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Sample records for included postural exercises

  1. Specific balance training included in an endurance-resistance exercise program improves postural balance in elderly patients undergoing haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frih, Bechir; Mkacher, Wajdi; Jaafar, Hamdi; Frih, Ameur; Ben Salah, Zohra; El May, Mezry; Hammami, Mohamed

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of 6 months of specific balance training included in endurance-resistance program on postural balance in haemodialysis (HD) patients. Forty-nine male patients undergoing HD were randomly assigned to an intervention group (balance training included in an endurance-resistance training, n = 26) or a control group (resistance-endurance training only, n = 23). Postural control was assessed using six clinical tests; Timed Up and Go test, Tinetti Mobility Test, Berg Balance Scale, Unipodal Stance test, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scale. All balance measures increased significantly after the period of rehabilitation training in the intervention group. Only the Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test and Activities Balance Confidence scores were improved in the control group. The ranges of change in these tests were greater in the balance training group. In HD patients, specific balance training included in a usual endurance-resistance training program improves static and dynamic balance better than endurance-resistance training only. Implications for rehabilitation Rehabilitation using exercise in haemodialysis patients improved global mobility and functional abilities. Specific balance training included in usual endurance resistance training program could lead to improved static and dynamic balance.

  2. Axial Extension (Posture Exercise)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this helps: It lengthens your spine, which improves posture, and increases comfort, mobility and range of motion. Many of us have a forward head posture. We get this from the type of recreation ...

  3. Exercise and Posture

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    ... have also heard the myriad ways it can benefit our health. Exercise can... Read more… Video Spondyloarthritis & Exercise Posted November ... Talk On Spondylitis.” Read more… Spondylitis Plus The Benefits of Tai Chi ... Spondylitis Plus Tai Chi Posted ...

  4. Shoulder Blade Squeeze (Posture Exercise)

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    ... Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Shoulder Blade Squeeze Shoulder Blade Squeeze Make an Appointment Ask a Question Find ... do it: Stand straight and tall. Pull your shoulder blades back and slightly downward to bring your elbows ...

  5. Postural deviations from chronic low back pain and correction through exercise therapy

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    Farahpour N

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown that five deficits of the proprioceptive system and poor motor skills are associated with chronic low back pain (CLBP. However, the exact mechanism is unknown. The objectives of this study were to assess the dynamic postural balance behavior of CLBP patients, as well as the effects of a specific exercise therapy for the treatment of CLBP and related postural imbalances. Methods: Sixteen females with CLBP and 30 healthy females all between 20 and 40 years of age, of similar height and weight, voluntarily participated in this study. Patients underwent a three-month therapeutic exercise program. The disability and back pain of the patients were measured using the Oswestry and Quebec questionnaires, respectively. A dynamic stability platform system (Biodex was used to evaluate the postural imbalances in both groups. All measurements of the experimental group were repeated after the therapy. Results: Overall deviation of center of gravity (COG from COBOS in patients and controls were 3 (±0.3 and 1.3 (±0.2, respectively. Thus, postural imbalances were 2.3 times greater in the patients than those of the controls. After the treatment, the disability and pain of the patients were diminished by 53% and 58%, respectively. Furthermore, with the improvement of the patients COG deviation, both groups had similar posture. Conclusions: The postural orientation of CLBP patients was significantly improved by the therapeutic exercise program. The applied exercise therapy significantly reduced both the pain and the disability of the patients. Based on these conclusions, we recommend that postural correction be included in regular therapeutic exercise programs.

  6. SWISS BALL EXERCISE DAN KOREKSI POSTUR TDAK TERBUKTI LEBIH BAIK DALAM MEMPERKECIL DERAJAT SKOLIOSIS IDIOPHATIK DARIPADA KLAPP EXERCISE DAN KOREKSI POSTUR PADA ANAK USIA 11 – 13 TAHUN

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    Suriani Sari

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Scoliosis is abnormalities in skeletal form of the curvature of the spine , where the spine bending occurs towards the left or right side or abnormalities spine in the form of C or S. Common Signs of scoliosis include different shoulder bone , protruding shoulder blades , spine curvature real , pelvic tilt, the difference between arm and body space. Degree of scoliosis can be known with adam forward Bending and inclinometer test. The purpose of this study was to determine effectivity of swiss ball exercise training and posture correction and training effectiveness Klapp and posture correction exercise in reducing the scoliosis degree in children aged 11-13 years . This type of research was experimental design with pre and post contol group . In this study , 15 respondents were given swiss ball exercise training and 15 respondents were given Klapp excercise training . Each posture correction treatment was given every activity . Exercises performed with 45-minute frequency of 3 times a week for 12 weeks of data in the form of pre test and post test . Obtained by decreasing the degree of scoliosis. The results of this study are in the treatment group swiss ball exercise training the degree of scoliosis occurs with mean difference value of p < 0.05 and showed a significant difference . While in the commission of exercise training occurs Klapp mean difference degrees of scoliosis with a value of p < 0.05 and showed a significant difference. The conclusion of this study is the combination of swiss ball exercises and posture correction equally effective in reducing the degree of scoliosis with Klapp combination of exercise and posture correction in children aged 11-13 years. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso

  7. THE IMPACT OF PILATES EXERCISES ON THE POSTURAL ALIGNMENT OF HEALTHY ADULTS

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    Bruna Krawczky

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Exercises of Pilates method have been widely used to improve postural alignment. There is strong evidence favoring their use in improving flexibility and balance, as well as some evidence of improvement in muscle strength. However, the benefits related to posture are not well established. Objective: To investigate in healthy adults, the impact of the Pilates method in the postural alignment through some angles in the sagittal plane and the occurrence of pain before and after an exercise session, and after the completion of a 16-session program. Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study of pre and post-intervention type. Healthy adults (n = 37 interested in starting Pilates were evaluated for acute effects on posture after a Pilates session (n = 37 and after a 16-session program, for a period of 10 weeks (n = 13. Using the postural assessment software (SAPO, six angles were analyzed: head horizontal alignment (HHA, pelvis horizontal alignment (PHA, hip angle (HA, vertical alignment of the body (VAB, thoracic kyphosis (TK, and lumbar lordosis (LL. The occurrence of pain was investigated to control adverse effects. Results: Statistically significant (p<0.05 differences found after one session include increased HHA (left view, decreased VAB (left view and TK (both side views. After 16 sessions, we observed an increase of HHA, and a decrease of TK, LL (both side views and HA (right view. All the differences point to an improvement of postural alignment. A significant reduction of prevalence of pain was verified after the first session (40.5% vs. 13.5%; p=0.004 and after the full program (30.8% vs. 15.3%; p=0.02. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the Pilates method has a positive impact on postural alignment in healthy adults, besides being a safe exercise.

  8. Spinal postural training: Comparison of the postural and mobility effects of electrotherapy, exercise, biofeedback trainer in addition to postural education in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelenay, Şeyda Toprak; Kaya, Derya Özer; Özüdoğru, Anıl

    2015-01-01

    Spinal posture and mobility are significant for protecting spine. The aim was to compare effects of different postural training interventions on spinal posture and mobility. Ninety-six university students (ages: 18–25 years) were allocated into Electrical Stimulation (ES) (n = 24), Exercise (n = 24), Biofeedback Posture Trainer (Backtone) (n = 24), and Postural Education (n = 24, Controls) groups. All the groups got postural education. The interventions were carried out 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Spinal Mouse device (Idiag, Fehraltorf, Switzerland) was used to detect thoracic and lumbar curvatures and mobility (degrees) in standing and sitting positions. Paired Student’s t-test, one-way ANOVA, and pairwise post-hoc tests were used. ES decreased thoracic curvature, the exercise decreased thoracic and lumbar curvature and increased thoracic mobility in standing position between pre-post training (p < 0.05). Exercise and Backtone improved thoracic curvature in sitting (p <0.05). In Exercise Group, thoracic curvature decreased compared to Backtone and Education Groups, and thoracic mobility increased compared to all groups (p < 0.05). The exercise was effective and superior in improving thoracic and lumbar curves, and mobility among university students. ES decreased thoracic curve. Biofeedback posture trainer improved sitting posture. A prospective randomized controlled trial, Level 1.

  9. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy for postural hyperkyphosis: A randomized clinical trial.

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    Kamali, Fahimeh; Shirazi, Sara Abolahrari; Ebrahimi, Samaneh; Mirshamsi, Maryam; Ghanbari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of a manual therapy and an exercise therapy program in improving postural hyperkyphosis among young adults. Forty-six women between the ages of 18 to 30 years with thoracic kyphosis diagnosed by flexicurve ruler were randomly assigned to either an exercise therapy or a manual therapy group. The exercise therapy program focused on stretching and strengthening exercises in 15 sessions over 5 weeks. The manual therapy group received 15 sessions of manual techniques including massage, mobilization, muscle energy and myofascial release. Kyphosis angle and back extensor muscle strength were measured with a motion analysis system and a dynamometer at the baseline and after treatment. The data were analyzed with paired and independent t-tests. After treatment, the angle of thoracic kyphosis was smaller and back extensor muscle strength was significantly greater in both the exercise and manual therapy groups (p after treatment (p > 0.05). Manual therapy was as effective as exercise therapy in reducing kyphosis angle and increasing back extensor muscle strength in young women with postural hyperkyphosis.

  10. The effect of trunk coordination exercise on dynamic postural control using a Core Noodle.

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    Miyake, Yuki; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nakajima, Masaaki

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the influence of trunk coordination exercise on dynamic postural control relative to postural sway. The effects of trunk coordination exercises were examined using a Core Noodle for the postural sway in healthy students who were assigned to an exercise or control group. The independent variable was the extent of exposure to Core Noodle exercise, and the dependent variable was dynamic postural control. A stabilometer, which measures dynamic postural control, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the exercises. In addition, center of gravity movements were assessed using a Gravicorder G-620 stabilometer in which the subject was asked to shift their center of gravity between 2 circles on a computer monitor. Pre- and post-intervention dynamic postural control was statistically evaluated between the exercise group and control group using the Mann-Whitney test. Finally, we investigated the application of these exercises for a stroke patient. For post-intervention, the envelop area, mean length of the pathways between 2 circles, and the number of circles were significantly higher in the exercise group. Trunk coordination exercise performed Core Noodle may be used to enhance the dynamic postural balance of healthy young adults, and it can also be adapted for stroke patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effectiveness of strengthening and stretching exercises for the postural correction of abducted scapulae: a review.

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    Hrysomallis, Con

    2010-02-01

    Abnormal postural alignment can be detrimental to muscle function, is aesthetically unpleasing, and might contribute to joint pain. It has been unclear as to whether stretching or strengthening exercises can correct faulty posture such as abducted scapulae. It has been postulated that short and tight scapular abductor muscles or weak and lengthened scapular retractor muscles or a combination cause an abducted scapulae posture and that exercise can correct this condition. The purpose of this review was to compile the information on factors influencing scapular position at rest, examine the effectiveness of exercise interventions in altering scapular position, and make recommendations for future research. When examining the different methods that have been used to determine the position of the scapula, attention should be paid to their respective reliability and validity. Correlational studies have failed to detect a significant association between muscle strength and scapular position but found a significant relationship between muscle length and scapular position. Prospective intervention studies have shown that stretching the anterior chest muscles on its own or in combination with strengthening the scapular retractors can alter the position of the scapula at rest in individuals with abducted scapulae. Although these results are encouraging, there is a dearth of high-quality studies and more research is required to address the limitations of the studies. None of the intervention studies measured strength or flexibility pre or post intervention, so it is unclear how effective the intervention was in changing these factors and the actual mechanism behind the change. To determine which component of the intervention is most effective and whether the results are additive, future research should include stretching only, strengthening only, and combined stretching and strengthening groups. Follow-up measurements at some period after completion of the intervention would

  12. Effect of an exercise program for posture correction on musculoskeletal pain

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, DeokJu; Cho, MiLim; Park, YunHee; Yang, YeongAe

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effect of an exercise program for posture correction on musculoskeletal pain. [Subjects] Between September 2, 2013 and November 3, 2013, an exercise program was performed in 88 students from S University in K city (male students, n = 34; female students, n = 54). [Methods] The exercise program for posture correction was performed for 20 minutes per session, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Pain levels were measured using a pain scale, and pain levels be...

  13. Effect of mat pilates exercise on postural alignment and body composition of middle-aged women.

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    Lee, Hyo Taek; Oh, Hyun Ok; Han, Hui Seung; Jin, Kwang Youn; Roh, Hyo Lyun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study attempted to examine whether Pilates is an effective exercise for improving the postural alignment and health of middle-aged women. [Subjects and Methods] The participants in this study were 36 middle-aged women (20 in the experimental group, 16 in the control group). The experimental group participated in Pilates exercise sessions three times a week for 12 weeks. Body alignment and composition measurements before and after applying the Pilates exercise program were performed with a body composition analyzer and a three-dimensional scanner. [Results] Postural alignment in the sagittal and horizontal planes was enhanced in the Pilates exercise group. Trunk alignment showed correlations with body fat and muscle mass. [Conclusion] The Pilates exercises are performed symmetrically and strengthen the deep muscles. Moreover, the results showed that muscle mass was correlated with trunk postural alignment and that the proper amount of muscle is critical in maintaining trunk postural alignment.

  14. Cardiac responses to exercise distinguish postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome variants.

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    Pianosi, Paolo T; Schroeder, Darrell R; Fischer, Philip R

    2016-11-01

    We previously showed that one-third of adolescents with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) have hyperkinetic circulation. In a subsequent cohort, we compare participants with POTS grouped according to cardiac output (Q˙) versus oxygen uptake (V˙O2) function, whose circulatory response to exercise lay at the lower end of this distribution. We hypothesized that such grouping determines the circulatory response to incremental-protocol, upright, cycle ergometry by whatever blend of flow and resistance adjustments best maintains normal blood pressure. We reviewed data on 209 POTS participants aged 10-19 years (73% female) grouped as follows: Q˙-V˙O2 8 L·min -1 per L·min -1 (N = 32). Heart rate response to exercise was virtually identical in each group. Mean stroke volume (SV) rose normally in the hyperkinetic group (51 ± 38%); less in the normal Q˙ group (22 ± 27%); but was flat in the low Q˙ group (-7 ± 16%). Mean arterial pressure was similar at rest while systemic vascular conductance was flat from rest to exercise in the hypokinetic group, and by comparison rose more steeply in the normal Q˙ (P < 0.001) and in the hyperkinetic (P = 0.02) groups. In conclusion, we identified a variant of POTS with a hypokinetic circulation maintained by a vasoconstricted state. We speculate that they cannot muster preload to augment exercise SV due to profound thoracic hypovolemia, and must resort to vasoconstriction in order to maintain perfusion pressure within working muscle. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  15. Effects of scapular stabilization exercise on neck posture and muscle activation in individuals with neck pain and forward head posture.

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    Im, Boyoung; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of scapular stabilization exercise on neck posture, muscle activity, pain, and quality of life in individuals with neck pain and forward head posture. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen participants were recruited according to the selection criteria and were randomly allocated to the scapular stabilization group (n=8) and the control group (n=7). The scapular stabilization group underwent training for 30 minutes a day, 3 times a week for 4 weeks; the control group performed relaxation exercises for 4 weeks. [Results] After training the scapular stabilization group showed significant improvement on the craniovertebral angle, upper trapezius muscle activity, serratus anterior muscle activity, Neck Disability Index scores, Visual Analog Scale scores, and World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment-BREF scores compared to those in the control group. [Conclusion] Scapular stabilization exercise can help improve the head posture and pain in the patients with neck pain and forward head posture. Controlling the muscular activities through scapular stabilization exercise also improves the patients' quality of life.

  16. Do posture correction exercises have to be boring? Using unstable surfaces to prevent poor posture in children

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    Agnieszka Jankowicz-Szymanska

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Poor posture in children is a common problem. It appears most often in early school-age children and, if not corrected, progresses quickly as they mature. Aim of the research: To find a method that can prevent poor posture, is effective and attractive for children, and can be used on a wide scale in state schools. Material and methods : Seventy-seven first year pupils were tested at the beginning and at the end of the school year. Nineteen children undertook corrective exercises using unstable surfaces; 41 children sat on sensorimotor pillows during classes; and 17 children were the control group. Body mass and body height were measured. Body mass index was calculated. The symmetry of the position of selected skeletal points was assessed: the acromions, lower angles of the scapulas, apexes of the iliac crests, antero-superior iliac spine, and postero-superior iliac spine using a Duometer electronic device. The differences between the groups and changes between the first and second study for each group were estimated. Results : In the first study there were no significant differences in quality of posture. In the second study a significant improvement was noted in symmetry of the shoulders, scapulas, and pelvis in children who sat on sensorimotor pillows, as well as the position of the iliac crests and iliac spines in children exercising regularly on unstable surfaces. Conclusions: Exercises using unstable surfaces and sitting on sensorimotor pillows during classes might be an effective alternative to traditional posture correction exercises.

  17. Fatiguing exercise intensity influences the relationship between parameters reflecting neuromuscular function and postural control variables.

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    Sébastien Boyas

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of fatiguing exercise intensity on the nature and extent of fatigue-induced changes in neuromuscular function and postural stability in quiet standing. We also explored the contribution of selected neuromuscular mechanisms involved in force production to postural stability impairment observed following fatigue using an approach based on multivariate regressions. Eighteen young subjects performed 30-s postural trials on one leg with their eyes closed. Postural trials were performed before and after fatiguing exercises of different intensities: 25, 50 and 75% of maximal isometric plantarflexor torque. Fatiguing exercises consisted of sustaining a plantarflexor isometric contraction at the target intensity until task failure. Maximal isometric plantarflexor torque, electromyographic activity of plantarflexor and dorsiflexor muscles, activation level (twitch interpolation technique and twitch contractile properties of plantarflexors were used to characterize neuromuscular function. The 25% exercise was associated with greater central fatigue whereas the 50 and 75% exercises involved mostly peripheral fatigue. However, all fatiguing exercises induced similar alterations in postural stability, which was unexpected considering previous literature. Stepwise multiple regression analyses showed that fatigue-related changes in selected parameters related to neuromuscular function could explain more than half (0.51≤R(2≤0.82 of the changes in postural variables for the 25% exercise. On the other hand, regression models were less predictive (0.17≤R(2≤0.73 for the 50 and 75% exercises. This study suggests that fatiguing exercise intensity does not influence the extent of postural stability impairment, but does influence the type of fatigue induced and the neuromuscular function predictors explaining changes in postural variables.

  18. CALF BLOOD-FLOW AND POSTURE - DOPPLER ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS DURING AND AFTER EXERCISE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLEEUWEN, BE; BARENDSEN, GJ; LUBBERS, J; DEPATER, L

    To investigate the joint effects of body posture and calf muscle pump, the calf blood flow of eight healthy volunteers was measured with pulsed Doppler equipment during and after 3 min of rhythmic exercise on a calf ergometer in the supine, sitting, and standing postures. Muscle contractions

  19. Effect of core stability exercise on postural stability in children with Down syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sobhy M. Aly

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome is one of the commonest causes of developmental delay in children. Postural stability problems often exist with Down syndrome. To investigate the effect of core stability exercises on postural stability in children with down syndrome. Thirty children (21 boys and 9 girls) with down syndrome, with ages ranged from 6 to 10 years were participated in this study. They were assigned randomlyinto study and control group. Study group received core stability exercises and conventional p...

  20. An experimental controlled study on postural sway and therapeutic exercise in subjects with low back pain.

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    Kuukkanen, T M; Mälkiä, E A

    2000-04-01

    To describe postural sway and its associations to background factors, low back pain and functional capacity. To evaluate the changes in postural sway after three months of therapeutic exercise in the gym or at home. A one-year randomized experimental trial evaluated postural sway in three study groups: intensive training, home exercise and control group. Subjects were recruited from seven local occupational health care centres in Central Finland and were examined at Central Finland Hospital by medical doctors. Measurements and therapeutic exercise programmes were carried out in the Research Laboratory of Sport and Health Sciences at Jyväskylä University. Initially, 49 male and 41 female subjects (aged 20-55 years) with nonspecific and subacute low back pain were examined. Postural sway using a force platform, the Oswestry Index, as well as a measure of low back pain intensity were measured at the initial stage of the study, directly after interventions, as well as at three and nine months after the interventions. The background variables were not strongly correlated with postural sway. No changes occurred in the amplitude of sway during the study, but the sway velocity of the home exercise group increased. Postural sway measurements with a force platform may be suitable for detecting impairments of balance performance among subjects with pronounced functional or activity limitations and severe low back pain problems. In order to enhance balance performance, specific and customized exercise programmes are required.

  1. The effect of six weeks hamstring eccentric exercises on the postural control ability and knee joint proprioception in adolescent football players.

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    Azita Mohamadi

    2017-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on the results, hamstring eccentric exercises can improve the knee proprioception, postural control and hip flexion range of motion in the football players. Therefore, in order to improving the athletic performance and preventing the injuries occurrence, such exercises can be included in the training programs of these athletes.

  2. Effects of Pilates exercises on sensory interaction, postural control and fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis.

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    Soysal Tomruk, Melda; Uz, Muhammed Zahid; Kara, Bilge; İdiman, Egemen

    2016-05-01

    Decreased postural control, sensory integration deficits and fatigue are important problems that cause functional impairments in patients with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). To examine the effect of modified clinical Pilates exercises on sensory interaction and balance, postural control and fatigue in pwMS. Eleven patients with multiple sclerosis and 12 healthy matched controls were recruited in this study. Limits of stability and postural stability tests were used to evaluate postural control by Biodex Balance System and sensory interaction assessed. Fatigue was assessed by Modified Fatigue Impact Scale. Pilates exercises were applied two times a week for 10 weeks and measurements were repeated to pwMS after exercise training. Postural control and fatigue (except psychosocial parameter) of pwMS were significantly worser than healthy controls (pPilates training (ppilates exercises (p>0.05). Ten-week Pilates training is effective to improve sensory interaction and to decrease fatigue. Pilates exercises can be applied safely in ambulatory pwMS for enhance sensory interaction and balance and combat fatigue. More investigations are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of neck exercise on sitting posture in patients with chronic neck pain.

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    Falla, Deborah; Jull, Gwendolen; Russell, Trevor; Vicenzino, Bill; Hodges, Paul

    2007-04-01

    Poor sitting posture has been implicated in the development and perpetuation of neck pain symptoms. This study had 2 purposes: (1) to compare change in cervical and thoracic posture during a distracting task between subjects with chronic neck pain and control subjects and (2) to compare the effects of 2 different neck exercise regimens on the ability of people with neck pain to maintain an upright cervical and thoracic posture during this task. Fifty-eight subjects with chronic, nonsevere neck pain and 10 control subjects participated in the study. Change in cervical and thoracic posture from an upright posture was measured every 2 minutes during a 10-minute computer task. Following baseline measurements, the subjects with neck pain were randomized into one of two 6-week exercise intervention groups: a group that received training of the craniocervical flexor muscles or a group that received endurance-strength training of the cervical flexor muscles. The primary outcomes following intervention were changes in the angle of cervical and thoracic posture during the computer task. Subjects with neck pain demonstrated a change in cervical angle across the duration of the task (mean=4.4 degrees ; 95% confidence interval [CI]=3.3-5.4), consistent with a more forward head posture. No significant difference was observed for the change in cervical angle across the duration of the task for the control group subjects (mean=2.2 degrees ; 95% CI=1.0-3.4). Following intervention, the craniocervical flexor training group demonstrated a significant reduction in the change of cervical angle across the duration of the computer task. This study showed that people with chronic neck pain demonstrate a reduced ability to maintain an upright posture when distracted. Following intervention with an exercise program targeted at training the craniocervical flexor muscles, subjects with neck pain demonstrated an improved ability to maintain a neutral cervical posture during prolonged sitting.

  4. Effects of exercise training experience on hand grip strength, body composition and postural stability in fitness pole dancers.

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    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Mynarski, Arkadiusz; Powerska, Aneta; Rozpara, Michał; Garbaciak, Wiesław

    2017-09-01

    Although the growing popularity of pole dance as a leisure-time activity of people of all ages, the problem of physical effects of exercise on the pole is not considered in the scientific literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the hand grip strength, body composition and postural stability of fitness pole dancers with different training experience. The inclusion criteria for this study were met by 52 female pole dancers. The research program included assessment of body composition (using BC-418 Segmental Body Composition Analyzer, Tanita, Tokyo, Japan), hand grip strength by hydraulic dynamometer JAMAR, and postural stability using ALFA stabilometric platform. Significant differences depending on the pole dance advancement level were found in postural stability and hand-grip strength. The average values of the surface area and the length sway indicated by feet center of pressure were significantly decreasing with the increasing group experience (PStrength level was increasing with the consecutive advancement level (right hand χ2=9.595, P=0.008, left hand χ2=8.936, P=0.011). Regular practice of pole dance fitness can contribute to a significant increase of strength and improvement of the postural stability, which is important for the entire musculoskeletal system. However, further studies on the beneficial and negative (e.g. injuries) impact of exercises on the pole on the musculoskeletal system are required, including larger group of respondents, their diverse age and, above all, longitudinal studies.

  5. Effectiveness of an exercise program on postural control in frail older adults

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    Alfieri FM

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fábio Marcon Alfieri,1,2 Marcelo Riberto,3 Àngels Abril-Carreres,4 Maria Boldó-Alcaine,4 Elisabet Rusca-Castellet,4 Roser Garreta-Figuera,4 Linamara Rizzo Battistella51São Paulo Adventist University Center, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Institute of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Hospital of Clinics, University of São Paulo, Brazil; 3School of Medicine in Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Brazil; 4University Hospital Mútua Terrassa Department of Rehabilitation, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 5School of Medicine, Institute of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinics Hospital of University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilBackground: Exercise programs have proved to be helpful for frail older adults. This study aimed to investigate the effects of an exercise program with a focus on postural control exercises in frail older adults.Method: Twenty-six older adults (76.7 ± 4.9 years deemed clinically stable, chosen from the Falls Unit, University Hospital Mútua Terrassa, Barcelona, Spain, participated in this single-group study. Volunteers' postural control was evaluated using the Timed Up and Go test (TUG and the Guralnik test battery, and their static and dynamic posturography were evaluated using the Synapsys Posturography System®. These evaluations were performed before and after the intervention program, which included an educational session and two weekly 1-hour sessions over an 8-week period of stretching exercises, proprioception, balance, and motor coordination. Data were analyzed using the Student's t-test or the Wilcoxon test, with a significance level of 5%.Results: The TUG and Guralnik tests did not show significant differences. Concerning static posturography, there was improvement in the base of support (P = 0.006, anteroposterior displacement with eyes open (P = 0.02 and closed (P = 0.03, and the total amplitude of the center of pressure with eyes closed (P = 0.02. Regarding dynamic posturography, a

  6. The Use of Neck Support Pillows and Postural Exercises in the Management of Chronic Neck Pain.

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    Jamal, Alisha N; Feldman, Brian M; Pullenayegum, Eleanor

    2016-10-01

    Chronic neck pain is a common problem with a profound effect on quality of life. Identifying evidence-based management strategies is fundamental in improving patient outcomes. This study is a reanalysis of the data from Helewa, et al to further characterize the effects of postural exercises and neck support pillows on neck pain. A full factorial model was used. All interactions were analyzed adjusting for the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ) at baseline. Postural exercises significantly decreased NPQ scores at ≥ 3 weeks, and the use of a neck support pillow significantly decreased NPQ scores at ≥ 12 weeks. These interventions could be beneficial in reducing neck pain symptoms.

  7. Effects of Corrective Exercise for Thoracic Hyperkyphosis on Posture, Balance, and Well-Being in Older Women: A Double-Blind, Group-Matched Design.

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    Jang, Hyun-Jeong; Hughes, Lynne C; Oh, Duck-Won; Kim, Suhn-Yeop

    2017-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of a corrective exercise for thoracic hyperkyphosis on posture, balance, and well-being in Korean community-dwelling older women. Fifty women 65 years of age and older, recruited from 2 senior centers, participated in this study. Participants were assigned to either the experimental group (EG) or the control group (CG) on the basis of convenience of location, and 22 in each were analyzed. Participants in the EG underwent a thoracic corrective exercise program 1 hour each session, twice per week for 8 weeks (a total of 16 sessions), which consisted of specific exercises to enhance breathing, thoracic mobility and stability, and awareness of thoracic alignment. The CG received education on the same thoracic corrective exercise program and a booklet of the exercises. Outcome measures included the extent of postural abnormality (angle of thoracic kyphosis, kyphosis index calculated both in relaxed- and best posture using flexicurve, the ratio of the kyphosis index calculated best posture/relaxed posture, craniovertebral angle, and tragus-to-wall distance), balance (Short Physical Performance Battery and limit of stability), and well-being (Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]). All data were collected by 6 blinded assessors at baseline, at 8 weeks after the completion of intervention, and at 16 weeks for follow-up. For participants of the EG, means of all parameters showed significant improvements over time (P posture, balance, and well-being in older women with thoracic hyperkyphosis. We recommend the use of the therapeutic strategies utilized in this study to enhance thoracic posture, balance, and well-being of older women with thoracic hyperkyphosis. Future research is needed to apply this exercise protocol on a larger and more diverse population.

  8. Exercises in experimental physics including complete solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.; Loos, G.

    1978-01-01

    This collection of exercises is not only addressed to students of physics but also to scientists of other branches and to engineers. Possibilities are offered to the student to gain control on his growing knowledge from the beginning of his studies until the examination. The individual exercises are linked thematically and are mostly composed by several single tasks. Complete and detailed numerical solutions are presented. The topics covered are: (1) Mechanics, (2) thermodynamics, (3) oscillations and their propagation, (4) electricity and magnetism, (5) atomic physics, and (6) nuclear physics. (KBE)

  9. Exercise interventions improve postural control in children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewar, Rosalee; Love, Sarah; Johnston, Leanne Marie

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of exercise interventions that may improve postural control in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A systematic review was performed using American Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) and Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) methodology. Six databases were searched using the following keywords: ('cerebral palsy' OR 'brain injury'); AND ('postur*' OR 'balance' OR 'postural balance' [MeSH]); AND ('intervention' OR 'therapy' OR 'exercise' OR 'treatment'). Articles were evaluated based on their level of evidence and conduct. Searches yielded 45 studies reporting 13 exercise interventions with postural control outcomes for children with CP. Five interventions were supported by a moderate level of evidence: gross motor task training, hippotherapy, treadmill training with no body weight support (no-BWS), trunk-targeted training, and reactive balance training. Six of the interventions had weak or conflicting evidence: functional electrical stimulation (FES), hippotherapy simulators, neurodevelopmental therapy (NDT), treadmill training with body weight support, virtual reality, and visual biofeedback. Progressive resistance exercise was an ineffective intervention, and upper limb interventions lacked high-level evidence. The use of exercise-based treatments to improve postural control in children with CP has increased significantly in the last decade. Improved study design provides more clarity regarding broad treatment efficacy. Research is required to establish links between postural control impairments, treatment options, and outcome measures. Low-burden, low-cost, child-engaging, and mainstream interventions also need to be explored. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Effect of core stability exercise on postural stability in children with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobhy M. Aly

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome is one of the commonest causes of developmental delay in children. Postural stability problems often exist with Down syndrome. To investigate the effect of core stability exercises on postural stability in children with down syndrome. Thirty children (21 boys and 9 girls with down syndrome, with ages ranged from 6 to 10 years were participated in this study. They were assigned randomlyinto study and control group. Study group received core stability exercises and conventional physical therapy program while control group received Conventional physical therapy program. The duration of treatment was 8 weeks. Postural stability was evaluated pre and post treatment by Biodex *Balance System. There was a significant decrease in anteroposterior, mediolateral, and overall stability indices of the study group compared with control group post treatment (p <0.001. Both groups showed a significant decrease in anteroposterior, mediolateral, and overall stability indices post treatment compared with pre treatment (p < 0.001. Eight weeks of core stability exercises is effective in improving postural stabilityand balance of children with Down syndrome. Core stability exercises should be considered as important part of the rehabilitation program for childrenwith Down syndrome.

  11. Preliminary results of dancing exercise on postural stability in adolescent females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsu-Sheng; Law, Cheung-Lun; Pan, Hui-Fang; Hsiao, Yueh-Ping; Hu, Jeng-Ho; Chuang, Fu-Kai; Huang, Mao-Hsiung

    2011-12-01

    Twenty-six female student dancers of Chung-hua school of Art (mean age 17.5 ± 0.5 years) and twenty-five healthy active female collegiate students (mean age 18.1 ± 1.0 years) participated in this study to investigate the effects of dancing exercise on postural stability of adolescent female through a comparison study of two cohorts. The groups were matched in height and weight. Participants were excluded for left-side dominance, sustained lower extremity injury, any known vestibular system dysfunction, uncorrected visual problems, and other neurological conditions. Static and dynamic standing balances were measured by means of Biodex Stability System in six conditions include bilateral, dominant, and nondominant single leg stances with eye-open and eye-closed conditions. To investigate the difference between static and dynamic stabilities, two protocols were performed: the first protocol consisted of four positions including static position, Level 8, Level 4, and Level 1, respectively. They were instructed to maintain a level platform as stably as possible for a period of 30 seconds for each test and given a 30-second rest between tests. The second protocol was descending stability level that was gradually changed from Level 12 to Level 1 for 60 seconds. Balance indices included overall stability index, anterior-posterior stability index (APSI), and medial-lateral stability index. The results of first protocol showed that there were significant differences in overall stability index score between study and control groups at Level 8 with dominant single leg standing in the eye-open condition and the APSI score at Level 8 and at Level 4 with dominant single-leg standing in the eye-closed condition. There was no significant difference in the second protocol. The possible explanation is loss of familiarization adaptation because of level change consequently in both the groups, not step-by-step as in the first protocol study. Furthermore, a positive correlation was

  12. Effect of an exercise program for posture correction on musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, DeokJu; Cho, MiLim; Park, YunHee; Yang, YeongAe

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated the effect of an exercise program for posture correction on musculoskeletal pain. [Subjects] Between September 2, 2013 and November 3, 2013, an exercise program was performed in 88 students from S University in K city (male students, n = 34; female students, n = 54). [Methods] The exercise program for posture correction was performed for 20 minutes per session, 3 times a week for 8 weeks. Pain levels were measured using a pain scale, and pain levels before and after the exercise program were compared. [Results] Overall, pain levels of the participants were lower after the exercise program than before the program, and significant differences in pain levels were noted in the shoulders, middle back, and lower back. [Conclusion] In conclusion, shoulder pain, mid back pain, and low back pain were relieved with the exercise program for posture correction. Therefore, the findings of this study can be used to improve the work efficiency of students as well as people engaged in sedentary work.

  13. Acute effects of exercise posture on executive function in transient ischemic attack patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, James; Stoner, Lee; Grigg, Rebecca; Fryer, Simon; Stone, Keeron; Lambrick, Danielle

    2017-08-01

    In patients with stroke or transient ischemic attacks (TIA), a decline in executive function may limit an individual's ability to process motor tasks and relearn motor skills. The purpose of this study was to assess the acute effect of exercise posture (seated vs. supine cycle ergometry) on executive function and prefrontal cortex perfusion in patients with TIA. Eleven TIA patients (65 ± 10 years) and 15 age-matched, healthy controls (HC; 62 ± 7 years) completed two exercise tests to maximal capacity (one seated, one supine) and two 30-min submaximal exercise tests (one seated, one supine). Executive function was assessed prior to and following (1.5 min post, 15 min post) the submaximal exercise tests using a Stroop task. Prefrontal cortex perfusion (total hemoglobin) was continuously recorded using near-infrared spectroscopy. There was no Posture (seated, supine) × Group (TIA, HC) interaction for the Stroop task (p > .05). HC completed Stroop tasks significantly faster than TIA (51.9[SD = 10.3] vs. 64.2[8.5] s, respectively), while Stroop completion time significantly improved between baseline and 1.5 min post (61.3[10] vs. 58.1[9.4] s, respectively) and 1.5 min post and 15 min post (54.8[8.9] s). Posture and group had no significant influence on prefrontal cortex perfusion (p > .05). In summary, executive function improves to a similar extent in TIA and age-matched, healthy controls following an acute bout of exercise, regardless of exercise posture. As acute improvements in executive function were maintained for 15 min, there could be an important window of opportunity for assigning executive tasks following exercise rehabilitation for patients with TIA. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. The effects of dynamic exercise using the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation pattern on posture in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Misuk; Gong, Wontae

    2017-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of dynamic exercise utilizing the proprioceptor neuromuscular facilitation pattern accompanied by abdominal drawing-in exercises on posture in healthy adults. [Subjects and Methods] The total number of subjects were 32; 16 were randomly placed in the training group, and the remaining 16 made up the control group. The subjects in the training group conducted 5 sets of dynamic exercises utilizing the proprioceptor neuromuscular facilitation patterns each day, 3 times a week for 6 weeks. Using BackMapper, their trunk inclination, trunk imbalance, pelvic position, pelvic torsion, pelvic rotation and the position of their scapula were evaluated. [Results] When the training group's posture pre-test and post-test were compared in this study, there was a statistical significance in trunk inclination, pelvic position, pelvic torsion, pelvic rotation and the position of their scapula. [Conclusion] Dynamic exercise utilizing the proprioceptor neuromuscular facilitation patterns increased the posture that are the basis of trunk stabilization.

  15. Postural Cueing to Increase Lumbar Lordosis Increases Lumbar Multifidus Activation During Trunk Stabilization Exercises: Electromyographic Assessment Using Intramuscular Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beneck, George J; Story, John W; Donald, Shelby

    2016-04-01

    Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. Diminished multifidus activation and cross-sectional area are frequent findings in persons with low back pain. Increasing lumbar lordosis has been shown to increase activation of the multifidus with a minimal increase in activation of the long global extensors during unsupported sitting. To examine the influence of postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis on lumbar extensor activation during trunk stabilization exercises. Thirteen asymptomatic participants (9 male, 4 female) were instructed to perform 6 trunk stabilization exercises using a neutral position and increasing lumbar lordosis. Electrical activity of the deep multifidus and longissimus thoracis was recorded using fine-wire intramuscular electrodes. The mean root-mean-square of the electromyography (EMG) signal obtained during each exercise was normalized to a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A 2-way, repeated-measures analysis of variance (posture by exercise) was performed for each muscle. When averaged across the 6 exercises, postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis resulted in greater multifidus EMG activity compared to performing the exercises in a neutral posture (35.3% ± 15.1% versus 29.5% ± 11.2% MVIC). No significant increase in longissimus thoracis EMG activity was observed when exercising with cueing to increase lumbar lordosis. This study suggests that postural cueing to increase lumbar lordosis during trunk stabilization exercises may better promote multifidus activation than traditional stabilization exercises alone. Future studies are needed to determine whether increasing lumbar lordosis improves multifidus activation in persons with low back pain.

  16. Short-term exercise training improves the cardiovascular response to exercise in the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Shigeki; Fu, Qi; Bivens, Tiffany B; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Wang, Wade; Levine, Benjamin D

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested the presence of cardiac atrophy as a key component of the pathogenesis of the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), similar to physical deconditioning. It has also been shown that exercise intolerance is associated with a reduced stroke volume (SV) in POTS, and that the high heart rate (HR) observed at rest and during exercise in these patients is due to this low SV. We tested the hypotheses that (a) circulatory control during exercise is normal in POTS; and (b) that physical ‘reconditioning’ with exercise training improves exercise performance in patients with POTS. Nineteen (18 women) POTS patients completed a 3 month training programme. Cardiovascular responses during maximal exercise testing were assessed in the upright position before and after training. Resting left ventricular diastolic function was evaluated by Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared with those of 10 well-matched healthy sedentary controls. A lower SV resulted in a higher HR in POTS at any given oxygen uptake () during exercise while the cardiac output ()– relationship was normal. was lower in POTS than controls (26.1 ± 1.0 (SEM) vs. 36.3 ± 0.9 ml kg−1 min−1; P physical fitness and cardiovascular responses during exercise in patients with POTS. PMID:22641777

  17. Chiropractic manipulative therapy of the thoracic spine in combination with stretch and strengthening exercises, in improving postural kyphosis in woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Castello Branco

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: The study showed that all three treatment protocols for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were effective. However, Group 1 had not shown a great improvement in their postural kyphosis, Group 3 had shown a relatively good improvement in their posture, while Group 2 had shown the best results with regards to improvement of the participants' posture. Therefore, in conclusion, Groups 2 and 3 treatment protocols can be used effectively to treat postural kyphosis but Group 2's treatment protocol, consisting of chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy to the thoracic spine in combination with stretch and strengthening exercises, will yield the best results.

  18. Effects of fatiguing isometric and isokinetic ankle exercises on postural control while standing on firm and compliant surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisson Etienne J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fatiguing exercises used across studies to induce alterations in postural control are diverse and may explain the different findings reported. This study aimed to compare the effects of two types of fatiguing plantarflexion exercises on postural control on a firm and a compliant surface. Ten healthy young men (29 ± 4 years were asked to stand as steadily as possible for 30 s, blindfolded with feet together, on a firm and a compliant surface before and immediately after an isometric and an isokinetic fatiguing exercise. Results Maximal force reduction due to fatigue was found significant but similar between exercises. No significant difference was found between the fatiguing exercises on all Center of Pressure (CoP parameters. Both fatiguing exercises induced increases in CoP excursion area, CoP variability and CoP velocity in both planes (antero-posterior, mediolateral on the compliant surface. On the firm surface, both fatiguing exercises only induced increases in CoP variability and CoP velocity in the fatigued plane (antero-posterior. Conclusions Isometric and isokinetic fatiguing exercises, when producing a similar level of force reduction, induce similar decreases in postural control. The effects of fatigue on postural control in healthy young men are more pronounced when standing on a compliant surface, i.e. when proprioceptive information at the ankle is altered.

  19. Upper thoracic spine mobilization and mobility exercise versus upper cervical spine mobilization and stabilization exercise in individuals with forward head posture: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Juchul; Lee, Eunsang; Lee, Seungwon

    2017-12-12

    Although upper cervical and upper thoracic spine mobilization plus therapeutic exercises are common interventions for the management of forward head posture (FHP), no study has directly compared the effectiveness of cervical spine mobilization and stabilization exercise with that of thoracic spine mobilization and mobility exercise in individuals with FHP. Thirty-two participants with FHP were randomized into the cervical group or the thoracic group. The treatment period was 4 weeks, with follow-up assessment at 4 and 6 weeks after the initial examination. Outcome measures including the craniovertebral angle (CVA), cervical range of motion, numeric pain rating scale (NPRS), pressure pain threshold, neck disability index (NDI), and global rating of change (GRC) were collected. Data were examined with a two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance (group × time). Participants in the thoracic group demonstrated significant improvements (p < .05) in CVA, cervical extension, NPRS, and NDI at the 6-week follow-up compared with those in the cervical group. In addition, 11 of 15 (68.8%) participants in the thoracic group compared with 8 of 16 participants (50%) in the cervical group showed a GRC score of +4 or higher at the 4-week follow-up. The combination of upper thoracic spine mobilization and mobility exercise demonstrated better overall short-term outcomes in CVA (standing position), cervical extension, NPRS, NDI, and GRC compared with upper cervical spine mobilization and stabilization exercise in individuals with FHP. KCT0002307 , April 11, 2017 (retrospectively registered).

  20. The Effect of Physical Exercise on Postural Stability in Sighted Individuals and Those Who Are Visually Impaired: An Analysis Adjusted for Physical Activity and Body Mass Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska, Dorota; Stemplewski, Rafał; Szeklicki, Robert

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of physical exercise on postural stability in sighted participants and individuals who are visually impaired, adjusted for potential modulatory effects of physical activity level and body mass index (BMI). The study included 23 participants who were severely visually impaired and 23 sighted participants. Postural stability measurements were taken with open eyes (session I) and with closed eyes (session II). During each session, the mean velocity of the center of pressure (COP) displacements was determined using a force plate both before and after physical exercise. During testing with open eyes, the 2 groups did not differ significantly in terms of their postural response to physical exercise. When examined with closed eyes, the individuals who were visually impaired showed markedly greater postexercise increase in mean velocity of the COP displacement in the mediolateral direction. This intergroup difference was likely a consequence of significantly higher preexercise values of posturographic parameters observed in the sighted participants. More pronounced postexercise changes in the postural stability of sighted participants were associated with lower levels of physical activity and higher values of BMI. Further research is needed to explain the character of the abovementioned relationships in individuals who are visually impaired.

  1. Effect of Feldenkrais exercises on dual task postural control in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullmann G

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gerhild Ullmann,1 Harriet G Williams2 1Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of Memphis, School of Public Health, Memphis, TN, USA; 2Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USAAgmon et al1 recently published an interesting systematic review of interventions to improve dual-task postural control in older adults. Given that many everyday activities (eg, walking and carrying groceries require dual-task postural control, this is an important topic. This type of research is integral to expanding scientific knowledge in the field of interventions. The authors describe the methods of the review process clearly. However, in our opinion, adherence to the stated methods is not always evident. Read the original paper

  2. Greater bilateral deficit in leg press than in handgrip exercise might be linked to differences in postural stability requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Charlene R A; Farthing, Jonathan P

    2008-12-01

    Bilateral deficit is defined as the difference in the summed force between contracting muscles alone and contracting contralateral homologous muscles in combination. The purpose of the study was to investigate how postural stability influences bilateral deficit by comparing an exercise requiring more postural stability (the leg press) with an exercise requiring less postural stability (the handgrip). Eight participants volunteered for the study (3 males, 5 females). Maximal strength was determined by a 1-repetition maximum for the leg press (weight machine) and handgrip (dynamometer) exercises. Electromyography was used to measure activation of the effectors (flexor carpi ulnaris for the handgrip and vastus lateralis for the leg press) and the core muscles (rectus abdominis and external obliques). Bilateral deficit was greater in the leg press (-12.08 +/- 10.22%) than the handgrip (-0.677 +/- 5.00%; p < 0.05). Muscle activation of the effectors and core muscles was not significantly different between unilateral and bilateral conditions for either exercise. However, core muscle activation was significantly greater during the leg press (48.30 +/- 19.60 microV) than during the handgrip (16.50 +/- 8.10 microV; p < 0.05) exercise. These results support the hypothesis that an exercise requiring more postural stability (e.g., the leg press) will have a larger deficit and greater activation of core muscles than an exercise requiring less postural stability (e.g., the handgrip). Since the bilateral deficit was only apparent for the leg press exercise, we conclude that postural stability requirements might influence the magnitude of bilateral deficit.

  3. Effects of Four-Month Exercise Program on Correction of Body Posture of Persons with Different Visual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damira Vranesic-Hadzimehmedovic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a four-month specific exercise program on correcting the posture of persons with different visual impairment. The sample consisted of 20 elementary students with visual impairment diagnosis, 11 boys and 9 girls aged 9-14 (12±0.6. The classification of the examinees was performed according to the established degree of visual impairment, 10 blind persons and 10 partially sighted persons. The pupils voluntarily participated in the exercise program. The exercise program was structured of two phases: exercise on dryland and exercise in water. A total of 36 exercise units were completed during four months period. Seven tests were used to evaluate the body posture, based on the determination of segmental dimensions and the visual projection of the marked points. The contents of the program were performed with the aim of preventing and correcting the observed irregularities of the body posture. The t-test scores indicated statistically significant differences between two measurements (p<0.05, p<0.01. It can be concluded that elementary movements, performed through dryland and especially water exercises, had a good effect on correcting the body's posture of blind and partially sighted persons.

  4. The Effect of Corrective Exercises on Flexibility and Strength in Postural Scoliosis of Adolescent Girls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahboube Karbalaaie

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of corrective exercises on flexibility and strength in Postural Scoliosis of adolescent girls. Materials & Methods: This quasi experimental research was applied as a clinical trial and had done on 40 girls with postural scoliosis those were selected by convenient sampling and assigned to control (n=20 and experimental (n=20 group by simple randomized method. The experimental group received corrective exercises for 30 days and the control group was given no intervention. Flexibility and strength was measured before and after 30 days in all subjects. Data were analyzed by use of Paired T and Independent T tests. Results: There was statistically significant difference in Flexibility and Strength of experimental group between before and after intervention (P<0/001, but There was no significant difference between groups after intervention (P=0.6. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that corrective exercises can lead to improvement of flexibility and strength in scoliosis girls.

  5. Effects on muscle strength, maximal jump height, flexibility and postural sway after soccer and Zumba exercise among female hospital employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barene, Svein; Holtermann, Andreas; Oseland, Harald

    2016-01-01

    This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25-63 ...... have preventive effects with regard to future perceived muscle pain in the respective body regions. Furthermore, the Zumba group revealed positive effects on lower limb lean mass and postural sway compared to the control group.......This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25...... neck extension strength both after 3 (1.2 kg; P postural sway velocity moment (-9.2 mm(2)/s; P

  6. EFFECTIVENESS OF STRETCHING AND STRENGTHENING EXERCISES (JANDA’S APPROACH) IN SUBJECTS WITH POSTURAL BACKACHE: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay Kage; B.B. Putti

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chronic low back pain is often associated with imbalances in hip muscle length and strength. Low back pain could result from prolonged overstretching of the innervated soft tissues when poor sitting or standing postures were maintained. These changes in muscular tone create a muscle imbalance, which leads to movement dysfunction. Objectives: To investigate the effect of Stretching and Strengthening exercises (Janda’s Approach) in subjects with Postural Back Ache. Study D¬es...

  7. Effects of flexi-bar and non-flexi-bar exercises on trunk muscles activity in different postures in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jun Sub; Park, Seol; Kim, JiYoung; Park, Ji Won

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of flexi-bar exercises and non-flexi-bar exercises on trunk muscle activity in different postures in healthy adults. [Subjects] Twenty healthy right-hand dominant adults (10 males and 10 females) were selected for this study. None of the participants had experienced any orthopedic problems in the spine or in the upper and lower extremities in the previous six months. [Methods] The subjects were instructed to adopt three exercise postures: posture 1, quadruped; posture 2, side-bridge; and posture 3, standing. Surface electromyography of selected trunk muscles was normalized to maximum voluntary isometric contraction. [Results] The external oblique, internal oblique, and erector spinae muscle activity showed significant differences between flexi-bar exercises and non-flexi-bar exercises. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that flexi-bar exercises are useful in the activation of trunk muscles.

  8. Diabetic Foot and Exercise Therapy: Step by Step The Role of Rigid Posture and Biomechanics Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Piergiorgio; Gulisano, Massimo; Anichini, Roberto; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Lower extremity ulcers represent a serious and costly complication of diabetes mellitus. Many factors contribute to the development of diabetic foot. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main causes of foot ulceration and contribute in turn to the growth of additional risk factors such as limited joint mobility, muscular alterations and foot deformities. Moreover, a deficit of balance, posture and biomechanics can be present, in particular in patients at high risk for ulceration. The result of this process may be the development of a vicious cycle which leads to abnormal distribution of the foot's plantar pressures in static and dynamic postural conditions. This review shows that some of these risk factors significantly improve after a few weeks of exercise therapy (ET) intervention. Accordingly it has been suggested that ET can be an important weapon in the prevention of foot ulcer. The aim of ET can relate to one or more alterations typically found in diabetic patients, although greater attention should be paid to the evaluation and possible correction of body balance, rigid posture and biomechanics. Some of the most important limitations of ET are difficult access to therapy, patient compliance and the transitoriness of the results if the training stops. Many proposals have been made to overcome such limitations. In particular, it is important that specialized centers offer the opportunity to participate in ET and during the treatment the team should work to change the patient’s lifestyle by improving the execution of appropriate daily physical activity. PMID:24807636

  9. Rehabilitation Exercises to Induce Balanced Scapular Muscle Activity in an Anti-gravity Posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigaki, Tomonobu; Yamanaka, Masanori; Hirokawa, Motoki; Tai, Keita; Ezawa, Yuya; Samukawa, Mina; Tohyama, Harukazu; Sugawara, Makoto

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the intramuscular balance ratios of the upper trapezius muscle (UT) and the lower trapezius muscle (LT), and the intermuscular balance ratios of the UT and the serratus anterior muscle (SA) among prone extension (ProExt), prone horizontal abduction with external rotation (ProHAbd), forward flexion in the side-lying position (SideFlex), side-lying external rotation (SideEr), shoulder flexion with glenohumeral horizontal abduction load (FlexBand), and shoulder flexion with glenohumeral horizontal adduction load (FlexBall) in the standing posture. [Methods] The electromyographic (EMG) activities of the UT, LT and SA were measured during the tasks. The percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC) was calculated for each muscle, and the UT/LT ratios and the UT/SA ratios were compared among the tasks. [Results] The UT/LT ratio with the FlexBand was not significantly different from those of the four exercises in the side-lying and prone postures. The UT/SA ratio with the FlexBall demonstrated appropriate balanced activity. [Conclusion] In an anti-gravity posture, we recommend the FlexBand and the FlexBall for inducing balanced UT/LT and UT/SA ratios, respectively.

  10. A Scott bench with ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad improves body posture during preacher arm curl exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscarini, Andrea; Benvenuti, Paolo; Busti, Daniele; Zanuso, Silvano

    2016-05-01

    We assessed whether the use of an ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad, during the preacher arm curl exercise, could significantly reduce the excessive shoulder protraction and thoracic kyphosis induced by the standard flat pad built into the existing preacher arm curl equipment. A 3D motion capture system and inclinometers were used to measure shoulder protraction and thoracic kyphosis in 15 subjects performing preacher arm curl with a plate-loaded machine provided with the standard flat pad. The same measures were repeated after replacing the flat pad with a new ergonomic pad, specifically designed to accommodate the thorax profile and improve body posture. Pad replacement significantly (p ergonomic pad may potentially allow a more effective training, prevent musculoskeletal discomfort and reduce the risk of injury. Practitioner summary: We have designed an ergonomic thorax stabilisation pad for the preacher arm curl exercise. The new ergonomic pad improves the poor posture conditions induced by the standard flat pad and may potentially allow a more effective training, prevent musculoskeletal discomfort, improve the breathing function and reduce the risk of injury.

  11. The development and validation of using inertial sensors to monitor postural change in resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleadhill, Sam; Lee, James Bruce; James, Daniel

    2016-05-03

    This research presented and validated a method of assessing postural changes during resistance exercise using inertial sensors. A simple lifting task was broken down to a series of well-defined tasks, which could be examined and measured in a controlled environment. The purpose of this research was to determine whether timing measures obtained from inertial sensor accelerometer outputs are able to provide accurate, quantifiable information of resistance exercise movement patterns. The aim was to complete a timing measure validation of inertial sensor outputs. Eleven participants completed five repetitions of 15 different deadlift variations. Participants were monitored with inertial sensors and an infrared three dimensional motion capture system. Validation was undertaken using a Will Hopkins Typical Error of the Estimate, with a Pearson׳s correlation and a Bland Altman Limits of Agreement analysis. Statistical validation measured the timing agreement during deadlifts, from inertial sensor outputs and the motion capture system. Timing validation results demonstrated a Pearson׳s correlation of 0.9997, with trivial standardised error (0.026) and standardised bias (0.002). Inertial sensors can now be used in practical settings with as much confidence as motion capture systems, for accelerometer timing measurements of resistance exercise. This research provides foundations for inertial sensors to be applied for qualitative activity recognition of resistance exercise and safe lifting practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of squat exercises in postures for toilet use on blood flow velocity of the leg vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jun Ho; Chung, Sin Ho; Shim, Jae Hun

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of squat exercises performed in toilet-using postures on the blood flow velocity of the lower extremities for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis. [Subjects] The subjects were 28 students who were attending B University in Cheonan. They were divided into a group of 14 subjects of sitting toilet users and a group of 14 subjects of squat toilet users. [Methods] The subjects performed squat exercises in different toilet-using postures and we investigated the changes in blood flow velocity. [Results] The variations in blood flow velocities before and after the exercises showed significant differences in both groups but the differences between the two groups were not significant. [Conclusion] Based on the results of this study, we consider squat exercises are effective at improving the variation in lower-extremity blood flow velocity when using a toilet.

  13. Effect of thoracic stretching, thoracic extension exercise and exercises for cervical and scapular posture on thoracic kyphosis angle and upper thoracic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thoracic stretching, a thoracic extension exercise and exercises for cervical and scapular posture on thoracic kyphosis angle and upper thoracic pain. [Subject] A 36-year-old male, who complained of upper thoracic pain at the T1-4 level with forward head and round shoulders, was the subject. [Methods] He performed thoracic stretching (session 1), a thoracic extension exercise (session 2), and muscle exercises for cervical and scapular posture (session 3). [Results] The upper thoracic pressure pain threshold increased after session 1, session 2, and session 3. The thoracic kyphosis angle decreased after session 1, session 2, and session 3. [Conclusion] We suggest that intervention for thoracic pain or kyphotic thoracic correction should use not only an approach for extending the thoracic muscles, but also an approach treating muscles in the cervical and scapular region.

  14. Plyometric type neuromuscular exercise is a treatment to postural control deficits of volleyball players: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Asadi

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: It can be recommend that strength and conditioning professionals in the field of volleyball do not perform other type of landing exercise in plyometric training sessions because of postural control impaired and consequently the probability of lower extremity injuries will increase.

  15. The effects of a global postural exercise program on temporomandibular disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fiorelli

    Full Text Available Abstract Changes in the suboccipital muscles and the hamstrings may interfere with head posture and the biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint, both of which contribute to the severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMD. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of a global postural exercise program (GPEP on pain intensity and mouth-opening range of motion (ROM in women with TMD. The participants were comprised of 30 women with TMD who were divided into two groups: an experimental group (EG and a control group (CG. A pressure algometer was used for pain assessment and a paquimeter was used to measure ROM. The duration of the GPEP was six weeks. In the EG, there was a reduction in pain intensity and an increase in mouth-opening ROM compared to the CG. Therefore, we concluded that the GPEP was effective in relieving pain in all of the evaluated muscles and regions, and in increasing mouth-opening ROM in women with TMD.

  16. How experienced alpine-skiers cope with restrictions of ankle degrees-of-freedom when wearing ski-boots in postural exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, Frédéric; Amarantini, David; Paillard, Thierry

    2009-04-01

    The present study investigates the mechanisms underlying changes in postural strategy that occur to compensate for mechanical ankle joint restrictions induced by wearing ski-boots during postural exercises. Fourteen experienced skiers were asked to stand as still as possible in a stable (STA) posture and in 2 postures with instability in the medio/lateral and antero/posterior (ML and AP postures) direction. Postural tasks were performed with eyes open or closed and while wearing or not wearing ski-boots. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of representative lower limb muscles and positions of centre-of-foot pressure (COP) were recorded and analyzed. Our results illustrated enhanced postural performances with ski-boots in the STA posture, whereas postural performances remained unchanged when wearing ski-boots in the ML and AP postures. Analysis of COP sways in the frequency domain did not illustrate any modification in the contribution of different neuronal loops when the study subjects wore ski-boots. EMG showed that the mechanical effects of wearing ski-boots were compensated by changes in postural strategy through the reorganization of muscle coordination, made possible by inherent redundancies in the human body. The preservation of postural performances, despite restrictions of ankle degrees-of-freedom induced by ski-boots, emphasizes the subjects' capacity to exploit the additional support provided by ski-boots by adequately adjusting muscle coordination to control posture in different balance conditions.

  17. Changes in body posture in children with first-degree scoliosis taking part in corrective exercises in a water environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyk, Katarzyna; Skolimowski, Tadeusz; Zawadzka, Dominika

    2005-04-30

    Background. Swimming and aquatic exercises are a very attractive form of movement for children and young people, which is helpful in correcting posture defects. The water environment relieves pressure on the spine, relaxes muscles, and makes it easier to assume the proper posture. Swimming allows to join pleasure - water play and learning to swim - with therapeutic action. The primary purpose of our research was to evaluate the effectiveness of corrective swimming, based on our own program, and to determine the effect on swimming on spine arrangement in two position in children with posture defects. Material and methods. We studied 106 children (age 9-12). All these had been referred for corrective swimming by a specialist. The subjects were examined twice at a three-month interval. In particular we analyzed the shape of lordosis and kyphosis and the symmetry of the trunk in the frontal plane. We evaluated spinal positioning using a computer program designed to assess posture by photogramometry. Results. The initial results showed that posture defects are very common in children. The primary defects are rounded backs, concave-rounded back, and asymmetry of shoulders and shoulder blades. Conclusions. Our initial research shows that the computer photogram can be used for diagnosis and outcome measurement in hydrotherapy for children with posture defects.

  18. What is the most effective posture to conduct vibration from the lower to the upper extremities during whole-body vibration exercise?

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    Tsukahara Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yuka Tsukahara, Jun Iwamoto, Kosui Iwashita, Takuma Shinjo, Koichiro Azuma, Hideo MatsumotoInstitute for Integrated Sports Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Background: Whole-body vibration (WBV exercise is widely used for training and rehabilitation. However, the optimal posture for training both the upper and lower extremities simultaneously remains to be established. Objectives: The objective of this study was to search for an effective posture to conduct vibration from the lower to the upper extremities while performing WBV exercises without any adverse effects. Methods: Twelve healthy volunteers (age: 22–34 years were enrolled in the study. To measure the magnitude of vibration, four accelerometers were attached to the upper arm, back, thigh, and calf of each subject. Vibrations were produced using a WBV platform (Galileo 900 with an amplitude of 4 mm at two frequencies, 15 and 30 Hz. The following three postures were examined: posture A, standing posture with the knees flexed at 30°; posture B, crouching position with no direct contact between the knees and elbows; and posture C, crouching position with direct contact between the knees and elbows. The ratio of the magnitude of vibration at the thigh, back, and upper arm relative to that at the calf was used as an index of vibration conduction. Results: Posture B was associated with a greater magnitude of vibration to the calf than posture A at 15 Hz, and postures B and C were associated with greater magnitudes of vibration than posture A at 30 Hz. Posture C was associated with a vibration conduction to the upper arm that was 4.62 times and 8.26 times greater than that for posture A at 15 and 30 Hz, respectively. Conclusion: This study revealed that a crouching position on a WBV platform with direct contact between the knees and elbows was effective for conducting vibration from the lower to the upper extremities. Keywords: whole-body vibration exercise, upper

  19. Cost-effectiveness of postural exercise therapy versus physiotherapy in computer screen-workers with early non-specific work-related upper limb disorders (WRULD); a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eijsden, Marjon D; Gerhards, Sylvia A; de Bie, Rob A; Severens, Johan L

    2009-11-17

    Exercise therapies generate substantial costs in computer workers with non-specific work-related upper limb disorders (WRULD). To study if postural exercise therapy is cost-effective compared to regular physiotherapy in screen-workers with early complaints, both from health care and societal perspective. Prospective randomized trial including cost-effectiveness analysis; one year follow-up. Eighty-eight screen-workers with early non-specific WRULD; six drop-outs. A ten week postural exercise program versus regular physiotherapy. Effectiveness measures: Pain: visual analogous scale (VAS), self-perceived WRULD (yes/no). Functional outcome: Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand- Dutch Language Version (DASH-DLV). Quality of life outcome: EQ-5D.Economic measures: health care costs including patient and family costs and productivity costs resulting in societal costs. Cost-effectiveness measures: health care costs and societal costs related to the effectiveness measures. OUTCOME MEASURES were assessed at baseline; three, six and twelve months after baseline. At baseline both groups were comparable for baseline characteristics except scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and comparable for costs. No significant differences between the groups concerning effectiveness at one year follow-up were found. Effectiveness scores slightly improved over time. After one year 55% of participants were free of complaints. After one year the postural exercise group had higher mean total health care costs, but lower productivity costs compared to the physiotherapy group. Mean societal costs after one year (therefore) were in favor of postural exercise therapy [- euro622; 95% CI -2087; +590)]. After one year, only self- perceived WRULD seemed to result in acceptable cost-effectiveness of the postural exercise strategy over physiotherapy; however the probability of acceptable cost-effectiveness did not exceed 60%.Considering societal costs related to QALYs, postural exercise therapy had

  20. The effect of scapular posterior tilt exercise, pectoralis minor stretching, and shoulder brace on scapular alignment and muscles activity in subjects with round-shoulder posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-hyun; Cynn, Heon-seock; Yoon, Tae-lim; Ko, Chang-hee; Choi, Woo-jeong; Choi, Sil-ah; Choi, Bong-sam

    2015-02-01

    There are various methods for rehabilitating round-shoulder posture (RSP), including strengthening exercises, stretching, and using a shoulder brace or taping to correct the altered posture. However, no study has determined which intervention is the most effective of the three methods to decrease RSP (intervention #1: scapular posterior tilting exercise alone [hereafter, SPT], intervention #2: the scapular posterior tilting exercise after PM stretching [PM stretch+SPT], and intervention #3: the scapular posterior tilting exercise with use of a shoulder brace [SPT+brace]). The purpose of this study was to compare the SPT, PM stretch+SPT, and SPT+brace on RSP, PM index (PMI), and lower trapezius (LT) and serratus anterior (SA) activity in subjects with RSP. In total, fifteen young men with RSP, participated in the study (21.46 ± 2.30 years old). RSP was confirmed using a caliper measure. Surface electromyography (SEMG) data for LT and SA activity were collected during the three interventions, and the SEMG data are expressed as a percentage of the maximal voluntary isometric contraction (%MVIC). RSP was significantly less in the PM stretch+SPT and SPT+brace than in the SPT (Pstretch+SPT and SPT+brace than in the SPT (Pstretch+SPT than in the SPT or SPT+brace in subjects with RSP (Pstretching exercise and application of a shoulder brace may help correct RSP and restore the length of the PM. The posterior tilting exercise after PM stretching was the most effective method for eliciting greater LT muscle activation among the interventions tested. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The significance of swimming and corrective exercises in water in the treatment of postural deficits and scoliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Łubkowska, Wioletta; Paczyńska-Jędrycka, Małgorzata; Eider, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    More and more often specialized literature mentions the contemporarily relevant notion of the application of swimming as one of the therapeutic methods in modern medicine. The thesis reviews specialized literature and analyzes documents in order to demonstrate the significance of aquatic therapy and corrective swimming exercises as a corrective and therapeutic function in the treatment of postural deficits and scoliosis. As this article has a character of a review, its purpose is to ...

  2. Evaluation of the kinematic structure of indicators key elements of sports equipment exercise by postural orientation movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V. Litvinenko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Examine the kinematic structure of indicators key elements of sports equipment exercise (difficult to coordinate. The method of postural orientation movements. Material : The study involved acrobats jumpers on the path of high qualification (n = 7. The method used video - computer recording the movements of the athlete. Results : Identified nodal elements of sports equipment double back somersault tuck. Exercise performed after rondat and double back flip and stretch after rondat - flick (coup ago. In the preparatory phase of motor actions acrobatic exercises isolated and studied central element of sports equipment - starting posture of the body; in the phase of the main motor action - animation poses of the body; in the final phase - the final body posture (stable landing. Conclusions : The method of video - computer registration allowed to perform a biomechanical analysis and evaluation of key elements of sports equipment double back somersault tuck and a double back flip and stretch. Also gain new knowledge about the mechanism of the phase structure of movements when performing double somersaults.

  3. Immediate Effects of the Vocal Function Exercises Semi-Occluded Mouth Posture on Glottal Airflow Parameters: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croake, Daniel J; Andreatta, Richard D; Stemple, Joseph C

    2017-03-01

    The study aimed to quantify immediate alterations in the airflow glottogram between the Vocal Function Exercises semi-occluded mouth posture (/ol/ with lip buzz) and the sustained vowel /o/ in individuals with normal voices, and to determine if noted changes were in agreement with established semi-occluded vocal tract aerodynamic theory. Based on semi-occluded vocal tract aerodynamic theory, we hypothesized the following immediate changes in the flow glottogram during the /ol-buzz/ condition: a greater open quotient, a greater skewing quotient, a greater maximum flow declination rate, increased average airflow, decreased peak airflow, and increased minimum airflow. A cohort of eight men with normal voices produced the sustained vowel /o/ and the Vocal Function Exercises semi-occluded mouth posture (/ol-buzz/). Flow glottograms for both conditions were obtained from the inverse-filtered oral airflow signal via a circumferentially vented pneumotachograph mask. Data revealed that open quotient and minimum airflow rates increased significantly between conditions. All other measures trended in the directions predicted by aerodynamic theory, but were not statistically significant. The Vocal Function Exercises semi-occluded mouth posture appeared to provide an effective vocal tract semi-occlusion that immediately altered the flow glottogram in accordance with predictions made by computer-modeled aerodynamic theory. Copyright © 2017 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Influence of Plantar Short Foot Muscle Exercises on Foot Posture and Fundamental Movement Patterns in Long-Distance Runners, a Non-Randomized, Non-Blinded Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Sulowska

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of two kinds of plantar short foot muscles exercise on foot posture and fundamental movement patterns in long-distance runners.A parallel group non-blinded trial with 6-week follow-up.Twenty five long-distance runners aged 22-35 years. They were divided into two groups. In group 1 (n = 13 subjects performed the exercise "Vele's Forward Lean" and "Reverse Tandem Gait" and in Group 2 (n = 12 the "Short Foot Exercise." The runners performed the exercises daily for 6 weeks. The Foot Posture Index (FPI-6 and The Functional Movement Screen (FMS tests were performed twice: at baseline and after 6 weeks of the exercise.A significant improvement was observed in FPI -6 (talar head palpation in Group 1, and inversion/eversion of the calcaneus in Group 2. Also in Group 1 a significant improvement was noted in FMS tests: deep squat, active straight leg raise and in total score.Short foot muscles strengthening exercises have beneficial effect on functional movement patterns and on foot posture, therefore they should be included as a part of daily training program of runners.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12615001200572.

  5. The Influence of Plantar Short Foot Muscle Exercises on Foot Posture and Fundamental Movement Patterns in Long-Distance Runners, a Non-Randomized, Non-Blinded Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulowska, Iwona; Oleksy, Łukasz; Mika, Anna; Bylina, Dorota; Sołtan, Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of two kinds of plantar short foot muscles exercise on foot posture and fundamental movement patterns in long-distance runners. Design A parallel group non-blinded trial with 6-week follow-up. Methods Twenty five long-distance runners aged 22–35 years. They were divided into two groups. In group 1 (n = 13) subjects performed the exercise “Vele’s Forward Lean” and “Reverse Tandem Gait” and in Group 2 (n = 12) the “Short Foot Exercise.” The runners performed the exercises daily for 6 weeks. The Foot Posture Index (FPI-6) and The Functional Movement Screen (FMS) tests were performed twice: at baseline and after 6 weeks of the exercise. Results A significant improvement was observed in FPI -6 (talar head palpation in Group 1, and inversion/eversion of the calcaneus in Group 2). Also in Group 1 a significant improvement was noted in FMS tests: deep squat, active straight leg raise and in total score. Conclusions Short foot muscles strengthening exercises have beneficial effect on functional movement patterns and on foot posture, therefore they should be included as a part of daily training program of runners. Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12615001200572 PMID:27336689

  6. Washout rate of {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine increased by posture change or exercise in normal volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Takashi; Yamabe, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-04-01

    {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging detects sympathetic nerve function in the heart. The present study was conducted to clarify whether posture change or exercise affects {sup 123}I-MIBG kinetics in normal volunteers. Seven subjects underwent three {sup 123}I-MIBG studies, i.e., supine protocol, sitting protocol and exercise protocol. Planar {sup 123}I-MIBG images were obtained at 15 minutes, 1 hour and 4 hours after injection of {sup 123}I-MIBG. The washout rate (WR) from 15 minutes to 1 hour in the supine position in all subjects was similar for all three protocols, whereas the WR from 1 hour to 4 hours was significantly augmented in the sitting protocol and the exercise protocol as compared to the supine protocol (p<0.05 and p<0.01). The serum concentration of noradrenaline was significantly increased from the baseline to the 4 hour sampling in the sitting protocol and the exercise protocol (both p<0.01), but was not altered in the supine protocol. The WR from 1 hour to 4 hours significantly correlated with the noradrenaline concentration in 4 hour sampling (r=0.59, p<0.01). It also significantly correlated with an increase in the noradrenaline concentration from the baseline to the 4 hour sampling (r=0.53, p<0.05). It is concluded that posture change or exercise affects the WR of {sup 123}I-MIBG in normal healthy subjects. (author)

  7. Washout rate of [sup 123]I-metaiodobenzylguanidine increased by posture change or exercise in normal volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Takashi; Yamabe, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Mitsuhiro (Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1999-04-01

    [sup 123]I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging detects sympathetic nerve function in the heart. The present study was conducted to clarify whether posture change or exercise affects [sup 123]I-MIBG kinetics in normal volunteers. Seven subjects underwent three [sup 123]I-MIBG studies, i.e., supine protocol, sitting protocol and exercise protocol. Planar [sup 123]I-MIBG images were obtained at 15 minutes, 1 hour and 4 hours after injection of [sup 123]I-MIBG. The washout rate (WR) from 15 minutes to 1 hour in the supine position in all subjects was similar for all three protocols, whereas the WR from 1 hour to 4 hours was significantly augmented in the sitting protocol and the exercise protocol as compared to the supine protocol (p<0.05 and p<0.01). The serum concentration of noradrenaline was significantly increased from the baseline to the 4 hour sampling in the sitting protocol and the exercise protocol (both p<0.01), but was not altered in the supine protocol. The WR from 1 hour to 4 hours significantly correlated with the noradrenaline concentration in 4 hour sampling (r=0.59, p<0.01). It also significantly correlated with an increase in the noradrenaline concentration from the baseline to the 4 hour sampling (r=0.53, p<0.05). It is concluded that posture change or exercise affects the WR of [sup 123]I-MIBG in normal healthy subjects. (author)

  8. The effects of balance and postural stability exercises on spa based rehabilitation programme in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunay, Selim M; Keser, Ilke; Bicer, Zemzem T

    2017-09-08

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) can cause severe functional disorders that lead to loss of balance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of balance and postural stability exercises on spa based rehabilitation programme in AS subjects. Twenty-one participants were randomized to the study (n= 11) and control groups (n= 10). Patients balance and stability were assessed with the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG) Test, Single Leg Stance Test (SLST) and Functional Reach Test (FRT). AS spesicied measures were used for assessing to other parameters. The treatment plan for both groups consisted of conventional transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), spa and land-based exercises 5 days per week for 3 weeks. The study group performed exercises based on postural stability and balance with routine physiotherapy practice in thermal water and in exercise room. The TUG, SLST and FUT scores were significantly increased in the study group. In both groups, the BASMI, BASFI, BASDAI and ASQoL scores decreased significantly by the end of the treatment period (pbalance and stability exercises in addition to spa based routine approaches can increase the duration of maintaining balance and can improve the benefits of physiotherapy.

  9. The Effect of Rope Jumping Exercise on Postural Control, Static and Dynamic Balance in Male Students with Cavus Foot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Ghaderiyan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Plantar foot is a very active part in leap activities, such as rope jumping and with its small surface playes an important role in balance control. In this research, the effect of 12 week rope jumping exercise was investigated on postural control and static and dynamic balance in 10-13 years old male students with cavus foot. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was done on 450 male students aged 13-10 years in Jarghouyeh sofla. After the initial evaluation by pedescope (qualitative and then measurement by a foot scanner (quantitative and Staheli index, 30 students were selected as samples and were divided into two groups (experimental and control, each 15 cases. To measure the postural control, a foot scanner device was used and changes in plantar center of pressure was recorded for 20 seconds. Static balance was evaluated with stork test and dynamic balance by Y balance test. The subjects of the experimental group participated in a rope jumping training protocol three 45-minute sessions per week for 12 weeks. In this period of time, the subjects of the control group did not participate in any regular physical activity program in this time. Data were analyzed using dependent and independent t-tests. The significance level was considered p<0/05. Results: A 12-week rope jumping exercise improved postural control and static and dynamic balance in patients with cavus foot, which this change was significant (p<0.001. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, rope jumping can be a useful exercise to improve static and dynamic balance and postural control in individuals with cavus foot.

  10. Global postural reeducation and static stretching exercises in the treatment of myogenic temporomandibular disorders: a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluf, Sâmia A; Moreno, Bruno G D; Crivello, Osvaldo; Cabral, Cristina M N; Bortolotti, Gislaine; Marques, Amélia P

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 2 different interventions, global postural reeducation (GPR) and static stretching exercises (SS), in the treatment of women with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). A total of 28 subjects with TMDs were randomized into 2 treatment groups: GPR, where therapy involved muscle global chain stretching, or SS, with conventional static stretching; but only 24 completed the study. Eight treatment sessions lasting 40 minutes each (weekly) were performed. Assessments were conducted at baseline, immediately after treatment end, and 2 months later. Measurements included pain intensity at the temporomandibular joint, headache, cervicalgia, teeth clenching, ear symptoms, restricted sleep, and difficulties for mastication, using a visual analogue scale. In addition, electromyographic activity and pain thresholds were measured at the masseter, anterior temporalis, sternocleidomastoid, and upper trapezius muscles. Two-way analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc test was used for between-group comparisons. Significance level was .05. Comparing the pain assessments using the visual analogue scale, no significant differences were seen with the exception of severity of headaches at treatment end (GPR, 3.92 ± 2.98 cm; SS, 1.64 ± 1.66 cm; P .05). For the subjects in this study, both GPR and SS were similarly effective for the treatment of TMDs with muscular component. They equally reduced pain intensity, increased pain thresholds, and decreased electromyographic activity. Copyright © 2010 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mouth Breathing Syndrome: cervical muscles recruitment during nasal inspiration before and after respiratory and postural exercises on Swiss Ball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Eliane C R; Bérzin, Fausto

    2008-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the recruitment of cervical muscles during nasal inspiration before and after breathing and postural exercises on the Swiss Ball in children with Mouth Breathing Syndrome (MBS). Surface electromyography from the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), sub-occipitals and upper Trapezius muscles was recorded during nasal inspiration, before and at the end of three months of the treatment. A physical therapy program consisting in muscular stretching and strengthening exercises along with naso-diaphragmatic breathing on the Swiss Ball were carried out for body posture realignment and respiratory training. Nineteen mouth breathing children, mean age of 10.6 years, both genres, were the subjects of this study. In order to establish a comparison between the eletromyographic results (normalized values) obtained from pre and post-physical therapy program it was used the Wilcoxon non-parametric test for dependent data. It was found a significant decrease (pinspiration in all tested muscles after treatment (11.3-3.6% in the SCM, 22.4-11.7% in the sub-occipitals and 8.9-3.1% in the upper Trapezius). At the end of the treatment, the assessed muscles reached lower activity electromyographic levels during nasal inspiration and they became closer of those in the quiet position. The lower activity after the physical therapy program in these muscles indicates a less effort of the accessory inspiratory muscles, probably due to a better performance of diaphragm muscle with the improvement of the body posture.

  12. Improving Postural Control in the Battement Tendu: One Teacher's Reflections and Somatic Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Glenna

    2010-01-01

    The battement tendu is introduced early in dance training, remaining integral to a dancer's vocabulary. Although appearing relatively simple to execute, the tendu aesthetic takes years to master. One reason might be that efficient performance requires complex coordination of postural balance. Known as postural control, this coordination appears in…

  13. The effect of body posture during medication inhalation on exercise induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, R.; Wind, M.; de Graaf, B.J.; de Jong, F.H.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Thio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Inhaling medication in a standard body posture leads to impaction of particles in the sharp angle of the upper airway. Stretching the upper airway by extending the neck in a forward leaning body posture may improve pulmonary deposition. A single dose of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)

  14. Efficacy of kinesiology tape versus postural correction exercises on neck disability and axioscapular muscles fatigue in mechanical neck dysfunction: A randomized blinded clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Abd, Aliaa M; Ibrahim, Abeer R; El-Hafez, Haytham M

    2017-04-01

    Mechanical neck dysfunction (MND), with axioscapular muscles fatigue, is highly prevalent worldwide. While postural correction is commonly used for its treatment, efficacy of kinesiology tape (KT) has received considerable attention. To determine the effectiveness of KT versus correction exercises on neck disability, and axioscapular muscles fatigue in MND patients. 46 MND patients were randomly assigned into 1 of 2 groups receiving 4 weeks treatment of either KT or correction exercises. Neck disability and axioscapular muscles fatigue as median frequency of electromyography (EMG-MF) were measured pre and post treatment. Group-by-time interaction was not significant in the multivariable test. Post hoc tests revealed that KT produced more disability reduction than the postural exercises. However, there was no significant interaction for EMG-MF. KT has been found to be more effective than postural exercises to reduce neck disability. However, both modalities have similar effects to reduce axioscapular muscles fatigue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chiropractic manipulative therapy of the thoracic spine in combination with stretch and strengthening exercises, in improving postural kyphosis in woman

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    Kim C. Branco

    2016-10-01

    Method: A randomised study design with thirty female participants between the ages of twenty and  thirty nine was selected. Group 1 (n = 10 received chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy to the thoracic spine. Group 2 (n = 10 received chiropractic spinal manipulative therapy to the thoracic spine as well as stretch and strengthening exercises i.e. stretching the pectoralis major muscles and strengthening the rhomboid, middle and inferior trapezius muscles. Group 3 (n = 10 received stretch and strengthening exercises. The stretch and strengthening exercises were performed in the consultation rooms to ensure that the participants were complying with the treatment and doing the exercises properly. The study consisted of seven consultations for Group 1 (they received treatment once a week for six weeks and for Groups 2 and 3 there were nineteen consultations (they received three treatments a week for six weeks. Objective data was recorded at the beginning of the first, fourth and seventh consultations for Group 1, and the first, tenth and nineteenth consultations for Groups 2 and 3. On the seventh consultation (for Group 1 and nineteenth consultation for Groups 2 and 3, only data collection was done. Objective data were obtained by using the Flexicurve® Ruler measurements for the angle of kyphosis. Visual analysis was done by taking lateral (sagittal view photographs at the beginning of the initial and final consultations. Results: Statistical analysis revealed significant statistical changes for the intragroup results for all three groups. No significant statistical difference was found between the groups for the inter-group analysis. Conclusion: The study showed that all three treatment protocols for Groups 1, 2, and 3 were effective. However, Group 1 had not shown a great improvement in their postural kyphosis, Group 3 had shown a relatively good improvement in their posture, while Group 2 had shown the best results with regards to improvement of the

  16. The effect of 8-weeks proprioceptive exercise program in postural sway and isokinetic strength of ankle sprains of Tunisian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Moussa Zouita, A; Majdoub, O; Ferchichi, H; Grandy, K; Dziri, C; Ben Salah, F Z

    2013-12-01

    Our objective is to investigate the effects of proprioceptive exercises rehabilitation on isokinetic strength and postural balance in athletes with sprain ankle. The ankles of 16 subjects were tested: eight in the functional instability (FI) group and eight non-injured (NI) subjects in the control group. Subjects were asked to take part in a testing session. The test order for the postural stability and isokinetic strength tests was randomized to avoid learning or fatigue effects. The testing session started with a 5-minute warm-up. Subjects were then instructed to perform several lower body flexibility exercises. The test procedure consisted in static assessments, where single-limb (right and left) stance postural stability was assessed. Three practice trials were allowed for each subject. The assessment quantifies postural sway velocity while the athlete stands calmly on one foot on the force plate, for each leg. They were asked to stand as still as possible for 30s, upper limbs along the body. The subjects were requested to maintain balance with eyes open and then with the eyes closed on the firm surface. The sway velocity (in degrees per second) is given for all trials. Subjects were allowed a 1-minute rest between tests. The regime of isokinetic evaluation of dorsi-plantar flexions is concentric, with three successive speeds: slow (30°/s, reps 5), average (60°/s, reps 10), and fast (120°/s, reps 15), according to the protocol established by European Group for the development and the isokinetic research and the procedural guidelines. Relative moment of strength and times of acceleration and deceleration were calculated for each set of isokinetic testing repetitions per body side, muscle group and testing speed. The results of tests-retest and between both groups (injured vs. healthy) show that after eight weeks of proprioceptive work, significant increase of maximal strength, decrease in times of acceleration and deceleration at the level of plantar flexors

  17. Rotator cuff exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... perform activities, including your shoulder joint and your shoulder blade Observe your spine and posture as you stand ... with band Isometric shoulder exercises Wall push-ups Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - no tubing Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - ...

  18. Sleep, Exercise, and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrelson, Orvis A.; And Others

    The first part of this booklet concerns why sleep and exercise are necessary. It includes a discussion of what occurs during sleep and what dreams are. It also deals with the benefits of exercise, fatigue, posture, and the correlation between exercise and personality. The second part concerns nutrition and the importance of food. This part covers…

  19. Orthopaedic manual physical therapy including thrust manipulation and exercise in the management of a patient with cervicogenic headache: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Jacqueline; van Duijn, Arie J; Nitsch, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that in Western society as many as 16% of individuals experience cervicogenic headache, which can lead to significant amounts of pain and perceived disability. Cervicogenic headache is characterized by unilateral occipital-temporal pain that is increased by neck movement; it is accompanied by cervical hypomobility, postural changes, and/or increased cervical muscle tone. This case report describes the physical therapy differential diagnosis, management, and outcomes of a patient with cervicogenic headache. The patient was a 40-year-old woman referred by her physiatrist with complaints of cervical pain and ipsilateral temporal headache. The patient presented with increased muscle tone, multiple-level joint hypomobility in the cervical and thoracic spine, muscle weakness, and postural changes. Self-report outcome measures included the Visual Analog Scale for headache pain intensity and the Neck Disability Index. Management consisted of various thrust and non-thrust manipulations, soft tissue mobilizations, postural re-education, and exercise to address postural deficits and cervical and thoracic hypomobility and diminished strength. At discharge, the patient demonstrated clinically meaningful improvements with regard to pain, disability, and headache. This case report indicates that a multimodal physical therapy treatment program may be effective in the management of a patient diagnosed with cervicogenic headache.

  20. Exercise-induced muscle fatigue in the unaffected knee joint and its influence on postural control and lower limb kinematics in stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wook Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effects of exercise-induced muscle fatigue in the unaffected knee joint on postural control and kinematic changes in stroke patients. Forty participants (20 stroke patients, 20 age-matched healthy participants were recruited. To induce fatigue, maximum voluntary isometric contractions were performed in the unaffected knee joint in a Leg Extension Rehab exercise machine using the pneumatic resistance. We measured static and dynamic balance and lower-limb kinematics during gait. Changes in postural control parameters anteroposterior sway speed and total center of pressure distance differed significantly between the stroke and control groups. In addition, changes in gait kinematic parameters knee and ankle angles of initial contact differed significantly between stroke (paretic and non-paretic and control groups. Muscle fatigue in the unaffected knee and ankle impaired postural control and debilitates kinematic movement of ipsilateral and contralateral lower limbs, and may place the fatigued stroke patients at greater risk for falls.

  1. Do Pilates-based exercises following total knee arthroplasty improve postural control and quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Aysenur; Yuksel, Inci; Kinikli, Gizem Irem; Caglar, Omur

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized, controlled study was to investigate the effects of the addition of Pilates-based exercises to standard exercise programs performed after total knee arthroplasty on quality of life and balance. Forty-six volunteers were divided into two groups. The control group (n = 17) was assigned a standard exercise program after discharge; the study group (n = 17) was assigned Pilates-based exercises along with the standard exercise program. We carried out clinical evaluations of all patients on the day of discharge and after the completion of the 6-week exercise program. We also recorded sociodemographic data, Berg Balance test scores, and Short Form-36 (SF-36) health-related quality of life measurements. When we compared the differences between pre- and post-treatment balance scores of the groups, we found a significant change in favor of the Pilates-based exercise group (13.64 ± 1.45; p Pilates-based exercises group were found to be significant in terms of physical function (p = 0.001), physical role restriction (p = 0.01), and physical component score (p = 0.001). Pilates-based exercises performed along with standard exercise programs were more effective for improving balance and quality of life than standard exercise programs alone.

  2. Exercise at Home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Insights Exercise & Weight Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  3. Effects of exercise and nutrition on postural balance and risk of falling in elderly people with decreased bone mineral density : randomized controlled trial pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, Jaap; de Bruin, Eling Douwe; Stauffacher, Marguerite; Mulder, Theo; Uebelhart, Daniel

    Objective: To compare the effect of calcium/vitamin D supplements with a combination of calcium/vitamin D supplements and exercise/protein on risk of failing and postural balance. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Setting: University hospital physiotherapy department. Subjects: Twenty-four

  4. Determining postural stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Erez (Inventor); Forth, Katharine E. (Inventor); Paloski, William H. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for determining postural stability of a person can include acquiring a plurality of pressure data points over a period of time from at least one pressure sensor. The method can also include the step of identifying a postural state for each pressure data point to generate a plurality of postural states. The method can include the step of determining a postural state of the person at a point in time based on at least the plurality of postural states.

  5. Sex differences in response to targeted kyphosis specific exercise and posture training in community-dwelling older adults: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Wendy B; Parimi, Neeta; Gladin, Amy; Poltavskiy, Eduard A; Schafer, Anne L; Long, Roger K; Fan, Bo; Wong, Shirley S; Lane, Nancy E

    2017-12-04

    Hyperkyphosis, an excessive anterior curvature in the thoracic spine, is associated with reduced health status in older adults. Hyperkyphosis is highly prevalent, more common in older women than men. There is no standard intervention to reduce age-related hyperkyphosis. Sex differences in response to a kyphosis-specific exercise intervention are not known. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a targeted kyphosis-specific exercise and postural training program on the primary outcome Cobb angle of kyphosis, and investigated whether the magnitude of change differed between men and women. One hundred twelve participants aged ≥60 years with kyphosis ≥40° were enrolled and randomized to exercise or waitlist control, and 101 participants had analyzable baseline and follow-up radiographs for Cobb angle measurements. A group intervention including 10 participants per group was delivered by a physical therapist, 1-h, twice a week for 3-months. Controls were placed on a waitlist for 3 months before receiving a delayed intervention. Primary outcome was change from baseline to 3-months in Cobb angle measured from standing lateral spine radiographs. Secondary outcomes included change over 3-months in kyphometer-measured kyphosis, physical function and quality of life. Groups were combined for analysis after both received the intervention, and sex differences in response to the intervention were tested with ANOVA. Participants (60 women, 41 men) were 70.0 (SD = 5.7) years old with mean Cobb angle 55.9 (SD = 12.2) degrees at baseline. The active group had higher baseline modified Physical Performance Test scores than control, p = 0.03. Men had greater baseline kyphometer-measured kyphosis, p = 0.09, and higher bone mineral density (BMD), spine strength, more vertebral fractures and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) than women, p ≤ 0.01. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in change in Cobb at 3-months

  6. FORWARD HEAD POSTURE CORRECTION VERSUS SHOULDER STABILIZATION EXERCISES EFFECT ON SCAPULAR DYSKINESIA AND SHOULDER PROPRIOCEPTION IN ATHLETES AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepmala Thakur

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forward head posture (FHP, the most common deviation from the normal curvature in cervical spine. Craniocervical flexor muscle strengthening is frequently used treatment for FHP. Scapular dykinesia (SD is the alteration in the normal static or dynamic motion of the scapula during coupled scapulohumeral movements. Shoulder stabilization exercises are an effective treatment for SD. As both FHP and SD are related to each other, the objective of the study was to find and compare the effect of FHP correction and shoulder stabilization exercises on SD and shoulder proprioception. Methods: 40 athletes (18-30yrs were recruited. Subjects were randomly allocated into two groups. Group A received deep neck flexor strengthening and anterior scalene stretch, group B received shoulder stabilizing exercises. Paired t test and chi-square test were used to judge the statistical significant difference. The level of significance was set at p <0.05. All data was analyzed using SPSS program version 12. Result: No statistical significant difference was found between the groups for the 4 outcome variables, but significant improvement was seen within the groups. Shoulder proprioception was found to be significant between the groups where group B (p =<0.001 showed better improvement than group A (p = <0.017. Conclusion: Both FHP correction as well as shoulder stabilization exercises were equally effective in correction of scapular dyskinesia and shoulder proprioception. Shoulder stabilization exercises showed slightly better improvement than FHP correction group in reducing proprioception errors. Also neck strength values were found to be clinically significant for deep neck strengthening group.

  7. EXERCISE, MANUAL THERAPY AND POSTURAL RE-EDUCATION FOR UNCONTROLLED EAR TWITCHING AND RELATED IMPAIRMENTS AFTER WHIPLASH INJURY: A CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanders, Kelsey; Feldner, Heather

    2017-10-01

    Whiplash Associated Disorders and the interventions used to remediate them are well documented in physical therapy literature. However, specific interventions for spasms of the neck musculature that also involve constant ear twitching have yet to be addressed. The purpose of this case report is twofold. First, to describe comprehensive physical therapy management and outcomes for a subject with uncontrolled ear twitching and related musculoskeletal impairments, and second, to discuss the physical therapist's approach to evidence-based care when faced with a paucity of literature addressing physical therapy interventions for subjects with uncontrolled ear twitching. The subject was a 14-year-old female who sustained a right anterolateral whiplash injury when struck in the head by a volleyball seven months prior to physical therapy. Beginning five months after that injury, she experienced uncontrolled and constant superior/inferior movement of her right ear (hereafter described in this report as a twitch) in addition to facial and cervical pain from her initial injury. She was unable to participate in high school athletics due to her pain. A multimodal treatment approach including exercise, manual therapy, and postural reeducation was utilized during the subject's episode of care. After eight treatment sessions, the subjects's cervical range of motion and upper extremity strength improved. The reported frequency of ear twitching decreased, as did reports of neck and shoulder pain. In addition, her Neck Disability Index improved from a score of 22, indicating moderate disability, to 9, indicating mild disability and she was able to return to sport activity. With limited research to direct intervention, clinical reasoning was utilized to formulate an effective therapeutic intervention. A combination of manual therapy, exercise, and postural reeducation intervention was effective for this subject and could assist in guiding interventions for similarly unique clinical

  8. The Effects of Consecutive Supervised Functional Lumbar Stabilizing Exercises on the Postural Balance and Functional Disability in Low Back Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddin Karimi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to examine the effects of consecutively supervised core stability training on postural control and functional disability in female patients with non-specific chronic low back pain. Methods: Twenty nine female participants with non-specific chronic low back pain participated in the study. They were randomly divided into two groups: experimental group (10 days consecutively core stability exercises under physical therapist’s supervision and control group (without intervention. Before and after the intervention, stability situations, pain intensity and functional disability were assessed with Biodex, visual Analogue Scale, Oswestry and Quebec questionnaire scales respectively. Data were analyzed by using statistical methods, independent T test and ANCOVA. Results: The study results indicated no statistically significant differences in all variables except age between two groups before intervention. Analysis by ANCOVA showed a significant difference in disability, pain intensity, Overall Stability Index with Double Leg Eyes Closed, Anterior-Posterior Stability Index with Double Leg Eyes Closed and Medio-Lateral Stability Index with Double Leg Eyes Closed scores between two groups after intervention. However, other variable differences were not significant while these changes were greater in the intervention group. Discussion: The present study indicates that consecutively supervised core stability training is an effective approach in pain relief and improving postural control in female patients with non-specific chronic low back pain.

  9. The Comparative Study of the Effect of Stabilization Exercise and Stretching-Strengthening Exercise on Balance Parameters in Forward Head Posture Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solmaz Salehi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Balance disturbance is one of the observed impairments in patient with forward head posture (FHP. The aim of this study was comparing the effect of stabilization and stretching-strengthening exercises on the improvement of balance in these patients. Materials & Methods: Thirty three females with FHP were randomized into three groups of stabilization training, stretching-strengthening and control. The degree of FHP was measured using plumb line and the crania-vertebral angle. Balance tests performed in three different standing conditions on a force platform. The subjects were evaluated after 6 weeks training and 1 month follow-up by repeated measure ANOVA and T-test through SPSS software. Results: Balance parameters in both stretching-strengthening and control groups showed no significant changes (P>0.05 while in the stabilization group, significant decrease in displacement and velocity of center of pressure were seen under conditions of double-leg, eyes-open, foam-surface and single-leg, eyes-closed, rigid-surface (P0.05. Conclusion: In the conditions of standing that visual and proprioception information from plantar region of foot is challenged, stabilization exercises lead to more balance improvement than stretching-strengthening exercises.

  10. Effects of cervical stretching and cranio-cervical flexion exercises on cervical muscle characteristics and posture of patients with cervicogenic headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Kyu; Yang, Dae Jung; Kim, Je Ho; Kang, Da Hang; Park, Sam Heon; Yoon, Jong Hyuk

    2017-10-01

    [Purpose] The present study aimed to conduct a comparative analysis of changes in mechanical characteristics of cervical muscles and cervical posture in patients with cervicogenic headache following exercise program intervention in order to present effective treatment methods for such patients. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 30 patients with cervicogenic headache were recruited and 15 patients were allocated to cervical stretching exercise group and 15 to cervical stretching exercise and cranio-cervical flexion exercise group. After 3 weeks of exercise intervention, craniovertebral angle and tone (Hz) and stiffness (N/m) of the suboccipital and upper trapezius muscles were measured. [Results] After the exercise program intervention, a greater amount of change in tone of suboccipital and upper trapezius muscles was found in the experimental group, as compared to the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant. Greater amount of change in muscle stiffness and craniovertebral angle was found in the experimental group, as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Findings of the present study showed that cranio-cervical exercise was an effective form of exercise for changing muscle characteristics and posture in patients with cervicogenic headache. Such findings will be helpful in providing effective treatments for patients with cervicogenic headache.

  11. Effects of a high intensity intermitent exercise on the postural dynamic control of semi pro football players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Francisco Royán-González

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to study how intermittent high intensity exercise affects dynamic postural control in soccer players of the 3rd Spanish Division. Through an intermittent effort test (Yo-Yo Intermittent test 1 the players are subjected to a fatigue situation in order to observe the incidence of dynamic postural control, whose alteration is related to the increased risk of sports injuries. Fatigue is an element that brings with it a series of physiological changes and makes our motor response ineffective due to the diversity of stimuli offered by a sport such as football, and can trigger in an injury, the epidemiology of football shows us the importance of the control of Fatigue and its consequences on the actions of players. Objective. To verify the incidence of fatigue in dynamic postural control. Design. Pre experimental, pre and post treatment of a group. Population. Twelve male players (Age = 4 ± 5.3 years, height = 1.81 ± 0.04 m, weight = 76.8 ± 6.35, fat% = 11.9 ± 0.99% Method. We performed a pre-test Y Balance Test (YBT, we immediately induce fatigue through Yo-Yo Intermittent test 1, when the player completes the test we obtain lactam sample in blood and perform a post test YBT to see the differences After induced fatigue. Heart rate (HR was monitored throughout the process to obtain maximum heart rate (HRmax and the subjective perception of exertion of the players was controlled using Borg scale. Results. After performing a Student's T, we compared the pre and post means in order to verify if there were significant differences. All the scopes declined in the post-test, but significantly the right frontal range (p <0, 0100, right postero-lateral (p <0.0000 and left postero-medial range (p <0.0130. Pearson's correlation r found positive but not significant relationships between variables. Conclusion. With the data obtained, we can say that fatigue induced through a test of high intermittent intensity adversely affects

  12. The effects of isometric exercises and stretching on postural stability in Non–Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus patients with diffuse symmetrical sensory motor neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nenkova

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of isometric exercises and stretching on postural stability in Non – Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM patients with diffuse symmetrical sensory motor neuropathy. Patients were assigned to an experimental group and amatched control group. The experimental group received isometric exer-cises and stretching three times weekly for 12 weeks in addition to routine medication and dietary advice. A t the end of this period, this group wascompared with the control group, which received routine medication anddietary advice only. Measurements of muscle strength of quadriceps, ham-strings, ankle plantar and dorsiflexors, and Romberg’s test for postural sta-bility were carried out before and after the 12 weeks intervention. The study showed that isometric exercises and stretching for the lower extremities improved postural stability (p = 0.00and strength of the quadriceps (p = 0.001 hamstrings (p = 0.001 dorsiflexors (p = 0.001 plantarflexors (p = 0.001in NIDDM patients with diffuse symmetrical sensory motor neuropathy. This exercise regimen also had a loweringeffect on blood glucose level (p = 0.00.  In conclusion it seems that the simple exercise intervention described in thisstudy may be of benefit to these patients if incorporated into their management programmes.

  13. The effect of Pilates based exercise on mobility, postural stability, and balance in order to decrease fall risk in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pata, Rachel W; Lord, Katrina; Lamb, Jamie

    2014-07-01

    Falls are a common problem in older adults. Impaired balance, mobility and postural stability are risk factors for falling. Limited research has been performed on Pilates exercise and the ability to decrease fall risk. In this quasi-experimental study, 35 adults (61-87 years old) participated in an 8-week Pilates based exercise program. Blind examiners conducted the Timed Up and Go (TUG), Forward Reach Test, and Turn 180 Test before and after the intervention. Number of falls, perception of Pilates, and fear of falling was also recorded. Thirty-two (91.4%) participants completed post-test measures. Significant improvements were seen in the TUG (p Pilates program and decreased fear of falling was shown. Results suggest a Pilates based exercise program may be effective in improving balance, mobility and postural stability to decrease fall risk. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of kinesio taping versus postural correction exercises on pain intensity and axioscapular muscles activation in mechanical neck dysfunction: a randomized blinded clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Abd, Aliaa M; Ibrahim, Abeer R; El-Hafez, Haytham M

    2017-10-01

    While postural correction is commonly used for mechanical neck dysfunction (MND), efficacy of KT has received considerable attention. This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of kinesio taping (KT) versus postural correction exercises on pain intensity and axioscapular muscles activation in patients with MND. Randomized clinical trial for which forty six patients with MND were randomly assigned in to 1 of 2 groups received 4 weeks treatment; KT group: received kinesio taping, PCE group: performed postural correction exercises. Neck pain and axioscapular muscles activation in form of normalized root mean square of dominant upper trapezius and levator scapula muscles were measured pre- and post-treatment by visual analogue scale and electromyography. Two ways MANOVA was used to examine the effects of treatment on outcome measures. The variable of interest was the group-by-time interaction at an a priori alpha level of 0.05. Intragroup comparisons were performed using paired t-tests. Group by time interaction was statistically significant in multivariate test (F=3.114, P=0.031). KT produced more pain reduction than postural exercises (P<0.05). There was no significant interaction for either UT RMS (P=0.274) or LS RMS (P=0.59). In both groups, Paired t tests revealed that there was significant reduction in pain and muscle activation of both measured muscles (P<0.01). KT has been found to be more effective than postural exercises to reduce neck pain. However, both modalities have similar effects to reduce axioscapular muscles activation.

  15. "Mind Blown"--Including Exercise Science Students as Research Assistants to Reduce Ageist Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlenza, Samuel T.; Bourassa, Dara

    2017-01-01

    The amount of older adults is increasing rapidly and the demands of an aging population will need to be met by professionals in many fields, including exercise science. However, many undergraduate students do not want to work with older adults. Therefore, this qualitative study sought to examine the experiences and perceptions of exercise science…

  16. Analysis of Postural Control During Quiet Standing in a Population with Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Undergoing Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training: A Single Blind, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Snehil; Maiya, Arun; Shastry, Barkur A; Guddattu, Vasudev

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 8 wks of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise on postural control during quiet standing in type 2 diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Individuals were included in the study if they had type 2 diabetes with clinical neuropathy, defined by a minimum score of 7 on the Michigan Diabetic Neuropathy Score, following which the patients were randomly assigned to an 8-wk program by computer-generated random number tables to study or control group. Repeated-measures analysis of variance was used for data analysis (P < 0.05 was considered significant). After final randomization, there were 36 patients in the study group and 45 in the control group. On comparison of results for control and study groups using repeated-measures analysis of variance only in the eyes closed on foam condition was there was a significant difference between the two groups for sway velocity along the x-axis (df1, df2 = 1, 18, F = 3.86, P = 0.04) and mediolateral displacement (df1, df2 = 1, 18, F = 4.04, P = 0.03). Aerobic exercise training could exert a therapeutic effect on center of pressure movement only along the x-axis in the eyes closed condition on foam surface during quiet standing.

  17. Immediate effects of Pilates based therapeutic exercise on postural control of young individuals with non-specific low back pain: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Susana; Correia, Christophe; Félix, Gonçalo; Lopes, Mário; Cruz, Ana; Ribeiro, Fernando

    2017-10-01

    Low back pain affects the person's ability to keep balance, especially in challenging conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine the immediate effects of Pilates exercises on postural sway and dynamic balance of young individuals with non-specific low back pain. Controlled laboratory design. Forty-six participants with non-specific low back pain were randomized to a Pilates (n=23, 10 males; age: 21.8±3.2years) and a control group (n=23, 9 males; age: 22.8±3.6years). Postural sway was assessed with a force platform and dynamic balance with the Star Excursion Balance Test, before and after the intervention or rest period. To assess postural sway, participants stood still on an unstable surface set on the force plate for 90s, with eyes closed. The intervention lasted 20min and consisted on four Pilates exercises: single leg stretch (level 1), pelvic press (level 1), swimming (level 1) and kneeling opposite arm and leg reach. At baseline, no differences were found between groups. The Pilates group improved in all the postural sway values (area of CoP: 11.5±3.4 to 9.7±2.7cm 2 , p=0.002 and CoP velocity: 2.8±0.6 to 2.3±0.5cm/s, pPilates group. Pilates exercises immediately improved postural sway and dynamic balance in young adults with non-specific low back pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Body posture and postural stability of people practicing qigong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wilczyński

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Correct and stable posture is essential for the implementation of the majority of voluntary movements and locomotion. The study of postural stability is an element of clinical trials evaluating physical activity in order to determine the optimal therapeutic procedures. Qigong exercises are not only a form of prevention, helpful in maintaining wellbeing, but also a means of therapy in many diseases, including disorders of postural stability. Aim of the research: To analyse the association between the quality of posture and postural stability of people practicing qigong. Material and methods : The study involved 32 people. The mean age of those tested was 54 years. Posture study used optoelectronic method Diers formetric III 4D. Postural stability was tested on the platform Biodex Balance System. The studies were performed at the Posture Laboratory of the Institute of Physiotherapy at Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce. Results and conclusions : Spearman rank order correlation showed a positive correlation of relative rotation of the spine area with a general indicator of stability (p = 0.0206 at an average level (R = 0.4075 and with the index of the stability A/P (p = 0.0310, although at a lower level (R = 0.3819. With the increase in the relative rotation of the spine area the overall stability indicator and stability indicator A/P also increased. Significant positive correlations were also seen for the surface rotation (+max and a general indication of the stability and the stability index A/P. With the increase of surface rotation (+max of the spine the overall stability indicator and stability indicator A/P also increased.

  19. Leg extensor muscle strength, postural stability, and fear of falling after a 2-month home exercise program in women with severe knee joint osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rätsepsoo, Monika; Gapeyeva, Helena; Sokk, Jelena; Ereline, Jaan; Haviko, Tiit; Pääsuke, Mati

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE. The aim of this study was to compare the leg extensor muscle strength, the postural stability, and the fear of falling in the women with severe knee joint osteoarthritis (OA) before and after a 2-month home exercise program (HEP). MATERIAL AND METHODS. In total, 17 women aged 46-72 years with late-stage knee joint OA scheduled for total knee arthroplasty participated in this study before and after the 2-month HEP with strengthening, stretching, balance, and step exercises. The isometric peak torque (PT) of the leg extensors and postural stability characteristics when standing on a firm or a foam surface for 30 seconds were recorded. The fear of falling and the pain intensity (VAS) were estimated. RESULTS. A significant increase in the PT and the PT-to-body weight (PT-to-BW) ratio of the involved leg as well as the bilateral PT and the PT-to-BW ratio was found after the 2-month HEP compared with the data before the HEP (Pafter the HEP (PAfter the 2-month HEP, the leg extensor muscle strength increased and the postural sway length on a foam surface decreased. The results indicate that the increased leg extensor muscle strength improves postural stability and diminishes the fear of falling in women with late-stage knee joint OA.

  20. Effects on muscle strength, maximal jump height, flexibility and postural sway after soccer and Zumba exercise among female hospital employees: a 9-month randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barene, Svein; Holtermann, Andreas; Oseland, Harald; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-10-01

    This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25-63 were cluster-randomised to a soccer group, a Zumba group or a control group. Training was conducted outside working hours as two to three 1-h weekly sessions the first 3 months and once a week the last 6 months. Tests were conducted at baseline, after 3 and 9 months. The soccer group improved maximal neck extension strength both after 3 (1.2 kg; P strength (3.1 kg; P = 0.04) after 3 months, with improvements in postural sway velocity moment (-9.2 mm(2)/s; P exercise may be beneficial for improvement of the neck and trunk strength, which may have preventive effects with regard to future perceived muscle pain in the respective body regions. Furthermore, the Zumba group revealed positive effects on lower limb lean mass and postural sway compared to the control group.

  1. A water-based training program that include perturbation exercises to improve stepping responses in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled cross-over trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsedek Irit

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gait and balance impairments may increase the risk of falls, the leading cause of accidental death in the elderly population. Fall-related injuries constitute a serious public health problem associated with high costs for society as well as human suffering. A rapid step is the most important protective postural strategy, acting to recover equilibrium and prevent a fall from initiating. It can arise from large perturbations, but also frequently as a consequence of volitional movements. We propose to use a novel water-based training program which includes specific perturbation exercises that will target the stepping responses that could potentially have a profound effect in reducing risk of falling. We describe the water-based balance training program and a study protocol to evaluate its efficacy (Trial registration number #NCT00708136. Methods/Design The proposed water-based training program involves use of unpredictable, multi-directional perturbations in a group setting to evoke compensatory and volitional stepping responses. Perturbations are made by pushing slightly the subjects and by water turbulence, in 24 training sessions conducted over 12 weeks. Concurrent cognitive tasks during movement tasks are included. Principles of physical training and exercise including awareness, continuity, motivation, overload, periodicity, progression and specificity were used in the development of this novel program. Specific goals are to increase the speed of stepping responses and improve the postural control mechanism and physical functioning. A prospective, randomized, cross-over trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis will be performed to evaluate the efficacy of the water-based training program. A total of 36 community-dwelling adults (age 65–88 with no recent history of instability or falling will be assigned to either the perturbation-based training or a control group (no training

  2. A water-based training program that include perturbation exercises to improve stepping responses in older adults: study protocol for a randomized controlled cross-over trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Itshak; Elbar, Ori; Tsedek, Irit; Oddsson, Lars Ie

    2008-08-17

    Gait and balance impairments may increase the risk of falls, the leading cause of accidental death in the elderly population. Fall-related injuries constitute a serious public health problem associated with high costs for society as well as human suffering. A rapid step is the most important protective postural strategy, acting to recover equilibrium and prevent a fall from initiating. It can arise from large perturbations, but also frequently as a consequence of volitional movements. We propose to use a novel water-based training program which includes specific perturbation exercises that will target the stepping responses that could potentially have a profound effect in reducing risk of falling. We describe the water-based balance training program and a study protocol to evaluate its efficacy (Trial registration number #NCT00708136). The proposed water-based training program involves use of unpredictable, multi-directional perturbations in a group setting to evoke compensatory and volitional stepping responses. Perturbations are made by pushing slightly the subjects and by water turbulence, in 24 training sessions conducted over 12 weeks. Concurrent cognitive tasks during movement tasks are included. Principles of physical training and exercise including awareness, continuity, motivation, overload, periodicity, progression and specificity were used in the development of this novel program. Specific goals are to increase the speed of stepping responses and improve the postural control mechanism and physical functioning. A prospective, randomized, cross-over trial with concealed allocation, assessor blinding and intention-to-treat analysis will be performed to evaluate the efficacy of the water-based training program. A total of 36 community-dwelling adults (age 65-88) with no recent history of instability or falling will be assigned to either the perturbation-based training or a control group (no training). Voluntary step reaction times and postural stability

  3. [Evaluation of the electromyography activity of pelvic floor muscle during postural exercises using the Wii Fit Plus©. Analysis and perspectives in rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenstrup, B; Giralte, F; Bakker, E; Grise, P

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of postural awareness by using the Wii Fit Plus© on the quality of the baseline (automatic) activity of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) measured by intravaginal surface electromyography (sEMG). Four healthy continent female subjects, all able to perform a voluntary contraction, undertook 2 sets of 3 various exercises offered by the software Wii Fit Plus© using the Wii balance board© (WBB): one set without any visual control and the second set with postural control and sEMG visual feedback. Simultaneously, we recorded the sEMG activity of the PFM. Mean baseline activity of PFM in standing position at start was 2.87 mV, at submaximal voluntary contraction the sEMG activity raised at a mean of 14.43 mV (7.87-21.89). In the first set of exercises on the WBB without any visual feedback, the automatic activity of the PFM increased from 2.87 mV to 8.75 mV (7.96-9.59). In the second set, with visual postural and sEMG control, mean baseline sEMG activity even raised at 11.39 mV (10.17-11.58). Among women able of a voluntary contraction of PFM, visualisation of posture with the help of the WBB and of sEMG activity of the PFM during static and dynamic Wii Fit Plus© activities, may improve the automatic activation of the PFMs. 4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects on muscle strength, maximal jump height, flexibility and postural sway after soccer and Zumba exercise among female hospital employees: A 9-month randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Barene, Svein; Holtermann, Andreas; Oseland, Harald; Brekke, Ole Lars; Krustrup, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This 9-month randomised controlled workplace physical activity trial investigated the effects of soccer and Zumba exercise, respectively, on muscle strength, maximal jump height, sit-and-reach flexibility and postural sway among female workers. A total of 107 female hospital employees aged 25–63 were cluster-randomised to a soccer group, a Zumba group or a control group. Training was conducted outside working hours as two to three 1-h weekly sessions the first 3 months and once a week the las...

  5. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercises Electrothermal Modalities Ergonomic Changes Hydrotherapy Manual Therapy Physical Therapy Postural Training Traction Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections ...

  6. Decerebrate posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be brain and nervous system injury and permanent brain damage, which can lead to: Coma Inability to communicate Paralysis Seizures Alternative Names Opisthotonos - decerebrate posture; Abnormal posturing - ...

  7. The effects of scapular stabilization based exercise therapy on pain, posture, flexibility and shoulder mobility in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a controlled randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezy, Azar; Sepehrifar, Saeed; Solaymani Dodaran, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dysfunction in the kinetic chain caused by poor scapula stabilization can contribute to shoulder injuries and Shoulder Impingement Syndrome (SIS). The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two treatment approaches scapular stabilization based exercise therapy and physical therapy in patients with SIS. Methods: The study is a randomized clinical trial in which 68 patients with SIS were randomly assigned in two groups of exercise therapy (ET) and physical therapy (PT) and received 18 sessions of treatment. Pain, shoulders' range of abduction and external rotation, shoulder protraction, scapular rotation and symmetry as well as postural assessment and Pectoralis minor length were evaluated pre and post intervention. The paired-sample t test and the independent sample t test were applied respectively to determine the differences in each group and between two groups. Results: Our findings indicated significant differences in abduction and external rotation range, improvement of forward shoulder translation and increase in the flexibility of the involved shoulder between the two groups (respectively ; p=0.024, p=0.001, pshoulder (pshoulder range, decreasing forward head and shoulder postures and Pectoralis minor flexibility. PMID:25664288

  8. The effects of scapular stabilization based exercise therapy on pain, posture, flexibility and shoulder mobility in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a controlled randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezy, Azar; Sepehrifar, Saeed; Solaymani Dodaran, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction in the kinetic chain caused by poor scapula stabilization can contribute to shoulder injuries and Shoulder Impingement Syndrome (SIS). The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two treatment approaches scapular stabilization based exercise therapy and physical therapy in patients with SIS. The study is a randomized clinical trial in which 68 patients with SIS were randomly assigned in two groups of exercise therapy (ET) and physical therapy (PT) and received 18 sessions of treatment. Pain, shoulders' range of abduction and external rotation, shoulder protraction, scapular rotation and symmetry as well as postural assessment and Pectoralis minor length were evaluated pre and post intervention. The paired-sample t test and the independent sample t test were applied respectively to determine the differences in each group and between two groups. Our findings indicated significant differences in abduction and external rotation range, improvement of forward shoulder translation and increase in the flexibility of the involved shoulder between the two groups (respectively ; p=0.024, p=0.001, pshoulder (pshoulder range, decreasing forward head and shoulder postures and Pectoralis minor flexibility.

  9. Influência dos exercícios perineais e dos cones vaginais, associados à correção postural, no tratamento da incontinência urinária feminina Influence of perineal exercises and vaginal cones in association with corrective postural exercises, on female urinary incontinence treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Matheus

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a influência dos exercícios perineais e dos cones vaginais, em associação aos exercícios posturais corretivos para a normalização estática da pelve, no tratamento da incontinência urinária feminina. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas 12 mulheres apresentando queixa de incontinência urinária, com idade média de 52,3 ± 9,7, submetidas a 10 sessões fisioterapêuticas, duas vezes na semana, divididas em dois grupos: Grupo A: n = 6, utilizando exercícios perineais e Grupo B: n = 6, utilizando cones vaginais. Ambos os grupos realizaram exercícios posturais para correção estática da pelve, conforme alterações de cada participante. Foram coletados os seguintes dados, antes e após intervenção: grau de contração muscular do períneo, pela Avaliação Funcional do Assoalho Pélvico (AFA; perda quantitativa de urina, mensurada pelo teste da almofada (Pad-Test, e sensações de umidade e desconforto, verificadas pelas Escalas Visuais Análogas (EVA. Os dados posturais foram coletados através do exame estático da pelve, exame de flexibilidade das cadeias musculares e avaliação postural. RESULTADOS: Na comparação dos dados pré e pós-intervenção, foi observado, para ambos os grupos, diminuição estatisticamente significativa da perda urinária (p OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of perineal exercises and vaginal cones in association with corrective postural exercises for static normalization of the pelvis, on female urinary incontinence treatment. METHOD: Twelve women with urinary incontinence complaints (mean age: 52.3 ± 9.7 were assessed via 10 physical therapy sessions, twice a week. They were divided into two groups: Group A (n = 6 underwent perineal exercises, while Group B (n = 6 used vaginal cones. Both groups performed postural exercises for static correction of the pelvis, in accordance with each patient's abnormalities. The following data were collected before and after the intervention: degree

  10. Postural deformities in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doherty, K.M.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Peralta, M.C.; Silveira-Moriyama, L.; Azulay, J.P.; Gershanik, O.S.; Bloem, B.R.

    2011-01-01

    Postural deformities are frequent and disabling complications of Parkinson's disease (PD) and atypical parkinsonism. These deformities include camptocormia, antecollis, Pisa syndrome, and scoliosis. Recognition of specific postural syndromes might have differential diagnostic value in patients

  11. Postural Rehabilitation for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis during Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Moramarco, Marc Michael; Borysov, Maksym; Lee, Sang Gil; Nan, Xiaofeng; Moramarco, Kathryn Ann

    2016-01-01

    Long-term follow-up of untreated patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) indicates that, with the exception of some extremely severe cases, AIS does not have a significant impact on quality of life and does not result in dire consequences. In view of the relatively benign nature of AIS and the long-term complications of surgery, the indications for treatment should be reviewed. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that scoliosis-specific exercises focusing on postural rehabilitation can positively influence the spinal curvatures in growing adolescents. Experiential postural re-education is a conservative, non-invasive approach, and its role in the management of AIS warrants further study. This article reviews current evidence for the inclusion of various forms of postural reeducation in the management of AIS. Recent comprehensive reviews have been researched including a manual and PubMed search for evidence regarding the effectiveness of physical/postural re-education/physiotherapy programs in growing AIS patients. This search revealed that there were few studies on the application of postural re-education in the management of AIS. These studies revealed that postural re-education in the form of exercise rehabilitation programs may have a positive influence on scoliosis; however, the various programs were difficult to compare. More research is necessary. There is at present Level 1 evidence for the effectiveness of Schroth scoliosis exercises in the management of AIS. Whether this evidence can be extrapolated to include other forms of scoliosis- pattern-specific exercises requires further investigation. Because corrective postures theoretically reduce the asymmetric loading of the spinal deformities and reverse the vicious cycle of spinal curvature progression, their integration into AIS programs may be beneficial and should be further examined. PMID:27340540

  12. Should Ballet Dancers Vary Postures and Underfoot Surfaces When Practicing Postural Balance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Nili; Waddington, Gordon; Adams, Roger; Karin, Janet; Tirosh, Oren

    2018-01-01

    Postural balance (PB) is an important component skill for professional dancers. However, the effects of different types of postures and different underfoot surfaces on PB have not adequately been addressed. The main aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different conditions of footwear, surfaces, and standing positions on static and dynamic PB ability of young ballet dancers. A total of 36 male and female young professional ballet dancers (aged 14-19 years) completed static and dynamic balance testing, measured by head and lumbar accelerometers, while standing on one leg in the turnout position, under six different conditions: (1) "relaxed" posture; (2) "ballet" posture; (3) barefoot; (4) ballet shoes with textured insoles; (5) barefoot on a textured mat; and (6) barefoot on a spiky mat. A condition effect was found for static and dynamic PB. Static PB was reduced when dancers stood in the ballet posture compared with standing in the relaxed posture and when standing on a textured mat and on a spiky mat (p ballet shoes with textured insoles and when standing on a spiky mat compared with all other conditions (p ballet aligned position, including dance practice on different types of floors and on different types of textured/spiky materials may result in skill transfer to practice on normal floor surfaces, and both static and dynamic PB exercises should be assessed and generalized into practical dance routines.

  13. Postural variations in Cardio Stress Index scores | Bagwath Persad ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerous factors influence heart rate variability, including age, exercise and posture. The Cardio Stress Index (CSI) is a transformed measure of heart rate variability that is determined via a miniature digital multi-channel electrocardiogram system. Although the CSI and heart rate variability are reportedly analogous, little is ...

  14. Evaluation of Dogs with Border Collie Collapse, Including Response to Two Standardized Strenuous Exercise Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susan; Shmon, Cindy; Su, Lillian; Epp, Tasha; Minor, Katie; Mickelson, James; Patterson, Edward; Shelton, G Diane

    2016-01-01

    Clinical and metabolic variables were evaluated in 13 dogs with border collie collapse (BCC) before, during, and following completion of standardized strenuous exercise protocols. Six dogs participated in a ball-retrieving protocol, and seven dogs participated in a sheep-herding protocol. Findings were compared with 16 normal border collies participating in the same exercise protocols (11 retrieving, five herding). Twelve dogs with BCC developed abnormal mentation and/or an abnormal gait during evaluation. All dogs had post-exercise elevations in rectal temperature, pulse rate, arterial blood pH, PaO2, and lactate, and decreased PaCO2 and bicarbonate, as expected with strenuous exercise, but there were no significant differences between BCC dogs and normal dogs. Electrocardiography demonstrated sinus tachycardia in all dogs following exercise. Needle electromyography was normal, and evaluation of muscle biopsy cryosections using a standard panel of histochemical stains and reactions did not reveal a reason for collapse in 10 dogs with BCC in which these tests were performed. Genetic testing excluded the dynamin-1 related exercise-induced collapse mutation and the V547A malignant hyperthermia mutation as the cause of BCC. Common reasons for exercise intolerance were eliminated. Although a genetic basis is suspected, the cause of collapse in BCC was not determined.

  15. Comparison of hip extensor muscle activity including the adductor magnus during three prone hip extension exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Han-I; Jeon, Seung-Yeon; Kim, Si-Hyun; Park, Kyue-Nam

    2018-03-30

    This study compared the role of the adductor magnus muscle (Amag) as a hip extensor while performing active prone hip extension (PHE), PHE with hip adduction (PHE-ADD), and PHE with hip abduction (PHE-ABD) with the gluteus maximus (Gmax) and hamstrings. The study recruited 22 healthy participants. Electromyography data were recorded from the Amag, Gmax, and medial and lateral hamstrings during PHE, PHE-ADD, and PHE-ABD. Normalized electromyographic data were examined using one-way, repeated-measures analyses of variance. The magnitude of the Amag, Gmax, and hamstring activations did not differ significantly while performing PHE (p = 0.41). Furthermore, the Amag and hamstring activations were significantly greater than the Gmax activation when performing PHE-ADD (p < 0.05). The Gmax showed significantly greater activation during PHE-ABD than the Amag and medial and lateral hamstrings (p < 0.05). Based on these results, we advocate including the Amag as a hip extensor during the PHE test or exercise. Our preliminary results have the potential to be applied directly to the PHE test, for investigating the muscle-activation pattern of the Amag with the Gmax and hamstrings in patients with hip or lower back pain.

  16. Effects of a Pilates exercise program on muscle strength, postural control and body composition: results from a pilot study in a group of post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamin, M; Gobbo, S; Bullo, V; Zanotto, T; Vendramin, B; Duregon, F; Cugusi, L; Camozzi, V; Zaccaria, M; Neunhaeuserer, D; Ermolao, A

    2015-12-01

    Participation in exercise programs is heartily recommended for older adults since the level of physical fitness directly influences functional independence. The aim of this present study was to investigate the effects of supervised Pilates exercise training on the physical function, hypothesizing that a period of Pilates exercise training (PET) can increase overall muscle strength, body composition, and balance, during single and dual-task conditions, in a group of post-menopausal women. Twenty-five subjects, aged 59 to 66 years old, were recruited. Eligible participants were assessed prior and after 3 months of PET performed twice per week. Muscular strength was evaluated with handgrip strength (HGS) test, 30-s chair sit-to-stand test (30CST), and abdominal strength (AST) test. Postural control and dual-task performance were measured through a stabilometric platform while dynamic balance with 8 ft up and go test. Finally, body composition was assessed by means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Statistically significant improvements were detected on HGS (+8.22%), 30CST (+23.41%), 8 ft up and go test (-5.95%), AST (+30.81%), medio-lateral oscillations in open eyes and dual-task condition (-22.03% and -10.37%). Pilates was effective in increasing upper body, lower body, and abdominal muscle strength. No changes on body composition were detected. Results on this investigation indicated also that 12-week of mat Pilates is not sufficient to determine a clinical meaningful improvement on static balance in single and dual-task conditions.

  17. Does ceasing exercise induce depressive symptoms? A systematic review of experimental trials including immunological and neurogenic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Julie A; Olagunju, Andrew T; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2018-02-24

    Regular exercise in adults improves depressive symptoms (DS) and major depressive disorder (MDD), however the clinical effects of ceasing exercise are largely unknown. Seven databases were searched from inception to December 2017. Eligibility criteria included English language studies investigating the effects of ceasing exercise on DS or MDD in regularly active adults with or without prior DS or MDD. Blood based markers related to exercise cessation (EC) were assessed, if recorded. Studies investigating exercise follow-up periods were excluded. No studies investigated EC in MDD. Six studies including two RCTS and three studies investigating neurogenic and immune biological markers associated with DS met inclusion criteria (152 healthy adults, females n = 50/32.89%). Compared to baseline, EC increased DS after three days, one week, and two weeks. Female participants had significantly more DS than male participants. Following EC, no changes in brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF) were evident, however C-reactive protein (CRP) at week one and interleukin 6 (IL6) at week two were reduced. Quality concerns including risks of attrition and reporting bias limit our confidence in these results. Ceasing regular exercise increases DS in healthy adults, with greater DS in females than males. Contrary to the cytokine/inflammatory hypothesis of depression, DS were associated with reduced CRP and IL6 and without increased TNF. High quality trials are needed to extend this field of research in both healthy and MDD populations. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Detecting Restenosis after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Using Exercise-Stress Electrocardiogram Findings Including QT Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonpei Takase, MD

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advent of drug-eluting stents in Japan, bare metal stents or conventional balloon angioplasty are still indicated in some patients needing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI and in patients with acute coronary syndrome if these patients develop side effects while taking ticlopidine. In such patients, restenosis is a problem that is difficult to diagnose. To investigate the comparative diagnostic accuracy of the exercise-stress electrocardiogram (ECG for detecting restenosis after PCI, we measured conventional ST-segment changes and QT dispersion during exercise-stress testing in 173 patients with elective PCI (63 ± 10 years old. Exercise-stress testing was performed 3 to 6 months after successful PCI, and restenosis was confirmed by follow-up coronary angiogram. There were 98 patients with a prior myocardial infarction (prior MI group and 76 patients with no prior myocardial infarction (no MI group. Restenosis was found in 45 patients (46% in the prior MI group and 26 patients (34% in the no MI group. Conventional ST-segment depression (>1:0 mm, J 60 ms indicating exercise-induced myocardial ischemia had a sensitivity of around 50% and a specificity of around 70% for diagnosing restenosis in both groups. In the prior MI group, QT dispersion was increased by exercise-stress testing in both patients with and without restenosis, whereas in the no MI group, QT dispersion increased only in patients with restenosis. With a cut-off value of >60 ms, QT dispersion had a sensitivity of 54% and a specificity of 68% for detecting restenosis in the no MI group; these values were comparable to those seen with conventional ST-segment changes. In conclusion, due to its low cost, exercise-stress ECG remains useful for diagnosing restenosis following PCI if the clinician understands its limited sensitivity and specificity. The presence of a prior MI must be considered when QT dispersion during exercise-stress testing is used for

  19. Including the Copenhagen Adduction Exercise in the FIFA 11+ Provides Missing Eccentric Hip Adduction Strength Effect in Male Soccer Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harøy, Joar; Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The FIFA 11+ was developed as a complete warm-up program to prevent injuries in soccer players. Although reduced hip adduction strength is associated with groin injuries, none of the exercises included in the FIFA 11+ seem to specifically target hip adduction strength. PURPOSE......: To investigate the effect on eccentric hip adduction strength of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program with or without the Copenhagen adduction exercise. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. METHODS: We recruited 45 eligible players from 2 U19 elite male soccer teams. Players were randomized...... into 2 groups; 1 group carried out the standard FIFA 11+ program, while the other carried out the FIFA 11+ but replaced the Nordic hamstring exercise with the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Both groups performed the intervention 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. Players completed eccentric strength and sprint...

  20. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Jordan Gliedt, DC Directional Exercises Electrothermal Modalities Ergonomic Changes Hydrotherapy Manual Therapy Physical Therapy Postural Training Traction Watchful Waiting and Education Injection Treatments for Spinal Pain Epidural Steroid Injections ...

  1. Habitual body posture and mountain position of people practising yoga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Grabara

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the physical exercises of yoga (hatha yoga, the Mountain Pose is a basic arrangement of the body involving, among other things, active extension of the spine in the vertical axis and symmetrical arrangement of individual elements of the body. The aim of the study was to compare the difference between this posture and the relaxed stance in people doing hatha yoga. The study included 28 women and 8 men doing yoga aged 20-58. The study was carried out using the apparatus for computer assessment of posture of the MORA system.The study has shown that all the elements of body posture in the Mountain Pose are placed more correctly (according to the criterion of symmetry related to frontal and transverse planes. Differences in the placement of lines of the spinous processes and of the pelvis in the transverse plane were observed. The angles of inclination of the anteroposterior curvatures of the spine were smaller in the Mountain Pose than in the habitual one. It has been demonstrated that for people doing hatha yoga the Mountain Pose is a more correct (symmetrical stance than the habitual one. Those who had been doing yoga longer and those who devoted more time to exercise per week were characterised by more correct body stance. The physical exercises of yoga shape the habit of correct stance. The arrangement of the body in the Mountain Pose in the light of the criteria of correct posture may be regarded as optimal.

  2. Postural control during one-leg stance in active and sedentary older people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo George Victorio Victor

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical inactivity and aging are functional disability factors for older individuals, causing loss of balance and increasing the risk of falls. The purpose of this study was to compare the balance of physically independent older individuals, both participants and non-participants in a regular exercise program. Fifty six physically independent older participants were divided into G1ACTIVE = 28 individuals who participate in a regular exercise program and G2SEDENTARY = 28 individuals who did not participate in any physical exercise program. All participants underwent an eyes-open during one-leg balance test on a force platform. The postural oscillation parameters included center of pressure (COP; sway mean velocity and frequency of COP oscillations. G2 SEDENTARY showed higher postural instability than G1ACTIVE. Significant differences were observed for the main balance parameters. The results of this study support the concept that participation in regular physical activity is beneficial for postural balance of older individuals.

  3. MULLIGAN VERSUS MAITLAND MOBILIZATION ON THORACIC KYPHOTIC ANGLE IN POSTURAL KYPHOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ibrahim Fathallah Abdelhay

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postural hypnosis can lead to cervical pain or bad cosmetic appearance.There is a lack in the literature supporting the efficacy of spinal mobilization techniques in restoring normal thoracic curvature.Mulligan and Maitland's mobilization were used to improve range of motion and referred pain not to restore normal kyphotic angle. The purpose: this study was conducted to compare the efficacy of Mulligan and Maitland spinal mobilization on a kyphotic angle in postural kyphosis. Subjects: seventy-five male subjects with postural kyphosis their age (17-21 years were included in the study by initial postural examination and were randomly assigned into three equal groups. Methods: Group I each subject in this group received mulligan mobilization in addition to back exercises as conservative treatment, Group II each subject in this group received Maitland mobilization in addition to back exercises as conservative treatment, Group III this group was considered as a control group. Subjects within this group will perform exercises only as a conservative treatment. Kyphotic angle was measured by using formetric raster-stereography pre and post treatment. Result: The result of the study showed a significant effect of Mulligan mobilization in reducing kyphotic angle in patients with postural kyphosis p-value was (0.001, and there was no significant effect on Maitland mobilization on a kyphotic angle and the p-value was (0.256. Conclusion: Mulligan mobilization is effective in restoring normal kyphotic angle in cases of postural kyphosis

  4. Benefits of dietary phytochemical supplementation on eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage: Is including antioxidants enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira Panza, Vilma Simões; Diefenthaeler, Fernando; da Silva, Edson Luiz

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to critically discuss studies that investigated the effects of supplementation with dietary antioxidant phytochemicals on recovery from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. The performance of physical activities that involve unaccustomed eccentric muscle actions-such as lowering a weight or downhill walking-can result in muscle damage, oxidative stress, and inflammation. These events may be accompanied by muscle weakness and delayed-onset muscle soreness. According to the current evidences, supplementation with dietary antioxidant phytochemicals appears to have the potential to attenuate symptoms associated with eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage. However, there are inconsistencies regarding the relationship between muscle damage and blood markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Furthermore, the effectiveness of strategies appear to depend on a number of aspects inherent to phytochemical compounds as well as its food matrix. Methodological issues also may interfere with the proper interpretation of supplementation effects. Thus, the study may contribute to updating professionals involved in sport nutrition as well as highlighting the interest of scientists in new perspectives that can widen dietary strategies applied to training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of combination exercise therapy on walking distance, postural balance, fatigue and quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients: a clinical trial study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangelaji, Bahram; Nabavi, Seyed Massood; Estebsari, Fatemeh; Banshi, Mohammad Reza; Rashidian, Hamideh; Jamshidi, Ensiyeh; Dastoorpour, Maryam

    2014-06-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the nervous system which has numerous disabling effects on patients. This study aimed at investigating the short- and long-term effects of a period of combination exercise therapy on walking distance, balance, fatigue and quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients referred to the physiotherapy clinic of Iran's Multiple Sclerosis Society in 2013. This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial on 59 patients divided into the intervention (n = 39) and control groups (n = 20). The intervention group received 10 weeks of combination therapy including aerobic, strengthening, balancing and stretching exercises. A week before, a week later and a year after the beginning of the exercises, both groups of patients received BBSS, six minute walking, Family Support Services (FSS), Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and quality of life tests. The scores of two groups were then compared using statistical tests such as repeated measures ANOVA test. THE RESULTS INDICATED SIGNIFICANT CHANGES IN THE INTERVENTION GROUP IN COMPARISON TO THE CONTROL GROUP IN THE SECOND PHASE OF THE STUDY COMPARING TO THE FIRST ONE FOR ALL TESTS EXCEPT EDSS (MEAN DIFFERENCE SCORES OF EDSS: -0.13), P-value = 0.60; FSS: -6.9, P-value = 0.02, Mental Quality of Life (QOL): 16.36, P-value = 0.001; Physical QOL: 12.17, P-value = 0.001, six minute walking: 137.2, P-value Exercise has significant effect on improving symptoms of multiple sclerosis, and cessation of exercise may cause recurrence of symptoms in the intervention group with a slope similar to that of the control group. Therefore, continuous rather than short period exercises have valuable symptomatic and supportive relief effects in patients.

  6. Postural balance and the risk of falling during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Bulent; Ribeiro, Ana Paula; Inanir, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy is a physiological process and many changes occur in a woman's body during pregnancy. These changes occur in all systems to varying degrees, including the cardiovascular, respiratory, genitourinary, and musculoskeletal systems. The hormonal, anatomical, and physiological changes occurring during pregnancy result in weight gain, decreased abdominal muscle strength and neuromuscular control, increased ligamentous laxity, and spinal lordosis. These alterations shift the centre of gravity of the body, altering the postural balance and increasing the risk of falls. Falls during pregnancy can cause maternal and foetal complications, such as maternal bone fractures, head injuries, internal haemorrhage, abruption placenta, rupture of the uterus and membranes, and occasionally maternal death or intrauterine foetal demise. Preventative strategies, such as physical exercise and the use of maternity support belts, can increase postural stability and reduce the risk of falls during pregnancy. This article reviews studies that have investigated changes in postural balance and risk of falling during pregnancy.

  7. Dysphagia associated with cervical spine and postural disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulou, Soultana; Exarchakos, Georgios; Beris, Alexander; Ploumis, Avraam

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with swallowing may be both persistent and life threatening for the majority of those who experience it irrespective of age, gender, and race. The purpose of this review is to define oropharyngeal dysphagia and describe its relationship to cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances due to either congenital or acquired disorders. The etiology and diagnosis of dysphagia are analyzed, focusing on cervical spine pathology associated with dysphagia as severe cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances largely have been held accountable for deglutition disorders. Scoliosis, kyphosis–lordosis, and osteophytes are the primary focus of this review in an attempt to elucidate the link between cervical spine disorders and dysphagia. It is important for physicians to be knowledgeable about what triggers oropharyngeal dysphagia in cases of cervical spine and postural disorders. Moreover, the optimum treatment for dysphagia, including the use of therapeutic maneuvers during deglutition, neck exercises, and surgical treatment, is discussed.

  8. Thomas Kuhn's 'Structure of Scientific Revolutions' applied to exercise science paradigm shifts: example including the Central Governor Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Flávio de Oliveira; de Oliveira Pires, Flávio

    2013-07-01

    According to Thomas Kuhn, the scientific progress of any discipline could be distinguished by a pre-paradigm phase, a normal science phase and a revolution phase. The science advances when a scientific revolution takes place after silent period of normal science and the scientific community moves ahead to a paradigm shift. I suggest there has been a recent change of course in the direction of the exercise science. According to the 'current paradigm', exercise would be probably limited by alterations in either central command or peripheral skeletal muscles, and fatigue would be developed in a task-dependent manner. Instead, the central governor model (GCM) has proposed that all forms of exercise are centrally-regulated, the central nervous system would calculate the metabolic cost required to complete a task in order to avoid catastrophic body failure. Some have criticized the CGM and supported the traditional interpretation, but recently the scientific community appears to have begun an intellectual trajectory to accept this theory. First, the increased number of citations of articles that have supported the CGM could indicate that the community has changed the focus. Second, relevant journals have devoted special editions to promote the debate on subjects challenged by the CGM. Finally, scientists from different fields have recognized mechanisms included in the CGM to understand the exercise limits. Given the importance of the scientific community in demarcating a Kuhnian paradigm shift, I suggest that these three aspects could indicate an increased acceptance of a centrally-regulated effort model, to understand the limits of exercise.

  9. Lumbar spine and pelvic posture between standing and sitting: a radiologic investigation including reliability and repeatability of the lumbar lordosis measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Diana E; Soave, David; Ross, Kim; Callaghan, Jack P

    2010-01-01

    Sitting has been identified as a cause of mechanical low back pain. The purpose of this study was to use plain film x-rays to measure lumbar spine and pelvic posture differences between standing and sitting. Eight male subjects were radiographed standing and sitting in an automobile seat. Measures of lumbar lordosis, intervertebral disk angles, lumbosacral angle, lumbosacral lordosis, and sacral tilt were completed. One-way analysis of variance (alpha = .05) was conducted on the variables stated above. A Bland-Altman analysis was conducted to assess agreement and repeatability of the lumbar lordosis angle using 2 raters. Lumbar lordosis values in standing (average, 63 degrees +/- 15 degrees ) and sacral inclination (average, 43 degrees +/- 10 degrees ) decreased by 43 degrees and 44 degrees , respectively, in sitting. Intervertebral joint angles in sitting underwent substantial flexion (L1/L2-5 degrees [+/-3 degrees ], L2/L3-7 degrees [+/-3 degrees ], L3/L4-8 degrees [+/-3 degrees ], L4/L5-13 degrees [+/-3 degrees ], and L5/S1-4 degrees [+/-10 degrees ]). Measures of lumbar lordosis; intervertebral disk angles between L2/L3, L3/L4, and L4/L5; lumbosacral lordosis; lumbosacral angle; and sacral tilt were significantly decreased between standing and sitting (P sitting further emphasize the range of motion experienced at vertebral levels in sitting. Based on the results of this study, interventions to return motion segments to a less flexed posture should be investigated because they may play a role in preventing injury and low back pain. Copyright 2010 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Education and the Prevention of Postural Defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olchowska-Kotala Agnieszka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to determine: whether and at what stage of education is proper body posture learned, the intention of young adults to participate in activities teaching proper posture, and the effects of factors related with the said intention. Methods. The study involved 430 university students aged 18-24 years. Anthropometric data was collected. Participants completed questionnaires assessing physical activity level (IPAQ and their intention to participate in extracurricular activities teaching proper posture while sitting or walking, proper running technique, corrective gymnastics, or weight loss exercises. A self-assessment of posture, physical fitness, attractiveness, and body satisfaction was also completed. Results. Lower back pain was experienced by 41% of the respondents. Most were taught proper posture-related habits in primary school, followed by secondary school, and then at university. Many students expressed their intention to participate in the extracurricular activities. None of the questionnaire variables were associated with the intention to learn proper walking posture or proper running technique. The intention to participate in classes teaching proper sitting posture was associated with lower back pain in women and low physical activity level in men. In women, a relationship was found between the intention to participate in weight loss exercises and body dissatisfaction, high BMI, and poor self-evaluations of posture and attractiveness. In men, this activity was associated with body dissatisfaction. Conclusions. There is a need for further education on the development of proper postural habits at the university level.

  11. The fall of the postural-structural-biomechanical model in manual and physical therapies: exemplified by lower back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Eyal

    2011-04-01

    Manual and physical therapists often use a postural-structural-biomechanical (PSB) model to ascertain the causes of various musculoskeletal conditions. It is believed that postural deviations, body asymmetries and pathomechanics are the predisposing/maintaining factors for many musculoskeletal conditions. The PSB model also plays an important role in clinical assessment and management, including the choice of manual techniques and the exercise prescribed. However, the most important question is consistently being ignored--can a person's physical shape/posture/structure/biomechanics be the cause of their lower back pain? Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Departments Clinical Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a Question Reviewed by Barry J. Make, ...

  13. Postural effects when cycling in late pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Maureen E; Cooper, Karen A; Boyce, E Stewart; Hunyor, Stephen N

    2006-12-01

    This study assessed if upright cycling is preferable to semi-recumbent cycling during pregnancy. Healthy women with low risk singleton pregnancies were tested at 34-38 weeks gestation. They cycled for 12 min, either semi-recumbent (45 degrees, n = 27) or upright (n = 23), at 135-145 beats min(-1). When semi-recumbent, minute ventilation was greater (pposture-independent. All increased with exercise (p0.05). Small post-exercise fetal heart rate increases (by 8 beats min(-1), ppostures (n = 11 in each sub-group), with no adverse changes. Fetal heart rate accelerations and uterine activity (n = 11 in each sub-group) were not influenced by posture or exercise. (1) Neither posture had a distinct advantage. (2) Both postures were safe for short duration cycling. (3) The same target maternal heart rates are suitable for both postures because they resulted in similar oxygen consumptions and fetal heart rates.

  14. Posture and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Session TP3 includes short reports on: (1) Modification of Goal-Directed Arm Movements During Inflight Adaptation to Microgravity; (2) Quantitative Analysis of Motion control in Long Term Microgravity; (3) Does the Centre of Gravity Remain the Stabilised Reference during Complex Human Postural Equilibrium Tasks in Weightlessness?; and (4) Arm End-Point Trajectories Under Normal and Microgravity Environments.

  15. Guide to Good Posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good posture is about more than standing up straight so you can look your best. It is an important ... pain, injuries, and other health problems. What is posture? Posture is how you hold your body. There ...

  16. Effectiveness of global postural reeducation compared to segmental exercises on function, pain, and quality of life of patients with scapular dyskinesis associated with neck pain: a preliminary clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorim, Cinthia Santos Miotto de; Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Marques, Amélia Pasqual; Alves, Vera Lúcia Dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of global postural reeducation (GPR) relative to segmental exercises (SE) in the treatment of scapular dyskinesis (SD) associated with neck pain. Participants with SD and neck pain (n = 30) aged 18 to 65 years were randomly assigned to one of two groups: GPR and SE (stretching exercises). The upper extremity was assessed using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire; function of the neck was estimated using the Neck Disability Index; pain severity was measured using a visual analogical scale; and health-related quality of life was assessed using the Short Form-12. Assessments were conducted at baseline and after 10 weekly sessions (60 minutes each). The significance level adopted was α < .05. For pre-post treatment comparisons, GPR was significantly associated with improvements in function of neck and upper extremities, pain, and physical and mental domains of quality of life (P < .05). Segmental exercises improved function of upper extremities and of the neck and severity of pain (P < .05). When contrasting groups, GPR was significantly superior to SE in improving pain and physical domains of the quality of life. This study showed that GPR and SE had similar effects on function of the neck and upper extremity in patients with SD associated with neck pain. When comparing groups, GPR was superior to SE in improving pain and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of Circuit Aerobic Step Exercise Program on Musculoskeletal for Prevention of Falling and Enhancement of Postural Balance in Postmenopausal Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anek, Achariya; Bunyaratavej, Narong

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a circuit aerobic step exercise program and to examine the effects of the circuit aerobic step exercise program on bone formation, bone resorption, muscle strength and body balance of the postmenopausal females. The samples consisted of 52 female participants from Chulalongkorn University, aged between 45-55 years old. The subjects were divided into two groups: 26 females in the circuit aerobic step exercise group (CASE) and 26 females in the control group (CON) by the simple random sampling method. The experimental group participated in the aerobic step exercise program while wearing heart rate monitors. The exercise speed was determined by the rhythm of the music. The experimental group completed two circuits of aerobic step exercise at 6 stations, 3 times per week, for a period of 4 weeks. The intensity is 55-75% of a maximum heart rate. The control group did not participate in the circuit aerobic step exercise program. The collected data of the before and after experiment were the results of physiology test, biochemical bone markers, muscle strength and balance ability. The collected data were compared and analyzed by the mean and standard deviation. The differences of the tests were statistically significant at the 0.05 level. After the 4-week experiment training, the circuit aerobic step exercise group had significantly decreased in resting heart rate and bone resorption (p aerobic step exercise group when being compared with the pretest and the control group (p aerobic step exercise had positive effect on bon eformation, muscle strength and body balance. This, therefore, is a good exercise choice for postmenopausal people and can help reduce the risks of falling especially in postmenopausal women.

  18. Static and dynamic postural loadings during computer work in females: Sitting on an office chair versus sitting on an exercise ball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, I.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Seated computer work results in prolonged static loading, which has been associated with the development of musculoskeletal disorders. A popular alternative to sitting on an office chair while performing computer work is to sit on an exercise ball. Sitting on an exercise ball might affect static and

  19. Static and dynamic postural loadings during computer work in females: Sitting on an office chair versus sitting on an exercise ball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, I.; van Dieen, J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Seated computer work results in prolonged static loading, which has been associated with the development of musculoskeletal disorders. A popular alternative to sitting on an office chair while performing computer work is to sit on an exercise ball. Sitting on an exercise ball might affect static and

  20. 13. Posture

    OpenAIRE

    Zaffran, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Pour un médecin de famille, la participation à un groupe Balint permet, face à la complexité des relations qui se tissent entre lui et l’entourage de ses patients, de ne pas s’y empêtrer. Pour les patients, c’est une bénédiction. Au fil des mois et des séances, le changement qui s’opère en moi est — pour reprendre les termes de Michael Balint — « limité, mais considérable ». Car il ne porte ni sur mes aptitudes, ni sur mon savoir, mais sur un élément bien plus essentiel. Ma posture de soignan...

  1. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...

  2. Prevalence of osteoporosis increased in postmenopausal women with postural scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina Rachmawati

    2015-12-01

    In post menopausal women with postural scoliosis found a higher incidence of osteoporosis. High endurance of erector spinae muscle lowers the risk of scoliosis. Exercise to improve posture and increase endurance of erector spinae muscle need to be done to prevent decline of BMD.

  3. Outcomes of an aquatic exercise program including aerobic capacity, lactate threshold, and fatigue in two individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, Gina; Madras, Diane; Weiss, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Fatigue in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be exacerbated by poor cardiovascular fitness. Although aqua aerobic exercise is often recommended, little research has been conducted on the efficacy of aqua aerobic exercise in improving cardiovascular fitness in patients with MS. The purpose of this case report is to describe changes in cardiovascular fitness and fatigue for 2 people with MS following an aqua aerobics class. The participants were 2 females, both with MS for over 10 years and mild disability. Participant A (40 years old and EDSS = 2.5/10) reported fatigue, numbness in her hands and feet, and occasional blurred vision. Participant B (51 years old and EDSS = 3.0/10) reported the same problems as Participant A plus stiffness in her right lower extremity. The participants performed aqua aerobics at an intensity equivalent to their lactate threshold twice a week for 8 weeks. Lactate threshold is the exercise intensity just prior to the accumulation of blood lactate during graded exercise. A graded exercise test (with measurements of gas exchange) and a test of fatigue were administered before and after the intervention. Initially, both participants had poor cardiovascular fitness as demonstrated by their low peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and low lactate threshold (LT). After the intervention, both participants achieved a higher peak workload (their VO2peak increased) and they could sustain a higher submaximal workload without accumulation of acid substances causing fatigue (their LT increased). Changes in fatigue following the intervention were equivocal with Participant A reporting decreased fatigue and Participant B reporting no change. This report describes the use of exercise testing to guide clinical decision making for dosing of an aqua aerobic fitness intervention and illustrates positive effects of the intervention on cardiovascular fitness in 2 people with MS.

  4. Getting It Straight: Improve Your Posture for Better Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that typically combines physical postures, breathing exercises, and meditation or relaxation. In one study, older adults with ... of classes that focus on body awareness and mindfulness can help you learn to feel what’s wrong ...

  5. Postural ortostatisk takykardisyndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Pors, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a heterogeneous condition of dysautonomia and suspected autoimmunity characterized by abnormal increments in heart rate upon assumption of the upright posture accompanied by symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion and sympathoexcitation. An increase...

  6. Changes in the body posture of women occurring with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzał-Grabiec, Justyna; Snela, Sławomir; Rykała, Justyna; Podgórska, Justyna; Banaś, Agnieszka

    2013-10-12

    A current topic in the field of geriatrics still needing a great deal of study is the changes in body posture occurring with age. Symptoms of these changes can be observed starting between the ages of 40-50 years with a slow progression that increases after 60 years of age. The aims of this study were to evaluate parameters characterizing the posture of women over the age of 60 years compared with a control group and to determine the dynamics of body posture changes in the following decades. The study included 260 randomly selected women. The study group consisted of 130 women between the ages of 60-90 years (Older Women). The control group (Younger Women) consisted of 130 women between the ages of 20-25 years (posture stabilization period). The photogrammetric method was used to evaluate body posture using the phenomenon of the projection chamber. The study was conducted according to generally accepted principles. In the analysis of parameters characterizing individual slope curves, results were varied among different age groups. The lumbar spine slope did not show significant differences between different age groups (p = 0.6952), while statistically significant differences (p = 0.0000) were found in the thoracic-lumbar spine slope (p = 0.0033) and upper thoracic spine slope. Body angle was shown to increase with age (p = 0.0000). Thoracic kyphosis depth significantly deepened with age (p = 0.0002), however, the thoracic kyphosis angle decreased with age (p = 0.0000). An increase in asymmetries was noticed, provided by a significantly higher angle of the shoulder line (p = 0.0199) and the difference in height of the lower shoulder blade angle (p = 0.0007) measurements in the group of older women. Changes in the parameters describing body posture throughout consecutive decades were observed. Therapy for women over the age of 60 years should involve strengthening of the erector spinae muscles and controlling body posture with the aim of reducing trunk inclination

  7. Including the Copenhagen Adduction Exercise in the FIFA 11+ Provides Missing Eccentric Hip Adduction Strength Effect in Male Soccer Players: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harøy, Joar; Thorborg, Kristian; Serner, Andreas; Bjørkheim, André; Rolstad, Linn E; Hölmich, Per; Bahr, Roald; Andersen, Thor Einar

    2017-11-01

    The FIFA 11+ was developed as a complete warm-up program to prevent injuries in soccer players. Although reduced hip adduction strength is associated with groin injuries, none of the exercises included in the FIFA 11+ seem to specifically target hip adduction strength. To investigate the effect on eccentric hip adduction strength of the FIFA 11+ warm-up program with or without the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 1. We recruited 45 eligible players from 2 U19 elite male soccer teams. Players were randomized into 2 groups; 1 group carried out the standard FIFA 11+ program, while the other carried out the FIFA 11+ but replaced the Nordic hamstring exercise with the Copenhagen adduction exercise. Both groups performed the intervention 3 times weekly for 8 weeks. Players completed eccentric strength and sprint testing before and after the intervention. Per-protocol analyses were performed, and 12 players were excluded due to low compliance (<67% of sessions completed). The main outcome was eccentric hip adduction strength (N·m/kg). Between-group analyses revealed a significantly greater increase in eccentric hip adduction strength of 0.29 Nm/kg (8.9%; P = .01) in favor of the group performing the Copenhagen adduction exercise, whereas no within-group change was noted in the group that used the standard FIFA 11+ program (-0.02 N·m/kg [-0.7%]; P = .69). Including the Copenhagen adduction exercise in the FIFA 11+ program increases eccentric hip adduction strength, while the standard FIFA 11+ program does not. Registration: Registration: ISRCTN13731446 (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial Number registry).

  8. [Risks of awkward posture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzini, G; Capodaglio, E; Panigazzi, M; Prestifilippo, E; Vercesi, C

    2010-01-01

    For posture we mean the position of the body in the space and the relationship with its segments. The correct posture is determined by neurophysiological, biomechanical, emotional, psychological and relation factors, enabling us to perform daily and working activities with the lowest energy expenditure. When possible we suggest during posture variation, a preventive measure where there are prolonged fixed activities.

  9. Prevention of diabetes in overweight/obese children through a family based intervention program including supervised exercise (PREDIKID project): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenaza, Lide; Medrano, María; Amasene, María; Rodríguez-Vigil, Beatriz; Díez, Ignacio; Graña, Manuel; Tobalina, Ignacio; Maiz, Edurne; Arteche, Edurne; Larrarte, Eider; Huybrechts, Inge; Davis, Catherine L; Ruiz, Jonatan R; Ortega, Francisco B; Margareto, Javier; Labayen, Idoia

    2017-08-10

    The global pandemic of obesity has led to an increased risk for prediabetes and type-2 diabetes (T2D). The aims of the current project are: (1) to evaluate the effect of a 22-week family based intervention program, including supervised exercise, on insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) risk in children with a high risk of developing T2D and (2) to identify the profile of microRNA in circulating exosomes and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in children with a high risk of developing T2D and its response to a multidisciplinary intervention program including exercise. A total of 84 children, aged 8-12 years, with a high risk of T2D will be included and randomly assigned to control (N = 42) or intervention (N = 42) groups. The control group will receive a family based lifestyle education and psycho-educational program (2 days/month), while the intervention group will attend the same lifestyle education and psycho-educational program plus the exercise program (3 days/week, 90 min per session including warm-up, moderate to vigorous aerobic activities, and strength exercises). The following measurements will be evaluated at baseline prior to randomization and after the intervention: fasting insulin, glucose and hemoglobin A1c; body composition (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry); ectopic fat (magnetic resonance imaging); microRNA expression in circulating exosomes and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MiSeq; Illumina); cardiorespiratory fitness (cardiopulmonary exercise testing); dietary habits and physical activity (accelerometry). Prevention and identification of children with a high risk of developing T2D could help to improve their cardiovascular health and to reduce the comorbidities associated with obesity. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT03027726 . Registered on 16 January 2017.

  10. Effectiveness of conservative interventions including exercise, manual therapy and medical management in adults with shoulder impingement: a systematic review and meta-analysis of RCTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuri, Ruedi; Sattelmayer, Martin; Elsig, Simone; Kolly, Chloé; Tal, Amir; Taeymans, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effectiveness of conservative interventions for pain, function and range of motion in adults with shoulder impingement. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials. Data sources Medline, CENTRAL, CINAHL, Embase and PEDro were searched from inception to January 2017. Study selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including participants with shoulder impingement and evaluating at least one conservative intervention against sham or other treatments. Results For pain, exercise was superior to non-exercise control interventions (standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.94, 95% CI −1.69 to −0.19). Specific exercises were superior to generic exercises (SMD −0.65, 95% CI −0.99 to −0.32). Corticosteroid injections were superior to no treatment (SMD −0.65, 95% CI −1.04 to −0.26), and ultrasound guided injections were superior to non-guided injections (SMD −0.51, 95% CI −0.89 to −0.13). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) had a small to moderate SMD of −0.29 (95% CI −0.53 to −0.05) compared with placebo. Manual therapy was superior to placebo (SMD −0.35, 95% CI −0.69 to −0.01). When combined with exercise, manual therapy was superior to exercise alone, but only at the shortest follow-up (SMD −0.32, 95% CI −0.62 to −0.01). Laser was superior to sham laser (SMD −0.88, 95% CI −1.48 to −0.27). Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ECSWT) was superior to sham (−0.39, 95% CI −0.78 to –0.01) and tape was superior to sham (−0.64, 95% CI −1.16 to −0.12), with small to moderate SMDs. Conclusion Although there was only very low quality evidence, exercise should be considered for patients with shoulder impingement symptoms and tape, ECSWT, laser or manual therapy might be added. NSAIDS and corticosteroids are superior to placebo, but it is unclear how these treatments compare to exercise. PMID:28630217

  11. Functional Neuroanatomy for Posture and Gait Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Takakusaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we argue functional neuroanatomy for posture- gait control. Multi-sensory information such as somatosensory, visual and vestibular sensation act on various areas of the brain so that adaptable posture- gait control can be achieved. Automatic process of gait, which is steady-state stepping movements associating with postural reflexes including headeye coordination accompanied by appropriate alignment of body segments and optimal level of postural muscle tone, is mediated by the descending pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord. Particularly, reticulospinal pathways arising from the lateral part of the mesopontine tegmentum and spinal locomotor network contribute to this process. On the other hand, walking in unfamiliar circumstance requires cognitive process of postural control, which depends on knowledges of self-body, such as body schema and body motion in space. The cognitive information is produced at the temporoparietal association cortex, and is fundamental to sustention of vertical posture and construction of motor programs. The programs in the motor cortical areas run to execute anticipatory postural adjustment that is optimal for achievement of goal-directed movements. The basal ganglia and cerebellum may affect both the automatic and cognitive processes of posturegait control through reciprocal connections with the brainstem and cerebral cortex, respectively. Consequently, impairments in cognitive function by damages in the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum may disturb posture-gait control, resulting in falling.

  12. Gender and Postural Differences in Cardiovascular Response to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    exercise, and the similarities of the subjects. It was concluded that there are no significant gender and postural differences in cardiovascular response to hand grip testing exercise among elderly normotensives. It was thus recommended that irrespective of gender, the sitting or lying position can be used for hand grip.

  13. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leensen, Monique C J; Groeneveld, Iris F; Heide, Iris van der; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L J; Berkel, Sietske van; Snoek, Aernout; Harten, Wim van; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W; de Boer, Angela G E M

    2017-06-15

    To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to evaluate changes in work-related quality of life and physical outcomes. Longitudinal prospective intervention study using a one-group design. Two hospitals in the Netherlands. Of the eligible patients, 56% participated; 93 patients with a primary diagnosis of cancer receiving chemotherapy and on sick leave were included. Patients completed questionnaires on RTW, the importance of work, work ability (WAI), RTW self-efficacy, fatigue (MFI), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ C-30) at baseline and 6, 12 and 18 months follow-up. Before and after the exercise programme 1-repetition maximum (1RM) muscle strength and cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak) were assessed. Six months after the start of a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme that combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme, 59% of the cancer patients returned to work, 86% at 12 months and 83% at 18 months. In addition, significant improvements (pfatigue levels were significantly reduced. After completing the exercise programme, 1RM muscle strength was significantly increased but there was no improvement in VO 2 peak level. RTW rates of cancer patients were high after completion of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme. A multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme which combines occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme is likely to result in RTW, reduced fatigue and increased importance of work, work ability, and quality of life. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. [Effect of Core Muscle Strengthening Exercises (Including Plank and Side Plank) on Injury Rate in Male Adult Soccer Players: A Systematic Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasimann, Angela; Eberle, Simon; Scuderi, Manuel Markus

    2018-03-01

     Soccer is seen as highly intensive sport with an increased injury rate. Male adults are the players with the highest injury incidence. Accordingly, the importance of core muscle strengthening to prevent injury has increased in the past few years. Up to date, core muscle strengthening plays an important role in different prevention programs, such as the "FIFA 11 +". The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of core muscle strengthening on injury rate in male adult soccer players, including at least the known and easy exercises "plank" and "side plank", on injury rate in male adult soccer players.  The databases PubMed, PEDro, Cochrane Library, SPORTDiscus and Cinahl were searched systematically. Included studies had to comprise exercises for core muscles as an intervention (as a part of a prevention program) for adult male soccer players. The control group had to continue their usual exercise routine. The exercises "plank" and "side plank" were mandatory elements of the training program. The number of injuries and/or the injury rate (per 1000 hours) were defined as outcomes. The quality of the included studies was assessed with the PEDro scale and the Risk of Bias tool.  Seven studies with 2491 participants in total could be included. Two studies found a significant decrease in the injury rate in the intervention group (p  0.05).  The seven included studies differed greatly with respect to the applied methods, the chosen interventions and the obtained results. Furthermore, core muscles were never trained separately but were always part of a program containing other preventive elements. Therefore, it was difficult to compare the studies. However, prevention programs including strengthening exercises for core muscles tend to positively affect the injury rate. Based on the literature found, the research question cannot definitively be answered. In the future, further studies are needed which investigate the effect of isolated core

  15. Falls study: Proprioception, postural stability, and slips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jeehoon; Kim, Sukwon

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated effects of exercise training on the proprioception sensitivity, postural stability, and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Eighteen older adults (6 in balance, 6 in weight, and 6 in control groups) participated in this study. Three groups met three times per week over the course of eight weeks. Ankle and knee proprioception sensitivities and postural stability were measured. Slip-induced events were introduced for all participants before and after training. The results indicated that, overall, strength and postural stability were improved only in the training group, although proprioception sensitivity was improved in all groups. Training for older adults resulted in decreased likelihood of slip-induced falls. The study suggested that proprioception can be improved by simply being active, however, the results suggested that training would aid older adults in reducing the likelihood of slip-induced falls.

  16. Postural adaptations to long-term training in Prader-Willi patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisio Cinzia

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Improving balance and reducing risk of falls is a relevant issue in Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS. The present study aims to quantify the effect of a mixed training program on balance in patients with PWS. Methods Eleven adult PWS patients (mean age: 33.8 ± 4.3 years; mean BMI: 43.3 ± 5.9 Kg/m2 attended a 2-week training program including balance exercises during their hospital stay. At discharge, Group 1 (6 patients continued the same exercises at home for 6 months, while Group 2 (5 patients quitted the program. In both groups, a low-calorie, well-balanced diet of 1.200 kcal/day was advised. They were assessed at admission (PRE, after 2 weeks (POST1 and at 6-month (POST2. The assessment consisted of a clinical examination, video recording and 60-second postural evaluation on a force platform. Range of center of pressure (CoP displacement in the antero-posterior direction (RANGEAP index and the medio-lateral direction (RANGEML index and its total trajectory length were computed. Results At POST1, no significant changes in all of the postural parameters were observed. At completion of the home program (POST2, the postural assessment did not reveal significant modifications. No changes in BMI were observed in PWS at POST2. Conclusions Our results showed that a long-term mixed, but predominantly home-based training on PWS individuals was not effective in improving balance capacity. Possible causes of the lack of effectiveness of our intervention include lack of training specificity, an inadequate dose of exercise, an underestimation of the neural and sensory component in planning rehabilitation exercise and failed body weight reduction during the training. Also, the physiology of balance instability in these patients may possibly compose a complex puzzle not affected by our exercise training, mainly targeting muscle weakness.

  17. Postural orientation and equilibrium processes associated with increased postural sway in autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Hallac, Rami R; Conroy, Kaitlin C; White, Stormi P; Kane, Alex A; Collinsworth, Amy L; Sweeney, John A; Mosconi, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    Increased postural sway has been repeatedly documented in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Characterizing the control processes underlying this deficit, including postural orientation and equilibrium, may provide key insights into neurophysiological mechanisms associated with ASD. Postural orientation refers to children's ability to actively align their trunk and head with respect to their base of support, while postural equilibrium is an active process whereby children coordinate ankle dorsi-/plantar-flexion and hip abduction/adduction movements to stabilize their upper body. Dynamic engagement of each of these control processes is important for maintaining postural stability, though neither postural orientation nor equilibrium has been studied in ASD. Twenty-two children with ASD and 21 age and performance IQ-matched typically developing (TD) controls completed three standing tests. During static stance, participants were instructed to stand as still as possible. During dynamic stances, participants swayed at a comfortable speed and magnitude in either anterior-posterior (AP) or mediolateral (ML) directions. The center of pressure (COP) standard deviation and trajectory length were examined to determine if children with ASD showed increased postural sway. Postural orientation was assessed using a novel virtual time-to-contact (VTC) approach that characterized spatiotemporal dimensions of children's postural sway (i.e., body alignment) relative to their postural limitation boundary, defined as the maximum extent to which each child could sway in each direction. Postural equilibrium was quantified by evaluating the amount of shared or mutual information of COP time series measured along the AP and ML directions. Consistent with prior studies, children with ASD showed increased postural sway during both static and dynamic stances relative to TD children. In regard to postural orientation processes, children with ASD demonstrated reduced spatial

  18. Causes, Prevention and Correction of Impaired Posture in Children of Primary School Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. А. Щирба

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Research Objective. The objective of our research was to provide theoretical substantiation and implement corrective gymnastics in practice for the purposes of prevention and correction of faults in schoolchildren’s posture. The main means for shaping the correct posture, preventing and correcting faults in posture are callisthenic routine and special corrective exercises. Research methods: anamnesis, somatoscopy, clinical and mathematical methods. Research results. The medical examination revealed that only six of 60 pupils had normal correctly shaped posture, which accounts for 10%. The posture of the other 90% of the pupils was impaired. The most common faults were: asymmetrical pectoral girdle and shoulder blades, stooping posture. The examination revealed 19 pupils with scoliotic posture, which accounts for 44 %. The posture of 24 pupils, or 40%, was hyperkyphotic and stooping. In other words, the posture of 84% of the pupils was scoliotic or hyperkyphotic. The rest of the pupils had flat and kypholordic posture. It is worth mentioning that some of the pupils examined had more serious disorders of their musculoskeletal system, namely: organic disorders, such as spinal disorders in the sagittal plane — the scoliosis types excluded from the study. Significantly, the first main reason of posture disorders is weakness of the pectoral muscle sling. Conclusions. The principal means of prevention and correction of impaired posture are using special physical exercises designed to create a muscular corpus and correct particular faults in posture. We therefore developed sets of exercises intended to correct posture defects and proposed them to the physical education teacher and class teachers.

  19. Cognitively and socially induced stress affects postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumas, Michail; Morsanyi, Kinga; Young, William R

    2018-01-01

    Postural control is an adaptive process that can be affected by many aspects of human behavior, including emotional contexts. The main emotional contexts that affect postural control are postural threat and passive viewing of aversive or threatening images, both of which produce a reduction in postural sway. The aim of the present study was to assess whether similar stress-related changes in postural sway can be observed using stress induced by social evaluative threat (SET) while performing arithmetic tasks. Twelve young adults performed an arithmetic and a postural control task separately, concurrently, and concurrently with added time pressure in the arithmetic task. In the final condition, participants were given negative feedback about their performance in the arithmetic task and performed it again while being observed (SET condition). Results showed that stress increased linearly with task demand. Postural sway and reaction times were not affected by the first two conditions; however, when time pressure was introduced, reaction times became faster and sway amplitude increased. Finally, introduction of SET caused the predicted reduction in postural sway and an increase in reaction times relative to the time pressure condition. Our results suggest that stress induced using a combination of arithmetic tasks and social evaluative threat leads to systematic changes in postural control. The paradigm developed in the present study would be very useful in assessing interactions between cognition, stress, and postural control in the context of postural instability and falls in older adults.

  20. POSTUR PADA WANITA HAMIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paryono .

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIntroduction: Pregnancy effects in changes on all body systems leading to a new balance women and maternal adaptation.Weight gain in pregnant women from both the uterus and breast development generally occurs at the front of the body, butwhen standing they were still able to maintain a posture that does not face. The purpose of this article is to examine thereasons why pregnant women do not fall to front and how the good attitude of the pregnant woman's body.Materials and Methods: Material of this article are literatures related to pregnancy and the pregnant woman's bodyp o s t u r e , a n d t h e y w e r e c o l l e c t e d b y l i t e r a t u r e ' s s t u d y a n d l i t e r a r y s t u d y .Discussion: Increased abdominal distension that makes tilting the pelvis forward, decreased abdominal muscle tone andincrease weight gain in late pregnancy requires a readjustment spinal curvature. Woman's center of gravity shifts forward.Lumbosakrum normal curve should be more curved and the curvature of the servikodorsal be formed to maintain balance.Assessment of anterior view, lateral and posterior body should include an understanding of the physical structures such asjoints and muscles as well as how the meridian pathways. To compensate for the anterior position of the enlarged uterus,lordosis shifting center of gravity to the back of the lower limbs. There is an increased sacroiliac joint mobility,sakrokoksigeal, and pubic joints during pregnancy, possibly due to hormonal changes. Individual assessments will berequired to determine the pattern of muscle for every person, especially for those who have musculoskeletal problems.Conclusions and Recommendations: The size of the stomach in a pregnant woman, then the gravity of the body changes.Body to be biased toward the rear, but this position makes your back hurt. Advice for pregnant women in order to maintainyour posture as follows: head upKeyword : Posture, Pregnancy, Women.

  1. [Clinical and cost effectiveness of rehabilitation programs including physical exercises for patients with ischemic heart disease under conditions of resort and outpatient clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikhova, E V; Guliaeva, S F; Tsarev, Iu K; Chervotkina, L A

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate clinical and cost effectiveness of rehabilitation programs including long-term physical training of moderate intensity intended for the management of patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) who had undergone acute coronary events; the programs were adapted to the treatment under conditions of spa resorts, dispensaries, and outpatient clinics. It was shown that rehabilitation of patients presenting with CDH with the use of moderately intensive physical exercises during a long period enhances the effectiveness of application of the available funds due to improved clinical course of coronary heart disease, tolerance of physical load, and quality of life.

  2. Relationships among head posture, pain intensity, disability and deep cervical flexor muscle performance in subjects with postural neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun V. Subbarayalu, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Information Technology (IT professionals working with computers gradually develop forward head posture and, as a result, these professionals are susceptible to several neck disorders. This study intended to reveal the relationships between pain intensity, disability, head posture and deep cervical flexor (DCF muscle performance in patients with postural neck pain. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 84 IT professionals who were diagnosed with postural neck pain. The participants were recruited with a random sampling approach. A Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ, the Modified Head Posture Spinal Curvature Instrument (MHPSCI, and the Stabilizer Pressure Biofeedback Unit were used to measure neck pain intensity, neck disability, head posture, and DCF muscle performance, respectively. Results: The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a significantly strong positive relationship between the VAS and the NPQ (r = 0.734. The cranio-vertebral (CV angle was found to have a significantly negative correlation with the VAS (r = −0.536 and a weak negative correlation with the NPQ (r = −0.389. Conclusion: This study concluded that a smaller CV angle corresponded to greater neck pain intensity and disability. Furthermore, there is no significant relationship between CV angle and DCF muscle performance, indicating that head posture re-education through postural correction exercises would not completely correct the motor control deficits in DCF muscles. In addition, a suitable exercise regimen that exclusively targets the deep cervical flexor muscle to improve its endurance is warranted. Keywords: Craniovertebral angle, Disability deep cervical flexors muscle performance, Head posture, Postural neck pain

  3. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome: A Heterogeneous and Multifactorial Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benarroch, Eduardo E.

    2012-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is defined by a heart rate increment of 30 beats/min or more within 10 minutes of standing or head-up tilt in the absence of orthostatic hypotension; the standing heart rate is often 120 beats/min or higher. POTS manifests with symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion and excessive sympathoexcitation. The pathophysiology of POTS is heterogeneous and includes impaired sympathetically mediated vasoconstriction, excessive sympathetic drive, volume dysregulation, and deconditioning. POTS is frequently included in the differential diagnosis of chronic unexplained symptoms, such as inappropriate sinus tachycardia, chronic fatigue, chronic dizziness, or unexplained spells in otherwise healthy young individuals. Many patients with POTS also report symptoms not attributable to orthostatic intolerance, including those of functional gastrointestinal or bladder disorders, chronic headache, fibromyalgia, and sleep disturbances. In many of these cases, cognitive and behavioral factors, somatic hypervigilance associated with anxiety, depression, and behavioral amplification contribute to symptom chronicity. The aims of evaluation in patients with POTS are to exclude cardiac causes of inappropriate tachycardia; elucidate, if possible, the most likely pathophysiologic basis of postural intolerance; assess for the presence of treatable autonomic neuropathies; exclude endocrine causes of a hyperadrenergic state; evaluate for cardiovascular deconditioning; and determine the contribution of emotional and behavioral factors to the patient's symptoms. Management of POTS includes avoidance of precipitating factors, volume expansion, physical countermaneuvers, exercise training, pharmacotherapy (fludrocortisone, midodrine, β-blockers, and/or pyridostigmine), and behavioral-cognitive therapy. A literature search of PubMed for articles published from January 1, 1990, to June 15, 2012, was performed using the following terms (or combination of terms): POTS

  4. Anatomical correlation of core muscle activation in different yogic postures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrithunjay Rathore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Faulty postures due to sedentary lifestyle cause weakening of core muscles which contributes to increased incidence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs. Although a few research studies have quantified the core muscle activity in various yogic exercises used in rehabilitation programs, evidence correlating it to functional anatomy is scarce. Such information is important for exercise prescription when formulating treatment plans for MSDs. Therefore, the objective of this review article is to examine the literature and analyze the muscle activity produced across various yoga postures to determine which type of yoga posture elicits the highest activation for the core muscle in individuals. Literature search was performed using the following electronic databases: Cochrane Library, NCBI, PubMed, Google Scholar, EMBASE, and web of science. The search terms contained: Core muscle activation and yogic posture OR yoga and rehabilitation OR intervention AND Electromyography. Activation of specific core muscle involved asanas which depended on trunk and pelvic movements. Description of specific yogic exercise as they relate to core muscles activation is described. This information should help in planning yogic exercises that challenge the muscle groups without causing loads that may be detrimental to recovery and pain-free movement. Knowledge of activation of muscles in various yogic postures can assist health-care practitioners to make appropriate decisions for the designing of safe and effective evidence-based yoga intervention for MSDs.

  5. Acute Effects of Posture Shirts on Rounded-Shoulder and Forward-Head Posture in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, John; Hibberd, Elizabeth; Petschauer, Meredith; Myers, Joseph

    2016-12-01

    Rounded-shoulder and forward-head posture can be contributing factors to shoulder pain. Corrective techniques such as manual therapy and exercise have been shown to improve these altered postures, but there is little evidence that corrective garments such as posture shirts can alter posture. To determine the acute effects of corrective postureshirt use on rounded-shoulder and forward-head posture in asymptomatic college students. Repeated-measures intervention study with counterbalanced conditions. Research laboratory. 24 members of the general student body of a university, 18-25 y old, with a forward shoulder angle (FSA) >52° and no history of upper-extremity surgery, scoliosis, active shoulder pain, or shoulder pain in the previous 3 mo that restricted participation for 3 consecutive days. Photographic posture assessment under a control condition, under a sham or treatment condition (counterbalanced), under another control condition, and treatment or sham. FSA and forward head angle (FHA) calculated from a lateral photograph. FSA decreased relative to the control condition while participants wore the sham shirt (P = .029) but not the corrective posture shirt (P = 1.00). FHA was unchanged between groups (P = .371). Application of a corrective posture shirt did not acutely alter FSA or FHA, while application of a sham shirt may decrease FSA at rest.

  6. Yoga and physical exercise - a review and comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Ramajayam; Karmani, Sneha; Varambally, Shivarama; Gangadhar, B N

    2016-06-01

    Yoga is a multifaceted spiritual tool with enhanced health and well-being as one of its positive effects. The components of yoga which are very commonly applied for health benefits are asanas (physical postures), pranayama (regulated breathing) and meditation. In the context of asanas, yoga resembles more of a physical exercise, which may lead to the perception that yoga is another kind of physical exercise. This article aims at exploring the commonalities and differences between yoga and physical exercise in terms of concepts, possible mechanisms and effectiveness for health benefits. A narrative review is undertaken based on traditional and contemporary literature for yoga, along with scientific articles available on yoga and exercise including head-to-head comparative trials with healthy volunteers and patients with various disease conditions. Physical exercises and the physical components of yoga practices have several similarities, but also important differences. Evidence suggests that yoga interventions appear to be equal and/or superior to exercise in most outcome measures. Emphasis on breath regulation, mindfulness during practice, and importance given to maintenance of postures are some of the elements which differentiate yoga practices from physical exercises.

  7. Classic ballet dancers postural patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseani Paulini Neves Simas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate classic ballet practice and its influence on postural patterns and (a identify the most frequent postural changes; (b determine the postural pattern; (c verify the existence of association of practice time and postural changes. The investigation was carried out in two stages: one, description in which 106 dancers participated; the other, causal comparative in which 50 dancers participated; and (a questionnaire; (b a checkerboard; (c postural chart; (d measure tape; (e camera and (f pedoscope were used as instrument. Descriptive and inferential statistics was used for analysis. The results revealed the most frequent postural changes such as hyperlordosis, unleveled shoulders and pronated ankles. Ballet seems to have negative implications in the postural development , affecting especially the vertebral spine, trunk and feet. The practice time was not a parameter to indicate the increase in postural changes. In conclusion, ballet may be associated with postural changes and determining a characteristic postural pattern.

  8. Defining Pilates exercise: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Cherie; Kolt, Gregory S; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2012-08-01

    To describe Pilates exercise according to peer-reviewed literature, and compare definitions used in papers with healthy participants and those with low back pain. A systematic review of literature was conducted. A search for "pilates" within the maximal date ranges of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, ProQuest: Nursing and Allied Health Source, Proquest: Medical and Health Complete, Scopus, Sport Discus, and Web of Science, was undertaken. To be included, papers needed to describe Pilates exercise, and be published in English within an academic, peer-reviewed journal. There were no restrictions on the methodological design or quality of papers. Content analysis was used to record qualitative definitions of Pilates. Frequencies were calculated for mention of content categories, equipment, and traditional Pilates principles. Frequencies were then compared statistically in papers with healthy participants and those with low back pain. 119 papers fulfilled inclusion criteria. Findings suggest that Pilates is a mind-body exercise that focuses on strength, core stability, flexibility, muscle control, posture and breathing. Exercises can be mat-based or involve use of specialised equipment. Posture was discussed statistically significantly more often in papers with participants with low back pain compared to papers with healthy participants. Traditional Pilates principles of centering, concentration, control, precision, flow, and breathing were discussed on average in 23% of papers. Apart from breathing, these principles were not mentioned in papers with low back pain participants. There is a general consensus in the literature of the definition of Pilates exercise. A greater emphasis may be placed on posture in people with low back pain, whilst traditional principles, apart from breathing, may be less relevant. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Postural neck pain: an investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondston, Stephen J; Chan, Hon Yan; Ngai, Gorman Chi Wing; Warren, M Linda R; Williams, Jonathan M; Glennon, Susan; Netto, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    Impairments of cervico-cephalic kinaesthesia and habitual forward head posture have been considered important in the aetiology of postural neck pain, yet these factors have not been specifically examined in a homogeneous clinical population. The objective of this study was to compare the habitual sitting posture (HSP), perception of good posture and postural repositioning error (PRE) of the cervico-thoracic (CT) spine in individuals with postural neck pain, with a matched group of asymptomatic subjects. Twenty-one subjects with postural neck pain and 22 asymptomatic control subjects were recruited into the study. An optical motion analysis system was used to measure the HSP and perceived 'good' sitting posture. PRE was measured over six trials where the subject attempted to replicate their self-selected 'good' posture. There was no difference between the groups in the HSP but significant differences were identified in the perception of 'good' posture. Posture repositioning error was higher for the head posture variables than for CT and shoulder girdle variables in both groups. However, there was no significant difference in posture repositioning error between groups for any of the posture measures. The findings suggest that individuals with postural neck pain may have a different perception of 'good' posture, but no significant difference in HSP or kinaesthetic sensibility compared with matched asymptomatic subjects.

  10. Comparison of trunk electromyographic muscle activity depends on sitting postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, DongGeon; Yu, SeoJeong; Song, SunHae; Lee, Se-Han; An, SeungHeon; Cho, Hwi-Young; Cho, Ki-Hun; Lee, GyuChang

    2017-01-01

    Different postural positions can be characterized by the activation and relative contributions of different postural muscles, and may variously contribute to the recovery from or worsening of chronic lower back pain. The present study aimed to investigates trunk muscle activities in four types of seated postures: cross-legged, long, side, and W-shaped. Eight healthy adults participated in the study. Trunk muscle activities of the external oblique (EO), rectus abdominis (RA), latissimus dorsi (LD), and erector spinae (ES) muscles in each of the sitting postures including cross-legged, long, side, and W-shaped were collected utilizing surface electromyography (sEMG). The mean sEMG signals in each of the sitting postures were used for statistical comparisons. There were no significant differences in electromyographic muscle activity of EO, RA, LD, and ES in the four postures (p > 0.05). However, in the W-shape sitting posture, the left LD showed the greatest electromyographic muscle activity, followed by the right LD and left EO, respectively. The right and left LD in the long sitting posture and left ES in the side sitting posture showed greater electromyographic muscle activity than that of other muscles. Based on the results, trunk muscle activity did not significantly differ between the four types of sitting postures. However, our study is limited by its experimental method and sample size. Thus, in the Future, further study will be needed.

  11. Posture and nocturnal asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte, K F; Douglas, N J

    1989-01-01

    To investigate whether the supine posture caused sustained bronchoconstriction and could thus contribute to the development of nocturnal asthma, nine patients with nocturnal asthma were studied on two consecutive days, lying supine for four hours on one day and sitting upright for four hours on the other, the order of the two postures being randomised. Peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured immediately before an...

  12. Exercise and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to notice the benefits, including improved sleep and self-esteem. Exercise and physical activity can also: Improve or ... many exercises fit into more than one category: AEROBIC EXERCISE Aerobic exercise increases your breathing and heart ...

  13. Comparisons of muscular activity in males and females while walking in restricted postures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hodgskiss, J

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine differences in muscular activation between males and females while walking in restricted postures. Restricted postures are evident in various industries, including mining, construction and agriculture...

  14. Real-time posture reconstruction for Microsoft Kinect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shum, Hubert P H; Ho, Edmond S L; Jiang, Yang; Takagi, Shu

    2013-10-01

    The recent advancement of motion recognition using Microsoft Kinect stimulates many new ideas in motion capture and virtual reality applications. Utilizing a pattern recognition algorithm, Kinect can determine the positions of different body parts from the user. However, due to the use of a single-depth camera, recognition accuracy drops significantly when the parts are occluded. This hugely limits the usability of applications that involve interaction with external objects, such as sport training or exercising systems. The problem becomes more critical when Kinect incorrectly perceives body parts. This is because applications have limited information about the recognition correctness, and using those parts to synthesize body postures would result in serious visual artifacts. In this paper, we propose a new method to reconstruct valid movement from incomplete and noisy postures captured by Kinect. We first design a set of measurements that objectively evaluates the degree of reliability on each tracked body part. By incorporating the reliability estimation into a motion database query during run time, we obtain a set of similar postures that are kinematically valid. These postures are used to construct a latent space, which is known as the natural posture space in our system, with local principle component analysis. We finally apply frame-based optimization in the space to synthesize a new posture that closely resembles the true user posture while satisfying kinematic constraints. Experimental results show that our method can significantly improve the quality of the recognized posture under severely occluded environments, such as a person exercising with a basketball or moving in a small room.

  15. Autoimmune Basis for Postural Tachycardia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-23

    Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome; Postural Tachycardia Syndrome; Tachycardia; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Autonomic Nervous System Diseases; Orthostatic Intolerance; Cardiovascular Diseases; Primary Dysautonomias

  16. Etude radiographique du rachis lombaire lors de la posture assise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the prolonged sitting posture effect adopted by the blacksmiths on the lumbar spine. Thirty subjects with 15 blacksmiths with at least 10 years of seniority in the exercise of this profession and 15 non blacksmiths were part of the sample. After X-rays of the lumbar spine from the front and ...

  17. Comparison of cardiorespiratory responses between Surya Namaskar and bicycle exercise at similar energy expenditure level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Biswajit; Sinha, Tulika Dasgupta; Pathak, Anjana; Tomer, O S

    2013-01-01

    Surya Namaskar (SN), a popular traditional Indian yogic practice called "Sun Salutations", includes practice of twelve physical postures involving alternate backward bending and forward bending postures. The practice of twelve postures in succession makes one round of its practice. Many people practise it as part of their daily physical fitness regimen. No study is available to compare cardiorespiratory responses of SN with bicycle exercise (BE). 20 healthy Yoga instructors practicing various Yogic practices including SN since last 7-8 years participated in the study. They performed SN in the laboratory according to their customary daily practice routine. The subject also performed incremental load bicycle exercise test till exhaustion on their second visit for measuring their VO2 max. SN and BE were compared at three similar exercise intensity levels in terms of % of VO2 max. The exercise intensities were light (10-20% VO2 max), moderate (21-40% VO2 max) and high intensities (41-50% VO2 max). Heart rate at high work intensity was significantly higher in BE than SN (P < .001). Ventilation and carbon dioxide output were significantly higher in BE than SN at high exercise intensity (P < 0.001). Overall, cardiorespiratory stress is less in SN than BE at similar work intensities.

  18. Is Trunk Posture in Walking a Better Marker than Gait Speed in Predicting Decline in Function and Subsequent Frailty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Reshma A; Banerji, Subhasis; Singh, Gautam; Chew, Effie; Poh, Chueh L; Tapawan, Sarah C; Guo, Yan R; Pang, Yu W; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi; Tay, Stacey

    2016-01-01

    Many recent guidelines and consensus on sarcopenia have incorporated gait speed and grip strength as diagnostic criteria without addressing early posture changes adopted to maintain gait speed before weakness is clinically evident. Older adults are known to compensate well for declining physiological reserve through environmental modification and posture adaptation. This study aimed to analyze and identify significant posture adaptation in older adults that is required to maintain gait speed in the face of increasing vulnerability. This would be a useful guide for early posture correction exercise interventions to prevent further decline, in addition to traditional gait, balance, and strength training. A community-based cross-sectional study. The participants comprised 90 healthy community-dwelling Chinese men between the ages of 60 and 80 years and 20 Chinese adults between the ages of 21 and 50 years within the normal BMI range as a comparison group. All the participants underwent handgrip strength testing, 6-minute walk, timed up-and-go (TUG), and motion analysis for gait characteristics. Low function was characterized by slow walking speed (10 seconds), whereas low strength was determined by hand grip dynamometer testing (posture adaptations in walking in all 3 groups, including those who maintained a good walking speed (>1.0 m/s). The extent of such adaptation was larger in the vulnerable group as compared with the healthy group. Although gait speed is a robust parameter for screening older adults for sarcopenia and frailty, our data suggest that identifying trunk posture adaptation before the onset of decline in gait speed will help in planning interventions in the at-risk community-dwelling older adults even before gait speed declines. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Postural ortostatisk takykardi-syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Pors, Kirsten; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a heterogeneous condition of dysautonomia and suspected autoimmunity characterized by abnormal increments in heart rate upon assumption of the upright posture accompanied by symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion and sympathoexcitation. An increase...

  20. Ocular hypertension and posture.

    OpenAIRE

    Leonard, T J; Kerr Muir, M G; Kirkby, G R; Hitchings, R A

    1983-01-01

    Thirty-seven patients with ocular hypertension (OH) and 29 age matched controls were studied. Intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements were made in the sitting position and, immediately after changing posture, in the lying position. Sixty-three (85%) of the OH eyes and all the control eyes showed either stable IOP readings on changing posture of small elevations up to 3 mmHg. Eleven (15%) of the OH eyes showed larger elevations of IOP, between 5 and 9 mmHg when the patients changed to the lyin...

  1. Occlusion et posture

    OpenAIRE

    Le Breton, Alix

    2017-01-01

    L'objectif majeur de l'orthodontie est d'obtenir une occlusion fonctionnelle. Cette fonction occlusale est capitale dans la croissance du complexe maxillo-facial mais aussi dans la croissance et la statique générale du corps. Le champ d'action de l'orthodontiste s'inscrit donc dans une prise en charge globale. Il doit prendre conscience que son traitement risque d'influer sur la posture et modifier le schéma corporel du patient. Ce travail va dans un premier temps définir le système postural ...

  2. Working postures: prediction and evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delleman, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    To date, workstation designers cannot see the effects of a design on working posture before a mock-up/prototype is available. At that moment, usually the margin for creating the conditions required for adopting favourable working postures is still very limited. Posture prediction at an early design

  3. Benefits of a 12-week lifestyle modification program including diet and combined aerobic and resistance exercise on albuminuria in diabetic and non-diabetic Japanese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto-Kabasawa, Keiko; Hosojima, Michihiro; Yata, Yusuke; Saito, Mariko; Tanaka, Noriko; Tanaka, Junta; Tanabe, Naohito; Narita, Ichiei; Arakawa, Masaaki; Saito, Akihiko

    2015-12-01

    Albuminuria is a biomarker for chronic kidney disease and an independent predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. A recent meta-analysis concluded that these risks increase with urinary albumin concentration, even when below the microalbuminuria threshold. Thus, minimizing urinary albumin may be a valuable therapeutic goal regardless of disease status. We investigated the benefits and safety of a 12-week lifestyle modification program including diet and combined aerobic and resistance exercise for reducing albuminuria in 295 normoalbuminuric or microalbuminuric Japanese adults, including 30 with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), 104 with metabolic syndrome (MS), and 145 with hypertension (HT). In the study population, the urinary albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR) was reduced significantly (ΔUACR -3.8 ± 16.8 mg/g, P < 0.001) with no change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (ΔeGFR -0.4 ± 7.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), P = 0.343). The reduction in UACR was associated with decreased fasting plasma glucose (P < 0.05). The UACR was also reduced in the T2DM, MS, and HT groups with no change in eGFR. Reduced UACR was associated with decreased fasting plasma glucose in the MS group and decreased systolic blood pressure in the HT group. The UACR was also reduced in 46 subjects using renin-angiotensin system inhibitors with no change in eGFR. Our 12-week lifestyle modification program reduced UACR, maintained eGFR, and improved multiple fitness findings in Japanese subjects including T2DM, MS, and HT patients.

  4. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients: a prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C. J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; van der Heide, Iris; Rejda, Tomas; van Veldhoven, Peter L. J.; van Berkel, Sietske; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Wim; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; de Boer, Angela G. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  5. Return to work of cancer patients after a multidisciplinary intervention including occupational counselling and physical exercise in cancer patients : A prospective study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leensen, Monique C.J.; Groeneveld, Iris F.; Heide, Iris Van Der; Rejda, Tomas; Van Veldhoven, Peter L.J.; Berkel, Sietske Van; Snoek, Aernout; van Harten, Willem H.; Frings-Dresen, Monique H.W.; Boer, Angela G.E.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To support return to work (RTW) among cancer patients, a multidisciplinary rehabilitation programme was developed which combined occupational counselling with a supervised physical exercise programme during chemotherapy. The aim was to investigate RTW rates of cancer patients and to

  6. Non-surgical relief of cervical radiculopathy through reduction of forward head posture and restoration of cervical lordosis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickstrom, Bret M; Oakley, Paul A; Harrison, Deed E

    2017-08-01

    [Purpose] To present a case demonstrating the relief of cervical radiculopathy following the dramatic reduction of forward head posture and restoration of the cervical lordosis by use of a multi-modal rehabilitation program incorporating cervical extension traction. [Subject and Methods] A 31-year-old male patient presented with severe cervical radiculopathy and muscle weakness as well as neck pain. The patient had limited neck range of motion, and multiple positive orthopedic tests. Radiography revealed excessive forward head posture with a cervical kyphosis. [Results] The patient received a multi-modal rehabilitation protocol including mirror image extension exercises, cervical extension traction, and spinal manipulative therapy. After forty treatments over 17 weeks, the patient reported a complete resolution of radiculopathy and significant improvement in neck pain level. Post radiography demonstrated correction of the spine and posture alignment. The patient remained well and maintained corrected posture with limited treatment one year later. [Conclusion] Our case demonstrates the relief of cervical radiculopathy resulting from the non-surgical correction of forward head posture and cervical kyphosis.

  7. Effect of absence of vision on posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Abdullah Z; Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen A; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The visual system is one of the sensory systems that enables the body to assess and process information about the external environment. In the absence of vision, a blind person loses contact with the outside world and develops faulty motor patterns, which results in postural deficiencies. However, literature regarding the development of such deficiencies is limited. The aim of this study was to discuss the effect of absence of vision on posture, the possible biomechanics behind the resulting postural deficiencies, and strategies to correct and prevent them. [Subjects and Methods] Various electronic databases including PubMed, Medline, and Google scholar were examined using the words "body", "posture", "blind" and "absence of vision". References in the retrieved articles were also examined for cross-references. The search was limited to articles in the English language. [Results] A total of 74 papers were shortlisted for this review, most of which dated back to the 1950s and 60s. [Conclusion] Blind people exhibit consistent musculoskeletal deformities. Absence of vision leads to numerous abnormal sensory and motor interactions that often limit blind people in isolation. Rehabilitation of the blind is a multidisciplinary task. Specialists from different fields need to diagnose and treat the deficiencies of the blind together as a team. Before restoring the normal mechanics of posture and gait, the missing link with the external world should be reestablished.

  8. Virtual Reality Telerehabilitation for Postural Instability in Parkinson’s Disease: A Multicenter, Single-Blind, Randomized, Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marialuisa Gandolfi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Telerehabilitation enables patients to access remote rehabilitation services for patient-physiotherapist videoconferencing in their own homes. Home-based virtual reality (VR balance training has been shown to reduce postural instability in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD. The primary aim was to compare improvements in postural stability after remotely supervised in-home VR balance training and in-clinic sensory integration balance training (SIBT. Methods. In this multicenter study, 76 PD patients (modified Hoehn and Yahr stages 2.5–3 were randomly assigned to receive either in-home VR telerehabilitation (n=38 or in-clinic SIBT (n=38 in 21 sessions of 50 minutes each, 3 days/week for 7 consecutive weeks. VR telerehabilitation consisted of graded exergames using the Nintendo Wii Fit system; SIBT included exercises to improve postural stability. Patients were evaluated before treatment, after treatment, and at 1-month follow-up. Results. Analysis revealed significant between-group differences in improvement on the Berg Balance Scale for the VR telerehabilitation group (p=0.04 and significant Time × Group interactions in the Dynamic Gait Index (p=0.04 for the in-clinic group. Both groups showed differences in all outcome measures over time, except for fall frequency. Cost comparison yielded between-group differences in treatment and equipment costs. Conclusions. VR is a feasible alternative to in-clinic SIBT for reducing postural instability in PD patients having a caregiver.

  9. Analysis of body imbalance in various writing sitting postures using sitting pressure measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong-Eun; Seo, Sang-Min; Woo, Hee-Soon; Won, Sung-Yun

    2018-02-01

    [Purpose] This study set out to substantiate the importance of the right sitting posture by measuring the sitting pressure. It also described the influence of an imbalanced sitting posture on the body. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects included 30 healthy adults. A pressure mapping system was used to measure the sitting pressure in the right, one side prone, chin propped, and slumped sitting positions. [Results] The WDI (X AP ) showed a statistically significant difference between the 3 incorrect postures (one side prone, chin propped, and slumped sitting) and the right sitting posture. With regard to the WDI (X LR ), there was a statistically significant difference between the right sitting posture and the one side prone sitting posture only. [Conclusion] One side prone sitting was found to affect the body balance most adversely. This imbalanced posture may have an indirect effect on chronic diseases. The results prove that it is important to assume a proper posture to maintain body balance.

  10. Therapeutic modalities and postural balance of patients with knee osteoarthritis: systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andressa Silva

    Full Text Available AbstractObjective The objective of this review was to evaluate the evidence of the influence of therapeutic modalities on postural balance in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA.Methods A search for published papers on therapeutic modalities was conducted using the Pubmed, Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases. The keywords “knee” and “balance” in combination with “osteoarthritis” were used as the search strategy. Randomized controlled clinical trials published in the last 10 years in either English or Portuguese were selected. The PEDro scale was applied to assess the quality of the selected clinical trials.Results A total of 46 studies of patients with knee OA were found, of which seven were analyzed in full and 39 were excluded because they did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the seven studies reviewed, six were considered to have a high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Several therapeutic modalities were found (physical exercise, hydrotherapy, electrotherapy and manual therapy, and postural balance improved in only three studies.Conclusion The studies included in this systematic review had a high methodological quality, so it can be concluded that the therapeutic modalities used in those studies improved postural balance in patients with knee OA.

  11. POSTURAL SHOCK IN PREGNANCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Ralph L.; Knauer, John; Larson, Roger K.

    1955-01-01

    Signs and symptoms of shock may be produced in some patients in late pregnancy by putting them in the dorsal recumbent posture. Change from this position will relieve the condition. The features of the supine hypotensive syndrome can be duplicated by applying pressure to the abdomen with the patient in a lateral position. The postural variations of venous pressure, blood pressure, and pulse appear to be due to obstruction of venous return from the lower portion of the body caused by the large uterus of late pregnancy compressing the vena cava. When shock is observed in a woman in late pregnancy, she should be turned to a lateral position before more active measures of treatment are begun. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:14351983

  12. Body posture recognition and turning recording system for the care of bed bound patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Rong-Shue; Mi, Zhenqiang; Yang, Bo-Ru; Kau, Lih-Jen; Bitew, Mekuanint Agegnehu; Li, Tzu-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes body posture recognition and turning recording system for assisting the care of bed bound patients in nursing homes. The system continuously detects the patient's body posture and records the length of time for each body posture. If the patient remains in the same body posture long enough to develop pressure ulcers, the system notifies caregivers to change the patient's body posture. The objective of recording is to provide the log of body turning for querying of patients' family members. In order to accurately detect patient's body posture, we developed a novel pressure sensing pad which contains force sensing resistor sensors. Based on the proposed pressure sensing pad, we developed a bed posture recognition module which includes a bed posture recognition algorithm. The algorithm is based on fuzzy theory. The body posture recognition algorithm can detect the patient's bed posture whether it is right lateral decubitus, left lateral decubitus, or supine. The detected information of patient's body posture can be then transmitted to the server of healthcare center by the communication module to perform the functions of recording and notification. Experimental results showed that the average posture recognition accuracy for our proposed module is 92%.

  13. Wearable Sensor-Based Rehabilitation Exercise Assessment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun-Hui Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment.

  14. Motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic region improve respiratory function in obese men. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzoli, Emanuela; Andreotti, Dianne; Pianta, Lucia; Mascheroni, Martina; Piccinno, Lorena; Puricelli, Luca; Cimolin, Veronica; Salvadori, Alberto; Codecasa, Franco; Capodaglio, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    Obese subjects have decreased pulmonary function. The hypothesis of our study was that poor coordination of the lumbar-pelvic musculature secondary to obesity may hinder the synergic activation of the respiratory muscles. The aim of the paper was to evaluate whether specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic musculature were able to improve respiratory function. Twenty obese male patients underwent a rehabilitation program including adapted physical activity and respiratory physiotherapy. Patients were randomly assigned to a Specific Motor Control Exercise Group (SG) and a Control Group (CG). SG followed a protocol according to the SMARTERehab concept aimed at improving posture, intra-abdominal pressure, rib cage mobility, and perception of correct muscle activation. CG performed an exercise training protocol to improve aerobic capacity and muscle strength. After intervention, both groups showed similar changes in body weight, fat, and fat-free mass. Respiratory function indexes improved in SG due to improved proprioception and coordination of the deep lumbar-pelvic muscles. Our study provides preliminary evidence that breathing, postural control, and spinal stability are intertwined. Positive respiratory effects in obese men can be obtained by prescribing specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic muscles. Implications for rehabilitation Obese subjects present with decreased pulmonary function and postural changes. Poor coordination of the lumbar-pelvic muscles affects posture and the synergic activation of the respiratory muscles. Specific motor control exercises of the lumbar-pelvic musculature can improve respiratory function. Breathing and postural control are intertwined: positive respiratory effects can be obtained by enhancing motor control of the lumbar-pelvic muscles.

  15. The effect of middle and lower trapezius strength exercises and levator scapulae and upper trapezius stretching exercises in upper crossed syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Won-Sik; Lee, Hyun-Ok; Shin, Jae-Wook; Lee, Keon-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of strength and stretching exercises on upper crossed syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] After measuring cervical alignment using the Global Posture System, 30 students with forward head posture were selected and divided into two groups. The experimental group (n=15) participated in strength and stretching exercises, three times per week for 4 weeks. The control group (n=15) did not participate in the exercises. The exercise...

  16. Postural disorders in mouth breathing children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiva, Patricia Dayrell; Kirkwood, Renata Noce; Mendes, Polyana Leite; Zabjek, Karl; Becker, Helena Gonçalves; Mathur, Sunita

    Mouth breathing syndrome can cause sleep disturbances that compromise the performance of children in school. It might also cause postural abnormalities involving the head and cervical spine; however, the association between postural abnormalities and mouth breathing in children is unclear. To assess the methodological quality of studies and determine if there is an association between mouth breathing and postural disorders in children. Databases comprised MEDLINE, CINAHL, PEDro, LILACS, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Registrar of Controlled Trials. Searches were until March 2016 and included studies that evaluated postural disorders in children diagnosed with mouth breathing. The Downs and Black checklist was used to evaluate the quality of the evidences. Ten studies were included totaling 417 children from 5 to 14 years. Two studies used the New York State Postural Rating Scale, seven used photography and one used motion capture to measure posture. The methods used to analyze the data included the Postural Analysis Software (SAPO), Fisiometer, ALCimagem and routines in MATLAB program. Quality assessment resulted in low scores (Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  17. An analysis of posture and back pain in the first and third trimesters of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, M E; Conner-Kerr, T

    1998-09-01

    While the incidence of back pain during pregnancy has been shown to be high, few studies have investigated postural changes that occur during pregnancy and their relationship to back pain. The purpose of this study was to determine if posture and back pain changed from the first to the third trimester of pregnancy and whether there was a relationship between the two. Twelve healthy women who were having uncomplicated pregnancies participated in the study. During the first and third trimesters, each subject had their standing posture and back pain assessed by a Metrecom Skeletal Analysis System and a 0- to 10-cm line pain scale, respectively. Repeated measures analysis of variance and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated on or between back pain and nine posture variables and revealed significant increases in third trimester back pain and postures compared with first trimester back pain (p postures for lumbar angle (p change in posture and back pain. These results suggest that in the standing position the lumbar lordosis and sagittal pelvic tilt increased and head position become more posterior as women progressed from the first trimester to the last trimester of pregnancy. These postural changes, however, were not related to back pain. This suggests that many of the posture-correcting clinical exercise regimens given to pregnant women need to be investigated.

  18. Reflex control of the spine and posture: a review of the literature from a chiropractic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlappi Mark

    2005-08-01

    all of the postural reflexes either in Earth's gravity or in microgravitational environments. Studies testing the function of each postural component, as well as those discussing postural reflex interactions, were also included in this review. Discussion It is quite apparent from the indexed literature we searched that posture is largely maintained by reflexive, involuntary control. While reflexive components for postural control are found in skin and joint receptors, somatic graviceptors, and baroreceptors throughout the body, much of the reflexive postural control mechanisms are housed, or occur, within the head and neck region primarily. We suggest that the postural reflexes may function in a hierarchical fashion. This hierarchy may well be based on the gravity-dependent or gravity-independent nature of each postural reflex. Some or all of these postural reflexes may contribute to the development of a postural body scheme, a conceptual internal representation of the external environment under normal gravity. This model may be the framework through which the postural reflexes anticipate and adapt to new gravitational environments. Conclusion Visual and vestibular input, as well as joint and soft tissue mechanoreceptors, are major players in the regulation of static upright posture. Each of these input sources detects and responds to specific types of postural stimulus and perturbations, and each region has specific pathways by which it communicates with other postural reflexes, as well as higher central nervous system structures. This review of the postural reflex structures and mechanisms adds to the growing body of posture rehabilitation literature relating specifically to chiropractic treatment. Chiropractic interest in these reflexes may enhance the ability of chiropractic physicians to treat and correct global spine and posture disorders. With the knowledge and understanding of these postural reflexes, chiropractors can evaluate spinal configurations not only

  19. Resisted side-stepping: the effect of posture on hip abductor muscle activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Justin W.; Lee, Theresa S.; Foley, Hanna D.; Lewis, Cara L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. Objectives To compare hip abductor muscle activity and hip and knee joint kinematics in the moving limb to the stance limb during resisted side-stepping and also to determine if muscle activity was affected by the posture (upright standing versus squat) used to perform the exercise. Background Hip abductor weakness has been associated with a variety of lower extremity injuries. Resisted side-stepping is often used as an exercise to increase strength and endurance of the hip abductors. Exercise prescription would benefit from knowing the relative muscle activity level generated in each limb and for different postures during the side-stepping exercise. Methods Twenty-four healthy adults participated in this study. Kinematics and surface electromyographic (EMG) data from the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia lata (TFL) were collected as participants performed side-stepping with a resistive band around the ankle while maintaining each of 2 postures: 1) upright standing and 2) squat. Results Mean normalized EMG signal amplitude of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and TFL was higher in the stance limb than the moving limb (P≤.001). Gluteal muscle activity was higher, while TFL muscle activity was lower, in the squat posture compared to the upright standing posture (P<.001). Hip abduction excursion was greater in the stance limb than in the moving limb (P<.001). Conclusions The 3 hip abductor muscles respond differently to the posture variations of side-stepping exercise in healthy individuals. When prescribing resisted side-stepping exercises, therapists should consider the differences in hip abductor activation across limbs and variations in trunk posture. PMID:26161629

  20. Resisted Side Stepping: The Effect of Posture on Hip Abductor Muscle Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Justin W; Lee, Theresa S; Foley, Hanna D; Lewis, Cara L

    2015-09-01

    Controlled laboratory study, repeated-measures design. To compare hip abductor muscle activity and hip and knee joint kinematics in the moving limb to the stance limb during resisted side stepping, and to determine whether muscle activity was affected by the posture (upright standing versus squat) used to perform the exercise. Hip abductor weakness has been associated with a variety of lower extremity injuries. Resisted side stepping is often used as an exercise to increase strength and endurance of the hip abductors. Exercise prescription would benefit from knowing the relative muscle activity level generated in each limb and for different postures during the side-stepping exercise. Twenty-four healthy adults participated in this study. Kinematics and surface electromyographic data from the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia lata were collected as participants performed side stepping with a resistive band around the ankle, while maintaining each of 2 postures: (1) upright standing and (2) squat. Mean normalized electromyographic signal amplitude of the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and tensor fascia lata was higher in the stance limb than in the moving limb (P≤.001). Gluteal muscle activity was higher, whereas tensor fascia lata muscle activity was lower, in the squat posture compared to the upright standing posture (Pabduction excursion was greater in the stance limb than in the moving limb (P<.001). The 3 hip abductor muscles respond differently to the posture variations of the side-stepping exercise in healthy individuals. When prescribing resisted side-stepping exercises, therapists should consider the differences in hip abductor activation across limbs and variations in trunk posture.

  1. One- and two-incision anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a biomechanical comparison including the effect of simulated closed-chain exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalldorf, P G; Alexander, J; Lintner, D M

    1998-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of simulated closed-chain exercise on anterior translation in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstructed knee comparing patellar tendon grafts secured with endoscopic and two-incision techniques. ACL reconstructions, were performed on five matched pairs of fresh frozen cadaver lower extremities. One of each pair had endoscopic (inside-out) placement of the femoral interference screw and other had outside-in femoral screw placement. A model for closed-chain exercise was developed to simulate half squat exercises using a custom apparatus on the Material Testing machine with a 356 N (80 lb) axial load and 40 N (9 lb) static hamstring force. Knee motion from near full extension to 60 degrees flexion was achieved by varying the quadricep force. One thousand squats were performed, and KT-1000 arthometry was done before and after cycling each specimen. The femur-graft-tibia constructs were then stressed to failure. Closed-chain cycling resulted in no significant change in anterior translation in either group. The mean maximum load to failure of the femur-graft-tibia construct was 340.4N in the one-incision group and 434.2 N in the two-incision group. P=.048 was considered statistically significant. Anterior translation did not increase after 1,000 simulated half knee bends in either the one- or two-incision groups. Shallow knee bends are an important part of aggressive rehabilitation programs, and our data support the position that these closed-chain exercises do not deleteriously affect the graft. Though the maximum strength to failure differed significantly between the one- and two-incision groups, both techniques offered sufficient strength to withstand an aggressive simulated rehabilitation protocol.

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Assessment and Evaluation Exercises Included in Geography Textbooks Written According to the 2005 Secondary Education Geography Curriculum and Textbooks of the Former Curriculum in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Okan

    2009-01-01

    This study conducts comparative analysis of the assessment and evaluation exercises in the geography textbooks written according to the Secondary Education Geography Curriculum for 2005 in Turkey with those in the former geography textbooks. In this respect, firstly, the assessment and evaluation studies included in geography textbooks written…

  3. Posture and Locomotion Coupling: A Target for Rehabilitation Interventions in Persons with Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Laure Mille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Disorders of posture, balance, and gait are debilitating motor manifestations of advancing Parkinson's disease requiring rehabilitation intervention. These problems often reflect difficulties with coupling or sequencing posture and locomotion during complex whole body movements linked with falls. Considerable progress has been made with demonstrating the effectiveness of exercise interventions for individuals with Parkinson's disease. However, gaps remain in the evidence base for specific interventions and the optimal content of exercise interventions. Using a conceptual theoretical framework and experimental findings, this perspective and review advances the viewpoint that rehabilitation interventions focused on separate or isolated components of posture, balance, or gait may limit the effectiveness of current clinical practices. It is argued that treatment effectiveness may be improved by directly targeting posture and locomotion coupling problems as causal factors contributing to balance and gait dysfunction. This approach may help advance current clinical practice and improve outcomes in rehabilitation for persons with Parkinson's disease.

  4. Factors influencing postural management for children with cerebral palsy in the special school setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Carol A; Evans, Kerry A; Sprod, Judy A; Bostock, Sue M

    2011-01-01

    Postural management is used to help address the musculoskeletal and participation issues associated with cerebral palsy (CP). This study aimed to identify the factors influencing postural management in special schools. A purpose-designed, cross-sectional, descriptive survey was sent to teachers, physiotherapists, occupational therapists and speech pathologists working with children with moderate-to-severe CP, aged 5-12 years, in special schools within South Australia. The instrument included four main areas: demographics, perceived benefits of postural management, factors facilitating or hindering the implementation of postural management programmes and suggestions for improvement. Results were analysed descriptively. Forty-three therapists and 18 teachers completed the survey (response rate 81%). The most common factors hindering postural management were positioning equipment being unavailable or difficult to use, lack of time and school staff's knowledge and skills to carry out postural management. Facilitating factors included therapy staff providing a written postural management programme, open and regular communication between therapy and school staff and timetabling of postural management into the daily routine. Numerous factors impact on postural management for students in special schools. Practical solutions highlighted were increased training for school staff, timetabling of postural management into students' routines and provision of written postural management programmes.

  5. Chiropractic biophysics technique: a linear algebra approach to posture in chiropractic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D D; Janik, T J; Harrison, G R; Troyanovich, S; Harrison, D E; Harrison, S O

    1996-10-01

    This paper discusses linear algebra as applied to human posture in chiropractic, specifically chiropractic biophysics technique (CBP). Rotations, reflections and translations are geometric functions studied in vector spaces in linear algebra. These mathematical functions are termed rigid body transformations and are applied to segmental spinal movement in the literature. Review of the literature indicates that these linear algebra concepts have been used to describe vertebral motion. However, these rigid body movers are presented here as applying to the global postural movements of the head, thoracic cage and pelvis. The unique inverse functions of rotations, reflections and translations provide a theoretical basis for making postural corrections in neutral static resting posture. Chiropractic biophysics technique (CBP) uses these concepts in examination procedures, manual spinal manipulation, instrument assisted spinal manipulation, postural exercises, extension traction and clinical outcome measures.

  6. Measuring postural control during mini-squat posture in men with early knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrella, M; Gramani-Say, K; Serrão, P R M S; Lessi, G C; Barela, J A; Carvalho, R P; Mattiello, S M

    2017-04-01

    Studies have suggested a compromised postural control in individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA) evidenced by larger and faster displacement of center of pressure (COP). However, quantification of postural control in the mini-squat posture performed by patients with early knee OA and its relation to muscle strength and self-reported symptoms have not been investigated. The main aim of this cross-sectional, observational, controlled study was to determine whether postural control in the mini-squat posture differs between individuals with early knee OA and a control group (CG) and verify the relation among knee extensor torque (KET) and self-reported physical function, stiffness and pain. Twenty four individuals with knee OA grades I and II (OAG) (mean age: 52.35±5.00) and twenty subjects without knee injuries (CG) (mean age: 51.40±8.07) participated in this study. Participants were assessed in postural control through a force plate (Bertec Mod. USA), which provided information about the anterior-posterior (AP) and medial-lateral (ML) COP displacement during the mini-squat, in isometric, concentric and eccentric knee extensor torque (KET) (90°/s) through an isokinetic dynamometer (BiodexMulti-Joint System3, Biodex Medical Incorporation, New York, NY, USA), and in self-reported symptoms through the WOMAC questionnaire. The main outcomes measured were the AP and ML COP amplitude and velocity of displacement; isometric, concentric, and eccentric KET and self-reported physical function, stiffness and pain. No significant differences were found between groups for postural control (p>0.05). Significant lower eccentric KET (p=0.01) and higher scores for the WOMAC subscales of pain (p=knee OA to prevent postural instability and the need to include quadriceps muscle strengthening, especially by eccentric contractions. The relationship between the self-reported symptoms and a lower and slower COP displacement suggest that the postural control strategy during tasks with a

  7. Influence of kinesiotherapy in water and on land to prevent violations of posture in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitnikova N.S.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Disclosed problems prevent incorrect posture in children with exercise in the water therapeutic swimming and Pilates. Developed and tested methodology which was aimed at restoring and improving spinal mobility impairments, respiratory system and retention of skill correct posture. Proved that when properly used kinesotherapy patients increased efficiency, activated natural systems to adapt, improve the state of the central and autonomic nervous system is stimulated by mental activity and improvement occurs.

  8. Posture and theophylline kinetics.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, J B; Cuss, F; Barnes, P J

    1985-01-01

    The effect of posture on theophylline kinetics was examined in six healthy men who took 450 mg slow-release aminophylline orally at the same time of day on two separate occasions. On one day they remained standing and on the other supine throughout. Plasma theophylline was measured hourly for 6 h from ingestion. Mean theophylline levels were significantly higher in the standing position at all times (P less than 0.01). We conclude that diurnal variation in theophylline kinetics can be explain...

  9. Comparison of posture among adolescent male volleyball players and non-athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Grabara, M

    2014-01-01

    Due to high training loads and frequently repeated unilateral exercises, several types of sports training can have an impact on the process of posture development in young athletes. The objective of the study was to assess and compare the postures of adolescent male volleyball players and their non-training peers. The study group comprised 104 volleyball players while the control group consisted of 114 non-training individuals aged 14-16 years. Body posture was assessed by the Moiré method. T...

  10. Cinerama sickness and postural instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Ledegang, W.D.; Lubeck, A.J.A.; Stins, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min

  11. Determining posture from physiological tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Mark V.; Kording, Konrad P.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of body and limb posture is important to many clinical and research studies. Current approaches either directly measure posture (e.g., using optical or magnetic methods) or more indirectly measure it by integrating changes over time (e.g., using gyroscopes and/or accelerometers). Here, we introduce a way of estimating posture from movements without requiring integration over time and the resultingcomplications. Weshow how the almost imperceptible tremor of the hand is affected by posture in an intuitive way and therefore can be used to estimate the posture of the arm. We recorded postures and tremor of the arms of volunteers. By using only the minor axis in the covariance of hand tremor, we could estimate the angle of the forearm with a standard deviation of about 4° when the subject's elbow is resting on a table and about 10° when it is off the table. This technique can also be applied as a post hoc analysis on other hand-position data sets to extract posture. This new method allows the estimation of body posture from tremor, is complementary to other techniques, and so can become a useful tool for future research and clinical applications. PMID:21997329

  12. Body posture and syndromes of back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotny, Janusz; Nowotny-Czupryna, Olga; Brzęk, Anna; Kowalczyk, Anna; Czupryna, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The effects of faulty postures include disturbances of the symmetric distribution of compressive and tensile forces acting on both sides of the body axis and the emergence of harmful shear forces. The torques of antigravity muscles also change unfavourably. This may lead to the development of a repetitive strain syndrome, stenosis of intervertebral foramina, compression of nerve roots and back pain. The development of back pain syndromes is significantly affected by the performance of various work-related tasks in non-ergonomic positions. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between back pain syndromes and the quality of body posture, especially in the context of work ergonomics. The study enrolled 125 persons: 39 adults with a childhood history of scoliosis, 39 midwives, and 47 physiotherapists. Body posture was assessed in all participants. In midwives and physiotherapists, body position during the performance of work-related tasks was also evaluated. The frequency and severity of pain was assessed with the Jackson-Moskowitz measure. The study revealed that over 80% of the participants suffered from spinal pain. In most cases, the pain was intermittent and was felt in the lumbar spine. The occurrence of pain among midwives and physiotherapists was not directly dependent on the predominant type of abnormal spinal position assumed during the performance of occupational tasks or the quality of body posture. The complaint was also reported by ca. 85% of persons with a history of scoliosis. An incorrect body posture (especially scoliosis) and performance of work-related tasks in non-ergonomic positions increase the probability of back pain.

  13. Postural control in women with breast hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferreira Barbosa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The consequences of breast hypertrophy have been described based on the alteration of body mass distribution, leading to an impact on psychological and physical aspects. The principles of motor control suggest that breast hypertrophy can lead to sensorimotor alterations and the impairment of body balance due to postural misalignment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the postural control of women with breast hypertrophy under different sensory information conditions. METHOD: This cross-sectional study included 14 women with breast hypertrophy and 14 without breast hypertrophy, and the mean ages of the groups were 39 ±15 years and 39±16 years, respectively. A force platform was used to assess the sensory systems that contribute to postural control: somatosensory, visual and vestibular. Four postural conditions were sequentially tested: eyes open and fixed platform, eyes closed and fixed platform, eyes open and mobile platform, and eyes closed and mobile platform. The data were processed, and variables related to the center of pressure were analyzed for each condition. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare the conditions between the groups for the area of center of pressure displacement and the velocity of center of pressure displacement in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions. The alpha level error was set at 0.05. RESULTS: Women with breast hypertrophy presented an area that was significantly higher for three out of four conditions and a higher velocity of center of pressure displacement in the anterior-posterior direction under two conditions: eyes open and mobile platform and eyes closed and mobile platform. CONCLUSIONS: Women with breast hypertrophy have altered postural control, which was demonstrated by the higher area and velocity of center of pressure displacement.

  14. Postural control deficits in people with fibromyalgia: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Postural instability and falls are increasingly recognized problems in patients with fibromyalgia (FM). The purpose of this study was to determine whether FM patients, compared to age-matched healthy controls (HCs), have differences in dynamic posturography, including sensory, motor, and limits of stability. We further sought to determine whether postural instability is associated with strength, proprioception and lower-extremity myofascial trigger points (MTPs); FM symptoms and physical function; dyscognition; balance confidence; and medication use. Last, we evaluated self-reported of falls over the past six months. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we compared middle-aged FM patients and age-matched HCs who underwent computerized dynamic posturography testing and completed the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire-Revised (FIQR) and balance and fall questionnaires. All subjects underwent a neurological and musculoskeletal examination. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and explore the relationships between variables. The relationships between subjective, clinical and objective variables were evaluated by correlation and regression analyses. Results Twenty-five FM patients and twenty-seven HCs (combined mean age ± standard deviation (SD): 48.6 ± 9.7 years) completed testing. FM patients scored statistically lower on composite sensory organization tests (primary outcome; P < 0.010), as well as with regard to vestibular, visual and somatosensory ratio scores on dynamic posturography. Balance confidence was significantly different between groups, with FM patients reporting less confidence than HCs (mean ± SD: 81.24 ± 19.52 vs. 98.52 ± 2.45; P < 0.001). Interestingly, 76% to 84% of FM patients had gastrocnemius and/or anterior tibialis MTPs. Postural stability was best predicted by dyscognition, FIQR score and body mass index. Regarding falls, 3 (11%) of 27 HCs had fallen only once during the past 6 months, whereas 18 (72

  15. Prevention and correction of violations of posture in the required classes of physical training on the department of the athletics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavrilova N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Article is dedicated to the substantiation of the use of exercises, directed toward preventive and correction of the violations of posture, on the required classes of physical training. The state of the problem of prevention and correction of violations of student's posture was studied according to literature data scientific methods. The athletics is characterized by the variety of the utilized exercises and by a large quantity of methods and versions of their fulfillment, which makes these occupations optimal for the solution of the problems of prevention and correction of violations of posture. It is recommended to use special exercises for the prevention and correction of violations of posture on the athletics classes.

  16. Posture management program based on theory of planned behavior for adolescents with mild idiopathic scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jihea; Kim, Hee Soon; Kim, Gwang Suk; Lee, Hyejung; Jeon, Hye-Seon; Chung, Kyong-Mee

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a devised posture management program based on the Theory of Planned Behavior in adolescents with mild idiopathic scoliosis. A quasi-experimental study was conducted. It involved a nonequivalent comparison group design with pretest and posttest. Forty-four female adolescents with mild idiopathic scoliosis participated; data from 35 participants (20 for the test group, 15 for the control group) were used for the final analyses. The devised posture management program ran for 6 weeks. Posture management behavioral determinants (attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and behavioral intention) as cognitive outcomes and muscular strength and flexibility as physical outcomes were measured three times: at baseline, week 6 and week 8. Cobb's angle as another physical outcome was measured twice: at baseline and week 8. Descriptive analysis, repeated measures analysis of variance and t test were used for data analyses. Attitude, perceived control, and behavioral intention were consistently enhanced by the posture management program. The intervention increased flexibility and muscular strength and decreased Cobb's angle, which reduced spinal curvature. Frequency of posture management exercise showed a gradual increase in the test group. The results indicate that the posture management program is effective in maintaining posture management behavior in adolescents with mild idiopathic scoliosis for both cognitive and physical outcomes. The posture management program should be helpful in expanding the role of school nurses in improving the health status of adolescents with mild idiopathic scoliosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Effect of exercise intervention on vestibular related impairments in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Venkadesan Rajendran

    2012-11-09

    Nov 9, 2012 ... strated motor development deficit and postural control deficit compared with the normative sample and following exercise intervention, no placebo intervention, motor development and postural control improved. The post test PDMS raw scores as well as merged scores on SCT-3 and the vision and somato-.

  18. Exercising with Osteoporosis: Stay Active the Safe Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk of bone fracture Maintain or improve your posture Relieve or decrease pain Exercising if you have osteoporosis means finding the ... major muscle groups, especially spinal muscles important for posture. ... if you have pain. A physical therapist or personal trainer with experience ...

  19. Exercise renogram. A new approach documents renal involvement in systemic hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clorius, J.H.; Schmidlin, P.

    1983-01-01

    Hippurate functional scintiscans were obtained in 51 hypertensive patients and in 15 controls. The authors investigated the influence that posture and exercise have on hippurate kinetics in patients with hypertension. A posture- or exercise-induced disturbance of renal hippurate transport was sought. All persons were examined in prone and standing positions, as well as during exercise. When prone and upright renograms were compared, 24% of the hypertensives demonstrated bilateral orthostatic renal dysfunction. Exercise caused the hippurate transport disturbance to increase. Fifty-seven percent of all hypertensives developed evidence of marked, bilateral, renal dysfunction during ergometric stress, so that exercise renography was shown to be a more sensitive test of the presence of transient tubular dysfunction in hypertension than the standing renogram. In normotensive controls the hippurate functional scintigram failed to be influenced by posture and exercise. The results suggest presence in hypertension of transient, posture- and exercise-mediated alterations of renal cortical blood flow

  20. The exercise renogram. A new approach documents renal involvement in systemic hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clorius, J.H.; Schmidlin, P.

    1983-01-01

    Hippurate functional scintiscans were obtained in 51 hypertensive patients and in 15 controls. We investigated the influence that posture and exercise have on hippurate kinetics in patients with hypertension. A posture- or exercise-induced disturbance of renal hippurate transport was sought. All persons were examined in prone and standing positions, as well as during exercise. When prone and upright renograms were compared, 24% of the hypertensives demonstrated bilateral orthostatic renal dysfunction. Exercise caused the hippurate transport disturbance to increase. Fifty-seven percent of all hypertensives developed evidence of marked, bilateral, renal dysfunction during ergometric stress, so that exercise renography was shown to be a more sensitive test of the presence of transient tubular dysfunction in hypertension than the standing renogram. In normotensive controls the hippurate functional scintigram failed to be influenced by posture and exercise. The results suggest presence in hypertension of transient, posture- and exercise-mediated alterations of renal cortical blood flow

  1. Sitting Posture Monitoring System Based on a Low-Cost Load Cell Using Machine Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jongryun; Park, Hyeong-Jun; Lee, Kwang Jin; Hyeong, Joonho; Kim, Sayup; Lee, Boreom

    2018-01-12

    Sitting posture monitoring systems (SPMSs) help assess the posture of a seated person in real-time and improve sitting posture. To date, SPMS studies reported have required many sensors mounted on the backrest plate and seat plate of a chair. The present study, therefore, developed a system that measures a total of six sitting postures including the posture that applied a load to the backrest plate, with four load cells mounted only on the seat plate. Various machine learning algorithms were applied to the body weight ratio measured by the developed SPMS to identify the method that most accurately classified the actual sitting posture of the seated person. After classifying the sitting postures using several classifiers, average and maximum classification rates of 97.20% and 97.94%, respectively, were obtained from nine subjects with a support vector machine using the radial basis function kernel; the results obtained by this classifier showed a statistically significant difference from the results of multiple classifications using other classifiers. The proposed SPMS was able to classify six sitting postures including the posture with loading on the backrest and showed the possibility of classifying the sitting posture even though the number of sensors is reduced.

  2. The effect of balance training intervention on postural stability in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kováčiková, Zuzana; Neumannova, Katerina; Rydlova, Jana; Bizovská, Lucia; Janura, Miroslav

    2018-05-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation is mainly focused on exercise training and breathing retraining in children with asthma. Conversely, balance training is not usually recommended for the treatment, although postural deficits were found in these patients. Therefore, this study assessed the effect of balance training intervention on postural stability in children with asthma. Nineteen children with mild intermittent asthma (age 11.1 ± 2.1 years, height 147.6 ± 13.9 cm, weight 41.8 ± 13.3 kg) were randomly assigned to an experimental group or a control group and completed a four-week physiotherapy program including breathing exercises and aerobic physical training (six times/week, 45 minutes). Both groups performed the same training, but only the experimental group underwent exercises on balance devices. The center of pressure (CoP) velocity in the anteroposterior (V y ) and mediolateral (V x ) directions, and total CoP velocity (V tot ) were recorded before and after training in the preferred and the adjusted stances under eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) conditions. The addition of balance intervention led to significant improvements of V tot (p = 0.02, p = 0.04) in both types of stance, V x in the preferred stance (p = 0.03) and V y in the adjusted stance (p = 0.01) under EO conditions. Significant improvements were also found in V y in the adjusted stance (p = 0.01) under EC conditions. Results of this study support the effectiveness of balance training as a part of physiotherapy treatment for improving balance performance, predominantly under EO conditions, in children with mild asthma.

  3. POSTURAL ALTERATIONS IN PATIENTS WITH SUBACROMIAL IMPINGEMENT SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Roebuck, Margaret M; Makki, Ahmed T; Frostick, Simon P

    2017-12-01

    An aberrant upper body posture has been proposed as one of the etiological factors contributing to the development of subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS). Clinicians have translated this supposition into assessment and rehabilitation programs despite insufficient and conflicting evidence to support this approach. The purpose of this study was to compare several postural variables between the SAIS patients and asymptomatic healthy controls. Case-Control Study. A total of 75 participants including 39 patients (20 females; 19 males) and 36 healthy controls (15 females; 21 males) participated in the study. Study evaluated several postural variables including forward head posture (FHP), forward shoulder posture (FSP), thoracic kyphosis index (TKI), scapular index (SI), normalized scapular protraction (NSP), and the lateral scapular slide test (LSST). The variables were compared between patient and control groups according to sex. Significant differences were observed in the female patients compared to asymptomatic controls for the FHP (49.38 + 9.6o vs 55.5o+8.38, p=0.03), FSP (45.58 + 10.1o vs 53.68 + 7.08, p=0.02), and LSST in third position (10.2 + 2.1cm vs 11.5 + 0.7cm, p=0.01). Male patients showed a significant difference only in the FSP compared to controls (61.9o+9.4o vs 49.78 + 9.28, p<0.001). While inadequate data on the relationship between dysfunctional posture and SAIS has led to broad variations in current rehabilitation strategies, the results of the present study revealed different patterns of postural aberrations in female and male patients with SAIS. This clarifies the need to develop individualized or sex-specific approaches for assessing posture in men and women with SAIS and rehabilitation programs based on the assessment results. 3b.

  4. Effects of four days hiking on postural control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Fraga Vieira

    Full Text Available Hiking is a demanding form of exercise that may cause delayed responses of the postural muscles and a loss of somatosensory information, particularly when repeatedly performed for several days. These effects may negatively influence the postural control of hikers. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a four-day hike on postural control. Twenty-six adults of both sexes travelled 262 kilometers, stopping for lunch and resting in the early evening each day. Force platforms were used to collect center of pressure (COP data at 100 Hz for 70 seconds before hiking started and immediately after arriving at the rest station each day. The COP time course data were analyzed according to global stabilometric descriptors, spectral analysis and structural descriptors using sway density curve (SDC and stabilometric diffusion analysis (SDA. Significant increases were found for global variables in both the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral directions (COP sway area, COP total sway path, COP mean velocity, COP root mean square value and COP range. In the spectral analysis, only the 80% power frequency (F80 in the anterior-posterior direction showed a significant increase, reflecting the increase of the sway frequencies. The SDC revealed a significant increase in the mean distance between peaks (MD and a significant decrease in the mean peak amplitudes (MP, suggesting that a larger torque amplitude is required for stabilization and that the postural stability is reduced. The SDA revealed a decrease in the long-term slope (Hl and increases in the short-term (Ks and the long-term (Kl intercepts. We considered the likelihood that the presence of local and general fatigue, pain and related neuromuscular adaptations and somatosensory deficits may have contributed to these postural responses. Together, these results demonstrated that four days of hiking increased sway frequencies and deteriorated postural control in the standing

  5. Postural health in women: the role of physiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britnell, S J; Cole, J V; Isherwood, L; Sran, M M; Britnell, N; Burgi, S; Candido, G; Watson, L

    2005-05-01

    To advise obstetric and gynaecology care providers of the physical, psychological, and environmental factors that affect women's posture throughout their lifespan, from adolescence to menopause. To outline the physiotherapy management of obstetrics, osteoporosis, and urinary incontinence in women and to identify recommendations for referral to a physiotherapist. Knowledge of abnormal postures, contributing factors and recommendations for physiotherapy management. MEDLINE, PEDro, and Cochrane Library Search from 1992 to 2003 for English-language articles and references from current textbooks related to posture and women's health conditions that are managed by physiotherapists. The evidence collected was reviewed by the authors and quantified using the evaluation of evidence guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on the Periodic Health Exam. 1. Pelvic floor muscle training with a physiotherapist is recommended to prevent urinary incontinence during pregnancy and after delivery (I-A). 2. Core stability training with a physiotherapist is recommended to prevent and treat back and pelvic pain during and following pregnancy (I-B). 3. Physiotherapist-prescribed exercises are recommended for women to elicit positive changes in bone mass and to reduce fall and fracture risk (I-A). 4. Pelvic floor muscle training with a physiotherapist is recommended for women with stress urinary incontinence (I-A). The Canadian Physiotherapy Association and Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada have developed this joint policy statement regarding posture in women's health that highlights the physical, psychological, and environmental factors that affect women's posture throughout their lifespan, from adolescence to menopause. This statement outlines the role of physiotherapy in the assessment and treatment of women's posture; outlines the physiotherapy management of obstetrics, osteoporosis, and urinary incontinence; and identifies recommendations for referral to a

  6. Combination of BTrackS and Geri-Fit as a targeted approach for assessing and reducing the postural sway of older adults with high fall risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goble DJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Daniel J Goble, Mason C Hearn, Harsimran S Baweja School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, College of Health and Human Services, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: Atypically high postural sway measured by a force plate is a known risk factor for falls in older adults. Further, it has been shown that small, but significant, reductions in postural sway are possible with various balance exercise interventions. In the present study, a new low-cost force-plate technology called the Balance Tracking System (BTrackS was utilized to assess postural sway of older adults before and after 90 days of a well-established exercise program called Geri-Fit. Results showed an overall reduction in postural sway across all participants from pre- to post-intervention. However, the magnitude of effects was significantly influenced by the amount of postural sway demonstrated by individuals prior to Geri-Fit training. Specifically, more participants with atypically high postural sway pre-intervention experienced an overall postural sway reduction. These reductions experienced were typically greater than the minimum detectable change statistic for the BTrackS Balance Test. Taken together, these findings suggest that BTrackS is an effective means of identifying older adults with elevated postural sway, who are likely to benefit from Geri-Fit training to mitigate fall risk. Keywords: aging, balance, BTrackS, Geri-Fit, postural sway, fall risk

  7. Impaired postural stability after laparoscopic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, K Z; Staehr-Rye, A K; Rasmussen, L S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Early postoperative mobilisation may reduce patient morbidity and improve hospital efficiency by accelerated discharge. The aim of this study was to measure postural stability early after laparoscopic surgery in order to assess how early it is safe to mobilise and discharge patients....... METHODS: We included 25 women undergoing outpatient gynaecological laparoscopic surgery in the study. Patients received standardised anaesthesia with propofol, remifentanil and rocuronium. Postural stability was assessed preoperatively, at 30 min after tracheal extubation, and at discharge from the post......-anaesthesia care unit using a force platform where sway area, mean sway and sway velocity were determined. The assessments were done with eyes closed and with eyes open. The primary outcome was the change in sway area with eyes closed 30 min after extubation. Data are reported as median (25-75% range). RESULTS...

  8. Effects of Exercise on Spinal Deformities and Quality of Life in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnawaz Anwer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This systematic review was conducted to examine the effects of exercise on spinal deformities and quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Data Sources. Electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, and Web of Science, were searched for research articles published from the earliest available dates up to May 31, 2015, using the key words “exercise,” “postural correction,” “posture,” “postural curve,” “Cobb’s angle,” “quality of life,” and “spinal deformities,” combined with the Medical Subject Heading “scoliosis.” Study Selection. This systematic review was restricted to randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials on AIS published in English language. The quality of selected studies was assessed by the PEDro scale, the Cochrane Collaboration’s tool, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation System (GRADE. Data Extraction. Descriptive data were collected from each study. The outcome measures of interest were Cobb angle, trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar kyphosis, vertebral rotation, and quality of life. Data Synthesis. A total of 30 studies were assessed for eligibility. Six of the 9 selected studies reached high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce the Cobb angle, angle of trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis and low-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce average lateral deviation. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions improve the quality of life. Conclusions. A supervised exercise program was superior to controls in reducing spinal deformities and improving the quality of life in patients with AIS.

  9. Emergency exercise scenario tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, K.

    1998-03-01

    Nuclear power plant emergency exercises require a realistically presented accident situation which includes various aspects: plant process, radioactivity, radiation, weather and people. Experiences from nuclear power plant emergency exercises show that preparing accident scenarios even for relatively short exercises is tedious. In the future modern computer technology and past experience could be used for making exercise planning more effective. (au)

  10. Analýza postury polohovým snímačem DTP2 u žen ve věku senescence po aplikaci cíleného cvičebního programu Posture analysis using position detector DTP2 in senescent women after the application of a targeted exercise program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Přidalová

    2008-01-01

    66 years using the diagnostic device DTP2 following the interventional procedure of a targeted exercise program (the Chinese therapeutic exercise known as "Hui chun gong". The exercise influenced mainly the pelvic area; the trends suggesting improved posture and stability did not reach statistical significance in all cases. Since the exercise technique is technically difficult, improperly performed positions resulted in a zero effect rather than improvement.Positive changes were always found in terms of improved stance stability and significant shift of the thoracic kyphosis towards the vertical axis, which suggests improved posture. Shoulder position showed a certain degree of inconsistency in terms of changes in shoulder asymmetry. Pelvic position also responded to the intervention procedures by shifting the asymmetry of the spinal angles after the 1st and 2nd phases of exercise, while a statistically significant offset of the left sided asymmetry was achieved after the 3rd phase. We found a reduced extent of titubation of the axial skeleton, which was evaluated to be an accompanying effect of the improved stance stability. In total, best results were manifested following the intervention in 2007, when the extent of titubation was decreased in the direction of both the x and y axes, a statistically significant positive change was found in the adjustment of symmetry of the posterior superior iliac spine, and a materially significant trend of a decrease in the axial values of lordoses and thoracic kyphosis was observed. The reasons for these changes can be found in an increased emphasis on the proper performance of exercise techniques and thus adjustment of muscle imbalances.Subjective feelings of the senior patients were very beneficial, as they evaluated very positively the feeling of improved stance stability.

  11. Postural control in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porto EF

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available EF Porto,1,2 AAM Castro,1,3 VGS Schmidt,4 HM Rabelo,4 C Kümpel,2 OA Nascimento,5 JR Jardim5 1Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center, Federal University of São Paulo, 2Adventist University, São Paulo, 3Federal University of Pampa, Rio Grande do Sul, 4Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center, Adventist University, 5Respiratory Diseases, Pulmonary Rehabilitation Center, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD fall frequently, although the risk of falls may seem less important than the respiratory consequences of the disease. Nevertheless, falls are associated to increased mortality, decreased independence and physical activity levels, and worsening of quality of life. The aims of this systematic review was to evaluate information in the literature with regard to whether impaired postural control is more prevalent in COPD patients than in healthy age-matched subjects, and to assess the main characteristics these patients present that contribute to impaired postural control.Methods: Five databases were searched with no dates or language limits. The MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and PEDro databases were searched using “balance”, “postural control”, and “COPD” as keywords. The search strategies were oriented and guided by a health science librarian and were performed on March 27, 2014. The studies included were those that evaluated postural control in COPD patients as their main outcome and scored more than five points on the PEDro scale. Studies supplied by the database search strategy were assessed independently by two blinded researchers.Results: A total of 484 manuscripts were found using the “balance in COPD or postural control in COPD” keywords. Forty-three manuscripts appeared more than once, and 397 did not evaluate postural control in COPD patients as the primary outcome. Thus, only 14 studies had postural control as their primary outcome. Our study

  12. Crew Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafalik, Kerrie K.

    2017-01-01

    Johnson Space Center (JSC) provides research, engineering, development, integration, and testing of hardware and software technologies for exercise systems applications in support of human spaceflight. This includes sustaining the current suite of on-orbit exercise devices by reducing maintenance, addressing obsolescence, and increasing reliability through creative engineering solutions. Advanced exercise systems technology development efforts focus on the sustainment of crew's physical condition beyond Low Earth Orbit for extended mission durations with significantly reduced mass, volume, and power consumption when compared to the ISS.

  13. Is there a relationship between head posture and craniomandibular pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, C M; De Boer, W; Lobbezoo, F; Habets, L L M H; Naeije, M

    2002-11-01

    An often-suggested factor in the aetiology of craniomandibular disorders (CMD) is an anteroposition of the head. However, the results of clinical studies to the relationship between CMD and head posture are contradictory. Therefore, the first aim of this study was to determine differences in head posture between well-defined CMD pain patients with or without a painful cervical spine disorder and healthy controls. The second aim was to determine differences in head posture between myogenous and arthrogenous CMD pain patients and controls. Two hundred and fifty persons entered the study. From each person, a standardized oral history was taken and blind physical examinations of the masticatory system and of the neck were performed. The participants were only included into one of the subgroups when the presence or absence of their symptoms was confirmed by the results of the physical examination. Head posture was quantified using lateral photographs and a lateral radiograph of the head and the cervical spine. After correction for age and gender effects, no difference in head posture was found between any of the patient and non-patient groups (P > 0.27). Therefore, this study does not support the suggestion that painful craniomandibular disorders, with or without a painful cervical spine disorder, are related to head posture.

  14. Otolith and Vertical Canal Contributions to Dynamic Postural Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, F. Owen

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to determine: 1) how do normal subjects adjust postural movements in response to changing or altered otolith input, for example, due to aging? and 2) how do patients adapt postural control after altered unilateral or bilateral vestibular sensory inputs such as ablative inner ear surgery or ototoxicity, respectively? The following hypotheses are under investigation: 1) selective alteration of otolith input or abnormalities of otolith receptor function will result in distinctive spatial, frequency, and temporal patterns of head movements and body postural sway dynamics. 2) subjects with reduced, altered, or absent vertical semicircular canal receptor sensitivity but normal otolith receptor function or vice versa, should show predictable alterations of body and head movement strategies essential for the control of postural sway and movement. The effect of altered postural movement control upon compensation and/or adaptation will be determined. These experiments provide data for the development of computational models of postural control in normals, vestibular deficient subjects and normal humans exposed to unusual force environments, including orbital space flight.

  15. Imaging Posture Veils Neural Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert T Thibault

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Whereas modern brain imaging often demands holding body positions incongruent with everyday life, posture governs both neural activity and cognitive performance. Humans commonly perform while upright; yet, many neuroimaging methodologies require participants to remain motionless and adhere to non-ecological comportments within a confined space. This inconsistency between ecological postures and imaging constraints undermines the transferability and generalizability of many a neuroimaging assay.Here we highlight the influence of posture on brain function and behavior. Specifically, we challenge the tacit assumption that brain processes and cognitive performance are comparable across a spectrum of positions. We provide an integrative synthesis regarding the increasingly prominent influence of imaging postures on autonomic function, mental capacity, sensory thresholds, and neural activity. Arguing that neuroimagers and cognitive scientists could benefit from considering the influence posture wields on both general functioning and brain activity, we examine existing imaging technologies and the potential of portable and versatile imaging devices (e.g., functional near infrared spectroscopy. Finally, we discuss ways that accounting for posture may help unveil the complex brain processes of everyday cognition.

  16. Neck Posture Clusters and Their Association With Biopsychosocial Factors and Neck Pain in Australian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Karen V; Beales, Darren J; Smith, Anne J; O'Sullivan, Peter B; Straker, Leon M

    2016-10-01

    There is conflicting evidence on the association between sagittal neck posture and neck pain. The purposes of this study were: (1) to determine the existence of clusters of neck posture in a cohort of 17-year-olds and (2) to establish whether identified subgroups were associated with biopsychosocial factors and neck pain. This was a cross-sectional study. The adolescents (N=1,108) underwent 2-dimensional photographic postural assessment in a sitting position. One distance and 4 angular measurements of the head, neck, and thorax were calculated from photo-reflective markers placed on bony landmarks. Subgroups of sagittal sitting neck posture were determined by cluster analysis. Height and weight were measured, and lifestyle and psychological factors, neck pain, and headache were assessed by questionnaire. The associations among posture subgroups, neck pain, and other factors were evaluated using logistic regression. Four distinct clusters of sitting neck posture were identified: upright, intermediate, slumped thorax/forward head, and erect thorax/forward head. Significant associations between cluster and sex, weight, and height were found. Participants classified as having slumped thorax/forward head posture were at higher odds of mild, moderate, or severe depression. Participants classified as having upright posture exercised more frequently. There was no significant difference in the odds of neck pain or headache across the clusters. The results are specific to 17-year-olds and may not be applicable to adults. Meaningful sagittal sitting neck posture clusters were identified in 17-year-olds who demonstrated some differences with biopsychosocial profiling. The finding of no association between cluster membership and neck pain and headaches challenges widely held beliefs about the role of posture in adolescent neck pain. © 2016 American Physical Therapy Association.

  17. Hip prosthesis in sitting posture for bilateral transfemoral amputee after burn injury: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yukiyo; Mutsuzaki, Hirotaka; Maezawa, Takayuki; Idei, Yuji; Takao, Kazuya; Takeuchi, Ryoko; Onishi, Shinzo; Hada, Yasushi; Yamazaki, Masashi; Wadano, Yasuyoshi

    2017-10-01

    To overcome the challenges of rehabilitation of bilateral transfemoral amputees, we developed a novel "hip prosthesis in the sitting posture." Case Description and Methods: A 64-year-old male bilateral transfemoral amputee was transferred for rehabilitation 4 months following a burn injury. His wounds remained unhealed for 20 months; thus, he was unable to participate in standing training with the standard prosthetic sockets. Hip prosthesis in the sitting posture has very little friction between the sockets and residual limbs, which facilitated our patient to begin standing and walking exercises. Findings and Outcomes: The patient's refractory wounds healed 1 month after initiating exercises using hip prosthesis in the sitting posture, and he could begin rehabilitation with the standard prostheses. Hip prosthesis in the sitting posture enabled a bilateral transfemoral amputee with unhealed residual limbs to stand, walk, and begin balance training. Hip prosthesis in the sitting posture is an effective temporary prosthesis to prevent disuse until wounds are healed and to continue rehabilitation with standard prostheses. Clinical relevance Hip prosthesis in the sitting posture is useful for bilateral transfemoral amputees with unhealed residual limbs after burn injuries to prevent disuse and maintain motivation for walking.

  18. Practice of contemporary dance promotes stochastic postural control in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrufino, Lena; Bril, Blandine; Dietrich, Gilles; Nonaka, Tetsushi; Coubard, Olivier A

    2011-01-01

    As society ages and the frequency of falls increases, counteracting gait and posture decline is a challenging issue for countries of the developed world. Previous studies have shown that exercise and hazard management help to improve balance and/or decrease the risks for falling in normal aging. Motor activity based on motor-skill learning, particularly dance, can also benefit balance and decreases falls with age. Recent studies have suggested that older dancers have better balance, posture, or gait than non-dancers. Additionally, clinical or laboratory measures have shown improvements in some aspects of balance after dance interventions in elderly trainees. This study examined the impact of contemporary dance (CD) and of fall prevention (FP) programs on postural control of older adults. Posturography of quiet upright stance was performed in 41 participants aged 59-86 years before and after 4.4-month training in either CD or FP once a week. Though classical statistic scores failed to show any effect, dynamic analyses of the center-of-pressure displacements revealed significant changes after training. Specifically, practice of CD enhanced the critical time interval in diffusion analysis, and reduced recurrence and mathematical stability in recurrence quantification analysis, whereas practice of FP induced or tended to induce the reverse patterns. Such effects were obtained only in the eyes open condition. We suggest that CD training based on motor improvisation favored stochastic posture inducing plasticity in motor control, while FP training based on more stereotyped behaviors did not.

  19. Practice of contemporary dance promotes stochastic postural control in aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena eFerrufino

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As society ages and the frequency of falls increases, counteracting gait and posture decline is a challenging issue for countries of the developed world. Previous studies have shown that exercise and hazard management help to improve balance and/or decrease the risks for falling in normal aging. Motor activity based on motor-skill learning, particularly dance, can also benefit balance and decreases falls with age. Recent studies have suggested that older dancers had better balance, posture, or gait than non-dancers. Additionally, clinical or laboratory measures have shown improvements in some aspects of balance after dance interventions in elderly trainees. This study examined the impact of contemporary dance (CD and of fall prevention (FP programs on postural control of older adults. Posturography of quiet upright stance was performed in forty-one participants aged 59-86 years before and after 4.4-month training in either CD or FP once a week. Though classical statistic scores failed to show any effect, dynamic analyses of the center-of-pressure displacements revealed significant changes after training. Specifically, practice of CD enhanced the critical time interval in diffusion analysis, and reduced recurrence and mathematical stability in recurrence quantification analysis, whereas practice of FP induced or tended to induce the reverse patterns. We suggest that CD training based on motor improvisation favored stochastic posture inducing plasticity in motor control, while FP training based on more stereotyped behaviors did not.

  20. Practice of Contemporary Dance Promotes Stochastic Postural Control in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrufino, Lena; Bril, Blandine; Dietrich, Gilles; Nonaka, Tetsushi; Coubard, Olivier A.

    2011-01-01

    As society ages and the frequency of falls increases, counteracting gait and posture decline is a challenging issue for countries of the developed world. Previous studies have shown that exercise and hazard management help to improve balance and/or decrease the risks for falling in normal aging. Motor activity based on motor-skill learning, particularly dance, can also benefit balance and decreases falls with age. Recent studies have suggested that older dancers have better balance, posture, or gait than non-dancers. Additionally, clinical or laboratory measures have shown improvements in some aspects of balance after dance interventions in elderly trainees. This study examined the impact of contemporary dance (CD) and of fall prevention (FP) programs on postural control of older adults. Posturography of quiet upright stance was performed in 41 participants aged 59–86 years before and after 4.4-month training in either CD or FP once a week. Though classical statistic scores failed to show any effect, dynamic analyses of the center-of-pressure displacements revealed significant changes after training. Specifically, practice of CD enhanced the critical time interval in diffusion analysis, and reduced recurrence and mathematical stability in recurrence quantification analysis, whereas practice of FP induced or tended to induce the reverse patterns. Such effects were obtained only in the eyes open condition. We suggest that CD training based on motor improvisation favored stochastic posture inducing plasticity in motor control, while FP training based on more stereotyped behaviors did not. PMID:22232582

  1. Normative values for the Foot Posture Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redmond Anthony C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Foot Posture Index (FPI is a validated method for quantifying standing foot posture, and is being used in a variety of clinical settings. There have however, been no normative data available to date for comparison and reference. This study aimed to establish normative FPI reference values. Methods Studies reporting FPI data were identified by searching online databases. Nine authors contributed anonymised versions of their original datasets comprising 1648 individual observations. The datasets included information relating to centre, age, gender, pathology (if relevant, FPI scores and body mass index (BMI where available. FPI total scores were transformed to interval logit scores as per the Rasch model and normal ranges were defined. Comparisons between groups employed t-tests or ANOVA models as appropriate and data were explored descriptively and graphically. Results The main analysis based on a normal healthy population (n = 619 confirmed that a slightly pronated foot posture is the normal position at rest (mean back transformed FPI raw score = +4. A 'U' shaped relationship existed for age, with minors and older adults exhibiting significantly higher FPI scores than the general adult population (F = 51.07, p t = -1.44, p = 0.149. No relationship was found between the FPI and BMI. Systematic differences from the adult normals were confirmed in patients with neurogenic and idiopathic cavus (F = 216.981, p Conclusion A set of population norms for children, adults and older people have been derived from a large sample. Foot posture is related to age and the presence of pathology, but not influenced by gender or BMI. The normative values identified may assist in classifying foot type for the purpose of research and clinical decision making.

  2. Real-Time Hand Posture Recognition Using a Range Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahamy, Herve

    The basic goal of human computer interaction is to improve the interaction between users and computers by making computers more usable and receptive to the user's needs. Within this context, the use of hand postures in replacement of traditional devices such as keyboards, mice and joysticks is being explored by many researchers. The goal is to interpret human postures via mathematical algorithms. Hand posture recognition has gained popularity in recent years, and could become the future tool for humans to interact with computers or virtual environments. An exhaustive description of the frequently used methods available in literature for hand posture recognition is provided. It focuses on the different types of sensors and data used, the segmentation and tracking methods, the features used to represent the hand postures as well as the classifiers considered in the recognition process. Those methods are usually presented as highly robust with a recognition rate close to 100%. However, a couple of critical points necessary for a successful real-time hand posture recognition system require major improvement. Those points include the features used to represent the hand segment, the number of postures simultaneously recognizable, the invariance of the features with respect to rotation, translation and scale and also the behavior of the classifiers against non-perfect hand segments for example segments including part of the arm or missing part of the palm. A 3D time-of-flight camera named SR4000 has been chosen to develop a new methodology because of its capability to provide in real-time and at high frame rate 3D information on the scene imaged. This sensor has been described and evaluated for its capability for capturing in real-time a moving hand. A new recognition method that uses the 3D information provided by the range camera to recognize hand postures has been proposed. The different steps of this methodology including the segmentation, the tracking, the hand

  3. Relationship between functional movement screen scores, core strength, posture, and body mass index in school children in Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Ulrike H; Johnson, A Wayne; Adamson, Brynn

    2015-05-01

    The assessment of functionality should include parameters that consider postural control, limb asymmetries, range of motion limitations, proprioceptive deficits, and pain. An increasingly popular battery of tests, the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), is purported to assess the above named parameters. The purpose of our study was twofold: (a) to report differences in total FMS scores in children, provide preliminary normative reference values of each of the 7 individual FMS scores for both genders and report on asymmetries and (b) to evaluate the relationship between total FMS scores, age, body mass index (BMI), core strength/stability, and postural angles to explore the possibility of using the FMS in the assessment of children's functional fitness. Descriptive data on 77 children aged 8-11 years were collected. The children performed core strength/stability exercises. Photographs were taken from a lateral view for later calculation of postural angles. The children performed the FMS while being videotaped for later review. The average total FMS score (of 21) was 14.9 (+1.9), and BMI was 16.4 (+2.2). Static posture is not related to results of the FMS. Core strength was positively correlated to the total FMS score (r = 0.31; p = 0.006). Over 60% demonstrated at least 1 asymmetry. The individual test scores indicate that none of the test items is too difficult for the children. Based on the screen's correlation to core strength, and the fact that it identifies areas of asymmetry, we suggest to further investigate its possible use in the assessment of children's functional fitness.

  4. Combination of BTrackS and Geri-Fit as a targeted approach for assessing and reducing the postural sway of older adults with high fall risk

    OpenAIRE

    Goble,Daniel; Hearn,Mason; Baweja,Harsimran

    2017-01-01

    Daniel J Goble, Mason C Hearn, Harsimran S Baweja School of Exercise and Nutritional Sciences, College of Health and Human Services, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA Abstract: Atypically high postural sway measured by a force plate is a known risk factor for falls in older adults. Further, it has been shown that small, but significant, reductions in postural sway are possible with various balance exercise interventions. In the present study, a new low-cost force-plate technolo...

  5. Effects of the combined swimming, corrective and aqua gymnastics programme on body posture of preschool age children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldvin Torlaković

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This research paper is aimed at identifying the possible effects that the implementation of the combined kinesiological programs of swimming and hydro-kinesiological therapy may have on thebody posture in preschool children.Methods: The survey was conducted on a sample of 50 boys selected from a number of Sarajevo kindergartens, in the age group of 5.2±0.6 yrs.; mean height=114±7 cm; mean weight= 21.8±4.7 kg. In order to evaluate the postural status, we used a reduced Napoleon Wolanski method. The activities were carried out within the period of 16 weeks, twice a week for 60 minutes.Results: The analysis of the initial and fi nal series of testing with t-test indicates a high level of statistical signifi cance in the variables of shoulder posture assessment, shoulder blade posture assessment, spinalcord posture assessment, leg posture assessment, feet posture assessment, overall body posture assessment according to Wolanski, whereas somewhat lower level of statistical signifi cance was found in thevariables of abdominal posture assessment and chest posture assessment. A relatively low level of statistical significance is observed only in the variable of head posture assessment.Conclusion: It can be concluded that a combined program of corrective gymnastics with games and exercises in water had signifi cant effects on improving the muscle tone in the respondents, which in turn had a direct impact on improving their body posture, both in terms of all of the individually surveyed body parts and in overall terms.

  6. Investigating the Effects of Different Working Postures on Cognitive Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharareh Mohammadi

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion This study demonstrates that cognitive performance is affected by working postures. This study demonstrates that standard sitting posture is the best posture. Therefore, it is recommended that sitting posture can help in increasing cognitive performance in the workplace.

  7. The effect of sensorimotor training on the postural stability of visually impaired women over 50 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maćkowiak, Zuzanna; Osiński, Wieslaw; Salamon, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies indicated that blind and visually impaired people are a group with greater risk of falls. Postmenopausal changes significantly decrease physical efficiency and impair the body's mechanisms for maintaining postural stability. In addition, the frequency of falls among women is much higher than in men. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of sensorimotor exercise on changes in postural stability of visually impaired women over 50 years of age. Visually impaired women from group E showed a lower level of postural stability measured with EO compared to the healthy women. After completing the exercise, a more pronounced improvement in the level of postural stability was observed in group E.

  8. Compulsive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Compulsive Exercise KidsHealth / For Parents / Compulsive Exercise What's in this ... for both physical and psychological problems. About Compulsive Exercise Compulsive exercise (also called obligatory exercise and anorexia ...

  9. Vestibular humanoid postural control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergner, Thomas; Schweigart, Georg; Fennell, Luminous

    2009-01-01

    Many of our motor activities require stabilization against external disturbances. This especially applies to biped stance since it is inherently unstable. Disturbance compensation is mainly reactive, depending on sensory inputs and real-time sensor fusion. In humans, the vestibular system plays a major role. When there is no visual space reference, vestibular-loss clearly impairs stance stability. Most humanoid robots do not use a vestibular system, but stabilize upright body posture by means of center of pressure (COP) control. We here suggest using in addition a vestibular sensor and present a biologically inspired vestibular sensor along with a human-inspired stance control mechanism. We proceed in two steps. First, in an introductory review part, we report on relevant human sensors and their role in stance control, focusing on own models of transmitter fusion in the vestibular sensor and sensor fusion in stance control. In a second, experimental part, the models are used to construct an artificial vestibular system and to embed it into the stance control of a humanoid. The robot's performance is investigated using tilts of the support surface. The results are compared to those of humans. Functional significance of the vestibular sensor is highlighted by comparing vestibular-able with vestibular-loss states in robot and humans. We show that a kinematic body-space sensory feedback (vestibular) is advantageous over a kinetic one (force cues) for dynamic body-space balancing. Our embodiment of human sensorimotor control principles into a robot is more than just bionics. It inspired our biological work (neurorobotics: 'learning by building', proof of principle, and more). We envisage a future clinical use in the form of hardware-in-the-loop simulations of neurological symptoms for improving diagnosis and therapy and designing medical assistive devices.

  10. Cinerama sickness and postural instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Jelte E; Ledegang, Wietse D; Lubeck, Astrid J A; Stins, John F

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min after watching a 1 h 3D aviation documentary in a cinema. Sickness was significantly larger right after the movie than before, and in a lesser extent still so after 45 min. The average standard deviation of the lateral centre of pressure excursions was significantly larger only right afterwards. When low-pass filtered at 0.1 Hz, lateral and for-aft excursions were both significantly larger right after the movie, while for-aft excursions then remained larger even after 45 min. Speculating on previous findings, we predict more sickness and postural instability in 3D than in 2D movies, also suggesting a possible, but yet unknown risk for work-related activities and vehicle operation. Watching motion pictures may be sickening and posturally destabilising, but effects in a cinema are unknown. We, therefore, carried out an observational study showing that sickness then is mainly an issue during the exposure while postural instability is an issue afterwards.

  11. [Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, Lidija; Bjelaković, Bojko; Lazović, Milica; Stanković, Ivona; Čolović, Hristina; Kocić, Mirjana; Zlatanović, Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP). As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. The study included 19 children of both sexes, aged 6 to 12 years, with spastic CP. They were included in a 12-week aquatic exercise program, twice a week. Measurements of GMFM (gross motor function measurement), spasticity (MAS-Modified Ashworth Scale), heart rate (HR) and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) were carried out before and after treatment. The measurement results were compared before and after treatment. GMFM mean value before therapy was 80.2% and statistically it was significantly lower in comparison to the same value after therapy, which was 86.2% (p Aquatic exercise program can be useful in improving gross motor functioning, reducing spasticity and increasing cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP.

  12. Thermoregulatory postures limit antipredator responses in peafowl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica L. Yorzinski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Many animals inhabit environments where they experience temperature fluctuations. One way in which animals can adjust to these temperature changes is through behavioral thermoregulation. However, we know little about the thermal benefits of postural changes and the costs they may incur. In this study, we examined the thermoregulatory role of two postures, the head-tuck and leg-tuck posture, in peafowl (Pavo cristatus and evaluated whether the head-tuck posture imposes a predation cost. The heads and legs of peafowl are significantly warmer when the birds exhibit these postures, demonstrating that these postures serve an important thermoregulatory role. In addition, the birds are slower to respond to an approaching threat when they display the head-tuck posture, suggesting that a thermoregulatory posture can limit antipredator behavior.

  13. Thermoregulatory postures limit antipredator responses in peafowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorzinski, Jessica L; Lam, Jennifer; Schultz, Rachel; Davis, Melissa

    2018-01-05

    Many animals inhabit environments where they experience temperature fluctuations. One way in which animals can adjust to these temperature changes is through behavioral thermoregulation. However, we know little about the thermal benefits of postural changes and the costs they may incur. In this study, we examined the thermoregulatory role of two postures, the head-tuck and leg-tuck posture, in peafowl ( Pavo cristatus ) and evaluated whether the head-tuck posture imposes a predation cost. The heads and legs of peafowl are significantly warmer when the birds exhibit these postures, demonstrating that these postures serve an important thermoregulatory role. In addition, the birds are slower to respond to an approaching threat when they display the head-tuck posture, suggesting that a thermoregulatory posture can limit antipredator behavior. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. No association between q-angle and foot posture with running-related injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Daniel Ramskov; Jensen, Majbritt Lykke; Obling, Kirstine Høj

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of knowledge on the association between different foot posture quantified by Foot Posture Index (FPI) and Quadriceps angle (Q-angle) with development of running-related injuries. Earlier studies investigating these associations did not include an objective measure of the amount...

  15. Influence of antenatal physical exercise on haemodynamics in pregnant women: a flexible randomisation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Rhiannon Emma; Emery, Simon J; Uzun, Orhan; D'Silva, Lindsay A; Lewis, Michael J

    2015-08-22

    Normal pregnancy is associated with marked changes in haemodynamic function, however the influence and potential benefits of antenatal physical exercise at different stages of pregnancy and postpartum remain unclear. The aim of this study was therefore to characterise the influence of regular physical exercise on haemodynamic variables at different stages of pregnancy and also in the postpartum period. Fifty healthy pregnant women were recruited and randomly assigned (2 × 2 × 2 design) to a land or water-based exercise group or a control group. Exercising groups attended weekly classes from the 20th week of pregnancy onwards. Haemodynamic assessments (heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and end diastolic index) were performed using the Task Force haemodynamic monitor at 12-16, 26-28, 34-36 and 12 weeks following birth, during a protocol including postural manoeurvres (supine and standing) and light exercise. In response to an acute bout of exercise in the postpartum period, stroke volume and end diastolic index were greater in the exercise group than the non-exercising control group (p = 0.041 and p = 0.028 respectively). Total peripheral resistance and diastolic blood pressure were also lower (p = 0.015 and p = 0.007, respectively) in the exercise group. Diastolic blood pressure was lower in the exercise group during the second trimester (p = 0.030). Antenatal exercise does not appear to substantially alter maternal physiology with advancing gestation, speculating that the already vast changes in maternal physiology mask the influences of antenatal exercise, however it does appear to result in an improvement in a woman's haemodynamic function (enhanced ventricular ejection performance and reduced blood pressure) following the end of pregnancy. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02503995. Registered 20 July 2015.

  16. Measuring postural sway in sitting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Derek John; Hansen, Lisbeth; Luun, Malene

    2015-01-01

    and younger than 10 years old, participated in this study. The children sat unsupported for 30 s while their posture and sway were quantified using stereophotogrammetry. The tendency in both age groups was to sit with a backward tilted pelvis and a kyphotic trunk. The sitting position was most varied...... group appeared to result from an equally stable trunk supported on a less stable pelvis. Mediolateral marker sway and intersegmental angular sway showed a clearer age dependency. Trunk postural control does not appear to differ between children older and younger than 10 years old, but sagittal plane...

  17. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regular exercise is one of the best things you can do for your health. It has many benefits, including ... chronic diseases. There are many different types of exercise; it is important that you pick the right ...

  18. Experience in exercise evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, George E.

    1989-01-01

    This summary outline presents environmental ingestion exposure pathways exercise evaluations that should be followed by state and local governments. It includes environmental monitoring, food, feeds and monitoring of organisms as well as emergency planning and execution exercises

  19. Postural defects in children and teenagers as one of the major issues in psychosomatic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Wawrzyniak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Postural defect is a set of postural abnormalities defined as minor single deviations from correct posture, which may be repaired with the use of appropriate exercises, passive or active. Studies concerning the evaluation of children and teenagers’ health condition have shown that the incidence of postural defects in the population ranges from 30 to 60%. The greatest threat for the development of incorrect body posture is present in the period of fast growth, namely between the age of  5 and 7 and in the period of adolescence. The most common postural defects in the population of children in Poland include: scoliosis, juvenile kyphosis of the spine (Scheuermann’s disease and static deformations of lower extremities. Owing to the common nature of the issue and the possibility to apply effective preventive measures, it is necessary to early detect postural defects through appropriate examinations. Preventive healthcare for children is aimed at early diagnosis of irregularities in a child’s development. Screening tests among children detect three types of the motor system disorders: scoliosis, excessive thoracic kyphosis and static deformations of lower extremities and asymmetry in the length of lower extremities. Early detection of the defect prevents against its further development or the development of further abnormalities. The results of a report Health Behaviour in School-aged Children concerning the health of children clearly show that recently, there has been a substantive increase in the number of factors causing the creation of postural defects. School period is the most optimum one to carry out preventive actions in this respect. Postural defects develop in some children, despite preventive measures carried out. In accordance with the recommendations of experts, it is then necessary to perform secondary prophylaxis, which prevents further development of the defect, the

  20. Development and validation of a novel rating system for scoring standing foot posture: the Foot Posture Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Anthony C; Crosbie, Jack; Ouvrier, Robert A

    2006-01-01

    The limitations of clinical methods for appraising foot posture are well documented. A new measure, the Foot Posture Index is proposed, and its development and validation described. A four-phase development process was used: (i) to derive a series of candidate measures, (ii) to define an appropriate scoring system, (iii) to evaluate the validity of components and modify the instrument as appropriate, and (iv) to investigate the predictive validity of the finalised instrument relative to static and dynamic kinematic models. Methods included initial concurrent validation using Rose's Valgus Index, determination of inter-item reliability, factor analysis, and benchmarking against three dimensional kinematic models derived from electromagnetic motion tracking of the lower limb. Thirty-six candidate components were reduced to six in the final instrument. The draft version of the instrument predicted 59% of the variance in concurrent Valgus Index scores and demonstrated good inter item reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.83). The relevant variables from the motion tracking lower limb model predicted 58-80% of the variance in the six components retained in the final instrument. The finalised instrument predicted 64% of the variance in static standing posture, and 41% of the variance in midstance posture during normal walking. The Foot Posture Index has been subjected to thorough evaluation in the course of its development and a final version is proposed comprising six component measures that performed satisfactorily during the validation process. The Foot Posture Index assessment is quick and simple to perform and allows a multiple segment, multiple plane evaluation that offers some advantages over existing clinical measures of foot posture.

  1. Vliv posturální terapie s využitím posturomedu na výskok v basketbalu

    OpenAIRE

    Hrušková, Magdaléna

    2015-01-01

    Title: The Effect of Postural Therapy Using Posturomed on Jump in Basketball. Objectives: The aim of the thesis is to assess what effect the state of postural stabilization has on the jump height in basketball, to capture the level of postural stabilization before and after the 6-week proprioceptive postural therapy on Posturomed and to find out whether the jump height in probands changes after this therapy. Methods: The thesis included 30 probands - basketball players. 15 probands were assig...

  2. Nonplantigrade Foot Posture: A Constraint on Dinosaur Body Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Tai; Kubo, Mugino O.

    2016-01-01

    Dinosaurs had functionally digitigrade or sub-unguligrade foot postures. With their immediate ancestors, dinosaurs were the only terrestrial nonplantigrades during the Mesozoic. Extant terrestrial mammals have different optimal body sizes according to their foot posture (plantigrade, digitigrade, and unguligrade), yet the relationship of nonplantigrade foot posture with dinosaur body size has never been investigated, even though the body size of dinosaurs has been studied intensively. According to a large dataset presented in this study, the body sizes of all nonplantigrades (including nonvolant dinosaurs, nonvolant terrestrial birds, extant mammals, and extinct Nearctic mammals) are above 500 g, except for macroscelid mammals (i.e., elephant shrew), a few alvarezsauroid dinosaurs, and nondinosaur ornithodirans (i.e., the immediate ancestors of dinosaurs). When nonplantigrade tetrapods evolved from plantigrade ancestors, lineages with nonplantigrade foot posture exhibited a steady increase in body size following Cope’s rule. In contrast, contemporaneous plantigrade lineages exhibited no trend in body size evolution and were largely constrained to small body sizes. This evolutionary pattern of body size specific to foot posture occurred repeatedly during both the Mesozoic and the Cenozoic eras. Although disturbed by the end-Cretaceous extinction, species of mid to large body size have predominantly been nonplantigrade animals from the Jurassic until the present; conversely, species with small body size have been exclusively composed of plantigrades in the nonvolant terrestrial tetrapod fauna. PMID:26790003

  3. Nonplantigrade Foot Posture: A Constraint on Dinosaur Body Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Tai; Kubo, Mugino O

    2016-01-01

    Dinosaurs had functionally digitigrade or sub-unguligrade foot postures. With their immediate ancestors, dinosaurs were the only terrestrial nonplantigrades during the Mesozoic. Extant terrestrial mammals have different optimal body sizes according to their foot posture (plantigrade, digitigrade, and unguligrade), yet the relationship of nonplantigrade foot posture with dinosaur body size has never been investigated, even though the body size of dinosaurs has been studied intensively. According to a large dataset presented in this study, the body sizes of all nonplantigrades (including nonvolant dinosaurs, nonvolant terrestrial birds, extant mammals, and extinct Nearctic mammals) are above 500 g, except for macroscelid mammals (i.e., elephant shrew), a few alvarezsauroid dinosaurs, and nondinosaur ornithodirans (i.e., the immediate ancestors of dinosaurs). When nonplantigrade tetrapods evolved from plantigrade ancestors, lineages with nonplantigrade foot posture exhibited a steady increase in body size following Cope's rule. In contrast, contemporaneous plantigrade lineages exhibited no trend in body size evolution and were largely constrained to small body sizes. This evolutionary pattern of body size specific to foot posture occurred repeatedly during both the Mesozoic and the Cenozoic eras. Although disturbed by the end-Cretaceous extinction, species of mid to large body size have predominantly been nonplantigrade animals from the Jurassic until the present; conversely, species with small body size have been exclusively composed of plantigrades in the nonvolant terrestrial tetrapod fauna.

  4. Nonplantigrade Foot Posture: A Constraint on Dinosaur Body Size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Kubo

    Full Text Available Dinosaurs had functionally digitigrade or sub-unguligrade foot postures. With their immediate ancestors, dinosaurs were the only terrestrial nonplantigrades during the Mesozoic. Extant terrestrial mammals have different optimal body sizes according to their foot posture (plantigrade, digitigrade, and unguligrade, yet the relationship of nonplantigrade foot posture with dinosaur body size has never been investigated, even though the body size of dinosaurs has been studied intensively. According to a large dataset presented in this study, the body sizes of all nonplantigrades (including nonvolant dinosaurs, nonvolant terrestrial birds, extant mammals, and extinct Nearctic mammals are above 500 g, except for macroscelid mammals (i.e., elephant shrew, a few alvarezsauroid dinosaurs, and nondinosaur ornithodirans (i.e., the immediate ancestors of dinosaurs. When nonplantigrade tetrapods evolved from plantigrade ancestors, lineages with nonplantigrade foot posture exhibited a steady increase in body size following Cope's rule. In contrast, contemporaneous plantigrade lineages exhibited no trend in body size evolution and were largely constrained to small body sizes. This evolutionary pattern of body size specific to foot posture occurred repeatedly during both the Mesozoic and the Cenozoic eras. Although disturbed by the end-Cretaceous extinction, species of mid to large body size have predominantly been nonplantigrade animals from the Jurassic until the present; conversely, species with small body size have been exclusively composed of plantigrades in the nonvolant terrestrial tetrapod fauna.

  5. Effects of vision and lumbar posture on trunk neuromuscular control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaswinkel, Erwin; van Drunen, Paul; Veeger, Dirk-Jan H E J; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2015-01-21

    The goal of this study was to determine the effects of vision and lumbar posture on trunk neuromuscular control. Torso perturbations were applied with a pushing device while the subjects were restrained at the pelvis in a kneeling-seated position. Torso kinematics and the muscle activity of the lumbar part of the M. Longissimus were recorded for 14 healthy subjects. Four conditions were included: a flexion, extension and neutral lumbar posture with eyes closed and the neutral posture with eyes open. Frequency response functions of the admittance and reflexes showed that there was no significant difference between the eyes open and eyes closed conditions, thereby confirming that vision does not play a role in the stabilization of the trunk during small-amplitude trunk perturbations. In contrast, manipulating posture did lead to significant differences. In particular, the flexed condition led to a lower admittance and lower reflex contribution compared to the neutral condition. Furthermore, the muscle pre-activation (prior to the onset of the perturbation) was significantly lower in the flexed posture compared to neutral. This confirms that flexing the lumbar spine increases the passive tissue stiffness and decreases the contribution of reflex activity to trunk control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Leg muscles activities during hyperventilation following a cycling exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, P; Mora, I; Terrien, J; Lelard, T; Petitjean, M

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to establish how increased ventilation modifies postural stability, as characterized by body sway and leg muscle activities. Twelve healthy subjects had to perform six 30-second postural tests: one pre-exercise test while breathing gently and then one test every minute for the five minutes immediately following a maximum-intensity, incremental cycling exercise test. Subjects were asked to maintain an upright stance on a force plate for 30 s, with their eyes open. Movement of the centre of pressure in the sagittal plane was monitored in the time and spectral domains. Myoelectric activities of the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles were recorded using surface electromyography. Ventilatory parameters were measured with a portable, telemetric device. Postural changes related to respiratory variations were quantified by coherence analysis. The results showed that hyperventilation induced by exercise was accompanied by a significant increase in postural parameters, indicating a reduction in postural stability following a change in ventilatory drive. Coherence analysis confirmed the ventilatory origin of the postural oscillations. The results suggest that ventilation may be an important factor in postural disturbance during physical activity. The observed increases in leg muscle activities were most likely related to musculo-articular stiffening.

  7. Flexed Truncal Posture in Parkinson Disease: Measurement Reliability and Relationship With Physical and Cognitive Impairments, Mobility, and Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, Aimi L; Paul, Serene S; Allen, Natalie E; Sherrington, Catherine; Fung, Victor S C; Canning, Colleen G

    2017-04-01

    Flexed truncal posture is common in people with Parkinson disease (PD); however, little is known about the mechanisms responsible or its effect on physical performance. This cross-sectional study aimed to establish the reliability of a truncal posture measurement and explore relationships between PD impairments and truncal posture, as well as truncal posture and balance and mobility. A total of 82 people with PD participated. Truncal posture was measured in standing as the distance between vertebra C7 and a wall. Univariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed with truncal posture and impairments, including global axial symptoms, tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, freezing of gait (FOG), reactive stepping and executive function, as well as truncal posture with balance and mobility measures. The truncal posture measure had excellent test-retest reliability (ICC3,1 0.79, 95% CI 0.60-0.89, P < 0.001). Global axial symptoms had the strongest association with truncal posture (adjusted R = 0.08, P = 0.01), although the majority of the variance remains unexplained. Post hoc analysis revealed that several impairments were associated with truncal posture only in those who did not report FOG. Flexed truncal posture was associated with poorer performance of most balance and mobility tasks after adjustment for age, gender, disease severity, and duration (adjusted R = 0.24-0.33, P < 0.001-0.03). The C7 to wall measurement is highly reliable in people with PD. Global axial symptoms were independently associated with truncal posture. Greater flexed truncal posture was associated with poorer balance and mobility. Further studies are required to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for flexed truncal posture and the impact on activity.Video Abstract available for more insights from the authors (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A164).

  8. Subjective posture in tridimensional space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israël, I; Giannopulu, I

    2012-01-01

    The internal representation of the body is intimately related to postural orientation. This assists us to correctly identify our position relative to the earth-vertical. The postural orientation about the pitch-Y axis is by default forward tilted while there is no such default about the roll-X axis. We hypothetized that the internal representation of body position would be different between the Y and X axes. We designed a study to assess the accuracy of self-driven whole-body orienting to the horizontal and the vertical about the X (roll) and Y (pitch) axes, with healthy seated subjects in complete darkness. Consistent with our hypothesis, the results showed that when trying to reach the horizontal with the X-axis, subjects remained on the same tilted direction as the initial posture. On the return way to the vertical, the subjects did not cross this (vertical) line. Whereas when reaching the horizontal with the Y-axis, there was an undershoot on the supine direction, and an overshoot on the prone direction: this discrepancy could be due to somatosensory cues to subjects in seated posture. The relevant mechanisms related to the internal representation of the body and graviceptive systems underlying the construction of an head-foot line are discussed.

  9. Visual Vection does not Perturb Squatting Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Gilles

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Vision contributes fundamentally to the control of the standing posture. The illusion of self motion falsely perceived (vection increases postural sway while standing. In this paper we examine the effect of vection on both standing and deep squatting with the hypothesis that the squatting posture should not be disturbed by the conflict of sensory information due to vection. The results show that standing posture only was affected by the visual stimuli. The widespread use of squatting for work as well as rest could be due in part to this lack of effect of sensory perturbation on postural stability.

  10. Ergonomic assessment of the posture of surgeons performing endoscopic transurethral resections in urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sökeland Jürgen

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During transurethral endoscopic prostate and bladder operations the influence of an ergonomic redesign of the arrangement of the operation equipment - including the introduction of a video-assisted resection method ('monitor endoscopy' instead of directly viewing onto the operation area via the endoscope ('direct endoscopy' - was studied with respect to the postures of the surgeons. Methods Postures were analysed on the basis of video recordings of the surgeons performed in the operation theatre during live operations and subsequent visual posture estimation executed by an observer. In particular, head, trunk and arm positions were assigned to posture categories according to a newly developed posture classification schema. 10 urological operations with direct endoscopy and 9 with monitor endoscopy were included. Results Application of direct endoscopy coincides with distinct lateral and sagittal trunk and head inclinations, trunk torsion and strong forearm and upper arm elevations of the surgeons whereas operations with monitor endoscopy were performed with an almost upright head and trunk and hanging arms. The disadvantageous postures observed during direct endoscopy are mainly caused by the necessity to hold the endoscope continuously in close contact with the eye. Conclusion From an ergonomic point of view, application of the video-assisted resection method should be preferred in transurethral endoscopic operations in order to prevent awkward postures of the surgeons and to limit muscular strain and fatigue. Furthermore, the application of the monitor method enables the use of a chair equipped with back support and armrests and benefits the reduction of postural stress.

  11. The assessment and treatment of postural disorders in cerebellar ataxia: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquer, A; Barbieri, G; Pérennou, D

    2014-03-01

    Gait and balance disorders are often major causes of handicap in patients with cerebellar ataxia. Although it was thought that postural and balance disorders in cerebellar ataxia were not treatable, recent studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of rehabilitation programs. This article is the first systematic review on the treatment of postural disorders in cerebellar ataxia. Nineteen articles were selected, of which three were randomized, controlled trials. Various aetiologies of cerebellar ataxia were studied: five studies assessed patients with multiple sclerosis, four assessed patients with degenerative ataxia, two assessed stroke patients and eight assessed patients with various aetiologies. Accurate assessment of postural disorders in cerebellar ataxia is very important in both clinical trials and clinical practice. The Scale for the Assessment and Rating of Ataxia (SARA) is a simple, validated measurement tool, for which 18 of the 40 points are related to postural disorders. This scale is useful for monitoring ataxic patients with postural disorders. There is now moderate level evidence that rehabilitation is efficient to improve postural capacities of patients with cerebellar ataxia - particularly in patients with degenerative ataxia or multiple sclerosis. Intensive rehabilitation programs with balance and coordination exercises are necessary. Although techniques such as virtual reality, biofeedback, treadmill exercises with supported bodyweight and torso weighting appear to be of value, their specific efficacy has to be further investigated. Drugs have only been studied in degenerative ataxia, and the level of evidence is low. There is now a need for large, randomized, controlled trials testing rehabilitation programs suited to postural and gait disorders of patients with cerebellar ataxia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of posture among adolescent male volleyball players and non-athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Due to high training loads and frequently repeated unilateral exercises, several types of sports training can have an impact on the process of posture development in young athletes. The objective of the study was to assess and compare the postures of adolescent male volleyball players and their non-training peers. The study group comprised 104 volleyball players while the control group consisted of 114 non-training individuals aged 14-16 years. Body posture was assessed by the Moiré method. The volleyball players were significantly taller, and had greater body weight and fat-free mass. The analysis of posture relative to symmetry in the frontal and transverse planes did not show any significant differences between the volleyball players and non-athletes. Postural asymmetries were observed in both the volleyball players and the control participants. Lumbar lordosis was significantly less defined in the volleyball players compared to non-training individuals while no difference was observed in thoracic kyphosis. All athletes demonstrated a loss of lumbar lordosis and an increase in thoracic kyphosis. Significant differences in anteroposterior curvature of the spine between the volleyball players and the non-athletes might be associated with both training and body height. Considering the asymmetric spine overloads which frequently occur in sports training, meticulous posture assessment in young athletes seems well justified. PMID:25729154

  13. Changes in gait and posture as factors of dynamic stability during walking in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krkeljas, Zarko

    2018-04-01

    Changes in gait and postural control during pregnancy may lead to increased fall rates during walking relative to non-pregnant women. Due to lack of empirical evidence on balance and postural control in dynamic conditions, the primary aim of this study was investigate the changes in gait and postural control as factors of stability during walking. Gait and posture of thirty-five (35) pregnant women (27 ± 6.1 years) were analysed at self-selected walking speed, and at different stage of pregnancy. The results indicate that although the gait kinematics did not differ between the trimesters, significant associations were noted between the step width, the lateral trunk lean, and the medio-lateral deviations in centre of gravity and centre of pressure. In contrast to the static conditions, anterior-posterior postural sway is not present during walking, whereas the lateral trunk lean is the primary factor women use in pregnancy to keep the centre of gravity closer to the base of support. Postural changes and those in gait kinematics were largely affected by the relative mass gain, rather than the absolute mass. Considering the importance of relative mass gain, more attention during healthy pregnancy should be given to monitoring the timing of onset of musculoskeletal changes, and design of antenatal exercise programs targeting core strength and pelvic stability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of posture among adolescent male volleyball players and non-athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabara, M

    2015-03-01

    Due to high training loads and frequently repeated unilateral exercises, several types of sports training can have an impact on the process of posture development in young athletes. The objective of the study was to assess and compare the postures of adolescent male volleyball players and their non-training peers. The study group comprised 104 volleyball players while the control group consisted of 114 non-training individuals aged 14-16 years. Body posture was assessed by the Moiré method. The volleyball players were significantly taller, and had greater body weight and fat-free mass. The analysis of posture relative to symmetry in the frontal and transverse planes did not show any significant differences between the volleyball players and non-athletes. Postural asymmetries were observed in both the volleyball players and the control participants. Lumbar lordosis was significantly less defined in the volleyball players compared to non-training individuals while no difference was observed in thoracic kyphosis. All athletes demonstrated a loss of lumbar lordosis and an increase in thoracic kyphosis. Significant differences in anteroposterior curvature of the spine between the volleyball players and the non-athletes might be associated with both training and body height. Considering the asymmetric spine overloads which frequently occur in sports training, meticulous posture assessment in young athletes seems well justified.

  15. Comparison of posture among adolescent male volleyball players and non-athlete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Grabara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to high training loads and frequently repeated unilateral exercises, several types of sports training can have an impact on the process of posture development in young athletes. The objective of the study was to assess and compare the postures of adolescent male volleyball players and their non-training peers. The study group comprised 104 volleyball players while the control group consisted of 114 non-training individuals aged 14-16 years. Body posture was assessed by the Moiré method. The volleyball players were significantly taller, and had greater body weight and fat-free mass. The analysis of posture relative to symmetry in the frontal and transverse planes did not show any significant differences between the volleyball players and non-athletes. Postural asymmetries were observed in both the volleyball players and the control participants. Lumbar lordosis was significantly less defined in the volleyball players compared to non-training individuals while no difference was observed in thoracic kyphosis. All athletes demonstrated a loss of lumbar lordosis and an increase in thoracic kyphosis. Significant differences in anteroposterior curvature of the spine between the volleyball players and the non-athletes might be associated with both training and body height. Considering the asymmetric spine overloads which frequently occur in sports training, meticulous posture assessment in young athletes seems well justified.

  16. Comparison of posture among adolescent male volleyball players and non-athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Grabara

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to high training loads and frequently repeated unilateral exercises, several types of sports training can have an impact on the process of posture development in young athletes. The objective of the study was to assess and compare the postures of adolescent male volleyball players and their non-training peers. The study group comprised 104 volleyball players while the control group consisted of 114 non-training individuals aged 14-16 years. Body posture was assessed by the Moiré method. The volleyball players were significantly taller, and had greater body weight and fat-free mass. The analysis of posture relative to symmetry in the frontal and transverse planes did not show any significant differences between the volleyball players and non-athletes. Postural asymmetries were observed in both the volleyball players and the control participants. Lumbar lordosis was significantly less defined in the volleyball players compared to non-training individuals while no difference was observed in thoracic kyphosis. All athletes demonstrated a loss of lumbar lordosis and an increase in thoracic kyphosis. Significant differences in anteroposterior curvature of the spine between the volleyball players and the non-athletes might be associated with both training and body height. Considering the asymmetric spine overloads which frequently occur in sports training, meticulous posture assessment in young athletes seems well justified.

  17. Risk factors associated with structural postural changes in the spinal column of children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Adami Sedrez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between behavioral risk factors, specifically postural habits, with the presence of structural changes in the spinal column of children and adolescents. METHODS: 59 students were evaluated through the self-reporting Back Pain and Body Posture Evaluation Instrument and spinal panoramic radiographic examination. Spine curvatures were classified based on Cobb angles, as normal or altered in the saggital plane and as normal or scoliotic in the frontal plane. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0, based on descriptive statistics and chi-square association test (a=0,05. RESULTS: The prevalence of postural changes was 79.7% (n=47, of which 47.5% (n=28 showed frontal plane changes and 61% (n=36 sagital plane changes. Significant association was found between the presence of thoracic kyphosis and female gender, practice of physical exercises only once or twice a week, sleep time greater than 10 hours, inadequate postures when sitting on a seat and sitting down to write, and how school supplies are carried. Lumbar lordosis was associated with the inadequate way of carrying the school backpack (asymmetric; and scoliosis was associated wuth the practice of competitive sports and sleep time greater than 10 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Lifestyle may be associated with postural changes. It is important to develop health policies in order to reduce the prevalence of postural changes, by decreasing the associated risk factors.

  18. Perioperative care of an adolescent with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kernan Scott

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS is a disorder characterized by postural tachycardia in combination with orthostatic symptoms without associated hypotension. Symptoms include light-headedness, palpitations, fatigue, confusion, and anxiety, which are brought on by assuming the upright position and usually relieved by sitting or lying down. Given the associated autonomic dysfunction that occurs with POTS, various perioperative concerns must be considered when providing anesthetic care for such patients. We present an adolescent with POTS who required anesthetic care during posterior spinal fusion for the treatment of scoliosis. The potential perioperative implications of this syndrome are discussed.

  19. Hand posture recognition via joint feature sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chuqing; Sun, Ying; Li, Ruifeng; Chen, Lin

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we cast hand posture recognition as a sparse representation problem, and propose a novel approach called joint feature sparse representation classifier for efficient and accurate sparse representation based on multiple features. By integrating different features for sparse representation, including gray-level, texture, and shape feature, the proposed method can fuse benefits of each feature and hence is robust to partial occlusion and varying illumination. Additionally, a new database optimization method is introduced to improve computational speed. Experimental results, based on public and self-build databases, show that our method performs well compared to the state-of-the-art methods for hand posture recognition.

  20. Clinical tools that measure sitting posture, seated postural control or functional abilities in children with motor impairments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Debra; Livingstone, Roslyn

    2013-11-01

    To identify and critically appraise clinical measurement tools used to assess sitting posture, seated postural control or functional abilities for children with motor impairment who are candidates for seating interventions. Searches were run in 15 electronic databases along with hand searching. The search included articles published in English to December 2011. Key terms included: posture, sitting, sitting posture, seated posture, seated postural control, sitting position, seating, wheelchair(s), outcome and assess(ment). The PRISMA statement was followed with inclusion criteria set a priori. Two reviewers independently screened titles, reviewed abstracts and identified full-text articles that met criteria. Data extraction included tool description and clinical utility. Two quality-rating scales were used to evaluate conduct of the studies and psychometric properties of the tools. Of the 497 titles found in the search, 29 full-text articles met the inclusion criteria and 19 tools were identified. Tools represented all components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth (ICF-CY), with emphasis on body structure and function and activity components. Evidence supporting reliability and validity varied, with small sample sizes influencing quality ratings. Evidence of the tools' reliability was more prevalent than evidence of the tools' validity. Only four tools reported on responsiveness, an important consideration for evaluating change. Little information on clinical utility was provided. Although a number of tools are available, evidence supporting their use for seating interventions is limited, as is the evidence supporting the strength of their measurement properties. Few tools address participation, environmental factors or the child's and family's perspective.

  1. Specific exercise training for reducing neck and shoulder pain among military helicopter pilots and crew members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling

    2015-01-01

    ) or a reference group (RG). Participants in the TG performed 20-weeks of physical exercise training divided into sessions of 3 × 20 min per week. Training was completed within working hours and consisted of specific exercise training for the neck and shoulder muscles based on the principles of "Intelligent...... was to investigate whether a specifically tailored exercise intervention would reduce the prevalence and incidence rate of neck/shoulder pain among helicopter pilots and crew members. METHOD: This study used a prospective, parallel group, single blinded, randomized controlled design. Participants were military....... Secondary outcomes included: postural balance, strength, stability, and rate of force development for neck and shoulder muscles. Measurements at baseline and follow-up were conducted at four air force bases in Denmark. Sixty-nine participants were individually randomized to either a training group (TG...

  2. The Effect of Body Posture on Brain Glymphatic Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hedok; Xie, Lulu; Yu, Mei; Kang, Hongyi; Feng, Tian; Deane, Rashid; Logan, Jean; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene

    2015-08-05

    The glymphatic pathway expedites clearance of waste, including soluble amyloid β (Aβ) from the brain. Transport through this pathway is controlled by the brain's arousal level because, during sleep or anesthesia, the brain's interstitial space volume expands (compared with wakefulness), resulting in faster waste removal. Humans, as well as animals, exhibit different body postures during sleep, which may also affect waste removal. Therefore, not only the level of consciousness, but also body posture, might affect CSF-interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange efficiency. We used dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI and kinetic modeling to quantify CSF-ISF exchange rates in anesthetized rodents' brains in supine, prone, or lateral positions. To validate the MRI data and to assess specifically the influence of body posture on clearance of Aβ, we used fluorescence microscopy and radioactive tracers, respectively. The analysis showed that glymphatic transport was most efficient in the lateral position compared with the supine or prone positions. In the prone position, in which the rat's head was in the most upright position (mimicking posture during the awake state), transport was characterized by "retention" of the tracer, slower clearance, and more CSF efflux along larger caliber cervical vessels. The optical imaging and radiotracer studies confirmed that glymphatic transport and Aβ clearance were superior in the lateral and supine positions. We propose that the most popular sleep posture (lateral) has evolved to optimize waste removal during sleep and that posture must be considered in diagnostic imaging procedures developed in the future to assess CSF-ISF transport in humans. The rodent brain removes waste better during sleep or anesthesia compared with the awake state. Animals exhibit different body posture during the awake and sleep states, which might affect the brain's waste removal efficiency. We investigated the influence of body posture on brainwide transport of inert

  3. Postural stability in patients with knee osteoarthritis: comparison with controls and evaluation of relationships between postural stability scores and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ru-Lan; Lee, Wen-Chung; Lo, Min-Tzu; Liao, Wei-Cheng

    2013-02-01

    To assess the differences in postural stability between patients with knee osteoarthritis and controls without knee osteoarthritis, and to evaluate possible relations between postural stability scores and International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) components. An age-matched, case-controlled trial with a cross-sectional design. A teaching hospital. Patients with knee osteoarthritis (n=73) and age-matched controls (n=60). Data on patients' postural stability and additional health-related variables were collected using various instruments. These included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, the World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief Version, the physical function test (chair-rising time), the Chinese version of the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, the Chinese version of the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, and the Biodex Stability System. A comparison of postural stability in patients with knee osteoarthritis versus that of controls was performed. The relation between postural stability scores for patients with knee osteoarthritis and ICF components was evaluated. Pearson correlation tests were used to determine the variables that correlated with postural stability among these patients. Patients with knee osteoarthritis displayed lower overall postural stability than controls (scores of 0.7 vs. 0.5, P=.006) and scored lower on the environmental domain of the World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief Version (62.2 vs 66.8, P=.014). For patients with knee osteoarthritis, postural stability was weakly associated with the ICF components of body functions and structures, including pain (r=.33-.34, P=.004), physical fatigue (r=.28, P=.016), and reduced motivation (r=.30, P=.011). Weak to moderate associations between postural stability and the ICF components of activities and participation were found; the relevant ICF variables included

  4. Clinical effectiveness of a Pilates treatment for forward head posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Myung; Lee, Chang-Hyung; O'Sullivan, David; Jung, Joo-Ha; Park, Jung-Jun

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of pilates and an exercise program on the craniovertebral angle, cervical range of motion, pain, and muscle fatigue in subjects with a forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] A total of 28 sedentary females (age 20 to 39 years) with FHP were randomly assigned to pilates (n=14) and combined (n=14) exercise groups. The study was a randomized, controlled, double-blind study with the two groups performing exercise 50 min/day, 3 days/week, with an intensity of 11-15 rating of perceived exertion (RPE) for ten weeks. The main outcome measures were craniovertebral angle, cervical range of motion (ROM), pain levels assessed by visual analog scale (VAS), and neck disability index (NDI). Surface electromyography was also used to measure muscle fatigue. [Results] There were significant increases in craniovertebral angle and cervical ROM in the pilates group, but none in the control group. The only significant differences in muscle activity were recorded in the sternocleidomastoid muscle in the pilates group. Both exercise programs had positive effects on pain measures, as VAS and NDI were significantly decreased. [Conclusion] The results suggest that pilates could be recommended as an appropriate exercise for treatment of FHP in sedentary individuals.

  5. Evaluation of work posture and quantification of fatigue by Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizkya, I.; Syahputri, K.; Sari, R. M.; Anizar; Siregar, I.

    2018-02-01

    Work related musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), poor body postures, and low back injuries are the most common problems occurring in many industries including small-medium industries. This study presents assessment and evaluation of ergonomic postures of material handling worker. That evaluation was carried out using REBA (Rapid Entire Body Assessment). REBA is a technique to quantize the fatigue experienced by the worker while manually lifting loads. Fatigue due to abnormal work posture leads to complaints of labor-perceived pain. REBA methods were used to an assessment of working postures for the existing process by a procedural analysis of body postures involved. This study shows that parts of the body have a high risk of work are the back, neck, and upper arms with REBA score 9, so action should be taken as soon as possible. Controlling actions were implemented to those process with high risk then substantial risk reduction was achieved.

  6. Analysis awkward posture at food production activity using RULA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If the workers continuously perform the activities throughout the working hours, they may experience prolonged standing which creates fatigue and causes an occupational hazard which includes slips and falls. The goal of this study was to identify awkward postures during food production activities. 40 workers with minimum ...

  7. Examining the postural awareness and flexibility changes in physical therapy students who took clinical Pilates class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilgan, Esra; Tarakci, Devrim; Mutluay, Fatma

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate postural awareness and changes in posture and flexibility of students who took Clinical Pilates class as an elective course at the undergraduate level. The study conducted from 2013-2016 included 98 students who took Clinical Pilates class at the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences, Istanbul Medipol University, Turkey. The flexibility levels of the study participants were measured before and after the Clinical Pilates education using finger-to-floor test and modified Schober's test. Observational posture analysis and postural awareness were recorded using the scale prepared by the researchers. The post-education evaluations showed that postural distortions were fixed, and a significant increase in the postural awareness of the students was observed compared with the pre-education period. The results of both modified Schober's test and finger-to-floor test, which were used to measure the flexibility levels, showed a statistically significant increase in post-education scores compared with those of the pre-education period. This study showed that the Clinical Pilates course increased postural awareness and flexibility of physical therapy students and fixed postural distortions. Thus, the inclusion of Clinical Pilates class in the undergraduate education is considered to be important.

  8. Mild hallux valgus angle affects single-limb postural stability in asymptomatic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çınar-Medeni, Özge; Atalay Guzel, Nevin; Basar, Selda

    2016-01-01

    Single-limb postural stability is a key component of lower extremity functional status. Factors affecting postural stability should be well defined to prevent injuries. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the hallux valgus angle on postural stability in asymptomatic subjects. A total of 19 subjects were included in the study. The hallux valgus angle and postural stability were assessed. Participants were assigned to two groups according to whether the hallux valgus angle was pathological or not. A hallux valgus angle greater than 15 degrees was accepted as pathological. The relationship between the hallux valgus angle and postural stability, and the differences in postural stability scores between the two groups were analyzed. Postural stability was assessed with a stabilometer. The test was performed with the eyes open. We found a significant correlation between the hallux valgus angle and mediolateral and overall stability index (r= 0.484, p= 0.036; r = 0.463, p= 0.046 respectively). Subjects with a pathological mild hallux valgus angle had greater stability index scores than normal subjects (phallux valgus angle has negative effects on postural stability as a forefoot deformity. This deformity should be taken into account for injury prevention strategies in pain-free younger adults.

  9. Combination of BTrackS and Geri-Fit as a targeted approach for assessing and reducing the postural sway of older adults with high fall risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Daniel J; Hearn, Mason C; Baweja, Harsimran S

    2017-01-01

    Atypically high postural sway measured by a force plate is a known risk factor for falls in older adults. Further, it has been shown that small, but significant, reductions in postural sway are possible with various balance exercise interventions. In the present study, a new low-cost force-plate technology called the Balance Tracking System (BTrackS) was utilized to assess postural sway of older adults before and after 90 days of a well-established exercise program called Geri-Fit. Results showed an overall reduction in postural sway across all participants from pre- to post-intervention. However, the magnitude of effects was significantly influenced by the amount of postural sway demonstrated by individuals prior to Geri-Fit training. Specifically, more participants with atypically high postural sway pre-intervention experienced an overall postural sway reduction. These reductions experienced were typically greater than the minimum detectable change statistic for the BTrackS Balance Test. Taken together, these findings suggest that BTrackS is an effective means of identifying older adults with elevated postural sway, who are likely to benefit from Geri-Fit training to mitigate fall risk.

  10. Physical Therapists' Perceptions and Use of Exercise in the Management of Subacromial Shoulder Impingement Syndrome: Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanratty, Catherine E; Kerr, Daniel P; Wilson, Iseult M; McCracken, Martin; Sim, Julius; Basford, Jeffrey R; McVeigh, Joseph G

    2016-09-01

    Shoulder pain resulting from subacromial impingement syndrome (SAIS) is a common problem with a relatively poor response to treatment. There is little research exploring physical therapists' perspectives on the management of the syndrome. The study objective was to investigate physical therapists' perceptions and experiences regarding the use of exercise in the treatment of patients with SAIS. This was a qualitative focus group study. Three 60- to 90-minute focus group sessions containing 6 to 8 experienced musculoskeletal physical therapists (total number=20) were conducted. Thematic content analysis was used to analyze transcripts and develop core themes and categories. Exercise was seen as key in the management of SAIS. The overarching theme was the need to "gain buy-in to exercise" at an early stage. The main subtheme was patient education. Therapists identified the need to use education about SAIS etiology to foster buy-in and "sell" self-management through exercise to the patient. They consistently mentioned achieving education and buy-in using visual tools, postural advice, and sometimes a "quick fix" of pain control. Furthermore, experienced practitioners reported including educational interventions much earlier in treatment than when they first qualified. Therapists emphasized the need for individually tailored exercises, including: scapular stabilization; rotator cuff, lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscle strengthening; and anterior shoulder and pectoralis minor muscle stretching. Quality of exercise performance was deemed more important than the number of repetitions that the patients performed. Expanding the geographical area over which the focus groups were conducted and including therapists with less than 5 years of postgraduate experience may have strengthened the findings of this study. Experienced musculoskeletal physical therapists believe that exercise is central in treating patients with SAIS and that gaining patient buy-in to its

  11. Workplace interventions to improve sitting posture: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinton, Paul Alan; Cooper, Kay; Hancock, Elizabeth

    2017-08-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of workplace interventions to improve sitting posture of workers that spend long periods of time seated at a visual display terminal. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials, non-randomised controlled trials and single-group intervention trials featuring workplace interventions with pre- and follow-up measurements of sitting posture was conducted (registered in PROSPERO, CRD#42015027648). Nine databases were searched for studies available between January 2005 and February 2016. 2519 articles were screened with 12 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. The included studies featured various ergonomic workplace interventions and comprised 4 randomised controlled trial (n=457), 2 non-randomised controlled trials (n=416) and 6 single-group intervention trials (n=328). Due to clinical and methodological heterogeneity, pooling of data was not completed and a narrative summary of findings was developed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation (GRADE) framework. The evidence for four review outcomes was assessed with medium to large positive improvements obtained for the majority of studies investigating changes to gross sitting posture, whereas mixed findings were obtained for more specific local segment assessments of sitting posture. The overall evidence quality for all review outcomes were identified as either 'low' or 'very low'. There is evidence which is limited in quality to indicate that ergonomic workplace interventions can improve gross sitting posture. More high quality research across a range of intervention types is required with longer follow-up durations and more advanced methods to assess sitting posture with greater frequency and less bias. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Postural risk assessment of mechanised firewood processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Raffaele; Aminti, Giovanni; De Francesco, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    The study assessed the postural risk of mechanised firewood processing with eight machines, representing the main technology solutions available on the market. Assessment was conducted with the Ovako Working posture Analysis System (OWAS) on 1000 still frames randomly extracted from videotaped work samples. The postural risk associated with firewood processing was variable and associated with technology type. Simple, manually operated new machines incurred a higher postural risk compared with semi- or fully automatic machines. In contrast, new semi-automatic and automatic machines were generally free from postural risk. In all cases, attention should be paid to postural risk that may occur during blockage resolution. The study did not cover the postural risk of firewood processing sites as a whole. The study provided useful information for selecting firewood processing machinery and for improving firewood machinery design, as part of a more articulate strategy aimed at enhancing the safety of firewood processing work sites. Practitioner Summary: The postural risk associated with mechanised firewood processing (eg cutting and splitting) depends on the type of equipment. Postural risk is highest (OWAS Action Category 2) with new in-line machines, designed for operation by a single worker. Fully automatic machines present minimum postural risk, except during blockage resolution.

  13. Birthing postures and birth canal lacerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shunji

    2017-05-01

    This study was performed to assess the differences in the birth canal lacerations following the lateral and fours posture deliveries compared with those following the supine posture deliveries. We examined the birth canal lacerations of our "low risk" pregnant women under the midwife-led delivery care at Japanese Red Cross Katsushika Maternity Hospital between April 2006 and March 2015. There were 3826, 1754 and 719 women who delivered with supine, lateral and fours postures. The rate of no laceration in the women who delivered with lateral posture was significant lower than that in the women who delivered with supine posture (OR 0.630, 95% CI 0.56-0.71, p < 0.01); however, the incidence of perineal laceration in the women who delivered with lateral posture was significant lower than that in the women who delivered with supine posture (OR 0.856, 95% CI 0.76-0.90, p < 0.01). The incidence of perineal laceration of third- or fourth-degree in the women who delivered with fours posture was significant higher than that in the women who delivered with supine posture (OR 2.28, 95% CI 1.2-4.2, p < 0.01). The current results may be to help for self-determination of birthing postures in prenatal women.

  14. The influence of different sitting postures on head/neck posture and muscle activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneiro, Joao Paulo; O'Sullivan, Peter; Burnett, Angus; Barach, Avi; O'Neil, David; Tveit, Orjan; Olafsdottir, Karolina

    2010-02-01

    To date the influence that specific sitting posture has on the head/neck posture and cervico-thoracic muscle activity has been insufficiently investigated. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate whether three different thoraco-lumbar sitting postures affect head/neck posture and cervico-thoracic muscle activity. Twenty (10 men, 10 women) asymptomatic subjects were placed in 3 standardized thoraco-lumbar sitting postures (lumbo-pelvic, thoracic upright and slump) to investigate their influence on cervico-thoracic muscle activity and head/neck posture. There were significant differences in lumbar and thoracic curvatures in the 3 different sitting postures (Psitting was associated with greater head/neck flexion, anterior translation of the head (Psitting (P=0.001). Thoracic upright sitting showed increased muscle activity of thoracic erector spinae (TES) compared to slump and lumbo-pelvic postures (P=0.015). Upper trapezius (UT) demonstrated no significant difference in muscle activation in the 3 sitting postures (Psitting postures affect head/neck posture and cervico-thoracic muscle activity. It highlights the potential importance of thoraco-lumbar spine postural adjustment when training head/neck posture.

  15. Postural control in blind subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Antonio Vinicius; Oliveira, Cláudia Silva Remor de; Knabben, Rodrigo José; Domenech, Susana Cristina; Borges Junior, Noe Gomes

    2011-12-01

    To analyze postural control in acquired and congenitally blind adults. A total of 40 visually impaired adults participated in the research, divided into 2 groups, 20 with acquired blindness and 20 with congenital blindness - 21 males and 19 females, mean age 35.8 ± 10.8. The Brazilian version of Berg Balance Scale and the motor domain of functional independence measure were utilized. On Berg Balance Scale the mean for acquired blindness was 54.0 ± 2.4 and 54.4 ± 2.5 for congenitally blind subjects; on functional independence measure the mean for acquired blind group was 87.1 ± 4.8 and 87.3 ± 2.3 for congenitally blind group. Based upon the scale used the results suggest the ability to control posture can be developed by compensatory mechanisms and it is not affected by visual loss in congenitally and acquired blindness.

  16. Postural Synergies and Their Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark L. Latash

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent developments of a particular approach to analyzing motor synergies based on the principle of motor abundance has allowed a quantitative assessment of multieffector coordination in motor tasks involving anticipatory adjustments to self-triggered postural perturbations and in voluntary posturalsway. This approach, the uncontrolled manifold (UCM hypothesis, is based on an assumption that the central nervous system organizes covariation of elemental variables to stabilize important performance variables in a task-specific manner. In particular, this approach has been used to demonstrate and to assess the emergence of synergies and their modification with motor practice in typical persons and persons with Down syndrome. The framework of the UCM hypothesis allows the formulation of testable hypotheses with respect to developing postural synergies in typically and atypically developing persons.

  17. Postural control in blind subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vinicius Soares

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze postural control in acquired and congenitally blind adults. Methods: A total of 40 visually impaired adults participated in the research, divided into 2 groups, 20 with acquired blindness and 20 with congenital blindness - 21 males and 19 females, mean age 35.8 ± 10.8. The Brazilian version of Berg Balance Scale and the motor domain of functional independence measure were utilized. Results: On Berg Balance Scale the mean for acquired blindness was 54.0 ± 2.4 and 54.4 ± 2.5 for congenitally blind subjects; on functional independence measure the mean for acquired blind group was 87.1 ± 4.8 and 87.3 ± 2.3 for congenitally blind group. Conclusion: Based upon the scale used the results suggest the ability to control posture can be developed by compensatory mechanisms and it is not affected by visual loss in congenitally and acquired blindness.

  18. Posture of the head and pharyngeal swallowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekberg, O.

    1986-01-01

    Closure of the laryngeal vestibule during swallowing is important for protection of the airways. The present investigation included 53 patients with dysphagia examined cineradiographically with the head held in resting posture, flexion and extension. The ability to protect the airways by the downward movement of the epiglottis and by obliteration of the laryngeal vestibule was studied in different postures of the head. Of 35 patients with normal laryngeal obliteration with the head in resting position 10 showed a defective closure at swallowing in extension. In 18 patients with defective closure of the laryngeal vestibule in resting position 9 were improved on flexion and two on extension of the head. In one patient with defectie closure of the laryngeal vestibule in resting position swallowing in flexion showed an aggravated dysfunction. In our other patients the defective closure became more marked on extension. Four patients had less effective downward movement of the epiglottis with the head in extension. Of 10 patients with defective epiglottic movement with the head in resting position two were improved on tilting the head forwards. The results show that the position of the head influences the closure of the airways during swallowing. Patients with defective protection of the laryngeal vestibule should be instructed to swallow with the head tilted forwards. (orig.)

  19. Posture of the head and pharyngeal swallowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekberg, O.

    Closure of the laryngeal vestibule during swallowing is important for protection of the airways. The present investigation included 53 patients with dysphagia examined cineradiographically with the head held in resting posture, flexion and extension. The ability to protect the airways by the downward movement of the epiglottis and by obliteration of the laryngeal vestibule was studied in different postures of the head. Of 35 patients with normal laryngeal obliteration with the head in resting position 10 showed a defective closure at swallowing in extension. In 18 patients with defective closure of the laryngeal vestibule in resting position 9 were improved on flexion and two on extension of the head. In one patient with defectie closure of the laryngeal vestibule in resting position swallowing in flexion showed an aggravated dysfunction. In our other patients the defective closure became more marked on extension. Four patients had less effective downward movement of the epiglottis with the head in extension. Of 10 patients with defective epiglottic movement with the head in resting position two were improved on tilting the head forwards. The results show that the position of the head influences the closure of the airways during swallowing. Patients with defective protection of the laryngeal vestibule should be instructed to swallow with the head tilted forwards.

  20. Non-structural misalignments of body posture in the sagittal plane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaprowski, Dariusz; Stoliński, Łukasz; Tyrakowski, Marcin; Kozinoga, Mateusz; Kotwicki, Tomasz

    2018-01-01

    system in a specific way, which may lead to a functional disorder.When planning postural corrective exercises, not only the analysis of muscles in respect to their shortening and lengthening but also their hypoactivity and hyperactivity should be considered.

  1. Evaluation of Work Related Musculoskeletal Disorder and Postural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stooping and squatting postures were the dominating postures in potato cultivation jobs. Postural analysis indicated that during potato harvesting the workers were subjected to greater postural stress than that of other tasks. Postural stress might be the reason for the occurrence of MSDs. Thus, immediate ergonomic ...

  2. Hormonal changes after supine posture, immersion, and swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viti, A; Lupo, C; Lodi, L; Bonifazi, M; Martelli, G

    1989-12-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the supine posture, immersion, and swimming on hormones involved in the regulation of hydrosaline equilibrium. Plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), arginine vasopressin (AVP), plasma renin activity (PRA), and aldosterone (ALDO) were measured by radioimmunoassay in eight untrained young subjects (five males and three females). Blood samples were collected on different days: control morning samples in a relaxed standing posture before each test; after 20 min in a supine position; after 20 min of horizontal immersion in water at 28 degrees C; after 20 min of backstroke swimming (speed about 1 m/s). No changes occurred in AVP levels after each test. ALDO and PRA increased significantly only after swimming and were directly correlated. ANP increased significantly after immersion, but no further increase was observed after swimming. The hematocrit, which increased after swimming, was inversely correlated with ANP levels in the post-exercise samples. These data show that while ALDO and PRA increase only in response to swimming, even at moderate intensity, ANP probably requires more prolonged and intense exercise to reach a significantly higher level than in immersion.

  3. Orthostatic Hypotension (Postural Hypotension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include medications used to treat Parkinson's disease, certain antidepressants, certain antipsychotics, muscle relaxants, medications to treat erectile dysfunction and narcotics. Using medications that treat high blood pressure in combination with other prescription and over-the-counter medications ...

  4. Exercise and arthritis. Exercise and the back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, W

    1990-11-01

    Some of the positive benefits from participating in aerobic activity have already been addressed. However, an individual's ability to participate in many aerobic activities may be contingent on the ability to maintain a neutral or a stabilized spine. For example, the individual for whom jogging has been painful may be able to jog after he or she has learned trunk stabilization and is able to keep the spine in his or her pain-free position. Although Williams contended that jogging was an inappropriate activity for the individual with a low-back problem, contrary to this notion, White believes that jogging is more apt to protect a person from low-back pain than to cause it. Although no association was found between mileage run and osteoarthritis, jogging is not for all individuals who present with LBP or related arthritic conditions. Moreover, poor biomechanics in running can exacerbate existing low-back problems as well as bring about new ones as compensatory adaptations are made. For example, poor running technique might include excessive forward lean; this must be counterbalanced by contraction of the back extensors, which then may become overly tired or produce high intersegmental forces on the discs. We advocate an upright posture with minimal forward lean. The biomechanics of running also are most important from the perspective of shock absorption. Factors to consider in addition to running within the neutral spine excursion include cushioning footstrike by "giving" at the ankle, knee, and hip joints. In addition to good biomechanics, it would also be important to use an excellent quality training shoe and to run on a soft track as opposed to harder surfaces; hills should probably be avoided for most symptomatic individuals until they become strong. Nachemson indicates that in addition to recommending jogging for LBP, he most commonly recommends backstroke swimming, brisk walking, and stairclimbing. Bicycle riding (stationary or actual) would be another good

  5. The effect of middle and lower trapezius strength exercises and levator scapulae and upper trapezius stretching exercises in upper crossed syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Won-Sik; Lee, Hyun-Ok; Shin, Jae-Wook; Lee, Keon-Cheol

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of strength and stretching exercises on upper crossed syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] After measuring cervical alignment using the Global Posture System, 30 students with forward head posture were selected and divided into two groups. The experimental group (n=15) participated in strength and stretching exercises, three times per week for 4 weeks. The control group (n=15) did not participate in the exercises. The exercise program comprised middle and lower trapezius strength exercises and levator scapulae and upper trapezius stretching exercises. The temperature of the posterior neck was then measured using digital infrared thermographic imaging. [Results] There was a significant difference between the pretest and posttest results in the experimental group, and a significant difference in posterior neck temperature between the two groups. [Conclusion] This study showed that middle and lower trapezius strength exercises and levator scapulae and upper trapezius stretching exercises are more effective for upper crossed syndrome.

  6. Common postural defects among music students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Piñeiro, Patricia; Díaz-Pereira, M Pino; Martínez, Aurora

    2015-07-01

    Postural quality during musical performance affects both musculoskeletal health and the quality of the performance. In this study we examined the posture of 100 students at a Higher Conservatory of Music in Spain. By analysing video tapes and photographs of the students while performing, a panel of experts extracted values of 11 variables reflecting aspects of overall postural quality or the postural quality of various parts of the body. The most common postural defects were identified, together with the situations in which they occur. It is concluded that most students incur in unphysiological postures during performance. It is hoped that use of the results of this study will help correct these errors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Managing a female patient with left low back pain and sacroiliac joint pain with therapeutic exercise: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Kyndall L

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to describe the management of a female patient with chronic left low back pain and sacroiliac joint pain (LBP/SIJP) using unique unilateral exercises developed by the Postural Restoration Institute (PRI) to address pelvic asymmetry and left hip capsule restriction, which is consistent with a Right Handed and Left Anterior Interior Chain pattern of postural asymmetry.Client Description: The client was 65-year-old woman with a 10-month history of constant left LBP/SIJP and leg pain. The patient was seen six times to correct pelvic position/posture and left hip posterior capsule restriction via (1) muscle activation (left hamstrings, adductor magnus, and anterior gluteus medius) and (2) left hip adduction to lengthen the left posterior capsule/ischiofemoral ligament. Stabilization exercises included bilateral hamstrings, gluteus maximus, adductors, and abdominals to maintain pelvic position/posture.Measures and Outcome: Left Ober's test (initially positive) was negative at discharge. Pain as measured on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (initially 1/10 at best and 8/10 at worst) was 0/10-0/10 at discharge. Oswestry Disability Index score (initially 20%) was 0% at discharge. The patient no longer had numbness in her left leg, and sexual intercourse had become pain free. INTERVENTIONs to restore and maintain the optimal position of pelvis and hip (femoral head in the acetabulum) may be beneficial for treating patients with chronic LBP/SIJP. The patient's pain was eliminated 13 days after she first performed three exercises to reposition the pelvis and restore left posterior hip capsule extensibility and internal rotation.

  8. Postural alignment is altered in people with chronic stroke and related to motor and functional performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyden, Geert; Ruesen, Carolien; Gorissen, Monique; Brumby, Victoria; Moran, Rachel; Burnett, Malcolm; Ashburn, Ann

    2014-10-01

    Trunk control is impaired after stroke but little is known about how changes in posture relate to other deficits. We examined spinal postural alignment in people with chronic stroke and explored the relationship between postural alignment and clinical measures. Twenty-one subjects with stroke and 22 age-matched healthy comparison subjects participated in this observational, cross-sectional study. Data collection included measurements of thoracic, lumbar, sacral, and overall postural alignment in the sagittal plane in both sitting and standing. Measurements were made in different postures, including: upright, flexed forward, and extended backward. Clinical outcome measures included the Trunk Impairment Scale and its subscales, Fugl-Meyer Scale, Berg Balance Scale, Barthel Index, and Stroke Impact Scale. Significant deviations in postural alignment for participants with stroke compared with comparison subjects were apparent in sacral alignment (P Scale (r = -0.61) and Berg Balance Scale (r = -0.64). Participants with greater anterior pelvic tilt when flexed forward and more overall inclination when flexed forward and extended backward scored better on the Trunk Impairment Scale, its subscales, and Berg Balance Scale (r = -0.6-0.7). People with chronic stroke have altered postural alignment in standing compared with subjects without neurological deficits. Investigating interventions focusing on increasing anterior and posterior pelvic tilt seem warranted.Video Abstract available. See video (Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPT/A76) for more insights from the authors.

  9. Evaluation of Neutral Body Posture on Shuttle Mission STS-57 (SPACEHAB-1). Revision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Frances E.; Whitmore, Mihriban; Stealey, Sheryl L.

    2003-01-01

    Research has shown that the space environment induces physiological changes in the human body, such as fluid shifts in the upper body and chest cavity, spinal lengthening, muscular atrophy, space motion sickness, cardiopulmonary deconditioning, and bone mass loss, as well as some changes in visual perception. These require a period of adaptation and can substantially affect both crew member performance and posture. These physiological effects, when work activities are conducted, have been known to impact the body's center of gravity, reach, flexibility, and dexterity. All these aspects of posture must be considered to safely and efficiently design space systems and hardware. NASA has documented its microgravity body posture in the Man-Systems Integration Standards (MSIS); the space community uses the MSIS posture to design workstations and tools for space application. However, the microgravity body posture should be further investigated for several reasons, including small sample size in previous studies, possible imprecision, and lack of detail. JSC undertook this study to investigate human body posture exhibited under microgravity conditions. STS-57 crew members were instructed to assume a relaxed posture that was not oriented to any work area or task. Crew members were asked to don shorts and tank tops and to be blindfolded while data were recorded. Video data were acquired once during the mission from each of the six crew members. No one crew member exhibited the typical NBP called out in the MSIS; one composite posture is not adequate. A range of postures may be more constructive for design purposes. Future evaluations should define precise posture requirements for workstation, glove box, maintenance, foot-restraint, and handhold activities.

  10. [Brief on the standardization of the practitioner's posture in acupuncture operation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonghui

    2015-07-01

    To discuss the standardization of the practitioner's posture in acupuncture operation. Based on the relevant discussion on 'way to holding needle' recorded in Lingshu (Miraculous Pivot) and in association with the clinical acupuncture practice, it was required to standardize the practitioner's posture in acupuncture operation in reference to Lingshu (Miraculous Pivot). The standard standing posture of the practitioner is the precondition of acupuncture operation; the standard holding needle with the puncture hand is the key to the exercise of acupuncture technique and the regular standing orientation is the need of acupuncture operation. The three aspects are complemented each other, which is the coordinative procedure in acupuncture operation and enable the practitioner's high concentration with the body, qi and mind involved.

  11. Exercise for improving outcomes after osteoporotic vertebral fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangregorio, Lora M; MacIntyre, Norma J; Thabane, Lehana; Skidmore, Carly J; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Background Vertebral fractures are associated with increased morbidity (e.g., pain, reduced quality of life), and mortality. Therapeutic exercise is a non-pharmacologic conservative treatment that is often recommended for patients with vertebral fractures to reduce pain and restore functional movement. Objectives Our objectives were to evaluate the benefits and harms of exercise interventions of four weeks or greater (alone or as part of a physical therapy intervention) versus non-exercise/non-active physical therapy intervention, no intervention or place boon the incidence of future fractures and adverse events among adults with a history of osteoporotic vertebral fracture(s). We were also examined the effects of exercise on the following secondary outcomes: falls, pain, posture, physical function, balance, mobility, muscle function, quality of life and bone mineral density of the lumbar spine or hip measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We also reported exercise adherence. Search methods We searched the following databases: The Cochrane Library (Issue 11 of 12, November 2011), MEDLINE (2005 to 2011), EMBASE (1988 to November 23, 2011), CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, 1982 to November 23, 2011), AMED (1985 to November 2011), and PEDro (Physiotherapy Evidence Database, www.pedro.fhs.usyd.edu.au/index.html, 1929 to November 23, 2011. Ongoing and recently completed trials were identified by searching the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (to December 2009). Conference proceedings were searched via ISI and SCOPUS, and targeted searches of proceedings of the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine and American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Search terms or MeSH headings included terms such as vertebral fracture AND exercise OR physical therapy. Selection criteria We considered all randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomized trials comparing exercise or active

  12. THORACIC KYPHOSIS TREATED WITH GLOBAL POSTURAL REEDUCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Pita, Marisa de Castro

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the case of a patient subjected to physical therapy who had thoracic kyphosis of 55 degrees, chronic lumbar pain, and other postural deviations. The physical therapeutic treatment used was the technique of Global Posture Reeducation (RPG), aiming at morphological corrections and pain relief. The results obtained demonstrated improvement concerning the postural aspect, decrease of 16 degrees in the thoracic kyphosis and remission of the pain.

  13. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced asthma, is a narrowing of the airways causing difficulty ... exercise. Yet some people who don’t have asthma experience symptoms only when they exercise. Symptoms include: • Shortness of breath • Coughing • Wheezing • Tight ...

  14. Aquatic Exercise for the Aged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Michael; And Others

    The development and implementation of aquatic exercise programs for the aged are discussed in this paper. Program development includes a discussion of training principles, exercise leadership and the setting up of safe water exercise programs for the participants. The advantages of developing water exercise programs and not swimming programs are…

  15. The dentist's operating posture - ergonomic aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pîrvu, C; Pătraşcu, I; Pîrvu, D; Ionescu, C

    2014-06-15

    The practice of dentistry involves laborious high finesse dental preparations, precision and control in executions that require a particular attention, concentration and patience of the dentist and finally the dentist's physical and mental resistance. The optimal therapeutic approach and the success of practice involve special working conditions for the dentist and his team in an ergonomic environment. The meaning of the posture in ergonomics is the manner in which different parts of the body are located and thus the reports are established between them in order to allow a special task execution. This article discusses the posture adopted by dentists when they work, beginning with the balanced posture and going to different variants of posture. The ideal posture of a dentist gives him, on the one hand the optimal working conditions (access, visibility and control in the mouth) and on the other hand, physical and psychological comfort throughout the execution of the clinical acts. Although the theme of dentist posture is treated with great care and often presented in the undergraduate courses and the continuing education courses on ergonomics in dentistry, many dentists do not know the subject well enough nor the theoretical issues and therefore nor the practical applicability. The risk and perspective of the musculoskeletal disorders related to unbalanced postures should determine the dentists take postural corrective actions and compensation measures in order to limit the negative effects of working in a bad posture.

  16. Nuclear Posture Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-01

    technology, material or expertise to any state or non-state actor. North Korea relies on hardened and deeply buried facilities to secure the Kim regime...minimizing unintended effects. › Penetrating. The capacity to counter active and passive defenses, including hardened and buried facilities, to pose credible...information architecture." Commander, United States Strategic Command, General John Hyten, 4 April 2017 The Advanced Extremely High Frequency, or

  17. Reference Values for Human Posture Measurements Based on Computerized Photogrammetry: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo Ribeiro, Ana Freire; Bergmann, Anke; Lemos, Thiago; Pacheco, Antônio Guilherme; Mello Russo, Maitê; Santos de Oliveira, Laura Alice; de Carvalho Rodrigues, Erika

    The main objective of this study was to review the literature to identify reference values for angles and distances of body segments related to upright posture in healthy adult women with the Postural Assessment Software (PAS/SAPO). Electronic databases (BVS, PubMed, SciELO and Scopus) were assessed using the following descriptors: evaluation, posture, photogrammetry, physical therapy, postural alignment, postural assessment, and physiotherapy. Studies that performed postural evaluation in healthy adult women with PAS/SAPO and were published in English, Portuguese and Spanish, between the years 2005 and 2014 were included. Four studies met the inclusion criteria. Data from the included studies were grouped to establish the statistical descriptors (mean, variance, and standard deviation) of the body angles and distances. A total of 29 variables were assessed (10 in the anterior views, 16 in the lateral right and left views, and 3 in the posterior views), and its respective mean and standard deviation were calculated. Reference values for the anterior and posterior views showed no symmetry between the right and left sides of the body in the frontal plane. There were also small differences in the calculated reference values for the lateral view. The proposed reference values for quantitative evaluation of the upright posture in healthy adult women estimated in the present study using PAS/SAPO could guide future studies and help clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Postural control in sitting children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brogren, E; Hadders-Algra, M; Forssberg, H

    Children with cerebral palsy (CP) display postural problems, largely interfering with daily life activities. Clarification of neural mechanisms controlling posture in these children could serve as a base for more successful intervention. Studies on postural adjustments following horizontal forward

  19. Effects of a wobble board-based therapeutic exergaming system for balance training on dynamic postural stability and intrinsic motivation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Diarmaid; Trakarnratanakul, Nanthana; Smyth, Barry; Caulfield, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Randomized controlled trial. To compare the effects of wobble board exercises with and without feedback provided through integrating the wobble board movement into a computer game system, by comparing changes in postural stability and motivation. Therapeutic exergaming systems may offer a solution to poor adherence to postural control exercise regimes by improving motivation levels during exercise performance. Twenty-two healthy adults, randomly assigned to an exergaming group (n = 11) and a control group (n = 11), completed 12 exercise sessions. Dynamic postural stability was quantified at baseline and follow-up using the star excursion balance test and the dynamic postural stability index during a jump-landing task. Intrinsic motivation was measured at baseline using the Self-Motivation Inventory and at follow-up using the Intrinsic Motivation Inventory. Star excursion balance test scores showed a statistically significant (PIntrinsic Motivation Inventory showed significantly higher scores (PIntrinsic Motivation Inventory categories evaluated. The findings suggest that exercising with the therapeutic exergaming system showed similar improvements in dynamic postural stability and showed a greater level of interest and enjoyment when compared to a group doing similar balance training without the game system. Therapy, level 2b.

  20. Strategic Posture and Outsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Overby, Mikkel Lucas; Özcan, Serden

    2004-01-01

    IT-enabled innovations are of increasing importance for competitive success in a rangeto develop associated competencies -in-house and/or through outsourcing - consequential for creating and sustaining competitive advantage. Against the backdrop of the importance of IT-enabled innovation, the key...... thatgovernance choices are influenced by a company's attempts to create, imitate, and/orleapfrog IT-enabled innovation in varying technological regimes.of industries including express delivery services. How companies choose associated competences - in-house and/or through outsourcing - is conseqcreating...

  1. Prevalence of back pain, functional disability, and spinal postural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Tarragô Candotti

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective : To evaluate the prevalence of back pain, disability, and postural changes in the spines of adults of different ages and with different levels of body mass index (BMI. Methodology : A total of 534 users of the Brazilian Public Health System in Porto Alegre, Brazil, were included in the study. An evaluation of the thoracic and lumbar spine was performed using the Flexicurve instrument. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and the calculation of prevalence ratios (PR and their respective confidence intervals of 95% (CI 95%. Three analyses were performed with the dependent variables pain, functional disability, and posture. Results : A significant association between pain and female gender (p = 0.000, and pain and change in the lumbar spine (p = 0.014 were found. The variable disability was associated with BMI (p = 0.004 and age (p = 0.001. When we analyzed postural change, an association was found only with age group (p = 0.032. Conclusion : These findings highlight the need for prevention and primary care educational programs aimed at reducing postural aberrations in the adult population.

  2. Hand posture recognition using jointly optical flow and dimensionality reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boughnim, Nabil; Marot, Julien; Fossati, Caroline; Bourennane, Salah

    2013-12-01

    Hand posture recognition is generally addressed by using either YC b C r (luminance and chrominance components) or HSV (hue, saturation, value) mappings which assume that a hand can be distinguished from the background from some colorfulness and luminance properties. This can hardly be used when a dark hand, or a hand of any color, is under study. In addition, existing recognition processes rely on descriptors or geometric shapes which can be reliable; this comes at the expense of an increased computational complexity. To cope with these drawbacks, this paper proposes a four-step method recognition technique consisting of (i) a pyramidal optical flow for the detection of large movements and hence determine the region of interest containing the expected hand, (ii) a preprocessing step to compute the hand contour while ensuring geometric and illumination invariance, (iii) an image scanning method providing a signature which characterizes non-star-shaped contours with a one-pixel precision, and (iv) a posture classification method where a sphericity criterion preselects a set of candidate postures, principal component analysis reduces the dimensionality of the data, and Mahalanobis distance is used as a criterion to identify the hand posture in any test image. The proposed technique has been assessed in terms of its performances including the computational complexity using both visual and statistical results.

  3. Joint moments required to hold a posture while somersaulting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikl, Joanne

    2018-02-01

    A pure somersault is a key skill in diving and gymnastics, and involves rotation about the transverse axis of the body. As the rotational speed increases the effort required to maintain a specified posture increases. This paper derives equations for the joint moments required for an athlete to hold three sport specific postures as a function of rotational speed. The joint moment is related to the isometric muscular strength and is the limiting factor of an athlete in their ability to hold a fixed posture while somersaulting. One inertial property data set was used to explore the joint moments required for three sport specific postures -tuck, pike and layout-. Even though the joint moments are proportional to the square of angular velocity, the constant of proportionality differs for each joint, and so greater isometric strength is required at some joints; especially the hips and through the torso. The situation when the hands were allowed to hold the legs and when they did not has been considered. It was found that the arms holding an observed point on the lower legs could reduce the joint moments required through the legs and torso. The direction of the pull of the hands against the legs is critical for effectiveness. For the tuck this included a large component tangential to the shank and so emphasises the need to maximise friction between the shank and hands. For the pike the pull normal to the shank was more important. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spine Posture Influences Tactile Perceptual Sensitivity of the Trunk Dorsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudette, Shawn M; Smith, Simone G V S; Bent, Leah R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the current work was to quantify the influence of posture-mediated skin deformation on trunk dorsum tactile perceptual sensitivity. Twelve young and healthy individuals were assessed while adopting three different spine postures (extension, neutral and flexion). Tactile sensitivity threshold tests (T10 and L4 vertebral levels) included measures of touch sensitivity, spatial acuity and stretch sensitivity. The results demonstrate that tactile sensitivity can differ due to changes in body posture. The skin of the trunk dorsum had increased thresholds for touch sensitivity, longitudinal spatial acuity and transverse stretch sensitivity in spine flexion. Furthermore, spine flexion also resulted in a reduced sensory threshold to stretching stimuli in the longitudinal direction. The opposite trends occurred when participants adopted spine extension. It is suggested that posture-mediated skin deformation generates changes in the amount of strain experienced by individual skin mechanoreceptors, and the relative spacing between mechanoreceptors. Furthermore, it is suggested that "pre-stretch" of the skin brings mechanoreceptors closer to their stretch activation thresholds, thereby increasing an individual's sensitivity to skin stretch when in spine flexion.

  5. Strategic Posture and Outsourcing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahnke, Volker; Overby, Mikkel Lucas; Özcan, Serden

    2004-01-01

    IT-enabled innovations are of increasing importance for competitive success in a rangeto develop associated competencies -in-house and/or through outsourcing - consequential for creating and sustaining competitive advantage. Against the backdrop of the importance of IT-enabled innovation, the key...... concern of this chapter is to addressthe crucial question: How do capability development strategies differ between first-movers and late entrants in IT-enabled services. We develop theory based on three explorative case studies - FedEx, UPS and DHL. An analysis of the three companies reveals...... thatgovernance choices are influenced by a company's attempts to create, imitate, and/orleapfrog IT-enabled innovation in varying technological regimes.of industries including express delivery services. How companies choose associated competences - in-house and/or through outsourcing - is conseqcreating...

  6. Evaluating the head posture of dentists with no neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostamand, J; Lotfi, H; Safi, N

    2013-10-01

    Dentistry is one of the professions that requires a high degree of concentration during the treatment of patients. There are many predisposing factors, affecting dentists when working on the patient's teeth, including neck flexion, arm abduction and inflexible postural positions, which may put them at the risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders related to the neck. Although dentists with long records of service show different levels of pain and discomfort in their necks, there is no evidence regarding whether younger dentists report neck pain before the onset of an abnormal condition in this region, including forward head posture (FHP). Discovering any alteration in the head posture of dentists might confirm one of the reasons for neck pain in this population. Forty one dentists with no neck pain and forty controls having jobs other than dentistry who had no risk factors related to head posture voluntarily participated in the present study. A standard method was used to measure the cervical curve in these two groups. There was no significant difference between the mean values of cervical curve in dentists and the control group (p > 0.05). There was also no significant difference between cervical curve values in dentists working for either 5-8 years or 8-12 years (p > 0.05). The only significant difference was observed in mean cervical curve values of men and women in the dentist group (p pain sensation in the dentists in the current study. In other words, this group might have not yet experienced sufficient change in head posture to experience significant pain in their neck region. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Leisure sports and postural control: can a black belt protect your balance from aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampe, Ralf T; Smolders, Caroline; Doumas, Michail

    2014-03-01

    To determine potential benefits of intensive leisure sports for age-related changes in postural control, we tested 3 activity groups comprising 70 young (M = 21.67 years, SD = 2.80) and 73 older (M = 62.60 years, SD = 5.19) men. Activity groups were martial artists, who held at least 1st Dan (black belt), sportive individuals exercising sports without explicit balance components, and nonsportive controls. Martial artists had an advantage over sportive individuals in dynamic posture tasks (upright stance on a sway-referenced platform), and these 2 active groups showed better postural control than nonsportive participants. Age-related differences in postural control were larger in nonsportive men compared with the 2 active groups, who were similar in this respect. In contrast, negative age differences in other sensorimotor and cognitive functions did not differ between activity groups. We concluded that individuals engaging in intensive recreational sports have long-term advantages in postural control. However, even in older martial artists with years of practice in their sports, we observed considerable differences favoring the young. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. A Cross-Sectional Study for Screening of Postural Deficits among University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdelmoniem Ibrahim

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postural deviations are frequent in university students and may cause pain and functional impairment. Few studies have examined the association between body posture and intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Objective: To assess the prevalence of postural changes in university students, and to determine whether factors such as age, gender, BMI, and physical activity might explain these deviations, this study helping in preventing aggravation of postural deviations and providing the young adolescent students with exercises and help tips for correcting these problems. Design: Cross sectional study. Subjects and Methods: The posture of 48 students in Hail University was assessed by DIER formetric 4D. Their mean age was 20.35 ± 2.678, height was 185.56 ± 7.128 and weight was 54.19 ± 7.085. Results: results revealed positive correlation between height and weight, height and self-image, weight and surface rotation, self-image and pelvic tilting, kyphotic angle and lordotic angle, pelvic tilt and trunk imbalance, lateral deviation and trunk imbalance. Conclusion: high prevalence of abnormalities among students, so it is recommended that all instructors place more emphasis on training and using corrective actions in course one of general physical education. Furthermore, teaching the correct sleeping, sitting and carrying ways will stop high expenses and devoting long times for clinical remedies.

  9. Posture interacts with arm weight support to modulate corticomotor excitability to the upper limb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runnalls, Keith D; Anson, Greg; Byblow, Winston D

    2017-01-01

    The use of arm weight support (WS) to optimize movement quality may be an avenue for improved upper limb stroke rehabilitation; however, the underlying neurophysiological effects of WS are not well understood. Rehabilitation exercises may be performed when sitting or standing, but the interaction of posture with WS has not been examined until now. We explored the effect of posture with WS on corticomotor excitability (CME) in healthy adults. Thirteen participants performed static shoulder abduction in two postures (sitting and standing) at three levels of WS (0, 45, and 90 % of full support). Transcranial magnetic stimulation of primary motor cortex was used to elicit motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) in eight upper limb muscles. Stimulus-response (SR) curves were fitted to the MEP data using nonlinear regression. Whole-body posture interacted with WS to influence tonic activity and CME in all muscles examined. SR curve parameters revealed greater CME when standing compared to sitting for upper arm muscles, but lower CME to the shoulder, forearm, and hand. Distal to the shoulder, tonic activity and CME were modulated independent of any explicit differences in task requirements. Overall, these results support a model of integrated upper limb control influenced by whole-body posture and WS. These findings have implications for the application of WS in settings such as upper limb rehabilitation after stroke.

  10. No association between q-angle and foot posture with running-related injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, Daniel; Jensen, M L; Obling, K

    2013-01-01

    There is a paucity of knowledge on the association between different foot posture quantified by Foot Posture Index (FPI) and Quadriceps angle (Q-angle) with development of running-related injuries. Earlier studies investigating these associations did not include an objective measure of the amount...... of running performed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate if kilometers to running-related injury (RRI) differ among novice runners with different foot postures and Q-angles when running in a neutral running shoe....

  11. Body Posture Asymmetry in Prematurely Born Children at Six Years of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachwał, Maciej; Piwoński, Paweł; Perenc, Lidia; Przygoda, Łukasz; Zajkiewicz, Katarzyna

    2017-01-01

    Aims The purpose of the study was to assess body posture asymmetries in the standing and sitting position in prematurely born children at six years of age. Study Design and Subjects We measured trunk symmetry in coronal plane. The study was carried out in a group of 101 children, aged 6-7 years, mean age of 6.63, including 50 preterm children born at gestational age posture in the coronal plane, between preterm children and full-term children. Premature birth does not have adverse effects related to body posture asymmetry in preterm children at the age of six. PMID:29181408

  12. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... A SPECIALIST Prevention Strengthening Exercise Committee Exercise Committee Core Strengthening Many popular forms of exercise focus on ... acute pain, you should stop doing it. Transverse Core Strengthening This strengthens the muscles that cross from ...

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy ... 15 repetitions at a slow and controlled pace... Resistance Training Resistance training is exercise done against something providing ...

  14. Core exercises elevate trunk stability to facilitate skilled motor behavior of the upper extremities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yuki; Kobayashi, Ryuji; Kelepecz, Dolly; Nakajima, Masaaki

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of core exercises on upper extremity function relative to skilled motor behavior and postural sway. We examined the effects of core exercises on the skilled motor behavior and postural sway of 40 healthy students who were assigned randomly to the core exercise group or the control group. Independent variable is extent of exposure to core exercise and dependent variables are skilled motor behavior and postural sway. A Purdue pegboard which measures skilled motor behavior and a stabilometer which measures postural sway were used to evaluate the influence of core exercises. Pre-intervention and post-intervention skilled motor behavior and postural sway were compared between the core exercise group and control group using the Wilcoxon rank sum test; a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Also, we investigated the application of core exercises in a clinical setting for one patient with cerebral vascular disease. The post intervention skilled motor behavior (p = 0.04) and postural sway, LNG (p = 0.05), LNG/TIME (p = 0.04) and X LNG (p = 0.02) were significantly higher in the core exercise group than control group. In the case report, there were good results; function of the upper extremity improved after doing the exercises. There were positive changes in some daily living activities. Core exercises are likely to enhance trunk stabilization to improve upper extremity function. It is possible for core exercises to be adapted for patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The Contribution of Pre-impact Spine Posture on Human Body Model Response in Whole-body Side Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulard, David; Subit, Damien; Donlon, John-Paul; Lessley, David J; Kim, Taewung; Park, Gwansik; Kent, Richard W

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to analyze independently the contribution of pre-impact spine posture on impact response by subjecting a finite element human body model (HBM) to whole-body, lateral impacts. Seven postured models were created from the original HBM: one matching the standard driving posture and six matching pre-impact posture measured for each of six subjects tested in previously published experiments. The same measurements as those obtained during the experiments were calculated from the simulations, and biofidelity metrics based on signals correlation were established to compare the response of HBM to that of the cadavers. HBM responses showed good correlation with the subject response for the reaction forces, the rib strain (correlation score=0.8) and the overall kinematics. The pre-impact posture was found to greatly alter the reaction forces, deflections and the strain time histories mainly in terms of time delay. By modifying only the posture of HBM, the variability in the impact response was found to be equivalent to that observed in the experiments performed with cadavers with different anthropometries. The patterns observed in the responses of the postured HBM indicate that the inclination of the spine in the frontal plane plays a major role. The postured HBM sustained from 2 to 5 bone fractures, including the scapula in some cases, confirming that the pre-impact posture influences the injury outcome predicted by the simulation.

  16. The effect of recreational soccer training and running on postural balance in untrained men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Markus Due; Sundstrup, Emil; Krustrup, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of intense intermittent exercise performed as soccer training or interval running in comparison with continuous endurance running exercise on postural balance in young healthy untrained males. Young sedentary men were randomized to soccer training...... (SOC, n = 10), continuous running (RUN; n = 9), high-intensity interval running (INT; n = 7) or no training (CON; n = 9). Postural balance was evaluated pre and post 12 weeks of training using a 30-s single-leg stance test on a force plate (AMTI) to yield center of pressure (CoP) sway path and 1-min...

  17. The Impact of Deep Muscle Training on the Quality of Posture and Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczygieł, Elżbieta; Blaut, Jędrzej; Zielonka-Pycka, Katarzyna; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Golec, Joanna; Czechowska, Dorota; Masłoń, Agata; Golec, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Postural control and breathing are mechanically and neuromuscularly interdependent. Both systems- of spinal stability and respiration- involve the diaphragm, transversus abdominis, intercostal muscles, internal oblique muscles and pelvic floor muscles. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of exercises activating deep stabilizer muscles on postural control and quality of breathing movements. Eighteen volunteers (25,7 ± 3,5) were recruited from the general population. All the subjects implemented an exercise program activating deep muscles. Head, pelvic and trunk positions in the sagittal and frontal planes were assessed with the photogrammetric method. Breathing movements were estimated with the respiratory inductive plethysmography. The results indicate that the use of deep muscle training contributed to a significant change in the position of the body in the sagittal plane (p = 0.008) and the increase in the amplitude of breathing (p = 0.001).

  18. Resting position variables at the shoulder: evidence to support a posture-impairment association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borstad, John D

    2006-04-01

    A relationship between posture and impairment at the shoulder is theorized, but not supported by evidence. It is proposed that posture and impairment are not directly related, but linked by movement dysfunction. The purpose of this analysis was to explore the relationships among posture, pectoralis minor muscle length, and movement alterations at the shoulder. Subjects who were asymptomatic for shoulder pathology were divided into 2 groups of 25 subjects each based on normalized pectoralis minor muscle resting length. Scapula orientation, thoracic kyphosis, and pectoralis minor muscle lengths were measured, and ratios and indexes of postural variables were calculated. All variables were analyzed for correlations and group differences. Significant group differences were demonstrated for several posture variables, including thoracic spine kyphosis and scapular internal rotation. The distance from the sternal notch to the coracoid process demonstrated the highest correlation with pectoralis minor muscle length. The findings indicate a relationship between posture and pectoralis minor muscle length and support a proposed model linking posture, an anatomical variable, movement dysfunction, and impairment.

  19. Rater reliability and construct validity of a mobile application for posture analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Kimberly A; Brown, Elena V Donoso

    2018-01-01

    [Purpose] Measurement of posture is important for those with a clinical diagnosis as well as researchers aiming to understand the impact of faulty postures on the development of musculoskeletal disorders. A reliable, cost-effective and low tech posture measure may be beneficial for research and clinical applications. The purpose of this study was to determine rater reliability and construct validity of a posture screening mobile application in healthy young adults. [Subjects and Methods] Pictures of subjects were taken in three standing positions. Two raters independently digitized the static standing posture image twice. The app calculated posture variables, including sagittal and coronal plane translations and angulations. Intra- and inter-rater reliability were calculated using the appropriate ICC models for complete agreement. Construct validity was determined through comparison of known groups using repeated measures ANOVA. [Results] Intra-rater reliability ranged from 0.71 to 0.99. Inter-rater reliability was good to excellent for all translations. ICCs were stronger for translations versus angulations. The construct validity analysis found that the app was able to detect the change in the four variables selected. [Conclusion] The posture mobile application has demonstrated strong rater reliability and preliminary evidence of construct validity. This application may have utility in clinical and research settings.

  20. Musculoskeletal Disorders and Working Posture among Dental and Oral Health Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD in the dental professions has been well established, and can have detrimental effects on the industry, including lower productivity and early retirement. There is increasing evidence that these problems commence during undergraduate training; however, there are still very few studies that investigate the prevalence of MSD or postural risk in these student groups. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSD and conduct postural assessments of students studying oral health and dentistry. A previously validated self-reporting questionnaire measuring MSD prevalence, derived from the Standardised Nordic Questionnaire, was distributed to students. Posture assessments were also conducted using a validated Posture Assessment Instrument. MSD was highly prevalent in all student groups, with 85% reporting MSD in at least one body region. The neck and lower back were the most commonly reported. The final year dental students had the highest percentage with poor posture (68%, while the majority of students from other cohorts had acceptable posture. This study supports the increasing evidence that MSD could be developing in students, before the beginning of a professional career. The prevalence of poor posture further highlights the need to place further emphasis on ergonomic education.

  1. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise ...

  2. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit; Jensen, Lone Donbæk

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered postural control has been observed in low back pain (LBP) patients. They seem to be more dependent on vision when standing. The objective of the study was to determine concurrent and predictive validity of measures of postural stability in LBP patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS...

  3. Lung function and postural changes during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nørregaard, O; Schultz, P; Ostergaard, A; Dahl, R

    1989-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of postural changes on lung function in pregnant women during the first, second, third trimester and post partum. A significant decrease in FRC, PEF and FEV1 was observed as a result of the postural changes. Arterial oxygenation, MVV and DLCO remained largely the same.

  4. Postural Variables in Girls Practicing Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabara, Malgorzata; Hadzik, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Study aim: To assess body posture of young female volleyball players in relation to their untrained mates. Material and methods: A group of 42 volleyball players and another of 43 untrained girls, all aged 13-16 years were studied with respect to their body posture indices by using computer posturography. Spinal angles and curvatures were…

  5. Neuromechanical tuning of nonlinear postural control dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Lena H.; van Antwerp, Keith W.; Scrivens, Jevin E.; McKay, J. Lucas; Welch, Torrence D. J.; Bingham, Jeffrey T.; DeWeerth, Stephen P.

    2009-06-01

    Postural control may be an ideal physiological motor task for elucidating general questions about the organization, diversity, flexibility, and variability of biological motor behaviors using nonlinear dynamical analysis techniques. Rather than presenting "problems" to the nervous system, the redundancy of biological systems and variability in their behaviors may actually be exploited to allow for the flexible achievement of multiple and concurrent task-level goals associated with movement. Such variability may reflect the constant "tuning" of neuromechanical elements and their interactions for movement control. The problem faced by researchers is that there is no one-to-one mapping between the task goal and the coordination of the underlying elements. We review recent and ongoing research in postural control with the goal of identifying common mechanisms underlying variability in postural control, coordination of multiple postural strategies, and transitions between them. We present a delayed-feedback model used to characterize the variability observed in muscle coordination patterns during postural responses to perturbation. We emphasize the significance of delays in physiological postural systems, requiring the modulation and coordination of both the instantaneous, "passive" response to perturbations as well as the delayed, "active" responses to perturbations. The challenge for future research lies in understanding the mechanisms and principles underlying neuromechanical tuning of and transitions between the diversity of postural behaviors. Here we describe some of our recent and ongoing studies aimed at understanding variability in postural control using physical robotic systems, human experiments, dimensional analysis, and computational models that could be enhanced from a nonlinear dynamics approach.

  6. Compromising Postural Balance in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swanenburg, Jaap; de Bruin, Eling D.; Uebelhart, Daniel; Mulder, Theo

    2009-01-01

    Background: Additional tasks that are assumed to disturb standing postural control can be divided in added motor or added cognitive tasks. It is unknown which type of task causes the most disturbances of postural control in elderly. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine whether the dual

  7. Correcting Poor Posture without Awareness or Willpower

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernik, Uri

    2012-01-01

    In this article, a new technique for correcting poor posture is presented. Rather than intentionally increasing awareness or mobilizing willpower to correct posture, this approach offers a game using randomly drawn cards with easy daily assignments. A case using the technique is presented to emphasize the subjective experience of living with poor…

  8. Effects of posture on postoperative pulmonary function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K G; Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary morbidity is still a relevant complication to major surgery despite improvements in surgical technique and anaesthetic methods. Postoperative posture may be a pathogenic factor, but the effects of changes in postoperative posture on pulmonary function have not been reviewed...

  9. Posture-Motor and Posture-Ideomotor Dual-Tasking: A Putative Marker of Psychomotor Retardation and Depressive Rumination in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftanas, Lyubomir I; Bazanova, Olga M; Novozhilova, Nataliya V

    2018-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have demonstrated that the assessment of postural performance may be a potentially reliable and objective marker of the psychomotor retardation (PMR) in the major depressive disorder (MDD). One of the important facets of MDD-related PMR is reflected in disrupted central mechanisms of psychomotor control, heavily influenced by compelling maladaptive depressive rumination. In view of this we designed a research paradigm that included sequential execution of simple single-posture task followed by more challenging divided attention posture tasks, involving concurring motor and ideomotor workloads. Another difficulty dimension assumed executing of all the tasks with eyes open (EO) (easy) and closed (EC) (difficult) conditions. We aimed at investigating the interplay between the severity of MDD, depressive rumination, and efficiency of postural performance. Methods: Compared with 24 age- and body mass index-matched healthy controls (HCs), 26 patients with MDD sequentially executed three experimental tasks: (1) single-posture task of maintaining a quiet stance (ST), (2) actual posture-motor dual task (AMT); and (3) mental/imaginary posture-motor dual task (MMT). All the tasks were performed in the EO and the EC conditions. The primary dependent variable was the amount of kinetic energy ( E ) expended for the center of pressure deviations (CoPDs), whereas the absolute divided attention cost index showed energy cost to the dual-tasking vs. the single-posture task according to the formula: Δ E = ( E Dual-task - E Single-task ). Results: The signs of PMR in the MDD group were objectively indexed by deficient posture control in the EC condition along with overall slowness of fine motor and ideomotor activity. Another important and probably more challenging feature of the findings was that the posture deficit manifested in the ST condition was substantially and significantly attenuated in the MMT and AMT performance dual-tasking activity. A multiple

  10. Does asymmetry in the stomatognathic system correlate with body posture impairments?: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dal Borgo B.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the potential correlations between anatomical and functional asymmetry in the stomatognathic system and body posture impairments. Methods: Literature search using the Medline, SCOPUS, LILACS and SciELO databases, the Cochrane Library and a manual search. Experimental and observational studies were included with no restrictions as to the type of asymmetry. Type of asymmetry, treatment and/ or recording conditions, follow-up, postural examinations, main results and clinical implication were extracted, and risk of bias was assessed. Results: Eleven articles (including one randomized clinical trial were retrieved. The risk of bias was medium in 6 studies and high in the remaining investigations. Only three studies, all with a high risk of bias and without follow-up, reported significant correlations between the asymmetry in the stomatognathic system and body posture impairments. Discussion: According to the limited present evidence, asymmetry in the stomatognathic system does not appear to correlate with body posture impairments at a clinically relevant level.

  11. Postural trials: expertise in rhythmic gymnastics increases control in lateral directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calavalle, A R; Sisti, D; Rocchi, M B L; Panebianco, R; Del Sal, M; Stocchi, V

    2008-11-01

    The first aim of this paper was to investigate if expertise in rhythmic gymnastics influences postural performance even in an easy non-specific task such as bipedal posture. Rhythmic gymnastics is a unique female sport which encompasses aspects of both artistic gymnastics and ballet and includes the use of a small apparatus (rope, hoop, ball, clubs and ribbon). Most previous studies have shown that expertise achieved by artistic gymnasts and dancers improves postural steadiness only in the situations for which those athletes are trained. Literature has not yet compared rhythmic gymnasts to other athletes in terms of their postural strategies. Hence, the study presented herein tested a group of high level rhythmic gymnasts and a group of female university students, trained in other sports, in the bipedal posture under eyes open and closed conditions. A force platform was used to record body sway. (1) Distance from the centre of sway, (2) lateral and (3) antero-posterior displacements were analyzed in time and frequency domains. Comparing the two groups, it was found that rhythmic gymnasts had better strategies than students in simple postural tasks, especially in lateral directions and in the period from 0.05 to 2 s. The most interesting finding in this study is that rhythmic gymnastics training seems to have a direct effect on the ability to maintain bipedal posture, which may confirm the "transfer" hypothesis of rhythmic gymnastics expertise to bipedal postural sway, especially in medio-lateral displacements. This finding has never been reported in previous studies on artistic gymnasts and ballet dancers. Furthermore, the present study confirmed the visual dependence of all the athletes, irrespective of their disciplines, in their postural trials.

  12. A Finite Element Model of the Foot/Ankle to Evaluate Injury Risk in Various Postures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Chris; Quenneville, Cheryl E

    2017-08-01

    The foot/ankle complex is frequently injured in many types of debilitating events, such as car crashes. Numerical models used to assess injury risk are typically minimally validated and do not account for ankle posture variations that frequently occur during these events. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a finite element model of the foot and ankle accounting for these positional changes. A model was constructed from computed tomography scans of a male cadaveric lower leg and was evaluated by comparing simulated bone positions and strain responses to experimental results at five postures in which fractures are commonly reported. The bone positions showed agreement typically within 6° or less in all anatomical directions, and strain matching was consistent with the range of errors observed in similar studies (typically within 50% of the average strains). Fracture thresholds and locations in each posture were also estimated to be similar to those reported in the literature (ranging from 6.3 kN in the neutral posture to 3.9 kN in combined eversion and external rotation). The least vulnerable posture was neutral, and all other postures had lower fracture thresholds, indicating that examination of the fracture threshold of the lower limb in the neutral posture alone may be an underestimation. This work presents an important step forward in the modeling of lower limb injury risk in altered ankle postures. Potential clinical applications of the model include the development of postural guidelines to minimize injury, as well as the evaluation of new protective systems.

  13. Postural Coordination during Socio-motor Improvisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueugnon, Mathieu; Salesse, Robin N; Coste, Alexandre; Zhao, Zhong; Bardy, Benoît G; Marin, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Human interaction often relies on socio-motor improvisation. Creating unprepared movements during social interaction is not a random process but relies on rules of synchronization. These situations do not only involve people to be coordinated, but also require the adjustment of their posture in order to maintain balance and support movements. The present study investigated posture in such a context. More precisely, we first evaluated the impact of amplitude and complexity of arm movements on posture in solo situation. Then, we assessed the impact of interpersonal coordination on posture using the mirror game in which dyads performed improvised and synchronized movements (i.e., duo situation). Posture was measured through ankle-hip coordination in medio-lateral and antero-posterior directions (ML and AP respectively). Our results revealed the spontaneous emergence of in-phase pattern in ML direction and antiphase pattern in AP direction for solo and duo situations. These two patterns respectively refer to the simultaneous flexion/extension of the ankles and the hips in the same or opposite direction. It suggests different functional roles of postural coordination patterns in each direction, with in-phase supporting task performance in ML (dynamical stability) and antiphase supporting postural control in AP (mechanical stability). Although amplitude of movement did not influence posture, movement complexity disturbed postural stability in both directions. Conversely, interpersonal coordination promoted postural stability in ML but not in AP direction. These results are discussed in terms of the difference in coupling strength between ankle-hip coordination and interpersonal coordination.

  14. Why Do Sleeping Nematodes Adopt a Hockey-Stick-Like Posture?

    OpenAIRE

    Tramm, Nora; Oppenheimer, Naomi; Nagy, Stanislav; Efrati, Efi; Biron, David

    2014-01-01

    A characteristic posture is considered one of the behavioral hallmarks of sleep, and typically includes functional features such as support for the limbs and shielding of sensory organs. The nematode C. elegans exhibits a sleep-like state during a stage termed lethargus, which precedes ecdysis at the transition between larval stages. A hockey-stick-like posture is commonly observed during lethargus. What might its function be? It was previously noted that during lethargus, C. elegans nematode...

  15. Exercise and physical therapy help restore body and self in clients with severe anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolnes, Liv-Jorunn

    2017-07-01

    Exercise in the context of anorexia nervosa is a multifaceted endeavour surrounded by controversy and uncertainty. A broader comprehension of this poorly understood phenomenon is required. Informed by the findings of a body examination of six individuals with anorexia nervosa, as well as exercise science, phenomenology and neurocognition, the purpose of this article is to elaborate on the potential role of exercise and physical therapy in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. The findings of the body assessment include constriction of posture, muscles and pattern of breathing. These bodily restraints are not necessarily merely associated with high levels of exercise, they may also reflect psychological strain accompanying the illness. The restricted breathing in particular is assumed to be associated with difficult thoughts and suppressed feelings. Based on the results of the body examination, as well as medical and psychological considerations accompanying the illness, it is suggested that interventions should focus on improving postural stability and restoring related muscular function. Integral to engaging in these activities, the potential to integrate proprioceptive information in this process may generate a more coherent experience of the body, as well as of the self, in these clients. Accordingly, constrictions of the body may have a vital role in constraining the experience of the self. As such, addressing bodily restraints in these clients may facilitate the experience of being the subject causing and controlling the movements. This is in marked contrast to clients' previous exercise experiences, which were associated with compulsion, rigidity and the absence of coherence and control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tasks and means of therapeutic exercises in patients with breast cancer in pre- and postoperative periods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Grushina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The mainstay of radical treatment for patients with breast cancer (BC is a surgical intervention: radical mastectomy (RME of different modifications or organ-sparing operations. In the preoperative period, the tasks of therapeutic exercises (TEs are psychological preparation of a patient for active participation in his / her treatment, as well as complete breath training. Classes are done in a group of convalescents, by applying dynamic and static breathing exercises. In the early postoperative period, the tasks of TEs are to prevent hypostatic pneumonia, surgical-site shoulder joint stiffness and to improve systemic and regional blood and lymph circulation. Analysis of 1235 patients who had undergone RME and 212 patients who had radical resection showed that restricted shoulder joint motion due to hand immobilization in an adducted position and late initiation of TEs occurred in 44.6 and 33.5 % of the patients, respectively. Individual TEs classes include breathing exercises, position treatment, and special exercises to restore shoulder joint function and to control posture. Lymphadenectomy and failure to ligate intersected lymphatic vessels lead to inevitable lymphorrhea and seroma. Analysis of 1447 patents indicated that early initiation of TEs failed to affect seroma duration and extent and wound dehiscence. In the latter (that, according to the author»s data, occurs in 3.7 % of cases after RME and in 9.2 % after preoperative radiotherapy, TEs are limited by position treatment until the wound heals or secondary sutures are applied. The tasks of the late postoperative period are recovery of the full range of shoulder joint motion, normal posture, cardiovascular and respiratory adjustments to increased physical exercises, and general tonic exposure. The paper gives TEs sets developed for each period.

  17. Why Exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do I have to exercise to gain health benefits? Even small amounts of exercise are better than none at all. Start with ... As you become used to exercising, try to exercise within your target heart rate zone so that you get the most benefit. To take your pulse, gently rest 2 fingers ...

  18. Aquatic exercise in the treatment of children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Lidija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aquatic exercise is one of the most popular supplementary treatments for children with neuro-motor impairment, especially for cerebral palsy (CP. As water reduces gravity force which increases postural stability, a child with CP exercises more easily in water than on land. Objective. The aim of the study was to examine aquatic exercise effects on gross motor functioning, muscle tone and cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. Methods. The study included 19 children of both sexes, aged 6 to 12 years, with spastic CP. They were included in a 12-week aquatic exercise program, twice a week. Measurements of GMFM (Gross Motor Function Measurement, spasticity (MAS – Modified Ashworth Scale, heart rate (HR and maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max were carried out before and after treatment. The measurement results were compared before and after treatment. Results. GMFM mean value before therapy was 80.2% and statistically it was significantly lower in comparison to the same value after therapy, which was 86.2% (p<0.05. The level of spasticity was considerably decreased after therapy; the mean value before treatment was 3.21 according to MAS, and after treatment it was 1.95 (p<0.001. After treatment there was a statistically significant improvement of cardiorespiratory indurance, i.e., there was a significant decrease in the mean value of HR and a significant increase of VO2max (p<0.001. Conclusion. Aquatic exercise program can be useful in improving gross motor functioning, reducing spasticity and increasing cardiorespiratory endurance in children with spastic CP. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175092

  19. DANGEROUS EXERCISES

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Daneshmandi

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that many exercises are contraindicated and may do more harm thanbenefits. Many of the warm-up exercises we practiced each day have now found to be dangerous.While different levels of athletics do have different levels of stretching; it is necessary to knowwhat the dangerous exercises are and how to use safer alternatives. Certain exercises are toorisky and should not be performed at all. Exercises must be performed in certain ways and ifperformed incorrectly can cause inju...

  20. Orthostatic intolerance without postural tachycardia: how much dysautonomia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsaik, Ajay K; Singer, Wolfgang; Allison, Thomas G; Sletten, David M; Joyner, Michael J; Benarroch, Eduardo E; Low, Phillip A; Sandroni, Paola

    2013-08-01

    Chronic symptoms of orthostatic intolerance occur in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and patients with orthostatic intolerance (OI) without tachycardia. We recently reported that deconditioning is almost universal in both patient groups. In this study, we focussed on the question of how much dysautonomia, besides orthostatic tachycardia, is there in POTS vs. OI, and how the two groups compare in regards to clinical, autonomic, laboratory, and exercise variables. We retrospectively studied all patients referred for orthostatic intolerance at Mayo Clinic between January 2006 and June 2011, who underwent standardized autonomic and exercise testing. Eighty-four POTS and 100 OI fulfilled inclusion criteria, 89 % were females. The mean age was 25 and 32 years, respectively. Clinical presentation, autonomic parameters, laboratory findings, and degree of deconditioning were overall similar between the two groups, except for the excessive orthostatic heart rate (HR) rise and mild vasomotor findings observed in POTS but not in OI (slightly larger Valsalva ratio and incomplete blood pressure recovery during Valsalva). Both groups responded poorly to various medications. Severely deconditioned patients were similar to non-deconditioned patients, except for 24 h urine volume (1,555 vs. 2,417 ml), sweat loss on thermoregulatory sweat test (1.5 vs. 0.5 %), and few respiratory parameters during exercise, which are likely clinically insignificant. Though similar in clinical presentation, POTS and OI are different entities with greater, albeit still mild, dysautonomia in POTS. The clinical and pathophysiological relevance of minimal dysautonomia in the absence of orthostatic tachycardia as seen in OI remain uncertain.

  1. StartReact effects support different pathophysiological mechanisms underlying freezing of gait and postural instability in Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorik Nonnekes

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology underlying postural instability in Parkinson's disease is poorly understood. The frequent co-existence with freezing of gait raises the possibility of shared pathophysiology. There is evidence that dysfunction of brainstem structures contribute to freezing of gait. Here, we evaluated whether dysfunction of these structures contributes to postural instability as well. Brainstem function was assessed by studying the StartReact effect (acceleration of latencies by a startling acoustic stimulus (SAS.We included 25 patients, divided in two different ways: 1 those with postural instability (HY = 3, n = 11 versus those without (HY<3, n = 14; and 2 those with freezing (n = 11 versus those without freezing (n = 14. We also tested 15 matched healthy controls. We tested postural responses by translating a balance platform in the forward direction, resulting in backward balance perturbations. In 25% of trials, the start of the balance perturbation was accompanied by a SAS.The amplitude of automatic postural responses and length of the first balance correcting step were smaller in patients with postural instability compared to patients without postural instability, but did not differ between freezers and non-freezers. In contrast, the StartReact effect was intact in patients with postural instability but was attenuated in freezers.We suggest that the mechanisms underlying freezing of gait and postural instability in Parkinson's disease are at least partly different. Underscaling of automatic postural responses and balance-correcting steps both contribute to postural instability. The attenuated StartReact effect was seen only in freezers and likely reflects inadequate representation of motor programs at upper brainstem level.

  2. An investigation into essential aspects of posture in primary school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postures of the subjects were analysed by means of photographic images using the pro forma of Barlow (1956, 1990). The majority of the executives had malposture with 2.3%, 23.3%, 58.1% and 16.3% and 6.3% of the subjects being categorised with slight postural defects, severe postural defects, very severe postural ...

  3. Differences in body composition and occurrence of postural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anthropometric (BMI and percentage body fat) and body posture measurements were performed. Measurements were taken according to the standard procedures of the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK). A posture grid and the New York Posture Test were used for all postural ...

  4. The importance of postural control for feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redstone, Fran; West, Joyce F

    2004-01-01

    Children with cerebral palsy and other neurodisabilities often have decreased postural control that exacerbates their feeding/swallowing disorders. Correct postural alignment is important in the normal feeding/swallowing process. In the child with cerebral palsy, the alignment and stability of the oral structures for feeding/swallowing may be compromised by abnormal muscle tone and movement patterns. Effective oral functioning for feeding begins with attaining better head stability to improve jaw control. Head control is influenced by trunk alignment, which depends upon the stability of the pelvic area. Techniques such as therapeutic seating and oral control can enhance postural alignment and improve oral functioning for the safe intake of food.

  5. Confounders of vasovagal syncope: postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwazue, Victor C; Raj, Satish R

    2013-02-01

    Most patients who present to a cardiologist with syncope have vasovagal (reflex) syncope. A busy syncope practice often also sees patients with postural tachycardia syndrome, often presenting with severe recurrent presyncope. Recognition of this syncope confounder might be difficult without adequate knowledge of their presentation, and this can adversely affect optimal management. Postural tachycardia syndrome can often be differentiated from vasovagal syncope by its hemodynamic pattern during tilt table test and differing clinical characteristics. This article reviews the presentation of postural tachycardia syndrome and its putative pathophysiology and presents an approach to nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic management. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Postural Adaptations To Supra-postural Tasks in Children With Developmental Coordination Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wade Michael G.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of varying memory (cognitive demands, and visual (perceptual demands on postural motion. Sixty four children (32 DCD, 32 TDC, 9-to-10 years were volunteers. Each performed separate memory and visual tasks at two levels of difficulty; easy (LD and hard (HD while recording their postural motion. For the memory task, both groups reduced postural sway in the HD condition. For the visual task only the TDC group reduced postural sway in the HD condition; DCD children did not. The DCD group did not reduce postural motion but, in fact, increased motion. We also found several group  task interactions on sway. Our data suggest a weakening of the action linkage between both cognitive and perceptual tasks in children diagnosed with movement difficulties. The data are discussed in the context of limitations in the embodied relationship between posture and both perceptual and cognitive activity.

  7. Alternative Exercise Traditions in Cancer Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Kathryn J; Stan, Daniela L; Bhagra, Anjali; Jurisson, Mary; Cheville, Andrea L

    2017-02-01

    Alternative exercise traditions (AETs) such as Pilates, yoga, Tai Chi Chuan, Qigong, and various forms of dance offer the potential to improve diverse outcomes among cancer survivors by reducing adverse symptoms and mood disorders, and by enhancing function. Additionally AETs have emerged as a potential means to address deficits in current disease-focused care delivery models which are marked by prevalent under-treatment of symptoms and physical impairments. Relative to therapeutic exercise in allopathic models, many AETs are comparatively affordable and accessible. AETs have the further potential to simultaneously address needs spanning multiple domains including social, physical, and psycho-emotional. AETs additionally offer the salient benefits of promoting integrated whole body movement and concurrently enhancing strength, coordination, balance, posture, flexibility, and kinesthetic awareness. Despite AETs' benefits, compelling concerns leave many clinicians ambivalent and reluctant to endorse or even discuss them. One issue is the extensive heterogeneity across and even within specific AETs. An additional concern is that the one-size-fits-many nature of AET group classes undermines an instructor's capacity to individualize dose, type, frequency, and intensity, which are cornerstones of effective therapeutic exercise. Inconsistencies in AET practitioner expertise and certification, as well as the extent of practitioner familiarity with vulnerabilities unique to cancer populations, may also be problematic. At this juncture, an extensive literature of inconsistent quality that spans diverse cancer populations frustrates efforts to precisely determine the effect size of any specific AET in improving a specific outcome; Although systematic reviews and meta-analyses have concluded that AETs have beneficial effects, they consistently identify a high risk of bias in a majority of trials related to a lack of blinding, poor allocation concealment, small sample sizes

  8. THE ROLE OF LEG AND TRUNK MUSCLES PROPRIOCEPTION ON STATIC AND DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEYED Hossein Hosseinimehr

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The proprioception information is a prerequisite for balance, body’s navigation system, and the movement coordinator. Due to changes between the angles of ankle, knee, and hip joints the aforementioned information are important in the coordination of the limbs and postural balance. The aim of this study was to investigate therole of leg and trunk muscles proprioception on static and dynamic postural control. Thirty males students of physical education and sport sciences (age =21.23 ± 2.95 years, height = 170.4 ± 5.1 cm, and weight = 70.7 ± 5.6 kg participated in this study volunteered. Vibration (100HZ was used to disturb of proprioception. Vibrationoperated on leg muscle (gasterocnemius and trunk muscles (erector spine muscle, at L1 level. Leg stance time and Star Excursion Balance Test were used for evaluation of static and dynamic postural control respectively.Subjects performed pre and post (with operated vibration leg stance time and star excursion balance test. Paired sample test used for investigation the effect of vibration on leg and trunk muscles in static and dynamic postural control. Result of this study showed in static postural control, there is no significant difference between pre and post test (operated vibration in leg and trunk muscles (p≤0.05. In contrast there is significant difference indynamic postural control between pre and post test in leg muscles in 8 directions of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05 while there is only significant difference in trunk muscle in antrolateral and lateral of star excursion balance test (p≤0.05. During physical training such conditions like fatigue and injury can disturbproprioceptions’ information. Thus, due to the importance of this information we recommend that coaches'additionally specific trainings any sport used specific exercises to enhance the proprioception information

  9. Relationship between Postural Deformities and Frontal Function in Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ninomiya, Satoko; Morita, Akihiko; Teramoto, Hiroko; Akimoto, Takayoshi; Shiota, Hiroshi; Kamei, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Postural deformities and executive dysfunction (ED) are common symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD); however, the relationship between postural deformities and ED in patients with PD remains unclear. This study assessed the relationship between postural deformities and ED in patients with PD. Sixty-five patients with sporadic PD were assessed for the severity of postural deformities and executive function. The severity of postural deformities was scored using the United Parkinson's Disease Ra...

  10. Response to Niklasson's comment on Lin, et al. (2012) : "the relation between postural movement and bilateral motor integration".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Kai; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Wu, Huey-Min

    2014-10-01

    In the study of Lin, Wu, Lin, Wu, Wu, Kuo, and Yeung (2012 ), the relationship between the validity of postural movement and bilateral motor integration in terms of sensory integration theory was examined. Postural movement is the ability to use the antigravity postures required for stabilization of the neck, trunk and upper extremities via muscle co-contractions in the neck and upper extremities, and balance. Niklasson's (2013 ) comment argued that postural movement should include primitive reflexes in terms of the general abilities approach. Niklasson (2013 ) focused on the efficacy of the treatment rather than the theoretical frameworks implied in the therapeutic activities. For that purpose Lin, et al. (2012 ) used sensory integration as the theoretical foundation, and the relationship between postural movement and bilateral motor integration was assessed via empirical data. The result of Lin, et al. (2012 ) was offered as a theoretical reference for therapeutic activities.

  11. Children with nocturnal enuresis have posture and balance disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavione Rodrigues Pereira, R; Nascimento Fagundes, S; Surry Lebl, A; Azevedo Soster, L; Machado, M G; Koch, V H; Tanaka, C

    2016-08-01

    Integration of the neuromuscular system is required for maintaining balance and adequate voiding function. Children with enuresis have delayed maturation of the motor cortex, with changes in the sensory and motor systems. Along with various alterations, including the genetic, hormonal, behavioral, and sleep disturbances, and neuromotor and sensory deficits associated with nocturnal enuresis (NE) in children and adults, a consistent alteration in the posture of children with NE has been observed in the current practice. Because posture and the balance control system are strongly connected, this study aimed to investigate posture and balance in children and teenagers with NE. A total of 111 children with enuresis were recruited to the enuretic group (EG) and 60 asymptomatic children made up the control group (CG). The participants were divided into two age subgroups: (A) 7-11 years old, N = 77 for EG/A, N = 38 for CG/A; and (B) 12-16 years old, N = 34 for EG/B, N = 22 for CG/B. Balance was assessed using an electronic force plate (100 Hz) to calculate the area of the center of pressure (COP) displacement. The COP is the point that results from the action of vertical forces projected onto the force plate. Sensory integration was analyzed using a 60-s trial with the subject standing under four conditions: (1) eyes open, stable surface; (2) eyes closed, stable surface; (3) eyes open, unstable surface; (4) eyes closed, unstable surface. Posture was assessed by placing reflective anatomical landmarks on the anterior superior iliac spine, the posterior superior iliac spine, the greater trochanter, and lateral malleolus. A photograph was taken while the subject stood quietly. The angles were obtained from landmark connections using software to assess the following posture variables: pelvic ante/retroversion and pelvic ante/retropulsion. The EG showed a greater area of COP displacement compared with the CG under all four sensory conditions and both subgroups, except

  12. The effects of deuterium on static posture control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Charles S.

    1990-01-01

    A significant operational problem impacting upon the Space Shuttle program involves the astronaut's ability to safely egress from the Orbiter during an emergency situation. Following space flight, astronauts display significant movement problems. One variable which may contribute to increased movement ataxia is deuterium (D2O). Deuterium is present in low levels within the Orbiter's water supply but may accumulate to significant physiological levels during lengthy missions. Deuterium was linked to a number of negative physiological responses, including motion sickness, decreased metabolism, and slowing of neural conduction velocity. The effects of D2O on static postural control in response to a range of dosage levels were investigated. Nine sugjects were divided into three groups of three subjects each. The groups were divided into a low, medium, and a high D2O dosage group. The subjects static posture was assessed with the use of the EquiTest systems, a commercially available postural control evaluation system featuring movable force plates and a visual surround that can be servoed to the subject's sway. In addition to the force plate information, data about the degree of subject sway about the hips and shoulders was obtained. Additionally, surface electromyographic (EMG) data from the selected lower limb muscles were collected along with saliva samples used to determine the amount of deuterium enrichment following D2O ingestion. Two baseline testing sessions were performed using the EquiTest testing protocol prior to ingestion of the D2O. Thirty minutes after dosing, subjects again performed the tests. Two more post-dosing tests were run with an interest interval of one hour. Preliminary data anlaysis indicates that only subjects in the igh dose group displayed any significant static postural problems. Future analyses of the sway and EMG is expected to reveal significant variations in the subject's postural control strategy following D2O dosing. While

  13. Effects of multicomponent exercise on cognitive function in older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Takao

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the effects of a multicomponent exercise program on the cognitive function of older adults with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI. Methods Design: Twelve months, randomized controlled trial; Setting: Community center in Japan; Participants: Fifty older adults (27 men with aMCI ranging in age from 65 to 93 years (mean age, 75 years; Intervention: Subjects were randomized into either a multicomponent exercise (n = 25 or an education control group (n = 25. Subjects in the multicomponent exercise group exercised under the supervision of physiotherapists for 90 min/d, 2 d/wk, for a total of 80 times over 12 months. The exercises included aerobic exercises, muscle strength training, and postural balance retraining, and were conducted using multiple conditions to stimulate cognitive functions. Subjects in the control group attended three education classes regarding health during the 12-month period. Measurements were administered before, after the 6-month, and after the 12-month intervention period; Measurements: The performance measures included the mini-mental state examination, logical memory subtest of the Wechsler memory scale-revised, digit symbol coding test, letter and categorical verbal fluency test, and the Stroop color word test. Results The mean adherence to the exercise program was 79.2%. Improvements of cognitive function following multicomponent exercise were superior at treatment end (group × time interactions for the mini-mental state examination (P = 0.04, logical memory of immediate recall (P = 0.03, and letter verbal fluency test (P = 0.02. The logical memory of delayed recall, digit symbol coding, and Stroop color word test showed main effects of time, although there were no group × time interactions. Conclusions This study indicates that exercise improves or supports, at least partly, cognitive performance in older adults with aMCI.

  14. The effectiveness of combining inspiratory muscle training with manual therapy and a therapeutic exercise program on maximum inspiratory pressure in adults with asthma: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; Candelas-Fernández, Pablo; de-Diego-Cano, Beatriz; Mínguez-Calzada, Orcález; Del Corral, Tamara

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the addition of manual therapy and therapeutic exercise protocol to inspiratory muscle training was more effective in improving maximum inspiratory pressure than inspiratory muscle training in isolation. This is a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. In total, 43 patients with asthma were included in this study. The patients were allocated into one of the two groups: (1) inspiratory muscle training ( n = 21; 20-minute session) or (2) inspiratory muscle training (20-minute session) combined with a program of manual therapy (15-minute session) and therapeutic exercise (15-minute session; n = 22). All participants received 12 sessions, two days/week, for six weeks and performed the domiciliary exercises protocol. The main measures such as maximum inspiratory pressure, spirometric measures, forward head posture, and thoracic kyphosis were recorded at baseline and after the treatment. For the per-protocol analysis, between-group differences at post-intervention were observed in maximum inspiratory pressure (19.77 cmH 2 O (11.49-28.04), P inspiratory muscle training combined with a manual therapy and therapeutic exercise program is more effective than its application in isolation for producing short-term maximum inspiratory pressure and forward head posture improvements in patients with asthma.

  15. Exercise therapy and custom-made insoles are effective in patients with excessive pronation and chronic foot pain--a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jane; Mølgaard, Carsten M; Christensen, Marianne; Kaalund, Søren; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Simonsen, Ole; Voigt, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Excessive foot pronation is a causal mechanisms described in relation to injuries of the lower extremities. Evidence to support an effective treatment is insufficient. To investigate the effect of exercise and custom-made insoles to patients with excessive pronation and chronic pain conditions in the foot at short and long term follow-up. Single blinded Randomized Controlled Trial with 80 subjects randomized: (1) Standard Intervention, (2) Insole, (3) Exercise, and (4) Insole+Exercise. Exercise - 12 week supervised program. Insoles - individually molded and posted. Pain was measured during walking, resting and running. Static and dynamic foot postures were measured as calcaneal angle, navicular drift, drop and height. The average duration of foot pain was 7.3 years. There was a significant pain reduction during walking within all groups at 4 and 12 months follow-up. No differences were seen between groups in any of the pain parameters. Weak correlations between changes in pain and foot postures were observed at baseline and one-year follow-up. A significant pain reduction was seen in all groups, none of the treatment modalities seem to be superior with the number of patients included. Compliance in the standard intervention group was a concern at 12 months. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. EXERCISE-INDUCED ASTHMA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    ests include exercise in the management of chronic dis- ease, bone stress injuries, and exercise-associated muscle cramps. WAYNE DERMAN. MB ChB, BSc (Med) (Hons). Sports Science, PhD, FACSM. Associate Professor. MRC/UCT Research Unit for Sports Science and. Sports Medicine. Sports Science Institute of.

  17. Postural stability in young and old women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Grønbech

    USE OF VARIABILITY, SPEED AND ACCELERATION PARAMETERS TO EVALUATE POSTURAL BALANCE IN OLD VS YOUNG INDIVIDUALS   Jørgensen MG1,3, Larsen AH3, Caserotti P2,3, Nielsen OBF1, Aagaard P3   1Geriatric Department and Fall Clinic, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg Hospital; 2National Institute on Aging......, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; 3Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense   INTRODUCTION: Poor postural balance control (stability) is one of the major risk factors for falling. If individuals at risk of falling are to be identified...... at an early stage, good knowledge and sensitive measurements of postural stability are essential. In addition, in order to develop effective intervention strategies such knowledge is of major importance. However, no single postural stability parameter has effectively been able to identify individuals at risk...

  18. Lying Posture Classification for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Wai, Aung Phyo; Foo, Siang Fook; Huang, Weimin; Biswas, Jit; Hsia, Chi-Chun; Liou, Koujuch; Yap, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Pressure ulcers are a common problem among patients with limited mobility, such as those bed-bound and wheelchair-bound. Constant and prolonged applied pressure is one of the extrinsic factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers. Analyzing lying postures together with interface pressure measurements from a pressure sensitive bed helps revealing pressure hot spots that can potentially lead to pressure ulcer development. We propose an intelligent system that features lying postur...

  19. Effect of absence of vision on posture

    OpenAIRE

    Alotaibi, Abdullah Z.; Alghadir, Ahmad; Iqbal, Zaheen A.; Anwer, Shahnawaz

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The visual system is one of the sensory systems that enables the body to assess and process information about the external environment. In the absence of vision, a blind person loses contact with the outside world and develops faulty motor patterns, which results in postural deficiencies. However, literature regarding the development of such deficiencies is limited. The aim of this study was to discuss the effect of absence of vision on posture, the possible biomechanics behind the ...

  20. An investigation of rugby scrimmaging posture and individual maximum pushing force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Lan; Chang, Jyh-Jong; Wu, Jia-Hroung; Guo, Lan-Yuen

    2007-02-01

    Although rugby is a popular contact sport and the isokinetic muscle torque assessment has recently found widespread application in the field of sports medicine, little research has examined the factors associated with the performance of game-specific skills directly by using the isokinetic-type rugby scrimmaging machine. This study is designed to (a) measure and observe the differences in the maximum individual pushing forward force produced by scrimmaging in different body postures (3 body heights x 2 foot positions) with a self-developed rugby scrimmaging machine and (b) observe the variations in hip, knee, and ankle angles at different body postures and explore the relationship between these angle values and the individual maximum pushing force. Ten national rugby players were invited to participate in the examination. The experimental equipment included a self-developed rugby scrimmaging machine and a 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Our results showed that the foot positions (parallel and nonparallel foot positions) do not affect the maximum pushing force; however, the maximum pushing force was significantly lower in posture I (36% body height) than in posture II (38%) and posture III (40%). The maximum forward force in posture III (40% body height) was also slightly greater than for the scrum in posture II (38% body height). In addition, it was determined that hip, knee, and ankle angles under parallel feet positioning are factors that are closely negatively related in terms of affecting maximum pushing force in scrimmaging. In cross-feet postures, there was a positive correlation between individual forward force and hip angle of the rear leg. From our results, we can conclude that if the player stands in an appropriate starting position at the early stage of scrimmaging, it will benefit the forward force production.

  1. Is there an association between variables of postural control and strength in prepubertal children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Gollhofer, Albert

    2012-01-01

    The risk of sustaining falls and sports-related injuries is particularly high in children. Deficits in balance and muscle strength represent 2 important intrinsic fall and injury-risk factors. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between variables of static and dynamic postural control and isometric and dynamic muscle strength and to find out whether there is an association between measures of postural control and muscle strength in prepubertal children. Thirty children participated in this study (age 6.7 ± 0.5 years; body mass index 16.0 ± 1.8 kg·m(-2)). Biomechanic tests included the measurements of maximal isometric torque and rate of force development (RFD) of the plantar flexors on an isokinetic device, jumping power and height (countermovement jump [CMJ]) on a force plate, and the assessment of static and dynamic posture during bipedal stance on a balance platform. The significance level was set at p < 0.05. No significant associations were observed between variables of static and dynamic postural control. Significant positive correlations were detected between the RFD of the plantar flexors and CMJ height (r = 0.425, p < 0.01). No statistically significant associations were found between measures of postural control and muscle strength. The nonsignificant correlations between static and dynamic postural control and muscle strength imply that primarily dynamic measures of postural control should be incorporated in fall and injury-risk assessment and that postural control and muscle strength appear to be independent of each other and may have to be trained in a complementary manner for fall and injury-preventive purposes.

  2. A method to model anticipatory postural control in driver braking events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östh, Jonas; Eliasson, Erik; Happee, Riender; Brolin, Karin

    2014-09-01

    Human body models (HBMs) for vehicle occupant simulations have recently been extended with active muscles and postural control strategies. Feedback control has been used to model occupant responses to autonomous braking interventions. However, driver postural responses during driver initiated braking differ greatly from autonomous braking. In the present study, an anticipatory postural response was hypothesized, modelled in a whole-body HBM with feedback controlled muscles, and validated using existing volunteer data. The anticipatory response was modelled as a time dependent change in the reference value for the feedback controllers, which generates correcting moments to counteract the braking deceleration. The results showed that, in 11 m/s(2) driver braking simulations, including the anticipatory postural response reduced the peak forward displacement of the head by 100mm, of the shoulder by 30 mm, while the peak head flexion rotation was reduced by 18°. The HBM kinematic response was within a one standard deviation corridor of corresponding test data from volunteers performing maximum braking. It was concluded that the hypothesized anticipatory responses can be modelled by changing the reference positions of the individual joint feedback controllers that regulate muscle activation levels. The addition of anticipatory postural control muscle activations appears to explain the difference in occupant kinematics between driver and autonomous braking. This method of modelling postural reactions can be applied to the simulation of other driver voluntary actions, such as emergency avoidance by steering. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. A neural network model for predicting postures during non-repetitive manual materials handling tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Miguel A; Nussbaum, Maury A

    2008-10-01

    Posture prediction can be useful in facilitating the design and evaluation processes for manual materials handling tasks. This study evaluates the ability of artificial neural network models to predict initial and final lifting postures in 2-D and 3-D scenarios. Descriptors for the participant and condition of interest were input to the models; outputs consisted of posture-defining joint angles. Models were trained with subsets of an existing posture database before predictions were generated. Trained models predictions were then evaluated using the remaining data, which included conditions not presented during training. Prediction errors were consistent across these data subsets, suggesting the models generalised well to novel conditions. The models generally predicted whole-body postures with per-joint errors in the 5 degrees -20 degrees range, though some errors were larger, particularly for 3-D conditions. These models provided reasonably accurate predictions, even outperforming some computational approaches previously proposed for similar purposes. Suggestions for future refinement of such models are presented. The models in this investigation provide a means to predict initial and final postures in commonly occurring manual materials handling tasks. In addition, the model structures provide information about potential lifting strategies that may be used by individuals with particular anthropometry or strength characteristics.

  4. Cardiovascular and Postural Control Interactions during Hypergravity: Effects on Cerebral Autoregulation in Males and Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nandu; Blaber, Andrew; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Beck, Arnaud; Avan, Paul; Bruner, Michelle; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2012-07-01

    Orthostatic intolerance remains a problem upon return to Earth from the microgravity environment of spaceflight. A variety of conditions including hypovolemia, cerebral vasoconstriction, cerebral or peripheral vascular disease, or cardiac arrhythmias may result in syncope if the person remains upright. Current research indicates that there is a greater dependence on visual and somatosensory information at the beginning of space flight with a decreased otolith gain during prolonged space flight (Herault et al., 2002). The goal of the research is to further our understanding of the fundamental adaptive homeostatic mechanisms involved in gravity related changes in cardiovascular and postural function. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and postural sensory motor control systems in male and female participants before, during, and after exposure to graded levels of hyper-G were investigated. Hypotheses: 1) Activation of skeletal muscle pump will be directly related to the degree of orthostatic stress. 2) Simultaneous measurement of heart rate, blood pressure and postural sway will predict cardio-postural stability. Blood pressure and heart rate (means and variability), postural sway, center of pressure (COP), baroreflex function, calf blood flow, middle cerebral artery blood flow, non-invasive intracranial pressure measurements, and two-breath CO2 were measured. Results from the study will be used to provide an integrated insight into mechanisms of cardio-postural control and cerebral autoregulation, which are important aspects of human health in flights to Moon, Mars and distant planets.

  5. Hand posture effects on handedness recognition as revealed by the Simon effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan P Lameira

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the influence of hand posture in handedness recognition, while varying the spatial correspondence between stimulus and response in a modified Simon task. Drawings of the left and right hands were displayed either in a back or palm view while participants discriminated stimulus handedness by pressing left/right keys with their hands resting either in a prone or supine posture. As a control, subjects performed a regular Simon task using simple geometric shapes as stimuli. Results showed that when hands were in a prone posture, the spatially corresponding trials (i.e., stimulus and response located on the same side were faster than the non-corresponding trials (i.e., stimulus and response on opposite sides. In contrast, for the supine posture, there was no difference between corresponding and non-corresponding trials. The control experiment with the regular Simon task showed that the posture of the responding hand had no influence on performance. When the stimulus is the drawing of a hand, however, the posture of the responding hand affects the spatial correspondence effect because response location is coded based on multiple reference points, including the body of the hand.

  6. The ergonomics body posture on repetitive and heavy lifting activities of workers in aerospace manufacturing warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, S. R.; Zula, N. E. N. Md; Rayme, N. S.; Shamsuddin, S.; Husain, K.

    2017-06-01

    Warehouse is an important entity in manufacturing organizations. It usually involves working activities that relate ergonomics risk factors including repetitive and heavy lifting activities. Aerospace manufacturing workers are prone of having musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) problems because of the manual handling activities. From the questionnaires is states that the workers may have experience discomforts experience during manual handling work. Thus, the objectives of this study are; to investigate the body posture and analyze the level of discomfort for body posture of the workers while performing the repetitive and heavy lifting activities that cause MSD problems and to suggest proper body posture and alternatives to reduce the MSD related problems. Methodology of this study involves interviews, questionnaires distribution, anthropometry measurements, RULA (Right Upper Limb Assessment) assessment sheet and CATIA V5 RULA analysis, NIOSH lifting index (LI) and recommended weight limit (RWL). Ten workers are selected for pilot study and as for anthropometry measurement all workers in the warehouse department were involved. From the first pilot study, the RULA assessment score in CATIA V5 shows the highest score which is 7 for all postures and results after improvement of working posture is very low hence, detecting weight of the material handling is not in recommendation. To reduce the risk of MSD through the improvisation of working posture, the weight limit is also calculated in order to have a RWL for each worker. Therefore, proposing a guideline for the aerospace workers involved with repetitive movement and excessive lifting will help in reducing the risk of getting MSD.

  7. Postural Communication of Emotion: Perception of Distinct Poses of Five Discrete Emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Lukas D; Reschke, Peter J; Knothe, Jennifer M; Walle, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    Emotion can be communicated through multiple distinct modalities. However, an often-ignored channel of communication is posture. Recent research indicates that bodily posture plays an important role in the perception of emotion. However, research examining postural communication of emotion is limited by the variety of validated emotion poses and unknown cohesion of categorical and dimensional ratings. The present study addressed these limitations. Specifically, we examined individuals' (1) categorization of emotion postures depicting 5 discrete emotions (joy, sadness, fear, anger, and disgust), (2) categorization of different poses depicting the same discrete emotion, and (3) ratings of valence and arousal for each emotion pose. Findings revealed that participants successfully categorized each posture as the target emotion, including disgust. Moreover, participants accurately identified multiple distinct poses within each emotion category. In addition to the categorical responses, dimensional ratings of valence and arousal revealed interesting overlap and distinctions between and within emotion categories. These findings provide the first evidence of an identifiable posture for disgust and instantiate the principle of equifinality of emotional communication through the inclusion of distinct poses within emotion categories. Additionally, the dimensional ratings corroborated the categorical data and provide further granularity for future researchers to consider in examining how distinct emotion poses are perceived.

  8. Analysis of endodontist posture utilizing cinemetry, surface electromyography and ergonomic checklists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onety, Geraldo Celso da Silva; Leonel, Daniel Vilela; Saquy, Paulo César; Silva, Gabriel Pádua da; Ferreira, Bruno; Varise, Tiago Gilioli; Sousa, Luiz Gustavo de; Verri, Edson Donizetti; Siéssere, Selma; Semprini, Marisa; Nepomuceno, Victor Rodrigues; Regalo, Simone Cecilio Hallak

    2014-01-01

    The postural risk factors for dentists include the ease of vision in the workplace, cold, vibration and mechanical pressure in tissues, incorrect posture, functional fixity, cognitive requirements and work-related organizational and psychosocial factors. The objective was to analyze the posture of endodontists at the workplace. Eighteen right-handed endodontists aged 25 to 60 years (34±3) participated in the study. Electromyography, kinemetry, ergonomic scales (RULA and Couto's checklist) and biophotogrammetry were used to analyze the posture of endodontists during root canal treatment of the maxillary right first and second molars using rotary and manual instrumentation. The variations observed in the electromyographic activities during the performance of rotary and manual techniques suggest that the fibers of the longissimus region, anterior and medium deltoid, medium trapezium, biceps, triceps brachii, brachioradialis and short thumb abductor muscles underwent adaptations to provide more accurate functional movements. Computerized kinemetry and biophotogrammetry showed that, as far as posture is concerned, rotary technique was more demanding than the manual technique. In conclusion, the group of endodontists evaluated in this study exhibited posture disorders regardless of whether the rotary or manual technique was used.

  9. [Exercise program for chronic low back pain based on common clinical characteristics of patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2014-01-01

    1. To determine which clinical characteristics are common in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and 2. To present an exercise program for CLBP composed on the basis of the common clinical characteristics of patients. In the prospective study, we have included 420 patients with nonspecific CLBP (group A), 420 patients with CLBP (with or without radicular pain) and degenerative changes of lumbosacral (LS) spine (group B) and 80 patients with CLBP after a lumbar disc herniation surgery (group C). The clinical characteristics of patients and especially the characteristics of the most important parameters for the selection of exercises have been evaluated by means of physiatric and manual functional examination. The vast majority of patients had these common clinical characteristics: 1. hypertonic/shortened lumbar extensors (A: 89,5%, B: 92%, C: 92,5%), 2. hypertonic/shortened psoas muscles (A: 83%, B: 90,5%, C: 92,5%), 3. restricted active (A: 71,4%, B: 89%, C: 94%) and passive (segmental) mobility (A: 86,4%, B: 92%, C: 95%) of LS spine, 4. painful active movements of LS spine (A: 44%, B: 88,6%, C: 95%), 5. scoliotic posture (more rarely scoliosis) usually in a combination with reduced/flattened lumbar lordosis (A: 87%, B: 89%, C: 90%), 6. hypotonic/ weak gluteal (A: 51,2%, B: 68%, C: 82,5%) and abdominal muscles (A: 33,8%, B: 56,5%, C: 60%) and 7. shortened hamstrings (A: 70,7%; hamstrings flexibility testing in patients from groups B and C is unreliable because of a frequently positive Lasegue's sign). In 6,7% of examinees from the group A, 4,8% examinees from the group B and 2,5% examinees from the group C, we have found LS spine hypermobility. Our exercise program for CLBP composed on the basis of the common clinical characteristics of the patients includes: 1. Stretching exercises for lumbar extensors, 2. Stretching exercises for psoas muscles, 3. Stretching exercises for hamstrings, 4. Strengthening exercises for abdominal muscles, 5. Strengthening

  10. PALMILHAS PROPRIOCEPTIVAS PARA O CONTROLE POSTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Madia Mantovani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The postural control and balance depend of the sensory system and musculoskeletal biomechanics being the feet one of the main sensors of the sensory system. The aim were to evaluate postural control and plantar pressures before, during and after the use of proprioceptive insoles. Participated 15 subjects, age 19,62,1 years old, and body mass índex (BMI of 24,45,4 kg/m2. Postural assessment values have been measured the arrows on the spine curvature, followed by analysis of plantar pressures and measures for pedobarometricstabilometric for measuring of displacement of center of pressure before, during andafter the use of insoles. In the results we saw normal arrows post insole plantar pressureand stabilometry not statistically significant after its use. Conclued that after using these insole, was saw an adequate postural realignment, probably due to adequate muscle and posture tonedemonstrating the importance of assessing the captor podal for understanding postural disordens.

  11. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... martial arts all provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as ... doctor or physical therapist to prescribe an exercise program that matches your abilities. Neck Press This is ...

  12. Exercise Headaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... headaches may require emergency medical attention. Symptoms Primary exercise headaches These headaches: Are usually described as throbbing ... sides of the head in most cases Secondary exercise headaches These headaches may cause: The same symptoms ...

  13. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are ... a Success Story to Share? | Contact Us SPINE CARE PROVIDERS GO HERE © 2018 North American Spine Society | ...

  14. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... movements. Repeat 10-15 times, to fatigue... Abdominal Exercise Lay on your back with both knees bent. ... repetitions at a slow and controlled pace... Resistance Training Resistance training is exercise done against something providing ...

  15. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prescribe an exercise program that matches your abilities. Neck Press This is an isometric exercise to strengthen your neck. Press your palm against your forehead, then use ...

  16. Exercise Habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or months before you notice some of the benefits of exercise, such as weight loss. If you miss a ... can also keep you accountable. Think of the benefits of regular exercise. Write down the benefits and goals, and keep ...

  17. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Pilates, yoga and martial arts all provide well-rounded core strengthening programs. Simple exercises can be done at home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are described below. ...

  18. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain ... area. This can be done with quick short movements, or slow full movements. Repeat 10-15 times, ...

  19. Therapeutic actions for the compensation on postural changes in athletes of Race walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annia Gómez Valdés

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The research that is presented refers to the importance of having a control on the posture alterations that can be appreciated in athletes of sport march (12-15 years old in the sport formation school “Ormani Arenado", Pinar del Río; especially according to the age of these walkers. Its objective is aimed at proposing therapeutic actions for the compensation of the posture alterations, treated from planning physical preparation, based on indications as the positions and convenient movements, treatment goals and exercises for each deformity; addressing individual characteristics. For the realization of the investigation it was used theoretical, empiric and statistical methods which were facilitated to conclude that the adoption of incorrect postures during the training and the intensive use of the skeletal-muscle and locomotive systems impacts in the occurrence of the posture alterations that they rebound negatively in working of the athletes study object, standing out in them cavus feet, varus knees, lordosis and scoliosis; with the result that it is necessary their compensation and / or correction from the training of the physical preparation; so the application of therapeutic actions proposed to confirm their effectiveness in order to extend the study to other categories is recommended.

  20. Galois theory through exercises

    CERN Document Server

    Brzeziński, Juliusz

    2018-01-01

    This textbook offers a unique introduction to classical Galois theory through many concrete examples and exercises of varying difficulty (including computer-assisted exercises). In addition to covering standard material, the book explores topics related to classical problems such as Galois’ theorem on solvable groups of polynomial equations of prime degrees, Nagell's proof of non-solvability by radicals of quintic equations, Tschirnhausen's transformations, lunes of Hippocrates, and Galois' resolvents. Topics related to open conjectures are also discussed, including exercises related to the inverse Galois problem and cyclotomic fields. The author presents proofs of theorems, historical comments and useful references alongside the exercises, providing readers with a well-rounded introduction to the subject and a gateway to further reading. A valuable reference and a rich source of exercises with sample solutions, this book will be useful to both students and lecturers. Its original concept makes it particula...

  1. Postural control in blind individuals: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, Rodolfo Borges; Grecco, Luanda André Collange; Oliveira, Claudia Santos

    2017-09-01

    Postural control (PC) requires the interaction of the three sensory systems for a good maintenance of the balance, and in blind people, lack of visual input can harm your PC. Thus the objective is to perform a literature review concerning role of sight in the maintenance of PC and the adaptation of brain structures when vision is absent. Studies were searched from Pubmed, and EMBASE that included individuals with congenital blindness. Articles studying person with acquired blindness or low vision was excluded from this review. 26 out of 322 articles were selected for review, and we found that 1) blind individuals exhibit PC deficits and that is compensated by the intensification of the remaining systems; 2) Neuroplastic adaptation occurs throughout the entire cerebral cortex; and 3) Sensorimotor stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation seem to be a rehabilitation strategy. According to this review, the findings suggest that improved remaining sensations in the presence of adaptations and neuroplasticity, does not translate into better postural control performance. Regarding rehabilitation strategies, more studies are needed to show which therapeutic modality best contributes to postural control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of whole body vibration, posture and manual materials handling as risk factors for low back pain in occupational drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunribido, O O; Magnusson, M; Pope, M H

    2008-03-01

    It seems evident that occupational drivers have an increased risk of developing back pain. Not only are they exposed to whole body vibration (vibration), their work often includes exposure to several other risk factors for low back pain (LBP), particularly the seated posture (posture) and manual materials handling (MMH). Excessive demands on posture are likely to be aggravated by vibration and vice versa, and the risks may be further compounded when MMH is performed. This study investigated the relative role of vibration, posture and MMH as risk factors for LBP and the stated hypothesis was that the risks for LBP in drivers are the combined effect of vibration, posture and/or MMH. The findings showed that interaction effects due to posture and one or both of vibration and MMH, rather than the individual exposure effects, are the main contributors for precipitation of LBP.

  3. STUDY OF POSTURAL ABNORMALITIES OF MALE STUDENTS OF SAHAND UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hefzollesan Mehrdad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been accomplished in order to examine the prevalence of postural abnormalities of male students. The statistical community was the whole male students in the university. From this community 300 students within the ages range of 18 - 22 were selected randomly as the investigation subjects. Data were obtained by a questionnaire, podoscope, a digital camera (taking photos of the subjects from Anterior, Posterior and lateral views and the software for corrective exercises provided by Iran ministry of education. After that the investigation was finished the abundance percentage was used to express the postural abnormalities percentage of the research subjects. The results show that cervical lordosis and flat foot are the most prevalent abnormalities with18.66 and 17.66 percent respectively, and torticollis and knee hyperextension have less prevalence in investigation subjects. The results show that among all of the participants in the investigation, 140 students (46.66 % have no abnormalities, 160 students (53.34 % have at least one, and 70 students (23.33 % have more than one. From this study it is obvious that the prevalence of the postural abnormalities among the statistical subjects is high. Therefore the need to a serious program concerning the abnormalities, especially ordering corrective exercises and also preparing the way for students to have physical activities seems to be inevitable.

  4. Neck posture during lifting and its effect on trunk muscle activation and lumbar spine posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavenka, Thomas M; Christner, Vanessa F K; Gregory, Diane E

    2017-07-01

    Neck and head posture have been found to have a significant influence on the posture of the lower spine region during lifting and both an extended/upward gaze and a flexed/downward gaze have been hypothesized to lead to increased pain and/or overuse of the neck musculature. As a result, strength training recommendations have turned to the use of a retracted neck posture as being the safer posture to assume during lifting. This study examined trunk and neck muscle activity and lumbar spine posture in seven participants while performing moderate load lifts using a retracted neck posture (chin drawn in posteriorly; recently gaining popularity among coaches, trainers, and physical therapists to reduce neck pain during lifting, and freestyle neck posture (no instructions given). The retracted neck resulted in less lumbar spine flexion and increased lumbar erector spinae, external oblique, and sternocleidomastoid activity. The retracted posture also resulted in decreased activity in the thoracic erector spinae and dorsal neck musculature. The increased trunk and sternocleidomastoid activity and decreased spine flexion observed in the seven participants of this study when lifting with a retracted neck may have the potential to help lower the risk of spine pain/injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of Human Posture Simulation Method for Assessing Posture Angles and Spinal Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming-Lun; Waters, Thomas; Werren, Dwight

    2015-01-01

    Video-based posture analysis employing a biomechanical model is gaining a growing popularity for ergonomic assessments. A human posture simulation method of estimating multiple body postural angles and spinal loads from a video record was developed to expedite ergonomic assessments. The method was evaluated by a repeated measures study design with three trunk flexion levels, two lift asymmetry levels, three viewing angles and three trial repetitions as experimental factors. The study comprised two phases evaluating the accuracy of simulating self and other people’s lifting posture via a proxy of a computer-generated humanoid. The mean values of the accuracy of simulating self and humanoid postures were 12° and 15°, respectively. The repeatability of the method for the same lifting condition was excellent (~2°). The least simulation error was associated with side viewing angle. The estimated back compressive force and moment, calculated by a three dimensional biomechanical model, exhibited a range of 5% underestimation. The posture simulation method enables researchers to simultaneously quantify body posture angles and spinal loading variables with accuracy and precision comparable to on-screen posture matching methods. PMID:26361435

  6. A novel method for neck coordination exercise – a pilot study on persons with chronic non-specific neck pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björklund Martin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neck pain is a common problem and is often associated with changes in sensorimotor functions, such as reduced proprioceptive acuity of the neck, altered coordination of the cervical muscles, and increased postural sway. In line with these findings there are studies supporting the efficacy of exercises targeting different aspects of sensorimotor function, for example training aimed at improving proprioception and muscle coordination. To further develop this type of exercises we have designed a novel device and method for neck coordination training. The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical applicability of the method and to obtain indications of preliminary effects on sensorimotor functions, symptoms and self-rated characteristics in non-specific chronic neck pain Methods The study was designed as an uncontrolled clinical trial including fourteen subjects with chronic non-specific neck pain. A new device was designed to allow for an open skills task with adjustable difficulty. With visual feedback, subjects had to control the movement of a metal ball on a flat surface with a rim strapped on the subjects' head. Eight training sessions were performed over a four week period. Skill acquisition was measured throughout the intervention period. After intervention subjects were interviewed about their experience of the exercise and pain and sensorimotor functions, including the fast and slow components of postural sway and jerkiness-, range-, position sense-, movement time- and velocity of cervical rotation, were measured. At six-month follow up, self-rated pain, health and functioning was collected. Results The subjects improved their skill to perform the exercise and were overall positive to the method. No residual negative side-effects due to the exercise were reported. After intervention the fast component of postural sway (p = 0.019 and jerkiness of cervical rotation (p = 0.032 were reduced. The follow up

  7. Neck pain and postural balance among workers with high postural demands - a cross-sectional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie B.; Skotte, Jørgen H.; Holtermann, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Neck pain is related to impaired postural balance among patients and is highly prevalent among workers with high postural demands, for example, cleaners. We therefore hypothesised, that cleaners with neck pain suffer from postural dysfunction. This cross-sectional study tested if cleaners with neck...... pain have an impaired postural balance compared with cleaners without neck pain. Postural balance of 194 cleaners with (n = 85) and without (N = 109) neck pain was studied using three different tests. Success or failure to maintain the standing position for 30 s in unilateral stance was recorded....... Furthermore a perturbation test was performed. More cleaners with neck pain (81%) failed the unilateral stance compared with cleaners without neck pain (61%) (p

  8. Levels of physical fitness and analysis of posture tendencies in classic ballerinas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Prati

    2006-03-01

    -term training and forminimizing risk for posture problems, the training should include general and specific physical fitness and also compensatory exercises for the ballet dancers. RESUMO O ballet clássico é uma modalidade de dança praticada por crianças e adolescentes ao longo de todo o seu processo de desenvolvimento. Para se chegar ao estágio de elevado desempenho técnico e performance são necessários mais de sete anos de prática. Nesse sentido, a repetição dos movimentos técnicos pode promover a aquisição de algumas tendências de postura, bem como desenvolver aspectos da aptidão física específica. O objetivo desse trabalho descritivo foi de analisar níveis de aptidão física e tendências posturais de bailarinas clássicas. A amostra foi composta por onze bailarinas clássicas (com mais de sete anos de prática de escolas de ballet de Maringá. Para análise de tendências posturais foi utilizado o método PSU adaptado por Althoff et al. (1988 utilizando-se de avaliação subjetiva através de simetrógrafo e análise de desvios por seguimentos corporais (ideal quando ICP>85%. Para verificação dos níveis de aptidão física utilizou-se da análise de composição corporal por antropometria (IMC, %Gordura e relação cintura quadril=RCQ, testes de força (dinamometria=D, flexão de braços (FB, resistência abdominal (RA, potência muscular (impulsão vertical=IV e horizontal=IH, flexibilidade (Banco Well’s=Fl e potência aeróbica (Teste de 12’. Resultados principais foram: níveis médios de composição corporal (IMC=19,9kg/m2; %G=22,7% e RCQ=0,69 adequados à sua atividade; nos aspectos físicos, força e resistência (D=50,3kgf, FB=21, RA=23 e Fl=40cm, potência muscular (IV=36,8cm e IH=136cm e capacidade aeróbica (12’=1526m os resultados em média foram inferiores ao esperado. Quanto à postura, apresentaram em média índice de correção postural (ICP igual a 86,9%, e tendência a desvios nas regiões da cabeça e pescoço (13% cifose

  9. Changes in Postural Sway After a Single Global Postural Reeducation Session in University Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Quijada, Carlos; Poveda-Pagán, Emilio J; Segura-Heras, José V; Hernández-Sánchez, Sergio; Prieto-Castelló, María J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a single session of global postural reeducation (GPR) in postural sway in young adult university students who use data visualization screens. A randomized controlled trial with 2 parallel groups was performed. Sixty-four subjects were randomized in the experimental group (12 men and 20 women) who underwent the GPR session, and a control group (13 men and 19 women) that did not receive any intervention was included. Center of pressure (COP) was assessed using a stabilometric platform, with eyes open and eyes closed before, immediately after, 48 hours after, and 7 days after intervention in both groups. In the interaction of time and gender, statistically significant differences were found for the area covered by COP (P = .020) and for the standard deviation (SD) in the mediolateral axis (P = .035). Considering the complete interaction time, gender, and group, statistically significant differences were found (P = .015) for the anteroposterior rate covered by COP and the SD in the anteroposterior axis (P = .033). In eyes closed condition, the intersubject analysis showed statistically significant differences for the interaction between group and gender for the variable mediolateral SD (P = .043). Considering the interaction of time with group, statistically significant differences were found for full length covered by COP (P = .017). Changes in postural sway were observed after a single GPR session, mainly at 48 hours, with different behaviors between men and women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Head movements and postures as pain behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamadi, Ayoub; Limbrecht-Ecklundt, Kerstin; Walter, Steffen; Traue, Harald C.

    2018-01-01

    Pain assessment can benefit from observation of pain behaviors, such as guarding or facial expression, and observational pain scales are widely used in clinical practice with nonverbal patients. However, little is known about head movements and postures in the context of pain. In this regard, we analyze videos of three publically available datasets. The BioVid dataset was recorded with healthy participants subjected to painful heat stimuli. In the BP4D dataset, healthy participants performed a cold-pressor test and several other tasks (meant to elicit emotion). The UNBC dataset videos show shoulder pain patients during range-of-motion tests to their affected and unaffected limbs. In all videos, participants were sitting in an upright position. We studied head movements and postures that occurred during the painful and control trials by measuring head orientation from video over time, followed by analyzing posture and movement summary statistics and occurrence frequencies of typical postures and movements. We found significant differences between pain and control trials with analyses of variance and binomial tests. In BioVid and BP4D, pain was accompanied by head movements and postures that tend to be oriented downwards or towards the pain site. We also found differences in movement range and speed in all three datasets. The results suggest that head movements and postures should be considered for pain assessment and research. As additional pain indicators, they possibly might improve pain management whenever behavior is assessed, especially in nonverbal individuals such as infants or patients with dementia. However, in advance more research is needed to identify specific head movements and postures in pain patients. PMID:29444153

  11. Head movements and postures as pain behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Werner

    Full Text Available Pain assessment can benefit from observation of pain behaviors, such as guarding or facial expression, and observational pain scales are widely used in clinical practice with nonverbal patients. However, little is known about head movements and postures in the context of pain. In this regard, we analyze videos of three publically available datasets. The BioVid dataset was recorded with healthy participants subjected to painful heat stimuli. In the BP4D dataset, healthy participants performed a cold-pressor test and several other tasks (meant to elicit emotion. The UNBC dataset videos show shoulder pain patients during range-of-motion tests to their affected and unaffected limbs. In all videos, participants were sitting in an upright position. We studied head movements and postures that occurred during the painful and control trials by measuring head orientation from video over time, followed by analyzing posture and movement summary statistics and occurrence frequencies of typical postures and movements. We found significant differences between pain and control trials with analyses of variance and binomial tests. In BioVid and BP4D, pain was accompanied by head movements and postures that tend to be oriented downwards or towards the pain site. We also found differences in movement range and speed in all three datasets. The results suggest that head movements and postures should be considered for pain assessment and research. As additional pain indicators, they possibly might improve pain management whenever behavior is assessed, especially in nonverbal individuals such as infants or patients with dementia. However, in advance more research is needed to identify specific head movements and postures in pain patients.

  12. Exercise addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Christiansen, Erik; Elklit, Ask

    2014-01-01

    Exercise addiction is characterized by excessive exercise patterns with potential negative consequences such as overuse injuries. The aim of this study was to compare eating disorder symptoms, quality of life, personality traits and attachments styles in exercisers with and without indications...... of exercise addiction. A case-control study with 121 exercisers was conducted. The exercisers were categorized into an addiction group (n=41) or a control group (n=80) on the basis of their responses to the Exercise Addiction Inventory. The participants completed the Eating Disorder Inventory 2, the Short......-Form 36, the NEO Personality Inventory Revised and the Adult Attachment Scale. The addiction group scored higher on eating disorder symptoms, especially on perfectionism but not as high as eating disorder populations. The characteristic personality traits in the addiction group were high levels...

  13. Exercise for haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strike, Karen; Mulder, Kathy; Michael, Rojer

    2016-12-19

    Haemophilia is a bleeding disorder associated with haemorrhaging into joints and muscles. Exercise is often used to aid recovery after bleeds, and to improve joint function in the presence of arthropathy. Our objective was to systematically review the available evidence on the safety and effectiveness of exercise for people with haemophilia. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register and electronic databases PubMed, OVID-Embase, and CINAHL. We hand searched abstracts from congresses of the World Federation of Hemophilia and the European Hematology Association, trial registries and the reference lists of relevant articles.Date of the last search of the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register: 14 December 2016. Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled studies comparing any exercise intervention considered relevant in haemophilia management including supervised, unsupervised, aquatic, strengthening, aerobic or cardiovascular, stretching, proprioceptive and balance training exercise programs in males of any age with haemophilia A or B of any severity (those with co-morbidities were not excluded). Two authors reviewed the identified abstracts to determine their eligibility. For studies meeting the inclusion criteria, full articles were obtained. The two authors extracted data and assessed the risk of bias. Any disagreements were resolved by discussion. The authors contacted study investigators to obtain any missing data. Eight studies were included, which represented 233 males with all severities of haemophilia A and B, ranging in age from eight years to 49 years. Study duration ranged from four to 12 weeks. Exercise interventions varied greatly and included resistance exercises, isometric exercises, bicycle ergometry, treadmill walking and hydrotherapy; therefore, comparison between studies was difficult.None of the studies measured or reported adverse effects from

  14. Effect of IQoro® training on impaired postural control and oropharyngeal motor function in patients with dysphagia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägg, Mary; Tibbling, Lita

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion All patients with dysphagia after stroke have impaired postural control. IQoro® screen (IQS) training gives a significant and lasting improvement of postural control running parallel with significant improvement of oropharyngeal motor dysfunction (OPMD). Objectives The present investigation aimed at studying the frequency of impaired postural control in patients with stroke-related dysphagia and if IQS training has any effect on impaired postural control in parallel with effect on OPMD. Method A prospective clinical study was carried out with 26 adult patients with stroke-related dysphagia. The training effect was compared between patients consecutively investigated at two different time periods, the first period with 15 patients included in the study more than half a year after stroke, the second period with 11 patients included within 1 month after stroke. Postural control tests and different oropharyngeal motor tests were performed before and after 3 months of oropharyngeal sensorimotor training with an IQS, and at a late follow-up (median 59 weeks after end of training). Result All patients had impaired postural control at baseline. Significant improvement in postural control and OPMD was observed after the completion of IQS training in both intervention groups. The improvements were still present at the late follow-up.

  15. Evaluation of relations between body posture parameters with somatic features and motor abilities of boys aged 14 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Lizis

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction[/b]. Body posture is an individual characteristic for everyone, it shows great differentiation – especially in people during their progressive development. As a result, the variability of the development and lack of physical activity impose body posture defects in children and youth. In the literature there is a great lack of measureable data on the relations between correct body posture with somatic features, especially motor features in children at the developing age. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relations between correct body posture parameters, measured with the photogrammetric method, with some of the somatic features and motor abilities of boys at the age of 14. [b]material and methods[/b]. The study included 133 boys aged 14 attending junior secondary schools in the Kraków area of Poland. Only boys with the correct body posture were examined. Posture was examined by the Moire method, through which six parameters were obtained in the sagittal plane, seven in the frontal plane, and one in the transverse plane. The somatic measurements included basic parameters, such as body weight and body height. The measurements of motor features included: marching balance test, speed movement test of the arms and their functional strength. To evaluate the relationships between correct body posture with the characteristics of somatic and motor abilities, the Spearman rank correlation was used. The lowest level of statistical significance was accepted at p ≤ 0,05. [b]results[/b]. No correlations were noted between some of the correct body posture features and the somatic features, and some of the motor abilities of the examined boys at the level of p ≤ 0.05 and p ≤ 0.01. [b]conclusions[/b]. The irregular correlation between the correct body posture and somatic and motor features probably results from the rather big development variability of the boys during puberty.

  16. Physical exercise in treatment of patients with lumbar discopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziszewski, Krzysztof Roch

    2007-01-01

    The beneficial effect of physical exercise in the treatment of patients with intervertebral lumbar discopathy is generally known. Regular exercise has a beneficial effect on motor performance of the spine, increasing the degree of active stabilization. Exercise also improves posture control, coordination and precision of movement, preventing spinal fatigue and micro injuries. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the popularity of physical exercise in lumbar discopathy patients. 665 patients, 16 76 years of age, with L4-L5 or L5- with discopathy, were enrolled in the study.348 patients received only conservative therapy, while 317 had undergone surgery. 55.6% of the conservatively managed patients and 57.4% of the surgically managed patients reported regular physical exercise. Patients receiving conservative therapy exercised for approx. 1 hour a week. Older patients exercised for a shorter period than young and middle-aged patients. In long-term follow-up, 2.2% more patients performed spinal exercises. Surgical patients devoted the most time to spinal exercise during the first 3 years after surgery. In long-term follow-up, the percentage of regularly exercising patients decreased by 3.9%. On average, 16.8% of conservatively managed patients and 21.5% of surgically managed patients exercised for more than 2 hours per week. Only approx. 20% of patients regularly engaged in spinal exercises for ca. 30 minutes daily. There is insufficient use of physical exercise of the spine for the prevention and treatment of lumbar discopathy.

  17. Views on Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Michele Rose; Katz, Janet; Benavides-Vaello, Sandra; Oneal, Gail; Holliday, Carrie

    2017-06-01

    There is a large prevalence of asthma, particularly among Hispanic children. Although physical activity is a good way to manage asthma, more Hispanic children with asthma lack activity than their healthy classmates. Given this, the purpose of this study was to explore the development of exercise perceptions in Hispanic children with asthma and to further develop an existing explanatory theory. Grounded theory was the approach for the study. Grounded theory illuminated components of exercise perceptions from participants. Participants included Hispanic children with asthma, their families, and professionals who work with Hispanic children with asthma ( n = 29). Findings from this study supported the previously identified grounded theory called The Process of Creating Perceptions of Exercise. In addition, two new concepts ( cultural and peer influences) were identified that further explain the category of exercise influences. The revised theory can be used to assist in developing nursing interventions aimed at increasing exercise participation among Hispanic children with asthma.

  18. The Effects of Tai Chi and Neck Exercises in the Treatment of Chronic Nonspecific Neck Pain: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauche, Romy; Stumpe, Christoph; Fehr, Johannes; Cramer, Holger; Cheng, Ying Wu; Wayne, Peter M; Rampp, Thomas; Langhorst, Jost; Dobos, Gustav

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to test the efficacy of Tai Chi for treating chronic neck pain. Subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of group Tai Chi or conventional neck exercises with weekly sessions of 75 to 90 minutes, or a wait-list control. The primary outcome measure was pain intensity (visual analogue scale). Secondary outcomes included pain on movement, functional disability, quality of life, well-being and perceived stress, postural and interoceptive awareness, satisfaction, and safety. Altogether, 114 participants were included (91 women, 49.4 ± 11.7 years of age). After 12 weeks Tai Chi participants reported significantly less pain compared with the wait list group (average difference in mm on the visual analogue scale: -10.5; 95% confidence interval, -20.3 to -.9; P = .033). Group differences were also found for pain on movement, functional disability, and quality of life compared with the wait list group. No differences were found for Tai Chi compared with neck exercises. Patients' satisfaction with both exercise interventions was high, and only minor side effects were observed. Tai Chi was more effective than no treatment in improving pain in subjects with chronic nonspecific neck pain. Because Tai Chi is probably as effective as neck exercises it may be considered a suitable alternative to conventional exercises for those with a preference toward Tai Chi. This article presents results of a randomized controlled trial comparing Tai Chi, conventional neck exercises, and no treatment for chronic nonspecific neck pain. Results indicate that Tai Chi exercises and conventional neck exercises are equally effective in improving pain and quality of life therefore representing beneficial interventions for neck pain. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of different exercise programs on the psychological and cognitive functions of people with Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gobbi,Lilian Teresa Bucken; Teixeira-Arroyo,Claudia; Lirani-Silva,Ellen; Vitório,Rodrigo; Barbieri,Fabio Augusto; Pereira,Marcelo Pinto

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of different exercise programs on the psychological and cognitive functions in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Forty-five patients with PD participated in the study. The participants were randomized in three intervention programs: Group-1 (n=15, cognitive-activities), Group-2 (n=15, multimodal exercise) and Group-3 (n=15, exercises for posture and gait). The clinical, psychological and cognitive functions were assessed before and aft...

  20. Posture Stabilization of Robot by Visual Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Keisuke; Nagahara, Masanori; Uchimura, Yutaka

    In the future, with progress in robotics, robots will play an important role in the daily lives of human beings. The posture of a robot should be stable so that it does not fall. The posture of robots has been maintained stable mainly by using force and acceleration sensors. However, human beings maintain the stability of their postures on the basis of not only floor reaction force but also visual information. Therefore the use of visual information could be effective in maintaining the stability of the posture of a robot. The rotation invariant phase only correlation (RIPOC) method can be used to measure the rotation angle between two images. The accuracy of the RIPOC method is high in the case of 2D images, for example, in the case of fingerprint recognition and face recognition. However, it is difficult to accurately measure the rotation angle in 3D space by using this method. This paper describes a new extended RIPOC method that can be used to accurately measure the rotation angle in 3D space. By using visual feedback by the proposed method, the posture of robots can be stabilized. Experimental results that confirm the effectiveness of this method are provided in this paper.

  1. BODY POSTURES AND ASYMMETRIES IN FRONTAL AND TRANSVERSE PLANES IN THE TRUNK AREA IN TABLE TENNIS PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Barczyk-Pawelec

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to assess the body posture within the trunk area in table tennis players and to estimate the correlations between the specific body posture types, their asymmetries and table tennis practice (training experience. To evaluate body posture the photogrammetric method based on the Moiré phenomenon with equipment by CQ Electronic was applied. Tests of significance of difference and correlation were used to estimate the correlation of the observed asymmetries with the training experience. 40 table tennis players and 43 subjects not practising sports participated in the research. The analysis of the results revealed that table tennis players, unlike non-players, are characterized by kyphotic body posture. It probably results from a specific trunk, head and limb position during table tennis matches. Thus, many asymmetries in frontal and transverse planes were observed in the examined table tennis players. Perhaps table tennis, which is characterized by intensive and one-sided trunk muscle work during its performance, is in favour of creating asymmetries. The majority of subjects did not reveal any statistically significant correlations between the observed body posture types, their asymmetries and training experience. However, it was observed that training experience is significantly related to the considerable asymmetry of the inclination angle of shoulder line (KLB. It may result from the negative influence of very intensive, one-sided work and constant work of the shoulder girdle muscles of the playing limb with negligence of exercises of the second limb.

  2. Therapeutic patient education and exercise therapy in patients with cervicogenic dizziness: a prospective case series clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguez-Zuazo, Ana; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; Saiz, Beatriz Moral; La Touche, Roy; Lara, Sergio Lerma

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment for patients with cervicogenic dizziness that consisted of therapeutic education and exercises. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory and Neck Disability Index were used. Secondary outcomes included range of motion, postural control, and psychological variables. Seven patients (two males and five females) aged 38.43±14.10 with cervicogenic dizziness were included. All the participants received eight treatment sessions. The treatment was performed twice a week during a four weeks period. Outcome measures included a questionnaire (demographic data, body chart, and questions about pain) and self-reported disability, pain, and psychological variables. Subjects were examined for cervical range of motion and postural control. All of these variables were assessed pre- and postintervention. Participants received eight sessions of therapeutic education patient and therapeutic exercise. The majority of participants showed an improvement in catastrophism (mean change, 11.57±7.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.96-18.17; d=1.60), neck disability (mean change, 5.14±2.27.28; 95% CI, 3.04-7.24; d=1.32), and dizziness disability (mean change, 9.71±6.96; 95% CI, 3.26-16.15; d=1.01). Patients also showed improved range of motion in the right and left side. Therapeutic patient education in combination with therapeutic exercise was an effective treatment. Future research should investigate the efficacy of therapeutic patient education and exercise with larger sample sizes of patients with cervicogenic dizziness.

  3. Construct Validity and Reliability of the SARA Gait and Posture Sub-scale in Early Onset Ataxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjitske F. Lawerman

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In children, gait and posture assessment provides a crucial marker for the early characterization, surveillance and treatment evaluation of early onset ataxia (EOA. For reliable data entry of studies targeting at gait and posture improvement, uniform quantitative biomarkers are necessary. Until now, the pediatric test construct of gait and posture scores of the Scale for Assessment and Rating of Ataxia sub-scale (SARA is still unclear. In the present study, we aimed to validate the construct validity and reliability of the pediatric (SARAGAIT/POSTURE sub-scale.Methods: We included 28 EOA patients [15.5 (6–34 years; median (range]. For inter-observer reliability, we determined the ICC on EOA SARAGAIT/POSTURE sub-scores by three independent pediatric neurologists. For convergent validity, we associated SARAGAIT/POSTURE sub-scores with: (1 Ataxic gait Severity Measurement by Klockgether (ASMK; dynamic balance, (2 Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS; static balance, (3 Gross Motor Function Classification Scale -extended and revised version (GMFCS-E&R, (4 SARA-kinetic scores (SARAKINETIC; kinetic function of the upper and lower limbs, (5 Archimedes Spiral (AS; kinetic function of the upper limbs, and (6 total SARA scores (SARATOTAL; i.e., summed SARAGAIT/POSTURE, SARAKINETIC, and SARASPEECH sub-scores. For discriminant validity, we investigated whether EOA co-morbidity factors (myopathy and myoclonus could influence SARAGAIT/POSTURE sub-scores.Results: The inter-observer agreement (ICC on EOA SARAGAIT/POSTURE sub-scores was high (0.97. SARAGAIT/POSTURE was strongly correlated with the other ataxia and functional scales [ASMK (rs = -0.819; p < 0.001; PBS (rs = -0.943; p < 0.001; GMFCS-E&R (rs = -0.862; p < 0.001; SARAKINETIC (rs = 0.726; p < 0.001; AS (rs = 0.609; p = 0.002; and SARATOTAL (rs = 0.935; p < 0.001]. Comorbid myopathy influenced SARAGAIT/POSTURE scores by concurrent muscle weakness, whereas comorbid myoclonus predominantly influenced

  4. Análise da postura craniocervical de crianças respiradoras bucais após tratamento postural em bola suíça Craniocervical posture analysis of mouth breathing children after postural treatment on swiss ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Weber

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available O estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a postura craniocervical de crianças respiradoras bucais após tratamento postural em bola suíça. Doze crianças respiradoras bucais foram submetidas a um protocolo de reeducação postural constituído por exercícios de alongamento e fortalecimento muscular sobre a bola suíça, estimulação diafragmática e alongamento dos músculos acessórios da inspiração. A postura craniocervical foi avaliada através da análise biofotogramétrica. A posição da anteriorização da cabeça foi aferida por meio do ângulo formado pelos pontos localizados no tragus direito e no processo espinhoso da sétima vértebra cervical com a linha horizontal. A curvatura cervical foi avaliada pela distância horizontal de uma linha vertical tangenciando o ápice da cifose torácica e o ponto de maior concavidade da curvatura cervical. As fotografias foram obtidas antes e após dez atendimentos. A normalidade das variáveis foi verificada a partir do teste Shapiro-Wilk. Para as comparações entre as médias foi utilizado o teste t de Student para amostras dependentes admitindo-se nível de significância de 5% (pThe study aimed to evaluate the craniocervical posture of mouth breathing children after postural treatment on swiss ball. Twelve mouth breathing children were undergone to a postural reeducation protocol through stretching and strengthening exercises on swiss ball, diaphragmatic stimulation and stretching of the inspiratory accessory muscles. Craniocervical posture was evaluated through biophotogrammetry analysis. Forward head position was measured through an angle formed by the points in the tragus and in the spinous process of the seventh cervical vertebra with a horizontal line. Cervical column curvature was taken by the horizontal distance from a vertical line passing through the thoracic kyphosis apex to the point of the greatest cervical curvature concavity. Pictures were taken before and after ten treatment

  5. Exercise 5+6 - Introduction to Control and Lab Exercises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramer, Morten Mejlhede

    2015-01-01

    Exercises for the 2nd AAU and ECN EWTEC affiliated PhD course. The laboratory exercises are including both numerical and experimental work. A simulink model is provided to make realtime control on the laboratory setups. The groups are welcome to modify the program during the exercises. The groups...... are expected to make their own programs for numerical simulations on the device. Hydrodynamic parameters found using WAMIT are provided, but the groups are of course welcome to calculate their own parameters (e.g. using Nemoh). Exercise 5: Simple control and regular wave Exercise 6: Advanced control...

  6. Neck pain and postural balance among workers with high postural demands - a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Neck pain is related to impaired postural balance among patients and is highly prevalent among workers with high postural demands, for example, cleaners. We therefore hypothesised, that cleaners with neck pain suffer from postural dysfunction. This cross-sectional study tested if cleaners with neck pain have an impaired postural balance compared with cleaners without neck pain. Methods Postural balance of 194 cleaners with (n = 85) and without (N = 109) neck pain was studied using three different tests. Success or failure to maintain the standing position for 30 s in unilateral stance was recorded. Participants were asked to stand on a force platform for 30 s in the Romberg position with eyes open and closed. The centre of pressure of the sway was calculated, and separated into a slow (rambling) and fast (trembling) component. Subsequently, the 95% confidence ellipse area (CEA) was calculated. Furthermore a perturbation test was performed. Results More cleaners with neck pain (81%) failed the unilateral stance compared with cleaners without neck pain (61%) (p neck pain in comparison with cleaners without neck pain in the Romberg position with eyes closed, but not with eyes open. Conclusions Postural balance is impaired among cleaners with neck pain and the current study suggests a particular role of the slow component of postural sway. Furthermore, the unilateral stance test is a simple test to illustrate functional impairment among cleaners with concurrent neck and low back pain. Trial registration ISRCTN96241850 PMID:21806796

  7. Objective Markers of Postural Instability in Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riley, Michael A; Shockley, Kevin D

    2005-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this proposal was to identify markers of postural instability associated with PD and to relate the objective measures of postural instability to clinical ratings of PD severity...

  8. Sagittal evaluation of usual standing and sitting spinal posture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claeys, Kurt; Brumagne, Simon; Deklerck, Jan; Vanderhaeghen, Jacques; Dankaerts, Wim

    2016-04-01

    Postural rehabilitation often plays an important role in the management of non-specific low back pain. While cervical and lumbar correlations have been demonstrated previously, the different role of the pelvis and the thoracic spine for postural control in sitting and standing remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate postural correlations between all spinal regions in standing and sitting. Based on digital photographs eight postural angles were analyzed in 99 young healthy persons. Pearson correlations between different postural angles were calculated. In sitting pelvic tilt demonstrated mostly medium correlations with five out of seven other postural angles, compared to three in standing. In standing trunk angle showed five out of seven mostly medium correlations with other regions compared to four out of seven in usual sitting. The low and different correlations suggest a large between-subject variability in sagittal spinal posture, without the existence of any optimal sagittal posture. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lying Posture Classification for Pressure Ulcer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Phyo Wai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure ulcers are a common problem among patients with limited mobility, such as those bed-bound and wheelchair-bound. Constant and prolonged applied pressure is one of the extrinsic factors contributing to the development of pressure ulcers. Analyzing lying postures together with interface pressure measurements from a pressure sensitive bed helps revealing pressure hot spots that can potentially lead to pressure ulcer development. We propose an intelligent system that features lying posture classification with pressure hot spots identification based on interface pressure measurements to possibly identify potential pressure ulcer risk and to provide effective preventive measures. Experimental outcomes correctly classify different lying postures with an accuracy of up to 93%. The proposed system is expected to assist caregivers to detect risk evidence and to provide timely and appropriate interventions for effective pressure ulcer prevention.

  10. Postural balance in low back pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian; Jensen, Lone Donbæk

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (CoP...... Ratio) might be of clinical interest. This study aimed to assess postural balance in LBP patients by analyzing intra-session reliability of CoP parameters on a portable force platform, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether CoP parameters and OLST measure identical...... aspects of postural stability. We examined 49 LBP patients and found acceptable reliability of the CoP parameters' trace length and velocity, whereas reliability regarding C90 area, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST was poor. Correlations between the CoP parameters and OLST were insignificant. Reliability...

  11. Human upright posture control models based on multisensory inputs; in fast and slow dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Ryosuke; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Ota, Jun; Yozu, Arito; Haga, Nobuhiko

    2016-03-01

    Posture control to maintain an upright stance is one of the most important and basic requirements in the daily life of humans. The sensory inputs involved in posture control include visual and vestibular inputs, as well as proprioceptive and tactile somatosensory inputs. These multisensory inputs are integrated to represent the body state (body schema); this is then utilized in the brain to generate the motion. Changes in the multisensory inputs result in postural alterations (fast dynamics), as well as long-term alterations in multisensory integration and posture control itself (slow dynamics). In this review, we discuss the fast and slow dynamics, with a focus on multisensory integration including an introduction of our study to investigate "internal force control" with multisensory integration-evoked posture alteration. We found that the study of the slow dynamics is lagging compared to that of fast dynamics, such that our understanding of long-term alterations is insufficient to reveal the underlying mechanisms and to propose suitable models. Additional studies investigating slow dynamics are required to expand our knowledge of this area, which would support the physical training and rehabilitation of elderly and impaired persons. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Classifying Transition Behaviour in Postural Activity Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James BRUSEY

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A few accelerometers positioned on different parts of the body can be used to accurately classify steady state behaviour, such as walking, running, or sitting. Such systems are usually built using supervised learning approaches. Transitions between postures are, however, difficult to deal with using posture classification systems proposed to date, since there is no label set for intermediary postures and also the exact point at which the transition occurs can sometimes be hard to pinpoint. The usual bypass when using supervised learning to train such systems is to discard a section of the dataset around each transition. This leads to poorer classification performance when the systems are deployed out of the laboratory and used on-line, particularly if the regimes monitored involve fast paced activity changes. Time-based filtering that takes advantage of sequential patterns is a potential mechanism to improve posture classification accuracy in such real-life applications. Also, such filtering should reduce the number of event messages needed to be sent across a wireless network to track posture remotely, hence extending the system’s life. To support time-based filtering, understanding transitions, which are the major event generators in a classification system, is a key. This work examines three approaches to post-process the output of a posture classifier using time-based filtering: a naïve voting scheme, an exponentially weighted voting scheme, and a Bayes filter. Best performance is obtained from the exponentially weighted voting scheme although it is suspected that a more sophisticated treatment of the Bayes filter might yield better results.

  13. FOOT POSTURAL DEVIATIONS IN FEMALE KATHAK DANCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopika Sabharwal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kathak is a very complex dance form in which greater emphasis is laid on foot work thus putting substantial amount of stress over the feet. The purpose of this study was to investigate the foot postural deviations amongst the Kathak dancers. Methods: Screening of 40 Female Kathak Dancers was done for the study from Department of Dance, Punjabi University, Patiala on the basis of inclusion criteria. Subjects were assessed for Postural deviations via. Foot Posture Index, Medial Longitudinal Arch Angle, Navicular Drop, Rearfoot angle and Forefoot angle. Results: Percentile analysis of Foot Posture index scores suggested that a large population of kathak dancers (approx 92.5 % have pronated feet. Most of the Kathak dancers showed increase in Rearfoot angle (approx. 90%, Forefoot angle (approx.75% and Navicular drop (approx. 97% and decrease in Medial Longitudinal Arch angle (approx. 95%. Analysis of Coefficient of Correlation suggested a significant positive relationship of Foot Posture Index scores with Rearfoot angle (r = 0.40, p= 0.0087, Navicular Drop (r = 0.62, p= < 0.0001 and Forefoot angle (r = 0.51, p=0.0007 and a significant negative correlation with Medial Longitudinal Arch angle (r = -0.42, p= 0.0059. Conclusion: From the observations, it can be concluded that with time kathak dancers start developing certain Postural Deviations at Foot which can lead to hyperpronation. These changes if not treated on time may lead to various degenerative changes in the Foot and Ankle thus leading to the instabilities and can also make them susceptible to foot and ankle injuries, shin pain, etc. Thus, the study recommends that the dancers should be educated and trained about the foot problems associated with kathak dance and their prevention.

  14. Long-term effects of exercise and physical therapy in people with Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Margaret K; Wong-Yu, Irene S; Shen, Xia; Chung, Chloe L

    2017-11-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative movement disorder with symptoms reflecting various impairments and functional limitations, such as postural instability, gait disturbance, immobility and falls. In addition to pharmacological and surgical management of PD, exercise and physical therapy interventions are also being actively researched. This Review provides an overview of the effects of PD on physical activity - including muscle weakness, reduced aerobic capacity, gait impairment, balance disorders and falls. Previously published reviews have discussed only the short-term benefits of exercises and physical therapy for people with PD. However, owing to the progressive nature of PD, the present Review focuses on the long-term effects of such interventions. We also discuss exercise-induced neuroplasticity, present data on the possible risks and adverse effects of exercise training, make recommendations for clinical practice, and describe new treatment approaches. Evidence suggests that a minimum of 4 weeks of gait training or 8 weeks of balance training can have positive effects that persist for 3-12 months after treatment completion. Sustained strength training, aerobic training, tai chi or dance therapy lasting at least 12 weeks can produce long-term beneficial effects. Further studies are needed to verify disease-modifying effects of these interventions.

  15. Exercise Prescriptions to Prevent Musculoskeletal Disorders in Dentists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dodda Kiran; Mohan, Sreevalli; Begum, Mohammadi; Prasad, Bhanu; Prasad, Eswar Ravi Vara

    2014-01-01

    Since the number of dental patients is increasing day by day dentists are forced to spend longer times in dental chairs. This is increasing the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in dentists. This article reviews the mechanisms causing musculoskeletal disorders among dentists and also covers the exercises that can be done to prevent them. Exercises that increase the fitness of a dentist are divided into aerobic exercises – concentrating on total body fitness, stretching exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that tend to tighten in prolonged dental postures and strengthening exercises – that concentrate on the muscles that are opposite to the tight muscles. These exercises are made simple and of minimal intensity so that a dentist can practice them independently. PMID:25177661

  16. Effect of training on the slackline on postural stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Brožková, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Title: Effect of training on the slackline on postural stabilization Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine whether training on the slackline affects postural stabilization of sample of sport aktive population. The aim was to detect changes in postural stabilization immediately after the first training (30 minutes) on the slackline and after long-term training on the slackline. Another aim was to determine to what extent influenced measurement on Posturomed itself postural stabili...

  17. Strategic political postures and political market orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ormrod, Robert P.; Henneberg, Stephan C.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the areas of strategic political marketing and political market orientation have been the subject of several conceptual articles which have provided the theoretical foundations for further empirical work. However, despite the close conceptual relatedness of the proposed concepts...... by developing an integrated concept of political marketing strategy using two complementary frameworks, namely Strategic Political Postures (SPP) and Political Market Orientation (PMO). We introduce the two main concepts and derive for each of the strategic posture-specific PMO profiles as well as inter...

  18. Signature verification with writing posture analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsu-Yung; Yu, Chih-Chang

    2013-07-01

    A video-based handwritten signature verification framework is proposed in this paper. Using a camera as the sensor has the advantage that the entire writing processes can be captured along with the signatures. The main contribution of this work is that writing postures are analyzed to achieve the verification purpose because the writing postures cannot be easily imitated or forged. The proposed system is able to achieve low false rejection rates while maintaining low false acceptance rates for database containing both unskilled and skilled imitation signatures.

  19. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Steroid Injections Lumbar Zygapophysical (Facet) Joint Injections PREVENTION Lifestyle Choices 10 Tips for a Healthy Back Smoking Weight Patient Safety Exercise Strengthening Strengthen ...

  20. Postural muscle atrophy prevention and recovery and bone remodelling through high frequency proprioception for astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Dario; Rossitto, Franco; Battocchio, Luciano

    2009-09-01

    The difficulty in applying active exercises during space flights increases the importance of passive countermeasures, but coupling load and instability remains indispensable for generating high frequency (HF) proprioceptive flows and preventing muscle atrophy and osteoporosis. The present study, in microgravity conditions during a parabolic flight, verified whether an electronic system, composed of a rocking board, a postural reader and a bungee-cord loading apparatus creates HF postural instability comparable to that reachable on the Earth. Tracking the subject, in single stance, to real-time visual signals is necessary to obtain HF instability situations. The bungee-cord loading apparatus allowed the subject to manage the 81.5% body weight load (100% could easily be exceeded). A preliminary training programme schedule on the Earth and in space is suggested. Comparison with a pathological muscle atrophy is presented. The possibility of generating HF proprioceptive flows could complement current countermeasures for the prevention and recovery of muscle atrophy and osteoporosis in terrestrial and space environments. These exercises combine massive activation of spindles and joint receptors, applying simultaneously HF variations of pressure to different areas of the sole of the foot. This class of exercises could improve the effectiveness of current countermeasures, reducing working time and fatigue.

  1. Postural control and central motor pathway involvement in type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mona Mokhtar El Bardawil

    2013-04-18

    Apr 18, 2013 ... parts of the central nervous system (CNS), which consists of the spinal cord and the brain, take part in controlling posture.6. The automatic postural responses are the earliest functionally effective responses that mediate a person's active postural movements' control in response to external balance perturba-.

  2. Posture and isokinetic shoulder strength in female water polo players

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kathryn van Boom

    Posture assessment. The participants were asked to wear appropriate clothing so that the natural curves of the body could be seen. The subjects were asked to stand in their normal, comfortable anatomical position with the postural grid behind them and not to correct any postural abnormalities. A plumb line was used as a.

  3. Development of the Coordination between Posture and Manual Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Jeffrey M.; Claxton, Laura J.; Keen, Rachel; Berthier, Neil E.; Riccio, Gary E.; Hamill, Joseph; Van Emmerik, Richard E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Studies have suggested that proper postural control is essential for the development of reaching. However, little research has examined the development of the coordination between posture and manual control throughout childhood. We investigated the coordination between posture and manual control in children (7- and 10-year-olds) and adults during…

  4. Stability boundaries and lateral postural control in parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wegen, E. E.; van Emmerik, R. E.; Wagenaar, R. C.; Ellis, T.

    2001-01-01

    Postural instability is a major problem in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We examined balance control in PD by using center of pressure (CP) variability and time-to-contact to investigate boundary relevant postural control behavior under quiet stance leaning conditions. Postural orientation

  5. The effect of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seong Hun; Sim, Yong Hyeon; Kim, Myung Hoon; Bang, Ju Hee; Son, Kyung Hyun; Kim, Jae Woong; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] This study is designed to compare the effects of abdominal drawing-in exercise and myofascial release on pain, flexibility, and balance of elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Forty elderly females aged 65 or older who had complained of low back pain for three months or longer were selected as the subjects. They were randomly and equally assigned to either an abdominal drawing-in group or a myofascial release group. The subjects conducted exercise three times per week, 40 minutes each time, for eight weeks. As evaluation tools, visual analogue scale for pain, remodified schober test for flexibility, and upright posture with eye opening on hard platform, upright posture with eye closing on hard platform, upright posture with eye opening on soft platform, upright posture with eye closing on soft platform using tetrax for balance were used. [Results] The abdominal drawing-in exercise group saw significant difference in pain and balance after the exercise compared to before the exercise. The myofascial release group saw significant difference in pain and flexibility after exercise compared to before the exercise. [Conclusion] The above study showed that abdominal drawing-in exercise affected elderly females regarding pain and balance and myofascial release influenced their pain and flexibility.

  6. Aerobic anti-gravity exercise in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease types 1A and X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knak, Kirsten L; Andersen, Linda K; Vissing, John

    2017-01-01

    of aerobic anti-gravity exercise in weak patients with CMT 1A and X. Methods: Five adult patients performed moderate-intensity aerobic anti-gravity exercise 3/week for 10 weeks. Results: There was a significant positive difference in Berg balance scale and postural stability test between test occasions...

  7. A Review of Postural Balance and its Related Factors in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumi Nasrin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The slowing down of the nervous system function and changes in the musculoskeletal system (including joint changes and instability during old age have resulted in imbalance and lack of postural control becoming common problems during this age period. Using balancing tests and identifying those at risk can be an important step in the prevention of falls and its consequences in the elderly. The purpose of this study was to investigate the balance status of the elderly according to some demographic characteristics. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 194 elderly retired from public institutions were selected using systematic random sampling method and studied. To gather information, tinetti gait and balance evaluation tests were performed which included 16 items in 2 sections of dynamic balance and static balance. After collecting the data, they were analyzed using SPSS software, and Kruskal-Wallis test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Results showed that regarding static balance, 82% of participants had natural balance and 18% had abnormal balance. Regarding dynamic balance, 95.4% of participants had natural balance and 4.6% had abnormal balance. Among the demographic characteristics (age, gender, and disease, age had a significant relationship with balance (dynamic and static. Moreover, a significant relationship was observed between dynamic balance and disease. Therefore, the possibility of imbalance in the elderly increased with age and history of a disease. Conclusion: Imbalance has been introduced as one of the most common risk factors for falls in the elderly. Therefore, using balance tests and identifying elderly with balance disorders, and using multilateral interventions (including balance rehabilitation programs, regular exercise programs, suitable living environment (safer furniture, installing rails and handles, and showers with no tub, and specialist

  8. Posture analysis on young women before and after 60 days of -6 degrees head down bed rest (Wise 2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viguier, Marion; Dupui, Philippe; Montoya, Richard

    2009-02-01

    Twenty-four women divided into three groups: control, exercise and nutrition, have been involved in a -6 degrees head down bed rest (HDBR) experiment for 60 days. The objective was to analyse the effects of microgravity on balance function regulation. Group comparisons assessed the efficiency of countermeasures (specific exercises and in particular diet) on the deleterious effects of simulated microgravity. Measurements of orthostatic and dynamic balance were taken 9 and 2 days prior to the experiment, on the first day of getting up, the following day and 4 and 10 days after, under two visual conditions: eyes open and eyes closed. The results confirmed that, as in any other test performed with ordinary subjects, the postural balance performances are better with eyes open than with eyes closed. The static and dynamic postural performances were impaired on the first day of recovery (R0) following HDBR. This impairment lasted up to 4 days after getting up and, afterwards the volunteers recovered their initial performances. The exercise group recovered static postural performances more quickly than the other groups whereas there were no differences in the recovery of the dynamic balance performances.

  9. Dressing up posture: The interactive effects of posture and clothing on competency judgements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, Daniel J; Howlett, Neil; Pine, Karen; Tracey, Megan; Moggridge, Rachel

    2017-05-01

    Individuals often receive judgements from others based on their clothing and their posture. While both of these factors have been found to influence judgements of competency independently, their relative importance in impression formation is yet to be investigated. We address this by examining interactive effects of posture and clothing on four competency measures: confidence, professionalism, approachability, and likeliness of a high salary. Participants rated photographs of both male and female models pictured in different postures (strong, neutral, weak) in smart clothing (a suit for males; both a trouser suit and skirt suit for females) and casual clothing. We confirm that posture manipulations affected judgements of individuals differently according to the clothing they were pictured in. The nature of these interactions varied by gender and, for women, competency judgements differed according to attire type (trouser or skirt suit). The implications of these findings in relation to impression formation are discussed. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Postural analysis of workers in a typical meat processing company in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Wemerton Luis; de Fátima Tinoco, Ilda; de Souza, Amaury Paulo; Minette, Luciano José; da Costa Baeta, Fernando; da Silva, Emilia Pio; de Oliveira, Luciana Aparecida

    2012-01-01

    Companies have increasingly sought strategies that will ensure a more competitive position in the marketplace. Among these strategies adopted by companies include the health and welfare of the worker, factors currently valued by consumers, especially those of most demanding market. Thus, the postural analysis is of great importance and interest because it is the study of positioning related to body parts like head, torso and limbs, capable of producing loads that may be excessive or insufficient causing disturbances in the muscle skeletal system worker. The aim of this study was to perform a postural analysis of the main sectors of workers (slaughter, cutting room, special cuts, packaging and dispatch) of a typical refrigerator pig industry in Brazil during the execution of their daily activities as well as developing proposals to minimize and/or eliminate the diseases and accidents. The study followed the safety norms of Brazilian Ministry of Labor and Employment. The posture analysis used the OWAS (Ovako Working Posture Analyzing System) methodology. The postures assumed by workers in the sector of packaging were as the most in need of emergency and quick action.

  11. Effects of working posture and exposure to traffic pollutants on sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggia, B; Carbone, U; Farinaro, E; Zarrilli, S; Lombardi, G; Colao, A; De Rosa, N; De Rosa, M

    2009-05-01

    An increasing difficulty of couples in achieving pregnancy related to male infertility has been reported. Several factors have been implicated as possible causes of this decrease, including the exposure to the endocrine disruptors and the environmental toxicants, the changes in lifestyle and the exposure to heat. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of working posture when associated to nitrogen oxides exposure. Three hundred and seven male workers, employed in a motorway company, were enrolled into the study, underwent a complete physical examination and laboratory evaluations, endocrine screening and sperm analysis. Taking into account the exposure to fuel combustion gases and the working posture, sitting or free, the study population was divided in 4 groups. In the subjects occupationally exposed to NO2, a significant lower sperm total motility was observed than in not exposed workers. In the workers with obliged sitting working posture, lower sperm motility was also observed than in the workers with free working posture. Differences in sperm quality were strong when chemical and postural risk factors were associated. The findings of this study confirmed detrimental effects of nitrogen dioxide as a marker of traffic pollutants, showing alterations of sperm quality even if the environmental concentration of gas is very low according to the limits established by the Italian legislation. They suggest, also, the possible interaction between chemical exposure and obliged sitting position.

  12. A study of phonomicrosurgical arm support postures using a magnetic motion tracking system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Vamos, Andrew C; Dailey, Seth H; Geng, Zhixian; Jiang, Jack J

    2016-04-01

    To study the different arm support postures used in phonomicrosurgery by using a magnetic-based phonomicrosurgery instrument tracking system (MPTS). Through quantitative motion parameter data collected from four arm support postures (elbow support [ES], forearm support [FS], forearm and hand support, and no support), phonomicrosurgical operation postures were analyzed and compared. Prospective cohort study. Seven subjects operated on phonomicrosurgical simulation cutting tasks with four arm support postures while being monitored by MPTS. The motion parameters, including operation time, path length, depth perception, and motion smoothness were analyzed. The subjects' cutting quality was also calculated. With the FS, the nondominant hand showed improved S, better D, and shorter P (P < 0.05). Better motion control in the dominant hand resulted from ES posture (P < 0.05). Better operation quality was associated with increased motion control in the nondominant hand. Forearm support resulted in higher steadiness and shorter surgical path in the nondominant hand. In the dominant hand, ES resulted in increased steadiness, shorter surgical path, and better D. The effect of both gravity and wrist dexterity on movement control should be considered when selecting proper arm supports. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  13. Effect of postural changes on ICP in healthy and ill subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Morten; Hadi, Amer; Petersen, Lonnie G; Juhler, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Reference values and physiological measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP) are primarily reported in the supine position, while reports of ICP in the vertical position are surprisingly rare considering that humans maintain the vertical position for the majority of the day. In order to distinguish normal human physiology from disease entities such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension and normal pressure hydrocephalus, we investigated ICP in different body postures in both normal and ill subjects. Thirty-one patients were included: four normal patients following complete removal of a solitary clearly demarcated small brain tumour and fitted with a telemetric ICP monitoring device for long-term ICP monitoring; 27 patients requiring invasive ICP monitoring as a part of their diagnostic work-up or monitoring of shunt treatment effect. ICP was recorded in the following body positions: upright standing, sitting in a chair, supine and right lateral lumbar puncture position. Linear regression of median ICP based on patient posture, group, and purpose of monitoring presented a significant model (p ICP between body postures and supine ICP as the baseline, presented a highly significant model (p ICP between body postures enabled us to distinguish the normal group from patient groups. Normal patients appear able to more tightly regulate ICP when switching body postures.

  14. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be done at home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are described below. If any of the following ... balls, you will experience more benefit from this exercise... Sagittal Core Strengthening You can stretch and strengthen the low back ...

  15. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Strengthen Your Core! Stretching/Flexibility Aerobic Exercise Cervical Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back Pain Basics Book RESOURCES ... The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis BLOG FIND ...

  16. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be done at home as well. Some specific core strengthening exercises are described below. If any of the following ... balls, you will experience more benefit from this exercise... Sagittal Core Strengthening You can stretch and strengthen the low ...

  17. Sugars, exercise and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codella, Roberto; Terruzzi, Ileana; Luzi, Livio

    2017-12-15

    There is a direct link between a variety of addictions and mood states to which exercise could be relieving. Sugar addiction has been recently counted as another binge/compulsive/addictive eating behavior, differently induced, leading to a high-significant health problem. Regularly exercising at moderate intensity has been shown to efficiently and positively impact upon physiological imbalances caused by several morbid conditions, including affective disorders. Even in a wider set of physchiatric diseases, physical exercise has been prescribed as a complementary therapeutic strategy. A comprehensive literature search was carried out in the Cochrane Library and MEDLINE databases (search terms: sugar addiction, food craving, exercise therapy, training, physical fitness, physical activity, rehabilitation and aerobic). Seeking high-sugar diets, also in a reward- or craving-addiction fashion, can generate drastic metabolic derangements, often interpolated with affective disorders, for which exercise may represent a valuable, universal, non-pharmachological barrier. More research in humans is needed to confirm potential exercise-mechanisms that may break the bond between sugar over-consumption and affective disorders. The purpose of this review is to address the importance of physical exercise in reversing the gloomy scenario of unhealthy diets and sedentary lifestyles in our modern society. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. PHYSIOTHERAPY EXERCISES DURING ANTENATAL AND POSTNATAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Rajsekhar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: It’s a well-known fact that exercise is good for the mind and body making it beneficial for expectant and new mothers. The challenge of pregnancy, labor and looking after a new born is not an easy task. So the fitter you are the better you will cope with this life changing event. Method: Aerobic and strengthening exercises help in adjusting to the increasing weight and posture changes to cope effectively with the labor and the postnatal period. Although exercises in pregnancy are extremely beneficial, they can cause more harm than good if not done correctly. Medical screening for exercise should be done by the Doctor as well as the Physiotherapist to ensure that the patient underwent a basic screening, assessment or continued monitoring for the right exercise protocol for avoidance of any complications and to ensure the benefits of staying healthy and fit. Results: Evidence shows that exercise training programs designed and delivered by the Physiotherapists can relieve the prenatal post natal problems. Conclusion: Number of studies has shown the positive effects of aerobic and strengthening exercises on pregnant women. The physical changes to a pregnant woman’s body are multiple. There are center of mass changes, pressure on the organs and increased weight gain. In fact, over two thirds of pregnant women experience back pain, one fifth experience pelvic pain and over 40% experience urinary incontinence in their first pregnancy.

  19. Forearm posture and mobility in quadrupedal dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin S VanBuren

    Full Text Available Quadrupedality evolved four independent times in dinosaurs; however, the constraints associated with these transitions in limb anatomy and function remain poorly understood, in particular the evolution of forearm posture and rotational ability (i.e., active pronation and supination. Results of previous qualitative studies are inconsistent, likely due to an inability to quantitatively assess the likelihood of their conclusions. We attempt to quantify antebrachial posture and mobility using the radius bone because its morphology is distinct between extant sprawled taxa with a limited active pronation ability and parasagittal taxa that have an enhanced ability to actively pronate the manus. We used a sliding semi-landmark, outline-based geometric morphometric approach of the proximal radial head and a measurement of the angle of curvature of the radius in a sample of 189 mammals, 49 dinosaurs, 35 squamates, 16 birds, and 5 crocodilians. Our results of radial head morphology showed that quadrupedal ceratopsians, bipedal non-hadrosaurid ornithopods, and theropods had limited pronation/supination ability, and sauropodomorphs have unique radial head morphology that likely allowed limited rotational ability. However, the curvature of the radius showed that no dinosaurian clade had the ability to cross the radius about the ulna, suggesting parallel antebrachial elements for all quadrupedal dinosaurs. We conclude that the bipedal origins of all quadrupedal dinosaur clades could have allowed for greater disparity in forelimb posture than previously appreciated, and future studies on dinosaur posture should not limit their classifications to the overly simplistic extant dichotomy.

  20. Postural Determinants in the Blind. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Irwin M.; Murphy, Thomas J.

    The problem of malposture in the blind and its affect on orientation and travel skills was explored. A group of 45 students were enrolled in a standard 3-month mobility training program. Each student suffered a postural problem, some compounded by severe orthopedic and/or neurological deficit. All subjects were given complete orthopedic and…

  1. Robust balance shift control with posture optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavafoglu, Z.; Kavafoglu, Ersan; Egges, J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present a control framework which creates robust and natural balance shifting behaviours during standing. Given high-level features such as the position of the center of mass projection and the foot configurations, a kinematic posture satisfying these features is synthesized using

  2. Forearm posture and mobility in quadrupedal dinosaurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBuren, Collin S; Bonnan, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Quadrupedality evolved four independent times in dinosaurs; however, the constraints associated with these transitions in limb anatomy and function remain poorly understood, in particular the evolution of forearm posture and rotational ability (i.e., active pronation and supination). Results of previous qualitative studies are inconsistent, likely due to an inability to quantitatively assess the likelihood of their conclusions. We attempt to quantify antebrachial posture and mobility using the radius bone because its morphology is distinct between extant sprawled taxa with a limited active pronation ability and parasagittal taxa that have an enhanced ability to actively pronate the manus. We used a sliding semi-landmark, outline-based geometric morphometric approach of the proximal radial head and a measurement of the angle of curvature of the radius in a sample of 189 mammals, 49 dinosaurs, 35 squamates, 16 birds, and 5 crocodilians. Our results of radial head morphology showed that quadrupedal ceratopsians, bipedal non-hadrosaurid ornithopods, and theropods had limited pronation/supination ability, and sauropodomorphs have unique radial head morphology that likely allowed limited rotational ability. However, the curvature of the radius showed that no dinosaurian clade had the ability to cross the radius about the ulna, suggesting parallel antebrachial elements for all quadrupedal dinosaurs. We conclude that the bipedal origins of all quadrupedal dinosaur clades could have allowed for greater disparity in forelimb posture than previously appreciated, and future studies on dinosaur posture should not limit their classifications to the overly simplistic extant dichotomy.

  3. Injury incidence and selected biomechanical, postural and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The strongest predictors for lower extremity injuries (I>0.3) were uneven hips, pronated feet, tight hamstrings, anatomical leg length differences, gait pronation and a tall stature. It was concluded that certain postural and biomechanical imbalances in the lower extremities could contribute to injury among rugby union players.

  4. Evaluation of body posture in nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Marília Fernandes; Chaves, Érika de Cássia Lopes; Miguel, Michele Rita Oliveira; Simão, Talita Prado; Nogueira, Denismar Alves; Iunes, Denise Hollanda

    2017-08-28

    To investigate the body posture of nursing students before and after clinical practice. The study was developed in two stages. Initially the body posture of students of the 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th periods were assessed through photogrammetry. All images were analyzed in a random and masked manner with CorporisPro® 3.1.3 software. Three evaluations were performed for each angle and then the mean value was calculated. Two years later, when the 4th period students had developed their clinical internships, their body posture was again evaluated. The total sample consisted of 112 students. Comparison of their posture with the normality pattern showed that all the angles presented significant differences (pvalores de normalidade. Os segmentos com diferença significativa, comparando-se antes e após a prática, foram o ângulo acromioclavicular, flexo de joelho e ângulo tibiotársico, sendo os dois últimos na posição de rolamento.

  5. Public and Private Posture : Zadie Smith

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heynders, Odile

    2016-01-01

    This chapter will focus on Smith’s posture, and in particular on how her public position and literary work negotiate issues such as identification, celebrity, style and authenticity. First, the paradox of the ‘celebrity authority’ will be examined, followed by a Derrida-inspired analysis of Smith’s

  6. Forearm Posture and Mobility in Quadrupedal Dinosaurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBuren, Collin S.; Bonnan, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Quadrupedality evolved four independent times in dinosaurs; however, the constraints associated with these transitions in limb anatomy and function remain poorly understood, in particular the evolution of forearm posture and rotational ability (i.e., active pronation and supination). Results of previous qualitative studies are inconsistent, likely due to an inability to quantitatively assess the likelihood of their conclusions. We attempt to quantify antebrachial posture and mobility using the radius bone because its morphology is distinct between extant sprawled taxa with a limited active pronation ability and parasagittal taxa that have an enhanced ability to actively pronate the manus. We used a sliding semi-landmark, outline-based geometric morphometric approach of the proximal radial head and a measurement of the angle of curvature of the radius in a sample of 189 mammals, 49 dinosaurs, 35 squamates, 16 birds, and 5 crocodilians. Our results of radial head morphology showed that quadrupedal ceratopsians, bipedal non-hadrosaurid ornithopods, and theropods had limited pronation/supination ability, and sauropodomorphs have unique radial head morphology that likely allowed limited rotational ability. However, the curvature of the radius showed that no dinosaurian clade had the ability to cross the radius about the ulna, suggesting parallel antebrachial elements for all quadrupedal dinosaurs. We conclude that the bipedal origins of all quadrupedal dinosaur clades could have allowed for greater disparity in forelimb posture than previously appreciated, and future studies on dinosaur posture should not limit their classifications to the overly simplistic extant dichotomy. PMID:24058633

  7. The relationship between foot posture and plantar pressure during walking in adults: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldt, Andrew K; Allan, Jamie J; Landorf, Karl B; Menz, Hylton B

    2018-02-23

    Foot posture is a risk factor for some lower limb injuries, however the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Plantar pressure analysis is one technique to investigate the interaction between foot posture and biomechanical function of the lower limb. The aim of this review was to investigate the relationship between foot posture and plantar pressure during walking. A systematic database search was conducted using MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and Embase to identify studies that have assessed the relationship between foot posture and plantar pressure during walking. Included studies were assessed for methodological quality. Meta-analysis was not conducted due to heterogeneity between studies. Inconsistencies included foot posture classification techniques, gait analysis protocols, selection of plantar pressure parameters and statistical analysis approaches. Of the 4213 citations identified for title and abstract review, sixteen studies were included and underwent quality assessment; all were of moderate methodological quality. There was some evidence that planus feet display higher peak pressure, pressure-time integral, maximum force, force-time integral and contact area predominantly in the medial arch, central forefoot and hallux, while these variables are lower in the lateral and medial forefoot. In contrast, cavus feet display higher peak pressure and pressure-time integral in the heel and lateral forefoot, while pressure-time integral, maximum force, force-time integral and contact area are lower for the midfoot and hallux. Centre of pressure was more laterally deviated in cavus feet and more medially deviated in planus feet. Overall, effect sizes were moderate, but regression models could only explain a small amount of variance in plantar pressure variables. Despite these significant findings, future research would benefit from greater methodological rigour, particularly in relation to the use of valid foot posture measurement techniques, gait analysis

  8. Posture and Texting: Effect on Balance in Young Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Retno Nurwulan

    Full Text Available Using a mobile phone while doing another activity is a common dual-task activity in our daily lives. This study examined the effect of texting on the postural stability of young adults. Twenty college students were asked to perform static and dynamic postural stability tasks. Traditional COP and multivariate multiscale entropy (MMSE were used to assess the static postural stability and the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT was used to assess the dynamic postural stability. Results showed that (1 texting impaired postural stability, (2 the complexity index did not change much although the task conditions changed, and (3 performing texting is perceived to be more difficult.

  9. Posture and body image in individuals with major depressive disorder: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Janette Zamudio; Cordás, Táki Athanássios; Fiquer, Juliana Teixeira; Cavalcante, André Furtado; Moreno, Ricardo Alberto

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to quantify posture and body image in patients with major depressive disorder during episodes and after drug treatment, comparing the results with those obtained for healthy volunteers. Over a 10-week period, we evaluated 34 individuals with depression and 37 healthy volunteers. Posture was assessed based on digital photos of the subjects; CorelDRAW software guidelines and body landmarks were employed. Body image was evaluated using the Body Shape Questionnaire. During depressive episodes (in comparison with the post-treatment period), patients showed increased head flexion (pBody Shape Questionnaire was 90.03 during the depressive episode, compared with 75.82 during remission (p=0.012) and 62.57 for the controls. During episodes of depression, individuals with major depressive disorder experience changes in posture and mild dissatisfaction with body image. The findings demonstrate that the negative impact of depression includes emotional and physical factors.

  10. Context and hand posture modulate the neural dynamics of tool-object perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natraj, Nikhilesh; Poole, Victoria; Mizelle, J C; Flumini, Andrea; Borghi, Anna M; Wheaton, Lewis A

    2013-02-01

    Prior research has linked visual perception of tools with plausible motor strategies. Thus, observing a tool activates the putative action-stream, including the left posterior parietal cortex. Observing a hand functionally grasping a tool involves the inferior frontal cortex. However, tool-use movements are performed in a contextual and grasp specific manner, rather than relative isolation. Our prior behavioral data has demonstrated that the context of tool-use (by pairing the tool with different objects) and varying hand grasp postures of the tool can interact to modulate subjects' reaction times while evaluating tool-object content. Specifically, perceptual judgment was delayed in the evaluation of functional tool-object pairings (Correct context) when the tool was non-functionally (Manipulative) grasped. Here, we hypothesized that this behavioral interference seen with the Manipulative posture would be due to increased and extended left parietofrontal activity possibly underlying motor simulations when resolving action conflict due to this particular grasp at time scales relevant to the behavioral data. Further, we hypothesized that this neural effect will be restricted to the Correct tool-object context wherein action affordances are at a maximum. 64-channel electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded from 16 right-handed subjects while viewing images depicting three classes of tool-object contexts: functionally Correct (e.g. coffee pot-coffee mug), functionally Incorrect (e.g. coffee pot-marker) and Spatial (coffee pot-milk). The Spatial context pairs a tool and object that would not functionally match, but may commonly appear in the same scene. These three contexts were modified by hand interaction: No Hand, Static Hand near the tool, Functional Hand posture and Manipulative Hand posture. The Manipulative posture is convenient for relocating a tool but does not afford a functional engagement of the tool on the target object. Subjects were instructed to visually

  11. The evaluation of upright posture caused by simple movement test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínková, Ivana; Řorfová, Monika; Wagner, Heiko; Puta, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Actual studies show increasing poor posture especially in the cervical-thoracic spine. The aim of this study was to develop a model-based evaluation of posture and the amount of segmental spinal movement using a simple movement test. Twenty-five subjects with forward head posture were recruited. We were interested in the external humeral rotation with the adduction of the shoulder, its influence on posture of the cervical thoracic spine and the evaluation of upright posture. Upright posture was determined as the change in the gradient of the trunk from forward posture to erect posture. The kinematics of the cervical-thoracic spine and the inclination of the pelvis and thorax were measured in the sagittal plane with a motion analysis system. The kinematic model for the evaluation of upright posture and as a control the electromyography was presented. Correlation (Pearson r = 0.89; p postural quality was more important than the quantity of spinal movement. Upright posture of the cervical-thoracic spine was provoked only if there was horizontal position of the pelvis and thorax. This should be considered in clinical practice.

  12. Hubungan Postur Kepala dengan Tumbuh Kembang Mandibula pada Penderita Obstruksi Saluran Napas Atas dengan Kebiasaan Buruk Napas Mulut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erliera Erliera

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the correlations between head posture and mandible growth in Deuteromalayid OURT (obstruction of the upper respiratory tract patients with mouth breathing habit. Material & Methods: The study used cross sectional design for 64 subjects including 32 OURT patients with mouth breathing habit and 32 normal subjects, all 12 to 15 years old. Lateral cephalometry radiograph was taken for head posture measurements and mandibular growth (ramus height, mandibular length, and mandibular rotation measurements. Results: The fraction of subjects with kifosis head posture in OURT with mouth breathing habit (34.4% was larger than that in normal subjects (28.1%. There is no correlation between head posture and OURT with mouth breathing habit, but there is a correlation between OURT with mouth breathing habit and mandibular rotation. Conclusion: Patients with OURT and mouth breathing habit show more vertical growth of mandible than normal subjects.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v15i1.78

  13. Dysfunctional endogenous analgesia during exercise in patients with chronic pain: to exercise or not to exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijs, Jo; Kosek, Eva; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica; Meeus, Mira

    2012-07-01

    Exercise is an effective treatment for various chronic pain disorders, including fibromyalgia, chronic neck pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and chronic low back pain. Although the clinical benefits of exercise therapy in these populations are well established (i.e. evidence based), it is currently unclear whether exercise has positive effects on the processes involved in chronic pain (e.g. central pain modulation). Reviewing the available evidence addressing the effects of exercise on central pain modulation in patients with chronic pain. Narrative review. Exercise activates endogenous analgesia in healthy individuals. The increased pain threshold following exercise is due to the release of endogenous opioids and activation of (supra)spinal nociceptive inhibitory mechanisms orchestrated by the brain. Exercise triggers the release of beta-endorphins from the pituitary (peripherally) and the hypothalamus (centrally), which in turn enables analgesic effects by activating μ-opioid receptors peripherally and centrally, respectively. The hypothalamus, through its projections on the periaqueductal grey, has the capacity to activate descending nociceptive inhibitory mechanisms. However, several groups have shown dysfunctioning of endogenous analgesia in response to exercise in patients with chronic pain. Muscle contractions activate generalized endogenous analgesia in healthy, pain-free humans and patients with either osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis, but result in increased generalised pain sensitivity in fibromyalgia patients. In patients having local muscular pain (e.g. shoulder myalgia), exercising non-painful muscles activates generalized endogenous analgesia. However, exercising painful muscles does not change pain sensitivity either in the exercising muscle or at distant locations. The reviewed studies examined acute effects of exercise rather than long-term effects of exercise therapy. A dysfunctional response of patients with chronic pain and

  14. [Exercise induced hyponatremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Eran; Rosen, Eli; Heled, Yuval; Moran, Daniel S; Schindel, Yair

    2004-05-01

    A normal water-electrolyte balance is essential for normal function of body systems during physical activity. During recent years, awareness of the importance of drinking amongst athletes and Israeli Defense Force (IDF) soldiers, in particular, has been highlighted. A large number of athletes tend to drink prior to, during and after their exercise in order to enhance physical abilities and to prevent heat casualties and dehydration. However, excessive water consumption combined with sweat induced electrolytes loss during physical activity, may cause hyponatremia in extreme cases. Recently, several cases of exercise induced hyponatremia were reported in the IDF, resulting from improper water consumption. In this article, we describe a clinical case of exercise-induced hyponatremia in a soldier and a review of the literature, including the etiology, clinical characterization and recommended treatment. Moreover, water consumption recommendations with regard to physical activity are presented. The application of such recommendations may prevent future events of exercise-induced hyponatremia.

  15. Menopause and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindler, Natalia M; Santoro, Nanette F

    2015-12-01

    Accumulating data suggest that regular physical exercise reduces mortality and extends the functional life span of men and women. This review seeks to describe the current state of the medical literature on this topic. A narrative review of the current medical literature including randomized clinical trials and clinical guidelines that address the benefits of physical fitness and regular exercise on the health of midlife and postmenopausal women. Reduction and avoidance of obesity and its related comorbidities (hypertension, glucose intolerance, dyslipidemia, and heart disease) are one major benefit of exercise. However, long-term physical exercise is also associated with reduced rates of cancer, dementia and cognitive decline, adverse mood and anxiety symptoms, and reduction of osteoporosis, osteopenia, falls, and fractures. Beneficial physical activity includes exercise that will promote cardiovascular fitness (aerobic), muscle strength (resistance), flexibility (stretching), and balance (many of the preceding, and additional activities such as yoga). Given that it is unambiguously beneficial, inexpensive, and minimal risk, maintaining a healthy exercise regimen should be a goal for every participant to enhance lifelong wellness. Clinicians should use a number of behavioral strategies to support the physical fitness goals of their participants.

  16. Exercise countermeasures for bed-rest deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose for this 30-day bed rest study was to investigate the effects of short-term, high intensity isotonic and isokinetic exercise training on maintenance of working capacity (peak oxygen uptake), muscular strength and endurance, and on orthostatic tolerance, posture and gait. Other data were collected on muscle atrophy, bone mineralization and density, endocrine analyses concerning vasoactivity and fluid-electrolyte balance, muscle intermediary metabolism, and on performance and mood of the subjects. It was concluded that: The subjects maintained a relatively stable mood, high morale, and high esprit de corps throughout the study. Performance improved in nearly all tests in almost all the subjects. Isotonic training, as opposed to isokinetic exercise training, was associated more with decreasing levels of psychological tension, concentration, and motivation; and improvement in the quality of sleep. Working capacity (peak oxygen uptake) was maintained during bed rest with isotonic exercise training; it was not maintained with isokinetic or no exercise training. In general, there was no significant decrease in strength or endurance of arm or leg muscles during bed rest, in spite of some reduction in muscle size (atrophy) of some leg muscles. There was no effect of isotonic exercise training on orthostasis, since tilt-table tolerance was reduced similarly in all three groups following bed rest. Bed rest resulted in significant decreases of postural stability and self-selected step length, stride length, and walking velocity, which were not influenced by either exercise training regimen. Most pre-bed rest responses were restored by the fourth day of recovery.

  17. Exercise KATRINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clahane, Darren; Burgoyne, William

    1995-01-01

    Based on a hypothetical incident at the Scottish Nuclear Ltd Torness AGR nuclear power station, Exercise KATRINE was the 1994 national civil nuclear exercise and the biggest simulation of a nuclear accident to take place in Britain last year. The exercise, held on 17 and 18 November, was based on a series of postulated faults which resulted in an uncontrolled release of radioactivity. It commenced at 07.00 on Thursday and continued for about 33 hours, until around 15.30 on Friday. Activity focused on the Torness Off-site Centre (TOSC), in Cockenzie near Edinburgh, and the brand new Torness Media Briefing Centre (TMBC) located nearby. (author)

  18. THE SHORT-TERM EFFECT OF A HOME-BASED PROGRAM TO CORRECT FORWARD HEAD POSTURE IN ASYMPTOMATIC SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Omar Abdelnaeem

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Neck pain and dysfunction may be the consequence of adopting sustained non-neutral spinal postures. Such postures are associated with increased activation of the neck-shoulder stabilizer muscles, which eventually increase the loading of cervical spine. Forward head posture is a common postural dysfunction that has been associated with many musculoskeletal disorders. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of deep cervical flexor muscles training on the severity of forward head posture in asymptomatic subjects. Methods: Forty-one asymptomatic subjects volunteered in this study. Participants were randomly assigned into an intervention group (n= 20that received a home-based training of deep cervical flexor muscles for 6-weeks, and a control group(n= 21 that received only the assessment procedure. Subjects were assessed at baseline and 6weeks later with regards to the severity of forward head as indicated by the cranio-vertebral angle. Also, the strength and endurance of the deep flexor muscles were assessed. Results: After six weeks, participants in the intervention group showed significant improvement in all measured variables compared to the control group. Furthermore, participants in the intervention group showed significant difference in all measured variables after 6-weeks of training compared to baseline, whereas those in the control group remained the same. Conclusion: Six-weeks of deep cervical training improves forward head posture and deep flexors strength and endurance in asymptomatic subjects. Thus, this exercise could be used as a preventive measure against the development of neck dysfunction in at risk population even before the onset of any symptoms.

  19. Effects of low back pain and of stabilization or movement-system-impairment treatments on induced postural responses: A planned secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jesse V; Lomond, Karen V; Hitt, Juvena R; DeSarno, Michael J; Bunn, Janice Y; Henry, Sharon M

    2016-02-01

    Motor retraining for non-specific chronic low back pain (LBP) often focuses on voluntary postural tasks. This training, however, may not transfer to other known postural impairments, such as automatic postural responses to external perturbations. To evaluate the extent current treatments of motor retraining ameliorate impaired postural coordination when responding to a perturbation of standing balance. Planned secondary analysis of a prospectively registered (NCT01362049), randomized controlled trial with a blinded assessor. Sixty-eight subjects with chronic, recurrent, non-specific LBP were allocated to perform a postural response task as a secondary assessment one week before and one week after receiving either stabilization or Movement System Impairment (MSI)-directed treatment over 6 weekly 1-h sessions plus home exercises. For assessment, subjects completed the Oswestry disability and numeric pain rating questionnaires and then performed a postural response task of maintaining standing balance in response to 3 trials in each of 4 randomly presented directions of linear surface translations of the platform under the subjects' feet. Integrated amplitudes of surface electromyography (EMG) were recorded bilaterally from the rectus abdominis (RA), internal oblique (IO), and external oblique (EO) muscles during the postural response task. No significant effects of treatment on EMG responses were evident. Oswestry and numeric pain ratings decreased similarly following both treatments. Stabilization and MSI-directed treatments do not affect trunk EMG responses to perturbations of standing balance in people with LBP, suggesting current methods of motor retraining do not sufficiently transfer to tasks of reactive postural control. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effect of a trunk-targeted intervention using vibration on posture and gait in children with spastic type cerebral palsy: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Marianne; Jelsma, Jennifer; Stark, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether strengthening trunk muscles using vibration can improve posture and gait in children with spastic-type cerebral palsy (STCP). A total of 27 children (6-13 years) participated in a single-blinded pre-post crossover experimental trial. The 1-Minute Walk Test, 2D-posturography, ultrasound imaging and sit-ups in one minute were used to assess effect on gait, posture, resting abdominal muscle thickness and functional strength. Significant increase in distance walked (p posture, an increase in sit-ups executed (p posture were maintained at 4-weeks post-intervention. A trunk-targeted intervention using vibration can improve posture and gait in children with STCP without any known side effects. It is recommended that vibration and specific trunk strengthening is included in training or rehabilitation programmes. Effects of vibration on force generation and spasticity need further investigation.

  1. Effect of postural changes on ICP in healthy and ill subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lonnie G; Juhler, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    to distinguish normal human physiology from disease entities such as idiopathic intracranial hypertension and normal pressure hydrocephalus, we investigated ICP in different body postures in both normal and ill subjects. METHODS: Thirty-one patients were included: four normal patients following complete removal...

  2. Manual Therapy and Exercise for a Patient With Neck-Tongue Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niethamer, Lisa; Myers, Robin

    2016-03-01

    Case report. Neck-tongue syndrome (NTS) is defined as neck and/or head pain accompanied by ipsilateral dysesthesia of the tongue with sudden rotation of the head. Proposed causes include compression or irritation of the C2 nerve root as it courses behind the atlantoaxial joint or hypertrophy of the inferior oblique muscle. The primary purpose of this case report was to describe the conservative physical therapy treatment of a patient with uncomplicated NTS. The patient was a 13-year-old girl who reported insidious onset of sharp pain in the neck, numbness/tingling of the ipsilateral tongue/face, and tinnitus with cervical rotation. Symptoms occurred several times a week for approximately 10 seconds. Examination revealed impaired function, increased forward head posture, decreased cervical range of motion, and positive neurodynamic assessment. The patient's treatment included manual therapy and exercise for postural stabilization. Following 8 visits, pain of the neck and tongue numbness had resolved. Score on the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), cervical range of motion, and posture had also improved. At the 22-month follow-up, infrequent, momentary symptoms in the neck and dysesthesia of the tongue were reported. The PSFS remained the same. Objective measures were normal. This case report describes the physical therapy management of an individual with NTS. The management strategy followed a protocol similar to that used for cervicogenic headaches, due to the involvement of the upper cervical spine with both NTS and cervicogenic headache and the lack of evidence for the treatment of NTS. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4.

  3. Prevention: Exercise

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Exercise Strength Training for the Elderly Other Back Pack Safety Pregnancy and Back Pain Preventing Osteoporosis Back ... in very slightly. Hold a ball directly in front of you. Keep your abdominal muscles tight and ...

  4. Compulsive exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lichtenstein, Mia Beck; Hinze, Cecilie Juul; Emborg Jannsen, Bolette

    2017-01-01

    Compulsive exercise is a condition described since 1970s. It is characterized by a craving for physical training, resulting in uncontrollable excessive exercise behavior with harmful consequences, such as injuries and impaired social relations. It has not been accepted as a mental disorder...... found that compulsive exercise is associated with eating disorder pathology, perfectionism, neuroticism, narcissism, and obsessive compulsive traits. The most prominent negative consequences were injuries, social impairment, and depression, but more research is needed to uncover the potential...... dysfunction resulting from compulsive exercise. As the condition is not recognized as a psychiatric disorder, studies on treatment interventions are sparse. Problems with compliance have been reported; therefore, motivational interviewing has been proposed as a treatment approach, in combination...

  5. Prevention: Exercise

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    Full Text Available ... 15 repetitions at a slow and controlled pace... Resistance Training Resistance training is exercise done against something providing resistance. It can be done with weights (hand-held ...

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  7. Prevention: Exercise

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  12. Prevention: Exercise

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  13. Prevention: Exercise

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  14. Prevention: Exercise

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  15. Prevention: Exercise

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  16. Prevention: Exercise

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  17. Prevention: Exercise

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  18. Prevention: Exercise

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