two examples.

  6. Numerical simulation of dc high-pressure discharge lamps including electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flesch, P.; Neiger, M.

    2002-01-01

    The subject of this paper is a novel modelling method for dc operated high-pressure discharge lamps including both electrodes. No subdivisions of the discharge space into different regions (e.g. space charge layer, ionization zone, plasma column) is necessary. Starting from general diffusion equations, this goal is achieved by using a differential equation for a non-LTE electrical conductivity which is applicable for local thermal equilibrium (LTE) regions as well as non-LTE plasma regions close to electrodes. This novel approach is valid only for high-pressure conditions, where the product of electron mean free path and electric field is such that the mean energy gain of electrons is considerably less than the ionization energy of the discharge gas, so that the same local kinetic energy distribution can be assumed for the electron, the ion, and the neutral gas components anywhere within the discharge. Boundary conditions for this non-LTE electrical conductivity at cathode and anode are derived. We present modelling results for Hg- and Xe-discharge lamps (p≥1 MPa). Comparison with results from traditional models using plasma layers will be presented and discussed. Convective flow within the lamp is not included yet, as the emphasis of this paper is on the regions close to anode and cathode. (author)

  7. A lidar system for measuring atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwemmer, Geary K.; Dombrowski, Mark; Korb, C. Laurence; Milrod, Jeffry; Walden, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of a differential absorption lidar system capable of remotely measuring the vertical structure of tropospheric pressure and temperature are described. The measurements are based on the absorption by atmospheric oxygen of the spectrally narrowband output of two pulsed alexandrite lasers. Detailed laser output spectral characteristics, which are critical to successful lidar measurements, are presented. Spectral linewidths of 0.026 and 0.018 per cm for the lasers were measured with over 99.99 percent of the energy contained in three longitudinal modes.

  8. Pressure and temperature distribution in biological tissues by focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal, Ajit K.; Feng, Feng; Kabo, Michael; Wang, Jeffrey; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2003-07-01

    The interaction between ultrasound and biological tissues has been the subject of a number of investigators for nearly half a century and the number of applications of high intensity, focused ultrasound for therapeutic purposes continues to grow. This paper is motivated by possible medical applications of focused ultrasound in minimally invasive treatment of a variety of musculoskeletal disorders that are responsive to thermal treatment. The mechanical and thermal effects in a subject"s body induced by high-frequency ultrasound are simulated using PZFlex, a finite element based program. The FEM model described in this report is of a transverse section of the body at the level of the second lumbar vertebra (L2) extracted from a CT image. In order to protect the nerves inside the spinal canal as well as to obtain an effective heating result at the focal region within the intervertebral disk, a suitable orientation of axis of the focused ultrasound lens have to be determined in advance. The pressure, energy loss distribution and temperature distribution are investigated in this paper with the different orientations of the axis and different transverse diameter of the spherical ultrasound lens. Since nonlinear effects are expected to be important in the therapeutic application in some literatures, this paper also demonstrates the effects of nonlinearities on the pressure and temperature distribution induced by focused ultrasound in a two dimensional model. Finally, a comparison of the results between linear and nonlinear cases is reported.

  9. Comparison of extraction techniques, including supercritical fluid, high-pressure solvent, and soxhlet, for organophosphorus hydraulic fluids from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, M D; Seiber, J N

    1996-09-01

    The efficiencies of three extraction techniques for removal of nonpesticidal organophosphates from soil were determined. Traditional Soxhlet extraction was compared to supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and a low solvent volume flow through technique referred to here as high-pressure solvent extraction (HPSE). SFE, optimized by varying parameters of temperature, pressure, and methanol polarity modifier, showed at least 90% efficiency in the extraction of OPs from both spiked and native soils. HPSE experiments showed efficient and consistent recoveries over a range of temperatures up to 200 °C and pressures up to 170 atm. Recovery of TCP from spiked soils with HPSE depends on the system variables of temperature and pressure, which dictate density and flow rate. HPSE provided extraction efficiencies comparable to those obtained with Soxhlet extraction and SFE but with substantial savings of time and cost.

  10. On the pressure velocity and temperature factors and the effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By this, explicit results about the pressure, velocity and temperature distributions are obtained. It is observed that viscosity reduces the pressure, hence, the velocity and temperature distributions. Our results may find relevance in the medical treatment of high blood-pressure problem. Keywords: Viscosity pressure, velocity, ...

  11. 46 CFR 154.701 - Cargo pressure and temperature control: General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo pressure and temperature control: General. 154.701... Equipment Cargo Pressure and Temperature Control § 154.701 Cargo pressure and temperature control: General... the MARVS under § 154.405; or (b) Be refrigerated by a system meeting § 154.702, and each refrigerated...

  12. On the physics of the pressure and temperature gradients in the edge of tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2018-04-01

    An extended plasma fluid theory including atomic physics, radiation, electromagnetic and themodynamic forces, external sources of particles, momentum and energy, and kinetic ion orbit loss is employed to derive theoretical expressions that display the role of the various factors involved in the determination of the pressure and temperature gradients in the edge of tokamak plasmas. Calculations for current experiments are presented to illustrate the magnitudes of various effects including strong radiative and atomic physics edge cooling effects and strong reduction in ion particle and energy fluxes due to ion orbit loss in the plasma edge. An important new insight is the strong relation between rotation and the edge pressure gradient.

  13. Rheology of phase A at high pressure and high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilairet, N.; Amiguet, E.; Wang, Y.; Merkel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Subduction zones are locations where a tectonic plate slides and bends under another one. Materials there undergo large and heterogeneous deformations and stresses which are released through seismicity, occasionally. Thus plasticity of minerals filling faults and shear zones is a critical parameter for understanding the stress balance of whole subduction zones. We present a deformation study on a hexagonal hydrous phase that can exist in shear zones within subducting slabs, phase A, after dehydration of serpentine into pyroxene + phase A. Pure phase A samples were synthesized at 11 GPa and ca. 1100K, in the multi-anvil facility in Clermont-Ferrand, France, with N. Bolfan and D. Andrault. Three samples were deformed at 11 GPa confining pressure, and 673K or 973K, using a D-DIA apparatus [1] at 13B-MD at GSE-CARS, APS, in uniaxial shortening up to -0.24 strain and at 5.10-5 s-1. Lattice strains (a proxy for macro-stress), texture and strain were measured in-situ, using synchrotron radiation. Results from lattice strain and texture analysis show a decrease in flow stress and a change in deformation mechanisms with temperature, coherent with the findings in transmission electron microscopy on samples recovered in relaxation experiments from [2]. The slip systems involved during deformation were further analyzed using Visco-Plastic Self-Consistent (VPSC) simulations [3]. The model inputs were known slip systems for hexagonal materials, including the ones observed by [2], with tunable strengths, the strain rate, final strain, and either a random texture or the starting experimental texture. The final experimental textures could be reproduced. The slip systems that had to be activated for matching the experimental texture confirm the observations by [2]: at 673K, the most active slip systems are prismatic and pyramidal, with the requirement of a smaller activity on the basal system, and at 973K the basal system is the main slip system activated. [1] Wang et al, Review for

  14. Creep of Posidonia Shale at Elevated Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Herrmann, J.; Wirth, R.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    The economic production of gas and oil from shales requires repeated hydraulic fracturing operations to stimulate these tight reservoir rocks. Besides simple depletion, the often observed decay of production rate with time may arise from creep-induced fracture closure. We examined experimentally the creep behavior of an immature carbonate-rich Posidonia shale, subjected to constant stress conditions at temperatures between 50 and 200 °C and confining pressures of 50-200 MPa, simulating elevated in situ depth conditions. Samples showed transient creep in the semibrittle regime with high deformation rates at high differential stress, high temperature and low confinement. Strain was mainly accommodated by deformation of the weak organic matter and phyllosilicates and by pore space reduction. The primary decelerating creep phase observed at relatively low stress can be described by an empirical power law relation between strain and time, where the fitted parameters vary with temperature, pressure and stress. Our results suggest that healing of hydraulic fractures at low stresses by creep-induced proppant embedment is unlikely within a creep period of several years. At higher differential stress, as may be expected in situ at contact areas due to stress concentrations, the shale showed secondary creep, followed by tertiary creep until failure. In this regime, microcrack propagation and coalescence may be assisted by stress corrosion. Secondary creep rates were also described by a power law, predicting faster fracture closure rates than for primary creep, likely contributing to production rate decline. Comparison of our data with published primary creep data on other shales suggests that the long-term creep behavior of shales can be correlated with their brittleness estimated from composition. Low creep strain is supported by a high fraction of strong minerals that can build up a load-bearing framework.

  15. Creep Behavior of Posidonia Shale at Elevated Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybacki, E.; Herrmann, J.; Wirth, R.; Dresen, G.

    2017-12-01

    Unconventional reservoir rocks are usually stimulated by repeated hydraulic fracturing operations. However, the production rate often decays with time that may arise from creep-induced fracture closure by proppant embedment. To examine experimentally the creep behavior of shales, we deformed immature carbonate-rich Posidonia shale at constant stress conditions and elevated temperatures between 50° and 200°C and confining pressures of 50 to 200 MPa. Samples showed transient creep in the semibrittle regime with high deformation rates at high differential stress, high temperature, and low confinement. Strain was mainly accommodated by deformation of the weak organic matter and phyllosilicates and by pore space reduction. At relatively low stress the samples deformed in the primary creep regime with continuously decelerating strain rate. The relation between strain and time can be described by an empirical power law equation, where the fitted parameters vary with temperature, pressure and stress. Our results suggest that healing of hydraulic fractures at low stresses by creep-induced proppant embedment is unlikely within a creep period of several years. At high differential stress (85-90% of the triaxial strength), as may be expected in situ at contact areas due to stress concentrations, the shale showed secondary creep, followed by tertiary creep until failure. In this regime, stress corrosion may induce microcrack propagation and coalescence. Secondary creep rates were also described by a power law that predicts faster fracture closure rates than for primary creep and likely contributes to production rate decline. Comparison of our data with published primary creep data on other shales suggest that the long-term creep behavior of shales can be correlated to their brittleness estimated from composition. Low creep strain is supported by a high fraction of strong minerals that can build up a load-bearing framework.

  16. High-temperature vibrational response and high-pressure melting curve of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, N.K.; Thakore, B.Y.; Vyas, P.R.; Jani, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of mean-field potential (MFP) is an adequate description to evaluate vibrational contribution to the Helmholtz free energy at finite temperatures and pressures for condensed-state of matter. Once the total free energy is available, as an explicit function of temperature and volume (≡pressure), several thermodynamic properties can be calculated numerically using the text-book equations. While the MFP approach is robust, its applicability is extended to estimate atomic and vibrational properties of materials within the Debye model. In the present scheme, we propose energy-calculation based formula to calculate the Debye temperature. We discuss temperature dependence of Debye temperature, entropy and atomic mean-square displacements for elemental fcc-Pb. It is demonstrated that the present extended MFP (EMFP) scheme, allows one to include the effect of three choices for thermodynamic Grueneisen parameter, namely, due to Slater, due to Dugdale and MacDonald and the one due to free volume theory, on different physical properties. A much debatable dynamical phenomenon, a high pressure melting curve is also obtained, where melting temperature is now explicitly dependent on these three assumptions for the Grueneisen parameter. Results so obtained are discussed and compared with the recent first principles theoretical and experimental findings.

  17. High-temperature vibrational response and high-pressure melting curve of lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, N.K., E-mail: bhattnisarg@hotmail.co [Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120 (India); Thakore, B.Y. [Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120 (India); Vyas, P.R. [Department of Physics, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India); Jani, A.R. [Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar 388 120 (India)

    2010-08-15

    The concept of mean-field potential (MFP) is an adequate description to evaluate vibrational contribution to the Helmholtz free energy at finite temperatures and pressures for condensed-state of matter. Once the total free energy is available, as an explicit function of temperature and volume ({identical_to}pressure), several thermodynamic properties can be calculated numerically using the text-book equations. While the MFP approach is robust, its applicability is extended to estimate atomic and vibrational properties of materials within the Debye model. In the present scheme, we propose energy-calculation based formula to calculate the Debye temperature. We discuss temperature dependence of Debye temperature, entropy and atomic mean-square displacements for elemental fcc-Pb. It is demonstrated that the present extended MFP (EMFP) scheme, allows one to include the effect of three choices for thermodynamic Grueneisen parameter, namely, due to Slater, due to Dugdale and MacDonald and the one due to free volume theory, on different physical properties. A much debatable dynamical phenomenon, a high pressure melting curve is also obtained, where melting temperature is now explicitly dependent on these three assumptions for the Grueneisen parameter. Results so obtained are discussed and compared with the recent first principles theoretical and experimental findings.

  18. Brittle Creep of Tournemire Shale: Orientation, Temperature and Pressure Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhi; Bonnelye, Audrey; Dick, Pierre; David, Christian; Chen, Mian; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. Here, we conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France. Conventional tri-axial experiments were carried under two different temperatures (26˚ C, 75˚ C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1 along, perpendicular and 45˚ to bedding). Following the methodology developed by Heap et al. [2008], differential stress was first increased to ˜ 60% of the short term peak strength (10-7/s, Bonnelye et al. 2016), and then in steps of 5 to 10 MPa every 24 hours until brittle failure was achieved. In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1˜15 minutes, enabling us to monitor the evolution of elastic wave speed anisotropy. Temporal evolution of anisotropy was illustrated by inverting acoustic velocities to Thomsen parameters. Finally, samples were investigated post-mortem using scanning electron microscopy. Our results seem to contradict our traditional understanding of loading rate dependent brittle failure. Indeed, the brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed ˜50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. At higher temperatures, the creep failure strength of our samples was slightly reduced and deformation was characterized with faster 'steady-state' creep axial strain rates at each steps, and larger final axial strain

  19. Interfacial tension measurement between CO2 and brines under high temperature and elevated pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Boek, E. S.; Maitland, G. C.; Trusler, J. P. M.

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the dependence of interfacial tension of (CO2 + brine) on temperature, pressure and salinity (including both salt type and molality) over the range of conditions applicable to CO2 storage in saline aquifers. The study covered a wide range of measurements of the interfacial tensions between carbon dioxide and (NaCl + KCl)(aq), CaCl2(aq), MgCl2(aq), Na2SO4(aq), KHCO3(aq), NaHCO3(aq) and two laboratory constructed brines with molality ranging from (0.3 to 5.0) mol·kg-1. The measurements were made at temperatures between (298 and 448) K at various pressures up to 50 MPa, using the pendant drop method in a high-pressure view cell filled with water-saturated CO2. The drop to be imaged was created by injecting brine from a high-pressure syringe pump into a capillary sealed through the top of the cell. The expanded uncertainties of the experimental state variables at 95 % confidence are +0.05 K in temperature and +70 kPa in pressure. For the interfacial tension, the overall expanded relative uncertainty at 95 % confidence was +1.6%. The experimental results show that interfacial tension for all the systems increases linearly with molality, indicating that relatively few measurements and simple interpolation procedures are adequate for describing this property accurately over wide ranges of conditions.

  20. Thermodynamic properties of standard seawater: extensions to high temperatures and pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Safarov

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of (p, ρ, T properties of standard seawater with practical salinity S≈35, temperature T=(273.14 to 468.06 K and pressures, p, up to 140 MPa are reported with the reproducibility of the density measurements observed to be in the average percent deviation range Δρ/ρ=±(0.01 to 0.03%. The measurements are made with a newly constructed vibration-tube densimeter which is calibrated using double-distilled water, methanol and aqueous NaCl solutions. Based on these and previous measurements, an empirical expression for the density of standard seawater has been developed as a function of pressure and temperature. This equation is used to calculate other volumetric properties including isothermal compressibility, isobaric thermal expansibility, differences in isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, the thermal pressure coefficient, internal pressure and the secant bulk modulus. The results can be used to extend the present equation of state of seawater to higher temperatures for pressure up to 140 MPa.

  1. Ammonia oxidation at high pressure and intermediate temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yu; Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    2016-01-01

    oxidizing conditions the onset temperature for reaction was 850–875 K at 30 bar, while at 100 bar it was about 800 K, with complete consumption of NH3 at 875 K. The products of reaction were N2 and N2O, while NO and NO2 concentrations were below the detection limit even under oxidizing conditions. The data...... was satisfactory. The main oxidation path for NH3 at high pressure under oxidizing conditions is NH3⟶+OH NH2⟶+HO2,NO2 H2NO⟶+O2 HNO⟶+O2 NO ⟶+NH2 N2. The modeling predictions are most sensitive to the reactions NH2 + NO = NNH + OH and NH2 + HO2 = H2NO + OH, which promote the ammonia consumption by forming OH...

  2. [Genesis study of omphacite at high pressure and high temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ben-Fu; Yi, Li; Wang, Duo-Jun; Xie, Chao; Tang, Xue-Wu; Liu, Lei; Cui, Yue-Ju

    2013-11-01

    The melting and recrystallizing experiments of alkali basalt powder and mixture of pure oxides mixed as stoichiometry were performed at 3 GPa and 1 200 degrees C. Electronic microprobe analysis and Raman spectra showed that the recrystallized products were omphacites, the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of the Raman peak was narrow and its shape was sharp, which is attributed to the stable Si-O tetrahedral structure and the high degree of order in omphacite. Based on the results of previous studies, the influencing factors of omphacite genesis and its primary magma were discussed. The results showed that the formation of omphacite could be affected by many factors, such as the composition of parent rocks, the concentration of fluid in the system and the conditions of pressure and temperature. This result could support some experimental evidences on the genesis studies of omphacite and eclogite.

  3. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis. Effect of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, M.Z.; Høj, M.; Schandel, C. B.

    2018-01-01

    . The effect of varying the temperature (365–511 °C) and hydrogen pressure (1.6–3.6 MPa) on the product yield and organic composition was studied. The mass balance closed by a mass fraction between 90 and 101% dry ash free basis (daf). The yield of the combined condensed organics and C4+ varied between a mass...... fraction of 17 and 22% daf, corresponding to an energy recovery of between 40 and 53% in the organic product. The yield of the non-condensable gases varied between a mass fraction of 24 and 32% daf and the char yield varied between 9.6 and 18% daf. The condensed organics contained a mass fraction of 42...

  4. Vapour pressure of D2O - Ice at temperatures below 237 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heras, J.M.; Asensio, M.C.; Estiu, G.; Viscido, L.

    1984-01-01

    Accurate measurements of heavy water ice vapour pressures between 193 and 253 K have been carried out and an equation based on thermodynamic data has been derived in order to calculate the D 2 O-ice vapour pressures between 173 and 273 K. The agreement between our calculated vapour pressures and the available experimental data including those in this paper, is very good. The comparison between the theoretical calculations of H 2 O-ice and D 2 O-ice vapour pressures confirms the experimental evidence that H 2 O-ice is more volatile than D 2 O-ice at all temperatures in agreement with the vapour isotopic effect theory (VPIE).(author)

  5. Total dissolved gas, barometric pressure, and water temperature data, lower Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Dwight Q.; Harrison, Howard E.; McKenzie, Stuart W.

    1996-01-01

    Increased levels of total dissolved gas pressure can cause gas-bubble trauma in fish downstream from dams on the Columbia River. In cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the U.S. Geological Survey collected data on total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen pressure at 11 stations on the lower Columbia River from the John Day forebay (river mile 215.6) to Wauna Mill (river mile 41.9) from March to September 1996. Methods of data collection, review, and processing are described in this report. Summaries of daily minimum, maximum, and mean hourly values are presented for total dissolved gas pressure, barometric pressure, and water temperature. Hourly values for these parameters are presented graphically. Dissolved oxygen data are not presented in this report because the quality-control data show that the data have poor precision and high bias. Suggested changes to monitoring procedures for future studies include (1) improved calibration procedures for total dissolved gas and dissolved oxygen to better define accuracy at elevated levels of supersaturation and (2) equipping dissolved oxygen sensors with stirrers because river velocities at the shoreline monitoring stations probably cannot maintain an adequate flow of water across the membrane surface of the dissolved oxygen sensor.

  6. High-pressure cell for neutron scattering at very low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paureau, J.; Vettier, C.

    1975-01-01

    The high pressure cell for neutron scattering experiments at low temperatures described here consists of an autofreggated chamber and a shield. The bursting pressures for pressure cells of 7075-T6 and 7049A-T6 aluminium alloys have been measured at different temperatures. These studies demonstrate the feasibility and the safety of experiments at pressures up to 6 kbar at low temperatures. (author)

  7. Including Pressure Measurements in Supervision of Energy Efficiency of Wastewater Pump Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Arensman, Mareike; Nerup-Jensen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    energy). This article presents a method for a continuous supervision of the performance of both the pump and the pipeline in order to maintain the initial specific energy consumption as close as possible to the original value from when the system was commissioned. The method is based on pressure...... measurements only. The flow is determined indirectly from pressure fluctuations during pump run-up....

  8. Temperature/pressure and water vapor sounding with microwave spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhleman, D. O.; Janssen, M. A.; Clancy, R. T.; Gulkis, S.; Mccleese, D. J.; Zurek, R.; Haberle, R. M.; Frerking, M.

    1992-01-01

    Two intense microwave spectra lines exist in the martian atmosphere that allow unique sounding capabilities: water vapor at 183 GHz and the (2-1) rotational line of CO at 230 GHz. Microwave spectra line sounding is a well-developed technique for the Earth's atmosphere for sounding from above from spacecraft and airplanes, and from below from fixed surface sites. Two simple instruments for temperature sounding on Mars (the CO line) and water vapor measurements are described. The surface sounder proposed for the MESUR sites is designed to study the boundary layer water vapor distribution and the temperature/pressure profiles with vertical resolution of 0.25 km up to 1 km with reduced resolution above approaching a scale height. The water channel will be sensitive to a few tenths of a micrometer of water and the temperature profile will be retrieved to an accuracy between 1 and 2 K. The latter is routinely done on the Earth using oxygen lines near 60 GHz. The measurements are done with a single-channel heterodyne receiver looking into a 10-cm mirror that is canned through a range of elevation angles plus a target load. The frequency of the receiver is sweep across the water and CO lines generating the two spectra at about 1-hr intervals throughout the mission. The mass and power for the proposed instrument are 2 kg and 5-8 W continuously. The measurements are completely immune to the atmospheric dust and ice particle loads. It was felt that these measurements are the ultimate ones to properly study the martian boundary layer from the surface to a few kilometers. Sounding from above requires an orbiting spacecraft with multichannel microwave spectrometers such as the instrument proposed for MO by a subset of the authors, a putative MESUR orbiter, and a proposed Discovery mission called MOES. Such an instrument can be built with less than 10 kg and use less than 15 W. The obvious advantage of this approach is that the entire atmosphere can be sounded for temperature and

  9. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation.

  10. Joining and fabrication techniques for high temperature structures including the first wall in fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Kim, K. B.

    2003-09-01

    The materials for PFC's (Plasma Facing Components) in a fusion reactor are severely irradiated with fusion products in facing the high temperature plasma during the operation. The refractory materials can be maintained their excellent properties in severe operating condition by lowering surface temperature by bonding them to the high thermal conducting materials of heat sink. Hence, the joining and bonding techniques between dissimilar materials is considered to be important in case of the fusion reactor or nuclear reactor which is operated at high temperature. The first wall in the fusion reactor is heated to approximately 1000 .deg. C and irradiated severely by the plasma. In ITER, beryllium is expected as the primary armour candidate for the PFC's; other candidates including W, Mo, SiC, B4C, C/C and Si 3 N 4 . Since the heat affected zones in the PFC's processed by conventional welding are reported to have embrittlement and degradation in the sever operation condition, both brazing and diffusion bonding are being considered as prime candidates for the joining technique. In this report, both the materials including ceramics and the fabrication techniques including joining technique between dissimilar materials for PFC's are described. The described joining technique between the refractory materials and the dissimilar materials may be applicable for the fusion reactor and Generation-4 future nuclear reactor which are operated at high temperature and high irradiation

  11. An analysis of system pressure and temperature distribution in self-pressurizer of SMART considering thermal stratification at intermediate cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Moon; Lee, Doo Jeong; Yoon, Ju Hyun; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    Because the pressurizer is in reactor vessel, the heat transfer from primary water would increase the temperatures of fluids in pressurizer to same temperature of hotleg, if no cooling equipment were supplied. Thus, heat exchanger and thermal insulator are needed to minimize heat transferred from primary water and to remove heat in pressurizer. The temperatures in cavities of pressurizer for normal operation are 70 deg C and 74 deg C for intermediate and end cavity, respectively, which considers the solubility of nitrogen gas in water. Natural convection is the mechanism of heat balance in pressurizer of SMART. In SMART, the heat exchanger in pressurizer is placed in lower part of intermediate cavity, so the heat in upper part of intermediate cavity can't be removed adequately and it can cause thermal stratification. If thermal stratification occurred, it increases heat transfers to nitrogen gas and system pressure increases as the result. Thus, proper evaluation of those effects on system pressure and ways to mitigate thermal stratification should be established. This report estimates the system pressure and temperatures in cavities of pressurizer with considering thermal stratification in intermediate cavity. The system pressure and temperatures for each cavities considered size of wet thermal insulator, temperature of upper plate of reactor vessel, parameters of heat exchanger in intermediate cavity such as flow rate and temperature of cooling water, heat transfer area, effective tube height, and location of cooling tube. In addition to the consideration of thermal stratification thermal mixing of all water in intermediate cavity also considered and compared in this report. (author). 6 refs., 60 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Study on the high temperature, high pressure operation technique of fuel test loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Dae Young; Lee, Chung Young; Sim, Bong Shick; Kim, Jun Yun

    2001-04-01

    The project, 'Feasibility review on the installation of FTL in HANARO' charged by KISTEP has been performed for the technical evaluation of the steady state fuel test loop during 4 months from Dec. 2000 to Mar. 2001. This study describes the high temperature, high pressure technology of the FTL. This report includes the followings : - The construction of FTL - The operation schemes of the steady state - The operation procedures of FTL

  13. Study on the high temperature, high pressure operation technique of fuel test loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Dae Young; Lee, Chung Young; Sim, Bong Shick; Kim, Jun Yun

    2001-04-01

    The project, 'Feasibility review on the installation of FTL in HANARO' charged by KISTEP has been performed for the technical evaluation of the steady state fuel test loop during 4 months from Dec. 2000 to Mar. 2001. This study describes the high temperature, high pressure technology of the FTL. This report includes the followings : - The construction of FTL - The operation schemes of the steady state - The operation procedures of FTL.

  14. The equilibrium hydrogen pressure-temperature diagram for the liquid sodium-hydrogen-oxygen system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knights, C.F.; Whittingham, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    The underlying equilibria in the sodium-hydrogen-oxygen system are presented in the form of a completmentary hydrogen equilibrium pressure-temperature diagram, constructed by using published data and supplemented by experimental measurements of hydrogen equilibrium pressures over condensed phases in the system. Possible applications of the equilibrium pressure-temperature phase diagram limitations regarding its use are outlined

  15. Characterization of thick and thin film SiCN for pressure sensing at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Alfin; Andronenko, Sergey; Stiharu, Ion; Bhat, Rama B

    2010-01-01

    Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA), thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40-60 μm) and thick (about 2-3 mm) films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated.

  16. Characterization of Thick and Thin Film SiCN for Pressure Sensing at High Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama B. Bhat

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure measurement in high temperature environments is important in many applications to provide valuable information for performance studies. Information on pressure patterns is highly desirable for improving performance, condition monitoring and accurate prediction of the remaining life of systems that operate in extremely high temperature environments, such as gas turbine engines. A number of technologies have been recently investigated, however these technologies target specific applications and they are limited by the maximum operating temperature. Thick and thin films of SiCN can withstand high temperatures. SiCN is a polymer-derived ceramic with liquid phase polymer as its starting material. This provides the advantage that it can be molded to any shape. CERASET™ also yields itself for photolithography, with the addition of photo initiator 2, 2-Dimethoxy-2-phenyl-acetophenone (DMPA, thereby enabling photolithographical patterning of the pre-ceramic polymer using UV lithography. SiCN fabrication includes thermosetting, crosslinking and pyrolysis. The technology is still under investigation for stability and improved performance. This work presents the preparation of SiCN films to be used as the body of a sensor for pressure measurements in high temperature environments. The sensor employs the phenomenon of drag effect. The pressure sensor consists of a slender sensitive element and a thick blocking element. The dimensions and thickness of the films depend on the intended application of the sensors. Fabrication methods of SiCN ceramics both as thin (about 40–60 µm and thick (about 2–3 mm films for high temperature applications are discussed. In addition, the influence of thermosetting and annealing processes on mechanical properties is investigated.

  17. Selective hydrogen purification through graphdiyne under ambient temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranford, Steven W.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2012-07-01

    Graphdiyne, a recently synthesized one-atom-thick carbon allotrope, is atomistically porous - characterized by a regular ``nanomesh'' - and suggests application as a separation membrane for hydrogen purification. Here we report a full atomistic reactive molecular dynamics investigation to determine the selective diffusion properties of hydrogen (H2) amongst carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4), a mixture otherwise known as syngas, a product of the gasification of renewable biomass (such as animal wastes). Under constant temperature simulations, we find the mass flux of hydrogen molecules through a graphdiyne membrane to be on the order of 7 to 10 g cm-2 s-1 (between 300 K and 500 K), with carbon monoxide and methane remaining isolated. Using a simple Arrhenius relation, we determine the energy required for permeation on the order of 0.11 +/- 0.03 eV for single H2 molecules. We find that addition of marginal applied force (approximately 1 to 2 pN per molecule, representing a controlled pressure gradient, ΔP, on the order of 100 to 500 kPa) can successfully enhance the separation of hydrogen gas. Addition of larger driving forces (50 to 100 pN per molecule) is required to selectively filter carbon monoxide or methane, suggesting that, under near-atmospheric conditions, only hydrogen gas will pass such a membrane. Graphdiyne provides a unique, chemically inert and mechanically stable platform facilitating selective gas separation at nominal pressures using a homogeneous material system, without a need for chemical functionalization or the explicit introduction of molecular pores.

  18. Electrochemical cell and electrode designs for high-temperature/high-pressure kinetic measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Z.; Yonco, R.M.

    1987-05-01

    Many corrosion processes of interest to the nuclear power industry occur in high-temperature/high-pressure aqueous systems. The investigation of the kinetics of the appropriate electrode reactions is a serious experimental challenge, partially because of the high temperatures and pressures and partially because many of these reactions are very rapid, requiring fast relaxation measurements. An electrochemical measuring system is described which is suitable for measurements of the kinetics of fast electrode reactions at temperatures extending to at least 300 0 C and pressures to at least 10 MPa (100 atmospheres). The system includes solution preparation and handling equipment, the electrochemical cell, and several electrode designs. One of the new designs is a coaxial working electrode-counter electrode assembly; this electrode can be used with very fast-rising pulses, and it provides a well defined, repeatedly-polishable working surface. Low-impedance reference electrodes are also described, based on electrode concepts responding to the pH or the redox potential of the test solution. Additionally, a novel, long-life primary reference electrode design is reported, based on a modification of the external, pressure-balanced Ag/AgCl reference electrode

  19. Temperature-Compensated Force/Pressure Sensor Based on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Epoxy Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nghia Trong Dinh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we propose a multi-walled carbon nanotube epoxy composite sensor for force and pressure sensing in the range of 50 N–2 kN. A manufacturing procedure, including material preparation and deposition techniques, is proposed. The electrode dimensions and the layer thickness were optimized by the finite element method. Temperature compensation is realized by four nanocomposites elements, where only two elements are exposed to the measurand. In order to investigate the influence of the filler contents, samples with different compositions were prepared and investigated. Additionally, the specimens are characterized by cyclical and stepped force/pressure loads or at defined temperatures. The results show that the choice of the filler content should meet a compromise between sensitivity, temperature influence and noise behavior. At constant temperature, a force of at least 50N can be resolved. The measurement error due to the temperature influence is 150N in a temperature range of –20°C–50°C.

  20. Temperature-compensated force/pressure sensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotube epoxy composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Nghia Trong; Kanoun, Olfa

    2015-05-12

    In this study, we propose a multi-walled carbon nanotube epoxy composite sensor for force and pressure sensing in the range of 50 N-2 kN. A manufacturing procedure, including material preparation and deposition techniques, is proposed. The electrode dimensions and the layer thickness were optimized by the finite element method. Temperature compensation is realized by four nanocomposites elements, where only two elements are exposed to the measurand. In order to investigate the influence of the filler contents, samples with different compositions were prepared and investigated. Additionally, the specimens are characterized by cyclical and stepped force/pressure loads or at defined temperatures. The results show that the choice of the filler content should meet a compromise between sensitivity, temperature influence and noise behavior. At constant temperature, a force of at least 50N can be resolved. The measurement error due to the temperature influence is 150N in a temperature range of -20°C-50°C.

  1. Recent Progress on Labfit: a Multispectrum Analysis Program for Fitting Lineshapes Including the Htp Model and Temperature Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cich, Matthew J.; Guillaume, Alexandre; Drouin, Brian; Benner, D. Chris

    2017-06-01

    Multispectrum analysis can be a challenge for a variety of reasons. It can be computationally intensive to fit a proper line shape model especially for high resolution experimental data. Band-wide analyses including many transitions along with interactions, across many pressures and temperatures are essential to accurately model, for example, atmospherically relevant systems. Labfit is a fast multispectrum analysis program originally developed by D. Chris Benner with a text-based interface. More recently at JPL a graphical user interface was developed with the goal of increasing the ease of use but also the number of potential users. The HTP lineshape model has been added to Labfit keeping it up-to-date with community standards. Recent analyses using labfit will be shown to demonstrate its ability to competently handle large experimental datasets, including high order lineshape effects, that are otherwise unmanageable.

  2. Polymer/ceramic wireless MEMS pressure sensors for harsh environments: High temperature and biomedical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Michael A.

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation presents an investigation of miniaturized sensors, designed to wirelessly measure pressure in harsh environments such as high temperature and biomedical applications. Current wireless microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensors are silicon-based and have limited high temperature operation, require internal power sources, or have limited packaging technology that restricts their use in harsh environments. Sensor designs in this work are based on passive LC resonant circuits to achieve wireless telemetry without the need for active circuitry or internal power sources. A cavity, which is embedded into the substrate, is bound by two pressure-deformable plates that include a parallel-plate capacitor. Deflection of the plates from applied pressure changes the capacitance, thus, the resonance frequency varies and is a function of the applied pressure. The LC resonant circuit and pressure-deformable plates are fabricated into a monolithic housing that servers as the final device package (i.e. intrinsically packaged). This co-integration of device and package offers increased robustness and the ability to operate wirelessly in harsh environments. To intrinsically packaged devices, the fabrication approach relies on techniques developed for MEMS and leverage established lamination-based manufacturing processes, such as ceramic and flexible-circuit-board (flex-circuit) packaging technologies. The sensor concept is further developed by deriving the electromechanical model describing the sensor behavior. The model is initially divided into the electromagnetic model, used to develop the passive wireless telemetry, and the mechanical model, used to develop the pressure dependence of the sensor, which are then combined to estimate the sensor resonance frequency dependence as a function of applied pressure. The derived analytical model allows parametric optimization of sensor designs. The sensor concept is demonstrated in two applications: high

  3. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Anandan, P.; Malathi, N.; Mohankumar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resi...

  4. Visual Aid to Demonstrate Change of State and Gas Pressure with Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Shahrokh

    2011-01-01

    Demonstrations are used in chemistry lectures to improve conceptual understanding by direct observation. The visual aid described here is designed to demonstrate the change in state of matter with the change of temperature and the change of pressure with temperature. Temperature is presented by the rate of airflow and pressure is presented by…

  5. Atmospheric temperature and pressure influence the onset of spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motono, Nozomu; Maeda, Sumiko; Honda, Ryumon; Tanaka, Makoto; Machida, Yuichiro; Usuda, Katsuo; Sagawa, Motoyasu; Uramoto, Hidetaka

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the influence of the changes in the atmospheric temperature (ATemp) and the atmospheric pressure (APres) on the occurrence of a spontaneous pneumothorax (SP). From January 2000 to March 2014, 192 consecutive SP events were examined. The ATemp and APres data at the onset of SP, as well as those data at 12, 24, 36, 48, 60, and 72 h prior to the onset time, were analyzed. The frequencies of SP occurrence were not statistically different according to the months or seasons, but were statistically different according to the time period (P < .01) and SP events occurred most frequently from 12:00 to 18:00. SP events frequently occurred at an ATemp of 25 degrees Celsius or higher. There was a significantly negative correlation between the APres and the ATemp at the SP onset time. The values of change in the APres from 36 to 24 h prior to SP onset were significantly lower than the preceding values. In this study, we observed that a SP event was likely to occur in the time period from 12:00 to 18:00, at an ATemp of 25 degrees Celsius or higher, and at 24-36 h after a drop of APres. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Regional cooling for reducing brain temperature and intracranial pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Luis Vicente; Peluso, Cássio Morano; Prandini, Mirto Nelso; Godoy, Roberto; Rojas, Salomon Soriano Ordinola

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of regional cooling for reducing brain temperature (BrTe) and intracranial pressure (ICP) in patients where conventional clinical treatment has failed. Regional cooling was carried out using ice bags covering the area of the craniectomy (regional method) in 23 patients. The BrTe and ICP were determined using a fiber optic sensor. Thirteen patients (56.52%) were female. The ages ranged from 16 to 83 years (mean of 48.9). The mean APACHE II score was 25 points (11-35). The patients were submitted, on mean, to 61.7 hours (20-96) of regional cooling. There was a significant reduction in mean BrTe (p<0.0001--from 37.1 degrees C to 35.2 degrees C) and mean ICP (p=0.0001--from 28 mmHg to 13 mmHg). Our results suggest that mild brain hypothermia induced by regional cooling was effective in the control of ICP in patients who had previously undergone decompressive craniectomy.

  7. High Accuracy, Miniature Pressure Sensor for Very High Temperatures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SiWave proposes to develop a compact, low-cost MEMS-based pressure sensor for very high temperatures and low pressures in hypersonic wind tunnels. Most currently...

  8. Application of the failure assessment diagram to the evaluation of pressure-temperature limits for a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, K.K.; Bloom, J.M.; Pavinich, W.A.; Slayer, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    The failure assessment diagram approach, an elastic-plastic fracture mechanics procedure based on the J-integral concept, was used in the evaluation of pressuretemperature (P-T) limits for the beltline region of the vessel of a pressurized water reactor. The main objective of this paper is to illustrate the application of an alternate fracture mechanics method for the evaluation of pressure-temperature limits, as allowed by the Code of the Federal Regulation 10 CFR 50, Appendix G. The maximum allowable pressure levels were calculated at 33 time points along the given reactor bulk coolant temperature history representing the normal operation of a pressurized water reactor. The results of the calculations showed that adequate margins of safety on operating pressure for the critical weld in the beltline of the pressurized water reactor vessel are assured

  9. Phase transitions in cerium at high pressure up to 15 GPa and at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiok, O.B.; Khvostantsev, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    The phase transitions in cerium are studied through the electric resistance measurement method at pressures up to 15 GPa and high temperatures. It is determined that cerium at pressures above 10 GPa constitutes the mixture of stable and metastable phases, whereby its composition depends on thee trajectory on the P-T-plane, leading to the point with the given P-T-parameters. The transitions in the stable and metastable components of this mixture, proceeding more or less independently, demonstrate the entangled picture of the phase transitions. It was supposed that only the α (Fcc) and α' (α-U) phases are stable in the area of pressures above the well-known γ-α-transition; the remainder phases are metastable. The proposed cupola-shaped equilibrium phase diagram includes extremely wide hysteresis area, wherein the stable and metastable phases may coexist. However after heating above 500 deg C at 15 GPa there remains only one phase α (Fcc) [ru

  10. Effect of body temperature on peripheral venous pressure measurements and its agreement with central venous pressure in neurosurgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Altan; Salman, M Alper; Salman, A Ebru; Aypar, Ulka

    2005-04-01

    Previous studies suggest a correlation of central venous pressure (CVP) with peripheral venous pressure (PVP) in different clinical settings. The effect of body temperature on PVP and its agreement with CVP in patients under general anesthesia are investigated in this study. Fifteen American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients undergoing elective craniotomy were included in the study. CVP, PVP, and core (Tc) and peripheral (Tp) temperatures were monitored throughout the study. A total of 950 simultaneous measurements of CVP, PVP, Tc, and Tp from 15 subjects were recorded at 5-minute intervals. The measurements were divided into low- and high-Tc and -Tp groups by medians as cutoff points. Bland-Altman assessment for agreement was used for CVP and PVP in all groups. PVP measurements were within range of +/-2 mm Hg of CVP values in 94% of the measurements. Considering all measurements, mean bias was 0.064 mm Hg (95% confidence interval -0.018-0.146). Corrected bias for repeated measurements was 0.173 +/- 3.567 mm Hg (mean +/- SD(corrected)). All of the measurements were within mean +/- 2 SD of bias, which means that PVP and CVP are interchangeable in our setting. As all the measurements were within 1 SD of bias when Tc was > or = 35.8 degrees C, even a better agreement of PVP and CVP was evident. The effect of peripheral hypothermia was not as prominent as core hypothermia. PVP measurement may be a noninvasive alternative for estimating CVP. Body temperature affects the agreement of CVP and PVP, which deteriorates at lower temperatures.

  11. The effect of CO{sub 2} partial pressure on coal char gasification rates at high temperature and pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizabeth Hodge; Daniel Roberts; David Harris; John Stubington [CRC for Coal in Sustainable Development, Kenmore, Qld. (Australia)

    2007-07-01

    Deployment and optimisation of gasification-based technologies on a wider scale requires an improved understanding of the gasification process at high temperatures and pressures. The reactions of coal char with steam and CO{sub 2} (the gasification reactions) are the slowest steps in the gasification process; these reactions therefore limit the rate of coal conversion in the gasifier, making them key design and operating parameters for gasifier systems. As part of a wider study, this work investigates the char-CO{sub 2} reaction at high temperatures and pressures. New data are presented for reaction rates at temperatures of 1273-1673 K, pressures of 10-20 bar and CO{sub 2} partial pressures of 2.5-7.5 bar for a coal char in a pressurised entrained flow reactor. The data are used to investigate the effects of total pressure and CO{sub 2} partial pressure on the char-CO{sub 2} reaction rate at high temperature. The apparent reaction order was found to be 0.2-0.4, consistent with reaction in Regime 2 conditions. The effect of total pressure was found to be negligible, due to the dominance of Knudson diffusion in particles with small pore sizes. Ongoing work in this area is investigating further the links between char structure, intrinsic reactivity, and gasification rates at high temperatures. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The impact of stack geometry and mean pressure on cold end temperature of stack in thermoacoustic refrigeration systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wantha, Channarong

    2018-02-01

    This paper reports on the experimental and simulation studies of the influence of stack geometries and different mean pressures on the cold end temperature of the stack in the thermoacoustic refrigeration system. The stack geometry was tested, including spiral stack, circular pore stack and pin array stack. The results of this study show that the mean pressure of the gas in the system has a significant impact on the cold end temperature of the stack. The mean pressure of the gas in the system corresponds to thermal penetration depth, which results in a better cold end temperature of the stack. The results also show that the cold end temperature of the pin array stack decreases more than that of the spiral stack and circular pore stack geometry by approximately 63% and 70%, respectively. In addition, the thermal area and viscous area of the stack are analyzed to explain the results of such temperatures of thermoacoustic stacks.

  13. 40 CFR 1065.315 - Pressure, temperature, and dewpoint calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Calibrations and Verifications Measurement of Engine... temperature-equilibrated and temperature-monitored calibration salt solutions in containers that seal...

  14. High-pressure, high-temperature magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance devices and processes for making and using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Hu, Mary Y.; Townsend, Mark R.; Lercher, Johannes A.; Peden, Charles H. F.

    2015-10-06

    Re-usable ceramic magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR rotors constructed of high-mechanic strength ceramics are detailed that include a sample compartment that maintains high pressures up to at least about 200 atmospheres (atm) and high temperatures up to about least about 300.degree. C. during operation. The rotor designs minimize pressure losses stemming from penetration over an extended period of time. The present invention makes possible a variety of in-situ high pressure, high temperature MAS NMR experiments not previously achieved in the prior art.

  15. Effect of External Pressure Drop on Loop Heat Pipe Operating Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentung, Ku; Ottenstein, Laura; Rogers, Paul; Cheung, Kwok; Obenschain, Arthur F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of the pressure drop on the operating temperature in a loop heat pipe (LHP). Because the evaporator and the compensation chamber (CC) both contain two-phase fluid, a thermodynamic constraint exists between the temperature difference and the pressure drop for these two components. As the pressure drop increases, so will the temperature difference. The temperature difference in turn causes an increase of the heat leak from the evaporator to the CC, resulting in a higher CC temperature. Furthermore, the heat leak strongly depends on the vapor void fraction inside the evaporator core. Tests were conducted by installing a valve on the vapor line so as to vary the pressure drop, and by charging the LHP with various amounts of fluid. Test results verify that the LHP operating temperature increases with an increasing differential pressure, and the temperature increase is a strong function of the fluid inventory in the loop.

  16. Modeling of the Direct Current Generator Including the Magnetic Saturation and Temperature Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso J. Mercado-Samur

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the inclusion of temperature effect on the field resistance on the direct current generator model DC1A, which is valid to stability studies is proposed. First, the linear generator model is presented, after the effect of magnetic saturation and the change in the resistance value due to temperature produced by the field current are included. The comparison of experimental results and model simulations to validate the model is used. A direct current generator model which is a better representation of the generator is obtained. Visual comparison between simulations and experimental results shows the success of the proposed model, because it presents the lowest error of the compared models. The accuracy of the proposed model is observed via Modified Normalized Sum of Squared Errors index equal to 3.8979%.

  17. Development of Pressure-Temperature Integrated Multifunction Sensor Using Piezo-Resistive Element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palash K. Kundu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel attempt was made to develop a multifunction sensor using piezo resistive material for sensing pressure and temperature simultaneously as because it is well known that piezo resistive material has better selectivity to both temperature and pressure or force variables. The advantage of use of piezo resistive material is that it occupies minimum space. The aggregated output, when excited by electrical signal varies with respect to temperature and pressure both. From the output, the temperature and pressure values are extracted with developed model using multiple regression technique and artificial neural network.

  18. The reactions of CuO at high pressure and high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, G Z; Wang, X C; Ma, H A; Guo, X B; Liu, J T; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    The decomposition behaviour of CuO is studied at high temperature and high pressure. Experimental pressure and temperature determine the result. In the region of higher temperature and pressure (>=5.5 GPa, >=1400 deg. C), the product is just copper. In the region of lower temperature and pressure (< 5.0 GPa, < 1100 deg. C), CuO does not decompose. Between the two regions, the product is a mixture of Cu and Cu sub 2 O or a mixture of Cu sub 2 O and CuO.

  19. Should mean arterial pressure be included in the definition of ambulatory hypertension in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suláková, Terezie; Feber, Janusz

    2013-07-01

    The diagnosis of hypertension (HTN)/normotension (NT) on ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is usually based on systolic (SBP) or diastolic blood pressure (DBP). The goal of this study was to analyze whether inclusion of mean arterial pressure (MAP) improves the detection of HTN on ABPM. We retrospectively studied ABPM records in 229 children (116 boys, median age = 15.3 years) who were referred for evaluation of HTN. A diagnosis of HTN was made if: (A) MAP or SBP or DBP was ≥ 1.65 SDS (95th percentile); (B) SBP or DBP was ≥ 1.65 SDS (95th percentile), during 24-h or daytime or night-time in both definitions. Using definition A, 46/229 patients had HTN compared to definition B by which only 37/229 patients had HTN (p = 0.001). The level of agreement between the two definitions was very good (kappa = 0.86 ± 0.04), however nine patients (19.5 %) were missed by not using MAP in the definition of HTN. These nine patients had only mild HTN with a median Z score of 1.69. The inclusion of MAP in the definition of ambulatory HTN significantly increased the number of hypertensive patients. MAP may be very helpful in detecting mild HTN in patients with normal/borderline SBP and DBP.

  20. Synthesizing ocean bottom pressure records including seismic wave and tsunami contributions: Toward realistic tests of monitoring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Tatsuhiko; Tsushima, Hiroaki

    2016-11-01

    The present study proposes a method for synthesizing the ocean bottom pressure records during a tsunamigenic earthquake. First, a linear seismic wave simulation is conducted with a kinematic earthquake fault model as a source. Then, a nonlinear tsunami simulation is conducted using the sea bottom movement calculated in the seismic wave simulation. By using these simulation results, this method can provide realistic ocean bottom pressure change data, including both seismic and tsunami contributions. A simple theoretical consideration indicates that the dynamic pressure change caused by the sea bottom acceleration can contribute significantly until the duration of 90 s for a depth of 4000 m in the ocean. The performance of a tsunami monitoring system was investigated using the synthesized ocean bottom pressure records. It indicates that the system based on the hydrostatic approximation could not measure the actual tsunami height when the time does not elapse enough. The dynamic pressure change and the permanent sea bottom deformation inside the source region break the condition of a simple hydrostatic approximation. A tsunami source estimation method of tFISH is also examined. Even though the synthesized records contain a large dynamic pressure change, which is not considered in the algorithm, tFISH showed a satisfactory performance 5 min after the earthquake occurrence. The pressure records synthesized in this study, including both seismic wave and tsunami contributions, are more practical for evaluating the performance of our monitoring ability, whereas most tsunami monitoring tests neglect the seismic wave contribution.

  1. High Temperature, high pressure equation of state density correlations and viscosity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapriyal, D.; Enick, R.; McHugh, M.; Gamwo, I.; Morreale, B.

    2012-07-31

    Global increase in oil demand and depleting reserves has derived a need to find new oil resources. To find these untapped reservoirs, oil companies are exploring various remote and harsh locations such as deep waters in Gulf of Mexico, remote arctic regions, unexplored deep deserts, etc. Further, the depth of new oil/gas wells being drilled has increased considerably to tap these new resources. With the increase in the well depth, the bottomhole temperature and pressure are also increasing to extreme values (i.e. up to 500 F and 35,000 psi). The density and viscosity of natural gas and crude oil at reservoir conditions are critical fundamental properties required for accurate assessment of the amount of recoverable petroleum within a reservoir and the modeling of the flow of these fluids within the porous media. These properties are also used to design appropriate drilling and production equipment such as blow out preventers, risers, etc. With the present state of art, there is no accurate database for these fluid properties at extreme conditions. As we have begun to expand this experimental database it has become apparent that there are neither equations of state for density or transport models for viscosity that can be used to predict these fundamental properties of multi-component hydrocarbon mixtures over a wide range of temperature and pressure. Presently, oil companies are using correlations based on lower temperature and pressure databases that exhibit an unsatisfactory predictive capability at extreme conditions (e.g. as great as {+-} 50%). From the perspective of these oil companies that are committed to safely producing these resources, accurately predicting flow rates, and assuring the integrity of the flow, the absence of an extensive experimental database at extreme conditions and models capable of predicting these properties over an extremely wide range of temperature and pressure (including extreme conditions) makes their task even more daunting.

  2. Cubic silicon carbide and boron nitride as possible primary pressure calibrants for high pressure and temperature scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, K. K.; Goncharov, A. F.; Tkachev, S. N.; Prakapenka, V.

    2010-12-01

    K. K. Zhuravlev, A. F. Goncharov Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, 5251 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington DC, 20015 V. Prakapenka, S. N. Tkachev CARS, the University of Chicago, Bldg. 434A, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass. Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 Abstract Since its introduction, ruby-based pressure scale (Mao et al., 1986) has been the most commonly used by the high-pressure scientific community. However, it has limited use at elevated temperatures, due to the weakening and broadening of the ruby fluorescence line. The recent developments in the field of high temperature, high pressure physics and geophysics require some alternative pressure scale, which will be capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 3000 K. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) was recently (Goncharov et al., 2005) proposed as the possible pressure calibrant. It has been suggested that the simultaneous use of x-ray diffraction to measure density and Brillouin spectroscopy to obtain elastic properties of the crystal can be used to construct the pressure scale independent of any other pressure standards, i.e. cBN can be a primary pressure calibrant. However, the acoustic velocities of cBN are very close to those of diamond and, therefore, are hard to resolve in experiment at high pressures in diamond-anvil cell. Another possible primary pressure calibrant is cubic silicon carbide (SiC-3C). Its density and elastic parameters are quite different from the diamond ones and it is stable over the broad range of temperatures and pressures (up to 1 Mbar). SiC-3C is transparent and allows the use of Brillouin spectroscopy. Additionally, SiC-3C has two strong Raman lines, which can be used for the optical in situ pressure measurements. We report our experimental data on both cBN and SiC-3C and show that they, indeed, can be used in constructing reliable and accurate high-pressure, high-temperature scale. We performed single crystal x-ray diffraction and Brillouin

  3. Modeling of Temperature-Dependent Noise in Silicon Nanowire FETs including Self-Heating Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anandan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowires are leading the CMOS era towards the downsizing limit and its nature will be effectively suppress the short channel effects. Accurate modeling of thermal noise in nanowires is crucial for RF applications of nano-CMOS emerging technologies. In this work, a perfect temperature-dependent model for silicon nanowires including the self-heating effects has been derived and its effects on device parameters have been observed. The power spectral density as a function of thermal resistance shows significant improvement as the channel length decreases. The effects of thermal noise including self-heating of the device are explored. Moreover, significant reduction in noise with respect to channel thermal resistance, gate length, and biasing is analyzed.

  4. Fabrication and characterization of low pressure micro-resistojets with integrated heater and temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrieri, Daduí C.; Silva, Marsil A. C.; van Zeijl, Henk; Cervone, Angelo; Gill, Eberhard

    2017-12-01

    Three low pressure micro-resistojets (LPM) with integrated heater and temperature measurement were designed, manufactured and characterized at Delft university of technology. The devices were manufactured using silicon-based micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS) technology including a heater made of molybdenum for better operations at high temperature. The resistace of the heaters is used to estimate the chip temperature giving them a double function as heater and sensor simultaneously. The manufacturing steps are described in detail. A special interface was manufactured to hold the MEMS device considering the mechanical and electrical aspects. The MEMS devices are characterized for three different aspects: mechanical, electrical and propulsion. The three designed devices were tested mechanically and electrically, and one design was tested in terms of propulsion performance in a near-operational condition. The tests are promising and open the path to design a flight demonstration model.

  5. A Wireless Passive LC Resonant Sensor Based on LTCC under High-Temperature/Pressure Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Qin

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a wireless passive LC resonant sensor based on DuPont 951 ceramic is proposed and tested in a developed high-temperature/pressure complex environment. The test results show that the measured resonant frequency varies approximately linearly with the applied pressure; simultaneously, high temperature causes pressure signal drift and changes the response sensitivity. Through the theoretical analysis of the sensor structure model, it is found that the increase in the dielectric constant and the decrease in the Young’s modulus of DuPont 951 ceramic are the main causes that affect the pressure signal in high-temperature measurement. Through calculations, the Young’s modulus of DuPont 951 ceramic is found to decrease rapidly from 120 GPa to 65 GPa within 400 °C. Therefore, the LC resonant pressure sensor needs a temperature compensation structure to eliminate the impact of temperature on pressure measurement. Finally, a temperature compensation structure is proposed and fabricated, and the pressure response after temperature compensation illustrates that temperature drift is significantly reduced compared with that without the temperature compensation structure, which verifies the feasibility the proposed temperature compensation structure.

  6. A Wireless Passive LC Resonant Sensor Based on LTCC under High-Temperature/Pressure Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Li; Shen, Dandan; Wei, Tanyong; Tan, Qiulin; Luo, Tao; Zhou, Zhaoying; Xiong, Jijun

    2015-07-10

    In this work, a wireless passive LC resonant sensor based on DuPont 951 ceramic is proposed and tested in a developed high-temperature/pressure complex environment. The test results show that the measured resonant frequency varies approximately linearly with the applied pressure; simultaneously, high temperature causes pressure signal drift and changes the response sensitivity. Through the theoretical analysis of the sensor structure model, it is found that the increase in the dielectric constant and the decrease in the Young's modulus of DuPont 951 ceramic are the main causes that affect the pressure signal in high-temperature measurement. Through calculations, the Young's modulus of DuPont 951 ceramic is found to decrease rapidly from 120 GPa to 65 GPa within 400 °C. Therefore, the LC resonant pressure sensor needs a temperature compensation structure to eliminate the impact of temperature on pressure measurement. Finally, a temperature compensation structure is proposed and fabricated, and the pressure response after temperature compensation illustrates that temperature drift is significantly reduced compared with that without the temperature compensation structure, which verifies the feasibility the proposed temperature compensation structure.

  7. The elastic solid solution model for minerals at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, R.

    2018-02-01

    Non-ideality in mineral solid solutions affects their elastic and thermodynamic properties, their thermobaric stability, and the equilibrium phase relations in multiphase assemblages. At a given composition and state of order, non-ideality in minerals is typically modelled via excesses in Gibbs free energy which are either constant or linear with respect to pressure and temperature. This approach has been extremely successful when modelling near-ideal solutions. However, when the lattice parameters of the solution endmembers differ significantly, extrapolations of thermodynamic properties to high pressures using these models may result in significant errors. In this paper, I investigate the effect of parameterising solution models in terms of the Helmholtz free energy, treating volume (or lattice parameters) rather than pressure as an independent variable. This approach has been previously applied to models of order-disorder, but the implications for the thermodynamics and elasticity of solid solutions have not been fully explored. Solid solution models based on the Helmholtz free energy are intuitive at a microscopic level, as they automatically include the energetic contribution from elastic deformation of the endmember lattices. A chemical contribution must also be included in such models, which arises from atomic exchange within the solution. Derivations are provided for the thermodynamic properties of n-endmember solutions. Examples of the use of the elastic model are presented for the alkali halides, pyroxene, garnet, and bridgmanite solid solutions. Elastic theory provides insights into the microscopic origins of non-ideality in a range of solutions, and can make accurate predictions of excess enthalpies, entropies, and volumes as a function of volume and temperature. In solutions where experimental data are sparse or contradictory, the Helmholtz free energy approach can be used to assess the magnitude of excess properties and their variation as a function

  8. Structural and vibrational dynamics of molecular solids under variable temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatschneider, Bohdan Hindulak

    An ultra-high resolution FTIR study (0.01cm-1) coupled with molecular simulations of para-terphenyl (PTP) under variable temperatures and pressures has been conducted in an effort to better understand the molecular dynamics (MD) of organic molecular crystals. PTP's use as an electrooptic material and as a host matrix for single molecular spectroscopy has created significant interest into the systems dynamics under variable conditions. Our high resolution study reveals many structure and dynamics changes in the PTP matrix as a result of changes in temperature and pressure. Further spectroscopic analysis using MD verifies these structural and dynamics alterations. Accurately modeled pressure and temperature phase transitions between the low-temperature low-pressure triclinic phase and the high-pressure high-temperature monoclinic phase of PTP was accomplished by a one-parameter optimization of the torsion potential component of the polymer consistent force field (PCFF) along with incorporation of COMPASS' (Condensed-phase Optimized Molecular Potentials for Atomistic Simulation Studies) non-bond parameters. Initial MD simulations implementing the universal force field COMPASS could not adequately model the experimental crystal structure at 113K, nor could it reproduce the known transition temperature at ambient pressure or yield a well-defined transition pressure at low temperature. Therefore, we needed to create a new potential which was shown to reproduce the solid-solid phase transitions. The previously never simulated pressure induced solid-solid phase transition of PTP at low temperature (20K) and varying pressures (0-1GPa) was modeled. The symmetry based crystal/molecular rearrangement shows a compression and distortion of the unit cell and corresponding angles along with a flattening of the once twisted PTP molecules at high pressures (>0.5GPa). A fourth crystal phase (Phase IV) has been successfully identified through analysis of the individual molecule

  9. High-temperature pressure sensors with strain gauges based on silicon whiskers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druzhinin A. A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies aimed at the creating of piezoresistive pressure sensors based on silicon whiskers, operating at high temperatures were carried out. Using the glass adhesive for strain gauges mounting on spring elements of covar alloy gave the possibility to elevate the sensor’s operating temperature range. Several modifications of pressure sensors based on the proposed strain-unit design were developed.

  10. Phase transitions and hydrogen bonding in deuterated calcium hydroxide: High-pressure and high-temperature neutron diffraction measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iizuka, Riko; Komatsu, Kazuki; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Nagai, Takaya; Sano-Furukawa, Asami; Hattori, Takanori; Gotou, Hirotada; Yagi, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    In situ neutron diffraction measurements combined with the pulsed neutron source at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) were conducted on high-pressure polymorphs of deuterated portlandite (Ca(OD) 2 ) using a Paris–Edinburgh cell and a multi-anvil press. The atomic positions including hydrogen for the unquenchable high-pressure phase at room temperature (phase II′) were first clarified. The bent hydrogen bonds under high pressure were consistent with results from Raman spectroscopy. The structure of the high-pressure and high-temperature phase (Phase II) was concordant with that observed previously by another group for a recovered sample. The observations elucidate the phase transition mechanism among the polymorphs, which involves the sliding of CaO polyhedral layers, position modulations of Ca atoms, and recombination of Ca–O bonds accompanied by the reorientation of hydrogen to form more stable hydrogen bonds. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structures of high-pressure polymorphs of Ca(OD) 2 , (a) at room temperature (phase II′) and (b) at high temperature (phase II), were obtained from in situ neutron diffraction measurements. - Highlights: • We measured in situ neutron diffraction of high-pressure polymorphs of Ca(OD) 2 . • Hydrogen positions of the high-pressure phase are first determined. • The obtained hydrogen bonds reasonably explain Raman peaks of OH stretching modes. • A phase transition mechanism among the polymorphs is proposed

  11. High dynamic pressures and modest temperatures: a broad perspective and bridging the gap

    CERN Document Server

    Nellis, W J

    2002-01-01

    Pressures up to a few 100 GPa and temperatures as high as a few 1000 K have been achieved with high dynamic pressures using a two-stage light-gas gun. Results are reviewed for molecular fluids, metallic hydrogen, solids, implications for planetary interiors, and structures and properties of materials recovered intact from high dynamic pressures.

  12. Fluctuating pressure forces acting on the hot gas duct of a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achenbach, E.

    1977-01-01

    In the hot gas ducts of high temperature reactors high velocities (70 0 -bends of segmental design; 90 0 -bends, mitred; 90 0 -mitred, rectangular channel. For comparison the pressure fluctuations of the straight tube were also determined. The experiments were conducted in air, pressurized air and helium. The pressure fluctuations were measured by means of condenser microphones. (Auth.)

  13. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  14. Conduction mechanism in a novel oxadiazole derivative: effects of temperature and hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Jifeng; Han Yonghao; Tang Bencheng; Gao Chunxiao; Li Min; Zou Guangtian

    2005-01-01

    The quasi-four-probe resistivity measurement on the microcrystal of 1,4-bis[(4-heptyloxyphenyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazolyl]phenylene (OXD-3) is carried out under variable pressure and temperature conditions using a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Sample resistivity is calculated with a finite element analysis method. The temperature and pressure dependences of the resistivity of OXD-3 microcrystal are measured up to 150 0 C and 15 GPa, and the resistivity of OXD-3 decreases with increasing temperature, indicating that OXD-3 exhibits organic semiconductor transport property in the region of experimental pressure. With an increase of pressure, the resistivity of OXD-3 first increases and reaches a maximum at about 8 GPa, and then begins to decrease at high pressures. From the x-ray diffraction data in DAC under pressure, we can conclude that the anomaly of resistivity variation at 8 GPa results from the pressure-induced amorphism of OXD-3

  15. Temperature effects on surface pressure-induced changes in rat skin perfusion: implications in pressure ulcer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Knapp, C F; Donofrio, J C; Salcido, R

    1999-07-01

    The effect of varying local skin temperature on surface pressure-induced changes in skin perfusion and deformation was determined in hairless fuzzy rats (13.5+/-3 mo, 474+/-25 g). Skin surface pressure was applied by a computer-controlled plunger with corresponding skin deformation measured by a linear variable differential transformer while a laser Doppler flowmeter measured skin perfusion. In Protocol I, skin surface perfusion was measured without heating (control, T=28 degrees C), with heating (T=36 degrees C), for control (probe just touching skin, 3.7 mmHg), and at two different skin surface pressures, 18 mmHg and 73 mmHg. Heating caused perfusion to increase at control and 18 mmHg pressure, but not at 73 mmHg. In Protocol II, skin perfusion was measured with and without heating as in Protocol I, but this time skin surface pressure was increased from 3.7 to 62 mmHg in increments of 3.7 mmHg. For unheated skin, perfusion increased as skin surface pressure increased from 3.7 to 18 mmHg. Further increases in surface pressure caused a decrease in perfusion until zero perfusion was reached for pressures over 55 mmHg. Heating increased skin perfusion for surface pressures from 3.7 to 18 mmHg, but not for pressures greater than 18 mmHg. After the release of surface pressure, the reactive hyperemia peak of perfusion increased with heating. In Protocol III, where skin deformation (creep and relaxation) was measured during the application of 3.7 and 18 mmHg, heating caused the tissue to be stiffer, allowing less deformation. It was found that for surface pressures below 18 mmHg, increasing skin temperature significantly increased skin perfusion and tissue stiffness. The clinical significance of these findings may have relevance in evaluating temperature and pressure effects on skin blood flow and deformation as well as the efficacy of using temperature as a therapeutic modality in the treatment of pressure ulcers.

  16. Construction Of A Piezoelectric-Based Resonance Ceramic Pressure Sensor Designed For High-Temperature Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Belavič Darko; Bradeško Andraž; Zarnik Marina Santo; Rojac Tadej

    2015-01-01

    In this work the design aspects of a piezoelectric-based resonance ceramic pressure sensor made using low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology and designed for high-temperature applications is presented. The basic pressure-sensor structure consists of a circular, edge-clamped, deformable diaphragm that is bonded to a ring, which is part of the rigid ceramic structure. The resonance pressure sensor has an additional element – a piezoelectric actuator – for stimulating oscillation of ...

  17. Effects of ambient temperature and water vapor on chamber pressure and oxygen level during low atmospheric pressure stunning of poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Paul H; Pritchard, David G

    2017-08-01

    The characteristics of the vacuum used in a low atmospheric pressure stunning system to stun (render unconscious) poultry prior to slaughter are described. A vacuum chamber is pumped by a wet screw compressor. The vacuum pressure is reduced from ambient atmospheric pressure to an absolute vacuum pressure of ∼250 Torr (∼33 kPa) in ∼67 sec with the vacuum gate valve fully open. At ∼250 Torr, the sliding gate valve is partially closed to reduce effective pumping speed, resulting in a slower rate of decreasing pressure. Ambient temperature affects air density and water vapor pressure and thereby oxygen levels and the time at the minimum total pressure of ∼160 Torr (∼21 kPa) is varied from ∼120 to ∼220 sec to ensure an effective stun within the 280 seconds of each cycle. The reduction in total pressure results in a gradual reduction of oxygen partial pressure that was measured by a solid-state electrochemical oxygen sensor. The reduced oxygen pressure leads to hypoxia, which is recognized as a humane method of stunning poultry. The system maintains an oxygen concentration of controller and the human machine interface enable precise and accurate control. The vacuum system operates in the turbulent viscous flow regime, and is best characterized by absolute vacuum pressure rather than gauge pressure. Neither the presence of broiler chickens nor different fore-line pipe designs of four parallel commercial systems affected the pressure-time data. Water in wet air always reduces the oxygen concentrations to a value lower than in dry air. The partial pressure of water and oxygen were found to depend on the pump down parameters due to the formation of fog in the chamber and desorption of water from the birds and the walls of the vacuum chamber. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association.

  18. A unified theory of the thermodynamic properties of aqueous electrolytes to extreme temperatures and pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djamali, Essmaiil; Cobble, James W

    2009-02-26

    A new theoretical treatment has been developed for predicting the thermodynamic properties of electrolytes up to and beyond the critical temperature of water (973 K and at pressures up to 1000 MPa). The model is based upon the classical Born equation corrected for non-Born hydration effects. The temperature and pressure behavior of electrolytes can now be accurately predicted from existing low temperature data. Only two constants are needed for each electrolyte at all temperatures and pressures, where data exist to test the theory.

  19. Effect of temperature and/or pressure on tomato pectinesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Den Broeck, I; Ludikhuyze, L R; Van Loey, A M; Hendrickx, M E

    2000-02-01

    The activity of tomato pectinesterase (PE) was studied as a function of pressure (0.1-900 MPa) and temperature (20-75 degrees C). Tomato PE was rather heat labile at atmospheric pressure (inactivation in the temperature domain 57-65 degrees C), but it was very pressure resistant. Even at 900 MPa and 60 degrees C the inactivation was slower as compared to the same treatment at atmospheric pressure. At atmospheric pressure, optimal catalytic activity of PE was found at neutral pH and a temperature of 55 degrees C. Increasing pressure up to 300 MPa increased the enzyme activity as compared to atmospheric pressure. A maximal enzyme activity was found at 100-200 MPa combined with a temperature of 60-65 degrees C. The presence of Ca(2+) ions (60 mM) decreased the enzyme activity at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 45-60 degrees C but increased enzyme activity at elevated pressure (up to 300 MPa). Maximal enzyme activity in the presence of Ca(2+) ions was noted at 200-300 MPa in combination with a temperature of 65-70 degrees C.

  20. Kinetic analysis and modelling of combined high-pressure-temperature inactivation of the yeast Zygosaccharomyces bailii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyns, K M; Soontjens, C C; Cornelis, K; Weemaes, C A; Hendrickx, M E; Michiels, C W

    2000-06-01

    Eight foodborne yeasts were screened for sensitivity to high-pressure (HP) inactivation under a limited number of pressure-temperature combinations. The most resistant strains were Zygoascus hellenicus and Zygosaccharomyces bailii. The latter was taken for a detailed study of inactivation kinetics over a wide range of pressures (120-320 MPa) and temperatures (-5 to 45 degrees C). Isobaric and isothermal inactivation experiments were conducted in Tris-HCl buffer pH 6.5 for 48 different combinations of pressure and temperature. Inactivation was biphasic, with a first phase encompassing four to six decades and being described by first-order kinetics, followed by a tailing phase. Decimal reduction times (D) were calculated for the first-order inactivation phase and their temperature and pressure dependence was described. At constant temperature, D decreased with increasing pressure as expected. At constant pressure, D showed a maximum at around 20 degrees C, and decreased both at lower and at higher temperatures. A mathematical expression was developed to describe accurately the inactivation of Z. bailii as a function of pressure and temperature under the experimental conditions employed. A limited number of experiments in buffer at low pH (3-6) suggest that the model is, in principle, applicable at low pH. In apple and orange juice however, higher inactivation than predicted by the model was achieved.

  1. Pressure dependence of the melting temperature of solids - Rare-gas solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    A method presented by Schlosser et al. (1989) for analyzing the pressure dependence of experimental melting-temperature data is applied to rare-gas solids. The plots of the logarithm of the reduced melting temperature vs that of the reduced pressure are straight lines in the absence of phase transitions. The plots of the reduced melting temperatures for Ar, Kr, and Xe are shown to be approximately straight lines.

  2. Chamber for uniaxial pressure application at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grillo, M.L.N.; Carmo, L.C.S. do; Picon, A.P.

    1984-08-01

    A chamber for alignment of low temperature ferroelastic domains in crystals by the use of uniaxial stress was built. The system allows the use of EPR and optical techniques, as well as X-ray irradiation at temperatures as low as 77K. (Author) [pt

  3. Frictional characteristics of stainless steel 440C lubricated with water at pressurized high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, E. H.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, J. I.

    2001-01-01

    The fatigue life of stainless steel bearings is one of the most critical factors to determine the performance of the driving system. Because the bearings which are installed on the driving mechanism in the nuclear reactor are operated at high temperature and high pressure and especially lubricated with water with low viscosity, the friction and wear characteristics of the bearing material should be investigated thoroughly. In many control element drive mechanisms in the nuclear reactor the support bearings are made of the stainless steel and the sliding bearing ceramic material mainly. This study is focused on the characteristics of support bearing which may be used in the SMART. The ball bearings are made of standardized 440C stainless steel, and it supports thrust load including the weight of the driving system and external force. The friction and wear characteristics of this material operating under severe lubrication condition are not well known yet, however it will be changed with respect to temperature and boundary pressure. In this paper the friction characteristics are investigated experimentally using the reciprocating tribometer which can simulate the SMART operating conditions. Highly purified water is used as lubricant, and the water is warmed up and pressurized. Friction forces on the reciprocating specimens are measured insitu strain gages

  4. CFD - neutronic coupled calculation of a quarter of a simplified PWR fuel assembly including spacer pressure drop and turbulence enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, C.; Pellacani, F.; Macian Juan, R.; Chiva, S.; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R.

    2011-01-01

    developed for calculation and synchronization purposes. The data exchange is realized by means of the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) software package. In this contribution, steady-state and transient results of a quarter of PWR fuel assembly with cold water injection are presented and compared with obtained results from a RELAP5/PARCS v2.7 coupled calculation. A simplified model for the spacers has been included. A methodology has been introduced to take into account the pressure drop and the turbulence enhancement produced by the spacers. (author)

  5. CFD - neutronic coupled calculation of a quarter of a simplified PWR fuel assembly including spacer pressure drop and turbulence enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, C.; Pellacani, F.; Macian Juan, R., E-mail: carlos.pena@ntech.mw.tum.de, E-mail: pellacani@ntech.mw.tum.de, E-mail: macian@ntech.mw.tum.de [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Ntech Lehrstuhl fuer Nukleartechnik; Chiva, S., E-mail: schiva@emc.uji.es [Universitat Jaume I, Castellon de la Plana (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Mecanica y Construccion; Barrachina, T.; Miro, R., E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@iqn.upv.es [Universitat Politecnica de Valencia (ISIRYM/UPV) (Spain). Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety

    2011-07-01

    been developed for calculation and synchronization purposes. The data exchange is realized by means of the Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) software package. In this contribution, steady-state and transient results of a quarter of PWR fuel assembly with cold water injection are presented and compared with obtained results from a RELAP5/PARCS v2.7 coupled calculation. A simplified model for the spacers has been included. A methodology has been introduced to take into account the pressure drop and the turbulence enhancement produced by the spacers. (author)

  6. Influence of pressure and temperature on molar volume and retention properties of peptides in ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Horváth, Krisztián; Guillarme, Davy

    2013-10-11

    In this study, pressure induced changes in retention were measured for model peptides possessing molecular weights between ∼1 and ∼4kDa. The goal of the present work was to evaluate if such changes were only attributed to the variation of molar volume and if they could be estimated prior to the experiments, using theoretical models. Restrictor tubing was employed to generate pressures up to 1000bar and experiments were conducted for mobile phase temperatures comprised between 30 and 80°C. As expected, the retention increases significantly with pressure, up to 200% for glucagon at around 1000bar compared to ∼100bar. The obtained data were fitted with a theoretical model and the determination coefficients were excellent (r(2)>0.9992) for the peptides at various temperatures. On the other hand, the pressure induced change in retention was found to be temperature dependent and was more pronounced at 30°C vs. 60 or 80°C. Finally, using the proposed model, it was possible to easily estimate the pressure induced increase in retention for any peptide and mobile phase temperature. This allows to easily estimating the expected change in retention, when increasing the column length under UHPLC conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Universal cell frame for high-pressure water electrolyzer and electrolyzer including the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Edwin W.; Norman, Timothy J.

    2013-01-08

    Universal cell frame generic for use as an anode frame and as a cathode frame in a water electrolyzer. According to one embodiment, the universal cell frame includes a unitary annular member having a central opening. Four trios of transverse openings are provided in the annular member, each trio being spaced apart by about 90 degrees. A plurality of internal radial passageways fluidly interconnect the central opening and each of the transverse openings of two diametrically-opposed trios of openings, the other two trios of openings lacking corresponding radial passageways. Sealing ribs are provided on the top and bottom surfaces of the annular member. The present invention is also directed at a water electrolyzer that includes two such cell frames, one being used as the anode frame and the other being used as the cathode frame, the cathode frame being rotated 90 degrees relative to the anode frame.

  8. The Healing Effect of Low-Temperature Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma in Pressure Ulcer: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuangsuwanich, Apirag; Assadamongkol, Tananchai; Boonyawan, Dheerawan

    2016-12-01

    Pressure ulcers are difficult to treat. Recent reports of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma (LTAPP) indicated its safe and effectiveness in chronic wound care management. It has been shown both in vitro and vivo studies that LTAPP not only helps facilitate wound healing but also has antimicrobial efficacy due to its composition of ion and electron, free radicals, and ultraviolet ray. We studied the beneficial effect of LTAPP specifically on pressure ulcers. In a prospective randomized study, 50 patients with pressure ulcers were divided into 2 groups: Control group received standard wound care and the study group was treated with LTAPP once every week for 8 consecutive weeks in addition to standard wound care. We found that the group treated with LTAPP had significantly better PUSH (Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing) scores and exudate amount after 1 week of treatment. There was also a reduction in bacterial load after 1 treatment regardless of the species of bacteria identified.

  9. The analysis of energy efficiency in water electrolysis under high temperature and high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourng, L. W.; Tsai, T. T.; Lin, M. Y.

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to analyze the energy efficiency of water electrolysis under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The effects of temperature and pressure on four different kinds of reaction mechanisms, namely, reversible voltage, activation polarization, ohmic polarization, and concentration polarization, are investigated in details. Results show that the ohmic and concentration over-potentials are increased as temperature is increased, however, the reversible and activation over-potentials are decreased as temperature is increased. Therefore, the net efficiency is enhanced as temperature is increased. The efficiency of water electrolysis at 350°C/100 bars is increased about 17%, compared with that at 80°C/1bar.

  10. Translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Gliding arc discharges have generally been used to generate non-equilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure. Temperature distributions of a gliding arc are of great interest both for fundamental plasma research and for practical applications. In the presented studies, translational, rotational...... and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc generated at atmospheric pressure air are investigated. Translational temperatures (about 1100 K) were measured by laser-induced Rayleigh scattering, and two-dimensional temperature imaging was performed. Rotational and vibrational temperatures (about 3600 K and 6700...

  11. The effect of pressure on the Curie temperature in Fe-Ni Invar mechanical alloys

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, S; Zach, R; Matsushita, M; Takahashi, A; Inoue, H; Ono, F; Maeta, H; Iwase, A; Endo, S

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of the temperature dependence of the AC susceptibility were made for Fe-Ni Invar mechanical alloys under hydrostatic pressures up to 1.5 GPa. The Curie temperatures decreased linearly with pressure. The rate of decrease became larger for specimens annealed at higher temperatures. The temperature of annealing after ball milling has been directly related to the extent of the chemical concentration fluctuation, and the extent becomes smaller for specimens annealed at higher temperature. This tendency can be explained by assuming a Gaussian distribution function.

  12. Working gas temperature and pressure changes for microscale thermal creep-driven flow caused by discontinuous wall temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Yen-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Microscale temperature gradient-driven (thermal creep/transpiration) gas flows have attracted significant interest during the past decade. For free molecular and transitional conditions, applying temperature gradients to a flow channel's walls induces the thermal creep effect. This results in a working gas flowing through the channel from cold to hot, which is generally accompanied by a rising pressure from cold to hot in the channel. Working gas temperature and pressure distributions can vary significantly, depending on a flow channel's configuration and wall temperature distribution. Understanding working gas temperature excursions, both increases and decreases, is essential to ensure the effective use of thermal creep flows in microscale applications. In this study, the characterizations of working gas temperature variations, due to both temperature discontinuities and more gradual changes, on a variety of flow channel walls, were systematically investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. A micro/meso-scale pump, the Knudsen compressor, was chosen to illustrate the importance of controlling working gas temperature in thermal creep-driven flows. Gas pressure and temperature variations, through several Knudsen compressor stage configurations, were studied to determine the most advantageous flow phenomena for the efficient operation of Knudsen compressors.

  13. Size and pressure effects on glass transition temperature of poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, X.Y.; Zhang, G.H.; Lian, J.S.; Jiang, Q.

    2006-01-01

    A simple and unified model, without any adjustable parameter, is developed for size and pressure effects on glass transition temperatures of nanopolymers. The model is based on a model for size dependent glass transition temperature of nanopolymer glasses under ambient pressure, and a pressure-dependent function of the root of mean-square displacement of atom vibration. It is found that the size- and pressure-dependent glass transition temperatures of free-standing films or supported films having weak interaction with substrates decreases with decreasing of pressure and size. However, the glass transition temperature of supported films having strong interaction with substrates increases with the increase of pressure and the decrease of size. The predicted results correspond with available experimental evidences for atactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under hydrostatic pressure or under the pressure induced by supercritical fluid CO 2 . In addition, the predicted glass transition temperature of isotactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under ambient pressure is consistent with available experimental evidences

  14. Effects of pressure and temperature on the thermal properties of a salt and a quartz monzonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-03-27

    Measurements have been made of thermal conductivity, diffusivity, and linear expansion as a function of temperature (to 573 K) and hydrostatic pressure (to 50 MPa) on two rocks, Avery Island domal salt and Climax Stock quartz monzonite. For Avery Island salt the thermal properties do not show any pressure dependence and are approximately the same values as for single crystal halite at 0.1 MPa. The lack of pressure dependence is attributed to the high symmetry of halite (cubic) and to its low strength, both of which inhibit brittle fracturing. For Climax Stock quartz monzonite no pressure dependence of thermal diffusivity has been resolved, but conductivity does show a drop of approximately 10% with decreasing pressure from 50 to 3 MPa. The pressure dependence is not measurably altered by heating the rock to as high as 473 K under 50 MPa. Our measurements so far on the thermal conductivity of quartz monzonite vs temperature and pressure are in agreement with predictions of the Walsh and Decker (1966) model of thermal conductivity vs crack porosity based on independent measurements of crack porosity vs temperature and pressure for the same quartz monzonite. Heating to temperatures greater than 473 K at 50 MPa, or heating to lower temperatures at lower pressures, should substantially reduce thermal conductivity of the quart monzonite.

  15. Size and pressure effects on glass transition temperature of poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, X.Y. [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Zhang, G.H. [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Lian, J.S. [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Jiang, Q. [Key Laboratory of Automobile Materials (Jilin University), Ministry of Education, and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China)]. E-mail: jiangq@jlu.edu.cn

    2006-02-21

    A simple and unified model, without any adjustable parameter, is developed for size and pressure effects on glass transition temperatures of nanopolymers. The model is based on a model for size dependent glass transition temperature of nanopolymer glasses under ambient pressure, and a pressure-dependent function of the root of mean-square displacement of atom vibration. It is found that the size- and pressure-dependent glass transition temperatures of free-standing films or supported films having weak interaction with substrates decreases with decreasing of pressure and size. However, the glass transition temperature of supported films having strong interaction with substrates increases with the increase of pressure and the decrease of size. The predicted results correspond with available experimental evidences for atactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under hydrostatic pressure or under the pressure induced by supercritical fluid CO{sub 2}. In addition, the predicted glass transition temperature of isotactic-Poly (methyl methacrylate) thin films under ambient pressure is consistent with available experimental evidences.

  16. Novel High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Utilizing SiC Integrated Circuit Twin Ring Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, M.; Neudeck, P.; Spry, D.; Meredith, R.; Jordan, J.; Prokop, N.; Krasowski, M.; Beheim, G.; Hunter, G.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes initial development and testing of a novel high temperature capacitive pressure sensor system. The pressure sensor system consists of two 4H-SiC 11-stage ring oscillators and a SiCN capacitive pressure sensor. One oscillator has the capacitive pressure sensor fixed at one node in its feedback loop and varies as a function of pressure and temperature while the other provides a pressure-independent reference frequency which can be used to temperature compensate the output of the first oscillator. A two-day repeatability test was performed up to 500C on the oscillators and the oscillator fundamental frequency changed by only 1. The SiCN capacitive pressure sensor was characterized at room temperature from 0 to 300 psi. The sensor had an initial capacitance of 3.76 pF at 0 psi and 1.75 pF at 300 psi corresponding to a 54 change in capacitance. The integrated pressure sensor system was characterized from 0 to 300 psi in steps of 50 psi over a temperature range of 25 to 500C. The pressure sensor system sensitivity was 0.113 kHzpsi at 25C and 0.026 kHzpsi at 500C.

  17. A novel high pressure, high temperature vessel used to conduct long-term stability measurements of silicon MEMS pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewiski, David

    2014-03-01

    The need to quantify and to improve long-term stability of pressure transducers is a persistent requirement from the aerospace sector. Specifically, the incorporation of real-time pressure monitoring in aircraft landing gear, as exemplified in Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS), has placed greater demand on the pressure transducer for improved performance and increased reliability which is manifested in low lifecycle cost and minimal maintenance downtime through fuel savings and increased life of the tire. Piezoresistive (PR) silicon MEMS pressure transducers are the primary choice as a transduction method for this measurement owing to their ability to be designed for the harsh environment seen in aircraft landing gear. However, these pressure transducers are only as valuable as the long-term stability they possess to ensure reliable, real-time monitoring over tens of years. The "heart" of the pressure transducer is the silicon MEMS element, and it is at this basic level where the long-term stability is established and needs to be quantified. A novel High Pressure, High Temperature (HPHT) vessel has been designed and constructed to facilitate this critical measurement of the silicon MEMS element directly through a process of mechanically "floating" the silicon MEMS element while being subjected to the extreme environments of pressure and temperature, simultaneously. Furthermore, the HPHT vessel is scalable to permit up to fifty specimens to be tested at one time to provide a statistically significant data population on which to draw reasonable conclusions on long-term stability. With the knowledge gained on the silicon MEMS element, higher level assembly to the pressure transducer envelope package can also be quantified as to the build-effects contribution to long-term stability in the same HPHT vessel due to its accommodating size. Accordingly, a HPHT vessel offering multiple levels of configurability and robustness in data measurement is presented, along

  18. An analysis of system pressure and temperature distribution in self-pressurizer of SMART and calculation of sizing of wet thermal insulator and pressurizer cooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yeon Moon; Lee, Doo Jeong; Yoon, Ju Hyun; Kim, Hwan Yeol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    To evaluate the amount of heat transfer from coolant to gas in reactor vessel heat transfer through the structure of pressurizer and evaporation/condensation on surface of liquid pool should be considered. And, also the heat exchange by pressurizer cooler and heat transfer to upper plate of reactor vessel should be considered. Thus, overall examinations on design variables which affect the heat transfer from coolant to gas are needed to maintain the pressurizer conditions at designed value for normal operation through heatup process. The major design variables, which affect system pressure and gas temperature during heatup, and the sizes of wet thermal insulator and pressurizer cooler, and volume of gas cylinder connected to pressurizer. A computer program is developed for the prediction of system pressure and temperature of pressurizer gas region with considering volume expansion of coolant and heat transfer from coolant to gas during heatup. Using the program, this report suggests the optimized design values of wet thermal insulator, pressurizer cooler, and volume of gas cylinder to meet the target conditions for normal operation of SMART. (author). 6 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Coupling of temperature with pressure induced initial decomposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H··· O intermolecular hydrogen transfer, while at 4 and 5 GPa, it was triggered by N-H··· N intermolecular hydrogen transfer. This indicates that the initial decomposition mechanism was dependent on the pressure. Our study may provide new insights into initial mechanisms and decomposition reactions of molecular crystal.

  20. Coupling of temperature with pressure induced initial decomposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ForNTO, two different initial decomposition mechanisms were found. At 1, 2, and 3 GPa, it was triggered by NH....O intermolecular hydrogen transfer, while at 4 and 5 GPa, it was triggered by N-H.....N intermolecularhydrogen transfer. This indicates that the initial decomposition mechanism was dependent on the pressure.

  1. Rheometry of coarse biomass at high temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Klingenberg; Thatcher W. Root; Shalaka Burlawar; C. Tim Scott; Keith J. Bourne; Roland Gleisner; Carl Houtman; Vish Subramaniam

    2017-01-01

    We designed, constructed, and tested a new device that can measure the rheological properties of lignocellulosic biomass slurries with high solids concentrations (>25%) containing large particles (>10 mm), and that can operate at high temperatures (>230

  2. Pressure and temperature induced elastic properties of Am and Cf monobismuthides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, S., E-mail: sanjay-rjain@rediffmail.com [School of Physics, Vigyan Bhavan, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore 452001 (India); Sushila Devi Bansal College of Engineering, Rau, Indore 452001 (India); Shriya, S.; Varshney, Dinesh, E-mail: vdinesh33@rediffmail.com [School of Physics, Vigyan Bhavan, Devi Ahilya University, Khandwa Road Campus, Indore 452001 (India); Khenata, R. [Département de Technologie, Université de Mascara, 29000-Algeria (Algeria); Varshney, M. [Department of Physics, M. B. Khalsa College, Raj Mohallah, Indore 452002 (India)

    2016-05-23

    The pressure and temperature dependent mechanical properties as melting temperature, hardness and brittle nature of XBi (X = Am and Cf) are studied. The rare earth actinides pnictides showed a structural phase transition (B1–B2) at a transition pressure (P{sub T}) of 14.3 GPa (AmBi) and 10.8 GPa (CfBi). Pressure dependence of melting temperature (T{sub m}) discerns an increase inferring the hardening or stiffening of the lattice as a consequence of bond compression and bond strengthening. Suppressed T{sub M} as functions of temperature infers the weakening of the lattice results in bond weakening in XBi (X = Am, Cf). Vickers Hardness (H{sub V}), Poisson’s and Pugh ratio of XBi (X = Am and Cf) demonstrates that XBi (X = Am and Cf) is mechanically stiffened, thermally softened and brittle on applied pressure and temperature.

  3. Flexible and self-powered temperature-pressure dual-parameter sensors using microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fengjiao; Zang, Yaping; Huang, Dazhen; di, Chong-An; Zhu, Daoben

    2015-09-01

    Skin-like temperature- and pressure-sensing capabilities are essential features for the next generation of artificial intelligent products. Previous studies of e-skin and smart elements have focused on flexible pressure sensors, whereas the simultaneous and sensitive detection of temperature and pressure with a single device remains a challenge. Here we report developing flexible dual-parameter temperature-pressure sensors based on microstructure-frame-supported organic thermoelectric (MFSOTE) materials. The effective transduction of temperature and pressure stimuli into two independent electrical signals permits the instantaneous sensing of temperature and pressure with an accurate temperature resolution of health-monitoring elements.

  4. Pressure and Temperature Dependent Structural Studies on Hollandite Type Ferrotitanate and Crystal Structure of a High Pressure Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevara, Samatha; Achary, S Nagabhusan; Garg, Nandini; Chitnis, Abhishek; Sastry, P U; Shinde, A B; Krishna, P Siva Ram; Tyagi, Avesh Kumar

    2018-02-19

    The structural stability and phase transition behavior of tetragonal (I4/m) hollandite type K 2 Fe 2 Ti 6 O 16 have been investigated by in situ high pressure X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation and a diamond anvil cell as well as by variable temperature powder neutron and X-ray diffraction. The tetragonal phase is found to be stable in a wider range of temperatures, while it reversibly transforms to a monoclinic (I2/m) structure at a moderate pressure, viz. 3.6 GPa. The pressure induced phase transition occurs with only a marginal change in structural arrangements. The unit cell parameters of ambient (t) and high pressure (m) phases can be related as a m ∼ a t , b m ∼ c t , and c m ∼ b t . The pressure evolution of the unit cell parameters indicates anisotropic compression with β a = β b ≥ β c in the tetragonal phase and becomes more anisotropic with β a ≪ β b pressure-volume equations of state of both phases have been obtained by second order Birch-Murnaghan equations of state, and the bulk moduli are 122 and 127 GPa for tetragonal and monoclinic phases, respectively. The temperature dependent unit cell parameters show nearly isotropic expansion, with marginally higher expansion along the c-axis compared to the a- and b-axes. The tetragonal to monoclinic phase transition occurs with a reduction of unit cell volume of about 1.1% while the reduction of unit cell volume up to 6 K is only about 0.6%. The fitting of temperature dependent unit cell volume by using the Einstein model of phonons indicates the Einstein temperature is about 266(18) K.

  5. Non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of high pressure thermal inactivation of proteolytic Clostridium botulinum type B in foods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian B Maier

    Full Text Available The effect of high pressure thermal (HPT processing on the inactivation of spores of proteolytic type B Clostridium botulinum TMW 2.357 in four differently composed low-acid foods (green peas with ham, steamed sole, vegetable soup, braised veal was studied in an industrially feasible pressure range and temperatures between 100 and 120°C. Inactivation curves exhibited rapid inactivation during compression and decompression followed by strong tailing effects. The highest inactivation (approx. 6-log cycle reduction was obtained in braised veal at 600 MPa and 110°C after 300 s pressure-holding time. In general, inactivation curves exhibited similar negative exponential shapes, but maximum achievable inactivation levels were lower in foods with higher fat contents. At high treatment temperatures, spore inactivation was more effective at lower pressure levels (300 vs. 600 MPa, which indicates a non-linear pressure/temperature-dependence of the HPT spore inactivation efficiency. A comparison of spore inactivation levels achievable using HPT treatments versus a conventional heat sterilization treatment (121.1°C, 3 min illustrates the potential of combining high pressures and temperatures to replace conventional retorting with the possibility to reduce the process temperature or shorten the processing time. Finally, experiments using varying spore inoculation levels suggested the presence of a resistant fraction comprising approximately 0.01% of a spore population as reason for the pronounced tailing effects in survivor curves. The loss of the high resistance properties upon cultivation indicates that those differences develop during sporulation and are not linked to permanent modifications at the genetic level.

  6. High pressure neutron and X-ray diffraction at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridley, Christopher J.; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a review of techniques and considerations in the design and construction of high pressure, low temperature diffraction experiments. Also intended as an introductory text to new high pressure users, the crucial aspects of pressure cell design are covered. The general classification of common designs, and a discussion into the key beam interaction, mechanical, and thermal properties of commonly used materials is given. The advantages of different materials and high pressure cell classifications are discussed, and examples of designs developed for low temperature diffraction studies are presented, and compared. (orig.)

  7. Shock-darkening in ordinary chondrites: Determination of the pressure-temperature conditions by shock physics mesoscale modeling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Moreau, J.; Kohout, Tomáš; Wünnemann, K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 11 (2017), s. 2375-2390 ISSN 1086-9379 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : chondrites * pressure-temperature conditions * astrophysics Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.391, year: 2016

  8. Equation of states and melting temperatures of diamond cubic and zincblende semiconductors: pressure dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, V V; Hanh, P T M [Hanoi National Pedagogic University, Km8 Hanoi-Sontay Highway, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Masuda-Jindo, K [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagasuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Hai, N T [Hanoi University of Technology, 01 Dai Co Viet Road, Hanoi (Viet Nam)], E-mail: kmjindo@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2008-02-15

    The pressure dependence of the melting temperatures of tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors are studied using the equation of states derived from the statistical moment method, in comparison with those of the normal metals. Using the general expressions of the limiting temperatures T{sub m}, we calculate the 'melting' temperatures of the semiconductor crystals and normal metals as a function of the hydrostatic pressure. The physical origins for the inverse pressure dependence of T{sub m} observed for tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors are also discussed.

  9. Phase transformation of GaAs at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Shigeaki; Kikegawa, Takumi

    2018-02-01

    The high-pressure behavior of gallium arsenide, GaAs, has been investigated using an in-situ X-ray powder diffraction technique in a diamond anvil cell combined with a resistance heating method, at pressures and temperatures up to 25 GPa and 1000 K respectively. The pressure-induced phase transition from a zincblende to an orthorhombic (Cmcm) structure was observed. This transition occurred at 17.3 GPa and at room temperature, where a negative temperature dependence for this transition was confirmed. The transition boundary was determined to be P (GPa) = 18.0 - 0.0025 × T (K).

  10. The effect of temperature and pressure on the oxygen reduction reactions in polyelectrolyte membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdcroft, S.; Abdou, M.S.; Beattie, P.; Basura, V. [Simon Fraser Univ., Burnaby, BC (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    The effect of temperature and pressure on the oxygen reduction reaction in polyelectrolyte membranes was described. Polyelectrolytes chosen for the experiment differed in composition, weight and flexibility of the polymer chains. The study was conducted in a solid state electrochemical cell at temperatures between 30 and 95 degrees C and in the pressure range of 1 to 5 atm. The solubility of oxygen in these membranes was found to follow Henry`s Law, while the diffusion coefficient decreased with pressure. The effect of temperature on the solubility of oxygen and the diffusion coefficient of oxygen in the membranes was similar to that observed in solution electrolytes. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  11. High temperature and high pressure gas cell for quantitative spectroscopic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Caspar; Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine; Fateev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A high temperature and high pressure gas cell (HTPGC) has been manufactured for quantitative spectroscopic measurements in the pressure range 1-200 bar and temperature range 300-1300 K. In the present work the cell was employed at up to 100 bar and 1000 K, and measured absorption coefficients...... of a CO2-N2 mixture at 100 bar and 1000 K are revealed for the first time, exceeding the high temperature and pressure combinations previously reported. This paper discusses the design considerations involved in the construction of the cell and presents validation measurements compared against simulated...

  12. Conductivity determination of electrolytes at high pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovetto, Rosa; Gutierrez, Norberto; Petragalli, I.P

    1981-01-01

    An experimental layout is designed that would allow operation up to 350 deg C and 10 8 Pascal, thus facilitating measurements of conductivity in electrolytes with an accuracy of 0.1%. The unit was tested with ClK solutions at 25 deg C and pressures up to 6 x 10 7 Pascal, showing that under these conditions it yields results in good agreement with the electric conductivity data found in the bibliography. (M.E.L.) [es

  13. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael L. Swanson

    2005-08-30

    The transport reactor development unit (TRDU) was modified to accommodate oxygen-blown operation in support of a Vision 21-type energy plex that could produce power, chemicals, and fuel. These modifications consisted of changing the loop seal design from a J-leg to an L-valve configuration, thereby increasing the mixing zone length and residence time. In addition, the standpipe, dipleg, and L-valve diameters were increased to reduce slugging caused by bubble formation in the lightly fluidized sections of the solid return legs. A seal pot was added to the bottom of the dipleg so that the level of solids in the standpipe could be operated independently of the dipleg return leg. A separate coal feed nozzle was added that could inject the coal upward into the outlet of the mixing zone, thereby precluding any chance of the fresh coal feed back-mixing into the oxidizing zone of the mixing zone; however, difficulties with this coal feed configuration led to a switch back to the original downward configuration. Instrumentation to measure and control the flow of oxygen and steam to the burner and mix zone ports was added to allow the TRDU to be operated under full oxygen-blown conditions. In total, ten test campaigns have been conducted under enriched-air or full oxygen-blown conditions. During these tests, 1515 hours of coal feed with 660 hours of air-blown gasification and 720 hours of enriched-air or oxygen-blown coal gasification were completed under this particular contract. During these tests, approximately 366 hours of operation with Wyodak, 123 hours with Navajo sub-bituminous coal, 143 hours with Illinois No. 6, 106 hours with SUFCo, 110 hours with Prater Creek, 48 hours with Calumet, and 134 hours with a Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coal were completed. In addition, 331 hours of operation on low-rank coals such as North Dakota lignite, Australian brown coal, and a 90:10 wt% mixture of lignite and wood waste were completed. Also included in these test campaigns was

  14. A High-Temperature Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor with an Integrated Signal-Conditioning Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zong Yao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the design and fabrication of a high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor with an integrated signal-conditioning circuit, which consists of an encapsulated pressure-sensitive chip, a temperature compensation circuit and a signal-conditioning circuit. A silicon on insulation (SOI material and a standard MEMS process are used in the pressure-sensitive chip fabrication, and high-temperature electronic components are adopted in the temperature-compensation and signal-conditioning circuits. The entire pressure sensor achieves a hermetic seal and can be operated long-term in the range of −50 °C to 220 °C. Unlike traditional pressure sensor output voltage ranges (in the dozens to hundreds of millivolts, the output voltage of this sensor is from 0 V to 5 V, which can significantly improve the signal-to-noise ratio and measurement accuracy in practical applications of long-term transmission based on experimental verification. Furthermore, because this flexible sensor’s output voltage is adjustable, general follow-up pressure transmitter devices for voltage converters need not be used, which greatly reduces the cost of the test system. Thus, the proposed high-temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor with an integrated signal-conditioning circuit is expected to be highly applicable to pressure measurements in harsh environments.

  15. Contact angle of water droplets in a high temperature, high pressure environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, T.; Hazuku, T.; Takamasa, T.; Takamori, K.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of surface wettability on a stainless plate in a high-temperature, high-pressure environment. Using a pressure vessel, we measured contact angles of water droplets at temperatures from 20 to 300 C. deg. and a constant pressure of 15 MPa, as an indicator of macroscopic surface wettability. Measured contact angles decreased with temperature below 250 C. deg., clustering around a straight line at temperatures below 120 C. deg. and around another line in the range from 120 to 250 C. deg.. At temperatures above 250 C. deg., on the other hand, the contact angles remained constant, independent of temperature, and contrary to the existing theoretical model, no highly hydrophilic condition or null contact angle condition was achieved. This result will enable more accurate assessment of heat transfer not only in steam pipes of a boiler but also in subchannel of a BWR-type reactor. (authors)

  16. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines.

  17. A Harsh Environment Wireless Pressure Sensing Solution Utilizing High Temperature Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Pressure measurement under harsh environments, especially at high temperatures, is of great interest to many industries. The applicability of current pressure sensing technologies in extreme environments is limited by the embedded electronics which cannot survive beyond 300 °C ambient temperature as of today. In this paper, a pressure signal processing and wireless transmission module based on the cutting-edge Silicon Carbide (SiC) devices is designed and developed, for a commercial piezoresistive MEMS pressure sensor from Kulite Semiconductor Products, Inc. Equipped with this advanced high-temperature SiC electronics, not only the sensor head, but the entire pressure sensor suite is capable of operating at 450 °C. The addition of wireless functionality also makes the pressure sensor more flexible in harsh environments by eliminating the costly and fragile cable connections. The proposed approach was verified through prototype fabrication and high temperature bench testing from room temperature up to 450 °C. This novel high-temperature pressure sensing technology can be applied in real-time health monitoring of many systems involving harsh environments, such as military and commercial turbine engines. PMID:23447006

  18. Temperature and pressure adaptation of a sulfate reducer from the deep subsurface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja eFichtel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial life in deep marine subsurface faces increasing temperatures and hydrostatic pressure with depth. In this study, we have examined growth characteristics and temperature-related adaptation of the Desulfovibrio indonesiensis strain P23 to the in situ pressure of 30 MPa. The strain originates from the deep subsurface of the eastern flank of the Juan de Fuca Ridge (IODP Site U1301. The organism was isolated at 20 °C and atmospheric pressure from ~61 °C-warm sediments approximately five meters above the sediment-basement interface. In comparison to standard laboratory conditions (20 °C and 0.1 MPa, faster growth was recorded when incubated at in situ pressure and high temperature (45 °C, while cell filamentation was induced by further compression. The maximum growth temperature shifted from 48°C at atmospheric pressure to 50°C under high-pressure conditions. Complementary cellular lipid analyses revealed a two-step response of membrane viscosity to increasing temperature with an exchange of unsaturated by saturated fatty acids and subsequent change from branched to unbranched alkyl moieties. While temperature had a stronger effect on the degree of fatty acid saturation and restructuring of main phospholipids, pressure mainly affected branching and length of side chains. The simultaneous decrease of temperature and pressure to ambient laboratory conditions allowed the cultivation of our moderately thermophilic strain. This may in turn be one key to a successful isolation of microorganisms from the deep subsurface adapted to high temperature and pressure.

  19. Inactivation of orange pectinesterase by combined high-pressure and -temperature treatments: a kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Broeck, I; Ludikhuyze, L R; Van Loey, A M; Hendrickx, M E

    2000-05-01

    Pressure and/or temperature inactivation of orange pectinesterase (PE) was investigated. Thermal inactivation showed a biphasic behavior, indicating the presence of labile and stable fractions of the enzyme. In a first part, the inactivation of the labile fraction was studied in detail. The combined pressure-temperature inactivation of the labile fraction was studied in the pressure range 0.1-900 MPa combined with temperatures from 15 to 65 degrees C. Inactivation in the pressure-temperature domain specified could be accurately described by a first-order fractional conversion model, estimating the inactivation rate constant of the labile fraction and the remaining activity of the stable fraction. Pressure and temperature dependence of the inactivation rate constants of the labile fraction was quantified using the Eyring and Arrhenius relations, respectively. By replacing in the latter equation the pressure-dependent parameters (E(a), k(ref)(T)()) by mathematical expressions, a global model was formulated. This mathematical model could accurately predict the inactivation rate constant of the labile fraction of orange PE as a function of pressure and temperature. In a second part, the stable fraction was studied in more detail. The stable fraction inactivated at temperatures exceeding 75 degrees C. Acidification (pH 3.7) enhanced thermal inactivation of the stable fraction, whereas addition of Ca(2+) ions (1 M) suppressed inactivation. At elevated pressure (up to 900 MPa), an antagonistic effect of pressure and temperature on the inactivation of the stable fraction was observed. The antagonistic effect was more pronounced in the presence of a 1 M CaCl(2) solution as compared to the inactivation in water, whereas it was less pronounced for the inactivation in acid medium.

  20. Blood pressure regulation III: what happens when one system must serve two masters: temperature and pressure regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, W Larry; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Bruning, Rebecca S; Alexander, Lacy M

    2014-03-01

    When prolonged intense exercise is performed at high ambient temperatures, cardiac output must meet dual demands for increased blood flow to contracting muscle and to the skin. The literature has commonly painted this scenario as a fierce competition, wherein one circulation preserves perfusion at the expense of the other, with the regulated maintenance of blood pressure as the ultimate goal. This review redefines this scenario as commensalism, an integrated balance of regulatory control where one circulation benefits with little functional effect on the other. In young, healthy subjects, arterial pressure rarely falls to any great extent during either extreme passive heating or prolonged dynamic exercise in the heat, nor does body temperature rise disproportionately due to a compromised skin blood flow. Rather, it often takes the superimposition of additional stressors--e.g., dehydration or simulated hemorrhage--upon heat stress to substantially impact blood pressure regulation.

  1. Seasonal emanation of radon at Ghuttu, northwest Himalaya: Differentiation of atmospheric temperature and pressure influences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamra, Leena

    2015-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of radon along with meteorological parameters has been carried out in a seismically active area of Garhwal region, northwest Himalaya, within the frame work of earthquake precursory research. Radon measurements are carried out by using a gamma ray detector installed in the air column at a depth of 10 m in a 68 m deep borehole. The analysis of long time series for 2006–2012 shows strong seasonal variability masked by diurnal and multi-day variations. Isolation of a seasonal cycle by minimising short-time by 31 day running average shows a strong seasonal variation with unambiguous dependence on atmospheric temperature and pressure. The seasonal characteristics of radon concentrations are positively correlated to atmospheric temperature (R=0.95) and negatively correlated to atmospheric pressure (R=−0.82). The temperature and pressure variation in their annual progressions are negatively correlated. The calculations of partial correlation coefficient permit us to conclude that atmospheric temperature plays a dominant role in controlling the variability of radon in borehole, 71% of the variability in radon arises from the variation in atmospheric temperature and about 6% of the variability is contributed by atmospheric pressure. The influence of pressure variations in an annual cycle appears to be a pseudo-effect, resulting from the negative correlation between temperature and pressure variations. Incorporation of these results explains the varying and even contradictory claims regarding the influence of the pressure variability on radon changes in the published literature. Temperature dependence, facilitated by the temperature gradient in the borehole, controls the transportation of radon from the deep interior to the surface. - Highlights: • Seasonal variability of radon in borehole. • Influence of atmospheric temperature and pressure on radon variability. • Partial correlation coefficient.

  2. Coupling of temperature with pressure induced initial decomposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and 116 atoms, figure 1) and a 1 × 2 × 1 super- cell (8 molecules and 88 atoms, figure 1) respectively. First, the system was equilibrated at 298.15 K for 5 ps using NVT. Then, based on this equilibrated system, for. PETN, at 475 K (thermal decomposition temperature),. AIMD simulations were carried out using NPT at 1, 2,.

  3. Effect of working pressure and annealing temperature on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    roughness was found at higher temperatures as a result of a more heterogeneous growth and less tensions. Keywords. Barium strontium titanate; thin film; pulsed laser deposition; ferroelectric. 1. Introduction. Perovskite barium strontium titanate (BST) thin films are promising candidates for dynamic random access memory.

  4. The general use of the time-temperature-pressure superposition principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz

    This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) section 3.6(a). DPL do only concern material functions and only the effect of the temperature on these. This is a short introduction to the general use of the time-temperature-pressure superposition principle.......This note is a supplement to Dynamic of Polymeric Liquids (DPL) section 3.6(a). DPL do only concern material functions and only the effect of the temperature on these. This is a short introduction to the general use of the time-temperature-pressure superposition principle....

  5. Experimental on moisture migration and pore pressure formation of concrete members subjected to high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Kakuhiro; Nakane, Sunao

    1993-01-01

    The experimental studies concerning temperature, moisture migration, and pore pressure of mass concrete mock-up specimens heated up to high temperature at 110degC to 600degC, were performed, so as to correctly estimate the moisture migration behaviour of concrete members subjected to high temperature, which is considered significantly influenced on physical properties of concrete. As a results, it is confirmed that the moisture migration behavior of concrete members can be explained by temperature and pore pressure, and indicate the characteristics both sealed condition (dissipation of moisture is prevented) and unsealed condition (dissipation of moisture occur). (author)

  6. Temperature and Pressure Sensors Based on Spin-Allowed Broadband Luminescence of Doped Orthorhombic Perovskite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I. (Inventor); Chambers, Matthew D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods that are capable of measuring pressure or temperature based on luminescence are discussed herein. These systems and methods are based on spin-allowed broadband luminescence of sensors with orthorhombic perovskite structures of rare earth aluminates doped with chromium or similar transition metals, such as chromium-doped gadolinium aluminate. Luminescence from these sensors can be measured to determine at least one of temperature or pressure, based on either the intense luminescence of these sensors, even at high temperatures, or low temperature techniques discussed herein.

  7. The measurement for level of marine high-temperature and high-pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jie.

    1986-01-01

    The various error factors in measurement for level of marine high-temperature and high-pressure vessels are anslysed. The measuring method of error self compensation and its simplification for land use are shown

  8. In-Situ Rolling Element Bearing Temperature and/or Pressure Measurement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nickel, David

    1999-01-01

    ... attitude-control wheels. Thin-film deposition and patterning processes have been formulated for the production of thin-film resistive sensors for in-situ measurement of pressure and temperature transients in lubricated contacts...

  9. Stratospheric and Mesospheric Pressure-Temperature Profiles from the Rotational Analysis of CO subscript2 Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunson, M.; Lowes, L.; Abrams, M.; Raper, O.; Farmer, C.; Stiller, G.; Zander, R.; Rinsland, C.

    1994-01-01

    A simple, classical, and expedient method for the retrieval of atmospheric pressure-temperature profiles has been applied to the high-resolution infrared solar absorption spectra obtained with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) instrument.

  10. MGS RS: ATMOSPHERIC TEMPERATURE-PRESSURE PROFILES V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains over 21000 temperature-pressure profiles (TPS files) of the neutral atmosphere derived from Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) radio occultation data....

  11. Feasibility of Locating Leakages in Sewage Pressure Pipes Using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The cost effective maintenance of underwater pressure pipes for sewage disposal in Austria requires the detection and localization of leakages. Extrusion of wastewater in lakes can heavily influence the water and bathing quality of surrounding waters. The Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology is a widely used technique for oil and gas pipeline leakage detection. While in pipeline leakage detection, fiber optic cables are installed permanently at the outside or within the protective sheathing of the pipe; this paper aims at testing the feasibility of detecting leakages with temporary introduced fiber optic cable inside the pipe. The detection and localization were tested in a laboratory experiment. The intrusion of water from leakages into the pipe, producing a local temperature drop, served as indicator for leakages. Measurements were taken under varying measurement conditions, including the number of leakages as well as the positioning of the fiber optic cable. Experiments showed that leakages could be detected accurately with the proposed methodology, when measuring resolution, temperature gradient and measurement time were properly selected. Despite the successful application of DTS for leakage detection in this lab environment, challenges in real system applications may arise from temperature gradients within the pipe system over longer distances and the placement of the cable into the real pipe system.

  12. Study of the Army Helicopter Design Hover Criterion Using Temperature and Pressure Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Words) Ambient temperature and altitude are used to determine design points for helicopters. In this paper, pressure altitude is used to...Ground Effect; Pressure Altitude, Design Points, ACMES: Advanced Climate Modeling and Environmental Simulations 1. Abstract Ambient temperature and...of ambient air. Both compressibility and air density determine the amount of work that a rotor has to accomplish in order to propel a rotorcraft

  13. Retrieval of upper atmosphere pressure-temperature profiles from high resolution solar occultation spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Russell, J. M., III; Park, J. H.; Namkung, J.

    1987-01-01

    Pressure-temperature profiles over the 18 to 75 km altitude range were retrieved from 0.01 cm(-1) resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded with the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Fourier transform spectrometer operating in the solar occultation mode during the Spacelab 3 shuttle mission (April 30 to May 1, 1985). The analysis method is described and preliminary results deduced for five occultation events are compared to correlative pressure-temperature measurments.

  14. PTA-1 computer program for treating pressure transients in hydraulic networks including the effect of pipe plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngdahl, C.K.; Kot, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Pressure pulses in the intermediate sodium system of a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor, such as may originate from a sodium/water reaction in a steam generator, are propagated through the complex sodium piping network to system components such as the pump and intermediate heat exchanger. To assess the effects of such pulses on continued reliable operation of these components and to contribute to system designs which result in the mitigation of these effects, Pressure Transient Analysis (PTA) computer codes are being developed for accurately computing the transmission of pressure pulses through a complicated fluid transport system, consisting of piping, fittings and junctions, and components. PTA-1 provides an extension of the well-accepted and verified fluid hammer formulation for computing hydraulic transients in elastic or rigid piping systems to include plastic deformation effects. The accuracy of the modeling of pipe plasticity effects on transient propagation has been validated using results from two sets of Stanford Research Institute experiments. Validation of PTA-1 using the latter set of experiments is described briefly. The comparisons of PTA-1 computations with experiments show that (1) elastic-plastic deformation of LMFBR-type piping can have a significant qualitative and quantitative effect on pressure pulse propagation, even in simple systems; (2) classical fluid-hammer theory gives erroneous results when applied to situations where piping deforms plastically; and (3) the computational model incorporated in PTA-1 for predicting plastic deformation and its effect on transient propagation is accurate

  15. Polymorphism and the crystal structures of InSb at elevated temperature and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S.-C.; Spain, I. L.; Skelton, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents polycrystalline X-ray diffraction data for three high-pressure phases of InSb. The study employed two types of diamond-anvil pressure cells. The X-ray diffraction parameters were recorded at different fixed pressures and temperatures on flat film. The experiment utilized Zr-filtered Mo radiation. The intensities were estimated from the X-ray photographs using a semiautomated microdensitometer.

  16. Influence of pH, Salt and Temperature on Pressure Inactivation of Hepatitis A virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of pH (3-7), NaCl (0-6%), and temperature on pressure inactivation of hepatitis A virus (HAV) were determined. The HAV samples were treated at 400 MPa for 1 min at 5, 20, and 50C. Decreasing solution pH enhanced pressure inactivation of HAV. This enhanced inactivation effect was most e...

  17. Exploring nuclear magnetic resonance at the highest pressure. Closing the pseudogap under pressure in a high temperature superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Thomas

    2013-05-13

    In the present work, a novel probe design for high pressure NMR experiments in gem anvil cells (GAC) was used which places a small microcoil inside the high pressure volume as the detection coil. Based on tests carried out at ambient pressure and high pressure of 42 kbar it is demonstrated that this approach is indeed feasible and results in an increase of sensitivity by two orders of magnitude compared to previous GAC-NMR designs. The design was then successfully employed in the investigation of the electronic properties of metallic aluminum and the high temperature superconductor YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 8} at pressures of up to 101 kbar. Because of its improved sensitivity and the potential to achieve even higher pressures, the microcoil GAC-NMR setup should prove useful in the investigation of materials under high pressure conditions in the future. In the case of metallic aluminum, the effect of pressure on the electronic density of states at the Fermi level was probed via the Knight-shift K and the spin-lattice relaxation time T{sub 1} at room temperature up to a pressure of 101 kbar, extending the pressure range of previous NMR measurements by a factor of 14 [72]. Most notably, a decrease of K(p) by 11% is detected in the investigated pressure range that is inconsistent with a free electron behavior of the density of states. Numerical band structure calculations that are in excellent agreement with the experimental data suggest that the observed changes of K and T{sub 1} are due to a kink in the electronic states at a Lifshitz-transition at about 75 kbar which has not been observed previously. A further decrease of K by a factor of 2 is predicted to occur in the pressure range up to 300 kbar. In addition, an increase of the NMR linewidths of the metallic aluminum signal was observed above about 42 kbar that is inconsistent with a pure dipolar linewidth. Based on an analysis of the field dependence of this effect it was ascribed to a small additional

  18. Synthesis of hydrogen-carbon clathrate material and hydrogen evolution therefrom at moderate temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueking, Angela [State College, PA; Narayanan, Deepa [Redmond, WA

    2011-03-08

    A process for making a hydrogenated carbon material is provided which includes forming a mixture of a carbon source, particularly a carbonaceous material, and a hydrogen source. The mixture is reacted under reaction conditions such that hydrogen is generated and/or released from the hydrogen source, an amorphous diamond-like carbon is formed, and at least a portion of the generated and/or released hydrogen associates with the amorphous diamond-like carbon, thereby forming a hydrogenated carbon material. A hydrogenated carbon material including a hydrogen carbon clathrate is characterized by evolution of molecular hydrogen at room temperature at atmospheric pressure in particular embodiments of methods and compositions according to the present invention.

  19. Acetone photophysics at 282 nm excitation at elevated pressure and temperature. I: absorption and fluorescence experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason; Mittal, Gaurav; Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2017-06-01

    This is the first in a series of two papers that presents new experimental data to extend the range of acetone photophysics to elevated pressure and temperature conditions. In this work, a flexible static and flow system is designed and characterized to study the independent as well as coupled effect of elevated pressure and temperature on acetone photophysics over pressures of 0.05‒4.0 MPa and temperatures of 295‒750 K for 282 nm excitation wavelength in nitrogen and air as bath gases. Experimental results show that at 282 nm excitation, relative fluorescence quantum yield increases with increasing pressure, decreases with increasing temperature, and that the pressure sensitivity varies weakly with elevated temperature. The previously assumed linearity of fluorescence with tracer number density is shown to only be valid over a small range. Additionally, acetone fluorescence is only moderately quenched in the presence of oxygen. The present findings yield insight into the competition between the non-radiative and collisional rates at elevated temperature and pressure, as well as provide validation datasets for an updated fluorescence model developed in the second paper.

  20. Electrolyte CPA equation of state for very high temperature and pressure reservoir and basin applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtial, Xavier; Ferrando, Nicolas; de Hemptinne, Jean-Charles; Mougin, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    In this work, an electrolyte version of the Cubic Plus Association (eCPA) equation of state has been adapted to systems containing CH4, CO2, H2O and NaCl (up to 5 molal) at pressures up to 200 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K for salt-free systems and 573 K for salt-containing systems. Its purpose is to represent the phase behavior (including salting-out effect and critical point) and the phase densities in a range of temperature and pressure encountered in deep reservoirs and basins. The goal of the parameterization proposed is not to reach a very high accuracy for phase equilibrium and volumetric properties, but rather to develop a semi-predictive approach to model the phase and volumetric behavior of this system while allowing an easy extension to other compounds. Without salt, predictions for pure component vapor pressures and liquid molar volumes present an average absolute deviation (AAD) lower than 3% compared to experimental reference values. The pure component molar volumes out of saturation show an AAD lower than 4%. The highest deviations in densities are observed as expected in the vicinity of the critical coordinates of pure water and this effect increases when gases or salts are added to the system. For each binary system, CH4 + CO2, CH4 + H2O and CO2 + H2O, binary interaction parameters have been fitted to correctly represent the shape of the fluid phase envelopes (including all critical points) in the entire temperature and pressure range considered (219 K to 633 K and up to 250 MPa). The methane concentration in both phases of the CH4 + CO2 binary system is represented with an AAD lower than 9%. The methane solubility in water is represented within 16% and 8% for the methane content of the vapor. The CO2 solubility in water is within 26%, while the CO2 in the vapor phase shows an average deviation of 12%. All molar volumes are represented with an AAD lower than 3%. The few VLE experimental data for the CH4 + CO2 + H2O ternary system are fairly well

  1. High Temperature Heat Exchanger Design and Fabrication for Systems with Large Pressure Differentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chordia, Lalit [Thar Energy, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Portnoff, Marc A. [Thar Energy, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Green, Ed [Thar Energy, LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The project’s main purpose was to design, build and test a compact heat exchanger for supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) power cycle recuperators. The compact recuperator is required to operate at high temperature and high pressure differentials, 169 bar (~2,500 psi), between streams of sCO2. Additional project tasks included building a hot air-to-sCO2 Heater heat exchanger (HX) and design, build and operate a test loop to characterize the recuperator and heater heat exchangers. A novel counter-current microtube recuperator was built to meet the high temperature high differential pressure criteria and tested. The compact HX design also incorporated a number of features that optimize material use, improved reliability and reduced cost. The air-to-sCO2 Heater HX utilized a cross flow, counter-current, micro-tubular design. This compact HX design was incorporated into the test loop and exceeded design expectations. The test loop design to characterize the prototype Brayton power cycle HXs was assembled, commissioned and operated during the program. Both the prototype recuperator and Heater HXs were characterized. Measured results for the recuperator confirmed the predictions of the heat transfer models developed during the project. Heater HX data analysis is ongoing.

  2. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 1366 K flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagen, Nicholas; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    Water cooled supersonic probes are developed to investigate total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature in high-temperature jet plumes and thereby determine the mean flow properties. Two probe concepts, designed for operation at up to 1366 K in a Mach 2 flow, are tested on a water cooled nozzle. The two probe designs - the unsymmetric four-tube cooling configuration and the symmetric annular cooling design - take measurements at 755, 1089, and 1366 K of the three parameters. The cooled total and static pressure readings are found to agree with previous test results with uncooled configurations. The total-temperature probe, however, is affected by the introduction of water coolant, and effect which is explained by the increased heat transfer across the thermocouple-bead surface. Further investigation of the effect of coolant on the temperature probe is proposed to mitigate the effect and calculate more accurate temperatures in jet plumes.

  3. Modeling Study of High Pressure and High Temperature Reservoir Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Varzandeh, Farhad

    S-characterization combinations and 260 reservoir fluids. PC-SAFT with the new general characterization method is shown to give the lowest AAD% and maximum deviation in calculation of saturation pressure, density and STO density, among all the tested characterization methods for PC-SAFT. Application of the new characterization...... be highly rewarding if successfully produced. This PhD project is part of the NextOil (New Extreme Oil and Gas in the Danish North Sea) project which is intended to reduce the uncertainties in HPHT field development. The main focus of this PhD is on accurate description of the reservoir fluid behavior under...... HPHT conditions to minimize the production risks from these types of reservoirs. In particular, the study has thoroughly evaluated several non-cubic Equations of State (EoSs) which are considered promising for HPHT fluid modeling, showing their advantages and short comings based on an extensive...

  4. Compositions of graphene materials with metal nanostructures and microstructures and methods of making and using including pressure sensors

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2017-01-26

    Composition comprising at least one graphene material and at least one metal. The metal can be in the form of nanoparticles as well as microflakes, including single crystal microflakes. The metal can be intercalated in the graphene sheets. The composition has high conductivity and flexibility. The composition can be made by a one-pot synthesis in which a graphene material precursor is converted to the graphene material, and the metal precursor is converted to the metal. A reducing solvent or dispersant such as NMP can be used. Devices made from the composition include a pressure sensor which has high sensitivity. Two two- dimension materials can be combined to form a hybrid material.

  5. Gas-pressure forming of an AlMg-alloy sheet at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, B.; Goesling, M.; Homberg, W.; Kleiner, M. [Dortmund Univ. (DE). Inst. of Forming Technology and Lightweight Construction (IUL)

    2005-12-01

    Forming of automotive leightweight parts using aluminium offers numerous advantages. Compared to other wrought aluminium alloys, in particular AlMg-alloys generally show a good formability which is favourable for the production of complex parts. However, forming of Mg-containing alloys at room temperature leads to yielding patterns preventing their implementation for class-A-surface applications. Furthermore, the formability of steel still exceeds that of AlMg-alloys at room temperature. Thus, in the present study, sheet metal forming is applied at a temperature range that is typical for warm forming. It is supposed to profit from the advantages of warm forming like high achievable strains and improved surface quality of the formed part, while not having the disadvantages of long production times and high energy consumption, which is correlated with superplastic forming. Applying fluid-based sheet metal forming in this paper, nitrogen is used as fluid working medium to satisfy the demand on high temperature resistance. Concerning the blank material used, formability of Mg-containing aluminium alloys shows strong strain rate sensitivity at elevated temperatures. To figure out the optimal strain rates for this particular process, a control system for forming processes is developed within the scope of this paper. Additionally, FE-simulations are carried out and adapted to the experiment, based on the generated process data. FE-investigations include forming of domes (bulging) as well as shape-defined forming, having the objective to increase formability in critical form elements by applying optimal strain rates. Here, a closed-loop process control for gas-pressure forming at elevated temperatures is to be developed in the next stages of the project. (orig.)

  6. Redox systematics of a magma ocean with variable pressure-temperature gradients and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K; Ghiorso, M S

    2012-07-24

    Oxygen fugacity in metal-bearing systems controls some fundamental aspects of the geochemistry of the early Earth, such as the FeO and siderophile trace element content of the mantle, volatile species that influence atmospheric composition, and conditions for organic compounds synthesis. Redox and metal-silicate equilibria in the early Earth are sensitive to oxygen fugacity (fO(2)), yet are poorly constrained in modeling and experimentation. High pressure and temperature experimentation and modeling in metal-silicate systems usually employs an approximation approach for estimating fO(2) that is based on the ratio of Fe and FeO [called "ΔIW (ratio)" hereafter]. We present a new approach that utilizes free energy and activity modeling of the equilibrium: Fe + SiO(2) + O(2) = Fe(2)SiO(4) to calculate absolute fO(2) and relative to the iron-wüstite (IW) buffer at pressure and temperature [ΔIW (P,T)]. This equilibrium is considered across a wide range of pressures and temperatures, including up to the liquidus temperature of peridotite (4,000 K at 50 GPa). Application of ΔIW (ratio) to metal-silicate experiments can be three or four orders of magnitude different from ΔIW (P,T) values calculated using free energy and activity modeling. We will also use this approach to consider the variation in oxygen fugacity in a magma ocean scenario for various thermal structures for the early Earth: hot liquidus gradient, 100 °C below the liquidus, hot and cool adiabatic gradients, and a cool subsolidus adiabat. The results are used to assess the effect of increasing P and T, changing silicate composition during accretion, and related to current models for accretion and core formation in the Earth. The fO(2) in a deep magma ocean scenario may become lower relative to the IW buffer at hotter and deeper conditions, which could include metal entrainment scenarios. Therefore, fO(2) may evolve from high to low fO(2) during Earth (and other differentiated bodies) accretion. Any

  7. Temperature and pressure distributions in a 400 kW{sub t} fluidized bed straw gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erguedenler, A.; Ghaly, A.E.; Hamdullahpur, F. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    The temperature and pressure distribution characteristics of a 400 kW (thermal) dual-distributor type fluidized bed straw gasifier were investigated. The effects of the bed height, equivalence ratio (actual air-fuel ratio:stoichiometric air-fuel ratio) and fluidization velocity on the temperature and pressure variations in the gasifier were studied. Generally, the bed temperature reached the steady state condition within 15--20 minutes. The average temperature of the dense bed ranged from 649{degrees}C to 875{degrees}C depending on the levels of operating parameters used. The bed temperature increased linearly with increases in the equivalence ratio, higher bed temperatures were observed with lower bed height and no clear trend for the bed temperature with respect to variations in fluidization velocity was observed. The bed height, equivalence ratio and fluidization velocity affected the pressure drop in the fluidized bed gasifier. Increasing the fluidization velocity and/or decreasing the equivalence ratio resulted in higher pressure drops in the dense bed and the freeboard regions whereas increasing the bed height increased the pressure drop only in the dense bed.

  8. Neutron spin echo studies of the effects of temperature and pressure in a ternary microemulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Kawabata, Y; Seto, H; Takeda, T; Komura, S; Schwahn, D

    2002-01-01

    In order to clarify the self-assembling mechanisms in complex fluids involving amphiphiles, we have investigated dynamic features of amphiphilic membranes and droplets at high temperature and at high pressure in a ternary microemulsion, consisting of AOT, water, and n-decane. A high-pressure cell for neutron spin echo (NSE) experiments has been improved, and the static and dynamic features of droplets are observed in detail by means of small angle neutron scattering and NSE. It is found that the size fluctuation and the diffusion of droplets are enhanced by increasing temperature, while they are suppressed by increasing pressure. (orig.)

  9. Negative magnetoresistance of pitch-based carbon fibers Temperature and pressure dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambourger, P. D.

    1986-01-01

    The negative transverse magnetoresistance of high-modulus pitch-based carbon fibers has been measured over the temperature range 1.3-4.2 K at ambient pressure and at 4.2 K under hydrostatic pressure up to 16 kbar. At low fields (less than 0.5 torr) the magnitude of the magnetoresistance increases markedly as the temperature is lowered from 4.2 K to 1.3 K, in disagreement with Bright's theoretical model, and decreases with pressure at the rate -0.6 percent/kbar.

  10. Design Strategies for Optically-Accessible, High-Temperature, High-Pressure Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

    2000-02-01

    The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

  11. The effect of atmospheric temperature and pressure on the occurrence of acute myocardial infarction in Kaunas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radišauskas, Ričardas; Vaičiulis, Vidmantas; Ustinavičienė, Rūta; Bernotienė, Gailutė

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of meteorological variables (atmospheric temperature and pressure) on the daily occurrence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study used the daily values of atmospheric temperature and pressure in 2000-2007. The meteorological data were obtained from the Lithuanian Hydrometeorological Service for Kaunas. The relative risks of event occurrence were computed for 5°C atmospheric temperature and for 10-hPa atmospheric pressure variations by means of the Poisson regression model. RESULTS. The occurrence of AMI and atmospheric temperature showed an inverse linear relationship, while the occurrence of AMI and atmospheric pressure, a positive linear relationship. Among the youngest subjects (25-44 years old), no relationships were detected. Contrary, among the subjects aged 45-64 years and those aged 65 years and older, the occurrence of AMI significantly decreased with higher temperature (P=0.001 and P=0.002, respectively). A decrease in atmospheric temperature by 10ºC reduced the risk of AMI by 8.7% in the age groups of 45-64 and 65 years and older and by 19% in the age group of 25 years and older. Among the first AMI cases, the risk increased by 7.5% in the age group of 45-64-year olds and by 6.4% in the age group of 25-64-year olds. The relationship between atmospheric temperature and pressure, and AMI occurrence was found to be linear but inverse. An increase in atmospheric pressure by 10 hPa resulted in an increase in risk by 4% among the subjects aged 65 years and more and by 3% among the subjects aged 25 years and more. CONCLUSIONS. Atmospheric temperature and pressure variations had the greatest effect on middle-aged and aging subjects (starting from 45 years). At younger age, the effect of such factors on the AMI risk was considerably lower.

  12. Seasonal emanation of radon at Ghuttu, northwest Himalaya: Differentiation of atmospheric temperature and pressure influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamra, Leena

    2015-11-01

    Continuous monitoring of radon along with meteorological parameters has been carried out in a seismically active area of Garhwal region, northwest Himalaya, within the frame work of earthquake precursory research. Radon measurements are carried out by using a gamma ray detector installed in the air column at a depth of 10m in a 68m deep borehole. The analysis of long time series for 2006-2012 shows strong seasonal variability masked by diurnal and multi-day variations. Isolation of a seasonal cycle by minimising short-time by 31 day running average shows a strong seasonal variation with unambiguous dependence on atmospheric temperature and pressure. The seasonal characteristics of radon concentrations are positively correlated to atmospheric temperature (R=0.95) and negatively correlated to atmospheric pressure (R=-0.82). The temperature and pressure variation in their annual progressions are negatively correlated. The calculations of partial correlation coefficient permit us to conclude that atmospheric temperature plays a dominant role in controlling the variability of radon in borehole, 71% of the variability in radon arises from the variation in atmospheric temperature and about 6% of the variability is contributed by atmospheric pressure. The influence of pressure variations in an annual cycle appears to be a pseudo-effect, resulting from the negative correlation between temperature and pressure variations. Incorporation of these results explains the varying and even contradictory claims regarding the influence of the pressure variability on radon changes in the published literature. Temperature dependence, facilitated by the temperature gradient in the borehole, controls the transportation of radon from the deep interior to the surface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. 40 CFR 1065.120 - Fuel properties and fuel temperature and pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel properties and fuel temperature... (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.120 Fuel properties and fuel temperature and pressure. (a) Use fuels as specified in the standard-setting part, or as...

  14. Increasing preservation efficiency and product quality through control of temperature distributions in high pressure applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heij, de W.; Schepdael, van L.; Berg, van den R.; Bartels, P.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of HP sterilisation is a function of both temperature and pressure. As during pressurisation the product temperature increases, heat transfer to the colder HPP vessel wall occurs and the product fraction near the vessel wall will be colder than the product in the middle of the

  15. Evaluation of water cooled supersonic temperature and pressure probes for application to 2000 F flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagen, Nicholas T.; Seiner, John M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of water cooled supersonic probes used to study high temperature jet plumes is addressed. These probes are: total pressure, static pressure, and total temperature. The motivation for these experiments is the determination of high temperature supersonic jet mean flow properties. A 3.54 inch exit diameter water cooled nozzle was used in the tests. It is designed for exit Mach 2 at 2000 F exit total temperature. Tests were conducted using water cooled probes capable of operating in Mach 2 flow, up to 2000 F total temperature. Of the two designs tested, an annular cooling method was chosen as superior. Data at the jet exit planes, and along the jet centerline, were obtained for total temperatures of 900 F, 1500 F, and 2000 F, for each of the probes. The data obtained from the total and static pressure probes are consistent with prior low temperature results. However, the data obtained from the total temperature probe was affected by the water coolant. The total temperature probe was tested up to 2000 F with, and without, the cooling system turned on to better understand the heat transfer process at the thermocouple bead. The rate of heat transfer across the thermocouple bead was greater when the coolant was turned on than when the coolant was turned off. This accounted for the lower temperature measurement by the cooled probe. The velocity and Mach number at the exit plane and centerline locations were determined from the Rayleigh-Pitot tube formula.

  16. Effect of Contact Pressure on the Resistance Contact Value and Temperature Changes in Copper Busbar Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Risdiyanto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discussed the influence of tightness or contacts pressure on copper busbar joints to determine changes in the value of the initial contact resistance and the maximum temperature at the joint due to high current load. The test sample was copper busbar 3 x 30 mm with configuration of bolted overlapping joint. Increasing contact pressure at the joint was measured to find out its effect on the value of contact resistance. The applied pressure was 6 to 36 MPa. Procedure of contact resistance measurement refer to the ASTM B539 standard using four-wire method. The sample subsequently loaded with the current of 350 A for 60 minutes and the maximum temperature at the joint was measured. The result showed that increasing contact pressure at the busbar joint will reduce the contact resistance and maximum temperature. The increase of contact pressure from 6 to 30 MPa causes decreasing contact resistance from 16 μΩ to 11 μΩ. Further increasing of contact pressure more than 30 MPa did not affect the contact resistance significantly. The lowest temperatur of busbar joint of 54°C was reached at a contact pressure of 36 Mpa.

  17. MEMS fiber-optic Fabry-Perot pressure sensor for high temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, G. C.; Jia, P. G.; Cao, Q.; Xiong, J. J.

    2016-10-01

    We design and demonstrate a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot pressure sensor (FOFPPS) for high-temperature sensing by employing micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technology. The FOFPPS is fabricated by anodically bonding the silicon wafer and the Pyrex glass together and fixing the facet of the optical fiber in parallel with the silicon surface by glass frit and organic adhesive. The silicon wafer can be reduced through dry etching technology to construct the sensitive diaphragm. The length of the cavity changes with the deformation of the diaphragm due to the loaded pressure, which leads to a wavelength shift of the interference spectrum. The pressure can be gauged by measuring the wavelength shift. The pressure experimental results show that the sensor has linear pressure sensitivities ranging from 0 kPa to 600 kPa at temperature range between 20°C to 300°C. The pressure sensitivity at 300°C is approximately 27.63 pm/kPa. The pressure sensitivities gradually decrease with increasing the temperature. The sensor also has a linear thermal drift when temperature changes from 20°C - 300°C.

  18. $\\mu$SR-Measurements under High Pressure and at Low Temperatures

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    High pressure causes changes in the volume available to each atom in a solid and will therefore influence local properties like the electronic charge and spin densities and, in the case of magnetic materials, the spin ordering.\\\\ \\\\ The positive muon is known to be an interesting probe particle for the study of certain problems in magnetism. It has in fact been used for one high pressure experiment earlier in CERN, but the present experiments aim at more systematic studie For this purpose it is necessary to carry out pressure experiments at low temperatures. The new experiments use a helium gas pressure system, which covers the temperature range 10-300 K at pressures up to 14 Kbar.\\\\ \\\\ Experiments are in progress on \\item 1)~~~~Ferromagnetic metals like Fe, Co, Ni where the pressure dependence of the local magnetic field ~~~is studied at 77 K and at room temperature. \\item 2)~~~~Knight shifts in semimetals, where in the case of Sb strong variations with temperature and ~~~pressure are observed. \\end{enumerat...

  19. Research of a Novel Ultra-High Pressure Sensor with High-Temperature Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Dong Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-high pressure measurement has significant applications in various fields such as high pressure synthesis of new materials and ultra-high pressure vessel monitoring. This paper proposes a novel ultra-high pressure sensor combining a truncated-cone structure and a silicon-on-insulator (SOI piezoresistive element for measuring the pressure up to 1.6 GPa. The truncated-cone structure attenuates the measured pressure to a level that can be detected by the SOI piezoresistive element. Four piezoresistors of the SOI piezoresistive element are placed along specific crystal orientation and configured as a Wheatstone bridge to obtain voltage signals. The sensor has an advantage of high-temperature resistance, in that the structure of the piezoresistive element can avoid the leakage current at high temperature and the truncated-cone structure separates the piezoresistive element from the heat environment. Furthermore, the upper surface diameter of the truncated-cone structure is designed to be 2 mm for the application of small scale. The results of static calibration show that the sensor exhibits a good performance in hysteresis and repeatability. The temperature experiment indicates that the sensor can work steadily at high temperature. This study would provide a better insight to the research of ultra-high pressure sensors with larger range and smaller size.

  20. Calibrating airborne measurements of airspeed, pressure and temperature using a Doppler laser air-motion sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Cooper

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A new laser air-motion sensor measures the true airspeed with a standard uncertainty of less than 0.1 m s−1 and so reduces uncertainty in the measured component of the relative wind along the longitudinal axis of the aircraft to about the same level. The calculated pressure expected from that airspeed at the inlet of a pitot tube then provides a basis for calibrating the measurements of dynamic and static pressure, reducing standard uncertainty in those measurements to less than 0.3 hPa and the precision applicable to steady flight conditions to about 0.1 hPa. These improved measurements of pressure, combined with high-resolution measurements of geometric altitude from the global positioning system, then indicate (via integrations of the hydrostatic equation during climbs and descents that the offset and uncertainty in temperature measurement for one research aircraft are +0.3 ± 0.3 °C. For airspeed, pressure and temperature, these are significant reductions in uncertainty vs. those obtained from calibrations using standard techniques. Finally, it is shown that although the initial calibration of the measured static and dynamic pressures requires a measured temperature, once calibrated these measured pressures and the measurement of airspeed from the new laser air-motion sensor provide a measurement of temperature that does not depend on any other temperature sensor.

  1. First experiments with a newly developed high-pressure/high-temperature cell for neutron powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuetterer, K.; Depmeier, W.; Strobel, J.; Vogt, T.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of the well known and widely used piston cylinder high pressure cell of the McWhan type, a new high-pressure/high-temperature cell for angle dispersive neutron powder diffraction has been developed. A pressure/temperature range of simultaneously 1.5 GPa and 500 o C is aimed at. Up to now two test experiments with the cell on D2B of the ILL with calcite as sample could be performed. The maximum, non simultaneous pressures and temperatures reached so far, amount to about 0.75 GPa and 400 o C, respectively. The characteristics of the cell construction and first experimental experiences and results are reported. (author) 3 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs

  2. Effects of pressure and temperature on thermal contact resistance between different materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To explore whether pressure and temperature can affect thermal contact resistance, we have proposed a new experimental approach for measurement of the thermal contact resistance. Taking the thermal contact resistance between phenolic resin and carbon-carbon composites, cuprum, and aluminum as the examples, the influence of the thermal contact resistance between specimens under pressure is tested by experiment. Two groups of experiments are performed and then an analysis on influencing factors of the thermal contact resistance is presented in this paper. The experimental results reveal that the thermal contact resistance depends not only on the thermal conductivity coefficient of materials, but on the interfacial temperature and pressure. Furthermore, the thermal contact resistance between cuprum and aluminum is more sensitive to pressure and temperature than that between phenolic resin and carbon-carbon composites.

  3. Temperature Compensation Fiber Bragg Grating Pressure Sensor Based on Plane Diaphragm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Minfu; Fang, Xinqiu; Ning, Yaosheng

    2018-03-01

    Pressure sensors are the essential equipments in the field of pressure measurement. In this work, we propose a temperature compensation fiber Bragg grating (FBG) pressure sensor based on the plane diaphragm. The plane diaphragm and pressure sensitivity FBG (PS FBG) are used as the pressure sensitive components, and the temperature compensation FBG (TC FBG) is used to improve the temperature cross-sensitivity. Mechanical deformation model and deformation characteristics simulation analysis of the diaphragm are presented. The measurement principle and theoretical analysis of the mathematical relationship between the FBG central wavelength shift and pressure of the sensor are introduced. The sensitivity and measure range can be adjusted by utilizing the different materials and sizes of the diaphragm to accommodate different measure environments. The performance experiments are carried out, and the results indicate that the pressure sensitivity of the sensor is 35.7 pm/MPa in a range from 0 MPa to 50 MPa and has good linearity with a linear fitting correlation coefficient of 99.95%. In addition, the sensor has the advantages of low frequency chirp and high stability, which can be used to measure pressure in mining engineering, civil engineering, or other complex environment.

  4. Phenomenology of polymorphism: The topological pressure-temperature phase relationships of the dimorphism of finasteride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gana, Ines [EAD Physico-chimie Industrielle du Medicament (EA 4066), Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France) and Etablissement pharmaceutique de l' Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Agence Generale des Equipements et Produits de Sante, 7 Rue du Fer a moulin, 75005 Paris (France); Ceolin, Rene [EAD Physico-chimie Industrielle du Medicament (EA 4066), Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France); Rietveld, Ivo B., E-mail: ivo.rietveld@parisdescartes.fr [EAD Physico-chimie Industrielle du Medicament (EA 4066), Faculte de Pharmacie, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75006 Paris (France)

    2012-10-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The topological pressure-temperature phase diagram for the dimorphism of finasteride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pressure affects phase equilibria: an enantiotropic phase relationship turning monotropic at high pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The influence of pressure on phase behavior inferred from data obtained under ordinary conditions. - Abstract: Knowledge of the phase behavior in the solid state of active pharmaceutical ingredients is important for the development of stable drug formulations. The topological method for the construction of pressure-temperature phase diagrams has been applied to study the phase behavior of finasteride. It is demonstrated that with basic calorimetric measurements and X-ray diffraction sufficient data can be obtained to construct a complete topological pressure-temperature phase diagram. The dimorphism observed for finasteride gives rise to a phase diagram similar to the paradigmatic diagram of sulfur. The solid-solid phase relationship is enantiotropic at ordinary pressure and becomes monotropic at elevated pressure, where solid I is the only stable phase.

  5. Anharmonic effective pair potentials of gold under high pressure and high temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Okube, M; Ohtaka, O; Fukui, H; Katayama, Y; Utsumi, W

    2002-01-01

    In order to examine the effect of pressure on the anharmonicity of Au, extended x-ray absorption fine-structure spectra near the Au L sub 3 edge were measured in the temperature range from 300 to 1100 K under pressures up to 14 GPa using large-volume high-pressure devices and synchrotron radiation. The anharmonic effective pair potentials of Au, V (u) = au sup 2 + bu sup 3 , at 0.1 MPa, 6 and 14 GPa have been calculated. The pressure dependence of the thermal expansion coefficients has also been evaluated. The reliability of the anharmonic correction proposed on the basis of the Anderson scale has been discussed.

  6. Friction and wear studies of nuclear power plant components in pressurized high temperature water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P.L.; Robertson, M.F.

    1996-01-01

    Recent studies on wear mechanisms of nuclear power plant components have shown that depending on the operating conditions and the environment, different wear mechanisms could occur during a wear process. There is also evidence that in an environment of pressurized high temperature water the wear rate could be significantly different from those obtained from room temperature studies. An experimental facility that is capable of performing tests in pressurized high temperature water environment with feedback controlled impact and reciprocating sliding motion has been built. A research project aimed at gaining better understanding of the mechanisms and mechanics involved in vibratory wear in such environment has been carried out

  7. Energy-Based Tetrahedron Sensor for High-Temperature, High-Pressure Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Kent L.; Sommerfeldt, Scott D.; Blotter, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    An acoustic energy-based probe has been developed that incorporates multiple acoustic sensing elements in order to obtain the acoustic pressure and three-dimensional acoustic particle velocity. With these quantities, the user can obtain various energy-based quantities, including acoustic energy density, acoustic intensity, and acoustic impedance. In this specific development, the probe has been designed to operate in an environment characterized by high temperatures and high pressures as is found in the close vicinity of rocket plumes. Given these capabilities, the probe is designed to be used to investigate the acoustic conditions within the plume of a rocket engine or jet engine to facilitate greater understanding of the noise generation mechanisms in those plumes. The probe features sensors mounted inside a solid sphere. The associated electronics for the probe are contained within the sphere and the associated handle for the probe. More importantly, the design of the probe has desirable properties that reduce the bias errors associated with determining the acoustic pressure and velocity using finite sum and difference techniques. The diameter of the probe dictates the lower and upper operating frequencies for the probe, where accurate measurements can be acquired. The current probe design implements a sphere diameter of 1 in. (2.5 cm), which limits the upper operating frequency to about 4.5 kHz. The sensors are operational up to much higher frequencies, and could be used to acquire pressure data at higher frequencies, but the energy-based measurements are limited to that upper frequency. Larger or smaller spherical probes could be designed to go to lower or higher frequency range

  8. High-Temperature, High-Bandwidth Fiber Optic Pressure and Temperature Sensors for Gas Turbine Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fielder, Robert S; Palmer, Matthew E

    2003-01-01

    ..., and redesign compressor and turbine stages based on actual measurements. There currently exists no sensor technology capable of making pressure measurements in the critical hot regions of gas turbine engines...

  9. Friction and wear studies of nuclear power plant components in pressurized high temperature water environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P.L.; Zbinden, M.; Taponat, M.C.; Robertson, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    The present paper is part of a series of papers aiming to present the friction and wear results of a collaborative study on nuclear power plant components tested in pressurized high temperature water. The high temperature test facilities and the methodology in presenting the kinetics and wear results are described in detail. The results of the same material combinations obtained from two very different high temperature test facilities (NRCC and EDF) are presented and discussed. (K.A.)

  10. Thermal expansivity and bulk modulus of ZnO with NaCl-type cubic structure at high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Xiaowei; Liu Zijiang; Chen Qifeng; Chu Yandong; Wang Chengwei

    2006-01-01

    The thermal expansivity and bulk modulus of ZnO with NaCl-type cubic structure were estimated by using the constant temperature and pressure molecular dynamics technique with effective pair potentials which consist of the Coulomb, dispersion, and repulsion interaction at high pressures and temperatures. It is shown that the calculated thermodynamic parameters including linear thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are in good agreement with the available experimental data and the latest theoretical results. At an extended pressure and temperature ranges, linear thermal expansion coefficient and isothermal bulk modus have also been predicted. The thermodynamic properties of ZnO with NaCl-type cubic structure are summarized in the pressure 0-150 GPa ranges and the temperature up to 3000 K

  11. Ultrasonic liquid-level detector for varying temperature and pressure environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R.L.; Miller, G.N.

    1981-10-26

    An ultrasonic liquid level detector for use in varying temperature and pressure environments, such as a pressurized water nuclear reactor vessel, is provided. The detector employs ultrasonic extensional and torsional waves launched in a multiplexed alternating sequence into a common sensor. The sensor is a rectangular cross section stainless steel rod which extends into the liquid medium whose level is to be detected. The sensor temperature derived from the extensional wave velocity measurements is used to compensate for the temperature dependence of the torsional wave velocity measurements which are also level dependent. The torsional wave velocity measurements of a multiple reflection sensor then provide a measurement of liquid level over a range of several meters with a small uncertainty over a temperature range of 20 to 250/sup 0/C and pressures up to 15 MPa.

  12. Measurement component technology. Volume 1: Cryogenic pressure measurement technology, high pressure flange seals, hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer material, close coupled versus remote transducer installation and temperature compensation of pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, K. K.; Udell, D. R.; Iwata, M. M.; Lytle, C. F.; Chrisco, R. M.; Greenough, C. S.; Walling, J. A.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of an investigation into the availability and performance capability of measurement components in the area of cryogenic temperature, pressure, flow and liquid detection components and high temperature strain gages. In addition, technical subjects allied to the components were researched and discussed. These selected areas of investigation were: (1) high pressure flange seals, (2) hydrogen embrittlement of pressure transducer diaphragms, (3) The effects of close-coupled versus remote transducer installation on pressure measurement, (4) temperature transducer configuration effects on measurements, and (5) techniques in temperature compensation of strain gage pressure transducers. The purpose of the program was to investigate the latest design and application techniques in measurement component technology and to document this information along with recommendations for upgrading measurement component designs for future S-2 derivative applications. Recommendations are provided for upgrading existing state-of-the-art in component design, where required, to satisfy performance requirements of S-2 derivative vehicles.

  13. Natural occurrence and significance of fluids indicating high pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedder, E.

    1981-01-01

    Most natural minerals have formed from a fluid phase such as a silicate melt or a saline aqueous solution. Fluid inclusions are tiny volumes of such fluids that were trapped within the growing crystals. These inclusions can provide valuable but sometimes ambiguous data on the temperature, pressure, and composition of these fluids, many of which are not available from any other source. They also provide "visual autoclaves" in which it is possible to watch, through the microscope, the actual phase changes take place as the inclusions are heated. This paper reviews the methods of study and the results obtained, mainly on inclusions formed from highly concentrated solutions, at temperatures ???500??C. Many such fluids have formed as a result of immiscibility with silicate melt in igneous or high-temperature metamorphic rocks. These include fluids consisting of CO2, H2O, or hydrosaline melts that were <50% H2O. From the fluid inclusion evidence it is clear that a boiling, very hot, very saline fluid was present during the formation of most of the porphyry copper deposits in the world. Similarly, from the inclusion evidence it is clear that early (common) pegmatites formed from essentially silicate melts and that the late, rare-element-bearing and chamber-type pegmatites formed from a hydrosaline melt or a more dilute water solution. The evidence on whether this change in composition from early to late solutions was generally continuous or involved immiscibility is not as clear. ?? 1981.

  14. Theoretical Study of Plasma Parameters Dependence on Gas Temperature in an Atmospheric Pressure Argon Microwave Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2008-01-01

    The gas temperature is an important parameter in many applications of atmospheric pressure microwave discharges (MW). That is why it is necessary to study the influence of that temperature on the plasma characteristics. Our investigation is based on a self-consistent model including the wave electrodynamics and gas-discharge kinetics. We adopt a blocks' energy structure of the argon excited atom. More specifically, we consider 7 different blocks of states, namely 4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, and 6s. Each block k is characterized by its effective energy uk (derived as an average energy of all levels in the block), as well as its effective g-factor and population. The argon dimmer, atomic and molecular ions are also taken into account in the model. We solve the Boltzmann equation in order to get the electron energy distribution function and the necessary rate constants of the elementary processes. The collisional-radiative part of the model is based on 87 processes. As a result we obtain the electron and ions' number densities, mean electron energy, mean power for sustaining an electron--ion pair in the discharge bulk, as well as the population of the excited blocks of states of the argon atom as functions of the gas temperature

  15. Effects of pressure on aqueous chemical equilibria at subzero temperatures with applications to Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, G.M.; Kargel, J.S.; Catling, D.C.; Jakubowski, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    Pressure plays a critical role in controlling aqueous geochemical processes in deep oceans and deep ice. The putative ocean of Europa could have pressures of 1200 bars or higher on the seafloor, a pressure not dissimilar to the deepest ocean basin on Earth (the Mariana Trench at 1100 bars of pressure). At such high pressures, chemical thermodynamic relations need to explicitly consider pressure. A number of papers have addressed the role of pressure on equilibrium constants, activity coefficients, and the activity of water. None of these models deal, however, with processes at subzero temperatures, which may be important in cold environments on Earth and other planetary bodies. The objectives of this work were to (1) incorporate a pressure dependence into an existing geochemical model parameterized for subzero temperatures (FREZCHEM), (2) validate the model, and (3) simulate pressure-dependent processes on Europa. As part of objective 1, we examined two models for quantifying the volumetric properties of liquid water at subzero temperatures: one model is based on the measured properties of supercooled water, and the other model is based on the properties of liquid water in equilibrium with ice. The relative effect of pressure on solution properties falls in the order: equilibrium constants(K) > activity coefficients (??) > activity of water (aw). The errors (%) in our model associated with these properties, however, fall in the order: ?? > K > aw. The transposition between K and ?? is due to a more accurate model for estimating K than for estimating ??. Only activity coefficients are likely to be significantly in error. However, even in this case, the errors are likely to be only in the range of 2 to 5% up to 1000 bars of pressure. Evidence based on the pressure/temperature melting of ice and salt solution densities argue in favor of the equilibrium water model, which depends on extrapolations, for characterizing the properties of liquid water in electrolyte

  16. Spectral element modelling of seismic wave propagation in visco-elastoplastic media including excess-pore pressure development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Elif; Gélis, Céline; Bonilla, Luis Fabián; Delavaud, Elise

    2017-12-01

    Numerical modelling of seismic wave propagation, considering soil nonlinearity, has become a major topic in seismic hazard studies when strong shaking is involved under particular soil conditions. Indeed, when strong ground motion propagates in saturated soils, pore pressure is another important parameter to take into account when successive phases of contractive and dilatant soil behaviour are expected. Here, we model 1-D seismic wave propagation in linear and nonlinear media using the spectral element numerical method. The study uses a three-component (3C) nonlinear rheology and includes pore-pressure excess. The 1-D-3C model is used to study the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake (ML 6.6), which was recorded at the Wildlife Refuge Liquefaction Array, USA. The data of this event present strong soil nonlinearity involving pore-pressure effects. The ground motion is numerically modelled for different assumptions on soil rheology and input motion (1C versus 3C), using the recorded borehole signals as input motion. The computed acceleration-time histories show low-frequency amplification and strong high-frequency damping due to the development of pore pressure in one of the soil layers. Furthermore, the soil is found to be more nonlinear and more dilatant under triaxial loading compared to the classical 1C analysis, and significant differences in surface displacements are observed between the 1C and 3C approaches. This study contributes to identify and understand the dominant phenomena occurring in superficial layers, depending on local soil properties and input motions, conditions relevant for site-specific studies.

  17. Anisotropic deformation of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, R. W. L.

    2013-09-01

    Zr-2.5Nb alloy is used for the pressure tubes in CANDU® reactor fuel channels. In reactor, the pressure tube normally operates at 300 °C and experiences a primary coolant fluid internal pressure of approximately 10 MPa. Manufacturing and processing procedures generate an anisotropic state in the pressure tube which makes the tube stronger in the hoop (transverse) direction than in the axial (longitudinal) direction. This anisotropy condition is present for temperatures less than 500 °C. During postulated accident conditions where the material temperature could reach 1000 °C, it might be assumed that the high temperature and subsequent phase change would reduce the inherent anisotropy, and thus affect the deformation behaviour (ballooning) of the pressure tube. From constant-load, rapid-temperature-ramp, uniaxial deformation tests, the deformation rate in the longitudinal direction of the tube behaves differently than the deformation rate in the transverse direction of the tube. This anisotropic mechanical behaviour appears to persist at temperatures up to 1000 °C. This paper presents the results of high-temperature deformation tests using longitudinal and transverse specimens taken from as-received Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes. It is shown that the anisotropic deformation behaviour observed at high temperatures is largely due to the stable crystallographic texture of the α-Zr phase constituent in the material that was previously observed by neutron diffraction measurements during heating at temperatures up to 1050 °C. The deformation behaviour is also influenced by the phase transformation occurring at high temperatures during heating. The effects of texture and phase transformation on the anisotropic deformation of as-received Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material are discussed in the context of the tube ballooning behaviour. Because of the high temperatures in postulated accident scenarios, any irradiation damage will be annealed from the pressure tube material and

  18. ICECON: a computer program used to calculate containment back pressure for LOCA analysis (including ice condenser plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-07-01

    The ICECON computer code provides a method for conservatively calculating the long term back pressure transient in the containment resulting from a hypothetical Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) for PWR plants including ice condenser containment systems. The ICECON computer code was developed from the CONTEMPT/LT-022 code. A brief discussion of the salient features of a typical ice condenser containment is presented. Details of the ice condenser models are explained. The corrections and improvements made to CONTEMPT/LT-022 are included. The organization of the code, including the calculational procedure, is outlined. The user's manual, to be used in conjunction with the CONTEMPT/LT-022 user's manual, a sample problem, a time-step study (solution convergence) and a comparison of ICECON results with the results of the NSSS vendor are presented. In general, containment pressure calculated with the ICECON code agree with those calculated by the NSSS vendor using the same mass and energy release rates to the containment

  19. New primary pressure calibrants for high pressure and temperature scale: SiC-3C and cBN are possible candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, Kirill; Goncharov, Alexander; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2011-03-01

    Since the invention of a diamond-anvil cell, various high-pressure scales for in situ pressure measurements have been realized. Ruby-based pressure scale (Mao et al., 1986) is the best known and high-pressure scientific community has been using it for over two decades. However, it has limited use at elevated temperatures, due to the weakening and broadening of the ruby fluorescence line. The recent developments in the field of high temperature, high pressure physics and geophysics require some alternative pressure scale, capable of measuring pressures at temperatures up to 3000 K. Cubic boron nitride (cBN) was recently proposed as the possible pressure calibrant. It has been suggested that the simultaneous use of x-ray diffraction to measure density and Brillouin spectroscopy to obtain elastic properties of the crystal can be used to construct the pressure scale independent of any other pressure standards. However, the acoustic velocities of cBN are very close to those of diamond and, therefore, are hard to resolve in experiment in diamond-anvil cell. Another possible primary pressure calibrant is cubic silicon carbide (SiC-3C). We performed single crystal x-ray diffraction and Brillouin spectroscopy up to 1 Mbar in pressure at room temperature in the diamond-anvil cell and show that cBN and SiC-3C, indeed, can be used in constructing reliable and accurate high-pressure, high-temperature scale.

  20. An Integrative Genomic Island Affects the Adaptations of Piezophilic Hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus yayanosii to High Temperature and High Hydrostatic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments are characterized by high hydrostatic pressure and sharp temperature and chemical gradients. Horizontal gene transfer is thought to play an important role in the microbial adaptation to such an extreme environment. In this study, a 21.4-kb DNA fragment was identified as a genomic island, designated PYG1, in the genomic sequence of the piezophilic hyperthermophile Pyrococcus yayanosii. According to the sequence alignment and functional annotation, the genes in PYG1 could tentatively be divided into five modules, with functions related to mobility, DNA repair, metabolic processes and the toxin-antitoxin system. Integrase can mediate the site-specific integration and excision of PYG1 in the chromosome of P. yayanosii A1. Gene replacement of PYG1 with a SimR cassette was successful. The growth of the mutant strain ∆PYG1 was compared with its parent strain P. yayanosii A2 under various stress conditions, including different pH, salinity, temperature and hydrostatic pressure. The ∆PYG1 mutant strain showed reduced growth when grown at 100 °C, while the biomass of ∆PYG1 increased significantly when cultured at 80 MPa. Differential expression of the genes in module Ⅲ of PYG1 was observed under different temperature and pressure conditions. This study demonstrates the first example of an archaeal integrative genomic island that could affect the adaptation of the hyperthermophilic piezophile P. yayanosii to high temperature and high hydrostatic pressure.

  1. Evaluation of Oil Film Pressure and Temperature of an Elliptical Journal Bearing - An Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Singla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed at experimental evaluation of both oil film pressure and temperature at the central plane of finite elliptical journal bearing configuration. These parameters have been obtained by running the machine at various speeds under different applied loads ranging from 500 N to 2000 N using three different grades of oil (HYDROL 32, 68 and 150. The data has been obtained through a test rig which is capable of measuring both pressure and temperature at the same location on the elliptical bearing profile. An elliptical journal bearing with journal diameter=100 mm, L/D ratio=1.0, Ellipticity Ratio=1.0 and radial clearance=0.1 mm has been designed and tested to access the pressure and temperature rise of the oil film at the central plane of the bearing. Two different lobes of positive pressure have been obtained for elliptical bearing which results in smaller area for cavitation zone and accounts for better thermal stability. Also, with the increase in load both pressure and temperature of an oil film increases for all the three grades of oil. Experimentally, it has been established that the HYDROL 68 is suitable grade of lubricating oil which gives the optimum rise of pressure and temperate under all operating conditions among the lubricating oils under study.

  2. Development of Advanced ISS-WPA Catalysts for Organic Oxidation at Reduced Pressure/Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Nalette, Tim; Kayatin, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Water Processor Assembly (WPA) at International Space Station (ISS) processes a waste stream via multi-filtration beds, where inorganic and non-volatile organic contaminants are removed, and a catalytic reactor, where low molecular weight organics not removed by the adsorption process are oxidized at elevated pressure in the presence of oxygen and elevated temperature above the normal water boiling point. Operation at an elevated pressure requires a more complex system design compared to a reactor that could operate at ambient pressure. However, catalysts currently available have insufficient activity to achieve complete oxidation of the organic load at a temperature less than the water boiling point and ambient pressure. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a more active and efficient catalyst at ambient pressure and a moderate temperature that is less than water boiling temperature. This paper describes our efforts in developing high efficiency water processing catalysts. Different catalyst support structures and coating metals were investigated in subscale reactors and results were compared against the flight WPA catalyst. Detailed improvements achieved on alternate metal catalysts at ambient pressure and 200 F will also be presented in the paper.

  3. Intelligent Detector of Internal Combustion Engine Cylinder Pressure and Sensitivity Temperature Coefficient Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beirong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The detecting device based on mechanical mechanism is far from the measurement of internal combustion engine cylinder explosion and compression pressure. This pressure detection is under the environment of pulsed gas (over 500 times per one minute and mechanical impactive vibration. Piezoresistive detection with silicon on insulator (SOI strain gauges to pressure seems to be a good solution to meet such special applications. In this work, separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX wafer was used to fabricate the high temperature pressure sensor chip. For high accuracy and wide temperature range application, this paper also presents a novel pressure sensitivity temperature coefficient (TCS compensation method, using integrated constant current network. A quantitative compensation formula is introduced in mathematics. During experiments, the absolute value of the compensated TCS is easy to be 10 × 10−6/°C~100 × 10−6/°C by individual adjustment and calibration of each device’s temperature compensation. Therefore, the feasibility and practicability of this technology are tested. Again, the disadvantages are discussed after the research of the experiment data and the improvement methods are also given in the designing period. This technology exhibits the great potential practical value of internal combustion engine cylinder pressure with volume manufacturing.

  4. Source of temperature and pressure pulsations during sessile droplet evaporation into multicomponent atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Aaron H; Sefiane, Khellil; Ward, Charles A

    2013-10-29

    During sessile droplet evaporation, studies with IR thermography and shadowgraphs have indicated temperature pulsations. We confirm those observations with microthermocouples, but microthermocouples also indicate temperature pulsations in the atmosphere of the droplet. The pressure in this atmosphere pulsated as well and was correlated with the temperature pulsations in the droplet. Also, we find that if a droplet evaporates into its own vapor, there are no temperature or pressure pulsations. The pulsations occur only if the droplet evaporates into an atmosphere with a component having a heat of solution with the droplet when it adsorbs-absorbs. None of the currently proposed mechanisms for the temperature pulsations provide an explanation for the coupling between the temperature pulsations in the droplet and the vapor-phase pressure pulsations, and for the absence of the pulsations when the system is single-component. As a mechanism for the pulsations, we propose that when a droplet is exposed to an atmosphere containing a component that has a heat of solution with the droplet, energy will be released from adsorption-absorption. This energy will cause pulsations in the evaporation flux, and these pulsations could cause the observed temperature and pressure pulsations. We examine this mechanism by showing that, if the measured temperature pulsations in a water droplet exposed to a methanol atmosphere are used as the input to a theory of evaporation kinetics (statistical rate theory), the pressure pulsations of the water vapor in the methanol atmosphere are predicted and agree with those measured with a quadrupole mass analyzer. When the inputs and outputs are reversed in the theory, we find that the temperature pulsations in the droplet are correctly predicted from the measured water vapor pulsations in the atmosphere.

  5. Wireless Capacitive Pressure Sensor With Directional RF Chip Antenna for High Temperature Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scardelletti, M. C.; Jordan, J. L.; Ponchak, G. E.; Zorman, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and characterization of a wireless capacitive pressure sensor with directional RF chip antenna that is envisioned for the health monitoring of aircraft engines operating in harsh environments. The sensing system is characterized from room temperature (25 C) to 300 C for a pressure range from 0 to 100 psi. The wireless pressure system consists of a Clapp-type oscillator design with a capacitive MEMS pressure sensor located in the LC-tank circuit of the oscillator. Therefore, as the pressure of the aircraft engine changes, so does the output resonant frequency of the sensing system. A chip antenna is integrated to transmit the system output to a receive antenna 10 m away.The design frequency of the wireless pressure sensor is 127 MHz and a 2 increase in resonant frequency over the temperature range of 25 to 300 C from 0 to 100 psi is observed. The phase noise is less than minus 30 dBcHz at the 1 kHz offset and decreases to less than minus 80 dBcHz at 10 kHz over the entire temperature range. The RF radiation patterns for two cuts of the wireless system have been measured and show that the system is highly directional and the MEMS pressure sensor is extremely linear from 0 to 100 psi.

  6. Autonomic control of body temperature and blood pressure: influences of female sex hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkoudian, Nisha; Hart, Emma C J; Barnes, Jill N; Joyner, Michael J

    2017-06-01

    Female reproductive hormones exert important non-reproductive influences on autonomic regulation of body temperature and blood pressure. Estradiol and progesterone influence thermoregulation both centrally and peripherally, where estradiol tends to promote heat dissipation, and progesterone tends to promote heat conservation and higher body temperatures. Changes in thermoregulation over the course of the menstrual cycle and with hot flashes at menopause are mediated by hormonal influences on neural control of skin blood flow and sweating. The influence of estradiol is to promote vasodilation, which, in the skin, results in greater heat dissipation. In the context of blood pressure regulation, both central and peripheral hormonal influences are important as well. Peripherally, the vasodilator influence of estradiol contributes to the lower blood pressures and smaller risk of hypertension seen in young women compared to young men. This is in part due to a mechanism by which estradiol augments beta-adrenergic receptor mediated vasodilation, offsetting alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction, and resulting in a weak relationship between muscle sympathetic nerve activity and total peripheral resistance, and between muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure. After menopause, with the loss of reproductive hormones, sympathetic nerve activity, peripheral resistance and blood pressure become more strongly related, and sympathetic nerve activity (which increases with age) becomes a more important contributor to the prevailing level of blood pressure. Continuing to increase our understanding of sex hormone influences on body temperature and blood pressure regulation will provide important insight for optimization of individualized health care for future generations of women.

  7. High Speed Submarine Optical Fiber Communication System:Pressure and Temperature Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the performance of high speed submarine optical fiber cable systems is investigated, taking into account both the pressure and the temperature effects. Both the pressure and the temperature are depth-dependent variables, while both the spectral losses and the dispersion effects are temperature as well as wavelength dependent variables. Two important cases with real fibers are processed: a case with dispersion cancellation and a case without dispersion cancellation. It is found that the ocean pressure (due to the depth shifts the dispersion-free wavelength towards the third communication window. In general, as the depth increases the maximum transmitted bit rate increases in the range of interest. The system capacity as well as the spectral losses, and the dispersion effects are parametrically investigated over wide-range ranges of the set of affecting parameters {wavelength, ocean depth (and consequently the ocean pressure and temperature, and the chemical structure}. Key Words: Submarine Optical Fiber, Undersea Optical Communication, Pressure and Temperature Effects, Transoceanic Optical Communications

  8. Application of reference-modified density functional theory: Temperature and pressure dependences of solvation free energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Tomonari; Maruyama, Yutaka; Mitsutake, Ayori; Mochizuki, Kenji; Koga, Kenichiro

    2018-02-05

    Recently, we proposed a reference-modified density functional theory (RMDFT) to calculate solvation free energy (SFE), in which a hard-sphere fluid was introduced as the reference system instead of an ideal molecular gas. Through the RMDFT, using an optimal diameter for the hard-sphere reference system, the values of the SFE calculated at room temperature and normal pressure were in good agreement with those for more than 500 small organic molecules in water as determined by experiments. In this study, we present an application of the RMDFT for calculating the temperature and pressure dependences of the SFE for solute molecules in water. We demonstrate that the RMDFT has high predictive ability for the temperature and pressure dependences of the SFE for small solute molecules in water when the optimal reference hard-sphere diameter determined for each thermodynamic condition is used. We also apply the RMDFT to investigate the temperature and pressure dependences of the thermodynamic stability of an artificial small protein, chignolin, and discuss the mechanism of high-temperature and high-pressure unfolding of the protein. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. [Influence of compaction pressure and pre-sintering temperature on the machinability of zirconia ceramic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huil; Li, Jing; Zhang, Fuqiang; Sun, Jing; Gao, Lian

    2011-10-01

    In order to make certain the compaction pressure as well as pre-sintering temperature on the machinability of the zirconia ceramic. 3 mol nano-size 3 mol yttria partially stabilized zirconia (3Y-TZP) powder were compacted at different isostatic pressure and sintered at different temperature. The cylindrical surface was traversed using a hard metal tool. Surface and edge quality were checked visually using light stereo microscopy. Pre-sintering temperature had the obviously influence on the machinability of 3Y-TZP. The cutting surface was smooth, and the integrality of edge was better when the pre-sintering temperature was chosen between 800 degrees C to 900 degrees C. Compaction pressure showed only a weak influence on machinability of 3Y-TZP blanks, but the higher compaction pressure result in the poor surface quality. The best machinability of pre-sintered zirconia body was found for 800-900 degrees C pre-sintering temperature, and 200-300 MPa compaction pressure.

  10. Including temperature in a wavefunction description of the dynamics of the quantum Rabi model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Michael; Grossmann, Frank

    2018-01-01

    We present a wavefunction methodology to account for finite temperature initial conditions in the quantum Rabi model. The approach is based on the Davydov Ansatz together with a statistical sampling of the canonical harmonic oscillator initial density matrix. Equations of motion are gained from a variational principle and numerical results are compared to those of the thermal Hamiltonian approach. For a system consisting of a single spin and a single oscillator and for moderate coupling strength, we compare our new results with full quantum ones as well as with other Davydov-type results based on alternative sampling/summation strategies. All of these perform better than the ones based on the thermal Hamiltonian approach. The best agreement is shown by a Boltzmann weighting of individual eigenstate propagations. Extending this to a bath of many oscillators will, however, be very demanding numerically. The use of any one of the investigated stochastic sampling approaches will then be favorable.

  11. Combined Effect of Pressure and Temperature on the Viscous Behaviour of All-Oil Drilling Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermoso J.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The overall objective of this research was to study the combined influence of pressure and temperature on the complex viscous behaviour of two oil-based drilling fluids. The oil-based fluids were formulated by dispersing selected organobentonites in mineral oil, using a high-shear mixer, at room temperature. Drilling fluid viscous flow characterization was performed with a controlled-stress rheometer, using both conventional coaxial cylinder and non-conventional geometries for High Pressure/High Temperature (HPHT measurements. The rheological data obtained confirm that a helical ribbon geometry is a very useful tool to characterise the complex viscous flow behaviour of these fluids under extreme conditions. The different viscous flow behaviours encountered for both all-oil drilling fluids, as a function of temperature, are related to changes in polymer-oil pair solvency and oil viscosity. Hence, the resulting structures have been principally attributed to changes in the effective volume fraction of disperse phase due to thermally induced processes. Bingham’s and Herschel-Bulkley’s models describe the rheological properties of these drilling fluids, at different pressures and temperatures, fairly well. It was found that Herschel-Bulkley’s model fits much better B34-based oil drilling fluid viscous flow behaviour under HPHT conditions. Yield stress values increase linearly with pressure in the range of temperature studied. The pressure influence on yielding behaviour has been associated with the compression effect of different resulting organoclay microstructures. A factorial WLF-Barus model fitted the combined effect of temperature and pressure on the plastic viscosity of both drilling fluids fairly well, being this effect mainly influenced by the piezo-viscous properties of the continuous phase.

  12. Experimental Limiting Oxygen Concentrations for Nine Organic Solvents at Temperatures and Pressures Relevant to Aerobic Oxidations in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterberg, Paul M; Niemeier, Jeffry K; Welch, Christopher J; Hawkins, Joel M; Martinelli, Joseph R; Johnson, Thomas E; Root, Thatcher W; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-11-20

    Applications of aerobic oxidation methods in pharmaceutical manufacturing are limited in part because mixtures of oxygen gas and organic solvents often create the potential for a flammable atmosphere. To address this issue, limiting oxygen concentration (LOC) values, which define the minimum partial pressure of oxygen that supports a combustible mixture, have been measured for nine commonly used organic solvents at elevated temperatures and pressures. The solvents include acetic acid, N -methylpyrrolidone, dimethyl sulfoxide, tert -amyl alcohol, ethyl acetate, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, methanol, acetonitrile, and toluene. The data obtained from these studies help define safe operating conditions for the use of oxygen with organic solvents.

  13. Tribocorrosion in pressurized high temperature water: a mass flow model based on the third body approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guadalupe Maldonado, S.

    2014-07-01

    Pressurized water reactors (PWR) used for power generation are operated at elevated temperatures (280-300 °C) and under higher pressure (120-150 bar). In addition to these harsh environmental conditions some components of the PWR assemblies are subject to mechanical loading (sliding, vibration and impacts) leading to undesirable and hardly controllable material degradation phenomena. In such situations wear is determined by the complex interplay (tribocorrosion) between mechanical, material and physical-chemical phenomena. Tribocorrosion in PWR conditions is at present little understood and models need to be developed in order to predict component lifetime over several decades. The goal of this project, carried out in collaboration with the French company AREVA NP, is to develop a predictive model based on the mechanistic understanding of tribocorrosion of specific PWR components (stainless steel control assemblies, stellite grippers). The approach taken here is to describe degradation in terms of electro-chemical and mechanical material flows (third body concept of tribology) from the metal into the friction film (i.e. the oxidized film forming during rubbing on the metal surface) and from the friction film into the environment instead of simple mass loss considerations. The project involves the establishment of mechanistic models for describing the single flows based on ad-hoc tribocorrosion measurements operating at low temperature. The overall behaviour at high temperature and pressure in investigated using a dedicated tribometer (Aurore) including electrochemical control of the contact during rubbing. Physical laws describing the individual flows according to defined mechanisms and as a function of defined physical parameters were identified based on the obtained experimental results and from literature data. The physical laws were converted into mass flow rates and solved as differential equation system by considering the mass balance in compartments

  14. Design and Fabrication of a Piezoresistive Pressure Sensor for Ultra High Temperature Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, L B; Zhao, Y L; Jiang, Z D

    2006-01-01

    In order to solve the pressure measurement problem in the harsh environment, a piezoresistive pressure sensor has been developed, which can be used under high temperature above 200 deg. C and is able to endure instantaneous ultra high temperature (2000deg. C, duration≤2s) impact. Based on the MEMS (Micro Electro-Mechanical System) and integrated circuit technology, the piezoresistive pressure sensor's sensitive element was fabricated and constituted by silicon substrate, a thin buried silicon dioxide layer, four p-type resistors in the measuring circuit layer by boron ion implantation and photolithography, the top SiO2 layer by oxidation, stress matching Si3N4 layer, and a Ti-Pt-Au beam lead layer for connecting p-type resistors by sputtering. In order to decrease the leak-current influence to sensor in high temperature above 200deg. C, the buried SiO2 layer with the thickness 367 nm was fabricated by the SIMOX (Separation by Implantation of Oxygen) technology, which was instead of p-n junction to isolate the upper measuring circuit layer from Si substrate. In order to endure instantaneous ultra high temperature impact, the mechanical structure with cantilever and diaphragm and transmitting beam was designed. By laser welding and high temperature packaging technology, the high temperature piezoresistive pressure sensor was fabricated with range of 120MPa. After the thermal compensation, the sensor's thermal zero drift k 0 and thermal sensitivity drift k s were easy to be less than 3x10 -4 FS/deg. C. The experimental results show that the developed piezoresistive pressure sensor has good performances under high temperature and is able to endure instantaneous ultra high temperature impact, which meets the requirements of modern industry, such as aviation, oil, engine, etc

  15. Embedded infrared fiber-optic sensor for thermometry in a high temperature/pressure environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Wook Jae; Jang, Kyoung Won; Moon, Jinsoo; Han, Ki-Tek; Jeon, Dayeong; Lee, Bongsoo; Park, Byung Gi

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we developed an embedded infrared fiber-optic temperature sensor for thermometry in high temperature/pressure and water-chemistry environments by using two identical silver-halide optical fibers. The performance of the fabricated temperature sensor was assessed in an autoclave filled with an aqueous coolant solution containing boric acid and lithium hydroxide. We carried out real-time monitoring of the infrared radiation emitted from the signal and reference probes for various temperatures over a temperature range from 95 to 225 °C. In order to decide the temperature of the synthetic coolant solution, we measured the difference between the infrared radiation emitted from the two temperature-sensing probes. Thermometry with the proposed sensor is immune to any changes in the physical conditions and the emissivity of the heat source. From the experimental results, the embedded infrared fiber-optic temperature sensor can withstand, and normally operate in a high temperature/pressure test loop system corresponding to the coolant system used for nuclear power plant simulation. We expect that the proposed sensor can be developed to accurately monitor temperatures in harsh environments.

  16. Temperature-independent fiber-Bragg-grating-based atmospheric pressure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiguo; Shen, Chunyan; Li, Luming

    2018-03-01

    Atmospheric pressure is an important way to achieve a high degree of measurement for modern aircrafts, moreover, it is also an indispensable parameter in the meteorological telemetry system. With the development of society, people are increasingly concerned about the weather. Accurate and convenient atmospheric pressure parameters can provide strong support for meteorological analysis. However, electronic atmospheric pressure sensors currently in application suffer from several shortcomings. After an analysis and discussion, we propose an innovative structural design, in which a vacuum membrane box and a temperature-independent strain sensor based on an equal strength cantilever beam structure and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are used. We provide experimental verification of that the atmospheric pressure sensor device has the characteristics of a simple structure, lack of an external power supply, automatic temperature compensation, and high sensitivity. The sensor system has good sensitivity, which can be up to 100 nm/MPa, and repeatability. In addition, the device exhibits desired hysteresis.

  17. An organic cosmo-barometer: Distinct pressure and temperature effects for methyl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Wren; Watson, Jonathan S.; Sephton, Mark A., E-mail: w.montgomery@imperial.ac.uk [Impacts and Astromaterials Research Centre, Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-01

    There are a number of key structures that can be used to reveal the formation and modification history of organic matter in the cosmos. For instance, the susceptibility of organic matter to heat is well documented and the relative thermal stabilities of different isomers can be used as cosmothermometers. Yet despite being an important variable, no previously recognized organic marker of pressure exists. The absence of a pressure marker is unfortunate considering our ability to effectively recognize extraterrestrial organic structures both remotely and in the laboratory. There are a wide variety of pressures in cosmic settings that could potentially be reflected by organic structures. Therefore, to develop an organic cosmic pressure marker, we have used state-of-the-art diamond anvil cell (DAC) and synchrotron-source Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to reveal the effects of pressure on the substitution patterns for representatives of the commonly encountered methyl substituted naphthalenes, specifically the dimethylnaphthalenes. Interestingly, although temperature and pressure effects are concordant for many isomers, pressure appears to have the opposite effect to heat on the final molecular architecture of the 1,5-dimethylnaphthalene isomer. Our data suggest the possibility of the first pressure parameter or 'cosmo-barometer' (1,5-dimethylnaphthalene/total dimethylnaphthalenes) that can distinguish pressure from thermal effects. Information can be obtained from the new pressure marker either remotely by instrumentation on landers or rovers or directly by laboratory measurement, and its use has relevance for all cases where organic matter, temperature, and pressure interplay in the cosmos.

  18. An organic cosmo-barometer: Distinct pressure and temperature effects for methyl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, Wren; Watson, Jonathan S.; Sephton, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    There are a number of key structures that can be used to reveal the formation and modification history of organic matter in the cosmos. For instance, the susceptibility of organic matter to heat is well documented and the relative thermal stabilities of different isomers can be used as cosmothermometers. Yet despite being an important variable, no previously recognized organic marker of pressure exists. The absence of a pressure marker is unfortunate considering our ability to effectively recognize extraterrestrial organic structures both remotely and in the laboratory. There are a wide variety of pressures in cosmic settings that could potentially be reflected by organic structures. Therefore, to develop an organic cosmic pressure marker, we have used state-of-the-art diamond anvil cell (DAC) and synchrotron-source Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy to reveal the effects of pressure on the substitution patterns for representatives of the commonly encountered methyl substituted naphthalenes, specifically the dimethylnaphthalenes. Interestingly, although temperature and pressure effects are concordant for many isomers, pressure appears to have the opposite effect to heat on the final molecular architecture of the 1,5-dimethylnaphthalene isomer. Our data suggest the possibility of the first pressure parameter or 'cosmo-barometer' (1,5-dimethylnaphthalene/total dimethylnaphthalenes) that can distinguish pressure from thermal effects. Information can be obtained from the new pressure marker either remotely by instrumentation on landers or rovers or directly by laboratory measurement, and its use has relevance for all cases where organic matter, temperature, and pressure interplay in the cosmos.

  19. Distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the current sheet surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrie, N. P., E-mail: kyrie@fpl.gpi.ru; Markov, V. S., E-mail: natalya.kyrie@yandex.ru; Frank, A. G.; Vasilkov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The distributions of the ion temperature, ion pressure, and electron density over the width (the major transverse dimension) of the current sheet have been studied for the first time. The current sheets were formed in discharges in argon and helium in 2D and 3D magnetic configurations. It is found that the temperature of argon ions in both 2D and 3D magnetic configurations is almost uniform over the sheet width and that argon ions are accelerated by the Ampère force. In contrast, the distributions of the electron density and the temperature of helium ions are found to be substantially nonuniform. As a result, in the 2D magnetic configuration, the ion pressure gradient across the sheet width makes a significant contribution (comparable with the Ampère force) to the acceleration of helium ions, whereas in the 3D magnetic configuration, the Ampère force is counterbalanced by the pressure gradient.

  20. Nonlinear vacuum gas flow through a short tube due to pressure and temperature gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantazis, Sarantis; Naris, Steryios; Tantos, Christos [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece); Valougeorgis, Dimitris, E-mail: diva@mie.uth.gr [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, 38334 Volos (Greece); André, Julien; Millet, Francois; Perin, Jean Paul [Service des Basses Températures, UMR-E CEA/UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, Grenoble, F-38054 (France)

    2013-10-15

    The flow of a rarefied gas through a tube due to both pressure and temperature gradients has been studied numerically. The main objective is to investigate the performance of a mechanical vacuum pump operating at low temperatures in order to increase the pumped mass flow rate. This type of pump is under development at CEA-Grenoble. The flow is modelled by the Shakhov kinetic model equation, which is solved by the discrete velocity method. Results are presented for certain geometry and flow parameters. Since according to the pump design the temperature driven flow is in the opposite direction than the main pressure driven flow, it has been found that for the operating pressure range studied here the net mass flow rate through the pump may be significantly reduced.

  1. CONTEMPT-4MOD3, LWR Containment Long-Term Pressure Distribution and Temperature Distribution in LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.C.; Economos, C.; Lehner, J.R.; Maise, G.; Ng, K.K.; Mirsky, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: CONTEMPT-4/MOD5 describes the response of multi-compartment containment systems subjected to postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. The program can accommodate both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) containment systems. Also, both design basis accident (DBA) and degraded core type LOCA conditions can be analyzed. The program calculates the time variation of compartment pressures, temperatures, and mass and energy inventories due to inter-compartment mass and energy exchange taking into account user- supplied descriptions of compartments, inter-compartment junction flow areas, LOCA source terms, and user-selected problem features. Analytical models available to describe containment systems include models for containment fans and pumps, cooling sprays, heat conducting structures, sump drains, PWR ice condensers, and BWR pressure suppression systems. To accommodate degraded core type accidents, analytical models for hydrogen combustion within compartments and energy transfer due to gas radiation are also provided. CONTEMPT4/MOD6 is an update of previous CONTEMPT4 versions. Improvements in CONTEMPT4/MOD6 over CONTEMPT4/MOD3 include coding of a BWR pressure suppression system model, a hydrogen/carbon monoxide burn model, a gas radiation heat transfer model, a user specified variable junction (leakage) area as a function of pressure or time, additional heat transfer coefficient options for heat structures, generalized initial compartment conditions for inerted containment, an alternative containment spray model and spray carry-over capability. Also, the thermodynamic properties routines have been extended to accommodate the higher temperature and multicomponent gas mixtures associated with combustion. In addition, reduced running time is achieved by incorporation of an optional implicit numerical algorithm for junction flow. This makes economically feasible the analysis of very long

  2. On-line measurements of response time of temperature and pressure sensors in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    A review of modern techniques for in-situ response time testing of resistance temperature detectors (RTDs), and pressure, level and flow transmitters is presented. These techniques have been developed and validated for use in pressurized and boiling water reactors. The significance of the modern techniques is that they permit testing of installed sensors at process operating conditions and thereby provide the actual in-service response times of the sensors. (author)

  3. The pressure effect on the superconducting transition temperature of black phosphorus

    CERN Document Server

    Karuzawa, M; Endo, S

    2002-01-01

    We have measured the pressure effect on the superconducting transition temperature T sub c of black phosphorus up to 160 GPa using a superconducting quantum interference device vibrating coil magnetometer. It was found that T sub c had a maximum value of about 9.5 K at about 32 GPa, began decreasing with pressure and reached about 4.3 K at about 100 GPa.

  4. The effects of pressure, temperature, and pore water on velocities in Westerly granite. [for seismic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. W., Jr.; Nur, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A description is presented of an experimental assembly which has been developed to conduct concurrent measurements of compressional and shear wave velocities in rocks at high temperatures and confining pressures and with independent control of the pore pressure. The apparatus was used in studies of the joint effects of temperature, external confining pressure, and internal pore water on sonic velocities in Westerly granite. It was found that at a given temperature, confining pressure has a larger accelerating effect on compressional waves in dry rock, whereas at a given confining pressure, temperature has a larger retarding effect on shear waves.

  5. Experimental Investigation of Minimum Film Boiling Temperature for Vertical Cylinders at Elevated Pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, L.J.; Bajorek, S.M.

    2002-01-01

    The minimum film boiling temperature, T min , is of particular interest to nuclear safety. Many thermal-hydraulics codes depend on an accurate estimation of T min to determine the appropriate heat transfer regime. Heat transfer coefficients increase considerably when the surface temperature decreases below T min . This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation of T min for vertical cylinders at elevated pressure. While several previous studies have investigated T min under various conditions, relatively few have generated experimental data at pressures above atmospheric. As a result, correlations for T min often predict unrealistic values at high pressure. The present investigation has generated an experimental database examining the effects of pressure, material, subcooling, surface roughness, and oxidation on T min . The experimental apparatus and test specimens are described in addition to the evaluation procedure. T min results are reported in this paper for Type 316 stainless steel, Type 1018 carbon steel, and Zircaloy-4. Pressure was varied from 0.101 MPa to 3.0 MPa, and liquid subcooling was ranged up to 30 deg. C. Zircaloy-4 samples with a thick oxide layer were also tested. The results show that T min increases with pressure, liquid subcooling, surface roughness, and surface oxidation. T min is a strong function of pressure at low pressure, but asymptotically approaches a constant value as pressure increases. T min is also a function of surface material properties, with Zircaloy-4 being found to have the highest minimum film boiling temperature compared to carbon steel and stainless steel. For Zircaloy-4, an oxide layer was found to significantly increase T min . (authors)

  6. [Investigation on the gas temperature of a plasma jet at atmospheric pressure by emission spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-chen; Yuan, Ning; Jia, Peng-ying; Niu, Dong-ying

    2010-11-01

    A plasma jet of a dielectric barrier discharge in coaxial electrode was used to produce plasma plume in atmospheric pressure argon. Spatially and temporally resolved measurement was carried out by photomultiplier tubes. The light emission signals both from the dielectric barrier discharge and from the plasma plume were analyzed. Furthermore, emission spectrum from the plasma plume was collected by high-resolution optical spectrometer. The emission spectra of OH (A 2sigma + --> X2 II, 307.7-308.9 nm) and the first negative band of N2+ (B2 sigma u+ --> X2 IIg+, 390-391.6 nm) were used to estimate the rotational temperature of the plasma plume by fitting the experimental spectra to the simulated spectra. The rotational temperature obtained is about 443 K by fitting the emission spectrum from the OH, and that from the first negative band of N2+ is about 450 K. The rotational temperatures obtained by the two method are consistent within 5% error band. The gas temperature of the plasma plume at atmospheric pressure was obtained because rotational temperature equals to gas temperature approximately in gas discharge at atmospheric pressure. Results show that gas temperature increases with increasing the applied voltage.

  7. Analysis and evaluation system for elevated temperature design of pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Teiji; Sayawaki, Masaaki; Nishitani, Masahiro; Mii, Tatsuo; Murasawa, Kanji

    1977-01-01

    In pressure vessel technology, intensive efforts have recently been made to develop the elevated temperature design methods. Much of the impetus of these efforts has been provided mainly by the results of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) and more recently, of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Programs. The pressure vessels and associated components in these new type nuclear power plants must operate for long periods at elevated temperature where creep effects are significant and then must be designed by rigorous analysis for high reliability and safety. To carry out such an elevated temperature designing, numbers of highly developed analysis and evaluation techniques, which are so complicated as to be impossible by manual work, are indispensable. Under these circumstances, the authors have made the following approaches in the study: (1) Study into basic concepts and the associated techniques in elevated temperature design. (2) Systematization (Analysis System) of the procedure for loads and stress analyses. (3) Development of post-processor, ''POST-1592'', for strength evaluation based on ASME Code Case 1592-7. By linking the POST-1592 together with the Analysis System, an analysis and evaluation system is developed for an elevated temperature design of pressure vessels. Consequently, designing of elevated temperature vessels by detailed analysis and evaluation has easily and effectively become feasible by applying this software system. (auth.)

  8. Magnetic and Structural Phase Transitions in Thulium under High Pressures and Low Temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vohra, Yogesh K.; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Samudrala, Gopi K. [UAB

    2017-10-01

    The nature of 4f electrons in many rare earth metals and compounds may be broadly characterized as being either "localized" or "itinerant", and is held responsible for a wide range of physical and chemical properties. The pressure variable has a very dramatic effect on the electronic structure of rare earth metals which in turn drives a sequence of structural and magnetic transitions. We have carried out four-probe electrical resistance measurements on rare earth metal Thulium (Tm) under high pressures to 33 GPa and low temperatures to 10 K to monitor the magnetic ordering transition. These studies are complemented by angle dispersive x-ray diffraction studies to monitor crystallographic phase transitions at high pressures and low temperatures. We observe an abrupt increase in magnetic ordering temperature in Tm at a pressure of 17 GPa on phase transition from ambient pressure hcp-phase to α-Sm phase transition. In addition, measured equation of state (EOS) at low temperatures show anomalously low thermal expansion coefficients likely linked to magnetic transitions.

  9. Large inelastic deformation analysis of steel pressure vessels at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikonen, K.

    2001-01-01

    This publication describes the calculation methodology developed for a large inelastic deformation analysis of pressure vessels at high temperature. Continuum mechanical formulation related to a large deformation analysis is presented. Application of the constitutive equations is simplified when the evolution of stress and deformation state of an infinitesimal material element is considered in the directions of principal strains determined by the deformation during a finite time increment. A quantitative modelling of time dependent inelastic deformation is applied for reactor pressure vessel steels. Experimental data of uniaxial tensile, relaxation and creep tests performed at different laboratories for reactor pressure vessel steels are investigated and processed. An inelastic deformation rate model of strain hardening type is adopted. The model simulates well the axial tensile, relaxation and creep tests from room temperature to high temperature with only a few fitting parameters. The measurement data refined for the inelastic deformation rate model show useful information about inelastic deformation phenomena of reactor pressure vessel steels over a wide temperature range. The methodology and calculation process are validated by comparing the calculated results with measurements from experiments on small scale pressure vessels. A reasonably good agreement, when taking several uncertainties into account, is obtained between the measured and calculated results concerning deformation rate and failure location. (orig.)

  10. Phase transitions in Cd3P2 at high pressures and high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yel'kin, F.S.; Sidorov, V.A.; Waskowska, A.

    2008-01-01

    The high-pressure, high-temperature structural behaviour of Cd3P2 has been studied using electrical resistance measurements, differential thermal analysis, thermo baric analysis and X-ray diffraction. At room temperature, a phase transformation is observed at 4.0 GPa in compression. The experimen......The high-pressure, high-temperature structural behaviour of Cd3P2 has been studied using electrical resistance measurements, differential thermal analysis, thermo baric analysis and X-ray diffraction. At room temperature, a phase transformation is observed at 4.0 GPa in compression....... The experimental zero-pressure bulk modulus of the low-pressure phase is 64.7(7) GPa, which agrees quite well with the calculated value of 66.3 GPa using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital method within the local density approximation. Tentatively, the high-pressure phase has an orthorhombic crystal...... structure with space group Pmmn (#59). The relative volume change at the phase transition is Delta V/V= -5.5%. Amorphization of the sample occurs above 25 GPa. A P-T phase diagram of Cd3P2 has been constructed. A metastable phase is observed at ambient conditions after heating the sample to above 600 K...

  11. The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure by using CMS100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriyono; Satmoko, Ari; Febrianto; Hidayati, N R; Arifal; Sumarno, Ady; Handoyo, Ismu; Prasetjo, Joko

    1999-01-01

    The corrosion rate measurement of Inconel 690 on high temperature and pressure had been done. By using an Autoclave, and temperature can be simulated. For reducing the pressure on Autoclave so its can be measure by Corrosion Measurement System 100(CMS100), the electrodes placement had designed and fabrication on the cover of Autoclave. The electrodes of CMS100 are reference electrode, working electrodes and counter electrodes. The electrodes placement are made and and designed on two packages, these are Salt bridge and Counter-specimen placement. From the result of testing these both of placement are able to 90 bar (pressure) and 280 C (temperature) operation rate measurement was done on temperature variation from 150 0C, 190 0C, 200 0C, 210 0C, 220 0C and 230 0C, and the solution is 0.1 ppm chloride. The pressure experiment is the pressure, which occurred in Autoclave. From the Tafel analysis, even through very little The corrosion current increased from 150 C to 230 C it is 2,54x10-10 a/cm2 to 1,62x10-9 A/cm2, but the the corrosion rate is still zero

  12. The effect of nozzle diameter, injection pressure and ambient temperature on spray characteristics in diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhaodah Andsaler, Adiba; Khalid, Amir; Sharifhatul Adila Abdullah, Nor; Sapit, Azwan; Jaat, Norrizam

    2017-04-01

    Mixture formation of the ignition process is a key element in the diesel combustion as it influences the combustion process and exhaust emission. Aim of this study is to elucidate the effects of nozzle diameter, injection pressure and ambient temperature to the formation of spray. This study investigated diesel formation spray using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Multiphase volume of fluid (VOF) behaviour in the chamber are determined by means of transient simulation, Eulerian of two phases is used for implementation of mixing fuel and air. The detail behaviour of spray droplet diameter, spray penetration and spray breakup length was visualised using the ANSYS 16.1. This simulation was done in different nozzle diameter 0.12 mm and 0.2 mm performed at the ambient temperature 500 K and 700 K with different injection pressure 40 MPa, 70 MPa and 140 MPa. Results show that high pressure influence droplet diameter become smaller and the penetration length longer with the high injection pressure apply. Smaller nozzle diameter gives a shorter length of the breakup. It is necessary for nozzle diameter and ambient temperature condition to improve the formation of spray. High injection pressure is most effective in improvement of formation spray under higher ambient temperature and smaller nozzle diameter.

  13. Biomedical Applications of Low Temperature Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas to Cancerous Cell Treatment and Tooth Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Koo; Kim, Myoung Soo; Byun, June Ho; Kim, Kyong Tai; Kim, Gyoo Cheon; Park, Gan Young

    2011-08-01

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have attracted great interests and they have been widely applied to biomedical applications to interact with living tissues, cells, and bacteria due to their non-thermal property. This paper reviews the biomedical applications of low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas to cancerous cell treatment and tooth bleaching. Gold nanoparticles conjugated with cancer-specific antibodies have been introduced to cancerous cells to enhance selective killing of cells, and the mechanism of cell apoptosis induced by plasma has been investigated. Tooth exposed to helium plasma jet with hydrogen peroxide has become brighter and the productions of hydroxyl radicals from hydrogen peroxide have been enhanced by plasma exposure.

  14. GFOC Project results: High Temperature / High Pressure, Hydrogen Tolerant Optical Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Burov; A. Pastouret; E. Aldea; B. Overton; F. Gooijer; A. Bergonzo

    2012-02-12

    Tests results are given for exposure of multimode optical fiber to high temperatures (300 deg. C) and high partial pressure (15 bar) hydrogen. These results demonstrate that fluorine down doped optical fibers are much more hydrogen tolerant than traditional germanium doped multimode optical fibers. Also demonstrated is the similar hydrogen tolerance of carbon coated and non-carbon coated fibers. Model for reversible H2 impact in fiber versus T{sup o}C and H2 pressure is given. These results have significant impact for the longevity of use for distributed temperature sensing applications in harsh environments such as geothermal wells.

  15. Analysis of containment pressure and temperature changes following loss of coolant accident (LOCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, V.T.; Kieu, N.D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper present a preliminary thermal-hydraulics analysis of AP1000 containment following loss of coolant accident events such as double-end cold line break (DECLB) or main steam line break (MSLB) using MELCOR code. A break of this type will produce a rapid depressurization of the reactor pressure vessel (primary system) and release initially high pressure water into the containment followed by a much smaller release of highly superheated steam. The high pressure liquid water will flash and rapidly pressurize the containment building. The performance of passive containment cooling system for steam removal by condensation on large steel containment structure is a major contributing process, controlling the pressure and temperature maximum reached during the accident event. The results are analyzed, discussed and compared with the similar work done by Sandia National Laboratories. (author)

  16. A new approach for evaluating water hammer including the initial state of pressurization of the installation and fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kaless

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The water hammer phenomenon is well known since the 19th century, while its mathematical formulation, by means of differential equations, is due to works of researchers such us Allievi (1903 and others from the beginning of the 20th century. The equations found in the technical publications produce a strange water hammer when the initial condition is defined assuming an incompressible fluid and a rigid pipe. The correct solution requires solving the water hammer equations for the initial state. When the finite difference method is applied, the initial state is solved by means of a set of non-linear equations. A novel approach is proposed including the initial state of pressurization into the governing equations and hence simplifying the calculus of the initial conditions. Furthermore, a critical reading of the deduction of the equations is done pointing out conceptual inconsistencies and proposing corrections.

  17. Acetone photophysics at 282 nm excitation at elevated pressure and temperature. II: Fluorescence modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Jason; Raju, Mandhapati; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2017-07-01

    This is the second in a series of two papers that presents an updated fluorescence model and compares with the new experimental data reported in the first paper, as well as the available literature data, to extend the range of acetone photophysics to elevated pressure and temperature conditions. This work elucidates the complete acetone photophysical model in terms of each and every competing radiative and non-radiative rate. The acetone fluorescence model is then thoroughly examined and optimized based on disparity with recently conducted elevated pressure and temperature photophysical calibration experiments. The current work offers insight into the competition between non-radiative and vibrational energy decay rates at elevated temperature and pressure and proposes a global optimization of model parameters from the photophysical model developed by Thurber (Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence for Temperature and Multiparameter Imaging in Gaseous Flows. PhD thesis, Stanford University Mechanical Engineering Department, 1999). The collisional constants of proportionality, which govern vibrational relaxation, are shown to be temperature dependent at elevated pressures. A new oxygen quenching rate is proposed which takes into account collisions with oxygen as well as the oxygen-assisted intersystem crossing component. Additionally, global trends in ketone photophysics are presented and discussed.

  18. Pressure-temperature phase diagram of SeO2. Characterization of new phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orosel, D.; Leynaud, O.; Balog, P.; Jansen, M.

    2004-01-01

    We have investigated SeO 2 at high pressures and high temperatures. Two new phases (β-SeO 2 and γ-SeO 2 ) and the boundary separating them have been found, following experimental runs performed at pressures up to 15 GPa and temperatures up to 820 deg. C. The two phases crystallize in the orthorhombic system in space group Pmc2 1 (no. 26) with a=5.0722(1) A, b=4.4704(1) A, c=7.5309(2) A, V=170.760(9) A 3 and Z=4 for the β-phase, and with a=5.0710(2) A, b=4.4832(2) A, c=14.9672(6) A, V=340.27(3) A 3 and Z=8 for the γ-phase. Both phases are stable at ambient pressure and temperature below -30 deg. C. At ambient temperature the phases return to the starting phase (α-SeO 2 ) in a few days. We discuss our findings in relation to a previous report of in-situ measurements at high pressures and ambient temperature

  19. Effect of chemical composition on the electrical conductivity of gneiss at high temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lidong; Sun, Wenqing; Li, Heping; Hu, Haiying; Wu, Lei; Jiang, Jianjun

    2018-03-01

    The electrical conductivity of gneiss samples with different chemical compositions (WA = Na2O + K2O + CaO = 7.12, 7.27 and 7.64 % weight percent) was measured using a complex impedance spectroscopic technique at 623-1073 K and 1.5 GPa and a frequency range of 10-1 to 106 Hz. Simultaneously, a pressure effect on the electrical conductivity was also determined for the WA = 7.12 % gneiss. The results indicated that the gneiss conductivities markedly increase with total alkali and calcium ion content. The sample conductivity and temperature conform to an Arrhenius relationship within a certain temperature range. The influence of pressure on gneiss conductivity is weaker than temperature, although conductivity still increases with pressure. According to various ranges of activation enthalpy (0.35-0.52 and 0.76-0.87 eV) at 1.5 GPa, two main conduction mechanisms are suggested that dominate the electrical conductivity of gneiss: impurity conduction in the lower-temperature region and ionic conduction (charge carriers are K+, Na+ and Ca2+) in the higher-temperature region. The electrical conductivity of gneiss with various chemical compositions cannot be used to interpret the high conductivity anomalies in the Dabie-Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic belt. However, the conductivity-depth profiles for gneiss may provide an important constraint on the interpretation of field magnetotelluric conductivity results in the regional metamorphic belt.

  20. The Pressure-Temperature Regime of Iraq during the Period of 1948–2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.P. Perevedentsev

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We have considered spatiotemporal changes in the pressure-temperature regime at the territory of Iraq and Middle Eastern countries, which is limited by the following geographical coordinates: 27.5–37.5° N, 37.5–50.0° E. The initial data have been obtained from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis in the nodes of 2.5° × 2.5° grids, as well as from the indices of atmospheric circulation during the period of 1948–2013. Statistical processing of the material and construction of the linear trends and composites have allowed to reveal the dynamics of changes in the air temperature and pressure, its dependence on fluctuations in the atmospheric circulation. A tendency has been revealed towards a decrease in the temperature during the cold period and its increase during the warm period. Deviations (anomalies of the distribution of actual temperature and atmospheric pressure from the climatological norm have been estimated. Maps of temperature and pressure distribution in the regions have been created.

  1. Pressure-assisted low-temperature sintering for paper-based writing electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L Y; Yang, G Y; Jing, H Y; Wei, J; Han, Y D

    2013-09-06

    With the aim of preparing paper-based writing electronics, a kind of conductive pen was made with nano-silver ink as the conductive component and a rollerball pen as the writing implement. This was used to direct-write conductive patterns on Epson photo paper. In order to decrease the sintering temperature, pressure was introduced to enhance the driving forces for sintering. Compared with hot sintering without pressure, hot-pressure can effectively improve the conductivity of silver coatings, reduce the sintering time and thus improve productivity. Importantly, pressure can achieve a more uniform and denser microstructure, which increases the connection strength of the silver coating. At the optimum hot-pressure condition (sintering temperature 120 ° C/sintering pressure 25 MPa/sintering time 15 min), a typical measured resistivity value was 1.43 × 10⁻⁷ Ω m, nine greater than that of bulk silver. This heat treatment process is compatible with paper and does not cause any damage to the paper substrates. Even after several thousand bending cycles, the resistivity values of writing tracks by hot-pressure sintering stay almost the same (from 1.43 × 10⁻⁷ to 1.57 × 10⁻⁷ Ω m). The stability and flexibility of the writing circuits are good, which demonstrates the promising future of writing electronics.

  2. Pressure-assisted low-temperature sintering for paper-based writing electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L Y; Yang, G Y; Jing, H Y; Han, Y D; Wei, J

    2013-01-01

    With the aim of preparing paper-based writing electronics, a kind of conductive pen was made with nano-silver ink as the conductive component and a rollerball pen as the writing implement. This was used to direct-write conductive patterns on Epson photo paper. In order to decrease the sintering temperature, pressure was introduced to enhance the driving forces for sintering. Compared with hot sintering without pressure, hot-pressure can effectively improve the conductivity of silver coatings, reduce the sintering time and thus improve productivity. Importantly, pressure can achieve a more uniform and denser microstructure, which increases the connection strength of the silver coating. At the optimum hot-pressure condition (sintering temperature 120 ° C/sintering pressure 25 MPa/sintering time 15 min), a typical measured resistivity value was 1.43 × 10 −7 Ω m, nine greater than that of bulk silver. This heat treatment process is compatible with paper and does not cause any damage to the paper substrates. Even after several thousand bending cycles, the resistivity values of writing tracks by hot-pressure sintering stay almost the same (from 1.43 × 10 −7 to 1.57 × 10 −7 Ω m). The stability and flexibility of the writing circuits are good, which demonstrates the promising future of writing electronics. (paper)

  3. Investigation on the Permeability Evolution of Gypsum Interlayer Under High Temperature and Triaxial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meng; Yechao, You; Jie, Chen; Yaoqing, Hu

    2017-08-01

    The permeability of the surrounding rock is a critical parameter for the designing and assessment of radioactive waste disposal repositories in the rock salt. Generally, in the locations that are chosen for radioactive waste storage, the bedded rock salt is a sedimentary rock that contains NaCl and Na2SO4. Most likely, there are also layers of gypsum ( {CaSO}_{ 4} \\cdot 2 {H}_{ 2} {O)} present in the salt deposit. Radioactive wastes emit a large amount of heat and hydrogen during the process of disposal, which may result in thermal damage of the surrounding rocks and cause a great change in their permeability and tightness. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the permeability evolution of the gypsum interlayer under high temperature and high pressure in order to evaluate the tightness and security of the nuclear waste repositories in bedded rock salt. In this study, a self-designed rock triaxial testing system by which high temperature and pressure can be applied is used; the μCT225kVFCB micro-CT system is also employed to investigate the permeability and microstructure of gypsum specimens under a constant hydrostatic pressure of 25 MPa, an increasing temperature (ranging from 20 to 650 °C), and a variable inlet gas pressure (1, 2, 4, 6 MPa). The experimental results show: (a) the maximum permeability measured during the whole experiment is less than 10-17 m2, which indicates that the gypsum interlayer has low permeability under high temperature and pressure that meet the requirements for radioactive waste repository. (b) Under the same temperature, the permeability of the gypsum specimen decreases at the beginning and then increases as the pore pressure elevates. When the inlet gas pressure is between 0 and 2 MPa, the Klinkenberg effect is very pronounced. Then, as the pore pressure increases, the movement behavior of gas molecules gradually changes from free motion to forced directional motion. So the role of free movement of gas molecules gradually

  4. Effect of flow rate and temperature on transmembrane blood pressure drop in an extracorporeal artificial lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, M; Costa, E L V; Maciel, A T; Barbosa, E V S; Hirota, A S; Schettino, G de P; Azevedo, L C P

    2014-11-01

    Transmembrane pressure drop reflects the resistance of an artificial lung system to blood transit. Decreased resistance (low transmembrane pressure drop) enhances blood flow through the oxygenator, thereby, enhancing gas exchange efficiency. This study is part of a previous one where we observed the behaviour and the modulation of blood pressure drop during the passage of blood through artificial lung membranes. Before and after the induction of multi-organ dysfunction, the animals were instrumented and analysed for venous-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, using a pre-defined sequence of blood flows. Blood flow and revolutions per minute (RPM) of the centrifugal pump varied in a linear fashion. At a blood flow of 5.5 L/min, pre- and post-pump blood pressures reached -120 and 450 mmHg, respectively. Transmembrane pressures showed a significant spread, particularly at blood flows above 2 L/min; over the entire range of blood flow rates, there was a positive association of pressure drop with blood flow (0.005 mmHg/mL/minute of blood flow) and a negative association of pressure drop with temperature (-4.828 mmHg/(°Celsius). These associations were similar when blood flows of below and above 2000 mL/minute were examined. During its passage through the extracorporeal system, blood is exposed to pressure variations from -120 to 450 mmHg. At high blood flows (above 2 L/min), the drop in transmembrane pressure becomes unpredictable and highly variable. Over the entire range of blood flows investigated (0-5500 mL/min), the drop in transmembrane pressure was positively associated with blood flow and negatively associated with body temperature. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vose, R.S. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center); Schmoyer, R.L. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R. (National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States)); Eischeid, J.K. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences)

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the best'' data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  6. The Global Historical Climatology Network: Long-term monthly temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vose, R.S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Schmoyer, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Steurer, P.M.; Peterson, T.C.; Heim, R.; Karl, T.R. [National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, NC (United States); Eischeid, J.K. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences

    1992-07-01

    Interest in global climate change has risen dramatically during the last several years. In a similar fashion, the number of data sets available to study global change has also increased. Unfortunately, these data sets have been compiled by many different organizations/researchers, making it confusing and time consuming for individual researchers to acquire the ``best`` data. In response to this rapid growth in the number of global data sets, the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) commenced the Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN) project. The purpose of this project is to compile an improved global base-line data set of long-term monthly mean temperature, precipitation, sea level pressure, and station pressure for a dense network. of worldwide meteorological stations. Specifically, the GHCN project seeks to consolidate the numerous preexisting national-, regional-, and global-scale data sets into a single global climate data base that can be updated, enhanced, and distributed at regular intervals. The first version of the GHCN data base was completed during the summer of 1992. It contains 6039 temperature, 7533 precipitation, 1883 sea level pressure, and 1873 station pressure stations. All stations have at least 10 years of data, 40% have more than 50 years of data, and 10% have more than 100 years of data. Spatial coverage is good over most of the globe, particularly for the United States and central Europe. In comparison to other major global data sets, dramatic improvements are evident over South America, Africa, and Asia. The GHCN data base is available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP) from CDIAC. The NDP consists of this document and two magnetic tapes that contain machine-readable data files and accompanying retrieval codes. This document describes, in detail, both the GHCN data base and the contents of the magnetic tap

  7. ANSYS-based birefringence property analysis of side-hole fiber induced by pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinbang; Gong, Zhenfeng

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the influences of pressure and temperature on the birefringence property of side-hole fibers with different shapes of holes using the finite element analysis method. A physical mechanism of the birefringence of the side-hole fiber is discussed with the presence of different external pressures and temperatures. The strain field distribution and birefringence values of circular-core, rectangular-core, and triangular-core side-hole fibers are presented. Our analysis shows the triangular-core side-hole fiber has low temperature sensitivity which weakens the cross sensitivity of temperature and strain. Additionally, an optimized structure design of the side-hole fiber is presented which can be used for the sensing application.

  8. ANSYS-based birefringence property analysis of side-hole fiber induced by pressure and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinbang; Gong, Zhenfeng

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we theoretically investigate the influences of pressure and temperature on the birefringence property of side-hole fibers with different shapes of holes using the finite element analysis method. A physical mechanism of the birefringence of the side-hole fiber is discussed with the presence of different external pressures and temperatures. The strain field distribution and birefringence values of circular-core, rectangular-core, and triangular-core side-hole fibers are presented. Our analysis shows the triangular-core side-hole fiber has low temperature sensitivity which weakens the cross sensitivity of temperature and strain. Additionally, an optimized structure design of the side-hole fiber is presented which can be used for the sensing application.

  9. Analysis of fatigue reliability for high temperature and high pressure multi-stage decompression control valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Long; Xu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Lifang; Xu, Xiaogang

    2018-03-01

    Based on stress-strength interference theory to establish the reliability mathematical model for high temperature and high pressure multi-stage decompression control valve (HMDCV), and introduced to the temperature correction coefficient for revising material fatigue limit at high temperature. Reliability of key dangerous components and fatigue sensitivity curve of each component are calculated and analyzed by the means, which are analyzed the fatigue life of control valve and combined with reliability theory of control valve model. The impact proportion of each component on the control valve system fatigue failure was obtained. The results is shown that temperature correction factor makes the theoretical calculations of reliability more accurate, prediction life expectancy of main pressure parts accords with the technical requirements, and valve body and the sleeve have obvious influence on control system reliability, the stress concentration in key part of control valve can be reduced in the design process by improving structure.

  10. Disproportionation reaction of LaH2 at high pressure and low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, A.; Watanuki, T.; Kawana, D.; Aoki, K.

    2014-05-01

    Structural change of LaH2 has been investigated at high pressure and low temperature by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction. LaH2 has an fcc metal lattice with interstitial hydrogen atoms located at tetrahedral sites. The fcc-LaH2 decomposes into two phases, which have different hydrogen compositions such as hydrogen-poor LaH and hydrogen -rich LaH2+δ phases, at 11 GPa at room temperature. In spite of largely suppressed diffusivity of the interstitial hydrogen atoms at low temperature, we have found the disproportionation reaction around 14 GPa at 200 K. Difference in the molar volume between each phases suggests monohydride LaH is formed as the disproportionation product even at low temperature. The volume fraction of the hydrogen-poor phase relative to the hydrogen-rich one at 200 K rapidly rises against pressure and reaches to ~0.45 at ~17 GPa.

  11. Investigations for determining temperature, pressure and moisture distributions in concrete at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, A.; Kamp, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    The paper gives a report on the test program. The main objective of the tests was the determination of the temperature and moisture fields decisive for the corrosion conditions, which are built up behind the liner in the range of the heated concrete. The determination of transport characteristics of the concrete are another objective. Small concrete specimens are used to determine the following data: Thermal conductivity, heat capacity, diffusion coefficient for liquid water, steam and air, steam sorption therms. The chemical shrinkage of the concrete as a function of moisture and temperature is being evaluated by means of tests and calculations. (orig./HP)

  12. On axial temperature gradients due to large pressure drops in dense fluid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate, Sam O; Berger, Terry A

    2015-03-13

    The effect of energy degradation (Degradation is the creation of net entropy resulting from irreversibility.) accompanying pressure drops across chromatographic columns is examined with regard to explaining axial temperature gradients in both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The observed effects of warming and cooling can be explained equally well in the language of thermodynamics or fluid dynamics. The necessary equivalence of these treatments is reviewed here to show the legitimacy of using whichever one supports the simpler determination of features of interest. The determination of temperature profiles in columns by direct application of the laws of thermodynamics is somewhat simpler than applying them indirectly by solving the Navier-Stokes (NS) equations. Both disciplines show that the preferred strategy for minimizing the reduction in peak quality caused by temperature gradients is to operate columns as nearly adiabatically as possible (i.e. as Joule-Thomson expansions). This useful fact, however, is not widely familiar or appreciated in the chromatography community due to some misunderstanding of the meaning of certain terms and expressions used in these disciplines. In fluid dynamics, the terms "resistive heating" or "frictional heating" have been widely used as synonyms for the dissipation function, Φ, in the NS energy equation. These terms have been widely used by chromatographers as well, but often misinterpreted as due to friction between the mobile phase and the column packing, when in fact Φ describes the increase in entropy of the system (dissipation, ∫TdSuniv>0) due to the irreversible decompression of the mobile phase. Two distinctly different contributions to the irreversibility are identified; (1) ΔSext, viscous dissipation of work done by the external surroundings driving the flow (the pump) contributing to its warming, and (2) ΔSint, entropy change accompanying decompression of

  13. Pressure and temperature fields and water released by concrete submitted to high heat fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade Lima, F.R. de

    1982-01-01

    Inovations are introduced in the original program USINT considering thermal conductivity variations with the temperature. A subroutine - PLOTTI - is incorporate to the program aiming to obtain a graphic for results. The new program - USINTG - is used for calculating the field of pressure and temperature and the water released from the concrete structure during a simulation of sodium leak. The theoretical results obtained with USINTG are in good agreement with the experimental results previously obtained. (E.G.) [pt

  14. Effect of the operating temperature on hydrodynamics and membrane parameters in pressure retarded osmosis

    OpenAIRE

    Toauti, Khaled; Tadeo, Fernando; Hanel, C.; Schiestel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Producción Científica The osmotic energy recovered by pressure-retarded osmosis from flows of different salinities is affected by the temperature, so its effect on hydrodynamic and membrane parameters is studied here. It is shown by models and experimental results that raising the temperature of the solutions leads to a variation in the mass transfer coefficient, the boundary layer, the diffusion coefficient, the solute resistivity, and the permeability, therefore, affecting the water flux...

  15. 46 CFR 154.1836 - Vapor venting as a means of cargo tank pressure and temperature control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... cargo pressure and temperature control system under §§ 154.701 through 154.709 is operating and that venting of cargo is unnecessary to maintain cargo temperature and pressure control, except under emergency... temperature control. 154.1836 Section 154.1836 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  16. The effect of temperature and pressure on the crystal structure of piperidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Laura E; Ibberson, Richard M; Marshall, William G; Parsons, Simon

    2015-01-01

    The response of molecular crystal structures to changes in externally applied conditions such as temperature and pressure are the result of a complex balance between strong intramolecular bonding, medium strength intermolecular interactions such as hydrogen bonds, and weaker intermolecular van der Waals contacts. At high pressure the additional thermodynamic requirement to fill space efficiently becomes increasingly important. The crystal structure of piperidine-d11 has been determined at 2 K and at room temperature at pressures between 0.22 and 1.09 GPa. Unit cell dimensions have been determined between 2 and 255 K, and at pressures up to 2.77 GPa at room temperature. All measurements were made using neutron powder diffraction. The crystal structure features chains of molecules formed by NH…N H-bonds with van der Waals interactions between the chains. Although the H-bonds are the strongest intermolecular contacts, the majority of the sublimation enthalpy may be ascribed to weaker but more numerous van der Waals interactions. Analysis of the thermal expansion data in the light of phonon frequencies determined in periodic DFT calculations indicates that the expansion at very low temperature is governed by external lattice modes, but above 100 K the influence of intramolecular ring-flexing modes also becomes significant. The principal directions of thermal expansion are determined by the sensitivity of different van der Waals interactions to changes in distance. The principal values of the strain developed on application of pressure are similarly oriented to those determined in the variable-temperature study, but more isotropic because of the need to minimise volume by filling interstitial voids at elevated pressure. Graphical AbstractThough H-bonds are important interactions in the crystal structure of piperidine, the response to externally-applied conditions are determined by van der Waals interactions.

  17. Influence of reactions heats on variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts within a single acoustic cavitation bubble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerboua, Kaouther; Hamdaoui, Oualid

    2018-03-01

    The scientific interest toward the study of acoustic bubble is mainly explained by its practical benefit in providing a reactional media favorable to the rapid evolution of chemical mechanism. The evolution of this mechanism is related to the simultaneous and dependent variation of the volume, temperature and pressure within the bubble, retrieved by the resolution of a differential equations system, including among others the thermal balance. This last one is subject to different assumptions, some authors deem simply that the temperature varies adiabatically during the collapsing phase, without considering the reactions heat of the studied mechanism. This paper aims to evaluate the pertinence of neglecting reactions heats in the thermal balance, by analyzing their effect on the variation of radius, temperature, pressure and chemical species amounts. The results show that the introduction of reactions heats conducts to a decrease of the temperature, an increase of the pressure and a reduction of the bubble volume. As a consequence, this leads to a drop of the quantities of free radicals produced by the chemical mechanism evolving within the bubble. This paper also proved that the impact of the consideration of reactions heats is dependent of the frequency and the acoustic amplitude of the ultrasonic wave. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Hindered diffusion of asphaltenes at elevated temperature and pressure. Semiannual report, March 20 - September 20, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guin, J.A.; Geelen, R.; Gregory, C.; Yang, X.

    1996-11-01

    The objectives are to: investigate the hindered diffusion of coal and petroleum asphaltenes in the pores of catalyst particles at elevated temperature and pressures; and examine the effects of concentration, temperature, solvent type, and pressure on the intraparticle diffusivity of asphaltenes. Progress was made in several areas during this time period. The high temperature/high pressure autoclave has been received from Parr Instrument Company and is in the process of being set up and checked out. During this time period we mainly worked in two areas. In the first area, we performed some measurements on the adsorption isotherms of the model compound quinoline in cyclohexane onto a Criterion 324 catalyst at three temperatures. We are looking at the effect of temperature on the adsorption isotherms of several model compounds. This area is important since the adsorptive uptake of asphaltenes is being studied and the model compound systems lend insight as to how we may expect the more complex asphaltene systems to behave during adsorption on the surface of the porous particles. We found that even for the simple model compound quinoline, the adsorption behavior vs. temperature was quite 0563 complex. The second area explored during this time period was the application of a mathematical model to adsorptive uptake data for asphaltenes on Criterion 324 catalyst particles. This adsorptive uptake data was obtained during the previous time period and was analyzed by mathematical modeling during the current time period. The detailed findings in both of these areas are presented in this report.

  19. Analysis of atmospheric pressure and temperature effects on cosmic ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    de MendonçA, R. R. S.; Raulin, J.-P.; Echer, E.; Makhmutov, V. S.; Fernandez, G.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we analyze atmospheric pressure and temperature effects on the records of the cosmic ray detector CARPET. This detector has monitored secondary cosmic ray intensity since 2006 at Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (San Juan, Argentina, 31°S, 69°W, 2550 m over sea level) where the geomagnetic rigidity cutoff, Rc, is ~9.8 GV. From the correlation between atmospheric pressure deviations and relative cosmic ray variations, we obtain a barometric coefficient of -0.44 ± 0.01 %/hPa. Once the data are corrected for atmospheric pressure, they are used to analyze temperature effects using four methods. Three methods are based on the surface temperature and the temperature at the altitude of maximum production of secondary cosmic rays. The fourth method, the integral method, takes into account the temperature height profile between 14 and 111 km above Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito. The results obtained from these four methods are compared on different time scales from seasonal time variations to scales related to the solar activity cycle. Our conclusion is that the integral method leads to better results to remove the temperature effect of the cosmic ray intensity observed at ground level.

  20. Thermal properties of Permian Basin evaporites to 493 K temperature and 30 MPa confining pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Heard, H.C.; Boro, C.O.; Keller, K.T.; Ralph, W.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1987-03-01

    Laboratory measurements of the thermal conductivity and diffusivity of four rock salts, two anhydrites, and two dolomites bordering Cycle 4 and Cycle 5 bedded salt formations in the Permian Basin in Deaf Smith County, Texas, were made in conditions ranging from 303 to 473 K in temperature and 0.1 to 31.0 MPa in hydrostatic confining pressure. Within the +-5% measurement resolution neither conductivity nor diffusivity showed a dependence upon pressure in any of the rocks. Conductivity and diffusivity in all rocks had a negative temperature dependence. For the Cycle 4 salt samples, conductivity fell from 5.5 to 3.75 W/m . K, and diffusivity fell from about 2.7 to 1.7 x 10 -6 m 2 /s. One Cycle 5 salt was a single crystal with anomalous results, but the other had a low conductivity with very weak temperature dependence and a high diffusivity. In the nonsalts, conductivity and diffusivity decreased 10 to 20% over the temperature range explored. In measurements of the coefficient of thermal linear expansion for Cycle 5 salt and nonsalts, the coefficient typically varied from about 12 x 10 -6 K -1 at P = 3.0 MPa to 4 x 10 -6 K -1 at P = 30 MPa for both nonsalt rocks. In anhydrite, it decreased with increasing temperature. In dolomite, the coefficient increased at roughly the same rate. Expansion of the salt ranged from 33 to 38 x 10 -6 K -1 and was independent of pressure and temperature

  1. Removal of dust from flue gas at elevated temperatures and pressures. Roeggasrensning for stoev ved hoej temperatur og hoejt tryk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, D.V.; Rasmussen, J.

    1989-06-15

    Several new coal-based power generation systems are now ready for commercial application. Especially Integrated coal Gasification with combined Cycle (IGCC) and pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion possess the potential for reducing emissions of SOx, NOx and particulates compared to conventional technology. In addition to this a decrease in heat-rate is possible. However, the decrease in heat-rate is dependant on the temperature of which the removal of particulated and gaseous pollutants takes place. Using state-of-the-art technology this temperature is 25-40 deg. C, but the efficiency improvement will only be substantial if the temperature can be raised to 400-500 deg. C or more. The coal gasification, which is the heart of an IGCC-system, can be caried out in a number of ways. Since the hot gas clean-up equipment (HGCU) to some extent is dependant on the gasification technology used, a description of the leading coal gasification systems is given. It is concluded that special interest should be given to gasifiers of the entrained flow type. The aim is to develope a HGCU-system for the removal of gaseous pollutants as well as particulate matter. The operating principles and stage of development of the competing technologies for dust removal at high temperature and pressure are described. Special attention is paid to the electrostatic precipitator, and possible solutions to problems related ot this technology are given. (AB) 165 refs.

  2. Temperature and high pressure effects on the structural features of catalytic nanocomposites oxides by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Antonio N; Pinto, Raffael C F; Freire, Paulo T C; Junior, Jose Alves L; Oliveira, Alcineia C; Filho, Josué M

    2015-03-05

    Structural characterizations of nanostructured oxides were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman and infrared spectroscopy. The oxides catalysts namely, SnO2, ZrO2, CeO2, MnOx, Al2O3 and TiO2 were prepared by a nanocasting route and the effect of the temperature and pressure on the stability of the solids was evaluated. Raman spectra showed that ZrO2 and TiO2 exhibited phase transitions at moderate temperatures whereas CeO2, SnO2 and MnOx had an effective creation of defects in their structures upon annealing at elevated temperatures. The results suggested also that the effect of the temperature on the particles growth is related to the type of oxide. In this regard, phase transition by up to 600°C accelerated the sintering of ZrO2 and CeO2 grains compared to TiO2, SnO2 and MnOx counterparts. Under hydrostatic pressures lower than 10GPa, rutile TiO2 and tetragonal ZrO2 exhibited pressure induced phase transition whereas CeO2 and SnO2 were stable at pressures close to 15GPa. The experiments revealed that the nanostructured SnO2 oxide exhibited stable performance at relatively high temperatures without phase transition or sintering, being suitable to be used as catalysts in the range of temperature and pressure studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Predicting fluorescence quantum yield for anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Bonnety, J.; Legros, G.; Guibert, P.

    2017-07-01

    Aromatic molecules are promising candidates for using as a fluorescent tracer for gas-phase scalar parameter diagnostics in a drastic environment like engines. Along with anisole turning out an excellent temperature tracer by Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostics in Rapid Compression Machine (RCM), its fluorescence signal evolution versus pressure and temperature variation in a high-pressure and high-temperature cell have been reported in our recent paper on Applied Phys. B by Tran et al. Parallel to this experimental study, a photophysical model to determine anisole Fluorescence Quantum Yield (FQY) is delivered in this paper. The key to development of the model is the identification of pressure, temperature, and ambient gases, where the FQY is dominated by certain processes of the model (quenching effect, vibrational relaxation, etc.). In addition to optimization of the vibrational relaxation energy cascade coefficient and the collision probability with oxygen, the non-radiative pathways are mainly discussed. The common non-radiative rate (intersystem crossing and internal conversion) is simulated in parametric form as a function of excess vibrational energy, derived from the data acquired at different pressures and temperatures from the literature. A new non-radiative rate, namely, the equivalent Intramolecular Vibrational Redistribution or Randomization (IVR) rate, is proposed to characterize anisole deactivated processes. The new model exhibits satisfactory results which are validated against experimental measurements of fluorescence signal induced at a wavelength of 266 nm in a cell with different bath gases (N2, CO2, Ar and O2), a pressure range from 0.2 to 4 MPa, and a temperature range from 473 to 873 K.

  4. Structure and dynamics of superionic conductors at high temperatures and high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, N.

    1999-01-01

    Superionic conductors are materials with high ionic conductivities in the solid state approaching the typical value of that found in a molten ionic solid. The copper and silver monohalides have aroused much interest, because a number of these simple compounds display superionic behaviour at room pressure and high temperatures. Many studies of these compounds have been undertaken using varied techniques from simple alternating current conductivity measurements and differential thermal analysis studies, investigating their dynamical properties, through to X-ray and neutron diffraction, investigating their structural nature. High pressure measurements have indicated that these compounds have complicated pressure-temperature phase diagrams, although relatively few studies have been undertaken using the aforementioned techniques at high pressure. AgI at 1.1 GPa has the rocksalt structure. As the temperature is increased, our neutron diffraction measurements have observed a lattice parameter anomaly, a peak in the linear expansivity and a rise in interstitial occupancy of 8(c) sites at (1/4, 1/4, 1/4) which all occur at the same temperature. These measurements indicate that rocksalt AgI passes through a gradual transition into a superionic state, similar to the behaviour of Type II superionic conductors such as β-PbF 2 . CuI at pressures below 1.7 GPa exists in a zincblende structure that has a face centred cubic unit cell. At 1.30(8) GPa and increased temperature, our neutron diffraction measurements indicate that high pressure CuI adopts several highly disordered structures. Evidence is reported of a disordered rhombohedral structure and of the first measurements of a body centred cubic structured phase isostructural to α-AgI, with lattice parameter of 4.7983(4) A at 966 (6) K and 1.30(8) GPa. At high temperatures (> 473 K) Ag 3 SI exists as a disordered α-phase similar to α-AgI, with the anions distributed at random amongst the body centred cubic sites. On gradual

  5. Pressure and temperature analyses using GOTHIC for Mark I containment of the Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yen-Shu; Yuann, Yng-Ruey; Dai, Liang-Che; Lin, Yon-Pon

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The Chinshan Mark I containment pressure-temperature responses are analyzed. → GOTHIC is used to calculate the containment responses under three pipe break events. → This study is used to support the Chinshan Stretch Power Uprate (SPU) program. → The calculated peak pressure and temperature are still below the design values. → The Chinshan containment integrity can be maintained under SPU condition. - Abstract: Chinshan Nuclear Power Plant in Taiwan is a GE-designed twin-unit BWR/4 plant with original licensed thermal power (OLTP) of 1775 MWt for each unit. Recently, the Stretch Power Uprate (SPU) program for the Chinshan plant is being conducted to uprate the core thermal power to 1858 MWt (104.66% OLTP). In this study, the Chinshan Mark I containment pressure/temperature responses during LOCA at 105% OLTP (104.66% OLTP + 0.34% OLTP power uncertainty = 105% OLTP) are analyzed using the containment thermal-hydraulic program GOTHIC. Three kinds of LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) scenarios are investigated: Recirculation Line Break (RCLB), Main Steam Line Break (MSLB), and Feedwater Line Break (FWLB). In the short-term analyses, blowdown data generated by RELAP5 transient analyses are provided as boundary conditions to the GOTHIC containment model. The calculated peak drywell pressure and temperature in the RCLB event are 217.2 kPaG and 137.1 o C, respectively, which are close to the original FSAR results (219.2 kPaG and 138.4 o C). Additionally, the peak drywell temperature of 155.3 o C calculated by MSLB is presented in this study. To obtain the peak suppression pool temperature, a long-term RCLB analysis is performed using a simplified RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) volume to calculate blowdown flow rate. One RHR (Residual Heat Removal) heat exchanger is assumed to be inoperable for suppression pool cooling mode. The calculated peak suppression pool temperature is 93.2 o C, which is below the pool temperature used for evaluating the

  6. Stability of cubic zirconia in a granitic system under high pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibb, F. G. F.; Burakov, B. E.; Taylor, K. J.; Domracheva, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Cubic zirconia is a well known, highly durable material with potential uses as an actinide host phase in ceramic waste forms and inert matrix fuels and in containers for very deep borehole disposal of some highly radioactive wastes. To investigate the behaviour of this material under the conditions of possible use, a cube of ∼2.5 mm edge was made from a single crystal of Yttria stabilized cubic zirconia doped with 0.3 wt.% CeO 2 . The cube was enclosed in powdered granite within a gold capsule and a small amount of H 2 O added before sealing. The sealed capsule was held for 4 months in a cold-seal pressure vessel at a temperature of 780 deg. C and a pressure 150 MPa, simulating both the conditions of a deep borehole disposal involving partial melting of the host rock and the conditions under which the actinide waste form might be encapsulated in granite prior to disposal. At the end of the experiment the quenched, largely glassy, sample was cut into thin slices and studied by optical microscopy, EMPA, SEM and cathodoluminescence methods. The results show that no corrosion of the zirconia crystal or reaction with the granite melt occurred and that no detectable diffusion of elements, including Ce, in or out of the zirconia took place on the timescale of the experiment. Consequently, it appears that cubic zirconia could perform most satisfactorily as both an actinide host waste form for encapsulation in solid granite for very deep disposal and as a container material for deep borehole disposal of highly radioactive wastes (HLW), including spent fuel. (authors)

  7. The upper explosion limit of lower alkanes and alkenes in air at elevated pressures and temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Schoor, F; Verplaetsen, F

    2006-01-16

    The upper explosion limit (UEL) of ethane-air, propane-air, n-butane-air, ethylene-air and propylene-air mixtures is determined experimentally at initial pressures up to 30 bar and temperatures up to 250 degrees C. The experiments are performed in a closed spherical vessel with an internal diameter of 200 mm. The mixtures are ignited by fusing a coiled tungsten wire, placed at the centre of the vessel, by electric current. Flame propagation is said to have taken place if there is a pressure rise of at least 1% of the initial pressure after ignition of the mixture. In the pressure-temperature range investigated, a linear dependence of UEL on temperature and a bilinear dependence on pressure are found except in the vicinity of the auto-ignition range. A comparison of the UEL data of the lower alkanes shows that the UEL expressed as equivalence ratio (the actual fuel/air ratio divided by the stoichiometric fuel/air ratio) increases with increasing carbon number in the homologous series of alkanes.

  8. Study of CT Scan Flooding System at High Temperature and Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X. Y.

    2017-12-01

    CT scan flooding experiment can scan micro-pore in different flooding stages by the use of CT scan technology, without changing the external morphology and internal structure of the core, and observe the distribution characterization in pore medium of different flooding fluid under different pressure.thus,it can rebuilt the distribution images of oil-water distribution in different flooding stages. However,under extreme high pressure and temperature conditions,the CT scan system can not meet the requirements. Container of low density materials or thin shell can not resist high pressure,while high density materials or thick shell will cause attenuation and scattering of X-ray. The experiment uses a simple Ct scanning systems.X ray from a point light source passing trough a micro beryllium shell on High pressure stainless steal container,continuously irradiates the core holder that can continuously 360° rotate along the core axis. A rare earth intensifying screen behind the core holder emitting light when irradiated with X ray can show the core X ray section image. An optical camera record the core X ray images through a transparency high pressure glazing that placed on the High pressure stainless steal container.Thus,multiple core X ray section images can reconstruct the 3D core reconstruction after a series of data processing.The experiment shows that both the micro beryllium shell and rare earth intensifying screen can work in high temperature and high pressure environment in the stainless steal container. This way that X-ray passes through a thin layer of micro beryllium shell , not high pressure stainless steal shell,avoid the attenuation and scattering of X-ray from the container shell,while improving the high-pressure experiment requirements.

  9. System overview and characterization of a high-temperature, high-pressure, entrained-flow, laboratory-scale gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Madison A.; Jakulewicz, Micah S.; Dreyer, Christopher B.; Parker, Terence E.; Porter, Jason M.

    2015-05-01

    The high-temperature, high-pressure, entrained-flow, laboratory-scale gasifier at the Colorado School of Mines, including the primary systems and the supporting subsystems, is presented. The gasifier is capable of operating at temperatures and pressures up to 1650 °C and 40 bar. The heated section of the reactor column has an inner diameter of 50 mm and is 1 m long. Solid organic feedstock (e.g., coal, biomass, and solid waste) is ground into batches with particle sizes ranging from 25 to 90 μm and is delivered to the reactor at feed rates of 2-20 g/min. The maximum useful power output of the syngas is 10 kW, with a nominal power output of 1.2 kW. The initial characterization and demonstration results of the gasifier system with a coal feedstock are also reported.

  10. Development and testing of a new apparatus for the measurement of high-pressure low-temperature phase equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, José M.S.; von Solms, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    A new apparatus for the study of high-pressure phase equilibria at low temperatures using an analytical method was designed, assembled and tested. The apparatus was specially developed for the study of multi-phase equilibria in systems containing hydrocarbons, water and hydrate inhibitors......, at temperatures ranging from 213K to 353K and pressures up to 40MPa. The core of the apparatus is a variable-volume equilibrium cell, equipped with a 360° sapphire window and connected to an analytical system by three capillary samplers.The quality of the apparatus was confirmed through several tests, including...... the study of the system methane+water. An equilibrium point for the quaternary system methane+n-hexane+methanol+water is also presented....

  11. Simultaneous Effect of Plunger Motion Profile, Pressure, and Temperature on the Quality of High-Pressure Die-Cast Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorese, Elena; Bonollo, Franco

    2016-12-01

    High-pressure die casting has been used widely to manufacture a large variety of products with high dimensional accuracy and productivity. Although this process has a considerably lower cycle time than the other metal forming processes, it is not yet optimized, due to the complexity of the process and the number of parameters to be controlled. Hence, the identification of the parameters affecting quality of castings is the current challenge toward efficient and effective production. In their previous work, the authors proposed and validated some novel kinematic parameters of the plunger, which explain and forecast both the static mechanical properties and the internal quality of castings. The present work extends such an approach by including two other meaningful parameters, which describe the effect of upset pressure and temperature on the final outcome. These parameters are here formulated and have been validated by means of a statistically significant sample manufactured with different plunger motion profiles, upset pressures, and temperatures of the melt and die. The quality of the castings was assessed through static mechanical properties and density measurements. As further proof, internal defects were analyzed on the fracture surfaces of some meaningful castings.

  12. A system for regulating the pressure of resuperheated steam in high temperature gas-cooled reactor power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braytenbah, A.S.; Jaegines, K.O.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to a system for regulating steam-pressure in the re-superheating portion of a steam-boiler receiving heat from a gas-cooled high temperature nuclear reactor, provided with gas distributing pumps driven by steam-turbines. The system comprises means for generating a pressure signal of desired magnitude for the re-superheating portion, and means for providing a real pressure in the re-superheating portion, means (including a by-passing device) for generating steam-flow rate signal of desired magnitude, a turbine by-pass device comprising a by-pass tapping means for regulating the steam-flow-rate in said turbine according to the desired steam-flow rate signal and means for controlling said by-pass tapping means according to said desired steam-flow-rate signal [fr

  13. FRAP-T, Temperature and Pressure in Oxide Fuel During LWR LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L.J.; Shah, V.N.; Berna, G.A.; Hohorst, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: FRAP-T6 is the most recent in the FRAP-T (Fuel Rod Analysis Program - Transient) series of programs for calculating the transient behavior of light water reactor fuel rods during reactor transients and hypothetical accidents, such as loss-of-coolant and reactivity-initiated accidents. The program calculates the temperature and deformation histories of fuel rods as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. FRAP-T6 can be used as a 'stand-alone' code or, using steady state fuel rod conditions supplied by FRAPCON2 (NESC NO. 694), can perform a transient analysis. In either case, the phenomena modeled by FRAP-T6 include: heat conduction, heat transfer from cladding to coolant, elastic- plastic fuel and cladding deformation, cladding oxidation, fission gas release, fuel rod gas pressure, and pellet cladding mechanical interaction. Licensing audit models have been added, also. The program includes a user's option that automatically provides a detailed uncertainty analysis of the calculated fuel rod variables due to uncertainties in fuel rod fabrication, material properties, power and cooling. 2 - Method of solution: The models in FRAP-T6 use finite difference techniques to calculate the variables which influence fuel rod performance. The variables are calculated at user-specified slices of the fuel rod. Each slice is at a different elevation and is defined to be an axial node. At each axial node, the variables are calculated at user-specified locations. Each location is at a different radius and is defined to be a radial node. The variables at any given axial node are assumed to be independent of the variables at all other axial nodes. The solution for the fuel rod variables begins with the calculation of the fuel and cladding temperatures. Then, the temperature of the gases in the plenum of the fuel rod is calculated. Next, the stresses and strains in the fuel and cladding and the pressure of the

  14. Hydrogen termination of CVD diamond films by high-temperature annealing at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, V.; Ullien, D.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Sachdeva, S.; Murthy, D.H.K.; Savenije, T.J.; Ahmad, H.A.; Nunney, T.S.; Janssens, S.D.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, M.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; De Smet, L.C.P.M.

    2013-01-01

    A high-temperature procedure to hydrogenate diamond films using molecular hydrogen at atmospheric pressure was explored. Undoped and doped chemical vapour deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films were treated according to our annealing method using a H2 gas flow down to ?50 ml/min (STP) at

  15. Alkaline electrolysis cell at high temperature and pressure of 250 °C and 42 bar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allebrod, Frank; Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    A new type of alkaline electrolysis cells with nickel foam based gas diffusion electrodes and KOH (aq) immobilized in mesoporous SrTiO3 has been developed and tested at temperatures and pressures up to 250 °C and 42 bar, respectively. Current densities of 1.0 A cm−2 have been measured at a cell...

  16. Low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma sources for plasma medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    In this review paper, fundamental overviews of low-temperature atmospheric-pressure plasma generation are provided and various sources for plasma medicine are described in terms of operating conditions and plasma properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Studies on a thermal insulation layer in the high pressure, high temperature gas, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Hiroaki

    1978-03-01

    Basic equations of heat transfer in a thermal insulation layers are presented in the high pressure, high temperature gas atmosphere. Natural convective heat transfer in the packed beds is then studied. Further described are experiments plans and principal particulars of experimental apparatus based on the above discussions. (auth.)

  18. Temperature- and pressure-dependent lattice behaviour of RbFe(MoO4)(2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waskowska, A.; Gerward, Leif; Olsen, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Trigonal RbFe(MoO4)(2) is a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet on a triangular lattice below T-N = 3.8 K, The crystal exhibits also a structural phase transition at T-c = 190 K related to symmetry change from Pm1 to P. We present the temperature-and pressure-dependent characteristics...

  19. Homogenization Pressure and Temperature Affect Protein Partitioning and Oxidative Stability of Emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Anna Frisenfeldt; Barouh, Nathalie; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative stability of 10 % fish oil-in-water emulsions was investigated for emulsions prepared under different homogenization conditions. Homogenization was conducted at two different pressures (5 or 22.5 MPa), and at two different temperatures (22 and 72 °C). Milk proteins were used as the ...

  20. Probing the local, electronic and magnetic structure of matter under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torchio, R.; Boccato, S.; Cerantola, V.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present recent achievements in the field of investigation of the local, electronic and magnetic structure of the matter under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. These results were obtained thanks to the coupling of a compact laser heating system to the energy-dispersive...

  1. Temperature and stress distribution in pressure vessel by the boundary element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alujevic, A.; Apostolovic, D.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the applicability of boundary element method for the solution of temperatures and thermal stresses in the body of reactor pressure vessel of the NPP Krsko . In addition to the theory of boundary elements for thermo-elastic continua (2D, 3D) results are given of a numerically evaluated meridional cross-section. (author)

  2. Sterilization by high hydrostatic pressure : increasing efficiency and product quality by improved temperature control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heij, de W.B.C.; Schepdael, van L.J.M.M.; Moezelaar, R.; Berg, van den R.W.

    2003-01-01

    A product being pressurized will heat up due to compressive heating. Due to heat transfer, products close to the vessel wall will cool down, a process which may result in a non-homogeneous product temperature profile in radial direction. If the proper technological features are implemented these

  3. Effects of elevated CO2 partial pressure and temperature on the coccolithophore Syracosphaera pulchra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiorini, S.; Middelburg, J.J.; Gattuso, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of elevated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) and temperature on the cocco - lithophore Syracosphaera pulchra were investigated in isolation and in combination. Both the diploid and the haploid life stages were studied. Batch cultures were grown under 4 conditions: 400 μatm and 19°C; 400

  4. Pressure dependence of Curie temperature and resisitvity in complex Heusler alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bose, S. K.; Kudrnovský, Josef; Drchal, Václav; Turek, I.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 17 (2011), 174422/1-174422/8 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/09/0775 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Curie temperature * resistivity * Heusler alloys * hydrostatic pressure * first-principles Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.691, year: 2011

  5. A high pressure device for neutron scattering studies at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, E.; Will, G.

    1980-01-01

    A high-pressure device for neutron diffraction experiments up to 6.5 Kbar, suitable also for use at low temperatures, is described. Safety requirements for operation in a reactor hall have been satisfied. Preliminary results of diffraction measurements on CsClO 4 are presented. (author)

  6. High pressure-temperature processing as an alternative for preserving basil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krebbers, B.; Matser, A.; Koets, M.; Bartels, P.; Berg, van den R.

    2002-01-01

    In this study the effect of sterilisation by high pressure (HP) on the quality of basil was compared to conventional processing techniques. By means of freezing, or blanching followed by drying, microbial reduction of spores was maximal one-log. Pulsed HP-temperature treatment yielded a reduction of

  7. Kinetics of deuterium exchange on resorcinol in D2O at high pressure and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, S.; Palmer, B.J.; Yonker, C.R.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of deuteration of resorcinol in pure D 2 O were studied for the first time using a flow-through capillary tubular reactor with on-line, proton, and deuterium NMR detection at high temperatures and high pressure. The global rate constants for hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange were determined from temperatures of 200--450 C (723 K) at a pressure of ∼400 bar (the critical temperature and pressure of water are 374.2 C and 218.3 bar, respectively). The H/D exchange rate in resorcinol (1,3-dihydroxybenzene) under these extreme conditions was determined using proton NMR as a function of the resorcinol residence time in a capillary tubular reactor, which also served as a high-pressure NMR cell. The 1 H and 2 H NMR results indicate that H/D exchange in resorcinol for the ring protons was observed at temperatures as low as 200 C. The kinetics of H/D exchange in resorcinol and the activation energy was extracted from the experimental 1 H NMR data

  8. HoB4 at high pressure and low temperature: an experimental and theoretical study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. Staun; Waśkowska, A.; Gerward, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of HoB4 have been grown and used for synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies at pressures up to 23GPa and temperatures down to 100K. The experimental bulk modulus 195 ± 6GPa is in good agreement with 188.4 and 198.2GPa values calculated in the LSDA and LSDA+U approximations...

  9. Rayleigh-Brillouin scattering profiles of air at different temperatures and pressures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gu, Z.; Witschas, B.; van der Water, W.; Ubachs, W.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Rayleigh-Brillouin (RB) scattering profiles for air have been recorded for the temperature range from 255 to 340 K and the pressure range from 640 to 3300 mbar, covering the conditions relevant for the Earth's atmosphere and for planned atmospheric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) missions. The

  10. On the Pressure and Temperature Dependence of the Absorption Coefficient of NH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Aousgi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of pressure and temperature on the absorption coefficient of ammonia (NH3 gas self-perturbed and perturbed by nitrogen (N2 gas have been measured. We varied the gas pressure from 10 to 160 Torr and the temperature from 235 to 296 K in order to study the absorption coefficient at the center and the wings of lines in the ν4 band of NH3. These measurements were made using a high resolution (0.0038 cm-1 Bruker Fourier-transform spectrometer. These spectra have been analyzed using the method of multipressure technique permitting to succeed to an evolution of the absorption coefficient with the pressure and the quantum numbers J and K of the NH3 molecule. The results show that the absorption coefficient varies as a quadratic function of the pressure at the center of a given line. However, it has a linear evolution in the wings of the line. Moreover, the absorption coefficients are inversely proportional to temperature in the wings when NH3 lines are broadened by N2. The retrieved values of these coefficients were used to derive the temperature dependence of N2 broadening NH3 lines. The absorption coefficients were shown to fit closely the well-known exponential law.

  11. Thermal equation of state of synthetic orthoferrosilite at lunar pressures and temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; Jacobs, J.M.G.; van den Berg, A.P.; Wehber, M.; Lathe, C.; McCammon, C.A.; van Westrenen, W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron-rich orthopyroxene plays an important role in models of the thermal and magmatic evolution of the Moon, but its density at high pressure and high temperature is not well-constrained. We present in situ measurements of the unit-cell volume of a synthetic polycrystalline end-member

  12. Uncertainties in risk assessment of hydrogen discharges from pressurized storage vessels at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markert, Frank; Melideo, D.; Baraldi, D.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluations of the uncertainties resulting from risk assessment tools to predict releases from the various hydrogen storage types are important to support risk informed safety management. The tools have to predict releases from a wide range of storage pressures (up to 80 MPa) and temperatures (at...

  13. Effective like- and unlike-pair interactions at high pressure and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ree, F.H.; van Thiel, M.

    1991-05-01

    We describe how information on effective interactions of chemical species involving C, O, and N atoms at high pressure and high temperature may be inferred from available shock wave data of NO and CO. Our approach uses a modern statistical mechanical theory and a detailed equation of state (EOS) model for the condensed phases of carbon

  14. Nitrogen aggregation in Ib type synthetic diamonds at low pressure and high-temperature annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazyuchits, N.M.; Rusetskij, M.S.; Latushko, Ya.I.; Kazyuchits, V.N.; Zajtsev, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    A new technique for annealing of diamonds at low pressure and high temperature (LPHT) is considered. The absorption spectra of synthetic Ib diamonds are given before and after annealing. This is evident from a comparison of the spectra that nitrogen aggregation process takes place at the LPHT annealing diamond. (authors)

  15. Temperature and Pressure Dependence of the Reaction S plus CS (+M) -> CS2 (+M)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul; Troe, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data for the unimolecular decomposition of CS2 from the literature are analyzed by unimolecular rate theory with the goal of obtaining rate constants for the reverse reaction S + CS (+M) -> CS2 (+M) over wide temperature and pressure ranges. The results constitute an important input...

  16. Advanced setup for high-pressure and low-temperature neutron diffraction at hydrostatic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lokshin, Konstantin A.; Zhao Yusheng

    2005-01-01

    We describe a design of the experimental setup for neutron diffraction studies at low temperatures and hydrostatic pressure. The significant benefit of the setup, compared to the previous methods, is that it makes possible the simultaneous collection of neutrons diffracted at the 30 deg. -150 deg. range with no contamination by the primary scattering from the sample surroundings and without cutting out the incident and diffracted beams. The suggested design is most useful for third-generation time-of-flight diffractometers and constant wavelength instruments. Application of the setup expands the capabilities of high-pressure neutron diffraction, allowing time-resolved kinetics and structural studies, multihistogram Rietveld, and pair distribution function and texture analyses. The high efficiency of the setup was proven for the HIPPO diffractometer at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center under pressures up to 10 kbar and temperatures from 4 to 300 K

  17. High-temperature and high-pressure cubic zirconia anvil cell for Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyang; Zheng, Haifei; Xiao, Wansheng; Zeng, Yishan

    2003-10-01

    A simple and inexpensive cubic zirconia anvil cell has been developed for the performance of in situ Raman spectroscopy up to the conditions of 500 degrees C and 30 kbar pressure. The design and construction of this cell are fully described, as well as its applications for Raman spectroscopy. Molybdenum heater wires wrapped around ceramic tubes encircling two cubic zirconia anvils are used to heat samples, and the temperatures are measured and controlled by a Pt-PtRh thermocouple adhered near the sample chamber and an intelligent digital control apparatus. With this cell, Raman spectroscopic measurements have been satisfactorily performed on water at 6000 bar pressure to 455 degrees C and on ice of room temperature to 24 kbar, in which the determinations of pressures make use of changes of the A1 Raman modes of quartz and the shift of the sharpline (R-line) luminescence of ruby, respectively.

  18. The temperature and pressure dependence of the free volume in fluoroelastomers from PALS and PVT experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dlubek, G.; Sen Gupta, A.; Wawryszczuk, J.

    2005-01-01

    Positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments were performed as function of T (100-485 K) and P (10 -5 Pa - 500 MPa) on a fluoroelastomer. From positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, analyzed with LT9.0 assuming the dispersion in the e + (τ 2 ) and o-Ps(τ 3 ) lifetime, the mean (υ h ), and the width (standard deviation), σ h , of the hole size distribution were calculated. The pressure-volume-temperature data were analyzed using the Simba-Somcynsky hole-lattice theory to estimate the specific hole free volume V f . From comparison of V f with (υ h ) the specific hole number, N' h is estimated. The data from thermal expansion and pressure experiments show complete agreement with taking into account the compressibility of the occupied volume. (author)

  19. The Temperature and Pressure Dependence of the Free Volume in Fluoroelastomers from PALS and PVT Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlubek, G.; Gupta, A. Sen; Wawryszczuk, J.; Kilburn, D.; Pionteck, J.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Goworek, T.; Alam, M. A.; Kaspar, H.; Lochhaas, K. H.

    2005-04-01

    Positron lifetime and pressure-volume-temperature experiments were performed as function of T (100-485 K) and P (10-5 Pa-500 MPa) on a fluoroelastomer. From positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, analyzed with LT9.0 assuming a dispersion in the e+ (τ2) and o-Ps (τ3) lifetime, the mean,, and the width (standard deviation),σh, of the hole size distribution were calculated. The pressure-volume-temperature data were analyzed using the Simha-Somcynsky hole-lattice theory to estimate the specific hole free volume Vf. From a comparison of Vf with the specific hole number, N'h, is estimated. The data from thermal expansion and pressure experiments show complete agreement when taking into account the compressibility of the occupied volume.

  20. Power X-ray diffraction under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiquet, G.; Andrault, D.

    1999-01-01

    An important work has been carried out in the field of X-ray diffraction in obtaining accurate structure information from materials at extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. An experimental set-up combining a diamond-anvil high-pressure cell and a laser-heating technique has been installed at the high-pressure beamline ID30 at the ESRF (Grenoble) to study two major constituents of the Earth's deep interior: MgSiO 3 perovskite and iron. Experiments carried out on MgSiO 3 perovskite up to 86 GPa and over 2000 K yielded detailed structural information on this compound under these conditions and thus important constraints for the lower mantle mineralogical model, favouring a mixture of perovskite and magnesiowuestite. X-ray diffraction patterns recorded on imaging plates with micro-focused monochromatic radiation revealed a new high-temperature structure of iron above 40 GPa. (au)

  1. Fabrication of All-SiC Fiber-Optic Pressure Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggang Jiang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-crystal silicon carbide (SiC-based pressure sensors can be used in harsh environments, as they exhibit stable mechanical and electrical properties at elevated temperatures. A fiber-optic pressure sensor with an all-SiC sensor head was fabricated and is herein proposed. SiC sensor diaphragms were fabricated via an ultrasonic vibration mill-grinding (UVMG method, which resulted in a small grinding force and low surface roughness. The sensor head was formed by hermetically bonding two layers of SiC using a nickel diffusion bonding method. The pressure sensor illustrated a good linearity in the range of 0.1–0.9 MPa, with a resolution of 0.27% F.S. (full scale at room temperature.

  2. Finite deformations of functionally graded shell under outer pressure with steady state temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjeev; Panchal, Rekha; Sahni, Manoj; Sharma, Richa

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, finite elastic and plastic stresses have been determined for functionally graded shell using the concepts of transition theory and generalized measure of strain i.e. nonlinear terms in the displacements are also considered while in classical theory only infinitesimal strain theory concept has been applied. In this problem of spherical shell, temperature has been applied at the internal surface while pressure is considered to be applied at the external surface. From the detailed analysis, it has been noticed that temperature and pressure have significant effects on functionally graded shell. In this paper, it is found that external pressure required for the fully plastic state from initial yielding is on the higher side for the shell made up of highly functionally graded material as compared to the shell made up of less functionally graded material.

  3. Temperature and baryon-chemical-potential-dependent bag pressure for a deconfining phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, B.K.; Singh, C.P.

    1996-01-01

    We explore the consequences of a bag model developed by Leonidov et al. for the deconfining phase transition in which the bag pressure is made to depend on the temperature and baryon chemical potential in order to ensure the entropy and baryon number conservation at the phase boundary together with the Gibbs construction for an equilibrium phase transition. We show that the bag pressure thus obtained yields an anomalous increasing behavior with the increasing baryon chemical potential at a fixed temperature which defies a physical interpretation. We demonstrate that the inclusion of the perturbative interactions in the QGP phase removes this difficulty. Further consequences of the modified bag pressure are discussed. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  4. High Temperature and Pressure Alkaline Electrochemical Reactor for Conversion of Power to Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos

    2016-01-01

    for the sustainable production of chemicals 4-6. A novel type of alkaline electrochemical cell that can operate at elevated temperature and pressure has been developed that relies on corrosion resistant high temperature diaphragms, based on mesoporous ceramic membranes where aqueous KOH is immobilized by capillary...... densities. This work will provide an overview of our efforts to develop components of such high temperature alkaline electrochemical reactors for different applications. Low-cost large-scale production methods have been successfully employed for the production of ceramic diaphragms and full cells...

  5. Summaries of reports of the 30. Conference on low-temperature physics. Pt. 1. Fundamental questions of superconductivity including HTSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Thesis of reporsts of the 30th Conference on low-temperature physics are presented. Fundamental problems of superconductivity are discussed including HTSC in bulk crystals, in thin films of Josephson junctions, ceramics and heterostructures. Specific features of superconductor structure and magnetic properties and also different mechanisms of superconductivity are analyzed

  6. AMPTRACT: an algebraic model for computing pressure tube circumferential and steam temperature transients under stratified channel coolant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulshani, P.; So, C.B.

    1986-10-01

    In a number of postulated accident scenarios in a CANDU reactor, some of the horizontal fuel channels are predicted to experience periods of stratified channel coolant condition which can lead to a circumferential temperature gradient around the pressure tube. To study pressure tube strain and integrity under stratified flow channel conditions, it is, necessary to determine the pressure tube circumferential temperature distribution. This paper presents an algebraic model, called AMPTRACT (Algebraic Model for Pressure Tube TRAnsient Circumferential Temperature), developed to give the transient temperature distribution in a closed form. AMPTRACT models the following modes of heat transfer: radiation from the outermost elements to the pressure tube and from the pressure to calandria tube, convection between the fuel elements and the pressure tube and superheated steam, and circumferential conduction from the exposed to submerged part of the pressure tube. An iterative procedure is used to solve the mass and energy equations in closed form for axial steam and fuel-sheath transient temperature distributions. The one-dimensional conduction equation is then solved to obtain the pressure tube circumferential transient temperature distribution in a cosine series expansion. In the limit of large times and in the absence of convection and radiation to the calandria tube, the predicted pressure tube temperature distribution reduces identically to a parabolic profile. In this limit, however, radiation cannot be ignored because the temperatures are generally high. Convection and radiation tend to flatten the parabolic distribution

  7. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pastouret, Alan [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Gooijer, Frans [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Overton, Bob [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Jonker, Jan [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Curley, Jim [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Constantine, Walter [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States); Waterman, Kendall Miller [Draka Cableteq USA, Inc., North Dighton, MA (United States)

    2015-11-13

    insulated wire conductors Prysmian Group has developed a geothermal fiber optic cable (GFOC) solution which incorporates novel glass chemistry for optical fibers to operate at the required bandwidths in high temperature/high pressure hydrogen rich environments with fiber protection, high temperature insulated conductors and protective cladding for cable components. The cable solution has been tested in a geothermal installation for 10 months. The electrical insulation and optical fibers have been validated through laboratory testing to ensure successful operation for greater than 5 years at 300°C, with the possibility of higher temperatures depending on the particular well environment. With the 300°C optical fiber and electrical insulation developments completed and validated in laboratory tests the greatest challenge to a complete 300°C cable solution was protecting the optical fibers in the cable. Optical fibers are typically incased in a protective tube where the tube is filled with a gel. The gel serves as mechanical protection, prevent moisture ingress, and can include hydrogen scavenging materials. A suitable gel for use at 300°C could not be identified and an industrialized alternative was not fully attained. Despite the problems encountered and the lower long-term operating temperature of the cable solution, the project showed success in developing a complete cable solution for a large portion of the geothermal wells in operation today. Further work to obtain the higher long-term temperature goal of the project can be achieved based on the knowledge gained in the current project. This project is significant for many reasons including the new materials science, manufacturing technology, energy independence, and jobs created and will create.

  8. Pressure dependence of the antiferromagnetic ordering temperature of face-centered-cubic iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onodera, Akifumi; Tsunoda, Yorihiko; Kunitomi, Nobuhiko; Pringle, O.A.; Nicklow, R.M.; Moon, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    The Neel temperature T N of fcc Fe has been measured as a function of pressure to 8.7 kbar by neutron diffraction using a high pressure cell of supported-cylinder type. Cold-pressed zirconia was employed for the material of the cylinder. A sample with 2.77 at% of fcc Fe, precipitated in a Cu matrix, and having precipitates size between 500 and 600 A, undergoes antiferromagnetic ordering at 67±2 K at ambient pressure. With increasing pressure, T N decreases following a relation; T N (K) = 67 - 1.28p - 1.11 x 10 -1 p 2 - 6.17 x 10 -3 p 3 , where p is in kbar. (author)

  9. High Temperature Capacitive Pressure Sensor Employing a SiC Based Ring Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Roger D.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Ponchak, George E.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Scardelletti, Maximilian; Jordan, Jennifer L.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Spry, David J.; Krawowski, Michael J.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to develop harsh environment electronic and sensor technologies for aircraft engine safety and monitoring, we have used capacitive-based pressure sensors to shift the frequency of a SiC-electronics-based oscillator to produce a pressure-indicating signal that can be readily transmitted, e.g. wirelessly, to a receiver located in a more benign environment. Our efforts target 500 C, a temperature well above normal operating conditions of commercial circuits but within areas of interest in aerospace engines, deep mining applications and for future missions to the Venus atmosphere. This paper reports for the first time a ring oscillator circuit integrated with a capacitive pressure sensor, both operating at 500 C. This demonstration represents a significant step towards a wireless pressure sensor that can operate at 500 C and confirms the viability of 500 C electronic sensor systems.

  10. An experimental study of LiH stoichiometry at elevated temperatures and pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piwinskii, A.J.; Lilley, E.M.; Smith, G.S.

    1975-01-01

    The stoichiometry of LiH was studied at 500 to 900 0 K at hydrogen pressures between 2.5 and 6.0 GPa. Results and interpretation are complicated by the presence of ubiquitous intermetallic compounds from encapsulating materials, which are formed at pressures below 4.0 GPa. The most definitive results were produced in an assembly that consisted of a Ag--Pd inner capsule and tantalum outer capsule at a pressure of 5.0 GPa and 733 0 K. This run produced no change in LiH stoichiometry, nor any change in the NaCl-type crystal structure. It is concluded that up to a pressure of 6.0 GPa and a temperature of 803 0 K, no quenchable LiH/sub n/ with n greater than 1 can be produced. (U.S.)

  11. The pressure-temperature phase diagram of MgH₂ and isotopic substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, D; Baldissin, G; Bull, D J; Riley, D J; Morrison, I; Ross, D K; Oates, W A; Noréus, D

    2011-08-03

    Computational thermodynamics using density functional theory ab initio codes is a powerful tool for calculating phase diagrams. The method is usually applied at the standard pressure of p = 1 bar and where the Gibbs energy is assumed to be equal to the Helmholtz energy. In this work, we have calculated the Gibbs energy in order to study the release temperature and phase modifications of MgH(2) at high pressures up to 10 GPa (100 kbar). The isotopic substitution of hydrogen with deuterium (or tritium) does not bring about any strong effects on the phase diagram. These considerations are of extreme importance for (i) the synthesis of novel substitutional magnesium based materials at high pressure and (ii) the determination of the correct reference states for the calculation of phase diagrams at high pressure. The calculated results are compared with experimental data obtained with an in situ neutron diffraction measurement.

  12. Effects of holding pressure and process temperatures on the mechanical properties of moulded metallic parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Esteves, N.M.

    2013-01-01

    Metal injection moulding is gaining more and more importance over the time and needs more research to be done to understand the sensitivity of process to different process parameters. The current paper makes an attempt to better understand the effects of holding pressure and process temperatures...... on the moulded metallic parts. Stainless steel 316L is used in the investigation to produce the specimen by metal injection moulding (MIM) and multiple analyses were carried out on samples produced with different combinations of holding pressure, mould temperature and melt temperature. Finally, the parts were...... characterized to investigate mechanical properties like density, ultimate tensile strength, shrinkage etc. The results are discussed in the paper. The main conclusion from this study is unlike plastic moulding, the tensile properties of MIM parts doesn’t vary based on the flow direction of the melt, and tensile...

  13. Evaluation of Creep-Fatigue Integrity for High Temperature Pressure Vessel in a Sodium Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyeong-Yeon; Lee, Dong-Won

    2014-01-01

    In this study, high temperature integrity evaluation on a pressure vessel of the expansion tank operating at elevated temperature of 510°C in the sodium test facility of the SEFLA(Sodium Thermal-hydraulic Experiment Loop for Finned-tube Sodium-to-Air heat exchanger) to be constructed at KAERI has been performed. Evaluations of creep fatigue damage based on a full 3D finite element analyses were conducted for the expansion tank according to the recent elevated temperature design codes of ASME Section III Subsection NH and French RCC-MRx. It was shown that the expansion tank maintains its integrity under the intended creep-fatigue loads. Quantitative code comparisons were conducted for the pressure vessel of austenitic stainless steel 316L

  14. New type of Piezoresistive Pressure Sensors for Environments with Rapidly Changing Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tykhan Myroslav

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical aspects of a new type of piezo-resistive pressure sensors for environments with rapidly changing temperatures are presented. The idea is that the sensor has two identical diaphragms which have different coefficients of linear thermal expansion. Therefore, when measuring pressure in environments with variable temperature, the diaphragms will have different deflection. This difference can be used to make appropriate correction of the sensor output signal and, thus, to increase accuracy of measurement. Since physical principles of sensors operation enable fast correction of the output signal, the sensor can be used in environments with rapidly changing temperature, which is its essential advantage. The paper presents practical implementation of the proposed theoretical aspects and the results of testing the developed sensor.

  15. Hydration kinetics modeling of Portland cement considering the effects of curing temperature and applied pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Feng; Meyer, Christian

    2009-01-01

    A hydration kinetics model for Portland cement is formulated based on thermodynamics of multiphase porous media. The mechanism of cement hydration is discussed based on literature review. The model is then developed considering the effects of chemical composition and fineness of cement, water-cement ratio, curing temperature and applied pressure. The ultimate degree of hydration of Portland cement is also analyzed and a corresponding formula is established. The model is calibrated against the experimental data for eight different Portland cements. Simple relations between the model parameters and cement composition are obtained and used to predict hydration kinetics. The model is used to reproduce experimental results on hydration kinetics, adiabatic temperature rise, and chemical shrinkage of different cement pastes. The comparisons between the model reproductions and the different experimental results demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model, especially for cement hydration at elevated temperature and high pressure.

  16. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Hosokawa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal diamond X-ray windows attached to the externally heated high-pressure vessel were used for the IXS experiment of supercritical water and methanol. Some typical experimental results are also given, and the perspective of IXS technique under extreme conditions is discussed.

  17. High Efficiency Heat Exchanger for High Temperature and High Pressure Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Lv, Qiuping [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Moisseytsev, Anton [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2017-09-29

    CompRex, LLC (CompRex) specializes in the design and manufacture of compact heat exchangers and heat exchange reactors for high temperature and high pressure applications. CompRex’s proprietary compact technology not only increases heat exchange efficiency by at least 25 % but also reduces footprint by at least a factor of ten compared to traditional shell-and-tube solutions of the same capacity and by 15 to 20 % compared to other currently available Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger (PCHE) solutions. As a result, CompRex’s solution is especially suitable for Brayton cycle supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) systems given its high efficiency and significantly lower capital and operating expenses. CompRex has already successfully demonstrated its technology and ability to deliver with a pilot-scale compact heat exchanger that was under contract by the Naval Nuclear Laboratory for sCO2 power cycle development. The performance tested unit met or exceeded the thermal and hydraulic specifications with measured heat transfer between 95 to 98 % of maximum heat transfer and temperature and pressure drop values all consistent with the modeled values. CompRex’s vision is to commercialize its compact technology and become the leading provider for compact heat exchangers and heat exchange reactors for various applications including Brayton cycle sCO2 systems. One of the limitations of the sCO2 Brayton power cycle is the design and manufacturing of efficient heat exchangers at extreme operating conditions. Current diffusion-bonded heat exchangers have limitations on the channel size through which the fluid travels, resulting in excessive solid material per heat exchanger volume. CompRex’s design allows for more open area and shorter fluid proximity for increased heat transfer efficiency while sustaining the structural integrity needed for the application. CompRex is developing a novel improvement to its current heat exchanger design where fluids are directed to alternating

  18. Deposition of nanocryctalline silicon thin films: Effect of total pressure and substrate temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baghdad, R.; Benlakehal, D.; Portier, X.; Zellama, K.; Charvet, S.; Sib, J.D.; Clin, M.; Chahed, L.

    2008-01-01

    The structural changes in intrinsic silicon thin films are investigated as a function of the total pressure (2 to 4 Pa) and substrate temperature (room temperature to 200 deg. C). Infrared absorption, Raman spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy are applied to characterize the films. The results indicate that the films grown at 2 Pa are completely amorphous, while at 3 and 4 Pa, crystallization occurs at temperature as low as room temperature. These structural changes are well correlated to the variation of the room temperature conductivity, which increases up to about eight orders of magnitude for the nanocrystallized films. A crystalline volume fraction varying from 71 to about 90% is also observed. The growth mechanism of the nanocrystalline films is also discussed in the framework of the reported models

  19. Resin composite blocks via high-pressure high-temperature polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Jean-François; Migonney, Véronique; Ruse, N Dorin; Sadoun, Michaël

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to thermo-polymerize under high pressure four commercially available dental resin composites to obtain and characterize composite blocks suitable for CAD/CAM procedures. Gradia (GC, Japan), Vita VM LC (Vita Zahnfabrik, Germany), Grandio (VOCO, Germany), and EsthetX (Dentsply, Germany), were selected for this study. Paradigm (3 M ESPE, USA), a CAD/CAM composite block, was included for comparison. Composite blocks were obtained through polymerization at high-temperature high-pressure (HT/HP). Samples for mechanical/physical characterizations were cut from Paradigm and HT/HP composite blocks while control samples were obtained by photo-polymerizing (PP) the materials in molds. Flexural strength (σ(f)), fracture toughness (K(IC)), hardness, and density (ρ) were determined and compared by pairwise t-tests (α=0.05). Fractured surfaces were characterized under a scanning electron microscope. The results have shown that HT/HP polymerization resulted in a significant (p<0.05) increase in σ(f), hardness, and ρ for all composites investigated. Even if K(IC) of all materials was increased by HT/HP polymerization, significant increases were detected only for Gradia and EsthetX. The Weibull modulus of HT/HP polymerized composites was higher than that of PP counterparts. HT/HP materials had higher σ(f), Weibull modulus, and K(IC) compared to Paradigm. The most significant SEM observation of fractured K(IC) specimens from all the materials tested was the presence of fewer and smaller voids in HT/HP polymerized composites. The results of this study suggest that HT/HP polymerization could be used to obtain dental resin composite blocks with superior mechanical properties, suitable for CAD/CAM processing. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Gene-alcohol interactions identify several novel blood pressure loci including a promising locus near SLC16A9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette eSimino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is a known risk factor for hypertension, with recent candidate studies implicating gene-alcohol interactions in blood pressure (BP regulation. We used 6,882 (predominantly Caucasian participants aged 20 to 80 years from the Framingham SHARe (SNP Health Association Resource to perform a genome-wide analysis of SNP-alcohol interactions on BP traits. We used a two-step approach in the ABEL suite to examine genetic interactions with three alcohol measures [ounces of alcohol consumed per week, drinks consumed per week, and the number of days drinking alcohol per week] on four BP traits [systolic (SBP, diastolic (DBP, mean arterial (MAP, and pulse (PP pressure]. In the first step, we fit a linear mixed model of each BP trait onto age, sex, BMI, and antihypertensive medication while accounting for the phenotypic correlation among relatives. In the second step, we conducted 1 degree-of-freedom (df score tests of the SNP main effect, alcohol main effect, and SNP-alcohol interaction using the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters from the first step. We then calculated the joint 2 df score test of the SNP main effect and SNP-alcohol interaction using MixABEL. The effect of SNP rs10826334 (near SLC16A9 on SBP was significantly modulated by both the number of alcoholic drinks and the ounces of alcohol consumed per week (p-values of 1.27E-08 and 3.92E-08, respectively. Each copy of the G-allele decreased SBP by 3.79 mmHg in those consuming 14 drinks per week versus a 0.461 mmHg decrease in non-drinkers. Index SNPs in 20 other loci exhibited suggestive (p-value≤1E-06 associations with BP traits by the 1 df interaction test or joint 2df test, including 3 rare variants, one low-frequency variant, and SNPs near/in genes ESRRG, FAM179A, CRIPT-SOCS5, KAT2B,ADCY2, GLI3, ZNF716, SLIT1, PDE3A, KERA-LUM, RNF219-AS1, CLEC3A , FBX015, and IGSF5. SNP -alcohol interactions may enhance discovery of novel variants with large effects that can

  1. High-pressure high-temperature rheological studies of colloidal suspensions with carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Anoop; Sadr, Reza; Yarc, Rommel; Amani, Mahmood

    2017-11-01

    Selection of the drilling fluid, drilling mud, is vital in minimizing the cost and time required for the drilling in oil fields. Drilling mud aids in cooling, lubricating drilling bit, removing the debries from the drill bore and maintaining the wellbore stability. Owing to the enhanced thermo-physical properties and stable nature, suspensions of nanoparticles have been suggested for drilling fluids. High-pressure and high-temperature rheology of a nanomud suspension (nano particles suspended in a mud solution) is studied here. The nanomud is prepared by dispersing a water-based drilling mud suspension (water with 1% Bentonite and 7% Barite particles) with multi-walled carbon nanotubes, MWCNT. The effect of pressure, temperature, and shear rate are independently studied for the various particle loading of the nanoparticles. Viscosity values are measured at a maximum pressure of 170MPa with temperatures ranging from ambient to 180oC. The effect of MWCNT concentration and variation in shear rate are also investigated A shear thinning non-Newtonian behavior is observed for the basemud and the nanomud samples for all cases. The basemud showed an increase in viscosity with an increase in pressure. However, with MWCNT particle addition, this trend is observed to have reversed.

  2. Thermal conductivity and diffusivity of climax stock quartz monzonite at high pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.

    1981-11-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity have been made on two samples of Climax Stock quartz monzonite at pressures between 3 and 50 MPa and temperatures between 300 and 523 0 K. Following those measurements the apparatus was calibrated with respect to the thermal conductivity measurement using a reference standard of fused silica. Corrected thermal conductivity of the rock indicates a value at room temperature of 2.60 +- 0.25 W/mK at 3 MPa increasing linearly to 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 50 MPa. These values are unchanged (+- 0.07 W/mK) by heating under 50-MPa pressure to as high as 473 0 K. The conductivity under 50-MPa confining pressure falls smoothly from 2.75 +- 0.25 W/mK at 313 0 K to 2.15 +- 0.25 W/mK at 473 0 K. Thermal diffusivity at 300 0 K was found to be 1.2 +- 0.4 X 10 -6 m 2 /s and shows approximately the same pressure and temperature dependencies as the thermal conductivity

  3. Referenced dual pressure- and temperature-sensitive paint for digital color camera read out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Lorenz H; Karakus, Cüneyt; Meier, Robert J; Risch, Nikolaus; Wolfbeis, Otto S; Holder, Elisabeth; Schäferling, Michael

    2012-12-03

    The first fluorescent material for the referenced simultaneous RGB (red green blue) imaging of barometric pressure (oxygen partial pressure) and temperature is presented. This sensitive coating consists of two platinum(II) complexes as indicators and a reference dye, each of which is incorporated in appropriate polymer nanoparticles. These particles are dispersed in a polyurethane hydrogel and spread onto a solid support. The emission of the (oxygen) pressure indicator, PtTFPP, matches the red channel of a RGB color camera, whilst the emission of the temperature indicator [Pt(II) (Br-thq)(acac)] matches the green channel. The reference dye, 9,10-diphenylanthracene, emits in the blue channel. In contrast to other dual-sensitive materials, this new coating allows for the simultaneous imaging of both indicator signals, as well as the reference signal, in one RGB color picture without having to separate the signals with additional optical filters. All of these dyes are excitable with a 405 nm light-emitting diode (LED). With this new composite material, barometric pressure can be determined with a resolution of 22 mbar; the temperature can be determined with a resolution of 4.3 °C. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The role of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on bound polaron in semiconductor quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Moussaouy, A.; Ouchani, N.

    2014-01-01

    We studied theoretically the effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the binding energy of shallow hydrogenic impurity in a cylindrical quantum dot (QD) using a variational approach within the effective mass approximation. The hydrostatic stress was applied along the QD growth axis. The interactions between the charge carriers and confined longitudinal optical (LO) phonon modes are taken into account. The numerical computation for GaAs/Ga 1−x Al x As QD has shown that the binding energy with and without the polaronic correction depends on the location of the impurity and the pressure effect and it is more pronounced for impurities in the QD center. Both the binding energy and the polaronic contribution increase linearly with increasing stress. For each pressure value, these energies are also found to decrease as the temperature increases. The results obtained show that in experimental studies of optical and electronic properties of QDs, the effects of pressure, temperature and polaronic correction on donor impurity binding energy should be taken into consideration

  5. Thermal conductivity, diffusivity and expansion of Avery Island salt at pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    Preliminary data on the thermal propertes of a course-grained rock salt from Avery Island, Louisiana, indicate that hydrostatic pressure to 50 MPa has little effect on the thermal conductivity, diffusivity and linear expansion at temperatures from 300 to 573 K. The measurements were made in a new apparatus under conditions of true hydrostatic loading. At room temperature and effective confining pressure increasing from 10 to 50 MPa, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are constant at roughly 7 W/mK and 3.6 x 10 -6 m 2 /s, respectively. At 50 MPa and temperature increasing from 300 to 573 K, both conductivity and diffusivity drop by a factor of 2. Thermal linear expansion at 0 MPa matches that at 50 MPa, increasing from roughly 4.2 x 10 -5 /K at 300 K to 5.5 x 10 -5 /K at 573 K. The lack of a pressure effect on all three properties is confirmed by previous work. Simple models of microcracking suggest that among common geological materials the lack of pressure dependence is unique to rock salt

  6. Thermal conductivity, diffusivity and expansion of Avery Island salt at pressure and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, W.B.; Abey, A.E.; Trimmer, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary data on the thermal properties of a coarse-grained rock salt from Avery Island, Louisiana, indicates that hydrostatic pressure to 50 MPa has little effect on the thermal conductivity, diffusivity and linear expansion at temperatures from 300 to 573 K. The measurements were made in a new apparatus under conditions of true hydrostatic loading. At room temperature and effective confining pressure increasing from 10 to 50 MPa, thermal conductivity and diffusivity are constant at roughly 7W/mK and 3.6 x 10 -6 m 2 /s, respectively. At 50 MPa and temperature increasing from 300 to 573K, both conductivity and diffusivity drop by a factor of 2. Thermal linear expansion at 0 MPa matches that at 50 MPa, increasing from roughly 4.2 x 10 -5 /K at 300 K to 5.5 x 10 -5 at 573 K. The lack of a pressure effect on all three properties is confirmed by previous work. Simple models of microcracking suggest that among common geological materials the lack of pressure dependence is unique to rock salt

  7. Calculation of pressure and temperature in medium-voltage electrical installations due to fault arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X; Gockenbach, E [Institute of Electric Power Systems, Division of High Voltage Engineering, Leibniz University of Hanover, Hanover, 30167 Germany (Germany); Zhang, J [SIEMENS High Voltage Circuit Breaker Ltd Co., Hangzhou, 310018 (China)], E-mail: zhang@si.uni-hannover.de

    2008-05-21

    In order to determine the pressure rise due to arc faults in electrical installations, the portion of energy heating the surrounding gas of fault arcs has to be known. The ratio of the portion of energy to the electric energy, the thermal transfer coefficient, is adopted as the k{sub p} factor. This paper presents a theoretical approach for the determination of the thermal transfer coefficient and the pressure rise in electrical installations. It is based on the fundamental hydro- and thermodynamic conservation equations and the equation of gas state taking into account melting and evaporation of metals as well as chemical reactions with the surrounding gas. In order to consider the dependence of the arc energy on the gas density, the radiative effect of fault arcs on the energy balance is introduced into the arc model by using the net emission coefficient as a function of gas density, arc temperature and arc radius. The results for a test container show that factors such as the kinds of insulating gases and of electrode materials, the size of test vessels and the gas density considerably influence the thermal transfer coefficient and thus the pressure rise. Furthermore, it is demonstrated, for an example of the arc fault in a compact medium-voltage station with pressure relief openings and a pressure relief channel, that the arc energy and the arc temperature can be simulated based on the changing gas density.

  8. Apparatus for materials testing in high-pressure hydrogen at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gang; He, Jianhong; Fukuyama, Seiji; Yokogawa, Kiyoshi

    1997-11-01

    A new type of apparatus for materials testing in high-pressure hydrogen up to 10 MPa at low temperatures down to 20 K was developed. The apparatus consists of the pressure vessel, cooled by a two-step external cooling method, and the hydraulic loading system. In the first cooling step the specimen in the pressure vessel is cooled to 84 K using a cooling tube between the coolant shroud filled with liquid nitrogen and the pressure vessel. In the second cooling step the specimen is cooled to 20 K using a helium refrigerator. The apparatus is designed to measure the actual load on the specimen with an external load cell irrespective of the axial load caused by high pressure and friction at the sliding seals. As an example of the application of the apparatus, the tensile properties of type 304L stainless steel in 1 MPa hydrogen and helium at low temperature are measured and hydrogen environment embrittlement of the steel is briefly discussed.

  9. An experimental platform for triaxial high-pressure/high-temperature testing of rocks using computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatz, Guenther; Lapene, Alexandre; Castanier, Louis M.; Kovscek, Anthony R.

    2018-04-01

    A conventional high-pressure/high-temperature experimental apparatus for combined geomechanical and flow-through testing of rocks is not X-ray compatible. Additionally, current X-ray transparent systems for computed tomography (CT) of cm-sized samples are limited to design temperatures below 180 °C. We describe a novel, high-temperature (>400 °C), high-pressure (>2000 psi/>13.8 MPa confining, >10 000 psi/>68.9 MPa vertical load) triaxial core holder suitable for X-ray CT scanning. The new triaxial system permits time-lapse imaging to capture the role of effective stress on fluid distribution and porous medium mechanics. System capabilities are demonstrated using ultimate compressive strength (UCS) tests of Castlegate sandstone. In this case, flooding the porous medium with a radio-opaque gas such as krypton before and after the UCS test improves the discrimination of rock features such as fractures. The results of high-temperature tests are also presented. A Uintah Basin sample of immature oil shale is heated from room temperature to 459 °C under uniaxial compression. The sample contains kerogen that pyrolyzes as temperature rises, releasing hydrocarbons. Imaging reveals the formation of stress bands as well as the evolution and connectivity of the fracture network within the sample as a function of time.

  10. How does low temperature coupled with different pressures affect initiation mechanisms and subsequent decompositions in nitramine explosive HMX?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiong; Xiong, Guolin; Zhu, Weihua; Xiao, Heming

    2015-09-21

    We have performed ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to study coupling effects of temperature (534-873 K) and pressure (1-20 GPa) on the initiation mechanisms and subsequent chemical decompositions of nitramine explosive 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX). A new initiation decomposition mechanism of HMX was found to be the unimolecular C-H bond breaking, and this mechanism was independent of the coupling effects of different temperatures and pressures. The formed hydrogen radicals could promote subsequent decompositions of HMX. Subsequent decompositions were very sensitive to the pressure at low temperatures (534 and 608 K), while the temperature became the foremost factor that affected the decomposition at a high temperature (873 K) instead of the pressure. Our study may provide a new insight into understanding the coupling effects of the temperature and pressure on the initiation decomposition mechanisms of nitramine explosives.

  11. Direct measurement of osmotic pressure of glycosaminoglycan solutions by membrane osmometry at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Nadeen O; Chen, Faye H; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2005-09-01

    Articular cartilage is a hydrated soft tissue composed of negatively charged proteoglycans fixed within a collagen matrix. This charge gradient causes the tissue to imbibe water and swell, creating a net osmotic pressure that enhances the tissue's ability to bear load. In this study we designed and utilized an apparatus for directly measuring the osmotic pressure of chondroitin sulfate, the primary glycosaminoglycan found in articular cartilage, in solution with varying bathing ionic strength (0.015 M, 0.15 M, 0.5 M, 1 M, and 2 M NaCl) at room temperature. The osmotic pressure (pi) was found to increase nonlinearly with increasing chondroitin sulfate concentration and decreasing NaCl ionic bath environment. Above 1 M NaCl, pi changes negligibly with further increases in salt concentration, suggesting that Donnan osmotic pressure is negligible above this threshold, and the resulting pressure is attributed to configurational entropy. Results of the current study were also used to estimate the contribution of osmotic pressure to the stiffness of cartilage based on theoretical and experimental considerations. Our findings indicate that the osmotic pressure resulting from configurational entropy is much smaller in cartilage (based on an earlier study on bovine articular cartilage) than in free solution. The rate of change of osmotic pressure with compressive strain is found to contribute approximately one-third of the compressive modulus (H(A)(eff)) of cartilage (Pi approximately H(A)(eff)/3), with the balance contributed by the intrinsic structural modulus of the solid matrix (i.e., H(A) approximately 2H(A)(eff)/3). A strong dependence of this intrinsic modulus on salt concentration was found; therefore, it appears that proteoglycans contribute structurally to the magnitude of H(A), in a manner independent of osmotic pressure.

  12. Temperature induced development of porous structure of bituminous coal chars at high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Howaniec

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The porous structure of chars affects their reactivity in gasification, having an impact on the course and product distribution of the process. The shape, size and connections between pores determine the mechanical properties of chars, as well as heat and mass transport in thermochemical processing. In the study the combined effects of temperature in the range of 973–1273 °K and elevated pressure of 3 MPa on the development of porous structure of bituminous coal chars were investigated. Relatively low heating rate and long residence time characteristic for the in-situ coal conversion were applied. The increase in the temperature to 1173 °K under pressurized conditions resulted in the enhancement of porous structure development reflected in the values of the specific surface area, total pore volume, micropore area and volume, as well as ratio of the micropore volume to the total pore volume. These effects were attributed to the enhanced vaporization and devolatilization, as well as swelling behavior along the increase of temperature and under high pressure, followed by a collapse of pores over certain temperature value. This proves the strong dependence of the porous structure of chars not only on the pyrolysis process conditions but also on the physical and chemical properties of the parent fuel.

  13. Control of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor with water rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2003-01-01

    The plant system of a supercritical pressure light water reactor (SCR) is once-through direct cycle. The whole coolant from the feedwater pumps is driven to the turbines. The core flow rate is less than 1/7 of that of a boiling water reactor. In the present design of the high temperature thermal reactor (SCLWR-H), the fuel assemblies contain many water rods in which the coolant flows downward. The stepwise responses of the SCLWR-H are analyzed against perturbations without a control system. Based on these analyses, a control system of the SCLWR-H is designed. The pressure is controlled by the turbine control valves. The main steam temperature is controlled by the feedwater pumps. The reactor power is controlled by the control rods. The control parameters are optimized by the test calculations to satisfy the criteria of both fast convergence and stability. The reactor is controlled stably with the designed control systems against various perturbations, such as setpoint change of the pressure, the main steam temperature and the core power, decrease in the feedwater temperature, and decrease in the feedwater flow rate. (author)

  14. Temperature characteristics research of SOI pressure sensor based on asymmetric base region transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Li, Dandan; Yu, Yang; Wen, Dianzhong

    2017-07-01

    Based on the asymmetric base region transistor, a pressure sensor with temperature compensation circuit is proposed in this paper. The pressure sensitive structure of the proposed sensor is constructed by a C-type silicon cup and a Wheatstone bridge with four piezoresistors ({R}1, {R}2, {R}3 and {R}4) locating on the edge of a square silicon membrane. The chip was designed and fabricated on a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer by micro electromechanical system (MEMS) technology and bipolar transistor process. When the supply voltage is 5.0 V, the corresponding temperature coefficient of the sensitivity (TCS) for the sensor before and after temperature compensation are -1862 and -1067 ppm/°C, respectively. Through varying the ratio of the base region resistances {r}1 and {r}2, the TCS for the sensor with the compensation circuit is -127 ppm/°C. It is possible to use this compensation circuit to improve the temperature characteristics of the pressure sensor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61471159), the Natural Science Foundation of Heilongjiang Province (No. F201433), the University Nursing Program for Young Scholars with Creative Talents in Heilongjiang Province (No. 2015018), and the Special Funds for Science and Technology Innovation Talents of Harbin in China (No. 2016RAXXJ016).

  15. Development of the CARS method for measurement of pressure and temperature gradients in centrifuges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeltmann, A.H.; Valentini, J.J.

    1983-12-01

    These experiments evaluated the feasibility of applying the CARS technique to the measurement of UF 6 concentrations and pressure gradients in a gas centrifuge. The resultant CARS signals were properly related to system parameters as suggested by theory. The results have been used to guide design of an apparatus for making CARS measurements in a UF 6 gas centrifuge. Ease of measurement is expected for pressures as low as 0.1 torr. Temperature gradients can be measured by this technique with changes in the data acquisition method. 16 references, 8 figures, 2 tables

  16. Determination of time constants of reactor pressure and temperature sensors: the dynamic data system method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, S.M.; Hsu, M.C.; Chow, M.C.

    1979-01-01

    A new modeling technique is introduced for on-line sensor time constant identification, both for the resistance temperature detector (RTD) and for the pressure sensor using power plant operational data. The sensor's time constant is estimated from a real characteristic root of the fitted autoregressive moving average model. The RTD's time constant values were identified to be 8.4 s, with a standard deviation of 1.2 s. The pressure sensor time constant was identified to be 28.6 ms, with a standard deviation of 3.5 ms

  17. Effect of chemical composition on the electrical conductivity of gneiss at high temperatures and pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dai

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrical conductivity of gneiss samples with different chemical compositions (WA = Na2O + K2O + CaO  =  7.12, 7.27 and 7.64 % weight percent was measured using a complex impedance spectroscopic technique at 623–1073 K and 1.5 GPa and a frequency range of 10−1 to 106 Hz. Simultaneously, a pressure effect on the electrical conductivity was also determined for the WA = 7.12 % gneiss. The results indicated that the gneiss conductivities markedly increase with total alkali and calcium ion content. The sample conductivity and temperature conform to an Arrhenius relationship within a certain temperature range. The influence of pressure on gneiss conductivity is weaker than temperature, although conductivity still increases with pressure. According to various ranges of activation enthalpy (0.35–0.52 and 0.76–0.87 eV at 1.5 GPa, two main conduction mechanisms are suggested that dominate the electrical conductivity of gneiss: impurity conduction in the lower-temperature region and ionic conduction (charge carriers are K+, Na+ and Ca2+ in the higher-temperature region. The electrical conductivity of gneiss with various chemical compositions cannot be used to interpret the high conductivity anomalies in the Dabie–Sulu ultrahigh-pressure metamorphic belt. However, the conductivity–depth profiles for gneiss may provide an important constraint on the interpretation of field magnetotelluric conductivity results in the regional metamorphic belt.

  18. Flow behavior and microstructures of hydrous olivine aggregates at upper mantle pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohuchi, Tomohiro; Kawazoe, Takaaki; Higo, Yuji; Suzuki, Akio

    2017-08-01

    Deformation experiments on olivine aggregates were performed under hydrous conditions using a deformation-DIA apparatus combined with synchrotron in situ X-ray observations at pressures of 1.5-9.8 GPa, temperatures of 1223-1800 K, and strain rates ranging from 0.8 × 10-5 to 7.5 × 10-5 s-1. The pressure and strain rate dependencies of the plasticity of hydrous olivine may be described by an activation volume of 17 ± 6 cm3 mol-1 and a stress exponent of 3.2 ± 0.6 at temperatures of 1323-1423 K. A comparison between previous data sets and our results at a normalized temperature and a strain rate showed that the creep strength of hydrous olivine deformed at 1323-1423 K is much weaker than that for the dislocation creep of water-saturated olivine and is similar to that for diffusional creep and dislocation-accommodated grain boundary sliding, while dislocation microstructures showing the [001] slip or the [001](100) slip system were developed. At temperatures of 1633-1800 K, a much stronger pressure effect on creep strength was observed for olivine with an activation volume of 27 ± 7 cm3 mol-1 assuming a stress exponent of 3.5, water fugacity exponent of 1.2, and activation energy of 520 kJ mol-1 (i.e., power-law dislocation creep of hydrous olivine). Because of the weak pressure dependence of the rheology of hydrous olivine at lower temperatures, water weakening of olivine could be effective in the deeper and colder part of Earth's upper mantle.

  19. Nonmonotonic Temperature Dependence of the Pressure-Dependent Reaction Rate Constant and Kinetic Isotope Effect of Hydrogen Radical Reaction with Benzene Calculated by Variational Transition-State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Xin; Truhlar, Donald G; Xu, Xuefei

    2017-11-30

    The reaction between H and benzene is a prototype for reactions of radicals with aromatic hydrocarbons. Here we report calculations of the reaction rate constants and the branching ratios of the two channels of the reaction (H addition and H abstraction) over a wide temperature and pressure range. Our calculations, obtained with an accurate potential energy surface, are based on variational transition-state theory for the high-pressure limit of the addition reaction and for the abstraction reaction and on system-specific quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel theory calibrated by variational transition-state theory for pressure effects on the addition reaction. The latter is a very convenient way to include variational effects, corner-cutting tunneling, and anharmonicity in falloff calculations. Our results are in very good agreement with the limited experimental data and show the importance of including pressure effects in the temperature interval where the mechanism changes from addition to abstraction. We found a negative temperature effect of the total reaction rate constants at 1 atm pressure in the temperature region where experimental data are missing and accurate theoretical data were previously missing as well. We also calculated the H + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 and D + C 6 H 6 /C 6 D 6 kinetic isotope effects, and we compared our H + C 6 H 6 results to previous theoretical data for H + toluene. We report a very novel nonmonotonic dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on temperature. A particularly striking effect is the prediction of a negative temperature dependence of the total rate constant over 300-500 K wide temperature ranges, depending on the pressure but generally in the range from 600 to 1700 K, which includes the temperature range of ignition in gasoline engines, which is important because aromatics are important components of common fuels.

  20. Pressure of a partially ionized hydrogen gas: numerical results from exact low temperature expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alastuey, A. [Laboratoire de Physique, ENS Lyon, CNRS, Lyon (France); Ballenegger, V. [Institut UTINAM, Universite de Franche-Comte, CNRS, Besancon (France)

    2010-01-15

    We consider a partially ionized hydrogen gas at low densities, where it reduces almost to an ideal mixture made with hydrogen atoms in their ground-state, ionized protons and ionized electrons. By performing systematic low-temperature expansions within the physical picture, in which the system is described as a quantum electron-proton plasma interacting via the Coulomb potential, exact formulae for the first.ve leading corrections to the ideal Saha equation of state have been derived[A. Alastuey, V. Ballenegger et al., J. Stat. Phys. 130, 1119 (2008)]. Those corrections account for all effects of interactions and thermal excitations up to order exp(E{sub H} /kT) included, where E{sub H} {approx_equal} -13.6 eV is the ground state energy of the hydrogen atom. Among the.ve leading corrections, three are easy to evaluate, while the remaining ones involve suitably truncated internal partition functions of H{sub 2} molecules and H{sup -} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ions, for which no analytical formulae are available in closed form. We estimate those partitions functions at.nite temperature via a simple phenomenology based on known values of rotational and vibrational energies. This allows us to compute numerically the leading deviations to the Saha pressure along several isotherms and isochores. Our values are compared with those of the OPAL tables (for pure hydrogen) calculated within the ACTEX method (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Characterizations of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakas, Erdinc

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma jets (APLTPJs) driven by short pulses have recently received great attention because of their potential in biomedical and environmental applications. This potential is due to their user-friendly features, such as low temperature, low risk of arcing, operation at atmospheric pressure, easy handheld operation, and low concentration of ozone generation. Recent experimental observations indicate that an ionization wave exists and propagates along the plasma jet. The plasma jet created by this ionization wave is not a continuous medium but rather consists of a bullet-like-structure known as "Plasma Bullet". More interestingly, these plasma bullets actually have a donut-shaped makeup. The nature of the plasma bullet is especially interesting because it propagates in the ambient air at supersonic velocities without any externally applied electric field. In this dissertation, experimental insights are reported regarding the physical and chemical characteristics of the APLTPJs. The dynamics of the plasma bullet are investigated by means of a high-speed ICCD camera. A plasma bullet propagation model based on the streamer theory is confirmed with adequate explanations. It is also found that a secondary discharge, ignited by the charge accumulation on the dielectric electrode surfaces at the end of the applied voltage, interrupts the plasma bullet propagation due to an opposing current along the ionization channel. The reason for this interesting phenomenon is explained in detail. The plasma bullet comes to an end when the helium mole fraction along the ionization channel, or applied voltage, or both, are less than some critical values. The presence of an inert gas channel in the surrounding air, such as helium or argon, has a critical role in plasma bullet formation and propagation. For this reason, a fluid dynamics study is employed by a commercially available simulation software, COMSOL, based on finite element method. Spatio

  2. Atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and wind variations between 50 and 200 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justus, C. G.; Woodrum, A.

    1972-01-01

    Data on atmospheric pressure, density, temperature and winds between 50 and 200 km were collected from sources including Meteorological Rocket Network data, ROBIN falling sphere data, grenade release and pitot tube data, meteor winds, chemical release winds, satellite data, and others. These data were analyzed by a daily difference method and results on the distribution statistics, magnitude, and spatial structure of the irregular atmospheric variations are presented. Time structures of the irregular variations were determined by the analysis of residuals from harmonic analysis of time series data. The observed height variations of irregular winds and densities are found to be in accord with a theoretical relation between these two quantities. The latitude variations (at 50 - 60 km height) show an increasing trend with latitude. A possible explanation of the unusually large irregular wind magnitudes of the White Sands MRN data is given in terms of mountain wave generation by the Sierra Nevada range about 1000 km west of White Sands. An analytical method is developed which, based on an analogy of the irregular motion field with axisymmetric turbulence, allows measured or model correlation or structure functions to be used to evaluate the effective frequency spectra of scalar and vector quantities of a spacecraft moving at any speed and at any trajectory elevation angle.

  3. Contact angle analysis of low-temperature cyclonic atmospheric pressure plasma modified polyethylene terephthalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chun; Chang, Ya-Chi; Wu, Shin-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) films are modified by cyclonic atmospheric pressure plasma. The experimentally measured gas phase temperature was around 30 o C to 90 o C, indicating that this cyclonic atmospheric pressure plasma can treat polymers without unfavorable thermal effects. The surface properties of cyclonic atmospheric pressure plasma-treated PET films were examined by the static contact angle measurements. The influences of plasma conditions such as treatment time, plasma power, nozzle distance, and gas flow rate on the PET surface properties were studied. It was found that such cyclonic atmospheric pressure plasma is very effective in PET surface modification, the reduced water contact angle was observed from 74 o to less than 37 o with only 10 s plasma treatment. The chemical composition of the PET films was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to study the changes in PET surface feature of the polymer surfaces due to plasma treatment. The photoemission plasma species in the continuous cyclone atmospheric pressure plasma was identified by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). From OES analysis, the plasma modification efficiency can be attributed to the interaction of oxygen-based plasma species in the plasma with PET surface. In this study, it shows a novel way for large scale polymeric surface modification by continuous cyclone atmospheric pressure plasma processing.

  4. Pressure drop in packed beds of spherical particles at ambient and elevated air temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Radojica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the experimental investigation of the particle friction factor for air flow through packed bed of particles at ambient and elevated temperatures. The experiments were performed by measuring the pressure drop across the packed bed, heated to the desired temperature by hot air. Glass spherical particles of seven different diameters were used. The temperature range of the air flowing through the packed bed was from 20ºC to 350ºC and the bed voidages were from 0.3574 to 0.4303. The obtained results were correlated using a number of available literature correlations. The overall best fit of all of the experimental data was obtained using Ergun [1] equation, with mean absolute deviation of 10.90%. Ergun`s equation gave somewhat better results in correlating the data at ambient temperature with mean absolute deviation of 9.77%, while correlation of the data at elevated temperatures gave mean absolute deviation of 12.38%. The vast majority of the correlations used gave better results when applied to ambient temperature data than to the data at elevated temperatures. Based on the results obtained, Ergun [1] equation is proposed for friction factor calculation both at ambient and at elevated temperatures. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON172022

  5. Risk Associated With The Decompression Of High Pressure High Temperature Fluids - Study On Black Oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, D. C.; Fosbøl, P. L.; Thomsen, K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluids produced from deep underground reservoirs may result in exponential increase in temperature. It is a consequence of adiabatic fluid decompression from the inverse Joule Thomson Effect (JTE). The phenomenon requires analysis in order to avoid any operational risks. This study evaluates...... the JTE upon decompression of black oil in high pressure-high temperature reservoirs. Also the effect caused by the presence of water and brine on the black oil is studied. The final temperature is calculated from the corresponding energy balance at isenthalpic and non-isenthalpic conditions. It is found...... as well, but the increase is less. The effect of water is studied at different water fractions; it results in lower increase of the final temperature than observed for black oil. The presence of brine in black oil is also studied at different brine fractions. The addition of brine increases the final...

  6. Fatigue crack growth behavior of pressure vessel steels and submerged arc weldments in a high-temperature pressurized water environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, P.K.; Logsdon, W.A.; Begley, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    The fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) properties of SA508 Cl 2a and SA533 Gr A Cl 2 pressure vessel steels and the corresponding automatic submerged arc weldments were developed in a high-temperature pressurized water (HPW) environment at 288 degrees C (550 degrees F) and 7.2 MPa (1044 psi) at load ratios of 0.20 and 0.50. The properties were generally conservative compared to American Society of Mechanical Engineers Section XI water environment reference curve. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the base materials, however, was faster in the HPW environment than in a 288 degrees C (550 degrees F) base line air environment. The growth rate of fatigue cracks in the two submerged arc weldments was also accelerated in the HPW environment but to a lesser degree than that demonstrated by the base materials. In the air environment, fatigue striations were observed, independent of material and load ratio, while in the HPW environment, some intergranular facets were present. The greater environmental effect on crack growth rates displayed by the base materials compared the weldments attributed to a different sulfide composition and morphology

  7. Pulsed Laser Techniques to Determine Lattice and Radiative Thermal Conductivity of Deep Planetary Materials at Extreme Pressure-Temperature Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Holtgrewe, N.; Konopkova, Z.; McWilliams, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal conductivity of deep planetary materials determines the planetary heat transport mode and properties (e.g. magnetic field) and can be used to decipher the planetary thermal history. Due to the lack of direct measurements of the lattice and radiative conductivity of the relevant materials at the planetary conditions, the current geodynamical models use theoretical calculations and extrapolations of the available experimental data. Here we describe our pulsed laser techniques that enable direct measurements of the lattice and radiative lattice conductivity of the Earth's mantle and core materials and also of noble gases and simple molecules present in the interiors of giant planets (e.g. hydrogen). Flash heating laser techniques working in a pump-probe mode that include time resolved two-side radiative and thermoreflection temperature probes employ various laser and photo-detector configurations, which provide a measure of the thermal fluxes propagating through the samples confined in the diamond anvil cell cavity. A supercontinuum ultra-bright broadband laser source empower accurate measurements of the optical properties of planetary materials used to extract the radiative conductivity. Finite element calculations serve to extract the temperature and pressure dependent thermal conductivity and temperature gradients across the sample. We report thermal conductivity measurements of the Earth's minerals (postperovskite, bridgmanite, ferropericlase) and their assemblies (pyrolite) and core materials (Fe and alloys with Si and O) at the realistic deep Earth's pressure temperature conditions. We thank J.-F.Lin, M. Murakami, J. Badro for contributing to this work.

  8. Investigation of temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a simulating pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Koji; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Taisuke; Sugimoto, Katsumi

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal hydraulics phenomena were discussed in a spray pipe of pressurizer. • Temperature fluctuation was investigated in a stratified steam-water two-phase. • Remarkable liquid temperature fluctuations were observed in the liquid layer. • The observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave. • The temperature fluctuations decreased with increasing dissolved oxygen. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a horizontal rectangular duct, which simulate a pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor, were studied experimentally. Vertical distributions of the temperature and the liquid velocity were measured with water of various dissolved oxygen concentrations. Large liquid temperature fluctuations were observed when the water was deaerated well and dissolved oxygen concentration was around 10 ppb. The large temperature fluctuations were not observed when the oxygen concentration was higher. It was shown that the observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave since the Richardson numbers were larger than 0.25 and the temperature fluctuation frequencies were around the Brunt-Väisälä frequencies in the present experimental conditions. The temperature fluctuations decreased by the non-condensable gas since the non-condensable gas suppressed the condensation and the temperature difference in the liquid layer was small.

  9. A Simple Mercury-Free Laboratory Apparatus to Study the Relationship between Pressure, Volume, and Temperature in a Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Donna; Sweeney, William V.; Mills, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    A simple and inexpensive mercury-free apparatus to measure the change in volume of a gas as a function of pressure at different temperatures is described. The apparatus is simpler than many found in the literature and can be used to study variations in pressure, volume, and temperature. (Contains 1 table and 7 figures.)

  10. Central inhibitory effect of α-methyldopa on blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature of renal hypertensive rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, F.P.; Ezer, Joseph; Jong, Wybren de

    The central inhibitory effect of α-methyldopa on blood pressure, heart rate and body temperature was studied in conscious renal hypertensive rats. Systemic administration of α-methyldopa decreased mean arterial blood pressure and body temperature and caused a short lasting increase in heart rate

  11. Local electrochemical characteristics at various operating pressure and temperature values using a segmented polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Sang; Kim, Dong Kyu; Kim, Min Soo [Dept. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kong, Im Mo [Korea Automotive Technology Institute, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Sung [School of Energy Systems Engineering, Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The pressurization of reactant gases is one of the solutions for generating considerable power in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell with a restricted size. Electrochemical phenomena, such as current density distribution and ohmic resistance distribution, were observed to validate the effects of operating pressure and temperature on cell performance. The test was conducted in galvanostatic mode, and an inhomogeneous current distribution was observed under a high-pressure condition, except at a high temperature. High-frequency resistance measurement was also conducted to observe local ohmic resistance. Result showed that high pressure and temperature reduced ohmic loss and improved overall cell performance.

  12. Patterns in new dimensionless quantities containing melting temperature, and their dependence on pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. WALZER

    1980-06-01

    Full Text Available The relationships existing between melting temperature and other
    macroscopic physical quantities are investigated. A new dimensionless
    quantity Q(1 not containing the Grtineisen parameter proves to be suited for serving in future studies as a tool for the determination of the melting temperature in the outer core of the Earth. The pressure dependence of more general dimensionless quantities Q„ is determined analytically and, for the chemical elements, numerically, too. The patterns of various interesting dimensionless quantities are shown in the Periodic Table and compared.

  13. Propargyl Recombination: Estimation of the High Temperature, Low Pressure Rate Constant from Flame Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Lund; Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov; Jensen, Anker

    2005-01-01

    3 at temperatures below 1000 K, while data at high temperature and low pressure only can be obtained from flames. In the present work, an estimate of the rate constant for the reaction at 1400 +/- 50 K and 20 Torr is obtained from analysis of the fuel-rich acetylene flame of Westmoreland, Howard......, and Longwell. Based on an accurate modeling of the flame structure, in particular the concentration profile of propargyl, we estimate the rate constant by fitting the kinetic modeling predictions to the measured benzene and phenyl profiles. The best agreement is obtained with k = 1.3 x 10(12) cm(3)/mol...

  14. Integrated LTCC pressure/flow/temperature multisensor for compressed air diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues.

  15. Integrated LTCC Pressure/Flow/Temperature Multisensor for Compressed Air Diagnostics†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Yannick; Maeder, Thomas; Boutinard-Rouelle, Grégoire; Barras, Aurélie; Craquelin, Nicolas; Ryser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We present a multisensor designed for industrial compressed air diagnostics and combining the measurement of pressure, flow, and temperature, integrated with the corresponding signal conditioning electronics in a single low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) package. The developed sensor may be soldered onto an integrated electro-fluidic platform by using standard surface mount device (SMD) technology, e.g., as a standard electronic component would be on a printed circuit board, obviating the need for both wires and tubes and thus paving the road towards low-cost integrated electro-fluidic systems. Several performance aspects of this device are presented and discussed, together with electronics design issues. PMID:22163518

  16. Calculation of Prestressed Pressure Vessel Taking into Account the Concrete Temperature Inhomogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Vladimir

    2018-03-01

    The paper deals with the problem of determining the stress state of the pressure vessel (PV) with considering the concrete temperature inhomogeneity. Such structures are widely used in heat power engineering, for example, in nuclear power engineering. The structures of such buildings are quite complex and a comprehensive analysis of the stress state in them can be carried out either by numerical or experimental methods. However, a number of fundamental questions can be solved on the basis of simplified models, in particular, studies of the effect on the stressed state of the inhomogeneity caused by the temperature field.

  17. The effect of pressure and temperature on aluminium hydrolysis: Implications to trace metal scavenging in natural waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    further decreased with increase in pressure. Four kinds of natural water systems with varied pH, temperature and pressure were studied. Al removal seems to be more favoured in river and seawater at low pressures, that is not favoured in the deep oceans...

  18. A new retrieval algorithm for tropospheric temperature, humidity and pressure profiling based on GNSS radio occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchengast, Gottfried; Li, Ying; Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Schwärz, Marc; Schwarz, Jakob; Nielsen, Johannes K.

    2017-04-01

    both WEGC systems, current OPSv5.6 and next-generation rOPS, are shown and discussed, based on both insights from individual profiles and statistical ensembles, and compared to moist air retrieval results from the UCAR Boulder and ROM-SAF Copenhagen centers. The results show that the new algorithmic scheme improves the temperature, humidity and pressure retrieval performance, in particular also the robustness including for integrated uncertainty estimation for large-scale applications, over the previous algorithms. The new rOPS-implemented algorithm will therefore be used in the first large-scale reprocessing towards a tropospheric climate data record 2001-2016 by the rOPS, including its integrated uncertainty propagation.

  19. An investigation of temperature measurement methods in nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acton, R.U.; Gill, W.; Sais, D.J.; Schulze, D.H.; Nakos, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project was to provide an assessment of several methods by which the temperature of a commercial nuclear power plant reactor pressure vessel (RPV) could be measured during an annealing process. This project was a coordinated effort between DOE's Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology; DOE's Light Water Reactor Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories; and the Electric Power Research Institute's Non- Destructive Evaluation Center. Ball- thermocouple probes similar to those described in NUREG/CR-5760, spring-loaded, metal- sheathed thermocouple probes, and 1778 air- suspended thermocouples were investigated in experiments that heated a section of an RPV wall to simulate a thermal annealing treatment. A parametric study of ball material, emissivity, thermal conductivity, and thermocouple function locations was conducted. Also investigated was a sheathed thermocouple failure mode known as shunting (electrical breakdown of insulation separating the thermocouple wires). Large errors were found between the temperature as measured by the probes and the true RPV wall temperature during heat-up and cool-down. At the annealing soak temperature, in this case 454 degrees C [850'F], all sensors measured the same temperature within about ±5% (23.6 degrees C [42.5 degrees F]). Because of these errors, actual RPV wall heating and cooling rates differed from those prescribed (by up to 29%). Shunting does not appear to be a problem under these conditions. The large temperature measurement errors led to the development of a thermal model that predicts the RPV wall temperature from the temperature of a ball- probe. Comparisons between the model and the experimental data for ball-probes indicate that the model could be a useful tool in predicting the actual RPV temperature based on the indicated ball- probe temperature. The model does not predict the temperature as well for the spring-loaded and air suspended probes

  20. Origin of the critical temperature discontinuity in superconducting sulfur under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monni, M.; Bernardini, F.; Sanna, A.; Profeta, G.; Massidda, S.

    2017-02-01

    Elemental sulfur shows a superconducting phase at high pressure (above 100 GPa), with critical temperatures that rise up to 20 K [Phys. Rev. B 65, 064504 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevB.65.064504; Nature (London) 525, 73 (2015), 10.1038/nature14964] and presenting a jump at about 160 GPa, close to a structural phase transition to the β -Po phase. In this work we present a theoretical and fully ab initio characterization of sulfur based on superconducting density functional theory (SCDFT), focusing in the pressure range from 100 to 200 GPa. Calculations result in very good agreement with available experiments and point out that the origin of the critical temperature discontinuity is not related to the structural phase transition but induced by an electronic Lifshitz transition. This brings a strongly (interband) coupled electron pocket available for the superconducting condensation.

  1. Analysis of temperature and pressure distribution of containers for nuclear waste material disposal in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbibber, L. E.; Parker, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    A computer program was adapted from a previous generation program to analyze the temperature and internal pressure response of a radioactive nuclear waste material disposal container following impact on the earth. This program considers component melting, LiH dissociation, temperature dependent properties and pressure and container stress response. Analyses were performed for 21 cases with variations in radioactive power level, container geometry, degree of deformation of the container, degree of burial and soil properties. Results indicated that the integrity of SS-316 containers could be maintained with partial burials of either underformed or deformed containers. Results indicated that completely buried waste containers, with power levels above 5 kW, experienced creep stress rupture failures in 4 to 12 days.

  2. Exploring the limits: A low-pressure, low-temperature Haber-Bosch process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Medford, Andrew James; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Khan, Tuhin Suvra; Bligaard, T.; Nørskov, J. K.

    2014-04-01

    The Haber-Bosch process for ammonia synthesis has been suggested to be the most important invention of the 20th century, and called the ‘Bellwether reaction in heterogeneous catalysis’. We examine the catalyst requirements for a new low-pressure, low-temperature synthesis process. We show that the absence of such a process for conventional transition metal catalysts can be understood as a consequence of a scaling relation between the activation energy for N2 dissociation and N adsorption energy found at the surface of these materials. A better catalyst cannot obey this scaling relation. We define the ideal scaling relation characterizing the most active catalyst possible, and show that it is theoretically possible to have a low pressure, low-temperature Haber-Bosch process. The challenge is to find new classes of catalyst materials with properties approaching the ideal, and we discuss the possibility that transition metal compounds have such properties.

  3. Liquefaction of Warukin Formation Coal, Barito Basin, South Kalimantan on Low Pressure and Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edy Nursanto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Research focusing on the quality of coal in Warukin Formation has been conducted in coal outcrops located on Tabalong area, particularly in 3 coal seams, namely Wara 120 which consists of low rank coal (lignite. Meanwhile, coals in seam Tutupan 210 and Paringin 712 are medium rank coal (sub-bituminous. Coal liquefaction is conducted in an autoclave on low pressure and temperature. Pressure during the process is 14 psi and temperature is 120oC. Catalyst used are alumina, hydrogen donor NaOH and water solvent. Liquefaction is conducted in three times variables of 30 minutes, 60 minutes and 90 minutes. This process shows following yield : Wara seam 120: 25.37% - 51.27%; Tutupan seam 210: 3.02%-15.45% and seam Paringin 712:1.99%-11.95%. The average result of yield shows that coals in seam Wara has higher yield conversion than coals in seam Tutupan and Paringin.

  4. Solubility Measurements and Modeling of Zinc, Lead and Iron Sulfides at High Temperatures and High Pressures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carolina Figueroa Murcia, Diana; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Thomsen, Kaj

    Solubility measurements of sulfides in aqueous solutions are necessary to understand the behaviour of these scaling minerals in geothermal and oil reservoirs. The low solubility levels of Zinc Sulfide (ZnS), Lead Sulfide (PbS) and Iron Sulfide (FeS) make the solubility measurements a challenging...... task. Consequently existing data are rare and scattered. The aim of this work is to develop a reliable experimental procedure and to measure solubility of sulfides at high temperature and pressures. Additionally the experimental data are used for estimation of the solid-liquid equilibrium using...... the Extended UNIQUAC model. The experimental determination of the solubility of ZnS, PbS and FeS is carried out at temperatures up to 200°C and pressures up to 60 bars. The minerals in their pure form are added to ultra-pure water previously degassed with nitrogen. The aqueous solution is prepared in a reduced...

  5. Pressure-Temperature Phase Diagram of (TMTSF){sub 2}BF{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Yeon Jung [Dept. of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-08-15

    (TMTSF){sub 2}BF{sub 4} containing non-centrosymmetric anions is well known to exhibit a metal insulator transition around 37 K by ordering of the anions with a q{sub 2}=(1/2, 1/2, 1/2) wave vector. We established pressure-temperature phase diagram of the (TMTSF){sub 2}BF{sub 4} compound and showed that it can belong to the general phase diagram of the (TMTSF){sub 2}X family. Application of hydrostatic pressure decreases the anion ordering transition temperature and the superconducting state is finally stabilized below 3.77 K under 7.7 kbar. Magnetoresistance measurement on the (TMTSF){sub 2}BF{sub 4} under 7.8 kbar is performed but neither the field-induced spin-density-wave state nor the rapid oscillation is observed up to 9 T.

  6. High-pressure high-temperature experiments on delta-MoN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezinge, A.; Geneva Univ.; Yvon, K.; Muller, J.; Lengauer, W.; Ettmayer, P.

    1987-01-01

    High-pressure (6 GPa) high-temperature (1800 K) experiments on hexagonal delta-MoN were performed in an attempt to transform this phase to the cubic B1-MoN phase. No transformation was observed. The structure of delta-MoN after the high-pressure treatment was refined from X-ray powder diffraction data and found to consist of a NiAs-type related arrangement of Mo atoms which form triangular clusters and N atoms which are situated in trigonal prismatic holes. The superconducting critical temperature reached Tsub(c) =15.1 K. These are the first measurements on well characterized delta-MoN samples (author)

  7. Prediction of Pressure and Temperature Gradients in the Tokamak Plasma Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, W. M.

    2017-10-01

    An extended plasma fluid theory that takes into account kinetic ion orbit loss and electromagnetic forces in the continuity, momentum and energy balances, as well as atomic physics and radiation, has been used to reveal the explicit dependence of the temperature and pressure gradients in the tokamak edge plasma on these various factors. Combining the ion radial momentum balance and the Ohm's Law expression for Er reveals the dependence of the radial ion pressure gradient on VxB forces driven by radial particle fluxes, which depend on ion orbit loss, and other factors. The strong temperature gradients measured in the H-mode edge pedestal could certainly be associated with radiative and atomic physics edge cooling effects and the strong reduction in ion and energy fluxes due to ion orbit loss, as well as to the possible reductions in thermal diffusivities that is usually assumed to be the cause. Work supported by USDOE under DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  8. Study of the impact of gas temperature and pressure on image quality of lithography objective lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chao; Xing, Tingwen

    2013-08-01

    The aim of present work is to estimate the impact of gas refractive index shift on the image quality of projection lens caused by the change of environment condition. This work in the paper consists of two parts: a)when temperature rises or reduces, how gas refractive index changes and the wave front error comes up; b)when gas pressure changes. The model objective lens developed for simulation is a US patent lens whose NA patent lens, 5nm, the change caused by gas temperature and pressure can't be neglected. It proves the necessary of compensating or controlling the optical path change resulted from gas refractive index shift during the lithography projection lens work process.

  9. Design and analysis of push pipe joint under internal pressure and temperature loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abid, M.; Alam, K.

    2005-01-01

    Pipe joints flanged or welded are commonly used in industry for different applications ranging from sewerage to the high pressure and temperature applications. However, with the rapidly changing technological trends, for optimized space such as for heat exchanger applications, pipe joint design needs special consideration, especially for the internal pipe where no flanged/bolted joint due to space constraint can be used. In addition, where joint opening/closing is the requirement for maintenance or other functional purposes, it becomes inevitable to use some special design. In this paper, a push joint proposed is designed, analyzed, optimized and tested for safe stress and operating conditions. An experimental test rig is designed and tests are performed for internal pressure and temperature separately and joint's behaviour is analyzed in detail for any leaks. FEA results are compared and verified with the mathematical results. Based on the experimental observations, the joint is safe as no leaks are observed. (author)

  10. An Explosive Range Model Based on the Gas Composition, Temperature, and Pressure during Air Drilling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air drilling is low cost and effectively improves the penetration rate and causes minimal damage to liquid-sensitive pay zones. However, there is a potential downhole explosion when combustible gas mixed with drilling fluid reaches the combustible condition. In this paper, based on the underground combustion mechanism, an explosive range calculation model is established. This model couples the state equation and the empirical formula method, which considers the inert gas content, pressure, mixed gas component, and temperature. The result shows that increase of the inert gas content narrows the explosive range, while increase of the gas temperature and pressure improves the explosive range. A case in Chongqing, China, is used to validate the explosive range calculation model.

  11. Back reaction between restite and melt: Implications for geothermobarometry and pressure-temperature paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegsman, Leo M.; Hensen, Bas J.

    1998-12-01

    Partial melting is an important process in high-grade metamorphism and is responsible for the production of large volumes of melt in the Earth's crust. Unless melt extraction is complete, in-situ crystallizing melt back-reacts with the restite upon cooling. In the Northampton Block, Western Australia, spinel formed by high-temperature (˜850 °C) partial melting of metapelites is separated from leucosome by garnet ± sillimanite or cordierite ± sillimanite coronas. Formation of the coronas by back reaction with a silica-undersaturated melt is inferred because: (1) textural evidence indicates that quartz was exhausted as a result of progressive dehydration melting before formation of spinel + melt; (2) the coronitic phases are never in direct contact with quartz of the leucosome; (3) barometry on cordierite- and garnet-bearing equilibria with spinel gives conflicting pressures (8.0 ± 0.5 and 3.3 ± 0.2 kbar, respectively, at 850 °C) if reactions with quartz are assumed, but pressure estimates converge on 6.5 ± 0.5 kbar at lower silica activity, aSiO2 =0.85 ± 0.02. These results indicate that the use of corona textures for the derivation of pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions and pressure-temperature vectors in migmatites should be reconsidered. Such coronas may result from a heating-cooling cycle without substantial change in pressure. Back reaction with residual melt is likely to be an important process in migmatites generally, affecting both the solid residuum and the leucosome composition.

  12. Electrical resistance measurement in lithium under high pressure and low temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Shimizu, K; Amaya, K

    2002-01-01

    Lithium is known as a 'simple metal' and the lightest alkaline metal in the periodic table. At ambient pressure lithium forms a body-centred-cubic structure and the conduction electrons are considered to be almost free from interaction with the atomic core. However, Neaton and Ashcroft (Neaton J B and Ashcroft N W 1999 Nature 400 141) predicted that dense lithium at around 100 GPa will be found to transform to a low-symmetry phase and show a semi-metallic behaviour, in their calculation. Recently Hanfland et al (Hanfland M, Syassen K, Christensen N E and Novikov D L 2000 Nature 408 174) reported the experimental behaviour of the existence of new high-pressure phase of lithium above 40 GPa which tends towards symmetry-breaking transitions. Here we report electrical resistance measurements on lithium performed at pressures up to 35 GPa at the temperature of 80 K.

  13. Electrical resistance measurement in lithium under high pressure and low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, K [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Ishikawa, H [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Amaya, K [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2002-11-11

    Lithium is known as a 'simple metal' and the lightest alkaline metal in the periodic table. At ambient pressure lithium forms a body-centred-cubic structure and the conduction electrons are considered to be almost free from interaction with the atomic core. However, Neaton and Ashcroft (Neaton J B and Ashcroft N W 1999 Nature 400 141) predicted that dense lithium at around 100 GPa will be found to transform to a low-symmetry phase and show a semi-metallic behaviour, in their calculation. Recently Hanfland et al (Hanfland M, Syassen K, Christensen N E and Novikov D L 2000 Nature 408 174) reported the experimental behaviour of the existence of new high-pressure phase of lithium above 40 GPa which tends towards symmetry-breaking transitions. Here we report electrical resistance measurements on lithium performed at pressures up to 35 GPa at the temperature of 80 K.

  14. Pressure dependence of critical temperature of bulk FeSe from spin fluctuation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Peter; Kreisel, Andreas; Wang, Yan; Tomic, Milan; Jeschke, Harald; Jacko, Anthony; Valenti, Roser; Maier, Thomas; Scalapino, Douglas

    2013-03-01

    The critical temperature of the 8K superconductor FeSe is extremely sensitive to pressure, rising to a maximum of 40K at about 10GPa. We test the ability of the current generation of fluctuation exchange pairing theories to account for this effect, by downfolding the density functional theory electronic structure for each pressure to a tight binding model. The Fermi surface found in such a procedure is then used with fixed Hubbard parameters to determine the pairing strength using the random phase approximation for the spin singlet pairing vertex. We find that the evolution of the Fermi surface captured by such an approach is alone not sufficient to explain the observed pressure dependence, and discuss alternative approaches. PJH, YW, AK were supported by DOE DE-FG02-05ER46236, the financial support of MT, HJ, and RV from the DFG Schwerpunktprogramm 1458 is kindly acknowledged.

  15. Feasibility of Locating Leakages in Sewage Pressure Pipes Using the Distributed Temperature Sensing Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Apperl, Benjamin; Pressl, Alexander; Schulz, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    The cost effective maintenance of underwater pressure pipes for sewage disposal in Austria requires the detection and localization of leakages. Extrusion of wastewater in lakes can heavily influence the water and bathing quality of surrounding waters. The Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) technology is a widely used technique for oil and gas pipeline leakage detection. While in pipeline leakage detection, fiber optic cables are installed permanently at the outside or within the protective...

  16. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  17. High-pressure cell for luminescence studies of condensed phases at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variano, B.F.; Brenner, H.C.; Daniels, W.B.

    1986-01-01

    A clamped optical cell for high-pressure low-temperature fluorescence and phosphorescence studies is described. A particular innovation is the use of a bifurcated fiber-optic lightguide to enable sample illumination and emission collection with a single optical window. This very simple type of cell is adaptable to a variety of optical setups and is easily assembled and disassembled for sample mounting

  18. Pressure behavior of a steel pipeline experiencing creep at normal temperatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gajdoš, Lubomír; Šperl, Martin; Pavelková, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 3 (2018), č. článku 05018001. ISSN 0893-1321 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TE02000162 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : tightness test * pressure decrease * steel pipe * room temperature creep (RTC) Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 1.107, year: 2016 https://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/%28ASCE%29AS.1943-5525.0000846

  19. Analysis of the structural stability of the smectite submitted to high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alabarse, Frederico Gil

    2009-10-01

    The thermal stability of bentonite is of particular interest for containment barrier in nuclear waste disposal facilities. However, very little is known about the stability of smectite (principal component of bentonite) under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions (HPHT). The objective of this work was to investigate the stability of the smectite structure under HP-HT conditions. The HP-HT experiments were performed on toroidal chambers (TC) with pressure up 7.7 GPa and temperatures of 1000 deg C. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction after the HP-HT processing. Furthermore, one sample from the original material was analyzed using Fourier transformed infra-red (FTIR) in situ measurements on a diamond anvil cell (DAC) in experiments up to 12 GPa. The original sample of bentonite, calcium dioctahedral montmorillonite with small fraction of quartz, was characterized by FTIR, XRD, X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). In the experiment performed using the DAC up to 12 GPa, the FTIR in situ measurements analysis showed that the smectite structure is stable with a reversible deformation in the Si-O bond and that the smectite did not loose water. Experiments performed in TC at 7.7 GPa of pressure and 250 deg C of temperature, during 3.5 h showed, after analysis by XRD and FTIR, that the smectite structure is stable and did not loose water. Experiments performed in TC at 7.7 GPa of pressure and 1000 deg C of temperature, during 3.5 h showed, after analysis by XRD and SEM, the transformation of bentonite to the mineral assemblage: Coesite, Quartz, Kyanite and Pyrope. (author)

  20. A high-temperature, high-pressure, silver-silver chloride reference electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.; Bailey, M.G.; Clarke, C.F.; Ikeda, B.M.; Litke, C.D.; Ryan, S.R.

    1989-05-01

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, silver-silver chloride reference electrode is described. This report is meant to serve as a user's guide to the experimentalist. Consequently, the design and construction of the electrode are dealt with in some detail. The problems that may be encountered, along with their possible causes and remedies, are also discussed. Conversion factors are given for both internal and external reference electrodes, so that measured potentials can be related to the standard hydrogen electrode scale

  1. Quasiharmonic analysis of protein energy landscapes from pressure-temperature molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Jocelyn M.; Hemley, Russell J.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2017-09-01

    Positional fluctuations of an atom in a protein can be described as motion in an effective local energy minimum created by the surrounding protein atoms. The dependence of atomic fluctuations on both temperature (T) and pressure (P) has been used to probe the nature of these minima, which are generally described as harmonic in experiments such as x-ray crystallography and neutron scattering. Here, a quasiharmonic analysis method is presented in which the P-T dependence of atomic fluctuations is in terms of an intrinsic isobaric thermal expansivity αP and an intrinsic isothermal compressibility κT. The method is tested on previously reported mean-square displacements from P-T molecular dynamics simulations of lysozyme, which were interpreted to have a pressure-independent dynamical transition Tg near 200 K and a change in the pressure dependence near 480 MPa. Our quasiharmonic analysis of the same data shows that the P-T dependence can be described in terms of αP and κT where below Tg, the temperature dependence is frozen at the Tg value. In addition, the purported transition at 480 MPa is reinterpreted as a consequence of the pressure dependence of Tg and the quasiharmonic frequencies. The former also indicates that barrier heights between substates are pressure dependent in these data. Furthermore, the insights gained from this quasiharmonic analysis, which was of the energy landscape near the native state of a protein, suggest that similar analyses of other simulations may be useful in understanding such phenomena as pressure-induced protein unfolding.

  2. A novel interferometric characterization technique for 3D analyses at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshanghias, Ali; Bardong, Jochen; Pulko, Jozef; Binder, Alfred

    2018-04-01

    Advanced optical measurement techniques are always of interest for the characterization of engineered surfaces. When pressure or temperature modules are also incorporated, these techniques will turn into robust and versatile methodologies for various applications such as performance monitoring of devices in service conditions. However, some microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and MOEMS devices require performance monitoring at their final stage, i.e. enclosed or packaged. That necessitates measurements through a protective liquid, plastic, or glass, whereas the conventional objective lenses are not designed for such media. Correspondingly, in the current study, the development and tailoring of a 3D interferometer as a means for measuring the topography of reflective surfaces under transmissive media is sought. For topography measurements through glass, water and oil, compensation glass plates were designed and incorporated into the Michelson type interferometer objectives. Moreover, a customized chamber set-up featuring an optical access for the observation of the topographical changes at increasing pressure and temperature conditions was constructed and integrated into the apparatus. Conclusively, the in situ monitoring of the elastic deformation of sensing microstructures inside MEMS packages was achieved. These measurements were performed at a defined pressure (0–100 bar) and temperature (25 °C–180 °C).

  3. Viscosity measurements of water at high temperatures and pressures using dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Shigeru; Ghosh, Swapan K; Alargova, Rossitza G; Tsujii, Kaoru

    2006-09-21

    The application of dynamic light scattering to measure viscosity of water at high temperatures and pressures is demonstrated. Viscosity was obtained from the translational diffusion coefficient of probe particles dispersed in the medium by the Einstein-Stokes relationship. Measurements were carried out with polystyrene latex, colloidal silica, and colloidal gold. Under a constant pressure of 25 MPa, good agreement was found between the measured and calculated viscosities up to 275 degrees C with the polystyrene latex, 200 degrees C with the colloidal silica, and 297 degrees C with the colloidal gold. It was found that failure of the measurements at high temperatures is ascribed to change in either the dispersion stability or chemical stability of the probe particles. The present results indicate that the technique could also be used for other supercritical fluids having high critical temperature and pressure, such as methanol (T(c) = 239.4 degrees C, P(c) = 8.1 MPa) and ethanol (T(c) = 243.1 degrees C, P(c) = 6.4 MPa).

  4. Assessment of Fluctuation Patterns Similarity in Temperature and Vapor Pressure Using Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Araghi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Period and trend are two main effective and important factors in hydro-climatological time series and because of this importance, different methods have been introduced and applied to study of them, until now. Most of these methods are statistical basis and they are classified in the non-parametric tests. Wavelet transform is a mathematical based powerful method which has been widely used in signal processing and time series analysis in recent years. In this research, trend and main periodic patterns similarity in temperature and vapor pressure has been studied in Babolsar, Tehran and Shahroud synoptic stations during 55 years period (from 1956 to 2010, using wavelet method and the sequential Mann-Kendall trend test. The results show that long term fluctuation patterns in temperature and vapor pressure have more correlations in the arid and semi-arid climates, as well as short term oscillation patterns in temperature and vapor pressure in the humid climates, and these dominant periods increase with the aridity of region.

  5. EFFECTS OF PRESSURE AND TEMPERATURE ON ULTRAFILTRATION HOLLOW FIBER MEMBRANE IN MOBILE WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSDIANAH RAMLI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In Sabah, Malaysia, there are still high probability of limited clean water access in rural area and disaster site. Few villages had been affected in Pitas due to improper road access, thus building a water treatment plant there might not be feasible. Recently, Kundasang area had been affected by earthquake that caused water disruption to its people due to the damage in the underground pipes and water tanks. It has been known that membrane technology brought ease in making mobile water treatment system that can be transported to rural or disaster area. In this study, hollow fiber membrane used in a mobile water treatment system due to compact and ease setup. Hollow fiber membrane was fabricated into small module at 15 and 30 fibers to suit the mobile water treatment system for potable water production of at least 80 L/day per operation. The effects of transmembrane pressure (TMP and feed water temperature were investigated. It was found that permeate flux increases by more than 96% for both 15 and 30 fiber bundles with increasing pressure in the range of 0.25 to 3.0 bar but dropped when the pressure reached maximum. Lower temperature of 17 to 18˚C increase the water viscosity by 15% from normal temperature of water at 24˚C, making the permeate flux decreases. The fabricated modules effectively removed 96% turbidity of the surface water sample tested.

  6. Ab Initio High Pressure and Temperature Investigation on Cubic PbMoO3 Perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Sajad Ahmad; Srivastava, Vipul; Sakalle, Umesh Kumar

    2017-12-01

    A combined high pressure and temperature investigation on recently reported cubic perovskite PbMoO3 have been performed within the most accurate density functional theory (DFT). The structure was found stable in cubic paramagnetic phase. The DFT calculated analytical and experimental lattice constant were found in good agreement. The analytical tolerance factor as well as the elastic properties further verifies the cubic stability for PbMoO3. The spin polarized electronic band structure and density of states presented metallic nature with symmetry in up and down states. The insignificant magnetic moment also confirms the paramagnetic nature for the compound. The high pressure elastic and mechanical study up to 35 GPa reveal the structural stability of the material in this pressure range. The compound was found to establish a ductile nature. The electrical conductivity obtained from the band structure results show a decreasing trend with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of thermodynamic parameters such as specific heat ( C v), thermal expansion ( α) has also been evaluated.

  7. Microbubble-based fiber-optic Fabry-Perot pressure sensor for high-temperature application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Jia, Pinggang; Fang, Guocheng; Liang, Hao; Liang, Ting; Liu, Wenyi; Xiong, Jijun

    2018-03-10

    Using arc discharge technology, we fabricated a fiber-optic Fabry-Perot (FP) pressure sensor with a very low temperature coefficient based on a microbubble that can be applied in a high-temperature environment. The thin-walled microbubble can be fabricated by heating the gas-pressurized hollow silica tube (HST) using a commercial fusion splicer. Then, the well-cut single-mode fiber (SMF) was inserted into the microbubble, and they were fused together. Thus, the FP cavity can be formed between the end of the SMF and the inner surface of the microbubble. The diameter of the microbubble can be up to 360 μm with the thickness of the wall being approximately 0.5 μm. Experimental results show that such a sensor has a linear sensitivity of approximately -6.382  nm/MPa, -5.912  nm/MPa at 20°C, and 600°C within the pressure range of 1 MPa. Due to the thermal expansion coefficient of the SMF being slightly larger than that of silica, we can fuse the SMF and the HST with different lengths; thus, the sensor has a very low temperature coefficient of approximately 0.17 pm/°C.

  8. Simultaneous optimization of monolayer formation factors, including temperature, to significantly improve nucleic acid hybridization efficiency on gold substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pris, Andrew D; Ostrowski, Sara G; Garaas, Sarah D

    2010-04-20

    Past literature investigations have optimized various single factors used in the formation of thiolated, single stranded DNA (ss-DNA) monolayers on gold. In this study a more comprehensive approach is taken, where a design of experiment (DOE) is employed to simultaneously optimize all of the factors involved in construction of the capture monolayer used in a fluorescence-based hybridization assay. Statistical analysis of the fluorescent intensities resulting from the DOE provides empirical evidence for the importance and the optimal levels of traditional and novel factors included in this investigation. We report on the statistical importance of a novel factor, temperature of the system during monolayer formation of the capture molecule and lateral spacer molecule, and how proper usage of this temperature factor increased the hybridization signal 50%. An initial theory of how the physical factor of heat is mechanistically supplementing the function of the lateral spacer molecule is provided.

  9. Strength and Anisotropy in Tournemire Shale: Temperature, Pressure and Time Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnelye, A.; Schubnel, A.; Zhi, G.; David, C.; Dick, P.

    2017-12-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. We conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France, under two different temperatures (26°C, 75°C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1along, perpendicular and 45° to bedding). In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1 15 minutes. The brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed 50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. During creep, ultrasonic wave velocities first decreased, and then increased gradually. The magnitude of elastic wave velocity variations showed an important orientation and temperature dependence: velocities measured perpendicular to bedding showed increased variation, variation that was enhanced at higher temperature and higher pressure. The case of complete elastic anisotropy reversal was observed for sample deformed perpendicular to bedding, with amount of axial strain needed to reach anisotropy reversal reduced at higher temperature. SEM observations highlight the competition between crack growth, sealing/healing, and possibly mineral rotation, pressure solution or anisotropic compaction during creep defromation. Our study highlights that the short-term peak strength has little meaning in shale material, which can over-consolidate importantly by `plastic' flow. In addition, we show that elastic

  10. Adaptation to fluctuating temperatures in an RNA virus is driven by the most stringent selective pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Arribas

    Full Text Available The frequency of change in the selective pressures is one of the main factors driving evolution. It is generally accepted that constant environments select specialist organisms whereas changing environments favour generalists. The particular outcome achieved in either case also depends on the relative strength of the selective pressures and on the fitness costs of mutations across environments. RNA viruses are characterized by their high genetic diversity, which provides fast adaptation to environmental changes and helps them evade most antiviral treatments. Therefore, the study of the adaptive possibilities of RNA viruses is highly relevant for both basic and applied research. In this study we have evolved an RNA virus, the bacteriophage Qβ, under three different temperatures that either were kept constant or alternated periodically. The populations obtained were analyzed at the phenotypic and the genotypic level to characterize the evolutionary process followed by the virus in each case and the amount of convergent genetic changes attained. Finally, we also investigated the influence of the pre-existent genetic diversity on adaptation to high temperature. The main conclusions that arise from our results are: i under periodically changing temperature conditions, evolution of bacteriophage Qβ is driven by the most stringent selective pressure, ii there is a high degree of evolutionary convergence between replicated populations and also among populations evolved at different temperatures, iii there are mutations specific of a particular condition, and iv adaptation to high temperatures in populations differing in their pre-existent genetic diversity takes place through the selection of a common set of mutations.

  11. Nonlinear intersubband absorption and refractive index changes in square and graded quantum well modulated by temperature and Hydrostatic pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, Emine; Sokmen, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effects of hydrostatic pressure and temperature on the linear and nonlinear intersubband transitions and the refractive index changes in the conduction band of square and graded quantum well (QW) are theoretically calculated within the framework of effective mass approximation. Results obtained show that the energy levels in different QWs and intersubband properties can be modified and controlled by the hydrostatic pressure and temperature. The modulation of the absorption coefficients and the refractive index changes which can be suitable for good performance optical modulators and various infrared optical device applications can be easily obtained by tuning the temperature and the hydrostatic pressure. - Highlights: ► Linear and nonlinear optical processes can be changed by pressure and temperature. ► Magnitude and energy of absorption peaks decrease as pressure increases. ► Refractive index changes in magnitude and energy decrease by increasing pressure. ► Energy differences are dependent on pressure, temperature and QW shapes. ► By increasing pressure we can obtain redshift in the optical transitions. ► For SQW, the absorption spectrum shows blueshift as the temperature increases. ► For GQW, the absorption spectrum shows redshift by temperature.

  12. Simultaneous measurement of temperature and pressure by a single fiber Bragg grating with a broadened reflection spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tuan; Qiao, Xueguang; Jia, Zhenan; Zhao, Qida; Dong, Xiaoyi

    2006-05-01

    Simultaneous measurement of temperature and pressure with a single fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based on a broadened reflection spectrum is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. A novel double-hole structure of a cantilever beam is designed, and a FBG is affixed on the nonuniform strain area of the cantilever beam. The Bragg reflection bandwidth is sensitive to the spatially gradient strain but is free from the spatially uniform temperature. The wavelength peak shift and the bandwidth broadening of the FBG with a change of temperature and pressure allow for simultaneous discrimination between the temperature and the pressure effects. Standard deviation errors of 1.4 degrees C and 1.8 kPa were obtained with temperature and pressure ranges of 20 degrees C-100 degrees C and 0-80 kPa, respectively. This novel and low-cost sensor approach has considerable potential applications for temperature-insensitive strain measurement.

  13. Fabrication of High Temperature and High Pressure Vessel for the Fuel Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kook Nam; Lee, Jong Min; Sim, Bong Shick; Shon, Jae Min; Ahn, Seung Ho; Yoo, Seong Yeon

    2007-01-01

    The Fuel Test Loop(FTL) which is capable of an irradiation testing under a similar operating condition to those of PWR and CANDU nuclear power plants has been developed and installed in HANARO, KAERI. It is consisted of In-Pile Section(IPS) and Out-of Pile System(OPS). The IPS which is located inside the pool is divided into 3-parts; they are in-pool pipes, IVA(IPS Vessel Assembly) and the support structures. The test fuel is loaded inside a double wall, inner pressure vessel and outer pressure vessel, to keep the functionality of the reactor coolant pressure boundary. The localization of the IVA is achieved by manufacturing through local company and the functional test and verification were done through pressure drop, vibration, hydraulic and leakage tests. The brazing technique of the instrument lines has been checked for its functionality and yield. A IVA has been manufactured by local technique and will be finally tested under out of the high temperature and high pressure test

  14. Microsoft excel spreadsheets for calculation of P-V-T relations and thermodynamic properties from equations of state of MgO, diamond and nine metals as pressure markers in high-pressure and high-temperature experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Tatiana S.; Dorogokupets, Peter I.; Dymshits, Anna M.; Danilov, Boris S.; Litasov, Konstantin D.

    2016-09-01

    We present Microsoft Excel spreadsheets for calculation of thermodynamic functions and P-V-T properties of MgO, diamond and 9 metals, Al, Cu, Ag, Au, Pt, Nb, Ta, Mo, and W, depending on temperature and volume or temperature and pressure. The spreadsheets include the most common pressure markers used in in situ experiments with diamond anvil cell and multianvil techniques. The calculations are based on the equation of state formalism via the Helmholtz free energy. The program was developed using Visual Basic for Applications in Microsoft Excel and is a time-efficient tool to evaluate volume, pressure and other thermodynamic functions using T-P and T-V data only as input parameters. This application is aimed to solve practical issues of high pressure experiments in geosciences and mineral physics.

  15. In Situ XANES of U and Th in Silicate Liquids at High Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallmann, G.; Wykes, J.; Berry, A.; O'Neill, H. S.; Cline, C. J., II; Turner, S.; Rushmer, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    Although the chemical environments of elements in silicate melts at specific conditions of temperature, pressure and oxygen fugacity (fO2) are often inferred from measurements after quenching the melts to glasses, it is widely recognized that changes may occur during the quenching process, making measurements in situ at high pressure and temperature highly desirable. A case of importance in geochemistry is the speciation of uranium in silicate melts as a function of pressure. Evidence from mineral-melt partitioning and XANES (X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure) spectroscopy of glasses suggests that U5+ may be stable at low pressures in the Earth's crust (along with U4+ or U6+, depending on fO2) where basaltic liquids crystallize, but not in the Earth's upper mantle where peridotite partially melts to produce such liquids. To test these observations we recorded in situ transmission U and Th L3-edge XANES spectra of U and Th-doped silicate liquids at 1.6 GPa and 1350°C using the D-DIA apparatus at the X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Beamline of the Australian Synchrotron. Data for thorium, which occurs exclusively as a tetravalent cation under terrestrial fO2 conditions, were collected as a `control' to monitor for changes in coordination. The cell assembly consisted of a boron-epoxy cube as pressure medium, alumina sleeve and cylindrical graphite heater. The starting mix, a powdered synthetic average MORB silicate glass doped with 2 wt.% of U and Th, was loaded into San Carlos olivine capsules along with solid oxygen buffers (either Re-ReO2 or Ru-RuO2) in a sandwich arrangement. The capsule was then placed inside the graphite heater and insulated with crushable MgO powder. Temperature was monitored using a type D thermocouple. U and Th L3-edge XANES spectra were recorded throughout the heating/compression cycle and then after quenching. Our preliminary assessment indicates that the U-XANES spectra recorded for the liquid in situ at high pressure and temperature and

  16. Investigation of the effects of pressure gradient, temperature and wall temperature ratio on the stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders and gas turbine vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, H. T.; Duffy, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    Low and high pressure shock tubes were designed and constructed for the purpose of obtaining heat transfer data over a temperature range of 390 to 2500 K, pressures of 0.3 to 42 atm, and Mach numbers of 0.15 to 1.5 with and without pressure gradient. A square test section with adjustable top and bottom walls was constructed to produce the favorable and adverse pressure gradient over the flat plate with heat gages. A water cooled gas turbine nozzle cascade which is attached to the high pressure shock tube was obtained to measuse the heat flux over pressure and suction surfaces. Thin-film platinum heat gages with a response time of a few microseconds were developed and used to measure the heat flux for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers. The laminar boundary heat flux on the shock tube wall agreed with Mirel's flat plate theory. Stagnation point heat transfer for circular cylinders at low temperature compared with the theoretical prediction, but for a gas temperature of 922 K the heat fluxes were higher than the predicted values. Preliminary flat plate heat transfer data were measured for laminar, transition, and turbulent boundary layers with and without pressure gradients for free-stream temperatures of 350 to 2575 K and flow Mach numbers of 0.11 to 1.9. The experimental heat flux data were correlated with the laminar and turbulent theories and the agreement was good at low temperatures which was not the case for higher temperatures.

  17. A Flow-Through High-Pressure Electrical Conductance Cell for Determining of Ion Association of Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions at High Temperature and Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, H.; Ho, P.C.; Palmer, D.A.; Wood, R.H.

    1999-09-12

    A flow-through high-pressure electrical conductance cell was designed and constructed to measure limiting molar conductances and ion association constants of dilute aqueous solutions with high precision at high temperatures and pressures. The basic concept of the cell employs the principle developed at the University of Delaware in 1995, but overall targets higher temperatures (to 600 C) and pressures (to 300 MPa). At present the cell has been tested by measuring aqueous NaCl and LiOH solutions (10{sup {minus}3} to 10{sup {minus}5} mol.kg{sup {minus}1}) to 405 C and 33 MPa with good results.

  18. REMIX: a computer program for temperature transients due to high pressure injection after interruption of natural circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, K.; Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1986-05-01

    This report describes the features and use of several computer programs developed on the basis of the Regional Mixing Model (RMM). This model provides a phenomenologically-based analytical description of the stratified flow and temperature fields resulting from High Pressure Safety Injection (HPI) in the stagnated loops of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The basic program is called REMIX and is intended for thermally-induced stratification at low Froude number injections. The REMIX-S version is intended for solute-induced stratification with or without thermal effects as found in several experimental simulations. The NEWMIX program is a derivative of REMIX representing the limit of maximum possible mixing within the cold leg and is intended for high Froude number injections. The NEWMIX-S version accounts for solute effects. Listings of all programs and sample problem input and output files are included. 10 refs

  19. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Siewenie, Joan; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Page, Katharine

    2014-01-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO 2 measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO 2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H 2 and natural gas uptake/storage

  20. Pressure/temperature fluid cell apparatus for the neutron powder diffractometer instrument: Probing atomic structure in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiu-Wen; Fanelli, Victor R.; Reiche, Helmut M.; Larson, Eric; Taylor, Mark A.; Xu, Hongwu; Zhu, Jinlong; Siewenie, Joan; Page, Katharine

    2014-12-01

    This contribution describes a new local structure compatible gas/liquid cell apparatus for probing disordered materials at high pressures and variable temperatures in the Neutron Powder Diffraction instrument at the Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The new sample environment offers choices for sample canister thickness and canister material type. Finite element modeling is utilized to establish maximum allowable working pressures of 414 MPa at 15 K and 121 MPa at 600 K. High quality atomic pair distribution function data extraction and modeling have been demonstrated for a calibration standard (Si powder) and for supercritical and subcritical CO2 measurements. The new sample environment was designed to specifically target experimental studies of the local atomic structures involved in geologic CO2 sequestration, but will be equally applicable to a wide variety of energy applications, including sorption of fluids on nano/meso-porous solids, clathrate hydrate formation, catalysis, carbon capture, and H2 and natural gas uptake/storage.