WorldWideScience

Sample records for included major depressive

  1. Major Depression Among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Depressive Episode Among Adolescents Data Sources Share Major Depression Definitions Major depression is one of the most common mental disorders in the United States. For some individuals, major depression can result in severe impairments that interfere with ...

  2. Depression (Major Depressive Disorder)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your mood. Chronic pain causes a number of problems that can lead to depression, such as trouble sleeping and stress. Disabling pain can cause low self-esteem due to work, legal or financial issues. Depression ...

  3. Major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deal with them. Types of talk therapy include: Cognitive behavioral therapy teaches you how to fight off negative thoughts. ... 2/2016 Updated by: Fred K. Berger, MD, addiction and forensic psychiatrist, Scripps Memorial Hospital, La Jolla, ...

  4. Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Grobler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The treatment guideline draws on several international guidelines: (iPractice Guidelines of the American Psychiatric Association (APAfor the Treatment of Patients with Major Depressive Disorder, SecondEdition;[1](ii Clinical Guidelines for the Treatment of DepressiveDisorders by the Canadian Psychiatric Association and the CanadianNetwork for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT;[2](iiiNational Institute for Clinical Excellence (NICE guidelines;[3](iv RoyalAustralian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Clinical PracticeGuidelines Team for Depression (RANZCAP;[4](v Texas MedicationAlgorithm Project (TMAP Guidelines;[5](vi World Federation ofSocieties of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP Treatment Guideline forUnipolar Depressive Disorder;[6]and (vii British Association forPsychopharmacology Guidelines.[7

  5. Major depression with psychotic features

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... depression References American Psychiatric Association. Major depressive disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013; ...

  6. Do You Have Major Depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Depression Do You Have Major Depression? Past Issues / Fall 2009 Table of Contents Simple ... member may have major depression. —NIMH Types of Depression Just like other illnesses, such as heart disease, ...

  7. Cost-effectiveness of collaborative care including PST and an antidepressant treatment algorithm for the treatment of major depressive disorder in primary care; a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beekman Aartjan TF

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorder is currently one of the most burdensome disorders worldwide. Evidence-based treatments for depressive disorder are already available, but these are used insufficiently, and with less positive results than possible. Earlier research in the USA has shown good results in the treatment of depressive disorder based on a collaborative care approach with Problem Solving Treatment and an antidepressant treatment algorithm, and research in the UK has also shown good results with Problem Solving Treatment. These treatment strategies may also work very well in the Netherlands too, even though health care systems differ between countries. Methods/design This study is a two-armed randomised clinical trial, with randomization on patient-level. The aim of the trial is to evaluate the treatment of depressive disorder in primary care in the Netherlands by means of an adapted collaborative care framework, including contracting and adherence-improving strategies, combined with Problem Solving Treatment and antidepressant medication according to a treatment algorithm. Forty general practices will be randomised to either the intervention group or the control group. Included will be patients who are diagnosed with moderate to severe depression, based on DSM-IV criteria, and stratified according to comorbid chronic physical illness. Patients in the intervention group will receive treatment based on the collaborative care approach, and patients in the control group will receive care as usual. Baseline measurements and follow up measures (3, 6, 9 and 12 months are assessed using questionnaires and an interview. The primary outcome measure is severity of depressive symptoms, according to the PHQ9. Secondary outcome measures are remission as measured with the PHQ9 and the IDS-SR, and cost-effectiveness measured with the TiC-P, the EQ-5D and the SF-36. Discussion In this study, an American model to enhance care for patients with a

  8. Neurobiology of Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Villanueva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We survey studies which relate abnormal neurogenesis to major depressive disorder. Clinically, descriptive gene and protein expression analysis and genetic and functional studies revised here show that individual alterations of a complex signaling network, which includes the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; the production of neurotrophins and growth factors; the expression of miRNAs; the production of proinflammatory cytokines; and, even, the abnormal delivery of gastrointestinal signaling peptides, are able to induce major mood alterations. Furthermore, all of these factors modulate neurogenesis in brain regions involved in MDD, and are functionally interconnected in such a fashion that initial alteration in one of them results in abnormalities in the others. We highlight data of potential diagnostic significance and the relevance of this information to develop new therapeutic approaches. Controversial issues, such as whether neurogenesis is the basis of the disease or whether it is a response induced by antidepressant treatments, are also discussed.

  9. Emerging antidepressants to treat major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Samantha G; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2014-12-01

    Depression is a common disorder with an annual risk of a depressive episode in the United States of 6.6%. Only 30-40% of patients remit with antidepressant monotherapy, leaving 60-70% of patients who do not optimally respond to therapy. Unremitted depressive patients are at increased risk for suicide. Considering the prevalence of treatment resistant depression and its consequences, treatment optimization is imperative. This review summarizes the latest treatment modalities for major depressive disorder including pharmacotherapy, electroconvulsive therapy, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and psychotherapy. Through advancements in research to better understand the pathophysiology of depression, advances in treatment will be realized. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Depression and major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Tanaka, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Shin; Koyama, Tsukasa

    2010-01-15

    The prevalence of depression in Parkinson's disease (PD) varies greatly. In this study, we investigated major depressive disorder (MDD) and depressive symptoms without MDD in patients with PD. The psychopathological characteristics of depressive symptoms were assessed by a psychiatric interview. A total of 105 Japanese patients with PD without dementia were included. The Japanese version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) with a cutoff score of 13/14 was used to screen for depression. Using a structured interview, a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation of patients with BDI-II scores >13 (high BDI patients) was completed using the criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV-TR. Forty patients (38%) had a BDI-II >13, but 29 did not show any depressed mood. Five cases met the criteria for MDD (three current, two past) and one patient was diagnosed with minor depressive disorder. A slight depressed mood that was associated with worrying about PD was seen in 6 of 34 patients without any depressive disorder and fluctuated with aggravation of PD symptoms in two of these patients. For the diagnosis of MDD, the number of positive items from the DSM-IV-TR definition of MDD is most important and useful for differentiating MDD and non-MDD. The low-prevalence rate of MDD in our patient population suggests that PD may be a psychological stressor for MDD, but does not necessarily induce MDD.

  11. Thyroid activity in patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stipcević, Tamara; Pivac, Nela; Kozarić-Kovacić, Dragica; Mück-Seler, Dorotea

    2008-09-01

    Hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis dysfunction has been associated with pathophysiology of major depression. The aim of the study was to determine serum levels of total 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3), total thyroxine (T4) and thyroid-stimulating-hormone (TSH) in patients with major depression and healthy controls. The study included 53 medication-free patients with depression and 49 healthy controls. Exclusion criteria for patients was: other axis-I and axis-II diagnoses, intensive psychotherapy or electroconvulsive therapy, prior clinical and/or laboratory evidence of hypo- or hyperthyroidism, alcohol or nicotine dependence, pregnancy, hormone supplement therapy, somatic illnesses (diabetes, renal or hepatic disorders), infections or autoimmune diseases, recent surgical treatment or significantly changed body weight. For controls: the presence of psychiatric disorders and/or thyroid dysfunctions. The diagnosis of major depression was made using structured clinical interview based on DSM-IV criteria. The results showed significantly lower T3 and TSH levels in patients compared to controls. There was no significant difference in T4 values between patients with depression and control subjects. The results showing altered levels of thyroid hormones in depression indicate that further research on thyroid hormone activity can contribute to the better understanding of the biological basis of depression. Based on the high frequency of the subtle neuroendocrine disorders coexisting with depression, the association of thyroid abnormalities and depression should not be underestimated. Future research should identify different behavioral endophenotypes characteristic for depression, which would greatly facilitate delineating the biological phenomena associated with this psychiatric illness.

  12. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Frase, Lukas

    2012-11-01

    In this article, we will introduce interpersonal psychotherapy as an effective short-term treatment strategy in major depression. In IPT, a reciprocal relationship between interpersonal problems and depressive symptoms is regarded as important in the onset and as a maintaining factor of depressive disorders. Therefore, interpersonal problems are the main therapeutic targets of this approach. Four interpersonal problem areas are defined, which include interpersonal role disputes, role transitions, complicated bereavement, and interpersonal deficits. Patients are helped to break the interactions between depressive symptoms and their individual interpersonal difficulties. The goals are to achieve a reduction in depressive symptoms and an improvement in interpersonal functioning through improved communication, expression of affect, and proactive engagement with the current interpersonal network. The efficacy of this focused and structured psychotherapy in the treatment of acute unipolar major depressive disorder is summarized. This article outlines the background of interpersonal psychotherapy, the process of therapy, efficacy, and the expansion of the evidence base to different subgroups of depressed patients.

  13. Neuroticism in remitted major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gade, Anders; Kristoffersen, Marius; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The personality trait of neuroticism is strongly related to depression, but depression is etiologically heterogeneous. Late-onset depression (LOD) may be more closely related to vascular factors, and previous studies of neuroticism in LOD versus early-onset depression (EOD) have not b...

  14. Minor depression: risk profiles, functional disability, health care use and risk of developing major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuijpers, Pim; de Graaf, Ron; van Dorsselaer, Saskia

    2004-04-01

    minor depression has been found to affect quality of life, result in a increased service utilization, and lead to an increased risk of developing a major depression. In this study we examine risk profiles, functional disability, service utilization and the risk of developing major depression in minor depression. a random sample of the Dutch population (n=7076) was interviewed at baseline and 1 and 3 years later (response rate: 69.7%). Five categories of depression status were defined: major depression with seven to nine symptoms; with five or six symptoms; minor depression; one key symptom only; no depressive symptoms. Independent variables included: functional disability; care utilization; sociodemographic characteristics. functional disability was more pronounced in more severe categories of depression. Health care use was also found to be most intensive for more severe depression. The risk of developing major depression in subjects with minor depression was found to be 8.0% after 2 years. there had already been some attrition from the study when minor depression was measured. A definition of minor depression which approached the DSM-IV definition. Absence of homeless individuals in the dataset. depressive disorders seem to exist on a continuum, rather than in separate categories. Subjects with minor depression make less use of professional services than subjects with major depression, but because minor depression is more prevalent than major depression, the absolute number of subjects with minor depression receiving professional help is considerable.

  15. Inflammatory mechanisms in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raedler, Thomas J

    2011-11-01

    As the 'monoamine hypothesis of depression' fails to explain all aspects of major depression, additional causes are being investigated. Several observations suggest that inflammatory mechanisms pay a role in the cause of major depressive disorder (MDD). This article reviews their role in major depression. Recent studies support the concept that inflammatory mechanisms play a crucial role in the pathomechanisms of major depression. Major depression shares similarities with 'sickness behavior', a normal response to inflammatory cytokines. Elevations in proinflammatory cytokines and other inflammation-related proteins in major depression were found in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as well as in postmortem studies. Elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines persist after clinical symptoms of depression are in remission and can also predict the onset of a depressive episode. Antidepressant treatment can lead to a normalization of elevated cytokine levels in major depression. Finally, we understand how inflammatory mechanisms affect the metabolism of tryptophan and how nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can interfere with the effects of antidepressants. Further studies are needed to fully understand the role of inflammatory mechanisms in major depression and the potential treatment implications.

  16. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    open psychiatric wards. Only a few patients were re-cruited through advertisements (in the PEMF and Chronos studies). Inclusion criteria Inclusion criteria were major depression according to the DSM-IV, including a depressive episode as part of a bipolar disorder. For the PEMF study, treatment...... The results from the Pindolol study showed that pindolol did not augment the effect of venlafaxine for the whole sample. However, for those patients classified as slow metabolizers, based on their O-desmethylvenlafaxine/venlafaxine ratio (ODV/V), pindolol did augment the antidepressant effect. For patients...... classified as fast metabolizers, pindolol worsened the outcome. This interaction between ODV/V ratio and treatment group was statistically significant (p = 0.01). Results from the PEMF study The results from the PEMF Study showed that treatment with active versus sham PEMF augmented the effect of the ongoing...

  17. Depressive personality and treatment outcome in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, Andrew G; Quilty, Lena C; Vachon, David D; Bagby, R Michael

    2010-06-01

    Depressive personality disorder (DPD) is currently included in the DSM-IV Appendix B, Criteria Sets and Axes Provided for Further Study. Evidence of the clinical utility of DPD will likely play an important role in the determination of whether it warrants inclusion in future editions of DSM. The current investigation examines the capacity of DPD traits to predict overall and preferential treatment outcome for patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) (N = 120) using data from a randomized control trial, which included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy (IPT), and antidepressant medication (ADM) treatment arms. Patients were treated for 16-20 weeks and completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders Questionnaire (SCID-II/PQ) and the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression immediately before and after treatment. Higher scores on a dimensionalized SCID-II/PQ subscale assessing DPD traits were associated with poor outcome for IPT, but not CBT or ADM. This result remained after accounting for variance associated with other personality disorder (PD) traits; none of the other 10 main text PDs predicted treatment outcome.

  18. Migraine symptomatology and major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Lannie; Penninx, Brenda; Nyholt, Dale R.; Distel, Marijn A.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    Introduction and objective: Migraine and major depressive disorder (MDD) frequently co-occur, but it is unclear whether depression is associated with a specific subtype of migraine. The objective of this study was to investigate whether migraine is qualitatively different in MDD patients (N = 1816)

  19. Does major depression affect risk for adolescent obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Robert E; Duong, Hao T

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to reexamine the association between major depression and obesity in adolescents, testing the hypothesis that body image mediates this association. This is the first paper to examine this question using DSM-IV diagnosis of depression and data from a two-wave cohort of adolescents. Participants were 4175 youths 11-17 years of age sampled from the community who were followed up a year later (n=3134). Major depression was assessed using DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Body image was measured with perceived weight. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥95th percentile using measured height and weight. When we examined a model which included obesity, perceived weight, major depression and covariates, there was no association between major depression at baseline and obesity at follow-up. We found no independent association between major depression and body weight. The study was limited in that it is not a national sample, BMI was the only measure of adiposity, perceived weight was the only measure of body image, and there were no data on lifetime trajectories of depression, obesity, or body image. If there is an etiologic link between major depression and body weight among adolescents, it most likely operates through processes involving components of body image, since controlling for body image eliminated the association between depression and obesity. Clinically, addressing body image in depressed patients who are obese may improve outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biomarkers for Major Depressive Disorder: Economic Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogavac-Stanojevic, Natasa; Lakic, Dragana

    2016-11-01

    Preclinical Research Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a major psychiatric illness and it is predicted to be the second leading cause of disability by 2020 with a lifetime prevalence of about 13%. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly used therapeutic class for MDD. However, response to SSRI treatment varies considerably between patients. Biomarkers of treatment response may enable clinicians to target the appropriate drug for each patient. Biomarkers need to have accuracy in real life, sensitivity, specificity, and relevance to depression. Introduction of MDD biomarkers into the health care system can increase the overall cost of clinical diagnosis of patients. Because of that, decisions to allocate health research funding must be based on drug effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. The assessment of MDD biomarkers should include reliable evidence of associated drug effectiveness, adverse events and consequences (reduced productivity and quality of life, disability) and effectiveness of alternative approaches, other drug classes or behavioral or alternative therapies. In addition, all the variables included in an economic model (probabilities, outcomes, and costs) should be based on reliable evidence gained from the literature-ideally meta-analyses-and the evidence should also be determined by informed and specific expert opinion. Early assessment can guide decisions about whether or not to continue test development, and ideally to optimize the process. Drug Dev Res 77 : 374-378, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Depressive rumination alters cortisol decline in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoult, Joelle; Joormann, Jutta

    2014-07-01

    Depressive rumination - a central characteristic of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) - is a maladaptive emotion regulation strategy that prolongs sad mood and depressive episodes. Considerable research demonstrates the emotional and behavioral consequences of depressive rumination, yet few studies investigate its effect on neuroendocrine functioning. The current study examined the effect of an emotion regulation manipulation on the trajectory of cortisol concentrations among individuals with MDD and healthy controls (CTL). Sadness was induced via forced failure. Participants then were randomly assigned to a depressive rumination or distraction emotion regulation induction. MDDs in the rumination condition exhibited less cortisol decline compared to MDDs in the distraction condition and compared to CTLs in either condition. Findings suggest that depressive rumination alters the trajectory of cortisol secretion in MDD and may prolong cortisol production. Results thereby provide important insights into the interaction of biological and psychological factors through which distress contributes to MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Depressive Rumination Alters Cortisol Decline in Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMoult, Joelle; Joormann, Jutta

    2014-01-01

    Depressive rumination – a central characteristic of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) – is a maladaptive emotion regulation strategy that prolongs sad mood and depressive episodes. Considerable research demonstrates the emotional and behavioral consequences of depressive rumination, yet few studies investigate its effect on neuroendocrine functioning. The current study examined the effect of an emotion regulation manipulation on the trajectory of cortisol concentrations among individuals with MDD and healthy controls (CTL). Sadness was induced via forced failure. Participants then were randomly assigned to a depressive rumination or distraction emotion regulation induction. MDDs in the rumination condition exhibited less cortisol decline compared to MDDs in the distraction condition and compared to CTLs in either condition. Findings suggest that depressive rumination alters the trajectory of cortisol secretion in MDD and may prolong cortisol production. Results thereby provide important insights into the interaction of biological and psychological factors through which distress contributes to MDD. PMID:24835412

  3. Exercise for patients with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Speyer, Helene; Gluud, Christian

    2015-01-01

    is to investigate the beneficial and harmful effects of exercise, in terms of severity of depression, lack of remission, suicide, and so on, compared with treatment as usual with or without co-interventions in randomized clinical trials involving adults with a clinical diagnosis of major depression. A meta......BACKGROUND: The lifetime prevalence of major depression is estimated to affect 17% of the population and is considered the second largest health-care problem globally in terms of the number of years lived with disability. The effects of most antidepressant treatments are poor; therefore, exercise...... has been assessed in a number of randomized clinical trials. A number of reviews have previously analyzed these trials; however, none of these reviews have addresses the effect of exercise for adults diagnosed with major depression. METHODS/DESIGN: The objective of this systematic review...

  4. Personality disorders in dysthymia and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garyfallos, G; Adamopoulou, A; Karastergiou, A; Voikli, M; Sotiropoulou, A; Donias, S; Giouzepas, J; Paraschos, A

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the comorbidity of personality disorders in patients with primary dysthymia compared to those with episodic major depression. A total of 177 out-patients with primary dysthymia and 187 outpatients with episodic major depression were administered a structured diagnostic interview for DSM-III-R Axis II disorders. In addition, all of these patients completed the BDI, and those with the appropriate level of education also completed the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). A significantly higher proportion of dysthymic patients than patients with major depression met the criteria for a personality disorder, for borderline, histrionic, avoidant, dependent, self-defeating types and for personality disorders of clusters B and C. Further analysis revealed that the above differences were mainly due to the subgroup of patients with 'early-onset dysthymia'. Finally, patients with a personality disorder, both dysthymics and those with major depression, had significantly higher scores on the BDI and on the majority of the MMPI scales compared to those without a personality disorder. The data indicated that (i) dysthymia--mainly that of early onset--is associated with significantly higher personality disorder comorbidity than episodic major depression, and (ii) the presence of a personality disorder is related to more severe overall psychopathology.

  5. The construct validity of the Major Depression Inventory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marie Germund; Ørnbøl, Eva; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to assess the measurement properties of the ten-item Major Depression Inventory when used on clinical suspicion in general practice by performing a Rasch analysis. Methods General practitioners asked consecutive persons to respond to the web-based Major Depression Inventory...... on clinical suspicion of depression. We included 22 practices and 245 persons. Rasch analysis was performed using RUMM2030 software. The Rasch model fit suggests that all items contribute to a single underlying trait (defined as internal construct validity). Mokken analysis was used to test dimensionality...... for gender, age, work status and education. The Rasch and Mokken analyses revealed two dimensions, but the Major Depression Inventory showed fit to one scale if items 9 and 10 were excluded. Conclusion Our study indicated scalability problems in the current version of the Major Depression Inventory...

  6. 'Hot' cognition in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Carvalho, Andre F

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with significant cognitive dysfunction in both 'hot' (i.e. emotion-laden) and 'cold' (non-emotional) domains. Here we review evidence pertaining to 'hot' cognitive changes in MDD. This systematic review searched the PubMed and PsycInfo computerized...... to the perpetuation of negative emotional states in MDD. Limited success in the identification of susceptibility genes in MDD has led to great research interest in identifying vulnerability biomarkers or endophenotypes. Emerging evidence points to the persistence of 'hot' cognition dysfunction during remission...... databases in May 2014 augmented by hand searches of reference lists. We included original articles in which MDD participants (or their healthy first-dregree relatives) and a healthy control group were compared on standard measures of emotional processing or reward/ punishment processing as well...

  7. 'Hot' cognition in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Carvalho, Andre F

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with significant cognitive dysfunction in both 'hot' (i.e. emotion-laden) and 'cold' (non-emotional) domains. Here we review evidence pertaining to 'hot' cognitive changes in MDD. This systematic review searched the PubMed and PsycInfo computerized...... of negative emotional states in MDD. Limited success in the identification of susceptibility genes in MDD has led to great research interest in identifying vulnerability biomarkers or endophenotypes. Emerging evidence points to the persistence of 'hot' cognition dysfunction during remission and to subtle 'hot...... databases in May 2014 augmented by hand searches of reference lists. We included original articles in which MDD participants (or their healthy first-degree relatives) and a healthy control group were compared on standard measures of emotional processing or reward/ punishment processing as well as systematic...

  8. Advances in biomarkers of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tiao-Lai; Lin, Chin-Chuen

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is characterized by mood, vegetative, cognitive, and even psychotic symptoms and signs that can cause substantial impairments in quality of life and functioning. Biomarkers are measurable indicators that could help diagnosing MDD or predicting treatment response. In this chapter, lipid profiles, immune/inflammation, and neurotrophic factor pathways that have long been implicated in the pathogenesis of MDD are discussed. Then, pharmacogenetics and epigenetics of serotonin transport and its metabolism pathway, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and abnormality of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis also revealed new biomarkers. Lastly, new techniques, such as proteomics and metabolomics, which allow researchers to approach the studying of MDD with new directions and make new discoveries are addressed. In the future, more data are needed regarding pathophysiology of MDD, including protein levels, single nucleotide polymorphism, epigenetic regulation, and clinical data in order to better identify reliable and consistent biomarkers for diagnosis, treatment choice, and outcome prediction. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Sequence learning in major depressive disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbély-Ipkovich, Emöke; Németh, Dezsö; Janacsek, Karolina; Gonda, Xénia

    2014-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric diagnoses, accompanied by several psychological, behavioural and emotional symptoms, and in addition to the symptoms affecting the quality of life, it can lead to severe consequences, including suicide. Sequence learning plays a key role in adapting to the environment, neural plasticity, first language acquisition, social learning and skills, at the same time it defines the behaviour of the patient and also therapeutic possibilities. The aim of this paper is to review sequence learning and its consolidation in MDD. We know little about the effects of mood disorders on sequence learning; the results are contradictory, therefore, further studies are needed to test the effects of MDD on sequence learning and on the consolidation of implicitly acquired sequence knowledge.

  10. Perceptive biases in major depressive episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Marine; Carl, Tatiana; Surguladze, Simon; Guillen, Catherine; Gaillard, Philippe; Belzung, Catherine; El-Hage, Wissam; Atanasova, Boriana

    2014-01-01

    Alterations in emotional processing occur during a major depressive episode (MDE), and olfaction and facial expressions have implications in emotional and social interactions. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we characterized the perceptive sensorial biases, potential links, and potential remission after antidepressant treatment of MDE. We recruited 22 patients with acute MDE, both before and after three months of antidepressant treatment, and 41 healthy volunteers matched by age and smoking status. The participants underwent a clinical assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Physical and Social Anhedonia scales, Pleasure-Displeasure Scale), an olfactory evaluation (hedonic aspect, familiarity and emotional impact of odors), and a computerized Facial Affect Recognition task. MDE was associated with an olfactory bias concerning hedonic and emotional aspects, including negative olfactory alliesthesia (unpleasant odorants perceived as more unpleasant), facial emotion expression recognition (happy facial expressions), and in part olfactory anhedonia (pleasant odorants perceived as less pleasant). In addition, the results revealed that these impairments represent state markers of MDE, suggesting that the patients recovered the same sensory processing as healthy subjects after antidepressant treatment. This study demonstrated that MDE is associated with negative biases toward olfactory perception and the recognition of facial emotional expressions. The link between these two sensory parameters suggests common underlying processes.

  11. Perceptive biases in major depressive episode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Naudin

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Alterations in emotional processing occur during a major depressive episode (MDE, and olfaction and facial expressions have implications in emotional and social interactions. To gain a better understanding of these processes, we characterized the perceptive sensorial biases, potential links, and potential remission after antidepressant treatment of MDE. METHODS: We recruited 22 patients with acute MDE, both before and after three months of antidepressant treatment, and 41 healthy volunteers matched by age and smoking status. The participants underwent a clinical assessment (Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Physical and Social Anhedonia scales, Pleasure-Displeasure Scale, an olfactory evaluation (hedonic aspect, familiarity and emotional impact of odors, and a computerized Facial Affect Recognition task. RESULTS: MDE was associated with an olfactory bias concerning hedonic and emotional aspects, including negative olfactory alliesthesia (unpleasant odorants perceived as more unpleasant, facial emotion expression recognition (happy facial expressions, and in part olfactory anhedonia (pleasant odorants perceived as less pleasant. In addition, the results revealed that these impairments represent state markers of MDE, suggesting that the patients recovered the same sensory processing as healthy subjects after antidepressant treatment. DISCUSSION: This study demonstrated that MDE is associated with negative biases toward olfactory perception and the recognition of facial emotional expressions. The link between these two sensory parameters suggests common underlying processes.

  12. Neuroinflammatory Hypothesis in Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfizar Sozeri-Varma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Faced with stress and acute instances, brain cells trigger neuroinflammation and increase inflam-mation response and can cause cell damage, cell death and thereby functional insufficiencies, behavioral disorders and autonomic imbalances. Cytokines that play an important role in inflamma-tory processes affect neurotransmitter metabolism, neuroendocrine functions and synaptic plasticity. It has been proven that inflammatory activity increases in depression. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL-1, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF- and #945; along with acute phase reactants increase in depression. If the inflammatory response becomes chronic and cannot be balanced, inflammation and cytokines may cause behavioral symptoms and neuropsychiatric disorders such as major depression and anxiety disorders. In this article, the changes that occur in inflammatory processes in depressive disorder will be summarized; the effects of pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic approaches on these changes will be reviewed. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2014; 6(1.000: 1-9

  13. Cognitive hypnotherapy for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alladin, Assen

    2012-04-01

    Since the publication of the special issue on cognitive hypnotherapy in the Journal of Cognitive Psychotherapy: An International Quarterly (1994), there have been major developments in the application of hypnosis to the treatment of depression. However, there is no "one-size-fits-all" treatment for depressive disorders as the conditions represent a complex set of heterogeneous symptoms, involving multiple etiologies. It is thus important for therapists to promote a multimodal approach to treating depressive disorders. This article describes cognitive hypnotherapy (CH), an evidence-based multimodal psychological treatment that can be applied to a wide range of depressed patients. CH combines hypnosis with cognitive behavior therapy as the latter provides the best integrative lodestone for assimilating empirically supported treatment techniques derived from various psychotherapies.

  14. Biological substrates underpinning diagnosis of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibille, Etienne; French, Beverly

    2013-09-01

    Major depression is characterized by low mood, a reduced ability to experience pleasure and frequent cognitive, physiological and high anxiety symptoms. It is also the leading cause of years lost due to disability worldwide in women and men, reflecting a lifelong trajectory of recurring episodes, increasing severity and progressive treatment resistance. Yet, antidepressant drugs at best treat only one out of every two patients and have not fundamentally changed since their discovery by chance >50 yr ago. This status quo may reflect an exaggerated emphasis on a categorical disease classification that was not intended for biological research and on oversimplified gene-to-disease models for complex illnesses. Indeed, genetic, molecular and cellular findings in major depression suggest shared risk and continuous pathological changes with other brain-related disorders. So, an alternative is that pathological findings in major depression reflect changes in vulnerable brain-related biological modules, each with their own aetiological factors, pathogenic mechanisms and biological/environment moderators. In this model, pathological entities have low specificity for major depression and instead co-occur, combine and interact within individual subjects across disorders, contributing to the expression of biological endophenotypes and potentially clinical symptom dimensions. Here, we discuss current limitations in depression research, review concepts of gene-to-disease biological scales and summarize human post-mortem brain findings related to pyramidal neurons, γ-amino butyric acid neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes, as prototypical brain circuit biological modules. Finally we discuss nested aetiological factors and implications for dimensional pathology. Evidence suggests that a focus on local cell circuits may provide an appropriate integration point and a critical link between underlying molecular mechanisms and neural network dysfunction in major depression.

  15. Major depressive disorder: reification and (maybe) rheostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, S B

    2015-12-01

    The heterogeneity of clinical syndromes subsumed by diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD) is regarded by some as a reason to abandon or modify the criteria. However, heterogeneity may be unavoidable because of the biopsychosocial complexity of depression. MDD may be characterised by complexities that cannot be distilled down to any brief set of diagnostic criteria. Psychiatrists and psychiatric epidemiologists may need to revise their expectations of this diagnosis in order to avoid over-estimating its ability to guide the selection of treatments and prediction of prognosis. An opposing perspective is that of reification, in which the diagnosis is viewed as being more real than it really is. The concept of rheostasis may help to explain some features of this condition, such as why major depressive episodes sometimes seem understandable or even adaptive (e.g. in the context of bereavement) whereas at other times such episodes are inexplicable and maladaptive.

  16. Major depression and secondhand smoke exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Scott B; Williams, Jeanne V A; Lavorato, Dina H; Woolf, Benjamin; Wang, Jian Li; Bulloch, Andrew G M; Sajobi, Tolulope

    2018-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have consistently linked smoking to poor mental health. Among non-smokers, some studies have also reported associations between secondhand smoke exposure and psychological symptoms. However, an association between secondhand smoke exposure and depressive disorders has not been well established. This analysis used cross-sectional data from a series of 10 population surveys conducted in Canada between 2003 and 2013. The surveys targeted the Canadian household population, included a brief structured interview for past year major depressive episode (MDE) and included items assessing secondhand smoke exposure. We used two-stage individual-level random-effects meta-regression to synthesize results from these surveys. Over the study interval, about 20% of non-smokers reported substantial exposure to secondhand smoke. In this group, the pooled annual prevalence of MDE was 6.1% (95% CI 5.3-6.9) compared to 4.0% (95% CI 3.7-4.3) in non-smokers without secondhand smoke exposure. The crude odds ratio was 1.5 (95% CI 1.4-1.7). With adjustment for a set of potential confounding variables the odds ratio was unchanged, 1.4 (95% CI 1.2 - 1.6). These results provide additional support for public health measures aimed at reducing secondhand smoke exposure. A causal connection between secondhand smoke exposure and MDEs cannot be confirmed due to the cross-sectional nature of the data. Longitudinal studies are needed to establish temporal sequencing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Delayed mood transitions in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, Jakob

    The hypothesis defended here is that the process of mood-normalizing transitions fails in a significant proportion of patients suffering from major depressive disorder. Such a failure is largely unrelated to the psychological content. Evidence for the hypothesis is provided by the highly variable

  18. Major depressive disorder in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Flemming M; Kessing, Lars V; Sørensen, Tine M

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) were at an increased risk of developing major depression compared with patients having other medical illnesses with a comparable degree of disability. METHOD: Case register linkage study of Danish Psychiatric Central Register...

  19. Pharmacotherapy of major depressive disorder in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Gabriele; Liboni, Francesca; Brovedani, Paola

    2010-02-01

    At any one time, major depressive disorder (MDD) affects 4 - 6% of adolescents. When untreated, MDD leads to a high immediate and subsequent suicide risk, long-term chronicity and a poor psychosocial outcome. Whereas psychotherapy can be effective in mild depression, it seems to be less effective in moderate and severe depression. However, although the use of antidepressants increased markedly during the 1990s, in recent years it has decreased as a result of concerns regarding the emergence of suicidality during antidepressant treatment. Are antidepressants truly effective? What is the relationship between different treatments for depression - psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy - alone or in combination? Can antidepressants increase the risk of suicide in some adolescents? Can antidepressants reduce suicide risk in suicidal adolescents? There is evidence that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can improve adolescent depression better than placebo, although the magnitude of the antidepressant effect is 'small to moderate', because of a high placebo response. The SSRI with the best rate of response compared to placebo is fluoxetine. The increased risk of suicidality in adolescents, compared to adults, is weak but consistent across most studies. However, epidemiological studies do not support a relationship between use of antidepressants and suicide rate. A cautious and well-monitored use of antidepressant medications is a first-line treatment option in adolescents with moderate to severe depression. Low rates of remission with current treatment strategies indicate that further research in both psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy is warranted.

  20. Serum proteomic profiling of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bot, M; Chan, M K; Jansen, R; Lamers, F; Vogelzangs, N; Steiner, J; Leweke, F M; Rothermundt, M; Cooper, J; Bahn, S; Penninx, B W J H

    2015-07-14

    Much has still to be learned about the molecular mechanisms of depression. This study aims to gain insight into contributing mechanisms by identifying serum proteins related to major depressive disorder (MDD) in a large psychiatric cohort study. Our sample consisted of 1589 participants of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, comprising 687 individuals with current MDD (cMDD), 482 individuals with remitted MDD (rMDD) and 420 controls. We studied the relationship between MDD status and the levels of 171 serum proteins detected on a multi-analyte profiling platform using adjusted linear regression models. Pooled analyses of two independent validation cohorts (totaling 78 MDD cases and 156 controls) was carried out to validate our top markers. Twenty-eight analytes differed significantly between cMDD cases and controls (P depression. Changes were more prominent in cMDD, suggesting that molecular alterations in serum are associated with acute depression symptomatology. These findings may help to establish serum-based biomarkers of depression and could improve our understanding of its pathophysiology.

  1. The patient perspective in research on major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuijpers Pim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although thousands of studies have examined the genetics, epidemiology, etiology, biology, treatment and prevention of major depressive disorder, we still lack very basic knowledge about what patients with depressive disorders need. Despite the thousands of studies that have been conducted on major depression and the hundreds of randomized trials that have examined the effects of treatments, many patients still do not know how to cope with the daily problems caused by depressive disorders. In this Commentary the need for more research on the perspectives of patients is described. This research should guide treatment studies as well as basic research much more than it currently does. This perpective is especially important to understand and solve the undertreatment of depression, one of the major problems in this area. Up to 50% of depressed patients do not seek treatment, resulting in huge avoidable disease burden and economic costs. In order to solve this problem we need a better understanding of the problems patients encounter in daily life, and what factors contribute to the reasons for seeking treatment or not. Research from the patients' perspective is also necessary to meet the currently unmet information needs of patients, including information about the nature and causes of depression, stigma, medication, treatment and coping with the daily problems of having depression.

  2. Major Depression as a Complex Dynamic System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique O J Cramer

    Full Text Available In this paper, we characterize major depression (MD as a complex dynamic system in which symptoms (e.g., insomnia and fatigue are directly connected to one another in a network structure. We hypothesize that individuals can be characterized by their own network with unique architecture and resulting dynamics. With respect to architecture, we show that individuals vulnerable to developing MD are those with strong connections between symptoms: e.g., only one night of poor sleep suffices to make a particular person feel tired. Such vulnerable networks, when pushed by forces external to the system such as stress, are more likely to end up in a depressed state; whereas networks with weaker connections tend to remain in or return to a non-depressed state. We show this with a simulation in which we model the probability of a symptom becoming 'active' as a logistic function of the activity of its neighboring symptoms. Additionally, we show that this model potentially explains some well-known empirical phenomena such as spontaneous recovery as well as accommodates existing theories about the various subtypes of MD. To our knowledge, we offer the first intra-individual, symptom-based, process model with the potential to explain the pathogenesis and maintenance of major depression.

  3. Major depression in the transition to adulthood: risks and impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinherz, H Z; Giaconia, R M; Hauf, A M; Wasserman, M S; Silverman, A B

    1999-08-01

    An ongoing longitudinal community study (N = 375) examined childhood risks and later adult impairments associated with 1-year Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (3rd ed., rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 1987) diagnoses of major depression during the transition to adulthood. Risks from birth to age 9 were reported by mothers, participants, and teachers. Teacher-reported hostility at age 6 predicted later depression. At age 9, self-perceptions of anxiety/depression, unpopularity, familial rejection, and abuse were potent risks. For men, neonatal and childhood health problems predicted later depression. For women, risks included family constellation, parental death, and poor academic achievement at age 9. Men and women who were depressed at age 18, age 21, or both demonstrated extensive psychosocial impairments in early adulthood, including poor overall functioning, interpersonal and behavioral problems, low self-esteem, and suicidality.

  4. Major depressive disorder in the African American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Rahn K; Patel, Milapkumar; Barker, Narviar C; Ali, Shahid; Jabeen, Shagufta

    2011-07-01

    Depression is a common mental disorder that presents with depressed mood. It can become chronic or recurrent and lead to substantial impairment in an individual's ability to function. At this level, it is identified as major depressive disorder (MDD). Depression and MDD occur across all racial and ethnic groups. Although many depressed patients are treated in primary care, depression in these settings has been underdetected and undertreated. African Americans, especially, who suffer from depression are frequently underdiagnosed and inadequately managed in primary care due to patient, physician, and treatment setting factors. Patient factors include being poor, uninsured, restrictive insurance policies, biological-genetic vulnerability, nonresponsiveness to traditional pharmacological interventions, and stigma (i.e., attitudes and perceptions of mental illness). Physician factors include diagnosis and assessment, physician characteristics, physician bias, and culture; and treatment setting factors include systemic variables such as lack of or poor access to health care, racism, environment, and patient management. African Americans are less likely to receive proper diagnosis and treatment, more likely to have depression for long periods of time, and more likely to suffer greater disability from depression. Understanding patient, physician, and treatment setting factors as contributing barriers that impede effective diagnosis and treatment of depression and MDD in African Americans is critical to effective patient management and discovery. Greater African American participation in clinical research trials also is needed to effectively improve, diagnose, and treat depression in African Americans. This article examines depression among African Americans in the context of gender, culture, and psychosocial determinants, and their engagement in clinical trials.

  5. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder : findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmaal, L.; Veltman, D. J.; van Erp, T. G. M.; Saemann, P. G.; Frodl, T.; Jahanshad, N.; Loehrer, E.; Tiemeier, H.; Hofman, A.; Niessen, W. J.; Vernooij, M. W.; Ikram, M. A.; Wittfeld, K.; Grabe, H. J.; Block, A.; Hegenscheid, K.; Voelzke, H.; Hoehn, D.; Czisch, M.; Lagopoulos, J.; Hatton, S. N.; Hickie, I. B.; Goya-Maldonado, R.; Kraemer, B.; Gruber, O.; Couvy-Duchesne, B.; Renteria, M. E.; Strike, L. T.; Mills, N. T.; de Zubicaray, G. I.; McMahon, K. L.; Medland, S. E.; Martin, N. G.; Gillespie, N. A.; Wright, M. J.; Hall, G.B.; MacQueen, G. M.; Frey, E. M.; Carballedo, A.; van Velzen, L. S.; van Tol, M. J.; van der Wee, N. J.; Veer, I. M.; Walter, H.; Schnell, K.; Schramm, E.; Normann, C.; Schoepf, D.; Konrad, C.; Penninx, B. W. J. H.

    The pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical

  6. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    , patient self-assessment scales, including quality of life scales and a side effect scale. As clinician rated scales we used the Hamilton depression rating scale: the HAM-D17 and its 6 item subscale: the HAM-D6, the Bech Rafaelsen Melancholia scale (MES), and the Bech Rafaelsen Mania scale (MAS). As self...

  7. Gender-Specific Relationship between Obesity and Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Gower, Barbara A; Shelton, Richard C; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2017-01-01

    Prior research suggests a bidirectional relationship between obesity and major depressive disorder (MDD), but the results have been heterogeneous. Differences between males and females in the association of MDD with obesity may contribute to inconsistent results. Thus, this study was designed to determine whether sex has a differential effect on the relationship between MDD and obesity, and to explore the potential mechanisms. All participants were diagnosed with MDD, and depression severity was measured using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Body weight and height were measured to calculate body mass index (BMI). Body composition, including total fat, trunk fat, android fat, and visceral fat mass, was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Subjects provided blood samples, and serum was extracted for measuring the inflammatory factors using human immunoassay kits. Among all obesity measures, depressed women had greater BMI and total body fat. By contrast, depressed men had greater visceral fat mass. However, only in depressed women was depression correlated with several measures of obesity, including BMI, total body fat, and visceral fat mass. A stepwise multiple regression analysis was conducted, and only visceral fat entered the regression model and was most predictive of depression in women (β = 0.60, p  = 0.007). Moreover, compared with depressed men, depressed women had higher leptin levels after controlling for BMI, total body fat, and visceral fat. These results highlight gender differences in determining the association between obesity and depression, and elevated leptin level is a potential mechanism linking MDD to obesity in depressed women. Understanding a gender-specific relationship between obesity and MDD would allow clinicians to target and personalize therapies in the hope of improving health outcomes.

  8. Epigenetic Modifications of Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Saavedra

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is a chronic disease whose neurological basis and pathophysiology remain poorly understood. Initially, it was proposed that genetic variations were responsible for the development of this disease. Nevertheless, several studies within the last decade have provided evidence suggesting that environmental factors play an important role in MDD pathophysiology. Alterations in epigenetics mechanism, such as DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA expression could favor MDD advance in response to stressful experiences and environmental factors. The aim of this review is to describe genetic alterations, and particularly altered epigenetic mechanisms, that could be determinants for MDD progress, and how these alterations may arise as useful screening, diagnosis and treatment monitoring biomarkers of depressive disorders.

  9. 'Hot' cognition in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Carvalho, Andre F

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with significant cognitive dysfunction in both 'hot' (i.e. emotion-laden) and 'cold' (non-emotional) domains. Here we review evidence pertaining to 'hot' cognitive changes in MDD. This systematic review searched the PubMed and PsycInfo computerized...... to the perpetuation of negative emotional states in MDD. Limited success in the identification of susceptibility genes in MDD has led to great research interest in identifying vulnerability biomarkers or endophenotypes. Emerging evidence points to the persistence of 'hot' cognition dysfunction during remission...... and to subtle 'hot' cognition deficits in healthy relatives of patients with MDD. Taken together, these findings suggest that abnormalities in 'hot' cognition may constitute a candidate neurocognitive endophenotype for depression....

  10. 'Hot' cognition in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Carvalho, Andre F

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with significant cognitive dysfunction in both 'hot' (i.e. emotion-laden) and 'cold' (non-emotional) domains. Here we review evidence pertaining to 'hot' cognitive changes in MDD. This systematic review searched the PubMed and PsycInfo computerized......-limbic network with hyper-activity in limbic and ventral prefrontal regions paired with hypo-activity of dorsal prefrontal regions subserve these abnormalities. A cross-talk of 'hot' and 'cold' cognition disturbances in MDD occurs. Disturbances in 'hot cognition' may also contribute to the perpetuation......' cognition deficits in healthy relatives of patients with MDD. Taken together, these findings suggest that abnormalities in 'hot' cognition may constitute a candidate neurocognitive endophenotype for depression....

  11. Effects of exercise training on older patients with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, J A; Babyak, M A; Moore, K A; Craighead, W E; Herman, S; Khatri, P; Waugh, R; Napolitano, M A; Forman, L M; Appelbaum, M; Doraiswamy, P M; Krishnan, K R

    1999-10-25

    Previous observational and interventional studies have suggested that regular physical exercise may be associated with reduced symptoms of depression. However, the extent to which exercise training may reduce depressive symptoms in older patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) has not been systematically evaluated. To assess the effectiveness of an aerobic exercise program compared with standard medication (ie, antidepressants) for treatment of MDD in older patients, we conducted a 16-week randomized controlled trial. One hundred fifty-six men and women with MDD (age, > or = 50 years) were assigned randomly to a program of aerobic exercise, antidepressants (sertraline hydrochloride), or combined exercise and medication. Subjects underwent comprehensive evaluations of depression, including the presence and severity of MDD using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores before and after treatment. Secondary outcome measures included aerobic capacity, life satisfaction, self-esteem, anxiety, and dysfunctional cognitions. After 16 weeks of treatment, the groups did not differ statistically on HAM-D or BDI scores (P = .67); adjustment for baseline levels of depression yielded an essentially identical result. Growth curve models revealed that all groups exhibited statistically and clinically significant reductions on HAM-D and BDI scores. However, patients receiving medication alone exhibited the fastest initial response; among patients receiving combination therapy, those with less severe depressive symptoms initially showed a more rapid response than those with initially more severe depressive symptoms. An exercise training program may be considered an alternative to antidepressants for treatment of depression in older persons. Although antidepressants may facilitate a more rapid initial therapeutic response than exercise, after 16

  12. Placebo and antidepressant treatment for major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Esben

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressant medication is generally considered the primary treatment for major depressive disorders (MDD), but antidepressant treatment has recently approached a crisis with shrinking specific effects and growing placebo responses in current trials. The aim of the paper is to review the placebo...... problem within antidepressant treatment for MDD, and to draw lines to similar problems within the field of psychotherapy. Although clinicians might profit from the large placebo response in their treatment of MDD, the small differences between active treatment and placebo groups found in controlled...

  13. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Hypothesis The hypotheses of all the four included studies share the common idea that it is possible to augment the effect of antidepressant drug treatment by applying different interventions and with each intervention attain a clinically meaningful better effect compared to a control condition, and with minor side effects, thus improving the short- and medium-term outcome in major depression. Procedures Study design The basic study design has been the double blind randomised controlled trial (RCT). In the light therapy study, all patients were treated with sertraline for the whole of the study duration. In the first five weeks of the study, patients were randomised to treatment with either 60 minutes of bright white or 30 minutes of dim red light (sham condition). In the four weeks follow-up period, patients were treated with sertraline alone. In the Pindolol study, all patients were treated with venlafaxine and randomised to augmentation with either active or placebo matching pindolol tablets. In the PEMF study patients were continued on ongoing medication and randomised to augmentation with active or inactive (sham) 30 minutes daily PEMF treatment on weekdays. In the Chronos study all patients were treated with duloxetine and randomized to either a combination of three wake therapies with daily bright light treatment and sleep time stabilisation (wake group) or to daily exercise of minimum 30 minutes as an active control intervention (exercise group). The Chronos study was divided into: (1) a one-week run-in phase where duloxetine were started (and continued for the whole 29 week study period), (2) a one-week inpatient intervention phase where patient in the wake group did three wake therapies (sleep abstinence for the whole night and the following day until evening) in combination with daily light therapy and guidance on sleep time stabilisation and patients in the exercise group started a daily exercise program, (3) a seven week continuation phase where

  14. Aberrant REST-mediated transcriptional regulation in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuki, Koji; Uchida, Shusaku; Wakabayashi, Yusuke; Matsubara, Toshio; Hobara, Teruyuki; Funato, Hiromasa; Watanabe, Yoshifumi

    2010-04-01

    There is growing evidence that aberrant transcriptional regulation is one of the key components of the pathophysiology of mood disorders. The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) is a negative regulator of genes that contain the repressor element-1 (RE-1) binding site. REST has many target genes, including corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH), brain-derived neurotrophic factor, serotonin 1A receptor, which are suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of depression and the action of antidepressants. However, a potential role for REST-mediated transcriptional regulation in mood disorders remains unclear. In this study, we examined the mRNA levels of REST and its known and putative target genes, using quantitative real-time PCR in peripheral blood cells of patients with major depressive and bipolar disorders in both a current depressive and a remissive state. We found reduced mRNA expression of REST and increased mRNA expression of CRH, adenylate cyclase 5, and the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, member 12-13 in patients with major depressive disorder in a current depressive state, but not in a remissive state. Altered expression of these mRNAs was not found in patients with bipolar disorder. Our results suggest that the aberrant REST-mediated transcriptional regulation of, at least, CRH, adenylate cyclase 5, and tumor necrosis factor superfamily, member 12-13, might be state-dependent and associated with the pathophysiology of major depression. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Exercise for patients with major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Hjorthøj, Carsten; Speyer, Helene

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of exercise in patients with depression. Design Systematic review Data sources Bibliographical databases were searched until 20 June 2017. Eligibility criteria and outcomes Eligible trials were randomised clinical trials assessing the effect of exercise...... and lack of remission during follow-up after the intervention. Results Thirty-five trials enrolling 2498 participants were included. The effect of exercise versus control on depression severity was -0.66 standardised mean difference (SMD) (95% CI -0.86 to -0.46; p... assessment, development and evaluation (GRADE): very low quality). Restricting this analysis to the four trials that seemed less affected of bias, the effect vanished into -0.11 SMD (-0.41 to 0.18; p=0.45; GRADE: low quality). Exercise decreased the relative risk of no remission to 0.78 (0.68 to 0.90; p

  16. An animated depiction of major depression epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott B

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiologic estimates are now available for a variety of parameters related to major depression epidemiology (incidence, prevalence, etc.. These estimates are potentially useful for policy and planning purposes, but it is first necessary that they be synthesized into a coherent picture of the epidemiology of the condition. Several attempts to do so have been made using mathematical modeling procedures. However, this information is not easy to communicate to users of epidemiological data (clinicians, administrators, policy makers. Methods In this study, up-to-date data on major depression epidemiology were integrated using a discrete event simulation model. The mathematical model was animated in Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML to create a visual, rather than mathematical, depiction of the epidemiology. Results Consistent with existing literature, the model highlights potential advantages of population health strategies that emphasize access to effective long-term treatment. The paper contains a web-link to the animation. Conclusion Visual animation of epidemiological results may be an effective knowledge translation tool. In clinical practice, such animations could potentially assist with patient education and enhanced long-term compliance.

  17. Selective Neurocognitive Impairments in Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Georges; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie; Jepsen, Susie; Ballard, Kristin; Nelson, Megan; Houri, Alaa; Kumra, Sanjiv; Cullen, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated whether major depression in adolescence is characterized by neurocognitive deficits in attention, affective decision making, and cognitive control of emotion processing. Neuropsychological tests including the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, the Continuous Performance Test-Identical Pairs, the Attention Network…

  18. Women and major depressive disorder: clinical perspectives on causal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accortt, Eynav Elgavish; Freeman, Marlene P; Allen, John J B

    2008-12-01

    Epidemiological data on the prevalence of mood disorders demonstrate that major depressive disorder (MDD) is approximately twice as common in women as in men and that its first onset peaks during the reproductive years. We aimed to review key social, psychological, and biological factors that seem strongly implicated in the etiology of major depression and to focus on sex-specific aspects of depression, such as the role of a woman's reproductive life cycle in depressive symptomatology. A review of the literature, from 1965 to present, was conducted. An integrated etiological model best explains gender and sex differences in depression. Social, psychological, and biological variables must be simultaneously taken into account. These vulnerabilities include (but are not limited to) gender-specific roles in society, life stress such as trauma, a tendency toward ruminative coping strategies, and the effects of sex hormones and genetic factors. To effectively treat MDD in women and to prevent the recurrence of illness in vulnerable women, clinicians must understand the sex-specific aspects of mood disorders over the longitudinal course of women's reproductive lives. A biopsychosocial approach should, therefore, be the main focus of future research and practice, to eventually result in an integrated etiological model of depression in women. Based on the prevalence of MDD in women, timely screening, diagnosis, and intervention should be public health priorities.

  19. Generalized Anxiety and Major Depressive syndrome ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Environmental exposure to manganese (Mn) may cause generalized anxiety (GA) and major depression (MD) in residents living in Mn-exposed areas. Marietta and East Liverpool are two Ohio towns identified as having elevated levels of Mn. The objective was to determine if levels of Mn exposure were associated with levels of GA and MD.Participants and methods: 186 participants (Mean age: 55.0 ± 10.80) were examined. Levels of air-Mn were assessed over a period of ten years using U.S. EPA’s AERMOD dispersion model. Average air-Mn exposure was 0.53 μg/m3 in the two towns. The GA syndrome was comprised of anxiety, obsessive-compulsive, and phobic scales from the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90-R). The MD syndrome was comprised of depression, anxiety, and psychoticism scales also from the SCL-90-R. Linear regression models were used to determine the relationship between Mn and GA, MD and the specific components of each.Results: Elevated air-Mn was associated with GA (β= 0.240, p=0.002), and MD (β= 0.202, p=0.011). Air-Mn was associated with specific components of GA anxiety (β= 0.255, p=0.001), phobic anxiety (β= 0.159, p=0.046), and obsessive-compulsive (β= 0.197, p=0.013). Similarly, components of MD syndrome suggested an association as well: depression (β= 0.180, p=0.023), anxiety (β= 0.255, p=0.001), and psychoticism (β= 0.188, p=0.018). Conclusions: The results suggest that residents with elevated exposure to environmental Mn have elevated levels of

  20. 'Hot' cognition in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Carvalho, Andre F

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with significant cognitive dysfunction in both 'hot' (i.e. emotion-laden) and 'cold' (non-emotional) domains. Here we review evidence pertaining to 'hot' cognitive changes in MDD. This systematic review searched the PubMed and PsycInfo computerized...... reviews and meta-analyses. A total of 116 articles met the inclusion criteria of which 97 were original studies. Negative biases in perception, attention and memory for emotional information, and aberrant reward/punishment processing occur in MDD. Imbalanced responses to negative stimuli in a fronto......-limbic network with hyper-activity in limbic and ventral prefrontal regions paired with hypo-activity of dorsal prefrontal regions subserve these abnormalities. A cross-talk of 'hot' and 'cold' cognition disturbances in MDD occurs. Disturbances in 'hot cognition' may also contribute to the perpetuation...

  1. Predictors of incident major depression in diabetic outpatients with subthreshold depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, Mariska; Pouwer, Francois; Ormel, Johan

    2010-01-01

    patients were available at 2-year follow-up. The 2-year incidence of major depression was 42% (n=31). Higher baseline anxiety levels [odds ratio (OR)=1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.50; P=0.018] and depression severity levels (OR=1.09; 95% CI, 1.00-1.18; P=0.045) were predictors of incident...... major depression. Stepped care allocation was not related to incident major depression. In multivariable models, similar results were found. CONCLUSIONS: Having a higher baseline level of anxiety and depression appeared to be related to incident major depression during 2-year follow-up in diabetic...... patients with subthreshold depression. A stepped care intervention aimed at depression alone did not prevent the onset of depression in these patients. Besides level of depression, anxiety might be taken into account in the prevention of major depression in diabetic patients with subthreshold depression....

  2. The association between depressive symptoms, cognitive function, and inflammation in major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Benros, Michael E; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the association between IL-6 and CRP with depressive items and cognitive function. We included 112 outpatients with major depression from an exercise trial and 57 healthy controls. IL-6, high sensitive CRP (hsCRP), and cognitive function were assessed in all...... subjects. After baseline assessment, patients were randomised to either a 3months exercise intervention or an exercise control group. Post-intervention IL-6, hsCRP, depressive symptoms, and cognitive function were reassessed in the patient group. IL-6 and hsCRP were significantly increased in depressed...... patients compared to healthy controls (p=0.02 and 0.04). These differences were no longer significant after adjustment for lifestyle associated variables. We found no association between immune markers and specific depressive symptoms at baseline or as change over time. Regarding the cognitive tests, IL-6...

  3. Differences in depressive symptoms between Korean and American outpatients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hong Jin; Walker, Rosemary S; Inamori, Aya; Hong, Jin Pyo; Cho, Maeng Je; Baer, Lee; Clain, Alisabet; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David

    2014-05-01

    Previous epidemiologic studies have revealed that East-Asian populations experience fewer depressive symptoms than American populations do. However, it is unclear whether this difference applies to clinical patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). This present study included 1592 Korean and 3744 American outpatients who were 18 years of age or older and met the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. criteria for single or recurrent episodes of nonpsychotic MDD, and evaluated their symptoms of depression using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form. Korean patients scored significantly lower for guilt and depressed mood items, and higher for hypochondriasis and suicidality items than American patients did, after adjusting for total Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores. Conversely, no significant differences were found in quality and function of daily life between groups. Multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that Korean patients experienced less frequent depressed mood and guilt, including verbal and nonverbal expression of depressed mood [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.08-0.23] and feelings of punishment (AOR = 0.036, 95% CI 0.025-0.054) when compared with Americans after adjusting for age and sex. Conversely, Korean patients experienced more frequent suicidality and hypochondriasis, including suicidal ideas or gestures (AOR = 2.10, 95% CI 1.60-2.76) and self-absorption of hypochondriasis (AOR = 1.94, 95% CI 1.70-2.20). In conclusion, decreased expression of depressed mood and guilt may cause underdiagnosis of MDD in Korean patients. Early diagnosis of and intervention for depression and suicide may be delayed because of this specific cross-cultural difference in depression symptoms.

  4. A systematic review of yoga for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Holger; Anheyer, Dennis; Lauche, Romy; Dobos, Gustav

    2017-04-15

    The purpose of this review was to investigate the efficacy and safety of yoga interventions in treating patients with major depressive disorder. MEDLINE, Scopus, and the Cochrane Library were screened through December 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing yoga to inactive or active comparators in patients with major depressive disorder were eligible. Primary outcomes included remission rates and severity of depression. Anxiety and adverse events were secondary outcomes. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane tool. Seven RCTs with 240 participants were included. Risk of bias was unclear for most RCTs. Compared to aerobic exercise, no short- or medium-term group differences in depression severity was found. Higher short-term depression severity was found for yoga compared to electro-convulsive therapy; remission rates did not differ between groups. No short-term group differences occurred when yoga was compared to antidepressant medication. Conflicting evidence was found when yoga was compared to attention-control interventions, or when yoga as an add-on to antidepressant medication was compared to medication alone. Only two RCTs assessed adverse events and reported that no treatment-related adverse events were reported. Few RCTs with low sample size. This review found some evidence for positive effects beyond placebo and comparable effects compared to evidence-based interventions. However, methodological problems and the unclear risk-benefit ratio preclude definitive recommendations for or against yoga as an adjunct treatment for major depressive disorder. Larger and adequately powered RCTs using non-inferiority designs are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Multitarget botanical pharmacotherapy in major depression: a toxic brain hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Siu W; Tang, Wayne H; Leonard, Brain E

    2017-11-01

    A significant number of patients with major depression do not respond optimally to current antidepressant drugs. As depression is likely to be a heterogeneous disorder, it is possible that existing neurotransmitter-based antidepressant drugs do not fully address other pathologies that may exist in certain cases. Biological pathologies related to depression that have been proposed and studied extensively include inflammation and immunology, hypercortisolemia, oxidative stress, and impaired angiogenesis. Such pathologies may induce neurodegeneration, which in turn causes cognitive impairment, a symptom increasingly being recognized in depression. A neurotoxic brain hypothesis unifying all these factors may explain the heterogeneity of depression as well as cognitive decline and antidepressant drug resistance in some patients. Compared with neurotransmitter-based antidepressant drugs, many botanical compounds in traditional medicine used for the treatment of depression and its related symptoms have been discovered to be anti-inflammatory, immunoregulatory, anti-infection, antioxidative, and proangiogenic. Some botanical compounds also exert actions on neurotransmission. This multitarget nature of botanical medicine may act through the amelioration of the neurotoxic brain environment in some patients resistant to neurotransmitter-based antidepressant drugs. A multitarget multidimensional approach may be a reasonable solution for patients resistant to neurotransmitter-based antidepressant drugs.

  6. PCLO gene: its role in vulnerability to major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minelli, Alessandra; Scassellati, Catia; Cloninger, Claude Robert; Tessari, Elisabetta; Bortolomasi, Marco; Bonvicini, Cristian; Giacopuzzi, Mario; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista; Gennarelli, Massimo

    2012-08-01

    A recent genome-wide association study on Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) identified a specific association with a non-synonymous polymorphism (rs2522833) of a gene encoding the presynaptic protein piccolo (PCLO). A high percentage of patients who develop MDD have particular temperamental traits, such as passivity, pessimism, indecisiveness, and low self-esteem, which are related to the subsequent development of depression. The aims of this study were to perform a replicate case-control study and to conduct the first association study between the rs2522833 polymorphism and depression-related personality traits using the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) in a healthy subject sample. A total of 522 MDD patients and 375 healthy volunteers were enrolled in the study. Two hundred and forty-six controls agreed to fill out the TCI. The results showed that rs2522833 CC homozygotes were more frequent among the depressed patients than in the controls (pdepression, including higher Harm Avoidance (HA) and lower in Novelty Seeking (NS). In particular, C allele carriers were more fearful (HA2) and fatigable (HA4), and less impulsive/more deliberate (NS2) and less extravagant/more frugal (NS3). The absence of possible epistatic interaction effect. These results provide further support for the involvement of the PCLO gene in MDD and show that this effect may be mediated by influencing personality traits that increase the risk of major depression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk factors for and perinatal outcomes of major depression during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Räisänen, Sari; Lehto, Soili M; Nielsen, Henriette Svarre

    2014-01-01

    for 1996-2010. PARTICIPANTS: All singleton births (n=511,938) for 2002-2010 in Finland. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Prevalence, risk factors and consequences of major depression during pregnancy. RESULTS: Among 511,938 women, 0.8% experienced major depression during pregnancy, of which 46.9% had a history...... of depression prior to pregnancy. After history of depression, the second strongest associated factor for major depression was fear of childbirth, with a 2.6-fold (adjusted OR (aOR=2.63, 95% CI 2.39 to 2.89) increased prevalence. The risk profile of major depression also included adolescent or advanced maternal...... age, low or unspecified socioeconomic status (SES), single marital status, smoking, prior pregnancy terminations, anaemia and gestational diabetes regardless of a history of depression. Outcomes of pregnancies were worse among women with major depression than without. The contribution of smoking...

  8. Imaging genetics studies on monoaminergic genes in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Eunsoo; Ham, Byung-Joo

    2016-01-04

    Although depression is the leading cause of disability worldwide, current understanding of the neurobiology of depression has failed to be translated into clinical practice. Major depressive disorder (MDD) pathogenesis is considered to be significantly influenced by multiple risk genes, however genetic effects are not simply expressed at a behavioral level. Therefore the concept of endophenotype has been applied in psychiatric genetics. Imaging genetics applies anatomical or functional imaging technologies as phenotypic assays to evaluate genetic variation and their impact on behavior. This paper attempts to provide a comprehensive review of available imaging genetics studies, including reports on genetic variants that have most frequently been linked to MDD, such as the monoaminergic genes (serotonin transporter gene, monoamine oxidase A gene, tryptophan hydroxylase-2 gene, serotonin receptor 1A gene and catechol-O-methyl transferase gene), with regard to key structures involved in emotion processing, such as the hippocampus, amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rapid recovery from major depression using magnesium treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eby, George A; Eby, Karen L

    2006-01-01

    Major depression is a mood disorder characterized by a sense of inadequacy, despondency, decreased activity, pessimism, anhedonia and sadness where these symptoms severely disrupt and adversely affect the person's life, sometimes to such an extent that suicide is attempted or results. Antidepressant drugs are not always effective and some have been accused of causing an increased number of suicides particularly in young people. Magnesium deficiency is well known to produce neuropathologies. Only 16% of the magnesium found in whole wheat remains in refined flour, and magnesium has been removed from most drinking water supplies, setting a stage for human magnesium deficiency. Magnesium ions regulate calcium ion flow in neuronal calcium channels, helping to regulate neuronal nitric oxide production. In magnesium deficiency, neuronal requirements for magnesium may not be met, causing neuronal damage which could manifest as depression. Magnesium treatment is hypothesized to be effective in treating major depression resulting from intraneuronal magnesium deficits. These magnesium ion neuronal deficits may be induced by stress hormones, excessive dietary calcium as well as dietary deficiencies of magnesium. Case histories are presented showing rapid recovery (less than 7 days) from major depression using 125-300 mg of magnesium (as glycinate and taurinate) with each meal and at bedtime. Magnesium was found usually effective for treatment of depression in general use. Related and accompanying mental illnesses in these case histories including traumatic brain injury, headache, suicidal ideation, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, postpartum depression, cocaine, alcohol and tobacco abuse, hypersensitivity to calcium, short-term memory loss and IQ loss were also benefited. Dietary deficiencies of magnesium, coupled with excess calcium and stress may cause many cases of other related symptoms including agitation, anxiety, irritability, confusion, asthenia, sleeplessness

  10. Executive Attention Impairment in Adolescents With Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerfeldt, Sasha L; Cullen, Kathryn R; Han, Georges; Fryza, Brandon J; Houri, Alaa K; Klimes-Dougan, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Neural network models that guide neuropsychological assessment practices are increasingly used to explicate depression, though a paucity of work has focused on regulatory systems that are under development in adolescence. The purpose of this study was to evaluate subsystems of attention related to executive functioning including alerting, orienting, and executive attention networks, as well as sustained attention with varying working memory load, in a sample of depressed and well adolescents. Neuropsychological functioning in 99 adolescents diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD) and 63 adolescent healthy controls (M = 16.6 years old) was assessed on the Attention Network Test (ANT) and the Continuous Performance Test, Identical Pairs. Adolescents with MDD, particularly those who were not medicated, were slower to process conflict (slower reaction time on the Executive Attention scale of the ANT) compared to controls, particularly for those who were not undergoing psychopharmacological treatment. Tentative evidence also suggests that within the MDD group, orienting performance was more impaired in those with a history of comorbid substance use disorder, and alerting was more impaired in those with a history of a suicide attempt. Adolescents with depression showed impaired executive attention, although cognitive performance varied across subgroups of patients. These findings highlight the importance of examining neurocognitive correlates associated with features of depression and suggest an avenue for future research to help guide the development of interventions.

  11. Motor imagery in unipolar major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djamila eBennabi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Motor imagery is a potential tool to investigate action representation, as it can provide insights into the processes of action planning and preparation. Recent studies suggest that depressed patients present specific impairment in mental rotation. The present study was designed to investigate the influence of unipolar depression on motor imagery ability.Methods: Fourteen right-handed patients meeting DSM-IV criteria for unipolar depression were compared to fourteen matched healthy controls. Imagery ability was accessed by the timing correspondence between executed and imagined movements during a pointing task, involving strong spatiotemporal constraints (speed/accuracy trade off paradigm.Results: Compared to controls, depressed patients showed marked motor slowing on both actual and imagined movements. Furthermore, we observed greater temporal discrepancies between actual and mental movements in depressed patients than in healthy controls. Lastly, depressed patients modulated, to some extent, mental movement durations according to the difficulty of the task, but this modulation was not as strong as that of healthy subjects.Conclusion: These results suggest that unipolar depression significantly affects the higher stages of action planning and point out a selective decline of motor prediction.

  12. Development of a family functioning scale for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBenedetti, Dana Britt; Danchenko, Natalya; François, Clement; Lewis, Sandra; Davis, Kimberly H; Fehnel, Sheri E

    2012-03-01

    To better understand depression's impact on family functioning from the perspectives of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and their partners; to develop and test patient and partner versions of a new self-reported measure, the Depression and Family Functioning Scale (DFFS), for use in clinical trials. Concept elicitation interviews were conducted with 32 adults with clinician-diagnosed moderate-to-severe MDD and their respective partners. Twenty-six items were drafted to address relevant aspects of family functioning and were then tested and refined through two iterative sets of cognitive debriefing interviews, each conducted by the same pair of highly experienced researchers, including a licensed clinical psychologist. Depression negatively affects family functioning through poorer communication, increased conflicts, decreased family interaction, and decreased intimacy. No existing instrument measured all domains of interest, or had been rigorously developed and psychometrically validated in the target populations. The draft DFFS items generally tested well and only minor modifications were made to the items after the second set of interviews. Both patients and partners indicated that the final set of 15 DFFS items addresses all concepts of importance. The DFFS evaluates the impact of depression on family functioning and has the potential to provide important information that can facilitate a more comprehensive evaluation of new treatments in clinical trial settings. Although MDD severity was not confirmed with a standardized interview, in clinical practice in the US, MDD is generally not diagnosed with the use of a structured clinical interview or clinician-administered tool. In the current study, depression severity had little (if any) impact on the specific concepts elicited as being important to family functioning. In fact, patients with milder depression had more insight and were able to better articulate changes in family functioning with

  13. Psychosocial Functioning in Depressive Patients: A Comparative Study between Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Affective Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Major depressive disorder (MDD and bipolar affective disorder (BAD are among the leading causes of disability. These are often associated with widespread impairments in all domains of functioning including relational, occupational, and social. The main aim of the study was to examine and compare nature and extent of psychosocial impairment of patients with MDD and BAD during depressive phase. Methodology. 96 patients (48 in MDD group and 48 in BAD group were included in the study. Patients were recruited in depressive phase (moderate to severe depression. Patients having age outside 18–45 years, psychotic symptoms, mental retardation, and current comorbid medical or axis-1 psychiatric disorder were excluded. Psychosocial functioning was assessed using Range of Impaired Functioning Tool (LIFE-RIFT. Results. Domains of work, interpersonal relationship, life satisfaction, and recreation were all affected in both groups, but the groups showed significant difference in global psychosocial functioning score only (P=0.031 with BAD group showing more severe impairment. Conclusion. Bipolar depression causes higher global psychosocial impairment than unipolar depression.

  14. Major depressive disorder in children and adolescents after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanizadeh, A; Mansoori, Y; Ashkani, H; Fallahzadeh, M H; Derakhshan, A; Shokrpour, N; Akhondzadeh, S

    2009-06-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence of major depressive disorder and depressive symptoms in children and adolescents after renal transplantation. A total of 71 patients who had undergone renal transplantation were interviewed in person using the Farsi (Persian) version of the Kiddie Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders diagnostic criteria. Major depressive disorder, depressive symptoms, and suicidal behaviors were assessed. The rate of major depressive disorder was 2.8%; two-thirds of the patients had irritability; and approximately 40% had recurrent thoughts of death and suicidal ideation. The rate of major depressive disorder was lower than in other chronic diseases such as thallasemia or hemophilia; however, the rate of suicidal behaviors was high.

  15. From Stress to Inflammation and Major Depressive Disorder: A Social Signal Transduction Theory of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavich, George M.; Irwin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Major life stressors, especially those involving interpersonal stress and social rejection, are among the strongest proximal risk factors for depression. In this review, we propose a biologically plausible, multilevel theory that describes neural, physiologic, molecular, and genomic mechanisms that link experiences of social-environmental stress with internal biological processes that drive depression pathogenesis. Central to this social signal transduction theory of depression is the hypothesis that experiences of social threat and adversity up-regulate components of the immune system involved in inflammation. The key mediators of this response, called proinflammatory cytokines, can in turn elicit profound changes in behavior, which include the initiation of depressive symptoms such as sad mood, anhedonia, fatigue, psychomotor retardation, and social-behavioral withdrawal. This highly conserved biological response to adversity is critical for survival during times of actual physical threat or injury. However, this response can also be activated by modern-day social, symbolic, or imagined threats, leading to an increasingly proinflammatory phenotype that may be a key phenomenon driving depression pathogenesis and recurrence, as well as the overlap of depression with several somatic conditions including asthma, rheumatoid arthritis, chronic pain, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease, obesity, and neurodegeneration. Insights from this theory may thus shed light on several important questions including how depression develops, why it frequently recurs, why it is strongly predicted by early life stress, and why it often co-occurs with symptoms of anxiety and with certain physical disease conditions. This work may also suggest new opportunities for preventing and treating depression by targeting inflammation. PMID:24417575

  16. Severity of depressive symptoms and accuracy of dietary reporting among obese women with major depressive disorder seeking weight loss treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Whited

    Full Text Available An elevation in symptoms of depression has previously been associated with greater accuracy of reported dietary intake, however this association has not been investigated among individuals with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. The purpose of this study was to investigate reporting accuracy of dietary intake among a group of women with major depressive disorder in order to determine if reporting accuracy is similarly associated with depressive symptoms among depressed women. Reporting accuracy of dietary intake was calculated based on three 24-hour phone-delivered dietary recalls from the baseline phase of a randomized trial of weight loss treatment for 161 obese women with major depressive disorder. Regression models indicated that higher severity of depressive symptoms was associated with greater reporting accuracy, even when controlling for other factors traditionally associated with reporting accuracy (coefficient  =  0.01 95% CI = 0.01 - 0.02. Seventeen percent of the sample was classified as low energy reporters. Reporting accuracy of dietary intake increases along with depressive symptoms, even among individuals with major depressive disorder. These results suggest that any study investigating associations between diet quality and depression should also include an index of reporting accuracy of dietary intake as accuracy varies with the severity of depressive symptoms.

  17. Severity of depressive symptoms and accuracy of dietary reporting among obese women with major depressive disorder seeking weight loss treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Matthew C; Schneider, Kristin L; Appelhans, Bradley M; Ma, Yunsheng; Waring, Molly E; DeBiasse, Michele A; Busch, Andrew M; Oleski, Jessica L; Merriam, Philip A; Olendzki, Barbara C; Crawford, Sybil L; Ockene, Ira S; Lemon, Stephenie C; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2014-01-01

    An elevation in symptoms of depression has previously been associated with greater accuracy of reported dietary intake, however this association has not been investigated among individuals with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder. The purpose of this study was to investigate reporting accuracy of dietary intake among a group of women with major depressive disorder in order to determine if reporting accuracy is similarly associated with depressive symptoms among depressed women. Reporting accuracy of dietary intake was calculated based on three 24-hour phone-delivered dietary recalls from the baseline phase of a randomized trial of weight loss treatment for 161 obese women with major depressive disorder. Regression models indicated that higher severity of depressive symptoms was associated with greater reporting accuracy, even when controlling for other factors traditionally associated with reporting accuracy (coefficient  =  0.01 95% CI = 0.01 - 0.02). Seventeen percent of the sample was classified as low energy reporters. Reporting accuracy of dietary intake increases along with depressive symptoms, even among individuals with major depressive disorder. These results suggest that any study investigating associations between diet quality and depression should also include an index of reporting accuracy of dietary intake as accuracy varies with the severity of depressive symptoms.

  18. Pharmacological Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder in Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel L. Farley

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD affects a significant number of adolescents today. Its consequences (including social isolation, failure to achieve crucial developmental milestones, and suicide mandate close attention in clinical practice. While tricyclics and monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs have been used infrequently and with questionable efficacy, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, particularly fluoxetine, consistently have been shown to be of benefit in treating outpatient adolescents with MDD. Despite some success with other drugs in its class, fluoxetine remains the only SSRI that is FDA approved for treatment of children and adolescents with depression. A review of recent studies is presented, including the controversy regarding the relationship of antidepressants and suicidal behavior in this patient population.

  19. The interrelation between premenstrual syndrome and major depression: results from a population-based sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester-Knauss, Christine; Zemp Stutz, Elisabeth; Weiss, Carine; Tschudin, Sibil

    2011-10-12

    Research about the relationship between premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and major depression is limited. This study examined the relationship between moderate to severe PMS and major depression in a population-based sample of women of reproductive age. The objectives of the study were to assess the association between premenstrual syndrome and major depression, to analyse how PMS and major depression differ and to characterise the group of women who report both PMS and major depression. Data were obtained from the Swiss Health Survey 2007. Included in the analysis was data from women under the age of 55 without hysterectomy and who answered the questions on PMS symptoms. The population-based sample consisted of 3518 women. Weighted prevalence rates were calculated and relative risk ratios for PMS, major depression and women who reported both PMS and major depression, were calculated with logistic multinominal logit regression. The prevalence of major depression was 11.3% in women screening positive for moderate PMS and 24.6% in women screening positive for severe PMS. Compared to women without any of these conditions, women who reported moderate to severe alcohol consumption had a lower risk for PMS. Women reporting use of antidepressants, and use of oral contraceptives had a higher risk for major depression compared to women without any of these conditions. Women reporting work dissatisfaction had a higher risk for PMS. A higher relative risk to report both PMS and major depression compared to women without PMS or major depression was related to factors such as high psychological distress, low mastery, psychotropic drug consumption, and low self-rated health. The results suggested that women who suffer from both PMS and major depression are more impaired compared to women with only one disorder. The results further indicated that PMS and major depression are different disorders that can, however, co-occur.

  20. Major depressive disorder as a co-morbid diagnosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to focus on the importance of depressive symptoms in patients suffering from schizophrenia, and the dilemma posed by hierarchical classification methods, which exclude co-morbid diagnoses such as Major Depressive Disorder in patients with schizophrenia. The question arises that if Major ...

  1. The patient perspective in research on major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.

    2011-01-01

    Although thousands of studies have examined the genetics, epidemiology, etiology, biology, treatment and prevention of major depressive disorder, we still lack very basic knowledge about what patients with depressive disorders need. Despite the thousands of studies that have been conducted on major

  2. Benchmarks for Psychotherapy Efficacy in Adult Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Takuya; Wampold, Bruce E.; Serlin, Ronald C.; Kircher, John C.; Brown, George S.

    2007-01-01

    This study estimates pretreatment-posttreatment effect size benchmarks for the treatment of major depression in adults that may be useful in evaluating psychotherapy effectiveness in clinical practice. Treatment efficacy benchmarks for major depression were derived for 3 different types of outcome measures: the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression…

  3. Reliable change in depression during behavioral weight loss treatment among women with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Andrew M; Whited, Matthew C; Appelhans, Bradley M; Schneider, Kristin L; Waring, Molly E; DeBiasse, Michele A; Oleski, Jessica L; Crawford, Sybil L; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2013-03-01

    Although behavioral weight loss interventions generally have been shown to improve depressive symptoms, little is known as to whether some people with major depressive disorder experience worsening of depression during a weight loss intervention. Rates and predictors of change in depression symptoms among 148 obese women with major depressive disorder who participated in a trial comparing depression treatment plus behavioral weight loss treatment (Behavioral Activation; BA) to behavioral weight loss treatment alone (Lifestyle Intervention; LI) were examined. a statistically reliable change in depression was calculated as ≥9 points on the beck depression inventory in this sample. At 6 months, 73% of participants in BA and 54% of participants in LI showed reliable improvement in depression symptoms and 1.5% of participants in BA and 1.3% of participants in LI showed reliable worsening in depression symptoms. Rates of reliable change were similar at 12 months. Participants who experienced reliable improvement in depression lost significantly more weight than those who did not in both conditions. In the LI condition, baseline psychiatric variables and change in physical activity during treatment were also related to reliable improvement in depression. No evidence for an iatrogenic effect of behavioral weight loss treatment on depressive symptoms among obese women with major depressive disorder was detected; rather, behavioral weight loss treatment appears to be associated with significant concurrent improvement in depression. Even greater rates of reliable improvement were observed when depression treatment was added to weight loss treatment. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  4. Comorbid Problem Gambling and Major Depression in a Community Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Leanne; Yakovenko, Igor; Hodgins, David C; Dobson, Keith S; El-Guebaly, Nady; Casey, David M; Currie, Shawn R; Smith, Garry J; Williams, Robert J; Schopflocher, Don P

    2015-12-01

    Major depression is among the most common comorbid conditions in problem gambling. However, little is known about the effects of comorbid depression on problem gambling. The present study examined the prevalence of current major depression among problem gamblers (N = 105) identified from a community sample of men and women in Alberta, and examined group differences in gambling severity, escape motivation for gambling, family functioning, childhood trauma, and personality traits across problem gamblers with and without comorbid depression. The prevalence of major depression among the sample of problem gamblers was 32.4%. Compared to problem gamblers without depression (n = 71), problem gamblers with comorbid depression (n = 34) reported more severe gambling problems, greater history of childhood abuse and neglect, poorer family functioning, higher levels of neuroticism, and lower levels of extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. Furthermore, the problem gamblers with comorbid depression had greater levels of childhood abuse and neglect, worse family functioning, higher neuroticism, and lower agreeableness and conscientiousness than a comparison sample of recreational gamblers with depression (n = 160). These findings underscore the need to address comorbid depression in assessment and treatment of problem gambling and for continued research on how problem gambling is related to frequently co-occurring disorders such as depression.

  5. Social functioning in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupferberg, Aleksandra; Bicks, Lucy; Hasler, Gregor

    2016-10-01

    Depression is associated with social risk factors, social impairments and poor social functioning. This paper gives an overview of these social aspects using the NIMH Research and Domain Criteria 'Systems for Social Processes' as a framework. In particular, it describes the bio-psycho-social interplay regarding impaired affiliation and attachment (social anhedonia, hyper-sensitivity to social rejection, competition avoidance, increased altruistic punishment), impaired social communication (impaired emotion recognition, diminished cooperativeness), impaired social perception (reduced empathy, theory-of-mind deficits) and their impact on social networks and the use of social media. It describes these dysfunctional social processes at the behavioural, neuroanatomical, neurochemical and genetic levels, and with respect to animal models of social stress. We discuss the diagnostic specificity of these social deficit constructs for depression and in relation to depression severity. Since social factors are importantly involved in the pathogenesis and the consequences of depression, such research will likely contribute to better diagnostic assessments and concepts, treatments and preventative strategies both at the diagnostic and transdiagnostic level. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Gender differences in major depressive disorder : Results from the Netherlands study of depression and anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuch, Jerome J. J.; Roest, Annelieke M.; Nolen, Willem A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; de Jonge, Peter

    Background: Although an overall gender difference in prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) has been well established, several questions concerning gender differences in the clinical manifestation of depression remain. This study aims to identify gender differences in psychopathology,

  7. Suicides and Suicide Attempts during Long-Term Treatment with Antidepressants: A Meta-Analysis of 29 Placebo-Controlled Studies Including 6,934 Patients with Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Cora; Bschor, Tom; Franklin, Jeremy; Baethge, Christopher

    It is unclear whether antidepressants can prevent suicides or suicide attempts, particularly during long-term use. We carried out a comprehensive review of long-term studies of antidepressants (relapse prevention). Sources were obtained from 5 review articles and by searches of MEDLINE, PubMed Central and a hand search of bibliographies. We meta-analyzed placebo-controlled antidepressant RCTs of at least 3 months' duration and calculated suicide and suicide attempt incidence rates, incidence rate ratios and Peto odds ratios (ORs). Out of 807 studies screened 29 were included, covering 6,934 patients (5,529 patient-years). In total, 1.45 suicides and 2.76 suicide attempts per 1,000 patient-years were reported. Seven out of 8 suicides and 13 out of 14 suicide attempts occurred in antidepressant arms, resulting in incidence rate ratios of 5.03 (0.78-114.1; p = 0.102) for suicides and of 9.02 (1.58-193.6; p = 0.007) for suicide attempts. Peto ORs were 2.6 (0.6-11.2; nonsignificant) and 3.4 (1.1-11.0; p = 0.04), respectively. Dropouts due to unknown reasons were similar in the antidepressant and placebo arms (9.6 vs. 9.9%). The majority of suicides and suicide attempts originated from 1 study, accounting for a fifth of all patient-years in this meta-analysis. Leaving out this study resulted in a nonsignificant incidence rate ratio for suicide attempts of 3.83 (0.53-91.01). Therapists should be aware of the lack of proof from RCTs that antidepressants prevent suicides and suicide attempts. We cannot conclude with certainty whether antidepressants increase the risk for suicide or suicide attempts. Researchers must report all suicides and suicide attempts in RCTs. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Vortioxetine: a New Treatment for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, K Ryan; Thase, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Vortioxetine is a structurally novel medication that has recently been approved for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). This medication is a serotonin reuptake inhibitor that also has a number of other potentially relevant effects on serotoninergic receptors, which may differentiate the drug's effects from those of current first-line antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs). This article will review the basic clinical pharmacology of vortioxetine, summarize the major clinical trials that were performed prior to approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), discuss relevant post-marketing studies of this drug, and offer expert commentary on the significance of this new agent in clinical practice. Pre-approval studies were identified as all randomized, placebo-controlled studies of vortioxetine listed on clinicaltrials.gov. Other referenced studies were identified via a MEDLINE database literature search in August 2015 using the key search terms, vortioxetine and Lu AA21004, combined with additional terms that included pharmacological profile, pharmacokinetics, drug interactions, adverse effects, side effects, safety, major depression, and major depressive disorder. We identified relevant systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized trials and preclinical studies of importance. Results of placebo-controlled trials suggest efficacy and an overall safety profile comparable to existing first-line antidepressants. The most common side effects are nausea, vomiting and constipation. Results of several studies indicate that vortioxetine may have therapeutic effects on cognition (e.g., memory and executive functioning) that exceed that of standard antidepressants. Disadvantages include cost and the current paucity of long-term efficacy data from large clinical trials. The authors suggest that vortioxetine is currently a good second-line antidepressant option and shows

  9. Amitriptyline versus placebo for major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2013-01-01

    A recent Cochrane review concluded that amitriptyline is an efficacious antidepressant drug, however associated with a number of side effects. The present paper discusses this finding in relation to studies on effects and side effects of SSRIs and dual-action drugs. It is concluded...... that there is some evidence for recommending treatment with tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) especially in patients who are hospitalized with severe depression and melancholic features. Further, nortriptylin is preferred due to its more favourable side effects profile....

  10. Remission and functioning in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romera, Irene; Perez, Víctor; Gilaberte, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Evidence from numerous clinical studies has shown that the optimal goal for the treatment of depression is remission. Remission implies that the signs and symptoms of the disease are absent or virtually absent, which is typically associated with a return to the patient s previous daily functioning. Functioning in depression is a broad concept that covers different domains. There are many validated instruments for its assessment, these being reviewed in this article. Furthermore, recovering the pre-morbid level of functioning level is increasingly being identified as a significant target in addition to symptomatic remission. In this sense, functional recovery has been associated with better prognosis of depression and is also a clinical goal expressed by the patient. Several factors, like complete remission of symptoms, with no residual symptoms, maintenance of remission, quality of remission, early remission, have been identified as contributors to functional recovery. In order to facilitate the clinical outcomes, evaluation of and search for symptomatic remission as well as functional recovery need to be integrated into the clinical practice.

  11. Black- White Differences in Predictive Validity of Depressive Symptoms for Subsequent Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan eMoazen Zadeh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundBlack- White differences are shown in psychosocial and medical correlates of depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder (MDD. The current longitudinal study compared Blacks and Whites for the association between baseline depressive symptoms and subsequent risk of MDD 15 years later. MethodsData came from the Americans’ Changing Lives (ACL Study that followed 3,361 individuals (2,205 Whites and 1,156 Blacks from 1986 to 2001. Predictor was baseline depressive symptoms measured using an 11-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D in 1986. Outcome was 12 month MDD measured using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI at 2001. Covariates included baseline socio-demographics, financial difficulty, chronic medical conditions, and self-rated health (SRH measured at 1986. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association between baseline CES-D score and CIDI-based MDD 15 years later net of demographics, SES, CMCs and SRH. The models were applied in the pooled sample, as well as Blacks and Whites. We also reported data on reliability and factor structure of CES-D based on ethnicity. ResultsAccording to the logistic regression models, baseline CES-D scores were predictive of subsequent CIDI- based 12 month MDD 15 years later among Whites but not Blacks. Ethnic differences in predictive validity of CES-D scores on MDD could not be attributed to the ethnic differences in reliability of the CES-D which was even higher for Blacks than Whites. ConclusionBlack–White differences exist in the association between baseline depressive symptoms and subsequent risk of MDD over 15 years. Ethnic differences in the longitudinal link between baseline CES-D and subsequent risk of MDD among Blacks may explain some of the Black - White differences in social, psychological, and medical correlates of depressive symptoms and depression. Future research is still needed to compare Blacks and Whites for confirmatory

  12. The Association Between Major Depressive Disorder and Outcomes in Older Veterans Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWaters, Ami L; Chansard, Matthieu; Anzueto, Antonio; Pugh, Mary Jo; Mortensen, Eric M

    2018-01-01

    Major depressive disorder ("depression") has been identified as an independent risk factor for mortality for many comorbid conditions, including heart failure, cancer and stroke. Major depressive disorder has also been linked to immune suppression by generating a chronic inflammatory state. However, the association between major depression and pneumonia has not been examined. The aim of this study was to examine the association between depression and outcomes, including mortality and intensive care unit admission, in Veterans hospitalized with pneumonia. We conducted a retrospective national study using administrative data of patients hospitalized at any Veterans Administration acute care hospital. We included patients ≥65 years old hospitalized with pneumonia from 2002-2012. Depressed patients were further analyzed based on whether they were receiving medications to treat depression. We used generalized linear mixed effect models to examine the association of depression with the outcomes of interest after controlling for potential confounders. Patients with depression had a significantly higher 90-day mortality (odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.07-1.17) compared to patients without depression. Patients with untreated depression had a significantly higher 30-day (1.11, 1.04-1.20) and 90-day (1.20, 1.13-1.28) mortality, as well as significantly higher intensive care unit admission rates (1.12, 1.03-1.21), compared to patients with treated depression. For older veterans hospitalized with pneumonia, a concurrent diagnosis of major depressive disorder, and especially untreated depression, was associated with higher mortality. This highlights that untreated major depressive disorder is an independent risk factor for mortality for patients with pneumonia. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Cost analysis of paroxetine versus imipramine in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentkover, J D; Feighner, J P

    1995-09-01

    A simulation decision analytical model was used to compare the annual direct medical costs of treating patients with major depression using the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine or the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) imipramine. Medical treatment patterns were determined from focus groups of general and family practitioners and psychiatrists in Boston, Dallas and Chicago, US. Direct medical costs included the wholesale drug acquisition costs (based on a 6-month course of drug therapy), psychiatrist and/or general practitioner visits, hospital outpatient visits, hospitalisation and electroconvulsive therapy. Acute phase treatment failure rates were derived from an intention-to-treat analysis of a previously published trial of paroxetine, imipramine and placebo in patients with major depression. Maintenance phase relapse rates were obtained from a 12-month trial of paroxetine, supplemented from the medical literature. The relapse rates for the final 6 months of the year were obtained from medical literature and expert opinion. Direct medical costs were estimated from a health insurance claims database. The estimated total direct medical cost per patient was slightly lower using paroxetine ($US2348) than generic imipramine ($US2448) as first-line therapy. This result was sensitive to short term dropout rates but robust to changes in other major parameters, including hospitalisation costs and relapse rates. The financial benefit of paroxetine, despite its 15-fold higher acquisition cost compared with imipramine, is attributable to a higher rate of completion of the initial course of therapy and consequent reduced hospitalisation rates.

  14. Revisiting the Serotonin Hypothesis: Implications for Major Depressive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a heritable neuropsychiatric disease associated with severe changes at cellular and molecular levels. Its diagnosis mainly relies on the characterization of a wide range of symptoms including changes in mood and behavior. Despite the availability of antidepressant drugs, 10 to 30 % of patients fail to respond after a single or multiple treatments, and the recurrence of depression among responsive patients is very high. Evidence from the past decades suggests that the brain neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is incriminated in MDD, and that a dysfunction of 5-HT receptors may play a role in the genesis of this disease. The 5-HT membrane transporter protein (SERT), which helps regulate the serotonergic transmission, is also implicated in MDD and is one of the main targets of antidepressant therapy. Although a number of behavioral tests and animal models have been developed to study depression, little is known about the neurobiological bases of MDD. Understanding the role of the serotonergic pathway will significantly help improve our knowledge of the pathophysiology of depression and may open up avenues for the development of new antidepressant drugs. The overarching goal of this review is to present recent findings from studies examining the serotonergic pathway in MDD, with a focus on SERT and the serotonin 1A (5-HT1A), serotonin 1B (5-HT1B), and serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors. This paper also describes some of the main molecules involved in the internalization of 5-HT receptors and illustrates the changes in 5-HT neurotransmission in knockout mice and animal model of depression.

  15. Etiology and Diagnosis of Major Depression - A Novel Quantitative Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Classical psychiatric opinions are relative uncertain and treatment results are not impressive when dealing with major depression. Depression is related to the endocrine system, but despite much effort a good quantitative measure for characterizing depression has not yet emerged...... we compare the O-index with opinions reach by classical psychiatric diagnostic procedure (sensitivity 83%, specificity 59%, likelihood ratio positive 2.0, and likelihood ratio negative 0.29). The O-index nicely refines the etiology of depression: Combined with clinical data for 29 subjects earlier...... reported three categories emerge (p = 4.4 × 10-13): hypocortisolemic depressed, non-depressed, and hypercotisolemic depressed. The O-index also reveals why it has been difficult to obtain good markers earlier. It explains that healthy subjects may have an elevated (suppressed) level of cortisol or ACTH...

  16. Current understanding of the neurobiology of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiriţă, Anca Livia; Gheorman, Victor; Bondari, Dan; Rogoveanu, Ion

    2015-01-01

    Depression is highly prevalent worldwide and associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Approximately 340 million people worldwide suffer from depression at any given time. Based on estimates from the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is responsible for the greatest proportion of burden associated with non-fatal health outcomes and accounts for approximately 12% total years lived with disability. Probably no single risk factor can be completely isolated in major depressive disorder (MDD), as interactions between many sources of vulnerability are the most likely explanation. Buttressing the identification of grief, demoralization, hopelessness and styles of psychological coping of the depressed patient are vital, ongoing scientific developments that flow from an increased understanding of this interplay amongst the immune system, endocrine system and brain. The rapidly accumulating body of neurobiological knowledge has catalyzed fundamental changes in how we conceptualize depressive symptoms and has important implications regarding the treatment and even prevention of depressive symptoms in patients.

  17. KLEPTOMANIA PRESENTING WITH MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER : A CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, R.C.

    1996-01-01

    A 35 year old, married, educated woman of well to do economic condition who was referred by court for psychiatric opinion was found to suffer from “Kleptomania” with “recurrent major depressive disorder.” The patient had been stealing and hoarding (at times giving away when caught) defective and useless objects for the past 3 years .mostly during periods of depression and had been arrested twice for stealing. Her kleplomanic symptoms improved moderately when her depression lifted with antidep...

  18. Medical therapy for major depressive disorder in Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podawiltz, Alan; Culpepper, Larry

    2010-04-01

    Latino patients require special considerations due to cultural beliefs, inadequate antidepressant response, increased placebo response, and adherence problems. Current evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of depression are generally applicable to a Hispanic population, but no separate recommendations for the treatment of major depressive disorder in Hispanic veterans or their families exist. More research is needed on depression in Hispanic patients in order to establish treatment guidelines specific to this population. Copyright 2010 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  19. The Depression Inventory Development Workgroup: A Collaborative, Empirically Driven Initiative to Develop a New Assessment Tool for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarino, Anthony L; Evans, Kenneth R; Kalali, Amir H; Kennedy, Sidney H; Engelhardt, Nina; Frey, Benicio N; Greist, John H; Kobak, Kenneth A; Lam, Raymond W; MacQueen, Glenda; Milev, Roumen; Placenza, Franca M; Ravindran, Arun V; Sheehan, David V; Sills, Terrence; Williams, Janet B W

    2016-01-01

    The Depression Inventory Development project is an initiative of the International Society for CNS Drug Development whose goal is to develop a comprehensive and psychometrically sound measurement tool to be utilized as a primary endpoint in clinical trials for major depressive disorder. Using an iterative process between field testing and psychometric analysis and drawing upon expertise of international researchers in depression, the Depression Inventory Development team has established an empirically driven and collaborative protocol for the creation of items to assess symptoms in major depressive disorder. Depression-relevant symptom clusters were identified based on expert clinical and patient input. In addition, as an aid for symptom identification and item construction, the psychometric properties of existing clinical scales (assessing depression and related indications) were evaluated using blinded datasets from pharmaceutical antidepressant drug trials. A series of field tests in patients with major depressive disorder provided the team with data to inform the iterative process of scale development. We report here an overview of the Depression Inventory Development initiative, including results of the third iteration of items assessing symptoms related to anhedonia, cognition, fatigue, general malaise, motivation, anxiety, negative thinking, pain and appetite. The strategies adopted from the Depression Inventory Development program, as an empirically driven and collaborative process for scale development, have provided the foundation to develop and validate measurement tools in other therapeutic areas as well.

  20. Major depressive disorder as a co-morbid diagnosis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    mental disorders (DSM IV TR)3 diagnostic criteria for schizophrenia, major depressive disorder is ... the DSM IV TR criteria for Schizoaffective Disorder is unspecified. We suggest that one should only allocate the .... on average for 5 years and in total 81% of patients with first episode psychosis did suffer from depressed ...

  1. Increased neural response to social rejection in major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, Poornima; Waiter, Gordon D.; Dubois, Magda; Milders, Maarten; Reid, Ian; Steele, J. Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Background: Being a part of community is critical for survival and individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) have a greater sensitivity to interpersonal stress that makes them vulnerable to future episodes. Social rejection is a critical risk factor for depression and it is said to increase

  2. Amitriptyline versus placebo for major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Bukh, Jens Otto Drachmann

    2013-01-01

    A recent Cochrane review concluded that amitriptyline is an efficacious antidepressant drug, however associated with a number of side effects. The present paper discusses this finding in relation to studies on effects and side effects of SSRIs and dual-action drugs. It is concluded that there is ...... that there is some evidence for recommending treatment with tricyclic antidepressants (TCA) especially in patients who are hospitalized with severe depression and melancholic features. Further, nortriptylin is preferred due to its more favourable side effects profile.......A recent Cochrane review concluded that amitriptyline is an efficacious antidepressant drug, however associated with a number of side effects. The present paper discusses this finding in relation to studies on effects and side effects of SSRIs and dual-action drugs. It is concluded...

  3. Predictors of incident major depression in diabetic outpatients with subthreshold depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bot, Mariska; Pouwer, Francois; Ormel, Johan; Slaets, Joris P. J.; de Jonge, Peter

    2010-01-01

    P>Aims The objective of the study was to determine rates and risks of major depression in diabetes outpatients with subthreshold depression. Methods This study is based on data of a stepped care-based intervention study in which diabetic patients with subthreshold depression were randomly allocated

  4. Categorization of major depression in an outpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslam, N; Beck, A T

    1993-12-01

    Intake Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) item scores of 400 outpatient major depressives were submitted to a categorization algorithm developed for artificial intelligence applications. The algorithm maximizes a function of "category utility" that is preferable in several respects to available clustering methods, and has demonstrated its capacity to locate the most informative, or "basic," level of categorization. The analysis yielded four syndromal subtypes: a common, general depressive type; a common and relatively severe melancholic type; an infrequent type characterized by self-critical features, generalized anxiety, and an absence of melancholic features; and an infrequent, mild type distinguished by enervation and anhedonic features. Implications for the classification of depression are discussed.

  5. Major Depressive Disorder Definition, Etiology and Epidemiology: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatmagul Helvaci Celik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression is one of the most common psychiatric disorders influencing the all population. Untreated depression may lead to early death and worsening in general health. Depression has several clinically distinct subtypes which are sometimes difficult to diagnose. Diagnosis and treatment of these disorders are of concern to physicians other than psychiatrists, because of their effect on course and prognosis of general medical diseases. This is a concise and up to date overview of the epidemiology,etiology physiopathology and diagnosis of major depressive disorder. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(1.000: 51-66

  6. Depressive Symptoms Predict Major Depressive Disorder after 15 Years among Whites but Not Blacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazen-Zadeh, Ehsan; Assari, Shervin

    2016-01-01

    Black-White differences are shown in psychosocial and medical correlates of depressive symptoms and major depressive disorder (MDD). The current longitudinal study compared Blacks and Whites for the association between baseline depressive symptoms and subsequent risk of MDD after 15 years. Data were obtained from the Americans' Changing Lives (ACL) Study that included 3,361 individuals (2,205 Whites and 1,156 Blacks) from 1986 to 2001. Baseline depressive symptoms measured using an 11-item Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D) in 1986 were predictors. The outcome of 12-month MDD was measured using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) in 2001. Covariates such as baseline socio-demographics (SES), financial difficulty, chronic medical conditions (CMC), and self-rated health (SRH) were measured in 1986. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between baseline CES-D score and CIDI-based MDD after 15 years net of demographics, SES, CMC, and SRH. The models were applied in the pooled sample, as well as in Blacks and Whites. Data on reliability and factor structure of CES-D based on ethnicity were also reported. In the pooled sample, we found an interaction between race and baseline depressive symptoms, suggesting a stronger effect of baseline depressive symptoms on the subsequent risk of MDD for Whites compared with that of Blacks. Such an interaction was significant net of socioeconomic and health status. Based on our ethnic-specific models, among Whites but not Blacks, baseline CES-D score was predictive of the subsequent risk of MDD after 15 years, net of SES and health at baseline. Black-White differences in the predictive role of CES-D scores on MDD could not be attributed to the ethnic differences in the reliability of the CES-D, which was even higher for Blacks compared with those of Whites. Loadings of the CES-D positive affect items were reverse among Blacks compared to Whites. Black

  7. Comparison of depressive episodes in bipolar disorder and in major depressive disorder within bipolar disorder pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Philip B; Frankland, Andrew; Hadzi-Pavlovic, Dusan; Roberts, Gloria; Corry, Justine; Wright, Adam; Loo, Colleen K; Breakspear, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Although genetic epidemiological studies have confirmed increased rates of major depressive disorder among the relatives of people with bipolar affective disorder, no report has compared the clinical characteristics of depression between these two groups. To compare clinical features of depressive episodes across participants with major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder from within bipolar disorder pedigrees, and assess the utility of a recently proposed probabilistic approach to distinguishing bipolar from unipolar depression. A secondary aim was to identify subgroups within the relatives with major depression potentially indicative of 'genetic' and 'sporadic' subgroups. Patients with bipolar disorder types 1 and 2 (n = 246) and patients with major depressive disorder from bipolar pedigrees (n = 120) were assessed using the Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies. Logistic regression was used to identify distinguishing clinical features and assess the utility of the probabilistic approach. Hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify subgroups within the major depressive disorder sample. Bipolar depression was characterised by significantly higher rates of psychomotor retardation, difficulty thinking, early morning awakening, morning worsening and psychotic features. Depending on the threshold employed, the probabilistic approach yielded a positive predictive value ranging from 74% to 82%. Two clusters within the major depressive disorder sample were found, one of which demonstrated features characteristic of bipolar depression, suggesting a possible 'genetic' subgroup. A number of previously identified clinical differences between unipolar and bipolar depression were confirmed among participants from within bipolar disorder pedigrees. Preliminary validation of the probabilistic approach in differentiating between unipolar and bipolar depression is consistent with dimensional distinctions between the two disorders and offers clinical utility in

  8. Vilazodone in the treatment of major depressive disorder: efficacy across symptoms and severity of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif; Sambunaris, Angelo; Edwards, John; Ruth, Adam; Robinson, Donald S

    2014-03-01

    Vilazodone is a potent selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and serotonin 1A receptor partial agonist approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder in adults. To assess the efficacy of vilazodone across a range of symptoms and severities of depression, data from two phase III, 8-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials were pooled for analysis. Overall improvement in depressive symptoms measured using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale was statistically significant (Pdepression subgroups, with no consistent pattern associated with depression severity. These findings support the efficacy of vilazodone across a broad range of depressive symptoms and severities for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  9. Surrogate markers of visceral fat and response to anti-depressive treatment in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Morten; Petersen, Dorthe; Steglich-Petersen, Marie

    2017-01-01

    was to prospectively investigate whether visceral fat, as measured by hip-to-waist ratio and waist circumference, affects treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder in patients attending a hospital psychiatric care unit in Denmark. Methods: The study was conducted as an observational prospective......Background: Body mass index (BMI) and body weight have been shown to be associated to treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder, but this relationship is not clear. Visceral fat might be an underlying mechanism explaining this relationship. Aims: The aim of this study...... study including 33 patients with major depressive disorder. Assessments were made at enrolment and after 8 weeks. Primary variables were hip-to-waist ratio and waist circumference. Outcome were remission or response of depressive symptoms measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17...

  10. The effects of cognitive therapy versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Christian Jakobsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Cognitive therapy may be an effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cochrane systematic review methodology, with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomized trials, are comparing the effects of cognitive therapy versus 'treatment as usual' for major depressive disorder. To be included the participants had to be older than 17 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Altogether, we included eight trials randomizing a total of 719 participants. All eight trials had high risk of bias. Four trials reported data on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and four trials reported data on the Beck Depression Inventory. Meta-analysis on the data from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression showed that cognitive therapy compared with 'treatment as usual' significantly reduced depressive symptoms (mean difference -2.15 (95% confidence interval -3.70 to -0.60; P<0.007, no heterogeneity. However, meta-analysis with both fixed-effect and random-effects model on the data from the Beck Depression Inventory (mean difference with both models -1.57 (95% CL -4.30 to 1.16; P = 0.26, I(2 = 0 could not confirm the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression results. Furthermore, trial sequential analysis on both the data from Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Becks Depression Inventory showed that insufficient data have been obtained. DISCUSSION: Cognitive therapy might not be an effective treatment for major depressive disorder compared with 'treatment as usual'. The possible treatment effect measured on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression is relatively small. More randomized trials with low risk of bias, increased sample sizes, and broader more clinically relevant

  11. Decreased Prostaglandin D2 Levels in Major Depressive Disorder Are Associated with Depression-Like Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cuilin; Wei, Hui; Zhu, Wanwan; Shen, Yan; Xu, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) D2 is the most abundant prostaglandin in the mammalian brain. The physiological and pharmacological actions of PGD2 in the central nervous system seem to be associated with some of the symptoms exhibited by patients with major depressive disorder. Previous studies have found that PGD2 synthase was decreased in the cerebrospinal fluid of major depressive disorder patients. We speculated that there may be a dysregulation of PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder. Ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry coupled with a stable isotopic-labeled internal standard was used to determine PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice. A total of 32 drug-free major depressive disorder patients and 30 healthy controls were recruited. An animal model of depression was constructed by exposing mice to 5 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress. To explore the role of PGD2 in major depressive disorder, selenium tetrachloride was administered to simulate the change in PGD2 levels in mice. Mice exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress exhibited depression-like behaviors, as indicated by reduced sucrose preference and increased immobility time in the forced swimming test. PGD2 levels in the plasma of major depressive disorder patients and in the brains of depressive mice were both decreased compared with their corresponding controls. Further inhibiting PGD2 production in mice resulted in an increased immobility time in the forced swimming test that could be reversed by imipramine. Decreased PGD2 levels in major depressive disorder are associated with depression-like behaviors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  12. Thyroid hormones association with depression severity and clinical outcome in patients with major depressive disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Berent, Dominika; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Orzechowska, Agata; Gałecki, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The clinical implications of thyroid hormones in depression have been studied extensively and still remains disputable. Supplementation of thyroid hormones is considered to augment and accelerate antidepressant treatment. Studies on the role of thyroid hormones in depression deliver contradictory results. Here we assess theirs impact on depression severity and final clinical outcome in patients with major depression. Thyrotropin, free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentra...

  13. Additive genetic contribution to symptom dimensions in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Rahel; Palmer, Rohan H C; Brick, Leslie A; McGeary, John E; Knopik, Valerie S; Beevers, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a phenotypically heterogeneous disorder with a complex genetic architecture. In this study, genomic-relatedness-matrix restricted maximum-likelihood analysis (GREML) was used to investigate the extent to which variance in depression symptoms/symptom dimensions can be explained by variation in common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a sample of individuals with MDD (N = 1,558) who participated in the National Institute of Mental Health Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression (STAR*D) study. A principal components analysis of items from the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD) obtained prior to treatment revealed 4 depression symptom components: (a) appetite, (b) core depression symptoms (e.g., depressed mood, anhedonia), (c) insomnia, and (d) anxiety. These symptom dimensions were associated with SNP-based heritability (hSNP2) estimates of 30%, 14%, 30%, and 5%, respectively. Results indicated that the genetic contribution of common SNPs to depression symptom dimensions were not uniform. Appetite and insomnia symptoms in MDD had a relatively strong genetic contribution whereas the genetic contribution was relatively small for core depression and anxiety symptoms. While in need of replication, these results suggest that future gene discovery efforts may strongly benefit from parsing depression into its constituent parts. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. The effect of major depression on sexual function in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Louis F; Smith, Louis C

    2012-01-01

    Eleven hundred eighty-four depressed women were entered into five short-term (8 weeks) studies of gepirone-extended release (ER) vs. placebo for treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) (134001, 134002, and 134017), or atypical depressive disorder (ADD) (134004 and 134006). The effect of depression on sexual function was examined prior to treatment. To determine the effect of depression on the prevalence of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) sexual dysfunction diagnoses and the Derogatis Inventory of Sexual Function (DISF) total score and domain scores and to measure the effect of severity of depression. Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17), DSM-IV diagnoses, and DISF total and domain scores. DSM-IV diagnoses--hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), sexual aversion disorder (SAD), female arousal disorder (FAD), and female orgasmic disorder (FOD)--were made by a trained psychiatrist. The HAMD-17 measured antidepressant efficacy. The DISF or its self-report version measured sexual function. To access the effect of severity of depression, baseline HAMD-17 scores were stratified as mild (sexual desire and sexual arousal are somewhat preserved. Higher HAMD scores result in lower DISF scores (greater sexual dysfunction). In women, depression affects DISF scores more than DSM-IV diagnoses for sexual dysfunction. With increasing severity of depression (increased HAMD scores), sexual dysfunction becomes greater (lower DISF scores). For equal HAMD scores, DISF scores for MDD and ADD are the same. © 2011 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  15. Alterations of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Major Depressive Disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Hyoung; Chung, Yong An; Seo, Ye Young; Yoo, Ik Dong; Na, Sae Jung; Jung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Ki Jun [College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-15

    The authors analyzed how the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings of patients with major depression differ from the normal control, and our results were compared to previous reports. Twelve patients fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for major depression who were off all psychotropic medications for > 4 weeks (male: 7, female: 5, age range: 19approx52 years, average age: 29.3+-9.9 years) and 14 normal volunteers (male: 8, female: 6, age range: 19approx53 years, average age: 31.4+-9.2 years) were recruited. Images of brain perfusion SPECT were obtained using Tc-99m ECD and patterns of the rCBF were compared between patients with major depression and the healthy control subjects. The patients with major depression showed increase of the r-CBF in right lingual gyrus, right fusiform gyrus, left lingual gyrus, left precuneus, and left superior temporal gyrus, and showed decrease of r-CBF in right pons, left medial frontal gyrus, cingulate gyrus of left limbic lobe, cingulate gyrus of right frontal lobe, and cingulate gyrus of right limbic lobe compared to the normal control. The Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT findings in our study did not differ from the previously reported regional cerebral blood flow pattern of patients with major depression. Especially, decreased rCBF pattern typical to major depression patients in the right pons, left medial frontal gyrus, and cingulate regions was clearly demonstrated

  16. Alterations of Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Major Depressive Disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Hyoung; Chung, Yong An; Seo, Ye Young; Yoo, Ik Dong; Na, Sae Jung; Jung, Hyun Suk; Kim, Ki Jun

    2009-01-01

    The authors analyzed how the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) findings of patients with major depression differ from the normal control, and our results were compared to previous reports. Twelve patients fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for major depression who were off all psychotropic medications for > 4 weeks (male: 7, female: 5, age range: 19∼52 years, average age: 29.3±9.9 years) and 14 normal volunteers (male: 8, female: 6, age range: 19∼53 years, average age: 31.4±9.2 years) were recruited. Images of brain perfusion SPECT were obtained using Tc-99m ECD and patterns of the rCBF were compared between patients with major depression and the healthy control subjects. The patients with major depression showed increase of the r-CBF in right lingual gyrus, right fusiform gyrus, left lingual gyrus, left precuneus, and left superior temporal gyrus, and showed decrease of r-CBF in right pons, left medial frontal gyrus, cingulate gyrus of left limbic lobe, cingulate gyrus of right frontal lobe, and cingulate gyrus of right limbic lobe compared to the normal control. The Tc-99m ECD brain perfusion SPECT findings in our study did not differ from the previously reported regional cerebral blood flow pattern of patients with major depression. Especially, decreased rCBF pattern typical to major depression patients in the right pons, left medial frontal gyrus, and cingulate regions was clearly demonstrated

  17. Fat distribution and major depressive disorder in late adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coryell, William H; Butcher, Brandon D; Burns, Trudy L; Dindo, Lilian N; Schlechte, Janet A; Calarge, Chadi A

    2016-01-01

    Substantial evidence exists to indicate bidirectional relationships between obesity and depressive disorders and the importance of fat distribution to this relationship. This analysis used a well-characterized sample of individuals in late adolescence to determine the association between depressive illness and fat distribution. Medically healthy 15- to 20-year-olds, one-half of whom had recently begun treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, underwent a comprehensive psychiatric evaluation that resulted in diagnostic classification and weekly psychiatric disorder ratings over the prior 4 months using the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation. A whole-body scan, using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, allowed estimations of total body less head (TBLH), total mass, fat mass, and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) mass. Assessments occurred between September 2010 and April 2014. Multivariable linear regression analyses, adjusted for relevant covariates, examined the association between DSM-IV-TR-diagnosed major depressive disorder (MDD) and VAT, the primary outcome of interest. These procedures also determined whether significant associations were confined to overweight/obese participants. The analysis included data from 200 participants (71% female; mean age = 19.0 ± 1.6 years), of whom 128 had current MDD. The presence of MDD was associated with increased fat mass among overweight/obese participants (Cohen d = 0.79, P adolescents, relationships between central adiposity and MDD may be confined to those who are overweight/obese. Despite the high comorbidity of GAD and depressive disorders, only the latter appeared to be significantly associated with central adiposity. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  18. Posture and body image in individuals with major depressive disorder: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, Janette Zamudio; Cordás, Táki Athanássios; Fiquer, Juliana Teixeira; Cavalcante, André Furtado; Moreno, Ricardo Alberto

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to quantify posture and body image in patients with major depressive disorder during episodes and after drug treatment, comparing the results with those obtained for healthy volunteers. Over a 10-week period, we evaluated 34 individuals with depression and 37 healthy volunteers. Posture was assessed based on digital photos of the subjects; CorelDRAW software guidelines and body landmarks were employed. Body image was evaluated using the Body Shape Questionnaire. During depressive episodes (in comparison with the post-treatment period), patients showed increased head flexion (pBody Shape Questionnaire was 90.03 during the depressive episode, compared with 75.82 during remission (p=0.012) and 62.57 for the controls. During episodes of depression, individuals with major depressive disorder experience changes in posture and mild dissatisfaction with body image. The findings demonstrate that the negative impact of depression includes emotional and physical factors.

  19. Exercise as an augmentation strategy for treatment of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Madhukar H; Greer, Tracy L; Grannemann, Bruce D; Chambliss, Heather O; Jordan, Alexander N

    2006-07-01

    The use of augmentation strategies among patients with major depression is increasing because rates of complete remission with standard antidepressant monotherapy are quite low. Clinical and neurobiological data suggest that exercise may be a good candidate for use as an augmentation treatment for depression. This pilot study examined the use of exercise to augment antidepressant medication in patients with major depression. Seventeen patients with incomplete remission of depressive symptoms began a 12-week exercise program while continuing their antidepressant medication (unchanged in type or dose). Individual exercise prescriptions were calculated based on an exercise dose consistent with currently recommended public health guidelines. The exercise consisted of both supervised and home-based sessions. The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (IDS-SR30) were used to assess symptoms of depression on a weekly basis. Intent-to-treat analyses yielded significant decreases on both the HRSD17 (5.8 points, p SR30 (13.9 points, p SR30 scores decreased by 18.8 points. This study provides preliminary evidence for exercise as an effective augmentation treatment for antidepressant medication. This is a lower-cost augmentation strategy that has numerous health benefits and may further reduce depressive symptoms in partial responders to antidepressant treatment. Practical tips on how practitioners can use exercise to enhance antidepressant treatment are discussed. Longer-term use of exercise is also likely to confer additional health benefits for this population.

  20. Thyroid Autoimmune Antibodies and Major Depressive Disorder in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fam, Johnson; Rush, A John; Burt, Tal; Chan, Edwin Sy; Siddiqui, Fahad J; Assam, Pryseley N; Lai, Oi Fah; Chan, Herng Nieng; Ng, Beng Yeong; Khoo, Daphne H

    2015-08-01

    Anti-thyroid antibodies are associated with extra-thyroid diseases such as Graves' ophthalmopathy and Hashimoto's encephalopathy. Some evidence suggests that anti-thyroid antibodies are also associated with depression. Interleukin (IL)-17 appears to play an important role in autoimmune thyroid disease. This study investigated whether specific thyroid autoantibodies and IL-17 distinguished persons with depression from non-depressed controls. Forty-seven adult females with non-psychotic, current major depressive disorder and 80 healthy female controls participated in this study. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies, thyroglobulin antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibodies, free T3 and T4, TSH and IL-17 were measured from the serum. Measurements were repeated to assess test-retest reliability. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to estimate discriminatory values of the measurements. Differences between groups and associations between the clinical and biochemical assessments were analysed. Median TSH receptor antibody concentration was significantly higher in the depressed than control group (P depression severity scores (r = 0.33, P depression severity scores. Thyroid function and other thyroid autoantibodies were not associated with depression severity. TSH receptor antibodies might be a biomarker of immune dysfunction in depression.

  1. Rumination mediates the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depression in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yansong; Yu, Xinnian; Yang, Bixiu; Zhang, Fuquan; Zou, Wenhua; Na, Aiguo; Zhao, Xudong; Yin, Guangzhong

    2017-03-21

    Overgeneral autobiographical memory has been identified as a risk factor for the onset and maintenance of depression. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms that might explain overgeneral autobiographical memory phenomenon in depression. The purpose of this study was to test the mediation effects of rumination on the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depressive symptoms. Specifically, the mediation effects of brooding and reflection subtypes of rumination were examined in patients with major depressive disorder. Eighty-seven patients with major depressive disorder completed the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Ruminative Response Scale, and Autobiographical Memory Test. Bootstrap mediation analysis for simple and multiple mediation models through the PROCESS macro was applied. Simple mediation analysis showed that rumination significantly mediated the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depression symptoms. Multiple mediation analyses showed that brooding, but not reflection, significantly mediated the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depression symptoms. Our results indicate that global rumination partly mediates the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depressive symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder. Furthermore, the present results suggest that the mediating role of rumination in the relationship between overgeneral autobiographical memory and depression is mainly due to the maladaptive brooding subtype of rumination.

  2. Synaptic plasticity model of therapeutic sleep deprivation in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Elias; Kuhn, Marion; Normann, Claus; Mainberger, Florian; Maier, Jonathan G; Maywald, Sarah; Bredl, Aliza; Klöppel, Stefan; Biber, Knut; van Calker, Dietrich; Riemann, Dieter; Sterr, Annette; Nissen, Christoph

    2016-12-01

    Therapeutic sleep deprivation (SD) is a rapid acting treatment for major depressive disorder (MDD). Within hours, SD leads to a dramatic decrease in depressive symptoms in 50-60% of patients with MDD. Scientifically, therapeutic SD presents a unique paradigm to study the neurobiology of MDD. Yet, up to now, the neurobiological basis of the antidepressant effect, which is most likely different from today's first-line treatments, is not sufficiently understood. This article puts the idea forward that sleep/wake-dependent shifts in synaptic plasticity, i.e., the neural basis of adaptive network function and behavior, represent a critical mechanism of therapeutic SD in MDD. Particularly, this article centers on two major hypotheses of MDD and sleep, the synaptic plasticity hypothesis of MDD and the synaptic homeostasis hypothesis of sleep-wake regulation, and on how they can be integrated into a novel synaptic plasticity model of therapeutic SD in MDD. As a major component, the model proposes that therapeutic SD, by homeostatically enhancing cortical synaptic strength, shifts the initially deficient inducibility of associative synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) in patients with MDD in a more favorable window of associative plasticity. Research on the molecular effects of SD in animals and humans, including observations in the neurotrophic, adenosinergic, monoaminergic, and glutamatergic system, provides some support for the hypothesis of associative synaptic plasticity facilitation after therapeutic SD in MDD. The model proposes a novel framework for a mechanism of action of therapeutic SD that can be further tested in humans based on non-invasive indices and in animals based on direct studies of synaptic plasticity. Further determining the mechanisms of action of SD might contribute to the development of novel fast acting treatments for MDD, one of the major health problems worldwide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Depression as a systemic syndrome: mapping the feedback loops of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenborn, A K; Rahmandad, H; Rick, J; Hosseinichimeh, N

    2016-02-01

    Depression is a complex public health problem with considerable variation in treatment response. The systemic complexity of depression, or the feedback processes among diverse drivers of the disorder, contribute to the persistence of depression. This paper extends prior attempts to understand the complex causal feedback mechanisms that underlie depression by presenting the first broad boundary causal loop diagram of depression dynamics. We applied qualitative system dynamics methods to map the broad feedback mechanisms of depression. We used a structured approach to identify candidate causal mechanisms of depression in the literature. We assessed the strength of empirical support for each mechanism and prioritized those with support from validation studies. Through an iterative process, we synthesized the empirical literature and created a conceptual model of major depressive disorder. The literature review and synthesis resulted in the development of the first causal loop diagram of reinforcing feedback processes of depression. It proposes candidate drivers of illness, or inertial factors, and their temporal functioning, as well as the interactions among drivers of depression. The final causal loop diagram defines 13 key reinforcing feedback loops that involve nine candidate drivers of depression. Future research is needed to expand upon this initial model of depression dynamics. Quantitative extensions may result in a better understanding of the systemic syndrome of depression and contribute to personalized methods of evaluation, prevention and intervention.

  4. Depression as a systemic syndrome: mapping the feedback loops of major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenborn, A. K.; Rahmandad, H.; Rick, J.; Hosseinichimeh, N.

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression is a complex public health problem with considerable variation in treatment response. The systemic complexity of depression, or the feedback processes among diverse drivers of the disorder, contribute to the persistence of depression. This paper extends prior attempts to understand the complex causal feedback mechanisms that underlie depression by presenting the first broad boundary causal loop diagram of depression dynamics. Method We applied qualitative system dynamics methods to map the broad feedback mechanisms of depression. We used a structured approach to identify candidate causal mechanisms of depression in the literature. We assessed the strength of empirical support for each mechanism and prioritized those with support from validation studies. Through an iterative process, we synthesized the empirical literature and created a conceptual model of major depressive disorder. Results The literature review and synthesis resulted in the development of the first causal loop diagram of reinforcing feedback processes of depression. It proposes candidate drivers of illness, or inertial factors, and their temporal functioning, as well as the interactions among drivers of depression. The final causal loop diagram defines 13 key reinforcing feedback loops that involve nine candidate drivers of depression. Conclusions Future research is needed to expand upon this initial model of depression dynamics. Quantitative extensions may result in a better understanding of the systemic syndrome of depression and contribute to personalized methods of evaluation, prevention and intervention. PMID:26621339

  5. Peripheral biomarkers in animal models of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    Investigations of preclinical biomarkers for major depressive disorder (MDD) encompass the quantification of proteins, peptides, mRNAs, or small molecules in blood or urine of animal models. Most studies aim at characterising the animal model by including the assessment of analytes or hormones affected in depressive patients. The ultimate objective is to validate the model to better understand the neurobiological basis of MDD. Stress hormones or inflammation-related analytes associated with MDD are frequently measured. In contrast, other investigators evaluate peripheral analytes in preclinical models to translate the results in clinical settings afterwards. Large-scale, hypothesis-free studies are performed in MDD models to identify candidate biomarkers. Other studies wish to propose new targets for drug discovery. Animal models endowed with predictive validity are investigated, and the assessment of peripheral analytes, such as stress hormones or immune molecules, is comprised to increase the confidence in the target. Finally, since the mechanism of action of antidepressants is incompletely understood, studies investigating molecular alterations associated with antidepressant treatment may include peripheral analyte levels. In conclusion, preclinical biomarker studies aid the identification of new candidate analytes to be tested in clinical trials. They also increase our understanding of MDD pathophysiology and help to identify new pharmacological targets.

  6. Biomarkers in major depressive disorder: the role of mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Alisa G; Iosifescu, Dan V; Darie, Costel C

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is common. Despite numerous available treatments, many individuals fail to improve clinically. MDD continues to be diagnosed exclusively via behavioral rather than biological methods. Biomarkers-which include measurements of genes, proteins, and patterns of brain activity-may provide an important objective tool for the diagnosis of MDD or in the rational selection of treatments. Proteomic analysis and validation of its results as biomarkers is less explored than other areas of biomarker research in MDD. Mass spectrometry (MS) is a comprehensive, unbiased means of proteomic analysis, which can be complemented by directed protein measurements, such as Western Blotting. Prior studies have focused on MS analysis of several human biomaterials in MDD, including human post-mortem brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), blood components, and urine. Further studies utilizing MS and proteomic analysis in MDD may help solidify and establish biomarkers for use in diagnosis, identification of new treatment targets, and understanding of the disorder. The ultimate goal is the validation of a biomarker or a biomarker signature that facilitates a convenient and inexpensive predictive test for depression treatment response and helps clinicians in the rational selection of next-step treatments.

  7. Relationship of neurotransmitters to the symptoms of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2008-01-01

    A relationship appears to exist between the 3 main monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain (i.e., dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin) and specific symptoms of major depressive disorder. Specific symptoms are associated with the increase or decrease of specific neurotransmitters, which suggests that specific symptoms of depression could be assigned to specific neurochemical mechanisms, and subsequently specific antidepressant drugs could target symptom-specific neurotransmitters. Research on electroconvulsive therapy has supported a correlation between neurotransmitters and depression symptoms. A 2-dimensional model of neurotransmitter functions is discussed that describes depression as a mixture of 2 separate components--negative affect and the loss of positive affect--that can be considered in relation to the 3 amine neurotransmitters. Owing to the different methods of action of available antidepressant agents and the depression symptoms thought to be associated with dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine, current treatments can be targeted toward patients' specific symptoms.

  8. Uric acid in major depressive and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Catherine N; Bot, Mariska; Scheffer, Peter G; Snieder, Harold; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    2018-01-01

    Uric acid has neuroprotective effects, owing to its antioxidant properties. Lowered antioxidant capacity, causing increased oxidative stress, may be involved in affective disorders and might be altered by antidepressants. This study investigated the association of plasma uric acid, the greatest contributor to blood antioxidant capacity, with major depressive disorder (MDD) and anxiety disorders. Data were from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety including patients with current (N = 1648), remitted (N = 609) MDD and/or anxiety disorders (of which N = 710 antidepressant users) and 618 controls. Diagnoses were established with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Symptom severity was assessed with the Inventory of Depressive Symptoms-Self Report, Beck Anxiety Inventory and Fear Questionnaire. Uric acid was measured in plasma. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic, health and lifestyle variables. Plasma uric acid adjusted mean levels were lower in current MDD and/or anxiety disorder(s) (289μmol/l) compared to remitted disorders (298μmol/l, p uric acid. Limitations include the lack of data on dietary intake which could be a potential confounding factor. From these cross-sectional findings, the association between uric acid and psychopathology cannot be inferred to be causal. This large scale study finds plasma uric acid levels are lower in current, but not remitted, MDD and/or anxiety disorders, according to a dose-response gradient. This suggests the involvement of decreased antioxidant status in affective disorders, and points to their potential as an avenue for treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A major QTL affects temperature sensitive adult lethality and inbreeding depression in life span in Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, Cornelius J.; Bijlsma, R.; Loeschcke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    Background: The study of inbreeding depression has major relevance for many disciplines, including conservation genetics and evolutionary biology. Still, the molecular genetic basis of this phenomenon remains poorly characterised, as knowledge on the mechanistic causes of inbreeding depression and

  10. Subcortical brain alterations in major depressive disorder: findings from the ENIGMA Major Depressive Disorder working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaal, L; Veltman, D J; van Erp, T G M; Sämann, P G; Frodl, T; Jahanshad, N; Loehrer, E; Tiemeier, H; Hofman, A; Niessen, W J; Vernooij, M W; Ikram, M A; Wittfeld, K; Grabe, H J; Block, A; Hegenscheid, K; Völzke, H; Hoehn, D; Czisch, M; Lagopoulos, J; Hatton, S N; Hickie, I B; Goya-Maldonado, R; Krämer, B; Gruber, O; Couvy-Duchesne, B; Rentería, M E; Strike, L T; Mills, N T; de Zubicaray, G I; McMahon, K L; Medland, S E; Martin, N G; Gillespie, N A; Wright, M J; Hall, G B; MacQueen, G M; Frey, E M; Carballedo, A; van Velzen, L S; van Tol, M J; van der Wee, N J; Veer, I M; Walter, H; Schnell, K; Schramm, E; Normann, C; Schoepf, D; Konrad, C; Zurowski, B; Nickson, T; McIntosh, A M; Papmeyer, M; Whalley, H C; Sussmann, J E; Godlewska, B R; Cowen, P J; Fischer, F H; Rose, M; Penninx, B W J H; Thompson, P M; Hibar, D P

    2016-06-01

    The pattern of structural brain alterations associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) remains unresolved. This is in part due to small sample sizes of neuroimaging studies resulting in limited statistical power, disease heterogeneity and the complex interactions between clinical characteristics and brain morphology. To address this, we meta-analyzed three-dimensional brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 1728 MDD patients and 7199 controls from 15 research samples worldwide, to identify subcortical brain volumes that robustly discriminate MDD patients from healthy controls. Relative to controls, patients had significantly lower hippocampal volumes (Cohen's d=-0.14, % difference=-1.24). This effect was driven by patients with recurrent MDD (Cohen's d=-0.17, % difference=-1.44), and we detected no differences between first episode patients and controls. Age of onset ⩽21 was associated with a smaller hippocampus (Cohen's d=-0.20, % difference=-1.85) and a trend toward smaller amygdala (Cohen's d=-0.11, % difference=-1.23) and larger lateral ventricles (Cohen's d=0.12, % difference=5.11). Symptom severity at study inclusion was not associated with any regional brain volumes. Sample characteristics such as mean age, proportion of antidepressant users and proportion of remitted patients, and methodological characteristics did not significantly moderate alterations in brain volumes in MDD. Samples with a higher proportion of antipsychotic medication users showed larger caudate volumes in MDD patients compared with controls. This currently largest worldwide effort to identify subcortical brain alterations showed robust smaller hippocampal volumes in MDD patients, moderated by age of onset and first episode versus recurrent episode status.

  11. Postpartum major depression at six weeks in primary health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Major depression is a common and disabling complication of the postpartum period in women. It is thought to occur three times more commonly in the developing than in developed countries. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of and factors associated with major ...

  12. 'Hot' cognition in major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, Kamilla W; Carvalho, Andre F

    2014-01-01

    databases in May 2014 augmented by hand searches of reference lists. We included original articles in which MDD participants (or their healthy first-dregree relatives) and a healthy control group were compared on standard measures of emotional processing or reward/ punishment processing as well...... as systematic reviews and meta-analyses. A total of 116 articles met the inclusion criteria of which 97 were original studies. Negative biases in perception, attention and memory for emotional information, and aberrant reward/punishment processing occur in MDD. Imbalanced responses to negative stimuli...

  13. HAM/TSP and major depression: the role of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boa-Sorte, Ney; Galvão-Castro, Ana Verena; Borba, Danilo; Lima, Renan Barbalho Nunes de Castro; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of demographic variables in the relationship between the presence of HAM/TSP and current major depression. It is a cross-sectional study of 108 HTLV-1 infected patients (47 with TSP/HAM) resident of Salvador, Brazil. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Brazilian Version 5 was used to evaluate the presence of depression. Prevalence ratios were used to describe relationship between HAM/TSP and depression. The HAM/TSP classification was carried out according to the criteria proposed by Castro-Costa et al. Prevalence of depression was 37.96%. No association was observed between presence of HAM/TSP and diagnosis of current major depression in the global analysis of patients (PR: 0.94; CI 95%: 0.57-1.55). In the stratified analysis, however, greater prevalence of depression was observed amongst individuals with HAM/TSP in the 18-39 age group (PR: 2.59; CI 95%: 1.36-4.95). Our findings suggest that age is an effect modifier in the relationship between HAM/TSP and depression, and this aspect should be considered in future studies on the topic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Smoking and Major Depressive Disorder in Chinese Women

    OpenAIRE

    He, Qiang; Yang, Lei; Shi, Shenxun; Gao, Jingfang; Tao, Ming; Zhang, Kerang; Gao, Chengge; Yang, Lijun; Li, Kan; Shi, Jianguo; Wang, Gang; Liu, Lanfen; Zhang, Jinbei; Du, Bo; Jiang, Guoqing

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk factors that contribute to smoking in female patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and the clinical features in depressed smokers. METHODS: We examined the smoking status and clinical features in 6120 Han Chinese women with MDD (DSM-IV) between 30 and 60 years of age across China. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between clinical features of MDD and smoking status and between risk factors for MDD and smoking status. RESULTS: ...

  15. The functional anatomy of psychomotor disturbances in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny eLiberg

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Psychomotor disturbances (PMD are a classic feature of depressive disorder that provide rich clinical information. The aim our narrative review was to characterize the functional anatomy of PMD by summarizing findings from neuroimaging studies. We found evidence across several neuroimaging modalities that suggest involvement of fronto-striatal neurocircuitry, and monoaminergic pathways and metabolism. We suggest that PMD in major depressive disorder emerge from an alteration of limbic signals, which influence emotion, volition, higher-order cognitive functions, and movement.

  16. Novel Augmentation Strategies in Major Depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    and blood was drawn for thyroid analysis. In the Chronos study saliva and 24 hour urine cortisol was collected in the patients randomised to the exercise group. Main results The main results from the Bright Light study covering the first five weeks of the study are given in the PhD thesis "Adjunctive bright......Hypothesis The hypotheses of all the four included studies share the common idea that it is possible to augment the effect of antidepressant drug treatment by applying different interventions and with each intervention attain a clinically meaningful better effect compared to a control condition...... at Mental Health Centre North Zealand. For the Bright Light study, Pindolol and PEMF study patients were also seen at a psychiatric specialist practice in Copenhagen. Biochemical measures In the Light therapy study saliva cortisol was collected at baseline before start of light therapy and sertraline...

  17. Fronto-Temporal Connectivity Predicts ECT Outcome in Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber M. Leaver

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundElectroconvulsive therapy (ECT is arguably the most effective available treatment for severe depression. Recent studies have used MRI data to predict clinical outcome to ECT and other antidepressant therapies. One challenge facing such studies is selecting from among the many available metrics, which characterize complementary and sometimes non-overlapping aspects of brain function and connectomics. Here, we assessed the ability of aggregated, functional MRI metrics of basal brain activity and connectivity to predict antidepressant response to ECT using machine learning.MethodsA radial support vector machine was trained using arterial spin labeling (ASL and blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI metrics from n = 46 (26 female, mean age 42 depressed patients prior to ECT (majority right-unilateral stimulation. Image preprocessing was applied using standard procedures, and metrics included cerebral blood flow in ASL, and regional homogeneity, fractional amplitude of low-frequency modulations, and graph theory metrics (strength, local efficiency, and clustering in BOLD data. A 5-repeated 5-fold cross-validation procedure with nested feature-selection validated model performance. Linear regressions were applied post hoc to aid interpretation of discriminative features.ResultsThe range of balanced accuracy in models performing statistically above chance was 58–68%. Here, prediction of non-responders was slightly higher than for responders (maximum performance 74 and 64%, respectively. Several features were consistently selected across cross-validation folds, mostly within frontal and temporal regions. Among these were connectivity strength among: a fronto-parietal network [including left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC], motor and temporal networks (near ECT electrodes, and/or subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC.ConclusionOur data indicate that pattern classification of multimodal f

  18. Norplant-associated major depression and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, K D; Berenson, A B

    1994-11-01

    Norplant is a long-acting subdermal implant system that is widely used for contraception. The implant releases a continuous dose of levonorgestrel, a synthetic progestin. Although oral contraceptives are associated with depression and panic disorder, no cases have been reported of psychiatric disorders secondary to the use of Norplant. Two women, aged 18 and 29 years, are described who developed major depression and panic disorder while using the Norplant system. These women who had no prior psychiatric history developed major depression and panic disorder 1 to 2 months after insertion of Norplant system capsules. The symptoms worsened over the course of a year. Following removal of Norplant, the symptoms of depression and anxiety resolved within 1 month. The progesterone content of oral contraceptives has been linked to major depression and panic disorder. Since Norplant is a progestin-only preparation, it is likely that some women will develop these disorders. These cases illustrate the importance of careful follow-up for adolescents and adults who select Norplant for contraception. Patients should be informed about the possible occurrence of psychiatric disorders. When evaluating new onset of depression and panic disorder in adolescent and adult women, it is important to inquire about Norplant insertion.

  19. Major depressive and anxiety disorders in visually impaired older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Aa, Hilde P A; Comijs, Hannie C; Penninx, Brenda W J H; van Rens, Ger H M B; van Nispen, Ruth M A

    2015-01-20

    We assessed the prevalence of subthreshold depression and anxiety, and major depressive, dysthymic, and anxiety disorders (panic disorder, agoraphobia, social phobia, and general anxiety disorder) in visually impaired older adults and compared these estimates with those of normally sighted peers. Cross-sectional data were analyzed based on telephone interviews with visually impaired older adults aged ≥ 60 years (n = 615) with a visual acuity of ≥ 0.30 logMAR (20/40 Snellen) in the best eye from outpatient low vision rehabilitation centers, and face-to-face interviews with community-dwelling normally sighted peers (n = 1232). To determine prevalence rates, the normally sighted population was weighted on sex and age to fit the visually impaired population. Logistic regression analyses were used to compare the populations and to correct for confounders. The prevalence of major depressive disorder (5.4%) and anxiety disorders (7.5%), as well as the prevalence of subthreshold depression (32.2%) and subthreshold anxiety (15.6%), were significantly higher in visually impaired older adults compared to their normally sighted peers (P visually impaired older adults. This study shows that depression and anxiety are major public health problems in visually impaired older adults. Research on psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic interventions to improve depression and anxiety in this population is warranted. (http://www.trialregister.nl number, NTR3296.). Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  20. Agomelatine versus other antidepressive agents for major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guaiana, Giuseppe; Gupta, Sumeet; Chiodo, Debbie; Davies, Simon J C; Haederle, Katja; Koesters, Markus

    2013-12-17

    Major depressive disorder (MDD), or depression, is a syndrome characterised by a number of behavioural, cognitive and emotional features. It is most commonly associated with a sad or depressed mood, a reduced capacity to feel pleasure, feelings of hopelessness, loss of energy, altered sleep patterns, weight fluctuations, difficulty in concentrating and suicidal ideation. There is a need for more effective and better tolerated antidepressants to combat this condition. Agomelatine was recently added to the list of available antidepressant drugs; it is a novel antidepressant that works on melatonergic (MT1 and MT2), 5-HT 2B and 5-HT2C receptors. Because the mechanism of action is claimed to be novel, it may provide a useful, alternative pharmacological strategy to existing antidepressant drugs. The objective of this review was 1) to determine the efficacy of agomelatine in alleviating acute symptoms of major depressive disorder in comparison with other antidepressants, 2) to review the acceptability of agomelatine in comparison with other antidepressant drugs, and, 3) to investigate the adverse effects of agomelatine, including the general prevalence of side effects in adults. We searched the Cochrane Collaboration's Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group's Specialised Register (CCDANCTR) to 31 July 2013. The CCDANCTR includes relevant randomised controlled trials from the following bibliographic databases: CENTRAL (the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) (all years), EMBASE (1974 onwards), MEDLINE (1950 onwards) and PsycINFO (1967 onwards). We checked reference lists of relevant studies together with reviews and regulatory agency reports. No restrictions on date, language or publication status were applied to the search. Servier Laboratories (developers of agomelatine) and other experts in the field were contacted for supplemental data. Randomised controlled trials allocating adult participants with major depression to agomelatine versus any

  1. Perceived weight, not obesity, increases risk for major depression among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Robert E; Duong, Hao T

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the association between major depression, obesity and body image among adolescents. Participants were 4175 youths 11-17 years of age sampled from the community who were interviewed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children and Adolescents, Version IV, completed a self-report questionnaire, and had their weight and height measured. There were 2 measures of body image: perceived weight and body satisfaction. Obesity was associated with increased risk of depression, with no controls for covariates. However, when the association was examined in models which included weight, major depression, and body image measures and covariates, there was no association between major depression and body weight, nor between body satisfaction and major depression. Perceived overweight was strongly and independently associated with body weight (O.R. = 2.62). We found no independent association between major depression and body weight. If there is an etiologic link between major depression and body weight among adolescents, it most likely operates through processes involving components of body image. Future research should focus on the role of depression and body image in the etiology of obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Protective factors against suicidal acts in major depression: reasons for living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, K M; Oquendo, M A; Haas, G L; Ellis, S P; Li, S; Mann, J J

    2000-07-01

    Over 30,000 people a year commit suicide in the United States. Prior attempted suicide and hopelessness are the most powerful clinical predictors of future completed suicide. The authors hypothesized that "reasons for living" might protect or restrain patients with major depression from making a suicide attempt. Inpatients with DSM-III-R major depression were assessed for depression, general psychopathology, suicide history, reasons for living, and hopelessness. Of the 84 patients, 45 had attempted suicide and 39 had not. The depressed patients who had not attempted suicide expressed more feelings of responsibility toward family, more fear of social disapproval, more moral objections to suicide, greater survival and coping skills, and a greater fear of suicide than the depressed patients who had attempted suicide. Scores for hopelessness, subjective depression, and suicidal ideation were significantly higher for the suicide attempters. Reasons for living correlated inversely with the combined score on these measures, considered an indicator of "clinical suicidality." Neither objective severity of depression nor quantity of recent life events differed between the two groups. During a depressive episode, the subjective perception of stressful life events may be more germane to suicidal expression than the objective quantity of such events. A more optimistic perceptual set, despite equivalent objective severity of depression, may modify hopelessness and may protect against suicidal behavior during periods of risk, such as major depression. Assessment of reasons for living should be included in the evaluation of suicidal patients.

  3. Evaluation of Endocrine Parameters as Predictor of Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Soma; Mukherjee, Amrita; Biswas, Sangita; Bose, Smarajit; Nath, Saswati; Das, Harendra Nath

    2017-01-01

    The diagnosis of the disease, major depressive disorder (MDD), entirely depends on the presence of some symptoms without any biochemical parameter to support it. Depletion of dopamine though is an established feature, is not the sole causative factor of MDD. Moreover, it has very little diagnostic value due to a short half-life. Other chemical messengers like hormones have also been found to get altered due to significant over activity of hypothalamo-pituitary axis. Literature review suggests that cortisol, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and prolactin (PRL) are mostly altered in MDD, which can be utilized to diagnose the condition. A total of 101 patients suffering from MDD along with 106 age- and sex-matched controls were included in this study. Cortisol, TSH, and PRL were assayed in all the study participants by enzyme immunoassay. Student's t -test and linear discriminant analysis were used for statistical analysis. All the three hormones were found to be significantly high in cases with MDD. When applied for classification purpose, the errors in training group were found to be 15% and 15.74% from test set. None of the normal population was wrongly diagnosed as a patient of depression. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to evaluate multiple biochemical parameters as diagnostic marker of MDD. The study is in progress to find out a cutoff value of the responsible parameter so that they can be optimally used to diagnose a case of MDD.

  4. [Gap junctions: A new therapeutic target in major depressive disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrouilhe, D; Dejean, C

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder is a multifactorial chronic and debilitating mood disease with high lifetime prevalence and is associated with excess mortality, especially from cardiovascular diseases and through suicide. The treatments of this disease with tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are poorly tolerated and those that selectively target serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake are not effective in all patients, showing the need to find new therapeutic targets. Post-mortem studies of brains from patients with major depressive disorders described a reduced expression of the gap junction-forming membrane proteins connexin 30 and connexin 43 in the prefrontal cortex and the locus coeruleus. The use of chronic unpredictable stress, a rodent model of depression, suggests that astrocytic gap junction dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. Chronic treatments of rats with fluoxetine and of rat cultured cortical astrocytes with amitriptyline support the hypothesis that the upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication between brain astrocytes could be a novel mechanism for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. In conclusion, astrocytic gap junctions are emerging as a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Atypical depressive symptoms and obesity in a national sample of older adults with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kee-Lee; Yu, Kar-Ming

    2013-06-01

    The objectives of this study are to present findings on the rate of obesity associated with classic, atypical, and undifferentiated depression by comparing with those without depression in a nationally representative sample of United States older adults. The authors used data from the 2001 to 2002 National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), which included 10,557 adults 60 years of age and older. Chi-square tests were used to compare classic, atypical, and undifferentiated as well as nondepressed control in sociodemographic characteristics. Then, logistic regressions adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics were used to evaluate associations of rate of current obesity (defined as Body Mass Index (BMI) > 30) across the three depressive groups (classic, atypical, and undifferentiated depression) and nondepressed control. Lifetime, current, and past depression were examined. Significant differences were found between atypical and classic depression in sex, age, marital status, race, and personal income. After adjusting for sex, age, marital status, race, and personal income, the rate of obesity was significantly greater for respondents with atypical depression than respondents with classic, undifferentiated depression, or without depression. Same results were found in lifetime, current, and past depression. Our findings suggest that the heterogeneity of depression should be considered when examining the effect of depression on obesity in old age. Prevention measures should be designed and delivered to older adults with atypical depression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Does Age at Onset of First Major Depressive Episode Indicate the Subtype of Major Depressive Disorder?: The Clinical Research Center for Depression Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Hahn, Sang-Woo; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Kim, Jae-Min; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of age at onset of the first major depressive episode on the clinical features of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) in a large cohort of Korean depressed patients. Materials and Methods We recruited 419 MDD patients of age over 18 years from the Clinical Research Center for Depression study in South Korea. At the start of the study, the onset age of the first major depressive episode was self-reported by the subjects. The subjects were divided into four age-at-onset subgroups: childhood and adolescent onset (ages depressive episodes (F=3.475, p=0.016) and higher scores on the brief psychiatric rating scale (F=3.254, p=0.022), its negative symptom subscale (F=6.082, pdepressive episode is a promising clinical indicator for the clinical presentation, course, and outcome of MDD. PMID:25323911

  7. Does age at onset of first major depressive episode indicate the subtype of major depressive disorder?: the clinical research center for depression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seon-Cheol; Hahn, Sang-Woo; Hwang, Tae-Yeon; Kim, Jae-Min; Jun, Tae-Youn; Lee, Min-Soo; Kim, Jung-Bum; Yim, Hyeon-Woo; Park, Yong Chon

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of age at onset of the first major depressive episode on the clinical features of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) in a large cohort of Korean depressed patients. We recruited 419 MDD patients of age over 18 years from the Clinical Research Center for Depression study in South Korea. At the start of the study, the onset age of the first major depressive episode was self-reported by the subjects. The subjects were divided into four age-at-onset subgroups: childhood and adolescent onset (ages depressive episodes (F=3.475, p=0.016) and higher scores on the brief psychiatric rating scale (F=3.254, p=0.022), its negative symptom subscale (F=6.082, pdepressive episode is a promising clinical indicator for the clinical presentation, course, and outcome of MDD.

  8. An astroglial basis of major depressive disorder? An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Jie, Wei; Liu, Ji-Hong; Yang, Jian-Ming; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2017-08-01

    Depression is a chronic, recurring, and serious mood disorder that afflicts up to 20% of the global population. The monoamine hypothesis has dominated our understanding of the pharmacotherapy of depression for more than half a century; however, our understanding of the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of major depression has lagged far behind. Astrocytes are the most abundant and versatile cells in the brain, participating in most, if not all, of brain functions as both a passive housekeeper and an active player. Mounting evidence from clinical, preclinical and post-mortem studies has revealed a decrease in the number or density of astrocytes and morphological and functional astroglial atrophy in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and in animal models of depression. Furthermore, currently available antidepressant treatments at least partially exert their therapeutic effects on astrocytes. More importantly, dysfunctional astrocytes lead to depressive-like phenotypes in animals. Together, current studies point to astroglial pathology as the potential root cause of MDD. Thus, a shift from a neuron-centric to an astrocyte-centric cause of MDD has gained increasing attention during the past two decades. Here we will summarize the current evidence supporting the hypothesis that MDD is a disease of astrocyte pathology and highlight previous studies on promising strategies that directly target astrocytes for the development of novel antidepressant treatments. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Study Rate of Major Depression in Children and Adolescents with Tourette\\'s Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Amiri

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tourette disorder composed of history of multiple motor tics and at least a vocal tic during a period of such disorder. Many reports have investigated in co– morbid major depressive disorder, and studies signify such importance of early diagnosis and treatment. So diagnosis of major depressive disorder when it is comorbid with Tourette disorder considered to be important in our society as well. Materials & Methods: 30 cases of Tourette disorder who refferred to a child psychiatry center were studied during a period of one year in a descriptive. Cross sectional study. At the same time” 30 cases matched by age and sex were chosen as our control group from Tehran public schools. There were 25 boys and 5 girls in each group “with age rang of 8 to 18 years. A semistructural questionnaire of kiddy Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia was used to investigate the presence of major depressive disorder in both groups. Statistical tests including MC- Nemar exact test were used for statistical analysis. Results: 23/3% of Tourette group patients were diagnosed as major depressive while 3.3% of the control group was diagnosed as major depressive disorder” . Conclusion: As given the high association rate for Tourette disorder and major depressive disorder. It is suggested to investigate all cases of Tourette disorder for possible major depressive disorder.

  10. Sexual Functioning in Adolescents With Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deumic, Emira; Butcher, Brandon D; Clayton, Anita D; Dindo, Lilian N; Burns, Trudy L; Calarge, Chadi A

    2016-07-01

    To examine sexual functioning in adolescents with depression. Between September 2010 and March 2014, 235 participants who were between 15 and 20 years old and were unmedicated or within 1 month of beginning antidepressant treatment completed the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), and Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (CSFQ). They were also assessed to establish the presence of a DSM-IV-TR major depressive episode (MDE). The Student t test and χ² test were used to compare continuous and categorical variables, respectively, across participants with versus without MDE. Multivariable linear regression analysis examined the association between depression and sexual functioning. After the investigators controlled for age, female sex, antidepressant use, and the presence of generalized anxiety disorder, the presence of MDE was associated with a lower score on the CSFQ overall (P Depression Inventory items related to affective symptoms (P depression and lower sexual functioning. Furthermore, with higher BDI scores, males exhibited a steeper decline than females in both the CSFQ total score and the desire subscale (sex × BDI score interaction effect: P depressive disorder in older adolescents is associated with lower sexual functioning, particularly in males. This appears most related to affective symptoms. The potential impact of such impairment on future sexual functioning deserves further examination. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02147184. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  11. Family psychoeducation for major depressive disorder - study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmerby, Nina; Austin, Stephen F; Ussing, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder has been shown to affect many domains of family life including family functioning. Conversely, the influence of the family on the course of the depression, including the risk of relapse, is one reason for targeting the family in interventions. The few studies...... will investigate the effect of family psychoeducation compared to social support on the course of the illness in patients with major depressive disorder. METHOD/DESIGN: The study is designed as a dual center, two-armed, observer-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Relatives are randomized to participate in one...

  12. State and trait olfactory markers of major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Naudin

    Full Text Available Nowadays, depression is a major issue in public health. Because of the partial overlap between the brain structures involved in depression, olfaction and emotion, the study of olfactory function could be a relevant way to find specific cognitive markers of depression. This study aims at determining whether the olfactory impairments are state or trait markers of major depressive episode (MDE through the study of the olfactory parameters involving the central olfactory pathway. In a pilot study, we evaluated prospectively 18 depressed patients during acute episodes of depression and 6 weeks after antidepressant treatment (escitalopram against 54 healthy volunteers, matched by age, gender and smoking status. We investigated the participants' abilities to identify odors (single odors and in binary mixture, to evaluate and discriminate the odors' intensity, and determine the hedonic valence of odors. The results revealed an "olfactory anhedonia" expressed by decrease of hedonic score for high emotional odorant as potential state marker of MDE. Moreover, these patients experienced an "olfactory negative alliesthesia", during the odor intensity evaluation, and failed to identify correctly two odorants with opposite valences in a binary iso-mixture, which constitute potential trait markers of the disease. This study provides preliminary evidence for olfactory impairments associated with MDE (state marker that are persistent after the clinical improvement of depressive symptoms (trait marker. These results could be explained by the chronicity of depression and/or by the impact of therapeutic means used (antidepressant treatment. They need to be confirmed particularly the ones obtained in complex olfactory environment which corresponds a more objective daily life situation.

  13. State and trait olfactory markers of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Marine; El-Hage, Wissam; Gomes, Marlène; Gaillard, Philippe; Belzung, Catherine; Atanasova, Boriana

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, depression is a major issue in public health. Because of the partial overlap between the brain structures involved in depression, olfaction and emotion, the study of olfactory function could be a relevant way to find specific cognitive markers of depression. This study aims at determining whether the olfactory impairments are state or trait markers of major depressive episode (MDE) through the study of the olfactory parameters involving the central olfactory pathway. In a pilot study, we evaluated prospectively 18 depressed patients during acute episodes of depression and 6 weeks after antidepressant treatment (escitalopram) against 54 healthy volunteers, matched by age, gender and smoking status. We investigated the participants' abilities to identify odors (single odors and in binary mixture), to evaluate and discriminate the odors' intensity, and determine the hedonic valence of odors. The results revealed an "olfactory anhedonia" expressed by decrease of hedonic score for high emotional odorant as potential state marker of MDE. Moreover, these patients experienced an "olfactory negative alliesthesia", during the odor intensity evaluation, and failed to identify correctly two odorants with opposite valences in a binary iso-mixture, which constitute potential trait markers of the disease. This study provides preliminary evidence for olfactory impairments associated with MDE (state marker) that are persistent after the clinical improvement of depressive symptoms (trait marker). These results could be explained by the chronicity of depression and/or by the impact of therapeutic means used (antidepressant treatment). They need to be confirmed particularly the ones obtained in complex olfactory environment which corresponds a more objective daily life situation.

  14. Gender differences in major depressive disorder: results from the Netherlands study of depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Jérôme J J; Roest, Annelieke M; Nolen, Willem A; Penninx, Brenda W J H; de Jonge, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Although an overall gender difference in prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) has been well established, several questions concerning gender differences in the clinical manifestation of depression remain. This study aims to identify gender differences in psychopathology, treatment, and public health consequences in patients with MDD. Baseline data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA) were used, including 1115 participants (364 men, 751 women, mean age 41 years) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of current MDD. Characteristics studied included symptom profiles, comorbidity, treatment, and public health consequences. Women reported a younger age of onset of single (27.8 years vs. 31.6 years; p=0.001) and recurrent MDD (24.8 years vs. 27.6 years; p=0.014), a higher comorbidity of panic disorder with agoraphobia (24.9% vs. 17.3%; p=0.006) and life-time overall anxiety disorder (77.6% vs. 71.4%; p=0.029) than men. More men than women suffered from comorbid alcohol dependence or abuse (48.1% vs. 24.5%; pdepression in women (24.6% vs. 17.3%; p=0.009) was found. Women were treated more frequently by an alternative caretaker (20.6% vs. 14.8%; p=0.025), men more often in mental health care organizations (61.0% vs. 53.7%; p=0.025). No gender differences in frequency of medication use or counseling were found. Cross sectional design. Main gender differences in the clinical presentation of MDD concerned a younger age of onset, higher anxiety and lower alcohol use comorbidity and higher prevalence of atypical depression in women. These differences were accompanied by differences in health care use. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Lifetime suicidal ideation and attempt in adults with full major depressive disorder versus sustained depressed mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Jin Pyo; Cho, Maeng Je; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David; Heo, Jung-Yoon; Kim, Kiwon; Jeon, Hong Jin

    2016-10-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a well-known risk factor for suicidality, but depressed mood has been used non-specifically to describe the emotional state. We sought to compare influence of MDD versus sustained depressed mood on suicidality. A total of 12,532 adults, randomly selected through the one-person-per-household method, completed a face-to-face interview using the Korean version of Composite International Diagnostic Interview (K-CIDI) and a questionnaire for lifetime suicidal ideation (LSI) and lifetime suicidal attempt (LSA). Of 12,361 adults, 565 were assessed as 'sustained depressed mood group' having depressed mood for more than two weeks without MDD (4.6%), and 810 adults were assessed as having full MDD (6.55%) which consisted of 'MDD with depressed mood group' (6.0%) and 'MDD without depressed mood group' (0.5%). The MDD with depressed mood group showed higher odds ratios for LSI and LSA than the sustained depressed mood group. Contrarily, no significant differences were found in LSI and LSA between the MDD group with and without depressed mood. MDD showed significant associations with LSI (AOR=2.83, 95%CI 2.12-3.78) and LSA (AOR=2.17, 95%CI 1.34-3.52), whereas sustained depressed mood showed significant associations with neither LSI nor LSA after adjusting for MDD and other psychiatric comorbidities. Interaction effect of sustained depressed mood with MDD was significant for LSI but not for LSA. Sustained depressed mood was not related to LSI and LSA after adjusting for psychiatric comorbidities, whereas MDD was significantly associated with both LSI and LSA regardless of the presence of sustained depressed mood. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thyroid hormones association with depression severity and clinical outcome in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent, Dominika; Zboralski, Krzysztof; Orzechowska, Agata; Gałecki, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    The clinical implications of thyroid hormones in depression have been studied extensively and still remains disputable. Supplementation of thyroid hormones is considered to augment and accelerate antidepressant treatment. Studies on the role of thyroid hormones in depression deliver contradictory results. Here we assess theirs impact on depression severity and final clinical outcome in patients with major depression. Thyrotropin, free thyroxine (FT4), and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations were measured with automated quantitative enzyme immunoassay. Depression severity and final clinical outcome were rated with 17-itemic Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression [HDRS(17)] and Clinical Global Impression Scales for severity and for improvement (CGIs, CGIi). FT3 and FT4 concentrations were significantly positively correlated with clinical improvement evaluated with CGIi (R = 0.38, P = 0.012; R = 0.33, P = 0.034, respectively). There was a significant correlation between FT4 concentrations and depression severity assessed in HDRS(17) (R = 0.31, P = 0.047). Male patients presented significantly higher FT3 serum levels (Z = 2.34, P = 0.018) and significantly greater clinical improvement (Z = 2.36, P = 0.018) when compared to female patients. We conclude that free thyroid hormones concentrations are associated with depression severity and have an impact on final clinical outcome. It can be more efficient to augment and accelerate the treatment of major depressive disorder with triiodothyronine instead of levothyroxine because of individual differences in thyroid hormones metabolism.

  17. Highlights of the international consensus statement on major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, David J

    2011-06-01

    The International Consensus Group on Depression gathered to outline a universal treatment algorithm for depression with the purpose of merging the evidence base and standards of clinical practice from various countries, including the United States, Europe, the Middle East, China, and Japan. This brief summary includes the following recommendations made by the consensus group: periodically screen all patients for depression, use measurement-based tools and full psychiatric assessments to complete differential diagnoses, refer patients to psychiatric specialists when appropriate, establish a therapeutic alliance with patients and their families, begin treatment with an antidepressant for moderate or severe depression, treat patients to remission, and continually monitor patients' symptomatic improvement. © Copyright 2011 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  18. Consumers with Major Depressive Disorder: Factors Influencing Job Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hergenrather, Kenneth C.; Haase, Eileen; Zeglin, Robert J.; Rhodes, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) was applied to study the factors that influence the intention of public rehabilitation placement professionals to place consumers with major depressive disorder (MDD) in jobs. A sample of 108 public rehabilitation placement professionals in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States completed the MDD…

  19. Interpersonal Pathoplasticity in the Course of Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Nicole M.; Ansell, Emily B.; Wright, Aidan G. C.; Hopwood, Christopher J.; Thomas, Katherine M.; Pinto, Anthony; Markowitz, John C.; Sanislow, Charles A.; Zanarini, Mary C.; Shea, M. Tracie; Morey, Leslie C.; McGlashan, Thomas H.; Skodol, Andrew E.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The identification of reliable predictors of course in major depressive disorder (MDD) has been difficult. Evidence suggests that the co-occurrence of personality pathology is associated with longer time to MDD remission. Interpersonal pathoplasticity, the mutually influencing nonetiological relationship between psychopathology and…

  20. Neural basis of recollection in first-episode major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijndhoven, Philip; van Wingen, Guido; Fernández, Guillén; Rijpkema, Mark; Pop-Purceleanu, Monica; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Buitelaar, Jan; Tendolkar, Indira

    2013-01-01

    Background. Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) display impairments in recollection, which have been explained by both hippocampal and prefrontal dysfunction. Here, we used an event-related fMRI design, to dissociate hippocampal and prefrontal contributions to the neural processes involved

  1. Suicide risk in placebo-controlled studies of major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storosum, J. G.; van Zwieten, B. J.; van den Brink, W.; Gersons, B. P.; Broekmans, A. W.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if fear of an increased risk of attempted suicide in placebo groups participating in placebo-controlled studies is an argument against the performance of placebo-controlled trials in studies of major depression. All short-term and long-term,

  2. Clinical staging of major depressive disorder: an empirical exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verduijn, J.; Milaneschi, Y.; van Hemert, A.M.; Schoevers, R.A.; Hickie, I.B.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Beekman, A.T.F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Clinical staging has been proposed to supplement psychiatric diagnoses. We examined the construct and predictive validity of a clinical staging model for major depressive disorder (MDD) that distinguishes 8 consecutive stages (0, 1A, 1B, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C, 4) based on symptom severity

  3. What patients with bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adverse life events (ALEs) as precipitants of a major depressive episode (MDE) have been the subject of many studies.[1-7] Such studies indicate that there tends to be an increase in ALEs in the 6 months preceding an MDE.[1,4,5]. In line with the 'kindling effect' hypothesismore stressful. ALEs are needed for the first MDE, ...

  4. Increased suppression of negative and positive emotions in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beblo, Thomas; Fernando, Silvia; Klocke, Sabrina; Griepenstroh, Julia; Aschenbrenner, Steffen; Driessen, Martin

    2012-12-10

    Patients with major depression (MDD) show increased suppression of negative emotions. Emotion suppression is related to depressive symptoms such as depressive mood and anhedonia. It is not clear whether MDD patients also suppress positive emotions. In the present study we aim to investigate suppression of both negative and positive emotions in MDD patients as well as the relation between emotion suppression and depressive symptoms. In addition, we suggest that emotion suppression might be associated with fear of emotions. 39 MDD patients and 41 matched healthy control subjects were investigated for emotion suppression and fear of emotions with the Emotion Acceptance Questionnaire (EAQ). In addition, we applied additional questionnaires to validate emotion suppression findings and to assess depressive symptoms. MDD patients reported increased suppression of both negative and positive emotions. Suppression of negative and positive emotions was related to depressive symptoms. Patients also reported more fear of emotions than healthy subjects and this fear was related to emotion suppression in both study samples. Due to the cross-sectional and correlational study design, causal directions between the variables tested cannot be stated. Fear of emotion might be one reason why MDD patients suppress emotions. With regard to positive emotions, our results strongly suggest that therapeutic approaches should not only encourage patients to participate in potentially enjoyable situations but that patients may also benefit from practicing the allowance of pleasant emotions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Phonologically-based biomarkers for major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Andrea Carolina; Quatieri, Thomas Francis; Malyska, Nicolas

    2011-12-01

    Of increasing importance in the civilian and military population is the recognition of major depressive disorder at its earliest stages and intervention before the onset of severe symptoms. Toward the goal of more effective monitoring of depression severity, we introduce vocal biomarkers that are derived automatically from phonologically-based measures of speech rate. To assess our measures, we use a 35-speaker free-response speech database of subjects treated for depression over a 6-week duration. We find that dissecting average measures of speech rate into phone-specific characteristics and, in particular, combined phone-duration measures uncovers stronger relationships between speech rate and depression severity than global measures previously reported for a speech-rate biomarker. Results of this study are supported by correlation of our measures with depression severity and classification of depression state with these vocal measures. Our approach provides a general framework for analyzing individual symptom categories through phonological units, and supports the premise that speaking rate can be an indicator of psychomotor retardation severity.

  6. Phonologically-based biomarkers for major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevino Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Of increasing importance in the civilian and military population is the recognition of major depressive disorder at its earliest stages and intervention before the onset of severe symptoms. Toward the goal of more effective monitoring of depression severity, we introduce vocal biomarkers that are derived automatically from phonologically-based measures of speech rate. To assess our measures, we use a 35-speaker free-response speech database of subjects treated for depression over a 6-week duration. We find that dissecting average measures of speech rate into phone-specific characteristics and, in particular, combined phone-duration measures uncovers stronger relationships between speech rate and depression severity than global measures previously reported for a speech-rate biomarker. Results of this study are supported by correlation of our measures with depression severity and classification of depression state with these vocal measures. Our approach provides a general framework for analyzing individual symptom categories through phonological units, and supports the premise that speaking rate can be an indicator of psychomotor retardation severity.

  7. Depression and pain impair daily functioning and quality of life in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Chen, Ming-Chao; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2014-09-01

    Depression and pain frequently occur together. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of depression and pain on the impairment of daily functioning and quality of life (QOL) of depressed patients. We enrolled 131 acutely ill inpatients with major depressive disorder. Depression, pain, and daily functioning were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Body Pain Index, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Health-related QOL was assessed using three primary domains of the SF-36: social functioning, vitality, and general health perceptions. Pearson׳s correlation and structural equation modeling were used to examine relationships among the study variables. Five models were proposed. In all, 129 patients completed all the measures. Model 5, both depression and pain impaired daily functioning and QOL, was the most fitted structural equation model (χ(2)=9.2, df=8, p=0.33, GFI=0.98, AGFI=0.94, TLI=0.99, CFI=0.99, RMSEA=0.03). The correlation between pain and depression was weak (r=-0.27, z=-2.95, p=0.003). This was a cross-sectional study with a small sample size. Depression and pain exert a direct influence on the impairment of daily functioning and QOL of depressed patients; this impairment could be expected regardless of increased pain, depression, or both pain and depression. Pain had a somewhat separate entity from depression. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Relationship of Personality Disorders to the Course of Major Depressive Disorder in a Nationally Representative Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodol, Andrew E.; Grilo, Carlos M.; Keyes, Katherine; Geier, Timothy; Grant, Bridget F.; Hasin, Deborah S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of specific personality disorder co-morbidity on the course of major depressive disorder in a nationally-representative sample. Method Data were drawn from 1,996 participants in a national survey. Participants who met criteria for major depressive disorder at baseline in face-to-face interviews (2001–2002) were re-interviewed three years later (2004–2005) to determine persistence and recurrence. Predictors included all DSM-IV personality disorders. Control variables included demographic characteristics, other Axis I disorders, family and treatment histories, and previously established predictors of the course of major depressive disorder. Results 15.1% of participants had persistent major depressive disorder and 7.3% of those who remitted had a recurrence. Univariate analyses indicated that avoidant, borderline, histrionic, paranoid, schizoid, and schizotypal personality disorders all elevated the risk for persistence. With Axis I co-morbidity controlled, all but histrionic personality disorder remained significant. With all other personality disorders controlled, borderline and schizotypal remained significant predictors. In final, multivariate analyses that controlled for age at onset of major depressive disorder, number of previous episodes, duration of current episode, family history, and treatment, borderline personality disorder remained a robust predictor of major depressive disorder persistence. Neither personality disorders nor other clinical variables predicted recurrence. Conclusions In this nationally-representative sample of adults with major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder robustly predicted persistence, a finding that converges with recent clinical studies. Personality psychopathology, particularly borderline personality disorder, should be assessed in all patients with major depressive disorder, considered in prognosis, and addressed in treatment. PMID:21245088

  9. Relationship of personality disorders to the course of major depressive disorder in a nationally representative sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skodol, Andrew E; Grilo, Carlos M; Keyes, Katherine M; Geier, Timothy; Grant, Bridget F; Hasin, Deborah S

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of specific personality disorder comorbidity on the course of major depressive disorder in a nationally representative sample. Data were drawn from 1,996 participants in a national survey. Participants who met criteria for major depressive disorder at baseline in face-to-face interviews (in 2001-2002) were reinterviewed 3 years later (in 2004-2005) to determine persistence and recurrence. Predictors included all DSM-IV personality disorders. Control variables included demographic characteristics, other axis I disorders, family and treatment histories, and previously established predictors of the course of major depressive disorder. A total of 15.1% of participants had persistent major depressive disorder, and 7.3% of those who remitted had a recurrence. Univariate analyses indicated that avoidant, borderline, histrionic, paranoid, schizoid, and schizotypal personality disorders all elevated the risk for persistence. With axis I comorbidity controlled, all personality disorders except histrionic personality disorder remained significant. With all other personality disorders controlled, borderline and schizotypal disorders remained significant predictors. In final, multivariate analyses that controlled for age at onset of major depressive disorder, the number of previous episodes, duration of the current episode, family history, and treatment, borderline personality disorder remained a robust predictor of major depressive disorder persistence. Neither personality disorders nor other clinical variables predicted recurrence. In this nationally representative sample of adults with major depressive disorder, borderline personality disorder robustly predicted persistence, a finding that converges with recent clinical studies. Personality psychopathology, particularly borderline personality disorder, should be assessed in all patients with major depressive disorder, considered in prognosis, and addressed in treatment.

  10. Cytokines: abnormalities in major depression and implications for pharmacological treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Sinead M

    2012-02-03

    The role of cytokines in depression was first considered when the cytokine interferon resulted in "sickness behaviour", the symptoms of which are similar to those of major depression. The latter is associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). These cytokines are potent modulators of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) which produces heightened hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity characterized by increases in ACTH and cortisol, both of which are reported elevated in major depression. Antidepressant treatment has immunomodulatory effects with increases in the production of IL-10, which is an anti-inflammatory cytokine. This review based on a Medline search from 1980-2003, focuses on the evidence available of cytokine changes in acute stress, chronic stress and major depression. It examines the effects of antidepressant treatment on immune parameters in both animal models and clinical trials. We suggest that future antidepressants may target the immune system by either blocking the actions of pro-inflammatory cytokines or increasing the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  11. The quality of life of hematological malignancy patients with major depressive disorder or subsyndromal depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Omid; Sharifian, Ramezan-Ali; Soleimani, Mehdi; Jahanian, Amirabbas

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the quality of life of hematological malignancy patients with major depressive disorder or subsyndromal depression. Sample consisted of 93 hematological malignancy patients recruited from oncology ward of Valieasr hospital for Imam Khomeini complex hospital at Tehran through purposeful sampling. Participants were divided into three groups through diagnostic interview based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and the Beck Depression Inventory-2 (BDI-II): Major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 41; 44.1%); subsyndromal depression (SSD) (n = 23; 24.7%), and without depression (WD) (n = 29; 31.2%). Participants completed the short-form health survey (SF-36) as a measure of the quality of life. We carried out an analysis of covariance to examine the collected data. Findings showed that there was not a significant difference between patients with MDD and SSD based on measure of quality of life. But patients with MDD and SSD showed significantly worse quality of life than patients with WD. This finding highlights the clinical importance of subsyndromal depressive symptoms and casts doubt on the clinical utility of separation between MDD and subsyndromal depression in terms of important clinical outcomes.

  12. Diffusion tensor imaging atlas-based analyses in major depression after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vani; Mielke, Michelle; Xu, Xin; Smith, Gwenn S; McCann, Una D; Bergey, Alyssa; Doshi, Vishal; Pham, Dzung L; Yousem, David; Mori, Susumi

    2012-01-01

    There are currently no known early neuroanatomical markers predictive of the development of major depression or depressive symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The authors conducted a 1-year longitudinal pilot study to determine whether diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures collected within 1 month of mTBI could predict incident depression. Of the 14 subjects who met study inclusion criteria, 4 (28.6%) developed major depression over the follow-up period. Compared with the nondepressed group, those who developed depression had white-matter abnormalities in the fronto-temporal regions measured by DTI. These preliminary results highlight the need for additional studies, including studies using a larger sample and appropriate controls.

  13. The effects of cognitive therapy versus 'no intervention' for major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Christian Jakobsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Cognitive therapy may be an effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used The Cochrane systematic review methodology with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomized trials comparing the effects of cognitive therapy versus 'no intervention' for major depressive disorder. Participants had to be older than 17 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder to be eligible. Altogether, we included 12 trials randomizing a total of 669 participants. All 12 trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression showed that cognitive therapy significantly reduced depressive symptoms (four trials; mean difference -3.05 (95% confidence interval (Cl, -5.23 to -0.87; P<0.006 compared with 'no intervention'. Trial sequential analysis could not confirm this result. Meta-analysis on the Beck Depression Inventory showed that cognitive therapy significantly reduced depressive symptoms (eight trials; mean difference on -4.86 (95% CI -6.44 to -3.28; P = 0.00001. Trial sequential analysis on these data confirmed the result. Only a few trials reported on 'no remission', suicide inclination, suicide attempts, suicides, and adverse events without significant differences between the compared intervention groups. DISCUSSION: Cognitive therapy might be an effective treatment for depression measured on Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and Beck Depression Inventory, but these outcomes may be overestimated due to risks of systematic errors (bias and random errors (play of chance. Furthermore, the effects of cognitive therapy on no remission, suicidality, adverse events, and quality of life are unclear. There is a need for randomized trials with low risk of

  14. Relief of depression and pain improves daily functioning and quality of life in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Hua; Yen, Yung-Chieh; Chen, Ming-Chao; Chen, Cheng-Chung

    2013-12-02

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of depression relief and pain relief on the improvement in daily functioning and quality of life (QOL) for depressed patients receiving a 6-week treatment of fluoxetine. A total of 131 acutely ill inpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were enrolled to receive 20mg of fluoxetine daily for 6 weeks. Depression severity, pain severity, daily functioning, and health-related QOL were assessed at baseline and again at week 6. Depression severity, pain severity, and daily functioning were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Short-Form 36 (SF-36) Body Pain Index, and the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Health-related QOL was assessed by three primary domains of the SF-36, including social functioning, vitality, and general health perceptions. Pearson's correlation and structural equation modeling were used to examine relationships among the study variables. Five models were proposed. In model 1, depression relief alone improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 2, pain relief alone improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 3, depression relief, mediated by pain relief, improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 4, pain relief, mediated by depression relief, improved daily functioning and QOL. In model 5, both depression relief and pain relief improved daily functioning and QOL. One hundred and six patients completed all the measures at baseline and at week 6. Model 5 was the most fitted structural equation model (χ(2) = 8.62, df = 8, p = 0.376, GFI = 0.975, AGFI = 0.935, TLI = 0.992, CFI = 0.996, RMSEA = 0.027). Interventions which relieve depression and pain improve daily functioning and QOL among patients with MDD. The proposed model can provide quantitative estimates of improvement in treating patients with MDD. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mental health in senior housing: racial/ethnic patterns and correlates of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, Julie; Schensul, Jean J; Coman, Emil; Diefenbach, Gretchen J; Radda, Kim E; Gaztambide, Sonia; Disch, William B

    2009-09-01

    Mental health problems are associated with disability, overuse of medical care, higher rates of mortality and suicide as well as personal suffering for older adults. Residents of urban, low-income senior housing may face increased risk of a variety of mental health problems, including depression. This study identified the prevalence of multiple mental health problems in older residents of low-income senior housing and explored correlates of major depressive disorder for the two largest ethnic groups: black and Latino. In-person diagnostic interviews identified rates of mental illness in a sample of 635 residents of 13 low-income senior housing buildings in a medium-sized northeastern city. Applying George's Social Antecedent Model of Depression, logistic regression analyses identified shared and unique correlates of depression for Latino and black participants. This population had high rates of major depressive disorder (26%), generalized anxiety disorder (12%) and other mental health problems that varied significantly by ethnic and racial group. Separate multivariate models for Latino and black people showed that younger age, more chronic conditions and social distress were related to major depressive disorder for both ethnic groups. Perceived environmental stress, shorter tenure in the building, poorer perceived health, higher life stress and fewer leisure activities were associated with depression for Latinos only. Mental health screening and treatment services are needed in senior housing to address these high rates of mental illness. Unique constellations of correlates of depression for different ethnic groups underscore a need for culturally competent approaches to identification and treatment.

  16. Major depressive disorder: insight into candidate cerebrospinal fluid protein biomarkers from proteomics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Shweiki, Mhd Rami; Oeckl, Patrick; Steinacker, Petra; Hengerer, Bastian; Schönfeldt-Lecuona, Carlos; Otto, Markus

    2017-06-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is the leading cause of global disability, and an increasing body of literature suggests different cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteins as biomarkers of MDD. The aim of this review is to summarize the suggested CSF biomarkers and to analyze the MDD proteomics studies of CSF and brain tissues for promising biomarker candidates. Areas covered: The review includes the human studies found by a PubMed search using the following terms: 'depression cerebrospinal fluid biomarker', 'major depression biomarker CSF', 'depression CSF biomarker', 'proteomics depression', 'proteomics biomarkers in depression', 'proteomics CSF biomarker in depression', and 'major depressive disorder CSF'. The literature analysis highlights promising biomarker candidates and demonstrates conflicting results on others. It reveals 42 differentially regulated proteins in MDD that were identified in more than one proteomics study. It discusses the diagnostic potential of the biomarker candidates and their association with the suggested pathologies. Expert commentary: One ultimate goal of finding biomarkers for MDD is to improve the diagnostic accuracy to achieve better treatment outcomes; due to the heterogeneous nature of MDD, using bio-signatures could be a good strategy to differentiate MDD from other neuropsychiatric disorders. Notably, further validation studies of the suggested biomarkers are still needed.

  17. A Review of Vilazodone, Serotonin, and Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanism of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)–mediated serotonergic neurotransmission, focusing on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, which are proposed to be involved in delaying therapeutic efficacy. Vilazodone was specifically designed to function both as an SSRI and a partial agonist at 5-HT1A receptors. This combined mechanism is proposed to decrease time to efficacy, minimize sexual side effects, and provide concomitant anxiolytic properties. Data Sources: A PubMed search of all English-language articles from January 1990 to January 2013 was conducted using the search terms depression and 5-HT1A, depression and buspirone, depression and pindolol, and vilazodone. Study Selection: We found 47 articles and abstracts that were selected for inclusion on the basis of information about the pharmacology of 5-HT1A receptors and the clinical data on pindolol, buspirone, and vilazodone in depression. Data Extraction: This review summarizes current literature involving antidepressant activity, the role of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and clinical trials involving serotonin reuptake inhibition in conjunction with 5-HT1A agonists and partial agonists, with a focus on vilazodone. Results:Vilazodone has demonstrated efficacy in 2 large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in major depressive disorder. Results suggest that vilazodone has a low incidence of sexual side effects and is effective in patients with high levels of anxiety. A pooled analysis shows evidence of significant symptom reduction after only 1 week of therapy. Conclusions: If future studies corroborate the clinical benefits attributed to its mechanism of action, vilazodone may show potential advantages in terms of onset of action, sexual side effects, and anxiolytic activity in patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:24940527

  18. RSA Reactivity in Current and Remitted Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylsma, Lauren M.; Salomon, Kristen; Taylor-Clift, April; Morris, Bethany H.; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Objective Low resting respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) levels and blunted RSA reactivity are thought to index impaired emotion regulation capacity. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) has been associated with abberant RSA reactivity and recovery to a speech stressor task relative to healthy controls. Whether impaired RSA functioning reflects aspects of the depressed mood state or a stable vulnerability marker for depression is unknown. Methods We compared resting RSA and RSA reactivity between individuals with MDD (n=49), remitted depression (RMD, n=24), and healthy controls (n=45). ECG data were collected during a resting baseline, a paced-breathing baseline, and two reactivity tasks (speech stressor, cold exposure). Results A group by time quadratic effect emerged (F=4.36(2,109), p=.015) for RSA across phases of the speech stressor (baseline, instruction, preparation, speech, recovery). Follow-up analyses revealed that those with MDD uniquely exhibited blunted RSA reactivity, whereas RMD and controls both exhibited normal task-related vagal withdrawal and post-task recovery. The group by time interaction remained after covariation for age, sex, waist circumference, physical activity, and respiration, but not sleep quality. Conclusions These results provide new evidence that abberant RSA reactivity marks features that track the depressed state, such as poor sleep, rather than a stable trait evident among asymtomatic persons. PMID:24367127

  19. Understanding major depressive disorder among middle-aged African American men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Bedell, Keneshia; Waite, Roberta

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study of how a cohort of African American men recognized and expressed symptoms of depression, and how depression affected their lives. Major depressive disorder has had global financial consequences in the form of healthcare visits, lost work hours, and disruption of family lives. Early recognition of depression and engagement of depressed individuals to promote management and treatment of this disorder is crucial in controlling its impact. African American men are often not included in research exploring factors that limit their engagement in mental health care. A descriptive qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was conducted in 2008 with ten African American men between the ages of 40 and 59 years. All participants self-reported a history of depression. Three central themes were identified: life events, the funk, and the breakdown. Life events were identified as stressors which led the men to experience what they described as the funk, which was later identified as depression. Due to lack of resolution of the funk, a breakdown was experienced. Over time study participants became informed about their condition, and their responses to managing depression varied depending on individual and contextual factors. It is important to approach depression diagnoses from a broad perspective rather than as a limited list of symptoms. Healthcare providers would benefit from taking into account cultural factors, gender and age, examining them carefully in relation to the development of depressive symptoms.

  20. The expression of depression among Javanese patients with major depressive disorder: a concept mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brintnell, E Sharon; Sommer, Ryan W; Kuncoro, Bambang; Setiawan, G Pandu; Bailey, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    In this study, we explored the presentation of clinical depression in Java, Indonesia. Interviews were conducted with 20 Javanese patients (male and female) with major depressive disorder from both lower and higher socioeconomic levels. The recruited participants came from provincial and private mental health hospitals in the cities of Solo, Yogykarta (Jogja), Jakarta, and Malang on the island of Java, Indonesia. Concept mapping methodology using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify underlying themes in the expression of depressive phenomena in this Indonesian population. The results identified themes that grouped into six clusters: interpersonal relationships, hopelessness, physical/somatic, poverty of thought, discourage, and defeat. Findings give support to the view that culture influences the expression of Indonesian depressive phenomenology, which nevertheless has some common roots with Western clinical pictures of the disorder. Cultural influences may mask symptoms of the disorder to clinicians. Diagnostic and assessment tools must be carefully selected to ensure they address culturally specific expressions of depression.

  1. Differential mortality rates in major and subthreshold depression: meta-analysis of studies that measured both

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Vogelzangs, N.; Twisk, J.; Kleiboer, A.M.; Li, J.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although the association between depression and excess mortality has been well established, it is not clear whether this is greater in major depression than in subthreshold depression. Aims: To compare excess mortality in major depression with that in subthreshold depression. Method: We

  2. Prospective assessment of stereotactic ablative surgery for intractable major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Donald C; Asaad, Wael; Eskandar, Emad N; Jain, Felipe A; Cosgrove, G Rees; Flaherty, Alice W; Cassem, Edwin H; Price, Bruce H; Rauch, Scott L; Dougherty, Darin D

    2008-09-15

    Despite therapeutic advances for major depression, a subset of patients with this disorder does not respond to conventional treatment. Stereotactic ablative procedures such as anterior cingulotomy have been performed in severely affected, treatment-resistant patients, but the long-term results of such procedures are not fully understood. Findings are reported for 33 patients with severe treatment-resistant major depression who underwent ablative stereotactic procedures (dorsal anterior cingulotomy followed if necessary by subcaudate tractotomy). Preoperative and long-term postoperative Beck Depression Inventory scores were obtained along with postoperative Clinical Global Improvement values. Both were analyzed to evaluate patients' responses to the surgical procedure(s). At mean follow-up of 30 months after one or more stereotactic ablative procedures, 11 patients (33.3%) were classified as responders, 14 (42.4%) were partial responders, and 8 (24.2%) did not respond to the surgical procedure(s). Among those (17) who underwent only one procedure, seven (41.2%) responded, whereas six (35.3%) and four (23.5%) showed partial or no response, respectively. Among patients who required multiple surgical procedures, four patients (25%) responded, whereas eight (50%) and four (25%) patients demonstrated partial or no responses, respectively, at long-term follow-up evaluations. Approximately 75% of depression patients previously resistant to antidepressant therapies received partial or substantial benefit from stereotactic ablative procedures. Those requiring only a single anterior cingulotomy tended to demonstrate more pronounced responses than patients who underwent multiple surgical procedures.

  3. Major depression epidemiology from a diathesis-stress conceptualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patten Scott B

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a widely used diagnostic category but there is increasing dissatisfaction with its performance. The diathesis-stress model is an alternative approach that does not require the (sometimes arbitrary imposition of categories onto the spectrum of depressive morbidity. However, application of this model has not been well explored and its consistency with available epidemiologic data is uncertain. Methods Simulation provides an opportunity to explore these issues. In this study, a simulation model based on an intuitive representation of diathesis-stress interaction was developed. Both diathesis and stress were represented using continuous distributions, without categorization. A diagnostic threshold was then applied to the simulation output to create nominal categories and to explore their consistency with available information. Results An apparently complex epidemiologic pattern emerged from the diathesis-stress interaction when thresholds were applied: incidence was time dependent, recurrence depended on the number of past episodes, baseline symptoms were associated with an increased risk of subsequent episodes and the remission rate declined with increasing episode duration. Conclusions A diathesis-stress conceptualization coupled with application of a threshold-based diagnostic definition may explain several of the apparent complexities of major depression epidemiology. Some of these complexities may be artifacts of the nominal diagnostic approach. These observations should encourage an empirical exploration of whether diathesis-stress interactions provide a more parsimonious framework for understanding depression than current approaches.

  4. Psychiatric comorbidities in patients with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaipisuttikul P

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Papan Thaipisuttikul, Pichai Ittasakul, Punjaporn Waleeprakhon, Pattarabhorn Wisajun, Sudawan Jullagate Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand Background: Psychiatric comorbidities are common in major depressive disorder (MDD. They may worsen outcome and cause economic burden. The primary objective was to examine the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in MDD. The secondary objectives were to compare the presence of comorbidities between currently active and past MDD, and between patients with and without suicidal risk.Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. A total of 250 patients with lifetime MDD and age ≥18 years were enrolled. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, Thai version, was used to confirm MDD diagnosis and classify comorbidities. MDD diagnosis was confirmed in 190, and 60 patients were excluded due to diagnosis of bipolar disorder.Results: Of the 190 MDD patients, 25.8% had current MDD and 74.2% had past MDD. Eighty percent were women. The mean age at enrollment was 50 years, and at MDD onset was 41 years. Most patients were married (53.2%, employed (54.8%, and had ≥12 years of education (66.9%. There were 67 patients (35.3% with one or more psychiatric comorbidities. Comorbidities included dysthymia (19.5%, any anxiety disorders (21.1% (panic disorder [6.8%], agoraphobia [5.8%], social phobia [3.7%], obsessive–compulsive disorder [OCD] [4.7%], generalized anxiety disorder [5.3%], and post-traumatic stress disorder [4.2%], alcohol dependence (0.5%, psychotic disorder (1.6%, antisocial personality (1.1%, and eating disorders (0%. Compared with past MDD, the current MDD group had significantly higher OCD (P<0.001, psychotic disorder (P=0.048, past panic disorder (P=0.017, and suicidal risk (P<0.001. Suicidal risk was found in 32.1% of patients. Patients with suicidal risk had more comorbid anxiety disorder of any type (P=0.019 and

  5. Disrupted reward circuits is associated with cognitive deficits and depression severity in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Liang; Yin, Yingying; He, Cancan; Ye, Qing; Bai, Feng; Yuan, Yonggui; Zhang, Haisan; Lv, Luxian; Zhang, Hongxing; Xie, Chunming; Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that major depressive disorder (MDD) patients show blunted activity responses to reward-related tasks. However, whether abnormal reward circuits affect cognition and depression in MDD patients remains unclear. Seventy-five drug-naive MDD patients and 42 cognitively normal (CN) subjects underwent a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The bilateral nucleus accumbens (NAc) were selected as seeds to construct reward circuits across all subjects. A multivariate linear regression analysis was employed to investigate the neural substrates of cognitive function and depression severity on the reward circuits in MDD patients. The common pathway underlying cognitive deficits and depression was identified with conjunction analysis. Compared with CN subjects, MDD patients showed decreased reward network connectivity that was primarily located in the prefrontal-striatal regions. Importantly, distinct and common neural pathways underlying cognition and depression were identified, implying the independent and synergistic effects of cognitive deficits and depression severity on reward circuits. This study demonstrated that disrupted topological organization within reward circuits was significantly associated with cognitive deficits and depression severity in MDD patients. These findings suggest that in addition to antidepressant treatment, normalized reward circuits should be a focus and a target for improving depression and cognitive deficits in MDD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reduced Venous Blood Basophil Count and Anxious Depression in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Ji Hyun; Kim, Hee-Jin; Fava, Maurizio; Mischoulon, David; Papakostas, George I; Nierenberg, Andrew; Heo, Jung-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anxious depression has a distinct neurobiology, clinical course and treatment response from non-anxious depression. Role of inflammation in anxious depression has not been examined. As an exploratory study to characterize the role of inflammation on a development of anxious depression, we aimed to determine the relationship between white blood cell (WBC) subset counts and anxiety in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). Methods A total of 709 patients who were newly diagnosed with MDD were recruited. Anxiety levels of participants were evaluated using the Anxiety/ Somatization subitem of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. The association between WBC subset fraction and anxiety was evaluated. Results Basophil and eosinophil sub-fractions showed significant negative correlations with HAM-D anxiety/somatization factor scores (basophils: r=-0.092, p=0.014 and eosinophils: r=-0.075, p=0.046). When an anxiety score (a sum of somatic and psychic anxiety) was entered as a dependent variable, only basophils showed significant negative association with the anxiety scores after adjusting for all other WBC subset counts and demographic factors (t=-2.57, p=0.010). Conclusion This study showed that anxious depression had a decreased basophil subfraction, which might be associated with involvement of inflammation in development of anxious depression. PMID:27247599

  7. The inflammatory cytokines: molecular biomarkers for major depressive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Charlotte; Tansey, Katherine E; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Powell, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines are pleotropic cell signaling proteins that, in addition to their role as inflammatory mediators, also affect neurotransmitter systems, brain functionality and mood. Here we explore the potential utility of cytokine biomarkers for major depressive disorder. Specifically, we explore how genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic information relating to the cytokines might act as biomarkers, aiding clinical diagnosis and treatment selection processes. We advise future studies to investigate whether cytokine biomarkers might differentiate major depressive disorder patients from other patient groups with overlapping clinical characteristics. Furthermore, we invite future pharmacogenetic studies to investigate whether early antidepressant-induced changes to cytokine mRNA or protein levels precede behavioral changes and act as longer-term predictors of clinical antidepressant response.

  8. The Role of Lipid Biomarkers in Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Parekh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the UK, the lifetime-documented prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD is currently 10%. Despite its increasing prevalence and devastating impact on quality of life, the pathophysiological mechanisms underpinning MDD remain to be fully elucidated. Current theories of neurobiological components remain incomplete and protein-centric, rendering pharmacological treatment options suboptimal. In this review, we highlight the pivotal role of lipids in intra- and inter-neuronal functioning, emphasising the potential use of lipids as biomarkers for MDD. The latter has significant implications for improving our understanding of MDD at the cellular and circuit level. There is particular focus on cholesterol (high and low density lipoprotein, omega-3, and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids due to established evidence in the literature of a link between atherosclerotic disease and major depression. We argue that there is significant potential scope for the use of such peripheral biomarkers in the diagnosis, stratification and treatment of MDD.

  9. Antidepressants versus placebo in major depression: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif; Brown, Walter A

    2015-10-01

    Although the early antidepressant trials which included severely ill and hospitalized patients showed substantial drug-placebo differences, these robust differences have not held up in the trials of the past couple of decades, whether sponsored by pharmaceutical companies or non-profit agencies. This narrowing of the drug-placebo difference has been attributed to a number of changes in the conduct of clinical trials. First, the advent of DSM-III and the broadening of the definition of major depression have led to the inclusion of mildly to moderately ill patients into antidepressant trials. These patients may experience a smaller magnitude of antidepressant-placebo differences. Second, drug development regulators, such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency, have had a significant, albeit underappreciated, role in determining how modern antidepressant clinical trials are designed and conducted. Their concerns about possible false positive results have led to trial designs that are poor, difficult to conduct, and complicated to analyze. Attempts at better design and patient selection for antidepressant trials have not yielded the expected results. As of now, antidepressant clinical trials have an effect size of 0.30, which, although similar to the effects of treatments for many other chronic illnesses, such as hypertension, asthma and diabetes, is less than impressive. © 2015 World Psychiatric Association.

  10. Molecular connectivity disruptions in males with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Rajapillai Li; Zhang, Mengru; Yang, Jie; Mann, J John; Oquendo, Maria A; Parsey, Ramin V; DeLorenzo, Christine

    2018-01-01

    In most positron emission tomography (PET) molecular brain imaging studies, regions of interest have been defined anatomically and examined in isolation. However, by defining regions based on physiology and examining relationships between them, we may derive more sensitive measures of receptor abnormalities in conditions such as major depressive disorder (MDD). Using an average of 52 normalized binding potential maps, acquired using radiotracer [ 11 C]-WAY100635 and full arterial input analysis, we identified two molecular volumes of interest (VOIs) with contiguously high serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT 1A ) binding sites: the olfactory sulcus (OLFS) and a band of tissue including piriform, olfactory, and entorhinal cortex (PRF). We applied these VOIs to a separate cohort of 25 healthy control males and 16 males with MDD who received [ 11 C]-WAY100635 imaging. Patients with MDD had significantly higher binding than controls in both VOIs, ( p molecular connectivity, i.e. the correlation between binding of raphe nucleus (RN) 5-HT 1A autoreceptors and post-synaptic receptors in molecular VOIs. Molecular connectivity was significant in healthy controls ( p molecular connectivity allowed identification of MDD cases with high sensitivity (81%) and specificity (88%).

  11. An examination of DSM-IV depressive symptoms and risk for suicide completion in major depressive disorder: a psychological autopsy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGirr, Alexander; Renaud, Johanne; Seguin, Monique; Alda, Martin; Benkelfat, Chawki; Lesage, Alain; Turecki, Gustavo

    2007-01-01

    It is unclear whether certain DSM-IV depressive symptoms are more prevalent among individuals who die in the context of a major depressive episode and those who do not, whether this is associated with proximal or distal suicide risk, and whether depressive symptoms cluster to indicate suicide risk. A psychological autopsy method with best informants was used to investigate DSM-IV depressive symptoms among 156 suicides who died in the context of a major depressive episode and 81 major depressive controls. Suicides' depressive symptoms were more likely to include weight or appetite loss, insomnia, feelings of worthlessness or inappropriate guilt as well as recurrent thoughts of death or suicidal ideation. Fatigue and difficulties concentrating or indecisiveness were less prevalent among depressed suicides. These associations were independent of concomitant axis I and II psychopathology. The concomitant presence of (a) fatigue as well as impaired concentration or indecisiveness and (b) weight or appetite gain and hypersomnia was associated with decreased suicide risk. Inter-episode symptom concordance suggests that insomnia is an immediate indicator of suicide risk, while weight or appetite loss and feelings of worthlessness or guilt are not. This study employed proxy-based interviews. We found that discrete DSM-IV depressive symptoms and clusters of depressive symptoms help differentiate depressed individuals who die by suicide and those who do not. Moreover, some DSM-IV depressive symptoms are associated with an immediate risk for suicide, while others may result from an etiology of depression common to suicide without directly increasing suicide risk.

  12. Lithium treatment reduces suicide risk in recurrent major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzetta, Francesca; Tondo, Leonardo; Centorrino, Franca; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2007-03-01

    Evidence that clinical treatment reduces suicide risk in major depressive disorder (MDD) is limited and inconsistent. Since lithium shows major antisuicidal effects in bipolar disorders and in heterogeneous mood disorder samples, we evaluated evidence of antisuicidal effects of lithium in patients with recurrent MDD. We searched MEDLINE (January 1966 to April 2006; search terms: lithium, suicide, affective disorder, depression, major depression, and mood disorder) for studies reporting suicides or suicide attempts during treatment with and without lithium in recurrent MDD patients, and we added data for 78 new subjects, provided from the Lucio Bini Mood Disorders Research Center in Sardinia, Italy. Suicide rates were pooled and analyzed by use of incidence-rate ratios (IRRs) and meta-analytic methods. Eight studies involved 329 MDD patients and exposure for 4.56 years (1149 person-years) with, and 6.27 years (1285 person-years) without, lithium. Overall risk of suicides and suicide attempts was 88.5% lower with vs. without lithium: 0.17%/y versus 1.48%/y (IRR = 8.71; 95% CI: 2.10 to 77.2, p = .0005); for completed suicides (85% risk reduction), IRR = 6.77 (95% CI: 1.29 to 66.8, p = .01). Meta-analysis by risk difference and risk ratio supported these findings, and sensitivity analysis yielded similar results with studies omitted serially. This is the first meta-analysis suggesting antisuicidal effects of lithium in recurrent MDD, similar in magnitude to that found in bipolar disorders.

  13. The association between major depressive disorder in childhood and risk factors for cardiovascular disease in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottenberg, Jonathan; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Carney, Robert M; Freedland, Kenneth E; George, Charles J; Baji, Ildikó; Dochnal, Roberta; Gádoros, Júlia; Halas, Kitti; Kapornai, Krisztina; Kiss, Eniko; Osváth, Viola; Varga, Hedvig; Vetró, Agnes; Kovacs, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Depression in adults is associated with risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). It is unclear, however, when the association between clinical depression and cardiac risk factors develops or how early in life this association can be detected. In an ongoing study of pediatric depression, we compared CVD risk factors including smoking, obesity, physical activity level, sedentary behavior, and parental history of CVD across three samples of adolescents: probands with established histories of childhood-onset major depressive disorder (n = 210), never-depressed siblings of probands (n = 195), and controls with no history of any major psychiatric disorder (n = 161). When assessed during adolescence, 85% of the probands were not in a major depressive episode. Nevertheless, at that assessment, probands had a higher prevalence of regular smoking (odds ratio [OR] = 12.54, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.36-36.12) and were less physically active than controls (OR = 0.59, CI = 0.43-0.81) and siblings (OR = 0.70, CI = 0.52-0.94) and had a higher rate of obesity than did controls (OR = 3.67, CI = 1.42-9.52). Parents of probands reported high rates of CVD (significantly higher than did parents of controls), including myocardial infarction and CVD-related hospitalization (ORs = 1.62-4.36, CIs = 1.03-15.40). Differences in CVD risk factors between probands and controls were independent of parental CVD. Major depression in childhood is associated with an unfavorable CVD risk profile in adolescence, and risks for pediatric depression and CVD may coincide in families. Effective prevention and treatment of childhood depression may be a means to reduce the incidence of adult CVD.

  14. The epidemiology of major depression in South Africa: Results from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A nationally representative household survey was conducted between 2002 and 2004 using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) to establish a diagnosis of depression. The dataset analysed included 4 351 adult South Africans of all racial groups. Results. The prevalence of ...

  15. Severity of anxiety- but not depression- is associated with oxidative stress in Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkamp, Lisa R; Hough, Christina M; Reus, Victor I; Jain, Felipe A; Epel, Elissa S; James, S Jill; Morford, Alexandra E; Mellon, Synthia H; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Lindqvist, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in both depression and anxiety, but it is currently unclear whether this relates to syndromal diagnoses or trans-diagnostic dimensional symptoms. We examined the relationship between oxidative stress and severity of depression and anxiety symptoms in individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Plasma oxidative stress markers F2-isoprostanes and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), and the antioxidant reduced glutathione (GSH), were assessed in 69 physically healthy, medication-free MDD subjects. Symptoms of anxiety and depression were assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety (HAM-A) and Hamilton Depression (HAM-D) Rating Scales. Total HAM-A and HAM-D scores, along with "core" anxiety and depression subscales, and individual HAM-D items "psychic anxiety" and "depressed mood," were related to oxidative stress markers. Analyses controlled for age, sex, BMI, and smoking. Total HAM-A ratings were positively associated with F2-isoprostanes (β=.26, p=.042) and GSSG (β=.25, p=.049), but not GSH (β=.05, p=.711). Core anxiety severity was positively associated with F2-isoprostanes (β=.34, p=.012) and GSSG, although this did not reach significance (β=.24, p=.074). None of the biological markers were significantly associated with total HAM-D or core depression ratings (all p>.13). Subjects scoring high on "psychic anxiety" had elevated F2-isoprostanes (p=.030) and GSSG (p=.020). This was not seen with "depressed mood" scores (all p>.12). We assessed peripheral oxidative markers, but their relationship to the brain is unclear. Oxidative stress is more closely related to anxiety than depression symptoms in MDD. This highlights the importance of relating oxidative stress to specific symptoms and could provide new insights into the biological correlates of affective disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. What patients with bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder perceive as adverse life events precipitating a current major depressive episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robyn Anne van Schoor

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adverse life events (ALEs as precipitants of a major depressive episode (MDE have been the subject of many studies. These studies indicate an increase in ALEs in the 6 months preceding an MDE. Objectives. The study examined what participants, suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD or bipolar disorder (BD, perceived as the precipitating ALE of a current MDE. The severity and categories of ALEs were compared between these two patient groups. Methods. Consenting, adult inpatients were sourced from Weskoppies Hospital, Steve Biko Academic Hospital, Tshwane District Hospital, Denmar Psychiatric Hospital and Vista Clinic in the Pretoria area. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to obtain demographic data and the diagnosis. Information regarding the course of the disorder, including the number of previous MDEs and the age at which the first MDE occurred, was also obtained. The perceived precipitating ALE was detailed for each participant. A severity value referred to as a Life Change Unit Score (LCU score, based on the Recent Life Changes Questionnaire (RLCQ by Miller and Rahe, was then assigned to each participant’s perceived precipitant. Results. Of the 64 participants, 12.7 % were experiencing a first MDE. In those participants who had experienced prior episodes the average number (standard deviation (SD of previous episodes was 3.86 (2.46. The mean approximate age (SD at first onset of an MDE was 24.81 (10.9 years. The BD group had significantly more previous MDEs than the MDD group. Although the average LCU scores were higher in the BD group than the MDD group this did not reach statistical significance. Therefore, this study could not find a difference in the severity of the perceived precipitants between the BD group and MDD group. However, when the LCU scores were analysed within subcategories of the RLCQ, it was found that participants with BD perceived significantly more problems associated with the workplace as

  17. Is blunted cardiovascular reactivity in depression mood-state dependent? A comparison of major depressive disorder remitted depression and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Kristen; Bylsma, Lauren M; White, Kristi E; Panaite, Vanessa; Rottenberg, Jonathan

    2013-10-01

    Prior work has repeatedly demonstrated that people who have current major depression exhibit blunted cardiovascular reactivity to acute stressors (e.g., Salomon et al., 2009). A key question regards the psychobiological basis for these deficits, including whether such deficits are depressed mood-state dependent or whether these effects are trait-like and are observed outside of depression episodes in vulnerable individuals. To examine this issue, we assessed cardiovascular reactivity to a speech stressor task and a forehead cold pressor in 50 individuals with current major depressive disorder (MDD), 25 with remitted major depression (RMD), and 45 healthy controls. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure and impedance cardiography were assessed and analyses controlled for BMI and sex. Significant group effects were found for SBP, HR, and PEP for the speech preparation period and HR, CO, and PEP during the speech. For each of these parameters, only the MDD group exhibited attenuated reactivity as well as impaired SBP recovery. Reactivity and recovery in the RMD group more closely resembled the healthy controls. Speeches given by the MDD group were rated as less persuasive than the RMD or healthy controls' speeches. No significant differences were found for the cold pressor. Blunted cardiovascular reactivity and impaired recovery in current major depression may be mood-state dependent phenomena and may be more reflective of motivational deficits than deficits in the physiological integrity of the cardiovascular system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Smoking and major depressive disorder in Chinese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang He

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the risk factors that contribute to smoking in female patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and the clinical features in depressed smokers. METHODS: We examined the smoking status and clinical features in 6120 Han Chinese women with MDD (DSM-IV between 30 and 60 years of age across China. Logistic regression was used to determine the association between clinical features of MDD and smoking status and between risk factors for MDD and smoking status. RESULTS: Among the recurrent MDD patients there were 216(3.6% current smokers, 117 (2.0% former smokers and 333(5.6% lifetime smokers. Lifetime smokers had a slightly more severe illness, characterized by more episodes, longer duration, more comorbid illness (panic and phobias, with more DSM-IV A criteria and reported more symptoms of fatigue and suicidal ideation or attempts than never smokers. Some known risk factors for MDD were also differentially represented among smokers compared to non-smokers. Smokers reported more stressful life events, were more likely to report childhood sexual abuse, had higher levels of neuroticism and an increased rate of familial MDD. Only neuroticism was significantly related to nicotine dependence. CONCLUSIONS: Although depressed women smokers experience more severe illness, smoking rates remain low in MDD patients. Family history of MDD and environmental factors contribute to lifetime smoking in Chinese women, consistent with the hypothesis that the association of smoking and depression may be caused by common underlying factors.

  19. Brief Report: Overgeneral Autobiographical Memory in Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Katelynn; Burkhouse, Katie L.; Woody, Mary L.; Feurer, Cope; Sosoo, Effua; Gibb, Brandon E.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined whether overgeneral autobiographical memory (OGM) bias serves as a state-like marker of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescence or whether it would also be observed in currently nondepressed adolescents with a history of MDD. We examined differences in OGM to positive and negative cue words between adolescents (aged 11–18 years) with current MDD (n = 15), remitted MDD (n = 25), and no history of any depressive disorder (n = 25). Youth and their parents were administered a structured diagnostic interview and adolescents completed the autobiographical memory test. Compared to never depressed adolescents, adolescents with current or remitted MDD recalled less specific memories in response to positive and negative cue words. The difference between the two MDD groups was small and nonsignificant. These findings suggest that OGM is not simply a state-like marker in currently depressed adolescents, but is also evident in adolescents with remitted MDD, indicating that it may represent a trait-like vulnerability that increases risk for relapse. PMID:27498000

  20. Structure of major depressive disorder in adolescents and adults in the US general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Femke; Burstein, Marcy; He, Jian-ping; Avenevoli, Shelli; Angst, Jules; Merikangas, Kathleen R

    2012-08-01

    Although techniques such as latent class analysis have been used to derive empirically based subtypes of depression in adult samples, there is limited information on subtypes of depression in youth. To identify empirically based subtypes of depression in a nationally representative sample of US adolescents, and to test the comparability of subtypes of depression in adolescents with those derived from a nationally representative sample of adults. Respondents included 912 adolescents and 805 adults with a 12-month major depressive disorder, selected from the National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent Supplement and the National Comorbidity Survey Replication samples respectively. Latent class analysis was used to identify subtypes of depression across samples. Sociodemographic and clinical correlates of derived subtypes were also examined to establish their validity. Three subtypes of depression were identified among adolescents, whereas four subtypes were identified among adults. Two of these subtypes displayed similar diagnostic profiles across adolescent and adult samples (P = 0.43); these subtypes were labelled 'severe typical' (adults 45%, adolescents 35%) and 'atypical' (adults 16%, adolescents 26%). The latter subtype was characterised by increased appetite and weight gain. The structure of depression observed in adolescents is highly similar to the structure observed in adults. Longitudinal research is necessary to evaluate the stability of these subtypes of depression across development.

  1. Stressful life events preceding the onset of depression in Asian patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Subin; Hatim, Ahmad; Si, Tian-Mei; Jeon, Hong Jin; Srisurapanont, Manit; Bautista, Dianne; Liu, Shen-ing; Chua, Hong Choon; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have identified the significant role of stressful life events in the onset of depressive episodes. However, there is a paucity of cross-national studies on stressful life events that precede depression. We aimed to compare types of stressful life events associated with the onset of depressive episodes in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) in five Asian countries. A total of 507 outpatients with MDD were recruited in China (n = 114), South Korea (n = 101), Malaysia (n = 90), Thailand (n = 103) and Taiwan (n = 99). All patients were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and the List of Threatening Experiences. The prevalence of each type of stressful life events was calculated and compared between each country. The type of stressful life event that preceded the onset of a depressive episode differed between patients in China and Taiwan and those in South Korea, Malaysia and Thailand. Patients in China and Taiwan were less likely to report interpersonal relationship problems and occupational/financial problems than patients in South Korea, Malaysia and Thailand. Understanding the nature and basis of culturally determined susceptibilities to specific stressful life events is critical for establishing a policy of depression prevention and providing effective counseling services for depressed patients. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Positron emission tomography quantification of serotonin transporter in suicide attempters with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey M; Hesselgrave, Natalie; Ogden, R Todd; Sullivan, Gregory M; Oquendo, Maria A; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2013-08-15

    Several lines of evidence implicate abnormal serotonergic function in suicidal behavior and completed suicide, including low serotonin transporter binding in postmortem studies of completed suicide. We have also reported low in vivo serotonin transporter binding in major depressive disorder (MDD) during a major depressive episode using positron emission tomography (PET) with [(11)C]McN5652. We quantified regional brain serotonin transporter binding in vivo in depressed suicide attempters, depressed nonattempters, and healthy controls using PET and a superior radiotracer, [(11)C]DASB. Fifty-one subjects with DSM-IV current MDD, 15 of whom were past suicide attempters, and 32 healthy control subjects underwent PET scanning with [(11)C]DASB to quantify in vivo regional brain serotonin transporter binding. Metabolite-corrected arterial input functions and plasma free-fraction were acquired to improve quantification. Depressed suicide attempters had lower serotonin transporter binding in midbrain compared with depressed nonattempters (p = .031) and control subjects (p = .0093). There was no difference in serotonin transporter binding comparing all depressed subjects with healthy control subjects considering six a priori regions of interest simultaneously (p = .41). Low midbrain serotonin transporter binding appears to be related to the pathophysiology of suicidal behavior rather than of major depressive disorder. This is consistent with postmortem work showing low midbrain serotonin transporter binding capacity in depressed suicides and may partially explain discrepant in vivo findings quantifying serotonin transporter in depression. Future studies should investigate midbrain serotonin transporter binding as a predictor of suicidal behavior in MDD and determine the cause of low binding. Copyright © 2013 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Infidelity and separations precipitate major depressive episodes and symptoms of nonspecific depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, A; O'Leary, K D

    2000-10-01

    This study examined whether humiliating marital events (HMEs; husbands' infidelity, threats of marital dissolution) precipitated Major Depressive Episodes (MDEs) when controlling for marital discord. Participants were 25 women who recently experienced an HME and 25 control women who did not experience an HME. Both groups reported similar levels of marital discord. Results indicated that HME participants were 6 times more likely to be diagnosed with an MDE than control participants. These results remained even after controlling for family and lifetime histories of depression. HME participants also reported significantly more symptoms of nonspecific depression and anxiety than control participants. However, HME and control participants did not report significantly different numbers of anhedonic depression and anxious arousal symptoms. The research and clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Augmentation treatment in major depressive disorder: focus on aripiprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Craig Nelson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available J Craig Nelson1, Andrei Pikalov2, Robert M Berman31University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA; 2Otsuka Pharmaceutical Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 3Bristol-Myers Squibb, Wallingford, CT, USAAbstract: Major depressive disorder (MDD is a disabling psychiatric condition for which effective treatment remains an outstanding need. Antidepressants are currently the mainstay of treatment for depression; however, almost two-thirds of patients will fail to achieve remission with initial treatment. As a result, a range of augmentation and combination strategies have been used in order to improve outcomes for patients. Despite the popularity of these approaches, limited data from double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are available to allow clinicians to determine which are the most effective augmentation options or which patients are most likely to respond to which options. Recently, evidence has shown that adjunctive therapy with atypical antipsychotics has the potential for beneficial antidepressant effects in the absence of psychotic symptoms. In particular, aripiprazole has shown efficacy as an augmentation option with standard antidepressant therapy in two, large, randomized, double-blind studies. Based on these efficacy and safety data, aripiprazole was recently approved by the FDA as adjunctive therapy for MDD. The availability of this new treatment option should allow more patients with MDD to achieve remission and, ultimately, long-term, successful outcomes.Keywords: major depression, antipsychotic, mood disorder, aripiprazole

  5. Prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in unipolar major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Kai G; Greggersen, Wiebke; Schweiger, Ulrich; Cordes, Joachim; Balijepalli, Chakrapani; Lösch, Christian; Moebus, Susanne

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies on the association between affective disorders and the metabolic syndrome yielded inconclusive results. Therefore, we examined the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in 230 men and women with unipolar major depressive disorder during inpatient treatment and compared it to 1,673 subjects from primary care from a similar region in northern Germany. We used the AHA/NHBLI criteria to determine the rate of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and each single criterion of MetS in both groups. The age-standardized prevalence of MetS was 2.4× as high in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) compared with data from comparison subjects (41.0% vs. 17.0%). With respect to the single criteria, elevations were found in MDD patients for fasting glucose and triglycerides in both genders, and waist circumference in women. Men in the patient and the comparison groups were found to have higher rates of increased fasting glucose and triglycerides than women in the respective groups. Factors associated with the MetS in MDD patients comprise body mass index and the severity of depression. Our results demonstrate an increased prevalence of the MetS in men and women with MDD. Interventions for the frequently untreated metabolic abnormalities and careful screening for physical health conditions among people with MDD are warranted.

  6. Altered Hippocampal Morphology in Unmedicated Patients with Major Depressive Illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie E Bearden

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite converging evidence that major depressive illness is associated with both memory impairment and hippocampal pathology, findings vary widely across studies and it is not known whether these changes are regionally specific. In the present study we acquired brain MRIs (magnetic resonance images from 31 unmedicated patients with MDD (major depressive disorder; mean age 39.2±11.9 years; 77% female and 31 demographically comparable controls. Three-dimensional parametric mesh models were created to examine localized alterations of hippocampal morphology. Although global volumes did not differ between groups, statistical mapping results revealed that in MDD patients, more severe depressive symptoms were associated with greater left hippocampal atrophy, particularly in CA1 (cornu ammonis 1 subfields and the subiculum. However, previous treatment with atypical antipsychotics was associated with a trend towards larger left hippocampal volume. Our findings suggest effects of illness severity on hippocampal size, as well as a possible effect of past history of atypical antipsychotic treatment, which may reflect prolonged neuroprotective effects. This possibility awaits confirmation in longitudinal studies.

  7. Evaluation of periodontitis in hospital outpatients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, A C O; Marques, A H; Pannuti, C M; Lotufo, R F M; Lotufo-Neto, F

    2014-02-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) has been associated with alterations in the neuroendocrine system and immune function and may be associated with an increased susceptibility to cardiovascular disease, cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory disease. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between periodontitis and MDD in a convenience sample of hospital outpatients. The sample consisted of 72 physically healthy subjects (36 outpatients with MDD and 36 age-matched controls [± 3 years]). Patients with bipolar disorder, eating disorders and psychotic disorders were excluded. Probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were recorded at six sites per tooth. Depression was assessed by means of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Extent of clinical attachment level and probing pocket depth were not different between controls and subjects with depression for the following thresholds: ≥ 3 mm (Mann-Whitney, p = 0.927 and 0.756); ≥ 4 mm (Mann-Whitney, p = 0.656 and 0.373); ≥ 5 mm (Mann-Whitney, p = 0.518 and 0.870);, and ≥ 6 mm (Mann-Whitney, p = 0.994 and 0.879). Depression parameters were not associated with clinical attachment level ≥ 5 mm in this sample. Smoking was associated with loss of attachment ≥ 5 mm in the multivariable logistic regression model (odds ratio = 6.99, 95% confidence interval = 2.00-24.43). In this sample, periodontal clinical parameters were not different between patients with MDD and control subjects. There was no association between depression and periodontitis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Correlations between sexual dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms among patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiao-Fan; Juang, Yeong-Yuh; Wen, Jung-Kwang; Liu, Chia-Yih; Hung, Ching-I

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the degree of correlation between sexual dysfunction and depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms among patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and to identify the dimension most predictive of sexual dysfunction. One-hundred and thirty-five outpatients with MDD were enrolled and were treated with open-label venlafaxine 75 mg daily for one month. The Arizona Sexual Experience Scale-Chinese Version (ASEX-CV), Depression and Somatic Symptoms Scale (DSSS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) were administered at baseline and at one-month follow-up and the improvement percentage (IP) of each scale posttreatment was calculated. Multiple linear regression was used to determine the dimension most predictive of the total ASEX-CV score. Seventy subjects (20 men, 50 women) completed the one-month pharmacotherapy and the four scales. The depression subscale of the HADS was most strongly correlated with the ASEX-CV scale and was the only subscale to independently predict the total ASEX-CV score at the two points. However, the somatic subscale of the DSSS was not correlated with any ASEX-CV item. At the endpoint, depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms were significantly improved (IP 48.5% to 26.0%); however, very little improvement was observed in the total ASEX-CV score (IP -1.6%). The severity of sexual dysfunction among patients with MDD was most correlated with the severity of the depressive dimension, but not the severity of the somatic dimension. Further studies are indicated to explore the relationships between sexual dysfunction, depression, anxiety, and somatic symptoms.

  9. Bipolar I disorder and major depressive disorder show similar brain activation during depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerullo, Michael A; Eliassen, James C; Smith, Christopher T; Fleck, David E; Nelson, Erik B; Strawn, Jeffrey R; Lamy, Martine; DelBello, Melissa P; Adler, Caleb M; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2014-11-01

    Despite different treatments and courses of illness, depressive symptoms appear similar in major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar I disorder (BP-I). This similarity of depressive symptoms suggests significant overlap in brain pathways underlying neurovegetative, mood, and cognitive symptoms of depression. These shared brain regions might be expected to exhibit similar activation in individuals with MDD and BP-I during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI was used to compare regional brain activation in participants with BP-I (n = 25) and MDD (n = 25) during a depressive episode as well as 25 healthy comparison (HC) participants. During the scans, participants performed an attentional task that incorporated emotional pictures. During the viewing of emotional images, subjects with BP-I showed decreased activation in the middle occipital gyrus, lingual gyrus, and middle temporal gyrus compared to both subjects with MDD and HC participants. During attentional processing, participants with MDD had increased activation in the parahippocampus, parietal lobe, and postcentral gyrus. However, among these regions, only the postcentral gyrus also showed differences between MDD and HC participants. No differences in cortico-limbic regions were found between participants with BP-I and MDD during depression. Instead, the major differences occurred in primary and secondary visual processing regions, with decreased activation in these regions in BP-I compared to major depression. These differences were driven by abnormal decreases in activation seen in the participants with BP-I. Posterior activation changes are a common finding in studies across mood states in participants with BP-I. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A clinical prediction rule for detecting major depressive disorder in primary care : the PREDICT-NL study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuithoff, Nicolaas P A; Vergouwe, Yvonne; King, Michael; Nazareth, Irwin; Hak, Eelko; Moons, Karel G M; Geerlings, Mirjam I

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder often remains unrecognized in primary care. OBJECTIVE: Development of a clinical prediction rule using easily obtainable predictors for major depressive disorder in primary care patients. METHODS: A total of 1046 subjects, aged 18-65 years, were included from

  11. Factors associated with help-seeking behaviour among individuals with major depression: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaard, Julia Luise; Seeralan, Tharanya; Schulz, Holger; Brütt, Anna Levke

    2017-01-01

    Psychological models can help to understand why many people suffering from major depression do not seek help. Using the 'Behavioral Model of Health Services Use', this study systematically reviewed the literature on the characteristics associated with help-seeking behaviour in adults with major depression. Articles were identified by systematically searching the MEDLINE, EMBASE and PsycInfo databases and relevant reference lists. Observational studies investigating the associations between individual or contextual characteristics and professional help-seeking behaviour for emotional problems in adults formally diagnosed with major depression were included. The quality of the included studies was assessed, and factors associated with help-seeking behaviour were qualitatively synthesized. In total, 40 studies based on 26 datasets were included. Several studies investigated predisposing (age (N = 17), gender (N = 16), ethnicity (N = 9), education (N = 11), marital status (N = 12)), enabling (income (N = 12)), need (severity (N = 14), duration (N = 9), number of depressive episodes (N = 6), psychiatric comorbidity (N = 10)) and contextual factors (area (N = 8)). Socio-demographic and need factors appeared to influence help-seeking behaviour. Although existing studies provide insight into the characteristics associated with help seeking for major depression, cohort studies and research on beliefs about, barriers to and perceived need for treatment are lacking. Based on this review, interventions to increase help-seeking behaviour can be designed.

  12. Adjunctive minocycline treatment for major depressive disorder: A proof of concept trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Olivia M; Kanchanatawan, Buranee; Ashton, Melanie; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Ng, Chee Hong; Maes, Michael; Berk, Lesley; Sughondhabirom, Atapol; Tangwongchai, Sookjaroen; Singh, Ajeet B; McKenzie, Helen; Smith, Deidre J; Malhi, Gin S; Dowling, Nathan; Berk, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Conventional antidepressant treatments result in symptom remission in 30% of those treated for major depressive disorder, raising the need for effective adjunctive therapies. Inflammation has an established role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder, and minocycline has been shown to modify the immune-inflammatory processes and also reduce oxidative stress and promote neuronal growth. This double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial examined adjunctive minocycline (200 mg/day, in addition to treatment as usual) for major depressive disorder. This double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial investigated 200 mg/day adjunctive minocycline (in addition to treatment as usual) for major depressive disorder. A total of 71 adults with major depressive disorder ( Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition) were randomised to this 12-week trial. Outcome measures included the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (primary outcome), Clinical Global Impression-Improvement and Clinical Global Impression-Severity, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire, Social and Occupational Functioning Scale and the Range of Impaired Functioning Tool. The study was registered on the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Register: www.anzctr.org.au , #ACTRN12612000283875. Based on mixed-methods repeated measures analysis of variance at week 12, there was no significant difference in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores between groups. However, there were significant differences, favouring the minocycline group at week 12 for Clinical Global Impression-Improvement score - effect size (95% confidence interval) = -0.62 [-1.8, -0.3], p = 0.02; Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire score - effect size (confidence interval) = -0.12 [0.0, 0.2], p depressive disorder. Further studies are warranted to confirm the potential of this accessible agent to optimise

  13. Altered choroid plexus gene expression in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortney Ann Turner

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Given the emergent interest in biomarkers for mood disorders, we assessed gene expression in the choroid plexus, the region that produces cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD. Genes that are expressed in the choroid plexus (CP can be secreted into the CSF and may be potential biomarker candidates. Given that we have previously shown that fibroblast growth factor family members are differentially expressed in post-mortem brain of subjects with MDD and the CP is a known source of growth factors in the brain, we posed the question whether growth factor dysregulation would be found in the CP of subjects with MDD. We performed laser capture microscopy of the choroid plexus at the level of the hippocampus in subjects with MDD and psychiatrically normal controls. We then extracted, amplified, labeled and hybridized the cRNA to Illumina BeadChips to assess gene expression. In controls, the most highly abundant known transcript was transthyretin. Moreover, half of the 14 most highly expressed transcripts in controls encode ribosomal proteins. Using BeadStudio software, we identified 169 transcripts differentially expressed (p< 0.05 between control and MDD samples. Using pathway analysis we noted that the top network altered in subjects with MDD included multiple members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ pathway. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR confirmed downregulation of several transcripts that interact with the extracellular matrix in subjects with MDD. These results suggest that there may be an altered cytoskeleton in the choroid plexus in MDD subjects that may lead to a disrupted blood-CSF-brain barrier.

  14. The Role of Neurotrophins in Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Cheng; Salton, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Neurotrophins and other growth factors have been advanced as critical modulators of depressive behavior. Support for this model is based on analyses of knockout and transgenic mouse models, human genetic studies, and screens for gene products that are regulated by depressive behavior and/or antidepressants. Even subtle alteration in the regulated secretion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), for example, due to a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-encoded Val-Met substitution in proBDNF that affects processing and sorting, impacts behavior and cognition. Alterations in growth factor expression result in changes in neurogenesis as well as structural changes in neuronal cytoarchitecture, including effects on dendritic length and spine density, in the hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and prefrontal cortex. These changes have the potential to impact the plasticity and stability of synapses in the CNS, and the complex brain circuitry that regulates behavior. Here we review the role that neurotrophins play in the modulation of depressive behavior, and the downstream signaling targets they regulate that potentially mediate these behavioral pro-depressant and antidepressant effects. PMID:23691270

  15. Predicting the onset of major depression in subjects with subthreshold depression in primary care: A prospective study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Smit, H.F.E.; Willemse, G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: That subjects with subthreshold depression have an increased probability of developing major depression has been confirmed by many studies. However, the factors which may predict the onset of major depression have yet to be fully examined. Method: We examined the control group of a

  16. Mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells correlates with depressive subsymptoms and severity of major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabatsiakis, A; Böck, C; Salinas-Manrique, J; Kolassa, S; Calzia, E; Dietrich, D E; Kolassa, I-T

    2014-06-10

    Mitochondrial dysfunction might have a central role in the pathophysiology of depression. Phenotypically, depression is characterized by lack of energy, concentration problems and fatigue. These symptoms might be partially explained by reduced availability of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a consequence of impaired mitochondrial functioning. This study investigated mitochondrial respiration in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), an established model to investigate the pathophysiology of depression. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed in intact PBMCs in 22 individuals with a diagnosis of major depression (MD) compared with 22 healthy age-matched controls using high-resolution respirometry. Individuals with MD showed significantly impaired mitochondrial functioning: routine and uncoupled respiration as well as spare respiratory capacity, coupling efficiency and ATP turnover-related respiration were significantly lower in the MD compared with the control group. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiration was significantly negatively correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms, in particular, with loss of energy, difficulties concentrating and fatigue. The results suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction contributes to the biomolecular pathophysiology of depressive symptoms. The decreased immune capability observed in MD leading to a higher risk of comorbidities could be attributable to impaired energy supply due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus mitochondrial respiration in PBMCs and its functional consequences might be an interesting target for new therapeutical approaches in the treatment of MD and immune-related comorbidities.

  17. Outcome of patients with major depressive disorder after serious suicide attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suominen, Kirsi; Haukka, Jari; Valtonen, Hanna M; Lönnqvist, Jouko

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the outcome of subjects with major depressive disorder after serious suicide attempt and to examine the effect of psychotic symptoms on their outcome. The study population included all individuals aged 16 years or older in Finland who were hospitalized with ICD-10 diagnoses of major depressive disorder and attempted suicide from 1996 to 2003 (N = 1,820). The main outcome measures were completed suicides, overall mortality, and repeated suicide attempts during drug treatment versus no treatment. During the 4-year follow-up period, 13% of patients died, 6% completed suicide, and 31% made a repeat suicide attempt. Subjects with major depression with psychotic features completed suicide more often than subjects without psychotic features during the follow-up (hazard ratio [HR] 3.32; 95% CI, 1.95 - 5.67). Antidepressant treatment reduced all-cause mortality by 24% (HR 0.74; 95% CI, 0.56 - 0.97) but did not reduce suicide mortality (HR 1.06; 95% CI, 0.71 - 1.58). Psychotic symptoms during major depressive episode increase the risk of completed suicide after serious suicide attempt. The quality of treatment for major depression with psychotic features after attempted suicide should be improved to prevent suicide. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  18. Isolating the effect of major depression on obesity: role of selection bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Dhaval M; Tennant, Jennifer; Colman, Gregory

    2011-12-01

    There is suggestive evidence that rates of major depression have risen markedly in the U.S. concurrent with the rise in obesity. The economic burden of depression, about USD100 billion annually, is under-estimated if depression has a positive causal impact on obesity. However, virtually the entire existing literature on the connection between the two conditions has examined merely whether they are significantly correlated, sometimes holding constant a limited set of demographic factors. This study assesses whether, and the extent to which, the positive association between the two conditions reflects a causal link from major depression to higher BMI and obesity. Individual-level data from three nationally-representative studies are utilized: (i) National Comorbidity Survey-Replication (N=3,229); (ii) National Longitudinal Survey of Youth-1979 (N=21,365); and (iii) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (N=2,858,973). Dependent variables include body mass index (BMI) and a dichotomous indicator for overweight or obese. We measure diagnosed major depression based on DSM-IV criteria and the CES Depression scale. While contemporaneous effects are considered, the study primarily focuses on the effects of past and lifetime depression to bypass reverse causality and further assess the role of non-random selection on unobservable factors. The effects of past and lifetime depression on obesity are estimated based on: (i) models that control for an extensive set of typically-unobserved factors, including parental history, family background, parental investments, risk-taking, and use of anti-depressants and other prescription medications; (ii) constrained selection models; and (iii) models controlling for family fixed effects. There are expectedly no significant or substantial effects of current depression on BMI or overweight/obesity, given that BMI is a stock that changes relatively slowly over time. Results also do not support a causal interpretation among males

  19. Major depressive disorder with religious struggle and completed suicide after hair transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Emin Ceylan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Psychological outcomes of aesthetic surgical procedures like hair transplantation are mostly positive including decreased anxiety, depression and social phobia and increased general well-being, self-efficacy and self-esteem. However, some patients may suffer from post-surgical depression and post-surgical increased suicide rates have been reported for breast augmentation patients. Difficulty adapting to the new image, unfulfilled psychological needs expected to be met by the surgery, side effects of the surgery like tissue swelling or bruising, uncontrolled pain, presence of body dysmorphic disorder and previous history of mood disorder may be some of the risk factors for post-surgical depression. Methods: Here, we present a case without prior psychiatric history who developed major depressive disorder after hair transplantation and died of suicide. Results: He started experiencing religious struggle related to his decision about the hair transplant which he interpreted as acting against God’s will. While religious involvement has been reported to be a protective factor against depression, spiritual struggle, which includes religious guilt, has been described as an important risk factor for depression, hopelessness and suicidality which might explain the severity of depression in our patient. Conclusions: This case highlights the importance of a detailed psychiatric evaluation and exploration of religious concerns of any patient before any type of aesthetic surgery. Major depressive disorder is a treatable condition; however, mild depression can go unnoticed. Religious belief and related religious practices affect an individual’s personal health attitudes; therefore, we think that every physician is needed to explore the religious concerns of any patient during any medical examination or surgical procedure. Relevant religious authorities should be consulted when necessary.

  20. Major depressive disorder with religious struggle and completed suicide after hair transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Mehmet Emin; Önen Ünsalver, Barış; Evrensel, Alper

    2017-01-01

    Psychological outcomes of aesthetic surgical procedures like hair transplantation are mostly positive including decreased anxiety, depression and social phobia and increased general well-being, self-efficacy and self-esteem. However, some patients may suffer from post-surgical depression and post-surgical increased suicide rates have been reported for breast augmentation patients. Difficulty adapting to the new image, unfulfilled psychological needs expected to be met by the surgery, side effects of the surgery like tissue swelling or bruising, uncontrolled pain, presence of body dysmorphic disorder and previous history of mood disorder may be some of the risk factors for post-surgical depression. Here, we present a case without prior psychiatric history who developed major depressive disorder after hair transplantation and died of suicide. He started experiencing religious struggle related to his decision about the hair transplant which he interpreted as acting against God's will. While religious involvement has been reported to be a protective factor against depression, spiritual struggle, which includes religious guilt, has been described as an important risk factor for depression, hopelessness and suicidality which might explain the severity of depression in our patient. This case highlights the importance of a detailed psychiatric evaluation and exploration of religious concerns of any patient before any type of aesthetic surgery. Major depressive disorder is a treatable condition; however, mild depression can go unnoticed. Religious belief and related religious practices affect an individual's personal health attitudes; therefore, we think that every physician is needed to explore the religious concerns of any patient during any medical examination or surgical procedure. Relevant religious authorities should be consulted when necessary.

  1. Oxidative stress, inflammation and treatment response in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, Daniel; Dhabhar, Firdaus S; James, S Jill; Hough, Christina M; Jain, Felipe A; Bersani, F Saverio; Reus, Victor I; Verhoeven, Josine E; Epel, Elissa S; Mahan, Laura; Rosser, Rebecca; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Mellon, Synthia H

    2017-02-01

    Increased inflammation and oxidative stress have been shown in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), although there is significant heterogeneity across studies. Whether markers of inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with antidepressant treatment response in MDD is currently unclear. The goals of the present study are to investigate markers of inflammation and oxidative stress in unmedicated MDD subjects and controls and test the relationship between these markers and antidepressant response in MDD subjects. Interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein, F2-isoprostanes, 8-OH 2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), glutathione peroxidase, glutathione, and vitamin C were quantified in blood samples from 50 unmedicated MDD subjects and 55 healthy controls. Depression symptom severity was rated with the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). All subjects were somatically healthy and free from medications that could interfere with inflammation and oxidative stress markers. A subgroup of 22 MDD subjects underwent open-label selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant treatment for eight weeks, after which blood sampling and the HDRS were repeated. Antidepressant treatment "response" was defined as ≥50% decrease in HDRS ratings over 8 weeks of treatment. After controlling for the effects of age, sex, body mass index and smoking, MDD subjects had significantly higher levels of IL-6 (pinflammation and oxidative stress in MDD. Moreover, poorer antidepressant treatment response was related to higher baseline levels of the major oxidative stress marker, F2-isoprostanes, in vivo. Further, antidepressant response was associated with changes in oxidative (8-OHdG) and inflammatory (IL-6) markers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Design and methods for a randomized clinical trial treating comorbid obesity and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kristin L; Bodenlos, Jamie S; Ma, Yunsheng; Olendzki, Barbara; Oleski, Jessica; Merriam, Philip; Crawford, Sybil; Ockene, Ira S; Pagoto, Sherry L

    2008-09-15

    Obesity is often comorbid with depression and individuals with this comorbidity fare worse in behavioral weight loss treatment. Treating depression directly prior to behavioral weight loss treatment might bolster weight loss outcomes in this population, but this has not yet been tested in a randomized clinical trial. This randomized clinical trial will examine whether behavior therapy for depression administered prior to standard weight loss treatment produces greater weight loss than standard weight loss treatment alone. Obese women with major depressive disorder (N = 174) will be recruited from primary care clinics and the community and randomly assigned to one of the two treatment conditions. Treatment will last 2 years, and will include a 6-month intensive treatment phase followed by an 18-month maintenance phase. Follow-up assessment will occur at 6-months and 1- and 2 years following randomization. The primary outcome is weight loss. The study was designed to provide 90% power for detecting a weight change difference between conditions of 3.1 kg (standard deviation of 5.5 kg) at 1-year assuming a 25% rate of loss to follow-up. Secondary outcomes include depression, physical activity, dietary intake, psychosocial variables and cardiovascular risk factors. Potential mediators (e.g., adherence, depression, physical activity and caloric intake) of the intervention effect on weight change will also be examined. Treating depression before administering intensive health behavior interventions could potentially boost the impact on both mental and physical health outcomes. NCT00572520.

  3. The effects of cognitive therapy versus 'no intervention' for major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Storebø, Ole Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Cognitive therapy may be an effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews....

  4. The effects of cognitive therapy versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Lindschou Hansen, Jane; Storebø, Ole Jakob

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Cognitive therapy may be an effective treatment option for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews....

  5. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy to Prevent Relapse in Pediatric Responders to Pharmacotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Nightingale-Teresi, Jeanne; Nakonezny, Paul A.; Hughes, Jennifer L.; Jones, Jessica M.; Tao, Rongrong; Stewart, Sunita M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2008-01-01

    The outcome of a sequential treatment strategy that included cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in the prevention of major depressive disorder relapse among 46 youths is examined. Results show that youths under the antidepressant medication management plus relapse prevention CBT treatment was at lower risk for relapse than those under the…

  6. Identification of proteomic signatures associated with depression and psychotic depression in post-mortem brains from major depression patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Martins-de-Souza (Daniel); P.C. Guest (Paul); L.W. Harris (Laura); N. Vanattou-Saifoudine (Natacha); M.J. Webster (M.); H. Rahmoune (Hassan); S. Bahn (Sabine)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractMajor depressive disorder (MDD) is a leading cause of disability worldwide and results tragically in the loss of almost one million lives in Western societies every year. This is due to poor understanding of the disease pathophysiology and lack of empirical medical tests for accurate

  7. Use of insulin sensitizers for the treatment of major depressive disorder: a pilot study of pioglitazone for major depression accompanied by abdominal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, David E; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Ganocy, Stephen J; Conroy, Carla; Gao, Keming; Obral, Sarah; Fein, Elizabeth; Findling, Robert L; Calabrese, Joseph R

    2012-02-01

    This study was conducted to examine the safety and efficacy of pioglitazone, a thiazolidinedione insulin sensitizer, in adult outpatients with major depressive disorder. In a 12-week, open-label, flexible-dose study, 23 patients with major depressive disorder received pioglitazone monotherapy or adjunctive therapy initiated at 15 mg daily. Subjects were required to meet criteria for abdominal obesity (waist circumference>35 in. in women and >40 in. in men) or metabolic syndrome. The primary efficacy measure was the change from baseline to Week 12 on the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) total score. Partial responders (≥25% decrease in IDS total score) were eligible to participate in an optional extension phase for an additional three months. Pioglitazone decreased depression symptom severity from a total IDS score of 40.3±1.8 to 19.2±1.8 at Week 12 (pdepressive symptoms was maintained during an additional 3-month extension phase (total duration=24 weeks) according to IDS total scores (pdepression severity and improve several markers of cardiometabolic risk, including insulin resistance and inflammation. Larger, placebo-controlled studies are indicated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Personalized medicine in major depressive disorder -- opportunities and pitfalls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Diane B; O'Callaghan, James P

    2013-01-01

    The sequencing of the human genome in the early days of this millennium was greeted with great fanfare as this accomplishment was expected to revolutionize medicine and result in individualized treatments based on the genetic make-up of the patient. The ultimate promise of personalized medicine would be fulfilled with the identification of disease biomarkers that would be widely available for use in diagnosis and treatment. Progress, however, has been slow in providing disease biomarkers or approved diagnostic tests. This is true for major depressive disorder (MDD), despite its prevalence in the general population and the widespread acceptance of its biological basis. Studies using strategies like genome-wide association and candidate gene analyses have identified a number of possible biomarkers of MDD, including serum levels of neurotrophic factors, inflammatory cytokines and HPA axis hormones, but none have proven sufficiently powerful for clinical use. The lack of biologically based tests available for use in identifying patients with MDD is a significant impediment to personalized and more effective treatment, because it means diagnosis continues to be driven by subjective symptoms. While genetic studies of MDD have not yet led to diagnostic and treatment biomarkers, progress in determining the role of the genome in drug metabolism heralds the first effort in personalized prescribing for the antidepressants. The FDA suggested and approved genotyping tests for common variants of drug metabolism genes, such as the cytochrome p450s. By using these tests a physician can select an appropriate antidepressant for a given patient, as differences in clearance, half-life, and peak blood concentrations are controlled by genetic variability in drug metabolism. Personalization in drug choice can be achieved because these tests: (1) identify responders and non-responders; (2) provide alerts to possible adverse drug events; and (3) help optimize dose. Improved ways of

  9. Curcumin for the treatment of major depression: a randomised, double-blind, placebo controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopresti, Adrian L; Maes, Michael; Maker, Garth L; Hood, Sean D; Drummond, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin, the principal curcuminoid derived from the spice turmeric, influences several biological mechanisms associated with major depression, namely those associated with monoaminergic activity, immune-inflammatory and oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways, hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and neuroprogression. We hypothesised that curcumin would be effective for the treatment of depressive symptoms in individuals with major depressive disorder. In a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 56 individuals with major depressive disorder were treated with curcumin (500 mg twice daily) or placebo for 8 weeks. The primary measure was the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology self-rated version (IDS-SR30). Secondary outcomes included IDS-SR30 factor scores and the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). From baseline to week 4, both curcumin and placebo were associated with improvements in IDS-SR30 total score and most secondary outcome measures. From weeks 4 to 8, curcumin was significantly more effective than placebo in improving several mood-related symptoms, demonstrated by a significant group x time interaction for IDS-SR30 total score (F1, 53=4.22, p=.045) and IDS-SR30 mood score (F1, 53=6.51, p=.014), and a non-significant trend for STAI trait score (F1, 48=2.86, p=.097). Greater efficacy from curcumin treatment was identified in a subgroup of individuals with atypical depression. Partial support is provided for the antidepressant effects of curcumin in people with major depressive disorder, evidenced by benefits occurring 4 to 8 weeks after treatment. Investigations with larger sample sizes, over extended treatment periods, and with varying curcumin dosages are required. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Generalizability of Clinical Trial Results for Adolescent Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Carlos; Hoertel, Nicolas; Franco, Silvia; Olfson, Mark; He, Jian-Ping; López, Saioa; González-Pinto, Ana; Limosin, Frédéric; Merikangas, Kathleen R

    2017-12-01

    Although there have been a number of clinical trials evaluating treatments for adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD), the generalizability of those trials to samples of depressed adolescents who present for routine clinical care is unknown. Examining the generalizability of clinical trials of pharmacological and psychotherapy interventions for adolescent depression can help administrators and frontline practitioners determine the relevance of these studies for their patients and may also guide eligibility criteria for future clinical trials in this clinical population. Data on nationally representative adolescents were derived from the National Comorbidity Survey: Adolescent Supplement. To assess the generalizability of adolescent clinical trials for MDD, we applied a standard set of eligibility criteria representative of clinical trials to all adolescents in the National Comorbidity Survey: Adolescent Supplement with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition diagnosis of MDD ( N = 592). From the overall MDD sample, 61.9% would have been excluded from a typical pharmacological trial, whereas 42.2% would have been excluded from a psychotherapy trial. Among those who sought treatment ( n = 412), the corresponding exclusion rates were 72.7% for a pharmacological trial and 52.2% for a psychotherapy trial. The criterion leading to the largest number of exclusions was "significant risk of suicide" in both pharmacological and psychotherapy trials. Pharmacological and, to a lesser extent, psychotherapy clinical trials likely exclude most adolescents with MDD. Careful consideration should be given to balancing eligibility criteria and internal validity with applicability in routine clinical care while ensuring patient safety. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  11. Acute unstable depressive syndrome (AUDS is associated more frequently with epilepsy than major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iversen Valentina C

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depressive disorders are frequent in epilepsy and associated with reduced seizure control. Almost 50% of interictal depressive disorders have to be classified as atypical depressions according to DSM-4 criteria. Research has mainly focused on depressive symptoms in defined populations with epilepsy (e.g., patients admitted to tertiary epilepsy centers. We have chosen the opposite approach. We hypothesized that it is possible to define by clinical means a subgroup of psychiatric patients with higher than expected prevalence of epilepsy and seizures. We hypothesized further that these patients present with an Acute Unstable Depressive Syndrome (AUDS that does not meet DSM-IV criteria of a Major Depressive Episode (MDE. In a previous publication we have documented that AUDS patients indeed have more often a history of epileptic seizures and abnormal EEG recordings than MDE patients (Vaaler et al. 2009. This study aimed to further classify the differences of depressive symptoms at admittance and follow-up of patients with AUDS and MDE. Methods 16 AUDS patients and 16 age- and sex-matched MDE patients were assessed using the Symptomatic Organic Mental Disorder Assessment Scale (SOMAS, the Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS, and the Mini-Mental State Test (MMST, at day 2, day 4-6, day 14-16 and 3 months after admittance to a psychiatric emergency unit. Life events were assessed with The Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS and The Life Experience Survey (LES. We also screened for medication serum levels and illicit drug metabolites in urine. Results AUDS patients had significantly higher SOMAS scores (average score at admission 6.6 ± 0.8, reflecting increased symptom fluctuation and motor agitation, and decreased insight and concern compared to MDE patients (2.9 ± 0.7; p Conclusions AUDS patients present with rapidly fluctuating mood symptoms, motor agitation and relative lack of insight and concern. Seizures

  12. Psychological features in panic disorder: a comparison with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Yasmin A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aim to evaluate the psychodymanic model for panic disorder (PD formulated by Shear et al. (1993, comparing PD patients and major depression (MD patients. METHOD: We evaluated these parameters in open interviews in 10 PD patients and 10 patients with MD (DSM-IV. The data were recorded on videotape and were examined by 5 diagnostic blind appraisers. RESULTS: The data allowed a comparative analysis that underscores the existence of a psychological model for PD vs MD: 1 the protracted symbiotic phase of development and the existence of problems with separation in PD patients; 2 patients with MD tended to have a particularly negative impression of relationship with the first objects; furthermore, they had remarkable experiences of loss; and 3 while the PD patients tended to be shy and inhibited in childhood, especially showing a clear difficulty in expressing aggressiveness, the depressed patients tended to disclose an impulsive aggressiveness from infancy to adulthood. CONCLUSION: Exposure to parental behaviours that augment fearfulness may result in disturbances in object relations and persistence of conflicts between dependence and independence may predispose to anxiety symptoms and fears of PD.

  13. Adjunctive brexpiprazole for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, John L; Weisler, Richard H

    2016-12-01

    The lifetime prevalence of major depressive episodes in the United States is nearly 17%. Clinical trials and clinical effectiveness studies have demonstrated that many patients will fail to achieve remission using traditional monotherapy, contributing to significant morbidity and suffering. Because of this, augmentation strategies have been proposed to improve both treatment response and remission. Areas covered: Brexpiprazole is a second generation antipsychotic (SGA) approved by the US FDA in 2015 as an add-on treatment to an antidepressant medication for the treatment of adults with MDD, based on the results of two large-scale, randomized, placebo-controlled trials. It is thought to exert its antidepressant effect by a partial agonism of both the dopamine D2 and serotonin 5HT1A receptors. In addition, it also has potent antagonistic activity at 5HT2A, α1B and α2 C receptors, which may also contribute to monoamine transmission regulation. Expert Opinion: Overall, the tolerability of brexpiprazole is promising with relatively low rates of side effects and discontinuation rates, thus establishing it as a new option for the treatment of depression.

  14. The structure of the symptoms of major depression: exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis in depressed Han Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Aggen, S; Shi, S; Gao, J; Li, Y; Tao, M; Zhang, K; Wang, X; Gao, C; Yang, L; Liu, Y; Li, K; Shi, J; Wang, G; Liu, L; Zhang, J; Du, B; Jiang, G; Shen, J; Zhang, Z; Liang, W; Sun, J; Hu, J; Liu, T; Wang, X; Miao, G; Meng, H; Li, Y; Hu, C; Li, Y; Huang, G; Li, G; Ha, B; Deng, H; Mei, Q; Zhong, H; Gao, S; Sang, H; Zhang, Y; Fang, X; Yu, F; Yang, D; Liu, T; Chen, Y; Hong, X; Wu, W; Chen, G; Cai, M; Song, Y; Pan, J; Dong, J; Pan, R; Zhang, W; Shen, Z; Liu, Z; Gu, D; Wang, X; Liu, X; Zhang, Q; Flint, J; Kendler, K S

    2014-05-01

    The symptoms of major depression (MD) are clinically diverse. Do they form coherent factors that might clarify the underlying nature of this important psychiatric syndrome? Symptoms at lifetime worst depressive episode were assessed at structured psychiatric interview in 6008 women of Han Chinese descent, age ⩾30 years with recurrent DSM-IV MD. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatoryfactor analysis (CFA) were performed in Mplus in random split-half samples. The preliminary EFA results were consistently supported by the findings from CFA. Analyses of the nine DSM-IV MD symptomatic A criteria revealed two factors loading on: (i) general depressive symptoms; and (ii) guilt/suicidal ideation. Examining 14 disaggregated DSM-IV criteria revealed three factors reflecting: (i) weight/appetite disturbance; (ii) general depressive symptoms; and (iii) sleep disturbance. Using all symptoms (n = 27), we identified five factors that reflected: (i) weight/appetite symptoms; (ii) general retarded depressive symptoms; (iii) atypical vegetative symptoms; (iv) suicidality/hopelessness; and (v) symptoms of agitation and anxiety. MD is a clinically complex syndrome with several underlying correlated symptom dimensions. In addition to a general depressive symptom factor, a complete picture must include factors reflecting typical/atypical vegetative symptoms, cognitive symptoms (hopelessness/suicidal ideation), and an agitated symptom factor characterized by anxiety, guilt, helplessness and irritability. Prior cross-cultural studies, factor analyses of MD in Western populations and empirical findings in this sample showing risk factor profiles similar to those seen in Western populations suggest that our results are likely to be broadly representative of the human depressive syndrome.

  15. The neuroprogressive nature of major depressive disorder: pathways to disease evolution and resistance, and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moylan, S; Maes, M; Wray, N R; Berk, M

    2013-05-01

    In some patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), individual illness characteristics appear consistent with those of a neuroprogressive illness. Features of neuroprogression include poorer symptomatic, treatment and functional outcomes in patients with earlier disease onset and increased number and length of depressive episodes. In such patients, longer and more frequent depressive episodes appear to increase vulnerability for further episodes, precipitating an accelerating and progressive illness course leading to functional decline. Evidence from clinical, biochemical and neuroimaging studies appear to support this model and are informing novel therapeutic approaches. This paper reviews current knowledge of the neuroprogressive processes that may occur in MDD, including structural brain consequences and potential molecular mechanisms including the role of neurotransmitter systems, inflammatory, oxidative and nitrosative stress pathways, neurotrophins and regulation of neurogenesis, cortisol and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis modulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and epigenetic and dietary influences. Evidence-based novel treatments informed by this knowledge are discussed.

  16. An investigation of cognitive 'branching' processes in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Steven CR

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with depression demonstrate cognitive impairment on a wide range of cognitive tasks, particularly putative tasks of frontal lobe function. Recent models of frontal lobe function have argued that the frontal pole region is involved in cognitive branching, a process requiring holding in mind one goal while performing sub-goal processes. Evidence for this model comes from functional neuroimaging and frontal-pole lesion patients. We have utilised these new concepts to investigate the possibility that patients with depression are impaired at cognitive 'branching'. Methods 11 non-medicated patients with major depression were compared to 11 matched controls in a behavioural study on a task of cognitive 'branching'. In the version employed here, we recorded participant's performance as they learnt to perform the task. This involved participants completing a control condition, followed by a working memory condition, a dual-task condition and finally the branching condition, which integrates processes in the working memory and dual-task conditions. We also measured participants on a number of other cognitive tasks as well as mood-state before and after the branching experiment. Results Patients took longer to learn the first condition, but performed comparably to controls after six runs of the task. Overall, reaction times decreased with repeated exposure on the task conditions in controls, with this effect attenuated in patients. Importantly, no differences were found between patients and controls on the branching condition. There was, however, a significant change in mood-state with patients increasing in positive affect and decreasing in negative affect after the experiment. Conclusion We found no clear evidence of a fundamental impairment in anterior prefrontal 'branching processes' in patients with depression. Rather our data argue for a contextual learning impairment underlying cognitive dysfunction in this disorder. Our

  17. Long-term odor recognition memory in unipolar major depression and Alzheimer׳s disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Marine; Mondon, Karl; El-Hage, Wissam; Desmidt, Thomas; Jaafari, Nematollah; Belzung, Catherine; Gaillard, Philippe; Hommet, Caroline; Atanasova, Boriana

    2014-12-30

    Major depression and Alzheimer׳s disease (AD) are often observed in the elderly. The identification of specific markers for these diseases could improve their screening. The aim of this study was to investigate long-term odor recognition memory in depressed and AD patients, with a view to identifying olfactory markers of these diseases. We included 20 patients with unipolar major depressive episodes (MDE), 20 patients with mild to moderate AD and 24 healthy subjects. We investigated the cognitive profile and olfactory memory capacities (ability to recognize familiar and unfamiliar odors) of these subjects. Olfactory memory test results showed that AD and depressed patients were characterized by significantly less correct responses and more wrong responses than healthy controls. Detection index did not differ significantly between patients with major depression and those with AD when the results were analyzed for all odors. However, MDE patients displayed an impairment of olfactory memory for both familiar and unfamiliar odors, whereas AD subjects were impaired only in the recognition of unfamiliar odors, with respect to healthy subjects. If preservation of olfactory memory for familiar stimuli in patients with mild to moderate AD is confirmed, this test could be used in clinical practice as a complementary tool for diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Season of birth, clinical manifestations and Dexamethasone Suppression Test in unipolar major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaprinis George S

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports in the literature suggest that the season of birth might constitute a risk factor for the development of a major psychiatric disorder, possibly because of the effect environmental factors have during the second trimester of gestation. The aim of the current paper was to study the possible relationship of the season of birth and current clinical symptoms in unipolar major depression. Methods The study sample included 45 DSM-IV major depressive patients and 90 matched controls. The SCAN v. 2.0, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS were used to assess symptomatology, and the 1 mg Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST was used to subcategorize patients. Results Depressed patients as a whole did not show differences in birth season from controls. However, those patients born during the spring manifested higher HDRS while those born during the summer manifested the lowest HAS scores. DST non-suppressors were almost exclusively (90% likely to be born during autumn and winter. No effect from the season of birth was found concerning the current severity of suicidal ideation or attempts. Discussion The current study is the first in this area of research using modern and rigid diagnostic methodology and a biological marker (DST to categorize patients. Its disadvantages are the lack of data concerning DST in controls and a relatively small size of patient sample. The results confirm the effect of seasonality of birth on patients suffering from specific types of depression.

  19. The 5-HT1A receptor in Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Joshua; DeLorenzo, Christine; Choudhury, Sunia; Parsey, Ramin V.

    2016-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a highly prevalent psychiatric diagnosis that is associated with a high degree of morbidity and mortality. This debilitating disorder is currently one of the leading causes of disability nationwide and is predicted to be the leading cause of disease burden by the year 2030. A large body of previous research has theorized that serotonergic dysfunction, specifically of the serotonin (5-HT) 1A receptor, plays a key role in the development of MDD. The purpose of this review is to describe the evolution of our current understanding of the serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) receptor and its role in the pathophysiology MDD through the discussion of animal, post-mortem, positron emission tomography (PET), pharmacologic and genetic studies. PMID:26851834

  20. Support Tool in the Diagnosis of Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Luciano Comin; Pinheiro, Plácido Rogério; Pequeno, Tarcísio Cavalcante; Pinheiro, Mirian Calíope Dantas

    Major Depressive Disorder have been responsible for millions of professionals temporary removal, and even permanent, from diverse fields of activities around the world, generating damage to social, financial, productive systems and social security, and especially damage to the image of the individual and his family that these disorders produce in individuals who are patients, characteristics that make them stigmatized and discriminated into their society, making difficult their return to the production system. The lack of early diagnosis has provided reactive and late measures, only when the professional suffering psychological disorder is already showing signs of incapacity for working and social relationships. This article aims to assist in the decision making to establish early diagnosis of these types of psychological disorders. It presents a proposal for a hybrid model composed of expert system structured methodologies for decision support (Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis - MCDA) and representations of knowledge structured in logical rules of production and probabilities (Artificial Intelligence - AI).

  1. Review: Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Studies of Pediatric Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas G. Kondo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper focuses on the application of Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS to the study of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD in children and adolescents. Method. A literature search using the National Institutes of Health's PubMed database was conducted to identify indexed peer-reviewed MRS studies in pediatric patients with MDD. Results. The literature search yielded 18 articles reporting original MRS data in pediatric MDD. Neurochemical alterations in Choline, Glutamate, and N-Acetyl Aspartate are associated with pediatric MDD, suggesting pathophysiologic continuity with adult MDD. Conclusions. The MRS literature in pediatric MDD is modest but growing. In studies that are methodologically comparable, the results have been consistent. Because it offers a noninvasive and repeatable measurement of relevant in vivo brain chemistry, MRS has the potential to provide insights into the pathophysiology of MDD as well as the mediators and moderators of treatment response.

  2. Major depressive disorder alters perception of emotional body movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten eKaletsch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Much recent research has shown an association between mood disorders and an altered emotion perception. However, these studies were conducted mainly with stimuli such as faces. This is the first study to examine possible differences in how people with major depressive disorder (MDD and healthy controls perceive emotions expressed via body movements. 30 patients with MDD and 30 healthy controls observed video scenes of human interactions conveyed by point–light displays (PLDs. They rated the depicted emotions and judged their confidence in their rating. Results showed that patients with MDD rated the depicted interactions more negatively than healthy controls. They also rated interactions with negative emotionality as being more intense and were more confident in their ratings. It is concluded that patients with MDD exhibit an altered emotion perception compared to healthy controls when rating emotions expressed via body movements depicted in PLDs.

  3. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Type 2 Diabetes in Major Depression: A Study on 703 Individuals Referred for Sleep Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Matthieu; Lanquart, Jean-Pol; Loas, Gwénolé; Hubain, Philippe; Linkowski, Paul

    Several studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors of depression in individuals with type 2 diabetes. However, few studies have investigated the prevalence and risk factors for type 2 diabetes in major depression. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and risk factors of type 2 diabetes in a large sample of individuals with major depression. Data from 703 individuals with major depression recruited from the research database of the sleep laboratory of the Erasme Hospital were analysed. Only individuals with a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes according to the diagnostic criteria of the American Diabetes Association were included in the diabetes group. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine clinical and demographic risk factors of type 2 diabetes in major depression. The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in major depression is 21.2%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that male sex, high blood pressure, hypertriglyceridemia, BMI ≥30kg/m², age ≥50 years, sleep duration 12, and apnea-hypopnea index ≥5/h were significant risk factors of type 2 diabetes in major depression. Type 2 diabetes is a common condition in major depression. In this subpopulation, most of the risk factors for type 2 diabetes are reversible, which justifies better prevention and management of this disorder to avoid its negative consequences. Copyright © 2018 Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Correlates of late-life major depression: a comparison of urban and rural primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bruce; Conwell, Yeates; Delavan, Rachel L

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether factors associated with depression differ between elderly residents of rural and urban areas. The research design was cross-sectional and observational. The study subjects consisted of 926 Medicare primary care patients (650 urban and 276 rural) who were age 65+ and cognitively intact and had enrolled in a randomized, controlled Medicare demonstration. Major depression was identified by the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. A logistic regression model was estimated that included a rural-urban indicator variable, additional independent variables, and interaction terms between the rural-urban indicator and independent variables that were significant at p Reporting 0-1 close friends (odds ratio [OR]: 6.86; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.18-21.58), 2+ emergency room visits during the past 6 months (OR: 4.00; 95% CI: 1.19-13.43), and more financial strain (OR: 1.50; 95% CI: 1.01-2.23) were associated with significantly higher likelihood of major depression among rural as compared with urban patients. The SF-36 Physical Component Summary score had a curvilinear relationship with major depression and was higher for urban patients. The predicted probability for major depression is lower for the rural patients when financial strain is low, about the same for rural and urban patients when strain is intermediate, and higher for rural patients when strain is high. Clinicians in rural areas should be vigilant for major depression among patients with very few close friends, several recent emergency department visits, and financial strain.

  5. Dimensions of Adolescent Alcohol Involvement as Predictors of Young-Adult Major Depression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, W. Alex; Kosterman, Rick; Haggerty, Kevin P.; Hawkins, J. David; Redmond, Cleve; Spoth, Richard L.; Shin, Chungyeol

    2010-01-01

    Objective Adolescent alcohol involvement may increase risk for young-adult depression; however, findings are mixed and important questions remain unanswered. Because alcohol involvement among teens is multidimensional, this study examined the extent to which four different adolescent alcohol dimensions (i.e., frequency of alcohol use, quantity of consumption, frequency of heavy episodic drinking, and frequency of problem use) were predictive of young-adult major depressive disorder (MDD). Method Participants in this prospective longitudinal study, which extended from age 11 to age 22, were 429 rural teens (including 222 girls) and their families. Self-reports of each dimension of adolescent alcohol involvement were obtained at ages 16 and 18. Depression diagnoses were obtained at age 22, using a structured interview. Analyses included adolescent depressed mood, measured via self-report at ages 16 and 18. Data were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Results The multidimensional nature of adolescent alcohol involvement was best represented by a first-order problem-use factor and a second-order alcohol-intake factor comprised of quantity, frequency, and heavy drinking. After controlling for gender and depressed mood, adolescent problem use, but not alcohol intake, was a significant positive predictor of young-adult MDD. Conclusions Findings help clarify the link between alcohol involvement and depression and suggest that harm-reduction strategies may help prevent later mood disorders. PMID:18299769

  6. Major Depressive Disorder Complicated with Spinocerebellar Ataxia: Report of 2 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagahisa Okamoto

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is known that patients with spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA tend to exhibit depressive symptoms. But the pathology of depressive symptoms complicated with SCA, including the reaction to the stress resulting from decreased motor function and central dysfunction due to neurodegeneration, is controversial and remains to be elucidated. To our knowledge, there have been hardly any reports on treatment methods of major depressive disorder (MDD complicated with SCA. Case Reports: We report 2 cases in which selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs were effective against MDD complicated with SCA. Interestingly, one of the patients developed the symptoms of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD during the course of the MDD, and the other patient developed the symptoms of MDD during the course of SCA, but complete remission of the MDD occurred in both cases. In our cases, the depressive symptoms may have been caused mainly by an abnormality of reversible neural transmission including serotonin transmission due to central dysfunction, and there is the unlikely possibility that the depressive symptoms are reactive to the stress due to decreased motor function, because the depressive symptoms decreased with SSRIs. Conclusion: Although cerebellar degeneration is irreversible in SCA patients, our cases suggest that MDD complicated with SCA may be reversible and treatable using antidepressants such as SSRIs with few adverse events. Therefore, it is important for neurologists to detect MDD complicated with SCA early and consult a psychiatrist in order to improve quality of life of SCA patients.

  7. Functional impairment in patients with major depressive disorder: the 2-year PERFORM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer-Helmich, Lene; Haro, Josep Maria; Jönsson, Bengt; Tanguy Melac, Audrey; Di Nicola, Sylvie; Chollet, Julien; Milea, Dominique; Rive, Benoît; Saragoussi, Delphine

    2018-01-01

    The Prospective Epidemiological Research on Functioning Outcomes Related to Major depressive disorder (PERFORM) study describes the course of depressive symptoms, perceived cognitive symptoms, and functional impairment over 2 years in outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) and investigates the patient-related factors associated with functional impairment. This was a 2-year observational study in 1,159 outpatients with MDD aged 18-65 years who were either initiating antidepressant monotherapy or undergoing their first switch of antidepressant. Functional impairment was assessed by the Sheehan Disability Scale and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire. Patients assessed depression severity using the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire and severity of perceived cognitive symptoms using the five-item Perceived Deficit Questionnaire. To investigate which patient-related factors were associated with functional impairment, univariate analyses of variance were performed to identify relevant factors that were then included in multivariate analyses of covariance at baseline, month 2, months 6 and 12 combined, and months 18 and 24 combined. The greatest improvement in depressive symptoms, perceived cognitive symptoms, and functional impairment was seen immediately (within 2 months) following initiation or switch of antidepressant therapy, followed by more gradual improvement and long-term stabilization. Improvement in perceived cognitive symptoms was less marked than improvement in depressive symptoms during the acute treatment phase. Functional impairment in patients with MDD was not only associated with severity of depressive symptoms but also independently associated with severity of perceived cognitive symptoms when adjusted for depression severity throughout the 2 years of follow-up. These findings highlight the burden of functional impairment in MDD and the importance of recognizing and managing cognitive symptoms in daily practice.

  8. The Relationship between Thyroid Function and Recent History of Suicide Attempt in Patients with Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Eshraghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Todays, evaluation of the relationship between thyroid function and some psychiatric diseases have been identified. However, studies on the relationship between thyroid function and suicide attempt are limited. The present study was carried out with the aim of evaluating thyroid function in patients attempting suicide. Methods: In this descriptive analytical study during the years 2011 and 2012, 88 patients with major depression and recent history of suicide attemp and 89 patients with major depression without history of recent suicide, who were hospitalized in the psychiatric ward of Hazrat Rasoul Akram Hospital in Tehran, were included in the study. The studied variables in this research included demographic variables, such as age, gender as well as clinical findings, such as thyroid function tests, including TSH, T3, T4. thyroid function tests were requested for patients when hospitalized with a diagnosis of major depression during the years 2011 and 2012, that these values were extracted from the patients’ medical records. Results: The two groups were matched in terms of age and gender. In patients with recent suicide attempt, 5 (5.6% cases of clinical hypothyroidism and 6 (6.8% cases of subclinical hypothyroidism, were reported. In the major depression patients without recent suicide attempt, there were 3 (3.3% cases of clinical hypothyroidism and 6 (6.7% cases of subclinical hypothyroidism, and the two groups had no significant difference in terms of the incidence of thyroid disease (p=0.75. Conclusion: According to the results of the present study, lower levels of T3 and T3 to T4 ratio can be one of the factors related to the recent history of suicide in patients with major depression.

  9. Personality traits in the differentiation of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder during a depressive episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Jaciana Marlova Gonçalves; dos Passos, Miguel Bezerra; Molina, Mariane Lopez; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos

    2016-02-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the differences in personality traits between individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) during a depressive episode, when it can be hard to differentiate them. Data on personality traits (NEO-FFI), mental disorders (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview Plus) and socioeconomic variables were collected from 245 respondents who were in a depressive episode. Individuals with MDD (183) and BD (62) diagnosis were compared concerning personality traits, clinical aspects and socioeconomic variables through bivariate analyses (chi-square and ANOVA) and multivariate analysis (logistic regression). There were no differences in the prevalence of the disorders between socioeconomic and clinical variables. As for the personality traits, only the difference in Agreeableness was statistically significant. Considering the control of suicide risk, gender and anxiety comorbidity in the multivariate analysis, the only variable that remained associated was Agreeableness, with an increase in MDD cases. The brief version of the NEO inventories (NEO-FFI) does not allow for the analysis of personality facets. During a depressive episode, high levels of Agreeableness can indicate that MDD is a more likely diagnosis than BD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Interleukin-1β is associated with depressive episode in major depression but not in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Rosana; Gazal, Marta; Acosta, Bruna A; de Leon, Pâmela B; Jansen, Karen; Pinheiro, Ricardo T; Souza, Luciano D; Silva, Ricardo A; Oses, Jean P; Quevedo, Luciana; Lara, Diogo R; Ghisleni, Gabriele; Kaster, Manuella P

    2013-12-01

    Our work was sought to investigate possible changes in peripheral levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) according to the diagnosis of major depression (MD) and bipolar disorder (BD) and in different mood episodes. This is a cross-sectional nested in a population-based study comparing 240 young adults (80 controls, 80 MD and 80 BD), balanced for age and gender. Serum levels of IL-1β were significantly higher in MD when compared to control or BD subjects. In addition, when divided by current mood episode, MD subjects in current depression presented higher IL-1β levels than controls. No differences in IL-1β levels were found between different episodes of BD (euthymic, depressed, mania or mixed). Moreover, the use of psychiatric medication was very low in our sample and not associated with changes in IL-1β levels. In conclusion, increased peripheral IL-1β might be a useful marker associated with a depressive episode in the context of MD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Characteristics of Residual Symptoms in Korean Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: A Validation Study for the Korean Version of Depression Residual Symptom Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sol A; Jeon, Sang Won; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung; Yoon, Seo Young; Shin, Cheolmin; Ko, Young-Hoon

    2018-02-01

    Residual symptoms of depression are related to more severe and chronic course of functional impairment with higher risk of relapse. The objective of this study was to validate, and determine psychometric properties of the Korean version of Depression Residual Symptom Scale (KDRSS). A total of 203 outpatients with recent episode of major depression based on DSM-IV criteria were enrolled in this study. They had been treated with antidepressants and assessed by KDRSS, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-24 (HDRS-24), and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MARDS). The validity and reliability of KDRSS were assessed, including internal consistency reliability, concurrent validity, temporal stability, factorial validity, and discriminative validity. Internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha=0.961), concurrent validity (MADRS: r=0.731, pdepressive symptoms. Since some depressive symptoms including 'lack of energy' and 'increased emotionalism' in patients with full remission might be persistent during psychiatric intervention, these symptoms need to be focused on in clinical practice.

  12. Intermediate-term Outcome of Psychiatric Inpatients with Major Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Chih Tseng

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: At follow-up, almost half of the discharged depressive patients were still depressed. Screening for predictive factors of chronic depressive morbidity facilitates better outcome by considering the heterogeneity of psychopathology that can lead to failure in the treatment plan.

  13. An ethnographic study of the effects of cognitive symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebert, Bjarke; Miskowiak, Kamilla; Kloster, Morten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The manifestation of major depressive disorder (MDD) may include cognitive symptoms that can precede the onset of MDD and persist beyond the resolution of acute depressive episodes. However, little is known about how cognitive symptoms are experienced by MDD patients and the people...... around them. METHODS: In this international (Brazil, Canada, China, France, and Germany) ethnographic study, we conducted semi-structured interviews and observations of remitted as well as symptomatic MDD patients (all patients self-reported being diagnosed by an HCP and self-reported being...

  14. Major depressive disorder: a qualitative study on the experiences of Iranian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Kourosh; Negarandeh, Reza; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Eftekhar, Mehrdad

    2013-09-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one the most common mental disorders; it affects about 5-10% of the world population. This study explores the experiences of people with major depressive disorder in Zanjan, Iran. In order to identify recurring themes and patterns in individuals' experiences of major depressive disorder, semi-structured interviews with 18 patients were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were then analyzed based on conventional qualitative content analysis. Five main categories emerged. The first category was called emotional paralysis and included the subcategories feeling severely depressed; feeling anxious; feeling impatient and irritable; and having dyshedonia. The second category was disturbance of thinking and was comprised of the subcategories of preoccupation, instable spiritual beliefs, and guilt. Cognitive decline was the third identified category and was further divided into subcategories of frustration, unawareness of the disorder, negative evaluation, indecisiveness, and loss of focus and loss of memory. Another major category was physical illnesses with the subcategories of physical discomfort, sleep problems, appetite disturbance, facial changes, sexual dysfunction, and medical conditions. The final category was failure in life, which had failure in personal affairs, jeopardized interpersonal relations, and unstable work life as subcategories. These findings provide a base for further research in this area. They also have clinical relevance for health care providers working with patients with MDD. Related cultural issues also are discussed.

  15. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for treatment of major depression during pregnancy: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata de Melo Felipe

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Pregnancy is characterized by a high prevalence of mental disorders. Depression is the most common of these disorders and it is a risk factor for negative maternal and child development outcomes. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy are conventional and well-established therapeutic options, but some clients fail to respond and the safety of using some pharmacological agents during pregnancy is unclear. Some neuromodulation techniques, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS, have been studied in depressed pregnant women. Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of rTMS for major depression in pregnant women. Methods: The LILACS and PubMed databases were reviewed using the search terms depression, pregnancy and magnetic stimulation. Texts including primary data, published in Portuguese, Spanish, or English, between 1995 and 2014, that evaluated depressed pregnant women and used rTMS as the intervention were selected. Papers lacking sufficient data were excluded. Twenty-two texts were initially identified; after applying the inclusion criteria, 12 were selected and analyzed. Results: The studies reviewed reported satisfactory responses to rTMS in acute depressive episodes, as measured using depressive symptom scales. Remission of symptoms was achieved in many cases. The procedure was well tolerated and there were no reports of damage/complications to unborn children. Conclusion: The data available at this time support the efficacy and tolerability of rTMS for depression in pregnant women. Controlled studies should corroborate this conclusion. This review only included studies in three languages and the resulting sample size was not large enough to conduct a meta-analysis.

  16. Homer1a protein expression in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leber, Stefan L; Llenos, Ida C; Miller, Christine L; Dulay, Jeannette R; Haybaeck, Johannes; Weis, Serge

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, there was growing interest in postsynaptic density proteins in the central nervous system. Of the most important candidates of this specialized region are proteins belonging to the Homer protein family. This family of scaffolding proteins is suspected to participate in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. The present study aims to compare Homer1a expression in the hippocampus and cingulate gyrus of patients with major psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze changes of Homer1a protein expression in the hippocampal formation and the cingulate gyrus from the respective disease groups. Glial cells of the cingulate gyrus gray matter showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to controls. The same results were seen when comparing cingulate gyrus gray matter glial cells in bipolar disorder with major depression. Stratum oriens glial cells of the hippocampus showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to controls and major depression. Stratum lacunosum glial cells showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to major depression. In stratum oriens interneurons Homer1a levels were increased in all disease groups when compared to controls. Stratum lucidum axons showed decreased Homer1a levels in bipolar disorder when compared to controls. Our data demonstrate altered Homer1a levels in specific brain regions and cell types of patients suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression. These findings support the role of Homer proteins as interesting candidates in neuropsychiatric pathophysiology and treatment.

  17. Combined therapy of major depression with concomitant borderline personality disorder: comparison of interpersonal and cognitive psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Silvio; Zizza, Monica; Rinaldi, Camilla; Bogetto, Filippo

    2007-11-01

    The combination of antidepressants and brief psychotherapies has been proven more efficacious in treating major depression and is particularly recommended in patients with concomitant personality disorders. We compare the effects of 2 combined therapies, fluoxetine and interpersonal therapy (IPT) or fluoxetine and cognitive therapy (CT), on major depression in patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Thirty-five consecutive outpatients with a diagnosis of BPD and a major depressive episode (not bipolar and not psychotic) were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 combined treatments and treated for 24 weeks. Assessment included a semistructured interview, Clinical Global Impression (CGI) scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS), Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale (SOFAS), Satisfaction Profile (SAT-P) for quality of life (QOL), and Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP-64). Statistical analysis was performed using the univariate General Linear Model to calculate the effects of duration and type of treatment. No significant differences between treatments were found at CGI, HDRS, BDI-II, and SOFAS score. Combined treatment with CT had greater effects on HARS score and on psychological functioning factor of SAT-P. Combined treatment with IPT was more effective on social functioning factor of SAT-P and on domains domineering or controlling and intrusive or needy of IIP-64. Both combined therapies are efficacious in treating major depression in patients with BPD. Differences between CT and IPT concern specific features of subjective QOL and interpersonal problems. These findings lack reliable comparisons and need to be replicated.

  18. Increased Amygdala Response to Shame in Remitted Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcu, Erdem; Lythe, Karen; Elliott, Rebecca; Green, Sophie; Moll, Jorge; Deakin, John F. W.; Zahn, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Proneness to self-blaming moral emotions such as shame and guilt is increased in major depressive disorder (MDD), and may play an important role in vulnerability even after symptoms have subsided. Social psychologists have argued that shame-proneness is relevant for depression vulnerability and is distinct from guilt. Shame depends on the imagined critical perception of others, whereas guilt results from one’s own judgement. The neuroanatomy of shame in MDD is unknown. Using fMRI, we compared 21 participants with MDD remitted from symptoms with no current co-morbid axis-I disorders, and 18 control participants with no personal or family history of MDD. The MDD group exhibited higher activation of the right amygdala and posterior insula for shame relative to guilt (SPM8). This neural difference was observed despite equal levels of rated negative emotional valence and frequencies of induced shame and guilt experience across groups. These same results were found in the medication-free MDD subgroup (N = 15). Increased amygdala and posterior insula activations, known to be related to sensory perception of emotional stimuli, distinguish shame from guilt responses in remitted MDD. People with MDD thus exhibit changes in the neural response to shame after symptoms have subsided. This supports the hypothesis that shame and guilt play at least partly distinct roles in vulnerability to MDD. Shame-induction may be a more sensitive probe of residual amygdala hypersensitivity in MDD compared with facial emotion-evoked responses previously found to normalize on remission. PMID:24497992

  19. Neural correlates of rumination in adolescents with remitted major depressive disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie L; Jacobs, Rachel H; Peters, Amy T; Ajilore, Olu; Watkins, Edward R; Langenecker, Scott A

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to use fMRI to examine the neural correlates of engaging in rumination among a sample of remitted depressed adolescents, a population at high risk for future depressive relapse. A rumination induction task was used to assess differences in the patterns of neural activation during rumination versus a distraction condition among 26 adolescents in remission from major depressive disorder (rMDD) and in 15 healthy control adolescents. Self-report depression and rumination, as well as clinician-rated depression, were also assessed among all participants. All of the participants recruited regions in the default mode network (DMN), including the posterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobe, and medial temporal gyrus, during rumination. Increased activation in these regions during rumination was correlated with increased self-report rumination and symptoms of depression across all participants. Adolescents with rMDD also exhibited greater activation in regions involved in visual, somatosensory, and emotion processing than did healthy peers. The present findings suggest that during ruminative thought, adolescents with rMDD are characterized by increased recruitment of regions within the DMN and in areas involved in visual, somatosensory, and emotion processing.

  20. "Loser" or "Popular"?: Neural response to social status words in adolescents with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Jennifer S; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Kerestes, Rebecca; Griffith, Julianne M; Dahl, Ronald E; Ladouceur, Cecile D

    2017-12-01

    Concerns about social status are ubiquitous during adolescence, with information about social status often conveyed in text formats. Depressed adolescents may show alterations in the functioning of neural systems supporting processing of social status information. We examined whether depressed youth exhibited altered neural activation to social status words in temporal and prefrontal cortical regions thought to be involved in social cognitive processing, and whether this response was associated with development. Forty-nine adolescents (ages 10-18; 35 female), including 20 with major depressive disorder and 29 controls, were scanned while identifying the valence of words that connoted positive and negative social status. Results indicated that depressed youth showed reduced late activation to social status (vs neutral) words in the superior temporal cortex (STC) and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC); whereas healthy youth did not show any significant differences between word types. Depressed youth also showed reduced late activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and fusiform gyrus to negative (vs positive) social status words; whereas healthy youth showed the opposite pattern. Finally, age was positively associated with MPFC activation to social status words. Findings suggest that hypoactivation in the "social cognitive brain network" might be implicated in altered interpersonal functioning in adolescent depression. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Cognitive and neural consequences of memory suppression in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchet, Matthew D; Levy, Benjamin J; Hamilton, J Paul; Maksimovskiy, Arkadiy; Hertel, Paula T; Joormann, Jutta; Anderson, Michael C; Wagner, Anthony D; Gotlib, Ian H

    2017-02-01

    Negative biases in cognition have been documented consistently in major depressive disorder (MDD), including difficulties in the ability to control the processing of negative material. Although negative information-processing biases have been studied using both behavioral and neuroimaging paradigms, relatively little research has been conducted examining the difficulties of depressed persons with inhibiting the retrieval of negative information from long-term memory. In this study, we used the think/no-think paradigm and functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess the cognitive and neural consequences of memory suppression in individuals diagnosed with depression and in healthy controls. The participants showed typical behavioral forgetting effects, but contrary to our hypotheses, there were no differences between the depressed and nondepressed participants or between neutral and negative memories. Relative to controls, depressed individuals exhibited greater activity in right middle frontal gyrus during memory suppression, regardless of the valence of the suppressed stimuli, and differential activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during memory suppression involving negatively valenced stimuli. These findings indicate that depressed individuals are characterized by neural anomalies during the suppression of long-term memories, increasing our understanding of the brain bases of negative cognitive biases in MDD.

  2. Functional impairment in patients with major depressive disorder: the 2-year PERFORM study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammer-Helmich L

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lene Hammer-Helmich,1 Josep Maria Haro,2 Bengt Jönsson,3 Audrey Tanguy Melac,4 Sylvie Di Nicola,5 Julien Chollet,6 Dominique Milea,7 Benoît Rive,8 Delphine Saragoussi4 1Real World Evidence and Epidemiology, H Lundbeck A/S, Valby, Denmark; 2Research and Teaching Unit, Parc Sanitari Sant Joan de Deu, CIBERSAM, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 3Department of Economics, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm, Sweden; 4Real-World Evidence and Epidemiology, Lundbeck SAS, Issy-les-Moulineaux, 5Biostatistics, Inferential, Paris, 6Clinical Operations, Lundbeck SAS, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France; 7Health Economics and Epidemiology, Lundbeck Singapore Pte. Ltd, Singapore, Singapore; 8Global Analytics, Lundbeck SAS, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France Background: The Prospective Epidemiological Research on Functioning Outcomes Related to Major depressive disorder (PERFORM study describes the course of depressive symptoms, perceived cognitive symptoms, and functional impairment over 2 years in outpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD and investigates the patient-related factors associated with functional impairment.Methods: This was a 2-year observational study in 1,159 outpatients with MDD aged 18–65 years who were either initiating antidepressant monotherapy or undergoing their first switch of antidepressant. Functional impairment was assessed by the Sheehan Disability Scale and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire. Patients assessed depression severity using the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire and severity of perceived cognitive symptoms using the five-item Perceived Deficit Questionnaire. To investigate which patient-related factors were associated with functional impairment, univariate analyses of variance were performed to identify relevant factors that were then included in multivariate analyses of covariance at baseline, month 2, months 6 and 12 combined, and months 18 and 24 combined.Results: The greatest

  3. Treatment of Comorbid Obesity and Major Depressive Disorder: A Prospective Pilot Study for their Combined Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulconbridge, Lucy F; Wadden, Thomas A; Berkowitz, Robert I; Pulcini, Melissa E; Treadwell, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background. Obese individuals who suffer from major depressive disorder are routinely screened out of weight loss trials. Treatments targeting obesity and depression concurrently have not been tested. Purpose. To test the short-term efficacy of a treatment that combined behavioral weight management and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for obese adults with depression. Methods. Twelve obese females diagnosed with major depressive disorder received weekly group behavioral weight management, combined with CBT for depression, for 16 weeks. Weight, symptoms of depression, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors were measured at baseline and week 16. Results. Participants lost 11.4% of initial weight and achieved significant improvements in symptoms of depression and CVD risk factors. Conclusions. Obese individuals suffering from major depressive disorder can lose weight and achieve improvements in symptoms of depression and CVD risk factors with 16 weeks of combined treatment. A larger randomized controlled trial is needed to establish the efficacy of this treatment.

  4. Treatment of Comorbid Obesity and Major Depressive Disorder: A Prospective Pilot Study for their Combined Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy F. Faulconbridge

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Obese individuals who suffer from major depressive disorder are routinely screened out of weight loss trials. Treatments targeting obesity and depression concurrently have not been tested. Purpose. To test the short-term efficacy of a treatment that combined behavioral weight management and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT for obese adults with depression. Methods. Twelve obese females diagnosed with major depressive disorder received weekly group behavioral weight management, combined with CBT for depression, for 16 weeks. Weight, symptoms of depression, and cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors were measured at baseline and week 16. Results. Participants lost 11.4% of initial weight and achieved significant improvements in symptoms of depression and CVD risk factors. Conclusions. Obese individuals suffering from major depressive disorder can lose weight and achieve improvements in symptoms of depression and CVD risk factors with 16 weeks of combined treatment. A larger randomized controlled trial is needed to establish the efficacy of this treatment.

  5. Major depression in mothers predict reduced ventral striatum activation in adolescent female offspring with and without depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior research has identified reduced reward-related brain activation as a promising endophenotype for the early identification of adolescents with major depressive disorder. However, it is unclear whether reduced reward-related brain activation constitutes a true vulnerability for major depressive ...

  6. Getting the balance right: Established and emerging therapies for major depressive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojana Perovic

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Bojana Perovic, Marija Jovanovic, Branislava Miljkovic, Sandra VezmarDepartment of Pharmacokinetics, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Belgrade, SerbiaAbstract: Major depressive disorder (MDD is a common and serious illness of our times, associated with monoamine deficiency in the brain. Moreover, increased levels of cortisol, ­possibly caused by stress, may be related to depression. In the treatment of MDD, the use of older antidepressants such as monoamine oxidase inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants is decreasing rapidly, mainly due to their adverse effect profiles. In contrast, the use of serotonin reuptake inhibitors and newer antidepressants, which have dual modes of action such as inhibition of the serotonin and noradrenaline or dopamine reuptake, is increasing. Novel antidepressants have additive modes of action such as agomelatine, a potent agonist of melatonin receptors. Drugs in development for treatment of MDD include triple reuptake inhibitors, dual-acting serotonin reuptake inhibitors and histamine antagonists, and many more. Newer antidepressants have similar efficacy and in general good tolerability profiles. Nevertheless, compliance with treatment for MDD is poor and may contribute to treatment failure. Despite the broad spectrum of available antidepressants, there are still at least 30% of depressive patients who do not benefit from treatment. Therefore, new approaches in drug development are necessary and, according to current research developments, the future of antidepressant treatment may be promising.Keywords: major depressive disorders, monoamine deficiency, antidepressants, depression

  7. Disorder-specific volumetric brain difference in adolescent major depressive disorder and bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacMaster, Frank P; Carrey, Normand; Langevin, Lisa Marie; Jaworska, Natalia; Crawford, Susan

    2014-03-01

    Structural abnormalities in frontal, limbic and subcortical regions have been noted in adults with both major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). In the current study, we examined regional brain morphology in youth with MDD and BD as compared to controls. Regional brain volumes were measured in 32 MDD subjects (15.7 ± 2.1 years), 14 BD subjects (16.0 ± 2.4 years) and 22 healthy controls (16.0 ± 2.8 years) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Regions of interest included the hippocampus, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate, putamen and thalamus. Volumetric differences between groups were significant (F26,80 = 1.80, p = 0.02). Post-hoc analyses indicated that individuals with MDD showed reduced left hippocampus volumes (p = 0.048) as well as right ACC white and gray matter volumes (p = 0.003; p = 0.01) compared to controls. BD participants also displayed reduced left hippocampal and right/left putamen volumes compared to controls (p < 0.001; p = 0.015; p = 0.046 respectively). Interestingly, right and left ACC white matter volumes were smaller in MDD than in BD participants (p = 0.019; p = 0.045 respectively). No volumetric group differences were observed for the DLPFC and thalamus. Discriminant analysis was able to correctly classify 81.0 % of subjects as having BD or as MDD based on imaging data. Confirmation and extension of our findings requires larger sample sizes. Our findings provide new evidence of distinct, specific regional brain volumetric differences between MDD and BD that may be used to distinguish the two disorders.

  8. Visuospatial planning in unmedicated major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder : distinct and common neural correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rive, M. M.; Koeter, M. W. J.; Veltman, D. J.; Schene, A. H.; Ruhe, H. G.

    Background Cognitive impairments are an important feature of both remitted and depressed major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). In particular, deficits in executive functioning may hamper everyday functioning. Identifying the neural substrates of impaired executive functioning

  9. Efficacy of Desvenlafaxine Compared With Placebo in Major Depressive Disorder Patients by Age Group and Severity of Depression at Baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Daniel; Zhang, Min; Prieto, Rita; Boucher, Matthieu

    2017-04-01

    This post hoc meta-analysis evaluated the efficacy and safety of desvenlafaxine 50 and 100 mg versus placebo across age groups and severity of depression at baseline in patients with major depressive disorder. Data from placebo and desvenlafaxine 50-mg and 100-mg dose arms were pooled from 9 short-term, placebo-controlled, major depressive disorder studies (N = 4279). Effects of age (18-40 years, >40 to depression severity (mild, 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression total score [HAM-D17] ≤18; moderate, HAM-D17 >18 to depression and function compared with placebo for patients 18 to 40 years, older than 40 to younger than 55 years, and 55 to younger than 65 years, with no significant evidence of an effect of age. Desvenlafaxine significantly improved most measures of depression and function in moderately and severely depressed patients. There was a significant baseline severity by treatment interaction for HAM-D17 total score only (P = 0.027), with a larger treatment effect for the severely depressed group. Desvenlafaxine significantly improved depressive symptoms in patients younger than 65 years and in patients with moderate or severe baseline depression. Sample sizes were not adequate to assess desvenlafaxine efficacy in patients 65 years or older or with mild baseline depression.

  10. Role of depression severity and impulsivity in the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-yu; Jiang, Neng-zhi; Cheung, Eric F C; Sun, Hong-wei; Chan, Raymond C K

    2015-09-01

    Hopelessness, depression and impulsivity all contribute to the development of suicidal ideation in patients with major depressive disorder, but the pathway of these factors to suicidal ideation is not clear. This study examined the meditating effect of depression severity on the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation and explored how this mediating effect was moderated by impulsivity. A total of 162 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) completed a structured clinical diagnostic interview and a battery of scales assessing depression severity, hopelessness, suicidal ideation, and impulsivity. Regression analyses with bootstrapping methods were used to examine the mediating and moderating effects of various risk factors. Mediation analysis revealed a significant indirect effect of hopelessness on suicidal ideation, and the effect was fully mediated through depression severity. On moderation analysis, the moderating effects of the relationship between depression severity and suicidal ideation were significant in both the medium and high impulsivity groups. The present study was limited by the assessment of trait impulsivity and observer-rated depression severity, which might not fully reflect momentary impulsivity and feeling of depression when suicidal ideation occurs. Depression severity plays a mediator role in the relationship between hopelessness and suicidal ideation and this mechanism is contingent on the levels of impulsivity. MDD patients with higher impulsivity appear to be more likely to have suicidal ideations even when they are less depressed. These findings highlight the importance of impulsivity assessment and alleviation of depressive symptoms to prevent suicidality in patients with MDD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik; Gluud, Christian

    2011-04-27

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies may be effective interventions for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. Cochrane systematic review methodology with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of randomized trials comparing the effect of psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' for major depressive disorder. To be included the participants had to be older than 17 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Altogether, we included six trials randomizing a total of 648 participants. Five trials assessed 'interpersonal psychotherapy' and only one trial assessed 'psychodynamic psychotherapy'. All six trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis on all six trials showed that the psychodynamic interventions significantly reduced depressive symptoms on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (mean difference -3.12 (95% confidence interval -4.39 to -1.86;Pinterpersonal psychotherapy or psychodynamic therapy compared with 'treatment as usual' for patients with major depressive disorder. The potential beneficial effect seems small and effects on major outcomes are unknown. Randomized trials with low risk of systematic errors and low risk of random errors are needed.

  12. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janus Christian Jakobsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies may be effective interventions for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment in systematic reviews. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cochrane systematic review methodology with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis of randomized trials comparing the effect of psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' for major depressive disorder. To be included the participants had to be older than 17 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder. Altogether, we included six trials randomizing a total of 648 participants. Five trials assessed 'interpersonal psychotherapy' and only one trial assessed 'psychodynamic psychotherapy'. All six trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis on all six trials showed that the psychodynamic interventions significantly reduced depressive symptoms on the 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (mean difference -3.12 (95% confidence interval -4.39 to -1.86;P<0.00001, no heterogeneity compared with 'treatment as usual'. Trial sequential analysis confirmed this result. DISCUSSION: We did not find convincing evidence supporting or refuting the effect of interpersonal psychotherapy or psychodynamic therapy compared with 'treatment as usual' for patients with major depressive disorder. The potential beneficial effect seems small and effects on major outcomes are unknown. Randomized trials with low risk of systematic errors and low risk of random errors are needed.

  13. Higher-order social cognition in first-episode major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladegaard, Nicolai; Larsen, Erik Roj; Videbech, Poul; Lysaker, Paul H

    2014-04-30

    Patients suffering from major depression experience difficulties in multiple cognitive faculties. A growing body of research has linked affective disorders to abnormalities in social cognition and specifically the processing of discrete emotional stimuli. However, little inquiry has gone into possible impairment in higher-order social cognition including theory of mind, social perception and metacognition. Forty-four medication-naïve patients with first-episode unipolar major depressive disorder and an equal number of matched controls were assessed by the Metacognitive Assessment Scale-Abbreviated (MAS-A), The Frith-Happé animations (FHA) and The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT). Additionally, neurocognition was assessed utilyzing the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). Depressed patients showed impairment in all domains of higher-order social cognitive ability. Importantly, social cognitive variables retained their inter-group significance after controlling for possible covariates including neurocognition. Results indicate that first-episode depressed patients experience difficulties in all domains of higher-order social cognition including theory of mind, social perception and metacognition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Data-driven subtypes of major depressive disorder: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Loo Hanna M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to current classification systems, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD may have very different combinations of symptoms. This symptomatic diversity hinders the progress of research into the causal mechanisms and treatment allocation. Theoretically founded subtypes of depression such as atypical, psychotic, and melancholic depression have limited clinical applicability. Data-driven analyses of symptom dimensions or subtypes of depression are scarce. In this systematic review, we examine the evidence for the existence of data-driven symptomatic subtypes of depression. Methods We undertook a systematic literature search of MEDLINE, PsycINFO and Embase in May 2012. We included studies analyzing the depression criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV of adults with MDD in latent variable analyses. Results In total, 1176 articles were retrieved, of which 20 satisfied the inclusion criteria. These reports described a total of 34 latent variable analyses: 6 confirmatory factor analyses, 6 exploratory factor analyses, 12 principal component analyses, and 10 latent class analyses. The latent class techniques distinguished 2 to 5 classes, which mainly reflected subgroups with different overall severity: 62 of 71 significant differences on symptom level were congruent with a latent class solution reflecting severity. The latent class techniques did not consistently identify specific symptom clusters. Latent factor techniques mostly found a factor explaining the variance in the symptoms depressed mood and interest loss (11 of 13 analyses, often complemented by psychomotor retardation or fatigue (8 of 11 analyses. However, differences in found factors and classes were substantial. Conclusions The studies performed to date do not provide conclusive evidence for the existence of depressive symptom dimensions or symptomatic subtypes. The wide diversity of identified

  15. Ventilatory inefficiency in major depressive disorder: a potential adjunct for cardiac risk stratification in depressive disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donath, Lars; Puta, Christian; Boettger, Silke; Mueller, Hans Josef; Faude, Oliver; Meyer, Tim; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Gabriel, Holger H W

    2010-08-16

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) provides insights into ventilatory, cardiac and metabolic dysfunction in heart and lung diseases and might play a role in cardiac risk stratification in major depressive disorder (MDD). The VE/VCO(2)-slope indicates ventilatory efficiency and has been applied to stratify the cardiac risk in heart failure (HF). Therefore, the current study was conducted to evaluate and classify ventilatory efficiency and its relationship to physical fitness and disease severity in MDD. Exhaustive incremental exercise testing was completed by 15 female MDD patients and pair matched controls. The ventilatory threshold (VT) and the VE/VCO(2)-slope were assessed. Statistical analyses were conducted by means of MANOVAs and follow-up univariate ANOVAs. In patients with MDD, significant different relative work rates and oxygen uptakes at the VT in comparison to healthy controls were observed. Furthermore, we found an increased VE/VCO(2)-slope in depressed patients. We additionally report an inverse relationship between the VE/VCO(2)-slope and peak power output as well as peak oxygen uptake solely in patients. We did not observe any association of assessed parameters with disease severity. CPET measures indicate ventilatory inefficiency in patients with MDD. The elevated VE/VCO(2)-slope indicates that patients with MDD need to ventilate significantly more to a given amount of developing CO(2). Further investigations are needed to verify the application of the ventilatory classification system to stratify cardiovascular risk in depressive disorder. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG to discriminate primary degenerative dementia from major depressive disorder (depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deslandes Andréa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalography (EEG can be a valuable technique to assess electrophysiological changes related to dementia. In patients suspected of having dementia, the EEG is often quite informative. The sensitivity of the EEG to detect correlates of psychiatric disorders has been enhanced by means of quantitative methods of analysis (quantitative EEG. Quantitative features are extracted from, at least, 2 minutes of artifact-free, eyes closed, resting EEG, log-transformed to obtain Gaussianity, age-regressed, and Z-transformed relative to population norms (Neurometrics database. Using a subset of quantitative EEG (qEEG features, forward stepwise discriminant analyses are used to construct classifier functions. Along this vein, the main objective of this experiment is to distinguish profiles of qEEG, which differentiate depressive from demented patients (n = 125. The results showed that demented patients present deviations above the control group in variables associated to slow rhythms: Normed Monopolar Relative Power Theta for Cz and Normed Bipolar Relative Power Theta for Head. On the other hand, the deviation below the control group occurs with the variable associated to alpha rhythm: Normed Monopolar Relative Power Alpha for P3, in dementia. Using this method, the present investigation demonstrated high discriminant accuracy in separating Primary Degenerative Dementia from Major Depressive Disorder (Depression.

  17. Physical Activity, Sedentary Behavior, and Symptoms of Major Depression in Middle Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahl, Tonje; Steinsbekk, Silje; Wichstrøm, Lars

    2017-02-01

    The prospective relation between physical activity and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-defined major depression in middle childhood is unknown, as is the stability of depression. We therefore aimed to (1) determine whether there are reciprocal relations between moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary behavior, on one hand, and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition defined symptoms of major depressive disorder, on the other and (2) assess the extent of stability in depressive symptoms from age 6 to 10 years. A community sample of children living in Trondheim, Norway, comprising a total of 795 6-year-old children was followed up at 8 (n = 699) and 10 (n = 702) years of age. Physical activity was recorded by accelerometry and symptoms of major depression were measured through semistructured clinical interviews of parents and children. Bidirectional relationships between MVPA, sedentary activity, and symptoms of depression were analyzed through autoregressive cross-lagged models, and adjusted for symptoms of comorbid psychiatric disorders and BMI. At both age 6 and 8 years, higher MVPA predicted fewer symptoms of major depressive disorders 2 years later. Sedentary behavior did not predict depression, and depression predicted neither MVPA nor sedentary activity. The number of symptoms of major depression declined from ages 6 to 8 years and evidenced modest continuity. MVPA predicts fewer symptoms of major depression in middle childhood, and increasing MVPA may serve as a complementary method to prevent and treat childhood depression. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Identifying predictors, moderators, and mediators of antidepressant response in major depressive disorder: neuroimaging approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Mary L; Chase, Henry W; Sheline, Yvette I; Etkin, Amit; Almeida, Jorge R C; Deckersbach, Thilo; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2015-02-01

    Despite significant advances in neuroscience and treatment development, no widely accepted biomarkers are available to inform diagnostics or identify preferred treatments for individuals with major depressive disorder. In this critical review, the authors examine the extent to which multimodal neuroimaging techniques can identify biomarkers reflecting key pathophysiologic processes in depression and whether such biomarkers may act as predictors, moderators, and mediators of treatment response that might facilitate development of personalized treatments based on a better understanding of these processes. The authors first highlight the most consistent findings from neuroimaging studies using different techniques in depression, including structural and functional abnormalities in two parallel neural circuits: serotonergically modulated implicit emotion regulation circuitry, centered on the amygdala and different regions in the medial prefrontal cortex; and dopaminergically modulated reward neural circuitry, centered on the ventral striatum and medial prefrontal cortex. They then describe key findings from the relatively small number of studies indicating that specific measures of regional function and, to a lesser extent, structure in these neural circuits predict treatment response in depression. Limitations of existing studies include small sample sizes, use of only one neuroimaging modality, and a focus on identifying predictors rather than moderators and mediators of differential treatment response. By addressing these limitations and, most importantly, capitalizing on the benefits of multimodal neuroimaging, future studies can yield moderators and mediators of treatment response in depression to facilitate significant improvements in shorter- and longer-term clinical and functional outcomes.

  19. Neural correlates of treatment outcome in major depression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lisiecka, Danuta

    2012-02-01

    There is a need to identify clinically useful biomarkers in major depressive disorder (MDD). In this context the functional connectivity of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) to other areas of the affect regulation circuit is of interest. The aim of this study was to identify neural changes during antidepressant treatment and correlates associated with the treatment outcome. In an exploratory analysis it was investigated whether functional connectivity measures moderated a response to mirtazapine and venlafaxine. Twenty-three drug-free patients with MDD were recruited from the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich. The patients were subjected to a 4-wk randomized clinical trial with two common antidepressants, venlafaxine or mirtazapine. Functional connectivity of the OFC, derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging with an emotional face-matching task, was measured before and after the trial. Higher OFC connectivity with the left motor areas and the OFC regions prior to the trial characterized responders (p<0.05, false discovery rate). The treatment non-responders were characterized by higher OFC-cerebellum connectivity. The strength of response was positively correlated with functional coupling between left OFC and the caudate nuclei and thalami. Differences in longitudinal changes were detected between venlafaxine and mirtazapine treatment in the motor areas, cerebellum, cingulate gyrus and angular gyrus. These results indicate that OFC functional connectivity might be useful as a marker for therapy response to mirtazapine and venlafaxine and to reconstruct the differences in their mechanism of action.

  20. Major depressive disorder and diabetes: does serotonin bridge the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Long, Nicole E; Stepita, Rebecca A; Taylor, Valerie H; Holloway, Alison C

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric illnesses worldwide, with reported prevalence rates ranging between 10% and 19%. Pharmacotherapy is a first-line option for the management of MDD and, as a result, the use of antidepressants has increased 4 fold in the last 20 years. Serotonin is the most commonly dysregulated neurotransmitter in the etiology of MDD and this system is the primary focus of most medications used in the treatment of illness. Although antidepressant use in adults increases the risk of developing new onset type 2 diabetes, the mechanisms underlying this association are poorly defined. This review will focus on 1) the evidence from human and animal studies suggesting a link between the use of antidepressants that target serotonin signaling (i.e., SSRIs, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs), and noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs)) and increased risk of diabetes, and 2) the mechanisms by which alterations in serotonin signalling by antidepressants can affect glucose homeostasis.

  1. Mitochondrial variants in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandi Rollins

    Full Text Available Mitochondria provide most of the energy for brain cells by the process of oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial abnormalities and deficiencies in oxidative phosphorylation have been reported in individuals with schizophrenia (SZ, bipolar disorder (BD, and major depressive disorder (MDD in transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic studies. Several mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA sequence have been reported in SZ and BD patients.Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC from a cohort of 77 SZ, BD, and MDD subjects and age-matched controls (C was studied for mtDNA sequence variations and heteroplasmy levels using Affymetrix mtDNA resequencing arrays. Heteroplasmy levels by microarray were compared to levels obtained with SNaPshot and allele specific real-time PCR. This study examined the association between brain pH and mtDNA alleles. The microarray resequencing of mtDNA was 100% concordant with conventional sequencing results for 103 mtDNA variants. The rate of synonymous base pair substitutions in the coding regions of the mtDNA genome was 22% higher (p = 0.0017 in DLPFC of individuals with SZ compared to controls. The association of brain pH and super haplogroup (U, K, UK was significant (p = 0.004 and independent of postmortem interval time.Focusing on haplogroup and individual susceptibility factors in psychiatric disorders by considering mtDNA variants may lead to innovative treatments to improve mitochondrial health and brain function.

  2. Perceived parenting and risk for major depression in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J; Li, Y; Cai, Y; Chen, J; Shen, Y; Ni, S; Wei, Y; Qiu, Y; Zhu, X; Liu, Y; Lu, C; Chen, C; Niu, Q; Tang, C; Yang, Y; Wang, Q; Cui, W; Xia, J; Liu, T; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Guo, Z; Pan, J; Chen, H; Luo, Y; Sun, L; Xiao, X; Chen, Q; Zhao, X; He, F; Lv, L; Guo, L; Liu, L; Li, H; Shi, S; Flint, J; Kendler, K S; Tao, M

    2012-05-01

    In Western countries, a history of major depression (MD) is associated with reports of received parenting that is low in warmth and caring and high in control and authoritarianism. Does a similar pattern exist in women in China? Received parenting was assessed by a shortened version of the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI) in two groups of Han Chinese women: 1970 clinically ascertained cases with recurrent MD and 2597 matched controls. MD was assessed at personal interview. Factor analysis of the PBI revealed three factors for both mothers and fathers: warmth, protectiveness, and authoritarianism. Lower warmth and protectiveness and higher authoritarianism from both mother and father were significantly associated with risk for recurrent MD. Parental warmth was positively correlated with parental protectiveness and negatively correlated with parental authoritarianism. When examined together, paternal warmth was more strongly associated with lowered risk for MD than maternal warmth. Furthermore, paternal protectiveness was negatively and maternal protectiveness positively associated with risk for MD. Although the structure of received parenting is very similar in China and Western countries, the association with MD is not. High parental protectiveness is generally pathogenic in Western countries but protective in China, especially when received from the father. Our results suggest that cultural factors impact on patterns of parenting and their association with MD.

  3. Major depressive disorder in adolescents exposed to a friend's suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Jeffrey A; Day, Nancy L; Day, Richard; Richardson, Gale A; Birmaher, Boris; Brent, David A

    2003-11-01

    To evaluate whether the risk of DSM-III major depressive disorder (MDD) is uniform across the 6 months after adolescent exposure to a friend's suicide, and to examine potential moderating or mediating processes that may influence the risk of new-onset MDD. One-month incidence rates of MDD were compared between 129 adolescents who were exposed to a friend's suicide between December 1988 and March 1991 and 145 similar-aged, unexposed community controls participating in the Youth Exposed to Suicide study. Clinical, family, and social factors that antedated the exposure were examined as predictors of new-onset MDD within 1 month of the suicide. Exposed adolescents had a markedly increased risk of developing new-onset MDD that was restricted to a narrow period of time, within 1 month after exposure. In contrast, there were no differences in the incidence of MDD between the groups in months 2 to 6. Past history of alcohol abuse increased the risk of exposure to suicide, which subsequently increased the risk of new-onset MDD within 1 month of exposure. Exposed youths who had both a family history of MDD and feelings of accountability for the death were at considerably increased risk of new-onset MDD. For adolescents exposed to a friend's suicide, events surrounding the death interact with family history of MDD to greatly increase the risk for new-onset MDD.

  4. Heart and soul: heart rate variability and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Meyrick; Ellenbroek, Bart A

    2018-04-01

    There is a bidirectional relationship between affective disorders and cardiovascular abnormalities, often described as a downward spiral, whereas major depressive disorders (MDD, and anxiety disorders) significantly increase the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD); CVD are also associated with increased risk of developing MDD (and anxiety disorders). Moreover, the prognosis and progression of CVD is significantly worsened in the presence of MDD. Heart rate variability (HRV) has often been suggested as a potential mediator in this comorbidity. In this review, we discuss HRV alterations in MDD. However, we mainly focus on the direct relationship between HRV alterations and psychiatric symptoms, rather than its relationship with CVD, as this has been reviewed elsewhere. After a general introduction to HRV and how it can be measured, we review how HRV is altered in MDD. We subsequently describe how antidepressant drugs affect HRV, showing that some classes (such as tricyclics) generally worsen HRV, whereas others (most notably selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) have a more positive influence. We also review the effects of several other treatments, with a special focus on vagal nerve stimulation, finishing with some further considerations and recommendation for further research, both in humans and animals.

  5. Urinary peptidomics identifies potential biomarkers for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Chen, Jianjun; Chen, Liang; Zheng, Peng; Xu, Hong-Bo; Lu, Jia; Zhong, Jiaju; Lei, Yang; Zhou, Chanjuan; Ma, Qingwei; Li, Yan; Xie, Peng

    2014-06-30

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a debilitating psychiatric illness with no available objective laboratory-based diagnostic test. In this study, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based peptidomics was applied to identify potential urinary diagnostic biomarkers for MDD. A training set of 42 first-episode drug-naive MDD patients and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC) was used to develop a peptide diagnostic pattern. Then, the diagnostic efficacy of this pattern was assessed in an independent blinded test set consisting of 24 MDD patients and 13 age- and gender-matched HC. A combination of five potential biomarkers was identified, yielding a sensitivity of 91.7% and specificity of 84.6% in the test set. Moreover, the protein precursors of four of the five peptides were identified by tandem mass spectrometric analysis: serum albumin, apolipoprotein A-I, protein AMBP, and basement membrane-specific heparan sulfate proteoglycan core protein. Taken together, the peptide pattern may be valuable for establishing an objective laboratory-based diagnostic test for MDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The genealogy of major depression: symptoms and signs of melancholia from 1880 to 1900.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, K S

    2017-11-01

    How deep are the historical roots of our concept of major depression (MD)? I showed previously that psychiatric textbooks published in 1900-1960 commonly described 18 characteristic depressive symptoms/signs that substantially but incompletely overlapped with the current DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) MD criteria. I here expand that inquiry to the key years of 1880-1900 during which our major diagnostic categories of manic-depressive illness (MDI) and dementia praecox were developed. I review the symptoms of depression/melancholia in 28 psychiatric textbooks and 8 other relevant documents from this period including monographs, reviews and the first portrayal of melancholia Kraepelin in 1883. Descriptions of melancholia in the late nineteenth and twentieth century textbooks closely resembled each other, both reporting a mean of 12.4 characteristic symptoms, and emphasizing core features of mood change and alterations in cognitive content and psychomotor behavior. The detailed monographs, reviews and the early description of Kraepelin were more thorough, reporting a mean of 16.6 of these characteristic symptoms. These nineteenth century texts often contained phenomenologically rich descriptions of changes in mood and cognition, loss of interest and anhedonia and emphasized several features not in DSM including changes in volition/motivation, posture/facial expression and derealization/depersonalization. In the early nineteenth century, melancholia was often defined primarily by delusions or as the initial phase of a unitary psychosis transitioning to mania and then dementia. By 1880, the concept of depression as an independent mood disorder with characteristic symptoms/signs and a good prognosis had stabilized. Kraepelin incorporated this syndrome into his diagnostic concept of MDI, changing its name to 'Depressive States', but did not alter its underlying nature or clinical description.

  7. Design and methods for a randomized clinical trial treating comorbid obesity and major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crawford Sybil

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is often comorbid with depression and individuals with this comorbidity fare worse in behavioral weight loss treatment. Treating depression directly prior to behavioral weight loss treatment might bolster weight loss outcomes in this population, but this has not yet been tested in a randomized clinical trial. Methods and design This randomized clinical trial will examine whether behavior therapy for depression administered prior to standard weight loss treatment produces greater weight loss than standard weight loss treatment alone. Obese women with major depressive disorder (N = 174 will be recruited from primary care clinics and the community and randomly assigned to one of the two treatment conditions. Treatment will last 2 years, and will include a 6-month intensive treatment phase followed by an 18-month maintenance phase. Follow-up assessment will occur at 6-months and 1- and 2 years following randomization. The primary outcome is weight loss. The study was designed to provide 90% power for detecting a weight change difference between conditions of 3.1 kg (standard deviation of 5.5 kg at 1-year assuming a 25% rate of loss to follow-up. Secondary outcomes include depression, physical activity, dietary intake, psychosocial variables and cardiovascular risk factors. Potential mediators (e.g., adherence, depression, physical activity and caloric intake of the intervention effect on weight change will also be examined. Discussion Treating depression before administering intensive health behavior interventions could potentially boost the impact on both mental and physical health outcomes. Trial registration NCT00572520

  8. Metabolic syndrome in subjects with bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder in a current depressive episode: Population-based study: Metabolic syndrome in current depressive episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fernanda Pedrotti; Jansen, Karen; Cardoso, Taiane de Azevedo; Mondin, Thaíse Campos; Magalhães, Pedro Vieira da Silva; Kapczinski, Flávio; Souza, Luciano Dias de Mattos; da Silva, Ricardo Azevedo; Oses, Jean Pierre; Wiener, Carolina David

    2017-09-01

    To assess the differences in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and their components in young adults with bipolar disorder (BD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) in a current depressive episode. This was a cross-sectional study with young adults aged 24-30 years old. Depressive episode (bipolar or unipolar) was assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview - Plus version (MINI Plus). The MetS was assessed using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP/ATP III). The sample included 972 subjects with a mean age of 25.81 (±2.17) years. Both BD and MDD patients showed higher prevalence of MetS compared to the population sample (BD = 46.9%, MDD = 35.1%, population = 22.1%, p obesity were observed in both BD and MDD individuals with current depressive episode compared to the general population. Moreover, there was a significant difference on BMI values in the case of BD and MDD subjects (p = 0.016). Metabolic components were significantly associated with the presence of depressive symptoms, independently of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Social relationship correlates of major depressive disorder and depressive symptoms in Switzerland: nationally representative cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The quality and quantity of social relationships are associated with depression but there is less evidence regarding which aspects of social relationships are most predictive. We evaluated the relative magnitude and independence of the association of four social relationship domains with major depressive disorder and depressive symptoms. Methods We analyzed a cross-sectional telephone interview and postal survey of a probability sample of adults living in Switzerland (N = 12,286). Twelve-month major depressive disorder was assessed via structured interview over the telephone using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). The postal survey assessed depressive symptoms as well as variables representing emotional support, tangible support, social integration, and loneliness. Results Each individual social relationship domain was associated with both outcome measures, but in multivariate models being lonely and perceiving unmet emotional support had the largest and most consistent associations across depression outcomes (incidence rate ratios ranging from 1.55-9.97 for loneliness and from 1.23-1.40 for unmet support, p’s social relationship domains except marital status were independently associated with depressive symptoms whereas only loneliness and unmet support were associated with depressive disorder. Conclusions Perceived quality and frequency of social relationships are associated with clinical depression and depressive symptoms across a wide adult age spectrum. This study extends prior work linking loneliness to depression by showing that a broad range of social relationship domains are associated with psychological well-being. PMID:24656048

  10. Classification of Anxiety Disorders Comorbid with Major Depression; common or distinct influences on risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscati, A.; Flint, J.; Kendler, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anxiety and depression display frequent comorbidity. Individuals with comorbid disorders also often have more extreme symptomatology than those with single disorders. This correlation between comorbidity and severity poses an interesting question: are comorbid forms of anxiety and depression essentially just more severe versions of the pure disorders? Methods In a large major depression case-control sample of individuals from the CONVERGE project, we examined the patterns of lifetime anxiety comorbidity (including generalized anxiety disorder – GAD, panic disorder and five phobia subtypes) among major depression (MD) cases (N=5,864) in this population. Binary and multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate associations between risk factors and outcomes including MD as well as latent class membership, which were compared using continuation ratios. Results We found a five-class solution to fit best, and each resulting class had a distinct pattern of association with the tested risk factors. The use of continuation ratios suggests that a class characterized by high endorsement of GAD is comparable to a more severely affected ‘pure MD’ group. The other three classes (characterized by agoraphobia, various specific phobias, and by high endorsement of all comorbid anxiety disorders, respectively) appear to differ meaningfully from MD alone. Conclusions Risk for MD resulting from environmental and psychosocial factors may also predispose individuals to GAD, and less consistently, other anxiety disorders. Presentations of MD with certain phobias display distinguishably different patterns of risk, however, and are therefore likely qualitatively distinct. PMID:26418316

  11. The History and Future of Ablative Neurosurgery for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpini, Matthew; Giacobbe, Peter; Cosgrove, G Rees; Levitt, Anthony; Lozano, Andres M; Lipsman, Nir

    2017-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop safe and effective treatments for patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Several neurosurgical procedures have been developed to treat the dysfunctional brain circuits implicated in major depression. This review describes the most common ablative procedures used to treat major depressive disorder: anterior cingulotomy, subcaudate tractotomy, limbic leucotomy, and anterior capsulotomy. The efficacy and safety of each are discussed and compared with other current and emerging modalities, including deep brain stimulation (DBS) and MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS). The PubMed and MEDLINE electronic databases were used in this study, through July 2016. Keywords, including "treatment resistant depression," and "ablative neurosurgery," etc. were used to generate reference hits. Approximately a third to half of patients who underwent ablative procedures achieved a treatment response and/or remission. The efficacy and safety profiles corresponding to both ablative procedures and DBS were very similar. The longitudinal experience with ablative procedures shows that there remains an important role for accurate, discrete lesions in disrupting affective circuitry in the treatment of TRD. New modalities, such as MRgFUS, have the potential to further improve the accuracy of ablative procedures, while enhancing safety by obviating the need for open brain surgery. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Estrogen enhances stress-induced prefrontal cortex dysfunction: relevance to Major Depressive Disorder in women

    OpenAIRE

    Shansky, Rebecca M.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.

    2006-01-01

    It is well documented that exposure to stress can precipitate or exacerbate many mental illnesses, 1,2 including major depressive disorder (MDD) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Women are twice as likely as men to develop these disorders, 3 4 as well as most anxiety disorders and phobias, 5 but the biological causes of this discrepancy are poorly understood. Interestingly, there is evidence that the increased prevalence of MDD in women occurs primarily during the childbearing years,...

  13. MAJOR SUMMER-INDUCED THERMAL RISKS IN THE ALBA IULIA – TURDA DEPRESSION

    OpenAIRE

    CĂTĂLINA MĂRCULEȚ

    2014-01-01

    Major summer-induced thermal risks in the Alba Iulia - Turda Depression. The study deals with warm-season phenomena, featuring positive, sometimes extremely high temperatures that may have a negative influence both on people’s health and economic activities. This category includes tropical waves of heat, absolute maximum temperatures, maximum frequency registered outside the specific interval of summer thermal regime: summer days, as well as tropical days and nights. The paper describes the c...

  14. Adolescents with Major Depression Demonstrate Increased Amygdala Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tony T.; Simmons, Alan N.; Matthews, Scott C.; Tapert, Susan F.; Frank, Guido K.; Max, Jeffrey E.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Lansing, Amy E.; Brown, Gregory; Strigo, Irina A.; Wu, Jing; Paulus, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Functional neuroimaging studies have led to a significantly deeper understanding of the underlying neural correlates and the development of several mature models of depression in adults. In contrast, our current understanding of the underlying neural substrates of adolescent depression is very limited. Although numerous studies have…

  15. Copeptin during rest and exercise in major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Jesper; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Jørgensen, Martin Balslev

    2013-01-01

    High vasopressin levels and a correlation between vasopressin and cortisol has been observed in patients with depression. The aim was to assess copeptin, the c-terminal of provasopressin, and the association between cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and copeptin in patients with depres...... with depression. Secondly, to examine the copeptin response to acute exercise and aerobic training....

  16. Recurrent major depression, ataxia, and cardiomyopathy: association with a novel POLG mutation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verhoeven WMA

    2011-05-01

    presentation, extensive diagnostic analysis is warranted, including the search for mitochondriopathies, in order to avoid unnecessary delay of adequate treatment.Keywords: DNA polymerase γ, mitochondrial disease, cerebellar ataxia, major depression

  17. Psychometric evaluation of the Major Depression Inventory (MDI) as depression severity scale using the LEAD (Longitudinal Expert Assessment of All Data) as index of validity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Per; Timmerby, N; Martiny, K

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Major Depression Inventory (MDI) was developed to cover the universe of depressive symptoms in DSM-IV major depression as well as in ICD-10 mild, moderate, and severe depression. The objective of this study was to evaluate the standardization of the MDI as a depression severity...

  18. The network model of depression as a basis for new therapeutic strategies for treating major depressive disorder in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eD'Ostilio

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The high prevalence of major depressive disorder in people with Parkinson's disease, its negative impact on health-related quality of life and the low response rate to conventional pharmacological therapies call to seek innovative treatments. Here, we review the new approaches for treating major depressive disorder in patients with Parkinson's disease within the framework of the network model of depression. According to this model, major depressive disorder reflects maladaptive neuronal plasticity. Non-invasive brain stimulation using high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over the prefrontal cortex has been proposed as a feasible and effective strategy with minimal risk. The neurobiological basis of its therapeutic effect may involve neuroplastic modifications in limbic and cognitive networks. However, the way this networks reorganize might be strongly influenced by the environment. To address this issue, we propose a combined strategy that includes non-invasive brain stimulation together with cognitive and behavioral interventions.

  19. The Network Model of Depression as a Basis for New Therapeutic Strategies for Treating Major Depressive Disorder in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Ostilio, Kevin; Garraux, Gaëtan

    2016-01-01

    The high prevalence of major depressive disorder in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD), its negative impact on health-related quality of life and the low response rate to conventional pharmacological therapies call to seek innovative treatments. Here, we review the new approaches for treating major depressive disorder in patients with PD within the framework of the network model of depression. According to this model, major depressive disorder reflects maladaptive neuronal plasticity. Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) using high frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) over the prefrontal cortex has been proposed as a feasible and effective strategy with minimal risk. The neurobiological basis of its therapeutic effect may involve neuroplastic modifications in limbic and cognitive networks. However, the way this networks reorganize might be strongly influenced by the environment. To address this issue, we propose a combined strategy that includes NIBS together with cognitive and behavioral interventions. PMID:27148016

  20. INFORMATION MODEL OF MAJOR DEPRESSION TREATMENT COST - RELEVANCE OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT OF HEALTH SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela Tadić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops multirelational data base for major depression costs. It lists how data are collected and stored into the fact base and dimension base. Uncertain data is described linguistically and modelled by fuzzy sets. Linguistic expressions are stored in dimension base. Models of major depression treatment costs are developed for each patient and all population. On the basis of this model and multirelational data base MD-OLAP a model for major depression treatment costs is developed.

  1. Age at onset of first depressive episode as a predictor for escitalopram treatment of major depression comorbid with alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Leea H; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lahti, Jari; Alho, Hannu

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine predictors of the response to escitalopram, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressant and memantine, a non-competitive glutamate NMDA receptor blocker, for the treatment of major depression comorbid with alcohol dependence. Eighty alcohol dependent treatment-seeking adult patients with comorbid major depressive disorder were randomized to receive either memantine 20 mg or escitalopram 20 mg for 26 weeks. In both treatment groups, depression was reduced significantly. Comparisons were made between patients in remission (final Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)major depressive episode significantly correlated with the treatment response in the escitalopram group; the mean age at onset of depression among patients on the non-responders group was 13.7+/-4.0 years and 31.9+/-11.9 years in remission. These results are significantly different from those with memantine. Our study provides evidence that the onset of the first major depressive episode might be a clinically relevant predictor of a response to escitalopram treatment in patients with major depression and comorbid alcohol dependence.

  2. Bipolar polygenic loading and bipolar spectrum features in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiste, Anna; Robinson, Elise B; Milaneschi, Yuri; Meier, Sandra; Ripke, Stephan; Clements, Caitlin C; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Rietschel, Marcella; Penninx, Brenda W; Smoller, Jordan W; Perlis, Roy H

    2014-09-01

    Family and genetic studies indicate overlapping liability for major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether this shared genetic liability influences clinical presentation. A polygenic risk score for bipolar disorder, derived from a large genome-wide association meta-analysis, was generated for each subject of European-American ancestry (n = 1,274) in the Sequential Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression study (STAR*D) outpatient major depressive disorder cohort. A hypothesis-driven approach was used to test for association between bipolar disorder risk score and features of depression associated with bipolar disorder in the literature. Follow-up analyses were performed in two additional cohorts. A generalized linear mixed model including seven features hypothesized to be associated with bipolar spectrum illness was significantly associated with bipolar polygenic risk score [F = 2.07, degrees of freedom (df) = 7, p = 0.04]. Features included early onset, suicide attempt, recurrent depression, atypical depression, subclinical mania, subclinical psychosis, and severity. Post-hoc univariate analyses demonstrated that the major contributors to this omnibus association were onset of illness at age ≤ 18 years [odds ratio (OR) = 1.2, p = 0.003], history of suicide attempt (OR = 1.21, p = 0.03), and presence of at least one manic symptom (OR = 1.16, p = 0.02). The maximal variance in these traits explained by polygenic score ranged from 0.8% to 1.1%. However, analyses in two replication cohorts testing a five-feature model did not support this association. Bipolar genetic loading appeared to be associated with bipolar-like presentation in major depressive disorder in the primary analysis. However, the results were at most inconclusive because of lack of replication. Replication efforts were challenged by different ascertainment and assessment strategies in the different cohorts. The methodological approach

  3. Bupropion in the treatment of problematic online game play in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Doug Hyun; Renshaw, Perry F

    2012-05-01

    As one of the problematic behaviors in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD), excessive online game play (EOP) has been reported in a number of recent studies. Bupropion has been evaluated as a potential treatment for MDD and substance dependence. We hypothesized that bupropion treatment would reduce the severity of EOP as well as depressive symptoms. Fifty male subjects with comorbid EOP and MDD were randomly assigned to bupropion + education for internet use (EDU) or placebo + EDU groups. The current study consisted in a 12-week, prospective, randomized, double-blind clinical trial, including an eight-week active treatment phase and a four-week post treatment follow-up period. During the active treatment period, Young Internet Addiction Scale (YIAS) scores and the mean time of online game playing in the bupropion group were greatly reduced compared with those of the placebo group. The Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores in the bupropion group were also greatly reduced compared with those of the placebo group. During the four-week post-treatment follow-up period, bupropion-associated reductions in online game play persisted, while depressive symptoms recurred. Conclusively, bupropion may improve depressive mood as well as reduce the severity of EOP in patients with comorbid MDD and online game addiction.

  4. Blood transcriptomic biomarkers in adult primary care patients with major depressive disorder undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redei, E E; Andrus, B M; Kwasny, M J; Seok, J; Cai, X; Ho, J; Mohr, D C

    2014-09-16

    An objective, laboratory-based diagnostic tool could increase the diagnostic accuracy of major depressive disorders (MDDs), identify factors that characterize patients and promote individualized therapy. The goal of this study was to assess a blood-based biomarker panel, which showed promise in adolescents with MDD, in adult primary care patients with MDD and age-, gender- and race-matched nondepressed (ND) controls. Patients with MDD received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and clinical assessment using self-reported depression with the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). The measures, including blood RNA collection, were obtained before and after 18 weeks of CBT. Blood transcript levels of nine markers of ADCY3, DGKA, FAM46A, IGSF4A/CADM1, KIAA1539, MARCKS, PSME1, RAPH1 and TLR7, differed significantly between participants with MDD (N=32) and ND controls (N=32) at baseline (qdepressed. Thus, blood levels of different transcript panels may identify the depressed from the nondepressed among primary care patients, during a depressive episode or in remission, or follow and predict response to CBT in depressed individuals.

  5. Cognitive-behavioral versus psychodynamic therapy for major depression: Secondary outcomes of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driessen, Ellen; Van, Henricus L; Peen, Jaap; Don, Frank J; Twisk, Jos W R; Cuijpers, Pim; Dekker, Jack J M

    2017-07-01

    In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and psychodynamic therapy for adult outpatient depression on measures of psychopathology, interpersonal functioning, pain, and quality of life. There were 341 Dutch adults (70.1% female, mean age = 38.9, SD = 10.3) meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition ( DSM-IV ) criteria for a major depressive episode and with a Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) score ≥14, who were randomized to 16 sessions of individual manualized CBT or short-term psychodynamic supportive psychotherapy. Severely depressed patients (HAM-D >24) received additional antidepressant medication according to a protocol. Outcome measures included the Brief Symptom Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Outcome Questionnaire, a visual analogue scale for pain, and EuroQol. Data were analyzed with mixed model analyses using intention-to-treat samples. Noninferiority margins were prespecified as Cohen's d = -0.30. Across treatment conditions, 45-60% of the patients who completed posttreatment assessment showed clinically meaningful change for most outcome measures. We found no significant differences between the treatment conditions on any of the outcome measures at both posttreatment and follow-up. Noninferiority of psychodynamic therapy to CBT was shown for posttreatment and follow-up anxiety measures as well as for posttreatment pain and quality of life measures, but could not be consistently demonstrated for the other outcomes. This is the first study that shows that psychodynamic therapy can be at least as efficacious as CBT for depression on important aspects of patient functioning other than depressive symptom reduction. These findings extend the evidence-base of psychodynamic therapy for depression, but replication is needed by means of rigorously designed noninferiority trials. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Obesity comorbidity in unipolar major depressive disorder: refining the core phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Robert D; Davis, Caroline; Kaplan, Allan S; Arenovich, Tamara; Phillips, D I W; Ravindran, Arun V

    2012-08-01

    While a significant body of research has demonstrated high comorbidity rates between depression and obesity, the vast majority of this work has considered depression as a unitary diagnosis. Given that increased appetite and weight gain are highly characteristic of the "atypical" subtype of depression, while classic depression is characterized by decreased appetite and weight loss, it would be important to examine whether increased obesity risk is consistent across the major vegetative subtypes of depression or is limited to the atypical subtype. Using data from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), we identified 5,092 US adults with past or current major depression based on DSM-IV-TR criteria and 1,500 gender-matched controls. Each depressed subject was designated as having classic, atypical, or undifferentiated depression based on core vegetative symptoms. Logistic regression models examined rates of current obesity (defined as a current body mass index [kg/m2] > 30) across the 3 depressive subgroups and nondepressed controls, adjusting for demographic differences. To limit the possible effect of current depressive symptoms on observed obesity rates, secondary analyses were completed in individuals with past depression only. Subjects with atypical depression had markedly elevated obesity rates compared to population controls and to other depressed subjects, with corresponding pairwise odds ratios consistently greater than 2.0 (P obesity rates were not significantly different in subjects with classic depression and nondepressed controls. These results were manifest in individuals with either current or past depression and were independent of gender and age. While many individuals with classic depression will present with obesity due to the high prevalence of both disorders, only atypical depression is associated with an elevated risk of obesity relative to the population at large. Refining the target phenotype

  7. Descriptive epidemiology of major depressive disorder in Canada in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Scott B; Williams, Jeanne V A; Lavorato, Dina H; Wang, Jian Li; McDonald, Keltie; Bulloch, Andrew G M

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) was first described in the Canadian national population in 2002. Updated information is now available from a 2012 survey: the Canadian Community Health Study-Mental Health (CCHS-MH). The CCHS-MH employed an adaptation of the World Health Organization World Mental Health Composite International Diagnostic Interview and had a sample of n=25 113. Demographic variables, treatment, comorbidities, suicidal ideation, and perceived stigma were assessed. The analysis estimated adjusted and unadjusted frequencies and prevalence ratios. All estimates incorporated analysis methods to account for complex survey design effects. The past-year prevalence of MDD was 3.9% (95% CI 3.5% to 4.2%). Prevalence was higher in women and in younger age groups. Among respondents with past-year MDD, 63.1% had sought treatment and 33.1% were taking an antidepressant (AD); 4.8% had past-year alcohol abuse and 4.5% had alcohol dependence. Among respondents with past-year MDD, the prevalence of cannabis abuse was 2.5% and that of dependence was 2.9%. For drugs other than cannabis, the prevalence of abuse was 2.3% and dependence was 2.9%. Generalized anxiety disorder was present in 24.9%. Suicide attempts were reported by 6.6% of respondents with past-year MDD. Among respondents accessing treatment, 37.5% perceived that others held negative opinions about them or treated them unfairly because of their disorder. MDD is a common, burdensome, and stigmatized condition in Canada. Seeking help from professionals was reported at a higher frequency than in prior Canadian studies, but there has been no increase in AD use among Canadians with MDD.

  8. Genome-wide DNA methylation scan in major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarven Sabunciyan

    Full Text Available While genome-wide association studies are ongoing to identify sequence variation influencing susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD, epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, which can be influenced by environment, might also play a role. Here we present the first genome-wide DNA methylation (DNAm scan in MDD. We compared 39 postmortem frontal cortex MDD samples to 26 controls. DNA was hybridized to our Comprehensive High-throughput Arrays for Relative Methylation (CHARM platform, covering 3.5 million CpGs. CHARM identified 224 candidate regions with DNAm differences >10%. These regions are highly enriched for neuronal growth and development genes. Ten of 17 regions for which validation was attempted showed true DNAm differences; the greatest were in PRIMA1, with 12-15% increased DNAm in MDD (p = 0.0002-0.0003, and a concomitant decrease in gene expression. These results must be considered pilot data, however, as we could only test replication in a small number of additional brain samples (n = 16, which showed no significant difference in PRIMA1. Because PRIMA1 anchors acetylcholinesterase in neuronal membranes, decreased expression could result in decreased enzyme function and increased cholinergic transmission, consistent with a role in MDD. We observed decreased immunoreactivity for acetylcholinesterase in MDD brain with increased PRIMA1 DNAm, non-significant at p = 0.08.While we cannot draw firm conclusions about PRIMA1 DNAm in MDD, the involvement of neuronal development genes across the set showing differential methylation suggests a role for epigenetics in the illness. Further studies using limbic system brain regions might shed additional light on this role.

  9. Social relationship correlates of major depressive disorder and depressive symptoms in Switzerland: nationally representative cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Steven D; Messerli-Bürgy, Nadine; Barth, Jürgen

    2014-03-24

    The quality and quantity of social relationships are associated with depression but there is less evidence regarding which aspects of social relationships are most predictive. We evaluated the relative magnitude and independence of the association of four social relationship domains with major depressive disorder and depressive symptoms. We analyzed a cross-sectional telephone interview and postal survey of a probability sample of adults living in Switzerland (N=12,286). Twelve-month major depressive disorder was assessed via structured interview over the telephone using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). The postal survey assessed depressive symptoms as well as variables representing emotional support, tangible support, social integration, and loneliness. Each individual social relationship domain was associated with both outcome measures, but in multivariate models being lonely and perceiving unmet emotional support had the largest and most consistent associations across depression outcomes (incidence rate ratios ranging from 1.55-9.97 for loneliness and from 1.23-1.40 for unmet support, p'sdepressive symptoms whereas only loneliness and unmet support were associated with depressive disorder. Perceived quality and frequency of social relationships are associated with clinical depression and depressive symptoms across a wide adult age spectrum. This study extends prior work linking loneliness to depression by showing that a broad range of social relationship domains are associated with psychological well-being.

  10. Gray colored glasses: is major depression partially a sensory perceptual disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Major depression is a neuropsychiatric disorder that can involve profound dysregulation of mood. While depression is associated with additional abnormalities besides reduced mood, such as cognitive dysfunction, it is not well established that sensory perception is also altered in this disorder (aside from in psychotic depression). Recent studies have shown that visual processing, in as early a stage as the retina, is impaired in depression. This paper examines the hypothesis that major depression can involve alterations in sensory perception. A Pubmed literature search investigated several lines of evidence: innervation of sensory cortex by serotonin and norepinephrine; antidepressant drugs and depression itself affecting processing of facial expressions of emotion; electroencephalography (EEG) studies of depressed persons and antidepressant drugs; involvement of the serotonergic 5HT2A receptor in both depression and hallucinogenic drug action; psychotic depression involving sensory distortions; dopamine possibly playing a role in depression; and the antidepressant effect of blocking the NMDA receptor with ketamine. Data from each of these lines of evidence support the hypothesis that major depression can involve sensory perceptual alterations. Loss of interest in one's daily activities and inability to experience pleasure, also known as anhedonia, in major depression may in part be mediated by sensory abnormalities, whereby normal sensory perceptions are no longer present to activate reward circuitry. The data supporting the hypothesis tend to be associative, so further confirmation of the hypothesis awaits additional controlled experiments. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomarker approaches in major depressive disorder evaluated in the context of current hypotheses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentsch, M.C.; Buel, E.M. Van; Bosker, F.J.; Gladkevich, A.V.; Klein, H.C.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Ruhe, E.G.; Eisel, U.L.; Schoevers, R.A.

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a heterogeneous disorder, mostly diagnosed on the basis of symptomatic criteria alone. It would be of great help when specific biomarkers for various subtypes and symptom clusters of depression become available to assist in diagnosis and subtyping of depression, and to

  12. Atypical major depressive episode as initial presentation of intracranial germinoma in a male adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YT

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Ting Chen,1,3,4 Kuan-Pin Su,2–5 Jane Pei-Chen Chang2–5 1Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 2Graduate Institute of Neural and Cognitive Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 3School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 4Department of Psychiatry, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan; 5Department of Psychological Medicine, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, UK Abstract: A 17-year-old adolescent boy presented with atypical major depressive episode (MDE without specific focal neurological signs for 6 months. He had a diagnosis of intra­cranial germinoma, and the atypical MDE symptoms subsided after the operation. However, he had a relapse of atypical MDE 7 months after the first surgery. His mood and binge eating symptoms subsided, but intractable body weight gain only partially improved after treatment. When encountering manifestations of depression with atypical features, especially with binge eating symptoms in male children and adolescents, with early onset age, no family history, and prolonged depressive episodes, clinicians should consider not only mood disorders including bipolar spectrum disorders but also organic brain lesions such as intracranial germinoma. Keywords: intracranial germinoma, atypical major depressive episode, binge eating behavior, body weight gain

  13. Differential gene expression in patients with subsyndromal symptomatic depression and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengqing; Hu, Guoqin; Li, Zezhi; Wang, Qingzhong; Wang, Xuemei; Yuan, Chengmei; Wang, Zuowei; Hong, Wu; Lu, Weihong; Cao, Lan; Chen, Jun; Wang, Yong; Yu, Shunying; Zhou, Yimin; Yi, Zhenghui; Fang, Yiru

    2017-01-01

    Subsyndromal symptomatic depression (SSD) is a subtype of subthreshold depressive and can lead to significant psychosocial functional impairment. Although the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder (MDD) and SSD still remains poorly understood, a set of studies have found that many same genetic factors play important roles in the etiology of these two disorders. Nowadays, the differential gene expression between MDD and SSD is still unknown. In our previous study, we compared the expression profile and made the classification with the leukocytes by using whole-genome cRNA microarrays among drug-free first-episode subjects with SSD, MDD and matched healthy controls (8 subjects in each group), and finally determined 48 gene expression signatures. Based on these findings, we further clarify whether these genes mRNA was different expressed in peripheral blood in patients with SSD, MDD and healthy controls (60 subjects respectively). With the help of the quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), we gained gene relative expression levels among the three groups. We found that there are three of the forty eight co-regulated genes had differential expression in peripheral blood among the three groups, which are CD84, STRN, CTNS gene (F = 3.528, p = 0.034; F = 3.382, p = 0.039; F = 3.801, p = 0.026, respectively) while there were no significant differences for other genes. CD84, STRN, CTNS gene may have significant value for performing diagnostic functions and classifying SSD, MDD and healthy controls.

  14. 'Third wave' cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian Nyfeldt; Kongerslev, Mickey Toftkjær

    2012-01-01

    Background: Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. 'Third wave' cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients...... with major depression.Methods/ design: We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder. The participants will be randomised to either 'third wave' cognitive therapy...... versus mentalization-based therapy. The primary outcome will be the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at cessation of treatment at 18 weeks. Secondary outcomes will be the proportion of patients with remission, Symptom Checklist 90 Revised, Beck's Depression Inventory, and The World Health...

  15. Gender differences in severity, symptomatology and distribution of melancholia in major depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Stage, Kurt Bjerregaard; Kragh-Soerensen, Per

    2003-01-01

    - and out-patients (652 women, 278 men) from 6 randomized controlled trials. All patients fulfilled DSM-III or DSM-III-R criteria for major depression. The 17-item Hamilton Depression Scale (HDS) was applied to all patients. A multi-axial evaluation was completed using the Newcastle 1 Depression Rating...... melancholic depression (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: In a large and broad sample of in- and out-patients with major depression, the severity and symptomatology of depression were similar for men and women. Melancholic depression was significantly more frequent among male than female patients. Inclusion...... and exclusion criteria in the randomized controlled trials provided a selected group of patients, which limited the generalisability of the results to an exclusive subgroup of patients treated for depression in routine clinical practice....

  16. Treatment of comorbid adolescent cannabis use and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminer, Yifrah; Connor, Daniel F; Curry, John F

    2008-09-01

    The comorbidity of unipolar depression with substance use disorders (SUD) in adolescents is well established and accounts for 24 to 50 percent in clinical samples. Very little empirical data exist on the treatment of dually diagnosed youth. The objective of this paper is twofold: 1) We will review the literature on SUD and unipolar depression; and 2) we will provide guidelines for a combined pharmacological and psychosocial intervention based on a clinical case example.

  17. Beck Depression Inventory is a useful screening tool for major depressive disorder in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, A.H.; Robertson, M.M.; Orth, M.

    2006-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of and factors associated with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). How a simple self-report instrument, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), correlates with clinical assessment of comorbid MDD in this

  18. Major depressive disorder, antidepressant use, and subsequent 2-year weight change patterns in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson-Smith, Deborah; Bot, Mariska; Milaneschi, Yuri; Twisk, Jos W; Visser, Marjolein; Brouwer, Ingeborg A; Penninx, Brenda W J H

    BACKGROUND: Although depression and obesity are bidirectionally associated, little is known about weight changes following major depressive disorder (MDD). This study compared 2-year weight changes between patients with current MDD (cMDD), patients with remitted MDD (rMDD), and healthy controls.

  19. The centrality of DSM and non-DSM depressive symptoms in Han Chinese women with major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kendler, K.S.; Aggen, S.H.; Flint, J.; Borsboom, D.; Fried, E.I.

    Introduction: We compared DSM-IV criteria for major depression (MD) with clinically selected non-DSM criteria in their ability to represent clinical features of depression. Method: We conducted network analyses of 19 DSM and non-DSM symptoms of MD assessed at personal interview in 5952 Han Chinese

  20. Mental state decoding impairment in major depression and borderline personality disorder: meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Mara J; Unoka, Zsolt

    2015-12-01

    Patients with major depression and borderline personality disorder are characterised by a distorted perception of other people's intentions. Deficits in mental state decoding are thought to be the underlying cause of this clinical feature. To examine, using meta-analysis, whether mental state decoding abilities in patients with major depression and borderline personality disorder differ from those of healthy controls. A systematic review of 13 cross-sectional studies comparing Reading in the Mind of the Eyes Test (RMET) accuracy performance of patients with major depression or borderline personality disorder and healthy age-matched controls (n = 976). Valence scores, where reported, were also assessed. Large significant deficits were seen for global RMET performance in patients with major depression (d = -0.751). The positive RMET valence scores of patients with depression were significantly worse; patients with borderline personality disorder had worse neutral scores. Both groups were worse than controls. Moderator analysis revealed that individuals with comorbid borderline personality disorder and major depression did better than those with borderline personality disorder alone on accuracy. Those with comorbid borderline personality disorder and any cluster B or C personality disorder did worse than borderline personality disorder alone. Individuals with both borderline personality disorder and major depression performed better then those with borderline personality disorder without major depression for positive valence. These findings highlight the relevance of RMET performance in patients with borderline personality disorder and major depression, and the importance of considering comorbidity in future analysis. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  1. Sociodemographic Correlates of Unipolar Major Depression among the Chinese Elderly in Klang Valley, Malaysia: An Epidemiological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Kumar Verma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Depression, as one of the most disabling diseases around the world, had caught the global concern with its rising prevalence rate. There is a growing need of detecting depression, particularly in the old age population which is often left being overlooked. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional community-based study which included 150 Chinese elderly aged 60 and above within Klang Valley area. We obtained the sociodemographic profiles and assessed the status of well-being, depression, and cognitive function of the participants with the help of instruments: WHO Five-Item Well-Being Index, Major (ICD-10 Depression Inventory, and 6-Item Cognitive Impairment Test. Results. We found that the prevalence of depression among the Chinese elderly within Klang Valley region was 10.7%. With multiple logistic regression, decision to consult doctor on depressed mood or memory problem and presence of cognitive impairment were shown to be significantly associated with unipolar major depression, whereas wellbeing status was also found to be statistically correlated with depression in univariate analysis. Conclusion. The prevalence of unipolar depression among Chinese elderly within Klang Valley, Malaysia presented that there was an increased trend compared to the previous studies.

  2. Prospective Longitudinal Study of Predictors of Postpartum-Onset Depression in Women With a History of Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Rita; Stowe, Zachary N; Cohen, Lee S; Newport, D Jeffrey; Burt, Vivien K; Aquino-Elias, Ana R; Knight, Bettina T; Mintz, Jim; Altshuler, Lori L

    Risk factors for postpartum depression in euthymic pregnant women with histories of major depressive disorder (MDD) were evaluated. From April 2003 to March 2009, 343 pregnant women with a history of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID)-diagnosed major depressive disorder were prospectively assessed from the third trimester into the postpartum period using the SCID mood module and 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS). Data from 300 subjects who completed at least 2 mood module assessments (1 within 60 days before and the other within 60 days after delivery) were analyzed for predictive associations between variables assessed in the third trimester and the development of a postpartum depression. The majority of women were euthymic in pregnancy by SCID criteria. Women with third trimester SCID-diagnosed depression (n = 45) versus euthymia (n = 255) had a significantly higher risk for having depression after delivery (24% vs 11%, P = .013). For pregnant euthymic women, third trimester total HDRS scores significantly predicted postpartum depression (P postpartum depression. Antidepressant use in the third trimester in euthymic women did not confer protection against the onset of postpartum depression. Among women with a history of MDD who are euthymic in the third trimester, 3 HDRS items-work activities, early insomnia, and suicidality-may be useful as screening items for clinicians working with pregnant women with histories of MDD to identify a group at risk for developing postpartum depression. Additionally, in euthymic women with a history of MDD, antidepressant use in the third trimester may not reduce the risk of developing postpartum depression. © Copyright 2017 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  3. Diagnostic accuracy for major depression in multiple sclerosis using self-report questionnaires

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Anja; Fischer, Marcus; Nicholls, Robert A; Lau, Stephanie; Poettgen, Jana; Patas, Kostas; Heesen, Christoph; Gold, Stefan M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Multiple sclerosis and major depressive disorder frequently co-occur but depression often remains undiagnosed in this population. Self-rated depression questionnaires are a good option where clinician-based standardized diagnostics are not feasible. However, there is a paucity of data on diagnostic accuracy of self-report measures for depression in multiple sclerosis (MS). Moreover, head-to-head comparisons of common questionnaires are largely lacking. This could be particularly rel...

  4. Motivational deficits in major depressive disorder: Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships with functional impairment and subjective well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fervaha, Gagan; Foussias, George; Takeuchi, Hiroyoshi; Agid, Ofer; Remington, Gary

    2016-04-01

    Many individuals with major depressive disorder present with prominent motivational deficits; however, the effect of these symptoms on functional outcomes in the illness remains unclear. Individuals with major depression who participated in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression study were included in the present investigation (N=1563). Motivational deficits were evaluated using a derived measure from the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, while functioning was assessed using the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Subjective outcomes were also evaluated using the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. After treatment with citalopram, over 70% of participants continued to experience some degree of motivational deficits. These deficits were significantly associated with greater functional impairments both globally and in each domain of functioning evaluated. These symptoms were also linked to worse subjective outcomes such as overall life satisfaction and quality of life. Change in the severity of motivational deficits over time was significantly linked with changes in outcome. Motivational deficits continued to demonstrate a significant association with outcomes, even after controlling for potentially confounding variables such as duration of depressive episode and severity of other depressive symptoms. Motivational deficits are significantly linked to the functional impairment present in many people with major depression, just as they are in other psychiatric illnesses such as schizophrenia. A greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of these motivational deficits in particular, beyond other depressive symptoms, is critical to the development of strategies aimed at enhancing functional recovery and improved subjective well-being. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and response to treatment in hepatitis C patients in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MM, Bassiony; A, Yousef; U, Youssef; GM, Salah El-Deen; M, Abdelghani; H, Al-Gohari; E, Fouad; MM, El-Shafaey

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate the prevalence and associated correlates of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder in hepatitis C virus patients before and after treatment and to investigate the relationship between major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder and treatment response. A total of 116 consecutive hepatitis C virus patients from hepatitis C virus treatment center in Zagazig city, Egypt, were included in the study and divided into treated group (N = 58) and untreated group (N = 58). All hepatitis C virus patients were screened for major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder using hospital anxiety and depression scale, and those who screened positive were interviewed to confirm the diagnosis of major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder using DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria. These measures were done at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment or observation. At baseline, 3.5% and 12.1% of hepatitis C virus patients (treated group) had major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder, respectively. After 12 weeks of treatment 37.9% of hepatitis C virus patients (treated group) had major depressive disorder and 46.6% had generalized anxiety disorder. There was a significant statistical difference between hospital anxiety and depression scale scores for depression (3.3 ± 2.3 vs. 6.4 ± 3.2, t = 9.6, p = 0.001) and for anxiety (4.6 ± 2.4 vs. 7.3 ± 3.0, t = 10.2, p = 0.001) before and after treatment. There was also significant statistical difference between treated group and untreated group regarding hospital anxiety and depression scale scores after treatment and observation (depression, treated group 6.4 ± 3.2 vs. untreated group 4.0 ± 2.4, t = 3.7, p = 0.001; anxiety, treated group 7.3 ± 3.0 vs. untreated group 4.5 ± 2.3, t = 4.4, p = 0.001). There was no association between major depressive disorder

  6. The association of major depressive episode and personality traits in patients with fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danyella de Melo Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Personality traits have been associated with primary depression. However, it is not known whether this association takes place in the case of depression comorbid with fibromyalgia. OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the association between a current major depressive episode and temperament traits (e.g., harm avoidance. METHOD: A sample of 69 adult female patients with fibromyalgia was assessed with the Temperament and Character Inventory. Psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview severity of depressive symptomatology with the Beck Depression Inventory, and anxiety symptomatology with the IDATE-state and pain intensity with a visual analog scale. RESULTS: A current major depressive episode was diagnosed in 28 (40.5% of the patients. They presented higher levels of harm avoidance and lower levels of cooperativeness and self-directedness compared with non-depressed patients, which is consistent with the Temperament and Character Inventory profile of subjects with primary depression. However, in contrast to previous results in primary depression, no association between a major depressive episode and self-transcendence was found. CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight specific features of depression in fibromyalgia subjects and may prove important for enhancing the diagnosis and prognosis of depression in fibromyalgia patients.

  7. The association between suicide risk and self-esteem in Japanese university students with major depressive episodes of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsui, Nobuyuki; Asakura, Satoshi; Shimizu, Yusuke; Fujii, Yutaka; Toyomaki, Atsuhito; Kako, Yuki; Tanaka, Teruaki; Kitagawa, Nobuki; Inoue, Takeshi; Kusumi, Ichiro

    2014-01-01

    The suicide risk among young adults is related to multiple factors; therefore, it is difficult to predict and prevent suicidal behavior. We conducted the present study to reveal the most important factors relating to suicidal ideation in Japanese university students with major depressive episodes (MDEs) of major depressive disorder (MDD). The subjects were 30 Japanese university students who had MDEs of MDD, and were aged between 18 and 26 years old. They were divided into two groups - without suicide risk group (n=15), and with suicide risk group (n=15) - based on the results of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Additionally, healthy controls were recruited from the same population (n=15). All subjects completed the self-assessment scales including the Beck Depression Inventory 2nd edition (BDI-II), the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS), Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), and SF-36v2™ (The Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey version 2), and they were all administered a battery of neuropsychological tests. The RSES score of the suicide risk group was significantly lower than the RSES score of the without suicide risk group, whereas the BDI-II score and the BHS score were not significantly different between the two groups. The mean social functioning score on the SF-36v2 of the with suicide risk group was significantly lower than that of the without suicide risk group. The individual's self-esteem and social functioning may play an important role in suicide risk among young adults with MDEs of MDD.

  8. Evidence for increased glutamatergic cortical facilitation in children and adolescents with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croarkin, Paul E; Nakonezny, Paul A; Husain, Mustafa M; Melton, Tabatha; Buyukdura, Jeylan S; Kennard, Betsy D; Emslie, Graham J; Kozel, F Andrew; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2013-03-01

    Converging lines of evidence implicate the glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid neurotransmitter systems in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. Transcranial magnetic stimulation cortical excitability and inhibition paradigms have been used to assess cortical glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid-mediated tone in adults with major depressive disorder, but not in children and adolescents. To compare measures of cortical excitability and inhibition with 4 different paradigms in a group of children and adolescents with major depressive disorder vs healthy controls. Cross-sectional study examining medication-free children and adolescents (aged 9-17 years) with major depressive disorder compared with healthy controls. Cortical excitability was assessed with motor threshold and intracortical facilitation measures. Cortical inhibition was measured with cortical silent period and intracortical inhibition paradigms. University-based child and adolescent psychiatry clinic and neurostimulation laboratory. Twenty-four participants with major depressive disorder and 22 healthy controls matched for age and sex. Patients with major depressive disorder were medication naive and had moderate to severe symptoms based on an evaluation with a child and adolescent psychiatrist and scores on the Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised. Motor threshold, intracortical facilitation, cortical silent period, and intracortical inhibition. Compared with healthy controls, depressed patients had significantly increased intracortical facilitation at interstimulus intervals of 10 and 15 milliseconds bilaterally. There were no significant group differences in cortical inhibition measures. These findings suggest that major depressive disorder in children and adolescents is associated with increased intracortical facilitation and excessive glutamatergic activity.

  9. Distress Related to Individual Depressive Symptoms: A Cross-sectional Study in Thai Patients with Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungpetchwong, T; Likhitsathian, S; Jaranai, S; Srisurapanont, M

    2017-09-01

    To examine the distress related to individual depressive symptoms, the correlation between symptom distress and disability, and the gender difference in distress levels in patients with major depressive disorder. This was a cross-sectional, observational study carried out at a university hospital providing tertiary care in northern Thailand. Participants were patients with major depressive disorder aged between 18 and 65 years. Depression severity was self-rated using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). We expanded the 9 symptom items of the PHQ-9 into 13 individual symptoms. The participants rated their distress for each symptom on a scale of 0 to 4, from 0 indicating 'not at all' to 4 indicating 'extremely'. A total of 130 (92 female and 38 male) patients with major depressive disorder participated in this study. Of the 13 symptoms, the distress level of overeating was lowest. Compared with overeating, the distress levels of feeling depressed / hopeless, feeling guilty, poor concentration, anhedonia, initial insomnia, middle / terminal insomnia, and fatigue were significantly higher and had a large effect size of differences (p difference between men and women on any symptom. Depressive symptoms related to high distress levels and moderately correlated with functional impairment were feeling depressed / hopeless, feeling guilty, poor concentration, and anhedonia.

  10. Neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio in patients with major depressive disorder undergoing no pharmacological therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demir S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Süleyman Demir,1 Abdullah Atli,1 Mahmut Bulut,1 Aslihan Okan İbiloğlu,1 Mehmet Güneş,1 Mehmet Cemal Kaya,1 Özlem Demirpençe,2 Aytekin Sir1 1Department of Psychiatry, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, 2Department of Biochemistry, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey Abstract: Studies attempting to clarify the relationship between major depressive disorder (MDD and the immune system have been increasing in recent years. It was reported that increased production of the main proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and that of acute phase reactants may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of depression. Stress and depression were reported to increase leukocyte and neutrophil counts and to decrease lymphocyte count. Biological determinants affecting the diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of depression are quite limited. Therefore, new etiological models are needed to explain the pathophysiology of depression. In recent years, neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR was determined to be a good indicator of inflammatory status. There is no study in the literature investigating NLR in MDD. This study aims to examine the role of inflammation in the etiology of depression based on the NLR in MDD patients who are undergoing no pharmacological therapy. A total of 41 patients diagnosed with MDD, who received no antidepressant therapy within the past 1 month, were included in the study, which took place between January and March 2015. The control group consisted of 47 healthy subjects with no psychiatric disorders. A sociodemographic information form and a Beck Depression Scale were administered, and the blood was taken for biochemical analysis. Significant differences were identified in the NLR, neutrophil count, lymphocyte percentage, and leukocyte values of the patient group when compared with the control group (P<0.05. Our study is the first in which NLR was investigated in MDD. The findings of the

  11. Do disabled elderly Medicare beneficiaries with major depression make less use of a consumer-directed home care voucher benefit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Bruce; Wamsley, Brenda R; Conwell, Yeates

    2015-01-01

    Older adults with major depression may underutilize consumer-directed long-term care. Systematic underutilization would create disparities in outcomes, undermining program effectiveness. The Medicare Primary and Consumer-Directed Care Demonstration included a consumer-directed indemnity benefit that paid for goods and services not financed by traditional Medicare. Overall and for most categories of goods and services there was little difference in use and expenditures between those with and without major depression. However, among those using the benefit to hire in-home workers, arguably the most important consumer-directed purchase, average spending for workers was about 30% lower for depressed persons. While our findings are generally reassuring for public policy, future research is needed to verify that major depression is associated with less spending on in-home workers.

  12. Prevalence of cognitive impairment in major depression and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Katie M; Gallagher, Peter; Robinson, Lucy J; Carter, Janet D; McIntosh, Virginia Vw; Frampton, Christopher Ma; Watson, Stuart; Young, Allan H; Ferrier, I Nicol; Porter, Richard J

    2018-01-18

    The current study examines prevalence of cognitive impairment in four mood disorder samples, using four definitions of impairment. The impact of premorbid IQ on prevalence was examined, and the influence of treatment response. Samples were: (i) 58 inpatients in a current severe depressive episode (unipolar or bipolar), (ii) 69 unmedicated outpatients in a mild to moderate depressive episode (unipolar or bipolar), (iii) 56 outpatients with bipolar disorder, in a depressive episode, and (iv) 63 outpatients with bipolar disorder, currently euthymic. Cognitive assessment was conducted after treatment in Studies 1 (6 weeks of antidepressant treatment commenced on admission) and 2 (16-week course of cognitive behaviour therapy or schema therapy), allowing the impact of treatment response to be assessed. All mood disorder samples were compared with healthy control groups. The prevalence of cognitive impairment was highest for the inpatient depression sample (Study 1), and lowest for the outpatient depression sample (Study 2). Substantial variability in rates was observed depending on the definition of impairment used. Correcting cognitive performance for premorbid IQ had a significant impact on the prevalence of cognitive impairment in the inpatient depression sample. There was minimal evidence that treatment response impacted on prevalence of cognitive impairment, except in the domain of psychomotor speed in inpatients. As interventions aiming to improve cognitive outcomes in mood disorders receive increasing research focus, the issue of setting a cut-off level of cognitive impairment for screening purposes becomes a priority. This analysis demonstrates important differences in samples likely to be recruited depending on the definition of cognitive impairment and begins to examine the importance of premorbid IQ in determining who is impaired. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A systematic approach to pharmacotherapy for geriatric major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulsant, Benoit H; Blumberger, Daniel M; Ismail, Zahinoor; Rabheru, Kiran; Rapoport, Mark J

    2014-08-01

    The broadening use of antidepressants among older Americans has not been associated with a notable decrease in the burden of geriatric depression. This article, based on a selective review of the literature, explores several explanations for this paradox. The authors propose that the effectiveness of antidepressants depends in large part on the way they are used. Evidence supports that antidepressant pharmacotherapy leads to better outcomes when guided by a treatment algorithm as opposed to attempting to individualize treatment. Several published guidelines and pharmacotherapy algorithms developed for the treatment of geriatric depression are reviewed, and an updated algorithm proposed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Reliability, validity and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the Major Depression Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsiptsios I

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is a brief self-rating scale for the assessment of depression. It is reported to be valid because it is based on the universe of symptoms of DSM-IV and ICD-10 depression. The aim of the current preliminary study was to assess the reliability, validity and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the MDI. Methods 30 depressed patients of mean age 23.41 (± 5.77 years, and 68 controls patients of mean age 25.08 (± 11.42 years, entered the study. In 18 of them, the instrument was re-applied 1–2 days later and the Translation and Back Translation made. Clinical diagnosis was reached with the use of the SCAN v.2.0 and the International Personality Disorders Examination (IPDE. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression (CES-D and the Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS were applied for cross-validation purposes. Statistical analysis included ANOVA, the Spearman Product Moment Correlation Coefficient, Principal Components Analysis and the calculation of Cronbach's α. Results Sensitivity and specificity were 0.86 and 0.94, respectively, at 26/27. Cronbach's α for the total scale was equal to 0.89. The Spearman's rho between MDI and CES-D was 0.86 and between MDI and ZDRS was 0.76. The factor analysis revealed two factors but the first accounted for 54% of variance while the second only for 9%. The test-retest reliability was excellent (Spearman's rho between 0.53 and 0.96 for individual items and 0.89 for total score. Conclusion The current study provided preliminary evidence concerning the reliability and validity of the Greek translation of the MDI. Its properties are similar to those reported in the international literature, but further research is necessary.

  15. Enduring cognitive dysfunction in unipolar major depression: a test-retest study using the Stroop paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar, Asa; Sørensen, Lin; Ardal, Guro; Oedegaard, Ketil Joachim; Kroken, Rune; Roness, Atle; Lund, Anders

    2010-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate automatic and effortful information processing with the Stroop paradigm in a long term perspective in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients were tested at two test occasions: at inclusion with a Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) score >18, and after 6 months, when most patients had experienced symptom reduction. The Stroop paradigm is considered to measure aspects of attention and executive functioning and consists of three conditions/cards: naming the color of the patches (Color), reading of the color-words (Word) and naming the ink color of color-words (Color-Word). The Color-Word condition is proved to be the most cognitive demanding task and requires the proband to actively suppress interference and is therefore considered to require more effortful information processing, whereas naming the color of the patches and reading the color-words are expected to be more automatic and less cognitive demanding. A homogenous group of 19 patients with unipolar recurrent MDD according to DSM-IV and a HDRS score of >18 were included in the study. A control group was individually matched for age, gender and level of education. Depressed patients performed equal to the control group on the Color and Word cards at both test occasions. However, the patients were impaired compared with the control group on the Color-Word card task at both test occasions. Thus, the depressed patients showed no improvement of effortful attention/executive performance as a function of symptom reduction. The results indicate that the depressed patients showed impaired cognitive performance on cognitive demanding tasks when symptomatic and that this impairment prevailed after 6 months, despite significant improvement in their depressive symptoms.

  16. Immune markers in fibromyalgia: comparison with major depressed patients and normal volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorso, S; Lin, A H; Verkerk, R; Van Hunsel, F; Libbrecht, I; Scharpé, S; DeClerck, L; Biondi, M; Janca, A; Maes, M

    1998-02-01

    There is a high degree of comorbidity between fibromyalgia and major depression. The latter is characterized by signs of immune activation, whereas the immune status in fibromyalgia is not yet elucidated. The aims of the present study were to examine (i) neopterin and biopterin excretion in 24-h urine of patients with fibromyalgia compared with normal volunteers and patients with major depression; and (ii) the effects of subchronic treatment with sertraline (11 weeks) on the urinary excretion of neopterin and biopterin. Measurements of neopterin, biopterin, pseudouridine, creatinine and uric acid in 24-h urine were performed by means of HPLC in 14 fibromyalgia and ten major depressed patients and 17 normal volunteers. There were no significant differences in urine excretion of the above five analytes between patients with fibromyalgia and normal volunteers. Patients with major depression showed significantly higher urinary neopterin excretion than normal volunteers and fibromyalgia patients. Patients with fibromyalgia and major depression had a significantly increased neopterin/creatinine ratio. Fibromyalgia patients had significantly lower urinary excretion of creatinine than patients with major depression. In fibromyalgia patients, there were no significant effects of sertraline treatment on any of the urine analytes. The findings suggest that fibromyalgia, in contrast to major depression, may not be accompanied by activation of cell-mediated immunity. Other immune markers should be measured in fibromyalgia before drawing definite conclusions. Increased urinary excretion of neopterin can be used as a marker for major depression, but not fibromyalgia.

  17. Racial/Ethnic Differences in Mental Health Service Use among Adolescents with Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Janet R.; Druss, Benjamin G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Little is known about racial/ethnic differences in the receipt of treatment for major depression in adolescents. This study examined differences in mental health service use in non-Hispanic white, black, Hispanic, and Asian adolescents who experienced an episode of major depression. Method: Five years of data (2004-2008) were pooled…

  18. Peripheral telomere length and hippocampal volume in adolescents with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henje Blom, E; Han, L K M; Connolly, C G; Ho, T C; Lin, J; LeWinn, K Z; Simmons, A N; Sacchet, M D; Mobayed, N; Luna, M E; Paulus, M; Epel, E S; Blackburn, E H; Wolkowitz, O M; Yang, T T

    2015-11-10

    Several studies have reported that adults with major depressive disorder have shorter telomere length and reduced hippocampal volumes. Moreover, studies of adult populations without major depressive disorder suggest a relationship between peripheral telomere length and hippocampal volume. However, the relationship of these findings in adolescents with major depressive disorder has yet to be explored. We examined whether adolescent major depressive disorder is associated with altered peripheral telomere length and hippocampal volume, and whether these measures relate to one another. In 54 unmedicated adolescents (13-18 years) with major depressive disorder and 63 well-matched healthy controls, telomere length was assessed from saliva using quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods, and bilateral hippocampal volumes were measured with magnetic resonance imaging. After adjusting for age and sex (and total brain volume in the hippocampal analysis), adolescents with major depressive disorder exhibited significantly shorter telomere length and significantly smaller right, but not left hippocampal volume. When corrected for age, sex, diagnostic group and total brain volume, telomere length was not significantly associated with left or right hippocampal volume, suggesting that these cellular and neural processes may be mechanistically distinct during adolescence. Our findings suggest that shortening of telomere length and reduction of hippocampal volume are already present in early-onset major depressive disorder and thus unlikely to be only a result of accumulated years of exposure to major depressive disorder.

  19. Surrogate markers of visceral fat and response to anti-depressive treatment in patients with major depressive disorder: a prospective exploratory analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tønning, Morten; Petersen, Dorthe; Steglich-Petersen, Marie; Csillag, Claudio

    2017-02-01

    Body mass index (BMI) and body weight have been shown to be associated to treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder, but this relationship is not clear. Visceral fat might be an underlying mechanism explaining this relationship. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate whether visceral fat, as measured by hip-to-waist ratio and waist circumference, affects treatment outcome in patients with major depressive disorder in patients attending a hospital psychiatric care unit in Denmark. The study was conducted as an observational prospective study including 33 patients with major depressive disorder. Assessments were made at enrolment and after 8 weeks. Primary variables were hip-to-waist ratio and waist circumference. Outcome were remission or response of depressive symptoms measured with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D 17 ) interviews and HAM-D 6 self-rating questionnaires. No differences were found in outcome between groups of patients with high vs low visceral fat in this population. The lack of association was evident for all surrogate markers of visceral fat, and suggests that visceral fat has no impact on outcomes of depressive symptoms. However, study limitations might have contributed to this lack of association, especially sample size and considerable variations on multiple parameters including treatment received during the 8 weeks of follow-up.

  20. Neurophysiological correlates of suicidal ideation in major depressive disorder: Hyperarousal during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolsen, Michael R; Cheng, Philip; Arnedt, J Todd; Swanson, Leslie; Casement, Melynda D; Kim, Hyang Sook; Goldschmied, Jennifer R; Hoffmann, Robert F; Armitage, Roseanne; Deldin, Patricia J

    2017-04-01

    Suicide is a major public health concern, and a barrier to reducing the suicide rate is the lack of objective predictors of risk. The present study considers whether quantitative sleep electroencephalography (EEG) may be a neurobiological correlate of suicidal ideation. Participants included 84 (45 female, mean age=26.6) adults diagnosed with major depressive disorder (MDD). The item that measures thoughts of death or suicide on the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (QIDS) was used to classify 47 participants as low suicidal ideation (24 females, mean age=26.1) and 37 as high suicidal ideation (21 females, mean age=27.3). Data were obtained from archival samples collected at the University of Michigan and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center between 2004 and 2012. Sleep EEG was quantified using power spectral analysis, and focused on alpha, beta, and delta frequencies. Results indicated that participants with high compared to low suicidal ideation experienced 1) increased fast frequency activity, 2) decreased delta activity, and 3) increased alpha-delta sleep after adjusting for age, sex, depression, and insomnia symptoms. Limitations include the exclusion of imminent suicidal intent, a single suicidal ideation item, and cross-sectional archival data. This is one of the first studies to provide preliminary support that electrophysiological brain activity during sleep is associated with increased suicidal ideation in MDD, and may point toward central nervous system (CNS) hyperarousal during sleep as a neurobiological correlate of suicidal ideation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Add-on high frequency deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) to bilateral prefrontal cortex in depressive episodes of patients with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder I, and major depressive with alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Kotzalidis, Georgios D; Ferracuti, Stefano; Girardi, Nicoletta; Zangen, Abraham; Sani, Gabriele; Raccah, Ruggero N; Girardi, Paolo; Pompili, Maurizio; Del Casale, Antonio

    2018-04-03

    Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) is critically involved in mood and alcohol use disorders. We aimed to investigate the safety of intervention with add-on bilateral prefrontal high-frequency deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) and between-group differences in treatment response in patients with different types of depressive episodes, including major depressive episodes in the course of major depressive disorder (MDD), bipolar disorder, type I (BD-I), and MDD with alcohol use disorder (MDAUD). We conducted a 6-month open-label study, involving 82 patients with DSM-5 Depressive Episode. Of these, 41 had diagnosis of MDD, 20 BD-I, and 21 MDAUD. All patients received standard drug treatment and add-on dTMS over the bilateral DLPFC with left prevalence for four weeks, with five sessions in each week. We rated mood state with the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) at baseline, one-month, and six-month follow-up visits. Mean total HDRS scores dropped from 22.8 (SD = 5.9) at baseline to 10.4 (SD = 3.6) at 1 month, to 10.0 (SD = 4.5) at 6 months, while response/remission were 70.73% (N = 58) and 19.51% (N = 16) at 1 month and 76.83% (N = 63) and 32.93% (27) at 6 months, respectively, with no between-group differences. No patient experienced any side effects. High-frequency DLPFC dTMS was well tolerated and did not significantly differ on improvement of depression in MDD, BD-I, and MDAUD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Trajectories of mobility and IADL function in older patients diagnosed with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hybels, Celia F; Pieper, Carl F; Blazer, Dan G; Fillenbaum, Gerda G; Steffens, David C

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown an association between depression and functional limitations in older adults. Our aim was to explore the latent traits of trajectories of limitations in mobility and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) tasks in a sample of older adults diagnosed with major depression. Participants were 248 patients enrolled in a naturalistic depression treatment study. Mobility/IADL tasks included walking one-fourth mile, going up/down stairs, getting around the neighborhood, shopping, handling money, taking care of children, cleaning house, preparing meals and doing yardwork/gardening. Latent class trajectory analysis was used to identify classes of mobility/IADL function over a 4-year period. Class membership was then used to predict functional status over time. Using time as the only predictor, three latent class trajectories were identified: (1) Patients with few mobility/IADL limitations (42%), (2) Patients with considerable mobility/IADL limitations (37%) and (3) Patients with basically no limitations (21%). The classes differed primarily in their initial functional status, with some immediate improvement followed by no further change for patients in Classes 1 and 2 and a stable course for patients in Class 3. In a repeated measures mixed model controlling for potential confounders, class was a significant predictor of functional status. The effect of baseline depression score, cognitive status, self-perceived health and sex on mobility/IADL score differed by class. These findings show systematic variability in functional status over time among older patients with major depression, indicating that a single trajectory may not reflect the pattern for all patients. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Benefits and harms in clinical trials of duloxetine for treatment of major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maund, Emma; Tendal, Britta; Hróbjartsson, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine, using research on duloxetine for major depressive disorder as an example, if there are inconsistencies between protocols, clinical study reports, and main publicly available sources (journal articles and trial registries), and within clinical study reports themselves......, with respect to benefits and major harms. DESIGN: Data on primary efficacy analysis and major harms extracted from each data source and compared. SETTING: Nine randomised placebo controlled trials of duloxetine (total 2878 patients) submitted to the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for marketing approval.......gov and the manufacturer's online clinical trial registry were searched for trial results. RESULTS: Clinical study reports fully described the primary efficacy analysis and major harms (deaths (including suicides), suicide attempts, serious adverse events, and discontinuations because of adverse events). There were minor...

  4. Modulating the serotonin system in the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, Debbi Ann; Stahl, Stephen M

    2014-12-01

    Discuss the theory of modulation of receptor activity or the blockade of the reuptake of multiple neurotransmitter systems for the future treatment of MDD. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a serious and often crippling psychiatric illness with a high risk of relapse and treatment resistance. In this article, we discuss the role of the serotonergic system in MDD including our current understanding of how various serotonin (5HT) receptors modulate monoamine neurotransmission and behavior. We also discuss how pharmacologic interventions, including novel and existing antidepressants and atypical antipsychotics, may be utilized to adjust serotonergic neurotransmission and provide more effective treatments for patients with MDD.

  5. A clinically useful self-report measure of the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier for major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Chelminski, Iwona; Young, Diane; Dalrymple, Kristy; Walsh, Emily; Rosenstein, Lia

    2014-06-01

    To acknowledge the clinical significance of anxiety in depressed patients, DSM-5 included criteria for an anxious distress specifier for major depressive disorder. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, we modified our previously published depression scale to include a subscale assessing the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier. From December 1995 to August 2013, 773 psychiatric outpatients with major depressive disorder completed the Clinically Useful Depression Outcome Scale (CUDOS) supplemented with questions for the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier (CUDOS-A). To examine discriminant and convergent validity, the patients were rated on clinician severity indices of depression, anxiety, and irritability. Discriminant and convergent validity was further examined in a subset of patients who completed other self-report symptom severity scales. Test-retest reliability was examined in a subset who completed the CUDOS-A twice. We compared patients who did and did not meet the DSM-5 anxious distress specifier on indices of psychosocial functioning and quality of life. The CUDOS-A subscale had high internal consistency and test-retest reliability; was more highly correlated with other self-report measures of anxiety than with measures of depression, substance use problems, eating disorders, and anger; and was more highly correlated with clinician severity ratings of anxiety than depression and irritability. CUDOS-A scores were significantly higher in depressed outpatients with a current anxiety disorder than in depressed patients without a comorbid anxiety disorder (P depressive disorder. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  6. Personality, Stressful Life Events, and Treatment Response in Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmash, Eric; Harkness, Kate L.; Stewart, Jeremy G.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined whether the personality traits of self-criticism or dependency moderated the effect of stressful life events on treatment response. Depressed outpatients (N = 113) were randomized to 16 weeks of cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, or antidepressant medication (ADM). Stressful life events were…

  7. Treatment-resistant major depressive disorder and assisted dying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuklenk, Udo; van de Vathorst, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    Competent patients suffering from treatment-resistant depressive disorder should be treated no different in the context of assisted dying to other patients suffering from chronic conditions that render their lives permanently not worth living to them. Jurisdictions that are considering, or that

  8. Fluoxetine treatment for major depression decreases the plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The levels of all five cytokine of patients with MDD were significantly decreased after treatment. However, the levels remained significantly higher than those of the healthy controls (p<0.001). In the seven depressed subjects whose HDRS score fell to below seven after antidepressant therapy comparing with those subjects ...

  9. Psychotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder are among the most commonly diagnosed mental illnesses in Canada; both are associated with a high societal and economic burden. Treatment for major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder consists of pharmacological and psychological interventions. Three commonly used psychological interventions are cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy, and supportive therapy. The objectives of this report were to assess the effectiveness and safety of these types of therapy for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder, to assess the cost-effectiveness of structured psychotherapy (CBT or interpersonal therapy), to calculate the budget impact of publicly funding structured psychotherapy, and to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of people with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder. We performed a literature search on October 27, 2016, for systematic reviews that compared CBT, interpersonal therapy, or supportive therapy with usual care, waitlist control, or pharmacotherapy in adult outpatients with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder. We developed an individual-level state-transition probabilistic model for a cohort of adult outpatients aged 18 to 75 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder to determine the cost-effectiveness of individual or group CBT (as a representative form of structured psychotherapy) versus usual care. We also estimated the 5-year budget impact of publicly funding structured psychotherapy in Ontario. Finally, we interviewed people with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder to better understand the impact of their condition on their daily lives and their experience with different treatment options, including psychotherapy. Interpersonal therapy compared with usual care reduced posttreatment major depressive disorder

  10. Psychotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMartin, Kristen; Gajic-Veljanoski, Olga; Wells, David; Higgins, Caroline; Walter, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder are among the most commonly diagnosed mental illnesses in Canada; both are associated with a high societal and economic burden. Treatment for major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder consists of pharmacological and psychological interventions. Three commonly used psychological interventions are cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy, and supportive therapy. The objectives of this report were to assess the effectiveness and safety of these types of therapy for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder, to assess the cost-effectiveness of structured psychotherapy (CBT or interpersonal therapy), to calculate the budget impact of publicly funding structured psychotherapy, and to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of people with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder. Methods We performed a literature search on October 27, 2016, for systematic reviews that compared CBT, interpersonal therapy, or supportive therapy with usual care, waitlist control, or pharmacotherapy in adult outpatients with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder. We developed an individual-level state-transition probabilistic model for a cohort of adult outpatients aged 18 to 75 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder to determine the cost-effectiveness of individual or group CBT (as a representative form of structured psychotherapy) versus usual care. We also estimated the 5-year budget impact of publicly funding structured psychotherapy in Ontario. Finally, we interviewed people with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder to better understand the impact of their condition on their daily lives and their experience with different treatment options, including psychotherapy. Results Interpersonal therapy compared with usual care reduced

  11. Comparison of demographic and clinical characteristics between children and adolescents with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-I, Lee; Wang, Yuan Pang

    2008-06-01

    To compare clinical characteristics of major depressive disorder symptoms between children and adolescents. The subjects were 58 patients of a Child and Adolescent Affective Disorder Clinic consecutively admitted during a six-month period. Children aged 5-9 years old and adolescents from 10-17 years old currently meeting DSM-IV criteria diagnosis of major depressive disorder were chosen. Current MDD diagnosis and depressive psychopathology were assessed by a clinical interview and the Diagnostic Interview for Children and Adolescents-DSM-IV version. The Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised Version and the Children Global Assessment Scale rated the severity and global functioning of major depressive disorder. The most common depressive symptoms were: anhedonia (72.4%), depressed mood (72.4%), decreased concentration (62.1%), and irritability (58.6%). The intensity of depressive episodes of this sample ranged from mild to moderate. Fifty percent reported thoughts of death, and 29.3% presented a variety of psychotic symptoms. When compared with children, adolescents reported a significantly more depressed mood (p = 0.043), lower self-esteem (p = 0.002), and had more difficulty concentrating (p = 0.020). Female adolescents had lower self-esteem (p = 0.003), and male adolescents showed more decreased concentration (p = 0.016). This study suggests that age and gender differences might influence the clinical presentation of major depressive disorder in children and adolescents. Further studies with larger samples are needed.

  12. Late-Life Depressive Symptoms and Lifetime History of Major Depression: Cognitive Deficits are Largely Due to Incipient Dementia rather than Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heser, Kathrin; Bleckwenn, Markus; Wiese, Birgitt; Mamone, Silke; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G; Stein, Janine; Lühmann, Dagmar; Posselt, Tina; Fuchs, Angela; Pentzek, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Werle, Jochen; Weeg, Dagmar; Bickel, Horst; Brettschneider, Christian; König, Hans-Helmut; Maier, Wolfgang; Scherer, Martin; Wagner, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Late-life depression is frequently accompanied by cognitive impairments. Whether these impairments indicate a prodromal state of dementia, or are a symptomatic expression of depression per se is not well-studied. In a cohort of very old initially non-demented primary care patients (n = 2,709, mean age = 81.1 y), cognitive performance was compared between groups of participants with or without elevated depressive symptoms and with or without subsequent dementia using ANCOVA (adjusted for age, sex, and education). Logistic regression analyses were computed to predict subsequent dementia over up to six years of follow-up. The same analytical approach was performed for lifetime major depression. Participants with elevated depressive symptoms without subsequent dementia showed only small to medium cognitive deficits. In contrast, participants with depressive symptoms with subsequent dementia showed medium to very large cognitive deficits. In adjusted logistic regression models, learning and memory deficits predicted the risk for subsequent dementia in participants with depressive symptoms. Participants with a lifetime history of major depression without subsequent dementia showed no cognitive deficits. However, in adjusted logistic regression models, learning and orientation deficits predicted the risk for subsequent dementia also in participants with lifetime major depression. Marked cognitive impairments in old age depression should not be dismissed as "depressive pseudodementia", but require clinical attention as a possible sign of incipient dementia. Non-depressed elderly with a lifetime history of major depression, who remained free of dementia during follow-up, had largely normal cognitive performance.

  13. Melancholic features and hostility are associated with suicidality risk in Asian patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hong Jin; Peng, Daihui; Chua, Hong Choon; Srisurapanont, Manit; Fava, Maurizio; Bae, Jae-Nam; Man Chang, Sung; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-06-01

    Suicide rates are higher in East-Asians than other populations, and especially high in Koreans. However, little is known about suicidality risk and melancholic features in Asian patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Drug-free MDD outpatients were included from 13 centers across five ethnicities consisting of Chinese (n=290), Korean (n=101), Thai (n=102), Indian (n=27), and Malay (n=27). All were interviewed using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I.), the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the Symptoms Checklist 90-Revised (SCL-90-R). Of 547 subjects, 177 MDD patients showed melancholic features (32.4%). These melancholic MDD patients revealed significantly higher suicidality risk (pChinese than that of Thai, Indian and Malay in MDD subjects with melancholic features, although depression severity showed no significant differences among the ethnicities. Suicidality risk is associated with both melancholic features and hostility and it shows cross-ethnic differences in Asian MDD patients, independent of depression severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Longitudinal Joint Effect of Obesity and Major Depression on Work Performance Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Schoevers, Robert A.; Bültmann, Ute

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the longitudinal effect of obesity, major depression, and their combination on work performance impairment (WPI). Methods. We collected longitudinal data (2004–2013) on 1726 paid employees from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety at baseline and 2-, 4-, and 6-year follow-up. We defined obesity with body mass index and waist circumference. We diagnosed major depression with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1. We assessed work performance impairment with a questionnaire for illness-associated costs. We used generalized estimating equations for modeling, and estimated interaction on the additive scale. Results. Obesity, abdominal obesity, and major depression were longitudinally associated with increased risk of high WPI. The combinations of obesity and major depression, and of abdominal obesity and major depression were associated with increased risk of high WPI (odds ratios of 2.36 [95% confidence interval = 1.61, 3.44] and 1.88 [95% confidence interval = 1.40, 2.53], respectively), but the relative excess risks attributable to interaction were nonsignificant. Conclusions. The longitudinal joint effect of obesity and major depression on high WPI implies that obesity intervention may be more beneficial for individuals with major depression than those without regarding risk of high WPI, if confirmed in a large, representative sample. PMID:25790401

  15. The longitudinal joint effect of obesity and major depression on work performance impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigatu, Yeshambel T; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Schoevers, Robert A; Bültmann, Ute

    2015-05-01

    We examined the longitudinal effect of obesity, major depression, and their combination on work performance impairment (WPI). We collected longitudinal data (2004-2013) on 1726 paid employees from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety at baseline and 2-, 4-, and 6-year follow-up. We defined obesity with body mass index and waist circumference. We diagnosed major depression with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview 2.1. We assessed work performance impairment with a questionnaire for illness-associated costs. We used generalized estimating equations for modeling, and estimated interaction on the additive scale. Obesity, abdominal obesity, and major depression were longitudinally associated with increased risk of high WPI. The combinations of obesity and major depression, and of abdominal obesity and major depression were associated with increased risk of high WPI (odds ratios of 2.36 [95% confidence interval = 1.61, 3.44] and 1.88 [95% confidence interval = 1.40, 2.53], respectively), but the relative excess risks attributable to interaction were nonsignificant. The longitudinal joint effect of obesity and major depression on high WPI implies that obesity intervention may be more beneficial for individuals with major depression than those without regarding risk of high WPI, if confirmed in a large, representative sample.

  16. ?Third wave? cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Gluud, Christian; Kongerslev, Mickey; Larsen, Kirsten Aaskov; S?rensen, Per; Winkel, Per; Lange, Theis; S?gaard, Ulf; Simonsen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. ‘Third wave‘ cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients with major depression. Methods/ design We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diag...

  17. Effect of mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR on depression symptoms and emotional schema inwomen with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdan Naderi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: mindfulness has an important role in depression. The present study investigatedthe impact of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR on emotional schema and depression symptoms in women with major depressive disorder. Method:In this experimental pretest-posttest study, twenty four patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD were selected by convenience sampling and randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group received MBSR therapy over two months. Beck Depression Questionnaire and Leahy Emotional Schema Scale (LESS were used to collect the data in the pre-test, post-test and two-month follow-up. Data were analyzed by mixed analysis of variance. Results: MBSR significantly reduced the symptoms of depression (P<0.01 and maladaptive emotional schemas (p<0.01, and increased adaptive emotional schemas (P<0.01 in experimental group in the post-test and follow-up. Conclusion:The results of this study revealed the effectiveness of mindfulness-based stress reduction in reducing the severity of depression and maladaptive emotional schema in depressed patients.

  18. Plasma Nervonic Acid Is a Potential Biomarker for Major Depressive Disorder: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Yuki; Kasahara, Takaoki; Nakamura, Takemichi; Hattori, Kotaro; Deguchi, Yasuhiko; Tani, Munehide; Kuroda, Kenji; Yoshida, Sumiko; Goto, Yu-Ichi; Inoue, Koki; Kato, Tadafumi

    2018-03-01

    Diagnostic biomarkers of major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia are urgently needed, because none are currently available. We performed a comprehensive metabolome analysis of plasma samples from drug-free patients with major depressive disorder (n=9), bipolar disorder (n=6), schizophrenia (n=17), and matched healthy controls (n=19) (cohort 1) using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. A significant effect of diagnosis was found for 2 metabolites: nervonic acid and cortisone, with nervonic acid being the most significantly altered. The reproducibility of the results and effects of psychotropic medication on nervonic acid were verified in cohort 2, an independent sample set of medicated patients [major depressive disorder (n=45), bipolar disorder (n=71), schizophrenia (n=115)], and controls (n=90) using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The increased levels of nervonic acid in patients with major depressive disorder compared with controls and patients with bipolar disorder in cohort 1 were replicated in the independent sample set (cohort 2). In cohort 2, plasma nervonic acid levels were also increased in the patients with major depressive disorder compared with the patients with schizophrenia. In cohort 2, nervonic acid levels were increased in the depressive state in patients with major depressive disorder compared with the levels in the remission state in patients with major depressive disorder and the depressive state in patients with bipolar disorder. These results suggested that plasma nervonic acid is a good candidate biomarker for the depressive state of major depressive disorder. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  19. Gender differences in a cohort of major depressive patients: further evidence for the male depression syndrome hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorin, Jean-Michel; Belzeaux, Raoul; Fakra, Eric; Kaladjian, Arthur; Hantouche, Elie; Lancrenon, Sylvie; Adida, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that major depressive patients may differ in several features according to gender, but the existence of a specific male depressive syndrome remains controversial. As part of the EPIDEP National Multisite French Study of 493 consecutive DSM-IV major depressive patients evaluated in at least two semi-structured interviews 1 month apart, 125 (27.7%) were of male gender, whereas 317 (72.3%) were female, after exclusion of bipolar I patients. Compared to women, men were more often married, had more associated mixed features, with more bipolar disorder NOS, more hyperthymic temperaments, and less depressive temperaments. Women had an earlier age at onset of depression, more depressive episodes and suicide attempts. A higher family loading was shown in men for bipolar disorder, alcohol use disorder, impulse control disorders and suicide, whereas their family loading for major depressive disorder was lower. Men displayed more comorbidities with alcohol use, impulse control, and cardiovascular disorders, with lower comorbidities with eating, anxiety and endocrine/metabolic disorders. The following independent variables were associated with male gender: hyperthymic temperament (+), alcohol use disorder (+), impulse control disorders (+), and depressive temperament (-). The retrospective design and the lack of specific tools to assess the male depressive syndrome. Study findings may lend support to the male depression syndrome concept and draw attention to the role of hyperthymic temperament, soft bipolarity as well as comorbidities as determinants of this syndrome. The latter could help recognize an entity which is probably underdiagnosed, but conveys a high risk of suicide and cardiovascular morbidity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Distinguishing bipolar II depression from major depressive disorder with comorbid borderline personality disorder: demographic, clinical, and family history differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Mark; Martinez, Jennifer H; Morgan, Theresa A; Young, Diane; Chelminski, Iwona; Dalrymple, Kristy

    2013-09-01

    Because of the potential treatment implications, it is clinically important to distinguish between bipolar II depression and major depressive disorder with comorbid borderline personality disorder. The high frequency of diagnostic co-occurrence and resemblance of phenomenological features has led some authors to suggest that borderline personality disorder is part of the bipolar spectrum. Few studies have directly compared patients with bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. In the present study from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services project, we compared these 2 groups of patients on demographic, clinical, and family history variables. From December 1995 to May 2012, 3,600 psychiatric patients presenting to the outpatient practice at Rhode Island Hospital (Providence, Rhode Island) were evaluated with semistructured diagnostic interviews for DSM-IV Axis I and Axis II disorders. The focus of the present study is the 206 patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder and borderline personality disorder (MDD-BPD) and 62 patients with DSM-IV bipolar II depression without borderline personality disorder. The patients with MDD-BPD were significantly more often diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (P depression had a significantly higher morbid risk for bipolar disorder in their first-degree relatives than the MDD-BPD patients (P depression and major depressive disorder with comorbid borderline personality disorder differed on a number of clinical and family history variables, thereby supporting the validity of this distinction. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  1. Clinical, Functional, and Biological Correlates of Cognitive Dimensions in Major Depressive Disorder ? Rationale, Design, and Characteristics of the Cognitive Function and Mood Study (CoFaM-Study)

    OpenAIRE

    Baune, Bernhard T.; Air, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies exploring clinical, functional, and biological correlates of major depressive disorder are frequent. In this type of research, depression is most commonly defined as a categorical diagnosis based on studies using diagnostic instruments. Given the phenotypic and biological heterogeneity of depression, we chose to focus the phenotypic assessments on three cognitive dimensions of depression including (a) cognitive performance, (b) emotion processing, and ...

  2. Gender differences in serum testosterone and cortisol in patients with major depressive disorder compared with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaka, Hisashi; Maeshima, Hitoshi; Kida, Sayaka; Kurita, Hirofumi; Shimano, Takahisa; Nakano, Yoshiyuki; Baba, Hajime; Suzuki, Toshihito; Arai, Heii

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone may have a role distinct from cortisol in the pathophysiology of depression. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis affects the functions of sex steroid hormones through interaction with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The objective of this study was to investigate differences in serum levels of testosterone and cortisol in male and female patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Participants included 87 inpatients with MDD at Juntendo University Koshigaya Hospital. Serum levels of testosterone and cortisol were assessed at admission. Matched controls included 128 healthy individuals. Data from MDD patients and controls were compared separately for men and women. Correlations between serum hormone levels and scores on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) of patients were assessed by sex. Effects of various factors on testosterone and cortisol were analyzed using multiple regression analysis. In male patients with MDD, a significant negative correlation was seen between testosterone levels and the "retardation" score of HAM-D. However, serum testosterone levels were not significantly different in either male or female MDD patients compared with controls. Serum testosterone was negatively associated with the number of depressive episodes in male patients with MDD. Serum cortisol levels in female patients were significantly increased compared with female controls with no significant correlations between cortisol levels and HAM-D scores. The negative correlation between the sub-score of the HAM-D and testosterone may be associated with the biological pathophysiology of male depression. Findings of serum cortisol levels in women may suggest distinct characteristics of these hormones in men and women with MDD.

  3. Comparative efficacy of escitalopram in the treatment of major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen K Ali

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Mazen K Ali, Raymond W LamDepartment of Psychiatry, University of British Columbia, and Mood Disorders Centre, University of British Columbia Hospital, Vancouver, CanadaBackground: Escitalopram is an allosteric selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI with some indication of superior efficacy in the treatment of major depressive disorder. In this systematic review, we critically evaluate the evidence for comparative efficacy and tolerability of escitalopram, focusing on pooled and meta-analysis studies.Methods: A literature search was conducted for escitalopram studies that quantitatively synthesized data from comparative randomized controlled trials in MDD. Studies were excluded if they did not focus on efficacy, involved primarily subgroups of patients, or synthesized data included in subsequent studies. Outcomes extracted from the included studies were weighted mean difference or standard mean difference, response and remission rates, and withdrawal rate owing to adverse events.Results: The search initially identified 24 eligible studies, of which 12 (six pooled analysis and six meta-analysis studies met the criteria for review. The pooled and meta-analysis studies with citalopram showed significant but modest differences in favor of escitalopram, with weighted mean differences ranging from 1.13 to 1.73 points on the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale, response rate differences of 7.0%–8.3%, and remission rate differences of 5.1%–17.6%. Pooled analysis studies showed efficacy differences compared with duloxetine and with serotonin noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors combined, but meta-analysis studies did not. The effect sizes of the efficacy differences increased in the severely depressed patient subgroups.Conclusion: Based on pooled and meta-analysis studies, escitalopram demonstrates superior efficacy compared with citalopram and with SSRIs combined. Escitalopram shows similar efficacy to serotonin noradrenaline reuptake

  4. Efficacy of escitalopram monotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanjun; Shen, Yifeng; Luo, Jianfeng; Li, Huafang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of escitalopram monotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD) on the basis of pooled data analysis of 4 Chinese clinical trials. A total of 649 outpatients with MDD score of ≥18 at the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD17) were included across 4 eligible studies. Patients were treated with 10 mg/day escitalopram for 2 weeks, and then 20 mg/day escitalopram was administered if the clinical response was poor. The change in total HAMD17 score was significantly greater in moderate MDD group than in other subgroups (P Escitalopram monotherapy is effective and safe in the treatment of MDD in Chinese patients, and therapeutic efficacy is dependent on the severity of MDD. Further study is needed to identify better predictors of therapeutic responses. PMID:28953649

  5. MAJOR SUMMER-INDUCED THERMAL RISKS IN THE ALBA IULIA – TURDA DEPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CĂTĂLINA MĂRCULEȚ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Major summer-induced thermal risks in the Alba Iulia - Turda Depression. The study deals with warm-season phenomena, featuring positive, sometimes extremely high temperatures that may have a negative influence both on people’s health and economic activities. This category includes tropical waves of heat, absolute maximum temperatures, maximum frequency registered outside the specific interval of summer thermal regime: summer days, as well as tropical days and nights. The paper describes the conditions in which these phenomena occur, average and maximum occurrence rate and evolution trends likely to impair the economy at large, and especially the wide variety of crops covering large surfaceareas in the Alba Iulia - Turda Depression enjoying a Föehn regime.

  6. The role of persistent and incident major depression on rate of cognitive deterioration in newly diagnosed Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalletta, Gianfranco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Girardi, Paolo; Gianni, Walter; Casini, Anna Rosa; Palmer, Katie

    2012-07-30

    Depression may potentially impair the clinical course of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate cognitive progression of AD patients with or without major depressive episode (MDE). In this 1-year longitudinal follow-up study conducted in three Italian memory clinics, 119 newly diagnosed probable AD patients of mild severity, who were not undergoing treatment with an acetyl-cholinesterase inhibitor (AChEI), and had not been treated with psychotropic drugs in the last 2 years, were included. Patients were assessed to investigate the effect of baseline and 1-year follow-up MDE (using modified DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for MDE in AD) on progression of global cognitive deterioration (using Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE)), adjusted for confounding factors. Never being depressed was associated with a 3.1 (95%CI 1.0-10.1) increased risk of MMSE decline compared to recovered depression. Six times more patients with persistent depression had MMSE decline compared to patients with recovered depression. However, the largest odds (7.3; 95%CI 1.4-38.1) of cognitive decline was observed in patients who developed incident depression over follow-up. In conclusion, persistent or incident depression worsens cognitive outcome while no or recovered depression does not affect it in early AD patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Quality of life, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with major depression: a prospective cohort study in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ana Flávia Barros da Silva; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida

    2011-09-01

    To describe the demographic and clinical characteristics, adequacy of antidepressant treatment, and changes in quality of life of patients with major depression receiving follow-up care from primary care centers. A cohort study was performed in which major depression patients were followed-up over a nine-month period. Several evaluation instruments were used, including the World Health Organization Quality of Life and the Quality of Life-Depression, Centers for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression questionnaires. The sample comprised 179 individuals, mostly female (73%), with a mean age of 38 years and mean education of 9 years. At the end of the follow-up period, 42% of the individuals still presented with major depression, 25% had complete symptom remission, and only 9% were properly treated with antidepressants. In relation to quality of life, there were significant differences especially between baseline and after nine months in almost all measures. This study demonstrated that depressive symptoms are poorly recognized and that treatment is often inadequate for patients followed-up in primary care units in the south of Brazil. Most of the patients continued to have symptoms of depression over the nine-month period which were associated with impaired quality of life.

  8. The Effectiveness of Group Cognitive Hypnotherapy on Major Depression Referred to Residential and Semi-residential Addiction Recovery Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Haghighi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Psychological consequences of addiction, such as major depression regardless of physical problems, economic, cultural and social is cause problems for both families and society. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of group cognitive hypnotherapy on major depression in residential and semi-residential addiction recovery centers in the city of Yasuj. Methods: The present quasi-experimental study was conducted using a pre-test, post-test and control group. The population included all patients drug dependent as residential and semi-residential referred to Yasuj addiction recovery centers. 40 patients were selected by convenience sampling and randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The instrument used in this study included Beck Depression Inventory which depressed patients diagnosed and according to clinical interview they entered the study. Group cognitive Hypnotherapy intervention model was carried out on the experimental group for 8 sessions for one hour once a week, but there was no intervention on control group. After the intervention both experimental and control groups were assessed. Collected   data was analyzed using covariance analysis. Results: The results revealed that the cognitive hypnotherapy treatment of group, leading to depression reduced significantly in the experimental group compared control group significantly (p <0.001. The mean pre-test score of major depression in the experimental group and in control group was 39/5 ± 10/54 and 61/4 ± 20/52 respectively.  Whereas the mean and standard deviation of major depression and post-test scores in the experimental group 55/2 ± 05/25 and in the control group was 50/3 ± 55/51. Conclusion: Cognitive hypnotherapy can be used as adjunctive therapy in reducing major depression or used in addiction recovery centers.

  9. Major depression: the relative contribution of gender, MDMA, and cannabis use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdle, Heather; Lundahl, Leslie H; Johanson, Chris-Ellyn; Tancer, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; ecstasy) users have elevated depressive symptomatology, although it is not clear whether this is due to MDMA or other drug use. This study aimed to investigate the contributions of MDMA and cannabis use to Major Depressive Disorder in MDMA users. A total of 226 MDMA users were studied. Participants (65% male) reported an average number of 35.8 uses of MDMA (SD = 45.6, range = 2-400). Participants were administered a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Twenty-six individuals (11.5%) met lifetime criteria for Major Depressive Disorder. High rates of lifetime Cannabis Abuse (30.1%) and Cannabis Dependence (12.4%) were reported. No association was found between number of uses of MDMA and Major Depressive Disorder. Those with lifetime major depression were found, however, to have higher rates of lifetime cannabis use disorder (adjusted OR = 2.40). A logistic regression indicated that lifetime cannabis use disorder, but not MDMA use, was significantly associated with lifetime Major Depressive Disorder. Stratified analyses suggested that for males, neither drug use variable was associated with major depression. For females, a lifetime cannabis use disorder (adjusted OR = 4.99), but not MDMA use, was associated with lifetime Major Depressive Disorder. Results of this study suggest that although MDMA use was not found to be significantly associated with major depression for either gender, a lifetime cannabis use disorder was significantly associated with lifetime major depression for female, but not male, users of MDMA.

  10. Narrative therapy for adults with major depressive disorder: improved symptom and interpersonal outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vromans, Lynette P; Schweitzer, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated depressive symptom and interpersonal relatedness outcomes from eight sessions of manualized narrative therapy for 47 adults with major depressive disorder. Post-therapy, depressive symptom improvement (d=1.36) and proportions of clients achieving reliable improvement (74%), movement to the functional population (61%), and clinically significant improvement (53%) were comparable to benchmark research outcomes. Post-therapy interpersonal relatedness improvement (d=.62) was less substantial than for symptoms. Three-month follow-up found maintenance of symptom, but not interpersonal gains. Benchmarking and clinical significance analyses mitigated repeated measure design limitations, providing empirical evidence to support narrative therapy for adults with major depressive disorder.

  11. ON THE ROLE OF IMMUNOLOGICAL ABNORMALITIES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION IN MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Aleksandrovich Bekker

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Major depression correlates to several known immune and endocrine abnormalities (e.g. HPA axis hyperactivity, thymus atrophy, thymic hormone hyposecretion, among others and is often leading to diminished resistance to infections and oncologic diseases. On the other hand, major depression is one of the leading causes of cognitive decline, and it is well–known fact that functional and social recovery correlates better to cognitive functioning than to general improvement in depressive symptoms. This article thoroughly reviews different correlations between immune functions and cognition, and the existing evidence base for immune correction of cognitive dysfunctions commonly seen in depressions.

  12. Cognitive Effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Patients with Major Depressive, Bipolar and Schizophrenia Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Fouladi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is a highly effective treatment for affective and schizophrenic disorders. The main objective of this study was to examine the cognitive effects of ECT in patients with major depressive, bipolar and schizophrenia disorders. Methods: In this study we administered a battery of cognitive tasks on 90 patients with major depressive, bipolar and schizophrenia disorders, one day before and after the termination of ECT. The effects were measured by a set of computerized cognitive tests including: auditory reaction time, visual reaction time, verbal memory, Benton visual memory, Wisconsin card sort and motor function. The collected data were analyzed using One-way ANOVA and dependent t-test. Results: The results showed that depressive patients had poorer verbal memory and motor function after the termination of ECT compared to pretest, but their executive function was improved (p<0.05. After the termination of ECT the verbal and visual memory and executive function was significantly improved in patients with bipolar and schizophrenia disorders but their motor function was significantly reduced (p<0.05. Conclusion: Results of this study showed improvement for most cognitive functions in patients after electroconvulsive therapy. Findings of this study may help patients and their families to overcome their fear of electroconvulsive therapy. The results also can aware patients regarding the cognitive effects of electroconvulsive therapy.

  13. Eating Disorders and Major Depression: Role of Anger and Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbate-Daga Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate comorbidity for MD in a large ED sample and both personality and anger as clinical characteristics of patients with ED and MD. We assessed 838 ED patients with psychiatric evaluations and psychometric questionnaires: Temperament and Character Inventory, Eating Disorder Inventory-2, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory. 19.5% of ED patients were found to suffer from comorbid MD and 48.7% reported clinically significant depressive symptomatology: patients with Anorexia Binge-Purging and Bulimia Nervosa were more likely to be diagnosed with MD. Irritable mood was found in the 73% of patients with MD. High Harm Avoidance (HA and low Self-Directedness (SD predicted MD independently of severity of the ED symptomatology, several clinical variables, and ED diagnosis. Assessing both personality and depressive symptoms could be useful to provide effective treatments. Longitudinal studies are needed to investigate the pathogenetic role of HA and SD for ED and MD.

  14. Prevalence and relationship between major depressive disorder and lung cancer: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneeton B

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Benchalak Maneeton,1 Narong Maneeton,1 Jirayu Reungyos,1 Suthi Intaprasert,1 Samornsri Leelarphat,1 Sumitra Thongprasert21Department of Psychiatry, 2Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, ThailandObjective: The aims of this study were to estimate the prevalence and examine the factors associated with major depressive disorder (MDD in lung cancer patients.Materials and methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out in the oncology clinic of the University Hospital, Chiang Mai University, Thailand. Patients with all stages of lung cancer were included in this study. Demographic data of eligible patients were gathered. The Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Thai version 5.0.0 was used to identify MDD. The Thai version of the Personal Health Questionnaire Depression Scale was used to assess depression severity.Results: A total of 146 lung cancer patients from the outpatient clinic from July to December 2012 were approached. The 104 patients were included and analyzed in this study. Based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview, 14.4% of them were defined as having MDD. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that Chalder Fatigue Scale, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – Lung, and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores were significantly correlated with MDD in lung cancer patients.Conclusion: The results suggest that MDD is more prevalent in lung cancer patients. In addition, fatigue, poor quality of life, and sleep disturbance may increase associated MDD. Because of the small sample size, further studies should be conducted to confirm these results.Keywords: lung cancer, major depressive disorder, prevalence

  15. Lithium's emerging role in the treatment of refractory major depressive episodes: augmentation of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Michael; Adli, Mazda; Bschor, Tom; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Pfennig, Andrea; Sasse, Johanna; Schmid, Rita; Lewitzka, Ute

    2010-01-01

    The late onset of therapeutic response and a relatively large proportion of nonresponders to antidepressants remain major concerns in clinical practice. Therefore, there is a critical need for effective medication strategies that augment treatment with antidepressants. To review the available evidence on the use of lithium as an augmentation strategy to treat depressive episodes. More than 30 open-label studies and 10 placebo-controlled double-blind trials have demonstrated substantial efficacy of lithium augmentation in the acute treatment of depressive episodes. Most of these studies were performed in unipolar depression and included all major classes of antidepressants, however mostly tricyclics. A meta-analysis including 10 randomized placebo-controlled trials has provided evidence that lithium augmentation has a statistically significant effect on the response rate compared to placebo with an odds ratio of 3.11, which corresponds to a number-needed-to-treat of 5. The meta-analysis revealed a mean response rate of 41.2% in the lithium group and 14.4% in the placebo group. One placebo-controlled trial in the continuation treatment phase showed that responders to acute-phase lithium augmentation should be maintained on the lithium-antidepressant combination for at least 12 months to prevent early relapses. Preliminary studies to assess genetic influences on response probability to lithium augmentation have suggested a predictive role of the -50T/C single nucleotide polymorphism of the GSK3beta gene. Augmentation of antidepressants with lithium is currently the best-evidenced augmentation therapy in the treatment of depressed patients who do not respond to antidepressants. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Functional Recovery in Major Depressive Disorder: Providing Early Optimal Treatment for the Individual Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Martin A; Habert, Jeffrey; McIntosh, Diane; MacQueen, Glenda M; Milev, Roumen V; McIntyre, Roger S; Blier, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Major depressive disorder is an often chronic and recurring illness. Left untreated, major depressive disorder may result in progressive alterations in brain morphometry and circuit function. Recent findings, however, suggest that pharmacotherapy may halt and possibly reverse those effects. These findings, together with evidence that a delay in treatment is associated with poorer clinical outcomes, underscore the urgency of rapidly treating depression to full recovery. Early optimized treatment, using measurement-based care and customizing treatment to the individual patient, may afford the best possible outcomes for each patient. The aim of this article is to present recommendations for using a patient-centered approach to rapidly provide optimal pharmacological treatment to patients with major depressive disorder. Offering major depressive disorder treatment determined by individual patient characteristics (e.g., predominant symptoms, medical history, comorbidities), patient preferences and expectations, and, critically, their own definition of wellness provides the best opportunity for full functional recovery. PMID:29024974

  17. Perception of affective prosody in major depression: a link to executive functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uekermann, Jennifer; Abdel-Hamid, Mona; Lehmkämper, Caroline; Vollmoeller, Wolfgang; Daum, Irene

    2008-07-01

    Major depression is associated with impairments of executive functions and affect perception deficits, both being linked to dysfunction of fronto-subcortical networks. So far, little is known about the relationship between cognitive and affective deficits in major depression. In the present investigation, affect perception and executive functions were assessed in 29 patients with a diagnosis of major depression (Dep) and 29 healthy controls (HC). Both groups were comparable on IQ, age, and gender distribution. Depressed patients showed deficits of perception of affective prosody, which were significantly related to inhibition, set shifting, and working memory. Our findings suggest a significant association between cognitive deficits and affect perception impairments in major depression, which may be of considerable clinical relevance and might be addressed in treatment approaches. Future studies are desirable to investigate the nature of the association in more detail.

  18. Mindfulness, Quality of Life, and Severity of Depressive Symptoms Among Patients With Schizophrenia and Patients With Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Ahmad Hussien Rateb

    2017-05-01

    The current study used a descriptive correlational design to examine the relationship between mindfulness and quality of life (QOL) among patients with schizophrenia (n = 160) and patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) (n = 161), controlling for demographic and clinical variables. Participants completed self-reported questionnaires regarding demographic variables, severity of depression, QOL, and mindfulness. Patients diagnosed with MDD had higher mindfulness scores than patients diagnosed with schizophrenia. Mindfulness scores were significantly associated with the severity of depression among participants. After controlling for the demographic variables and severity of depressive symptoms, mindfulness had a unique variance in QOL among patients with schizophrenia, but not among patients with MDD. The current study provides preliminary evidence regarding the role of mindfulness in improving depressive symptoms and the overall QOL among patients diagnosed with mental illness. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(5), 40-50.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Meditation for Depression: A Systematic Review of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    75.6.1000 Systematic review 69 Publication Exclusion Reason Cohen, G. E., and Shamus, E. (2009). Depressed, low self - esteem : what can exercise do for...Participants: gender , age, method of depression identification, baseline depression scores; • Interventions: type of meditation, dosage (intensity...Fourteen studies reported the outcome assessors were blinded to intervention assignment or the study 14 outcomes were self -reported instruments

  20. INFLEXIBLE COGNITION PREDICTS FIRST ONSET OF MAJOR DEPRESSIVE EPISODES IN ADOLESCENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Jonathan P; Connolly, Samantha L; Burke, Taylor A; Hamilton, Jessica L; Hamlat, Elissa J; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2016-04-19

    Major depressive disorder often is characterized by a lack of cognitive and emotional flexibility, resulting in an impaired ability to adapt to situational demands. Adolescence is an important period of risk for the first onset of depression, yet relatively little is known about whether aspects of inflexibility, such as rumination and deficits in attentional shifting, could confer risk for the development of the disorder during this time. In the present study, a sample of 285 never-depressed adolescents completed self-report and behavioral measures of rumination and attentional shifting at a baseline visit, followed by up to 4 years of annual prospective follow-up diagnostic assessments. Survival analyses indicated that adolescents with greater levels of rumination or poorer attentional shifting experienced a shorter time until the first onset of major depressive episodes, even after accounting for baseline symptoms and demographic characteristics. Although girls were twice as likely as boys to experience the first onset of depression, rumination predicted a shorter time until depression onset only for boys. Rumination and attentional shifting were not correlated and predicted time until onset of major depression independently of one another. These results provide evidence that components of cognition that are characterized by rigidity and perseveration confer risk for the first onset of major depression during adolescence. Evaluating rumination and attentional shifting in adolescence may be useful in identifying individuals who are at risk for depression and who may benefit from interventions that target or alter the development of these characteristics. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The computerized adaptive diagnostic test for major depressive disorder (CAD-MDD): a screening tool for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Robert D; Hooker, Giles; Finkelman, Matthew D; Weiss, David J; Pilkonis, Paul A; Frank, Ellen; Moore, Tara; Kupfer, David J

    2013-07-01

    To develop a computerized adaptive diagnostic screening tool for depression that decreases patient and clinician burden and increases sensitivity and specificity for clinician-based DSM-IV diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD). 656 individuals with and without minor and major depression were recruited from a psychiatric clinic and a community mental health center and through public announcements (controls without depression). The focus of the study was the development of the Computerized Adaptive Diagnostic Test for Major Depressive Disorder (CAD-MDD) diagnostic screening tool based on a decision-theoretical approach (random forests and decision trees). The item bank consisted of 88 depression scale items drawn from 73 depression measures. Sensitivity and specificity for predicting clinician-based Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders diagnoses of MDD were the primary outcomes. Diagnostic screening accuracy was then compared to that of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). An average of 4 items per participant was required (maximum of 6 items). Overall sensitivity and specificity were 0.95 and 0.87, respectively. For the PHQ-9, sensitivity was 0.70 and specificity was 0.91. High sensitivity and reasonable specificity for a clinician-based DSM-IV diagnosis of depression can be obtained using an average of 4 adaptively administered self-report items in less than 1 minute. Relative to the currently used PHQ-9, the CAD-MDD dramatically increased sensitivity while maintaining similar specificity. As such, the CAD-MDD will identify more true positives (lower false-negative rate) than the PHQ-9 using half the number of items. Inexpensive (relative to clinical assessment), efficient, and accurate screening of depression in the settings of primary care, psychiatric epidemiology, molecular genetics, and global health are all direct applications of the current system. © Copyright 2013 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  2. Personality and Major Depression among Directly Exposed Survivors of the Oklahoma City Bombing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol S. North

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Few disaster studies have specifically examined personality and resilience in association with disaster exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, and major depression. Methods. 151 directly-exposed survivors of the Oklahoma City bombing randomly selected from a bombing survivor registry completed PTSD, major depression, and personality assessments using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for DSM-IV and the Temperament and Character Inventory, respectively. Results. The most prevalent postdisaster psychiatric disorder was bombing-related PTSD (32%; major depression was second in prevalence (21%. Bombing-related PTSD was associated with the combination of low self-directedness and low cooperativeness and also with high self-transcendence and high harm avoidance in most configurations. Postdisaster major depression was significantly more prevalent among those with (56% than without (5% bombing-related PTSD (P<.001 and those with (72% than without (14% predisaster major depression (P<.001. Incident major depression was not associated with the combination of low self-directedness and low cooperativeness. Conclusions. Personality features can distinguish resilience to a specific life-threatening stressor from general indicators of well-being. Unlike bombing-related PTSD, major depression was not a robust marker of low resilience. Development and validation of measures of resilience should utilize well-defined diagnoses whenever possible, rather than relying on nonspecific measures of psychological distress.

  3. The extended functional neuroanatomy of emotional processing biases for masked faces in major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa A Victor

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder (MDD is associated with a mood-congruent processing bias in the amygdala toward face stimuli portraying sad expressions that is evident even when such stimuli are presented below the level of conscious awareness. The extended functional anatomical network that maintains this response bias has not been established, however.To identify neural network differences in the hemodynamic response to implicitly presented facial expressions between depressed and healthy control participants.Unmedicated-depressed participants with MDD (n=22 and healthy controls (HC; n=25 underwent functional MRI as they viewed face stimuli showing sad, happy or neutral face expressions, presented using a backward masking design. The blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD signal was measured to identify regions where the hemodynamic response to the emotionally valenced stimuli differed between groups.The MDD subjects showed greater BOLD responses than the controls to masked-sad versus masked-happy faces in the hippocampus, amygdala and anterior inferotemporal cortex. While viewing both masked-sad and masked-happy faces relative to masked-neutral faces, the depressed subjects showed greater hemodynamic responses than the controls in a network that included the medial and orbital prefrontal cortices and anterior temporal cortex.Depressed and healthy participants showed distinct hemodynamic responses to masked-sad and masked-happy faces in neural circuits known to support the processing of emotionally valenced stimuli and to integrate the sensory and visceromotor aspects of emotional behavior. Altered function within these networks in MDD may establish and maintain illness-associated differences in the salience of sensory/social stimuli, such that attention is biased toward negative and away from positive stimuli.

  4. Beck Depression Inventory is a useful screening tool for major depressive disorder in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Snijders, A H; Robertson, M M; Orth, M

    2006-01-01

    This study determined the prevalence of and factors associated with comorbid major depressive disorder (MDD) in patients with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). How a simple self‐report instrument, the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), correlates with clinical assessment of comorbid MDD in this population was assessed. In a continuous sample of 114 adult patients with GTS, assessed clinically using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders‐IV criteria, 26 (23%) patients met...

  5. Positive Affectivity is Dampened in Youths with Histories of Major Depression and Their Never-Depressed Adolescent Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Maria; Bylsma, Lauren M; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Rottenberg, Jonathan; George, Charles J; Kiss, Enikő; Halas, Kitti; Benák, István; Baji, Ildiko; Vetro, Ágnes; Kapornai, Krisztina

    2016-07-01

    While hedonic capacity is diminished during clinical depression, it is unclear whether that deficit constitutes a risk factor and/or persists after depression episodes remit. To examine these issues, adolescents with current/past major depression (probands; n=218), never depressed biological siblings of probands (n=207), and emotionally-well controls (n=183) were exposed to several positively valenced probes. Across baseline and hedonic probe conditions, controls consistently reported higher levels of positive affect than high-risk siblings, and siblings reported higher levels of positive affect than probands (remitted and depressed probands' reports were similar). Extent of positive affect across the protocol predicted adolescents' self-reports of social support network and parental reports of offspring's use of various adaptive mood repair responses in daily life. Attenuated hedonic responding among youths remitted from depression offers partial support for anhedonia as a trait, while its presence among never depressed high-risk siblings argues for anhedonia as a potential diathesis for clinical depression.

  6. Differential co-expression and regulation analyses reveal different mechanisms underlying major depressive disorder and subsyndromal symptomatic depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Yang, Jing; Chen, Jin; Wu, Qingyuan; Gong, Wei; Zhang, Jianguo; Shao, Weihua; Mu, Jun; Yang, Deyu; Yang, Yongtao; Li, Zhiwei; Xie, Peng

    2015-04-03

    Recent depression research has revealed a growing awareness of how to best classify depression into depressive subtypes. Appropriately subtyping depression can lead to identification of subtypes that are more responsive to current pharmacological treatment and aid in separating out depressed patients in which current antidepressants are not particularly effective. Differential co-expression analysis (DCEA) and differential regulation analysis (DRA) were applied to compare the transcriptomic profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with two depressive subtypes: major depressive disorder (MDD) and subsyndromal symptomatic depression (SSD). Six differentially regulated genes (DRGs) (FOSL1, SRF, JUN, TFAP4, SOX9, and HLF) and 16 transcription factor-to-target differentially co-expressed gene links or pairs (TF2target DCLs) appear to be the key differential factors in MDD; in contrast, one DRG (PATZ1) and eight TF2target DCLs appear to be the key differential factors in SSD. There was no overlap between the MDD target genes and SSD target genes. Venlafaxine (Efexor™, Effexor™) appears to have a significant effect on the gene expression profile of MDD patients but no significant effect on the gene expression profile of SSD patients. DCEA and DRA revealed no apparent similarities between the differential regulatory processes underlying MDD and SSD. This bioinformatic analysis may provide novel insights that can support future antidepressant R&D efforts.

  7. CLASSIFICATION OF ANXIETY DISORDERS COMORBID WITH MAJOR DEPRESSION: COMMON OR DISTINCT INFLUENCES ON RISK?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscati, Arden; Flint, Jonathan; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-02-01

    Anxiety and depression display frequent comorbidity. Individuals with comorbid disorders also often have more extreme symptomatology than those with single disorders. This correlation between comorbidity and severity poses an interesting question: Are comorbid forms of anxiety and depression essentially just more severe versions of the pure disorders? In a large major depression (MD) case-control sample of individuals from the China, Oxford and VCU Experimental Research on Genetic Epidemiology project, we examined the patterns of lifetime anxiety comorbidity (including generalized anxiety disorder--GAD, panic disorder, and five phobia subtypes) among MD cases (N = 5,864) in this population. Binary and multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate associations between risk factors and outcomes including MD as well as latent class membership, which were compared using continuation ratios. We found a five-class solution to fit best, and each resulting class had a distinct pattern of association with the tested risk factors. The use of continuation ratios suggests that a class characterized by high endorsement of GAD is comparable to a more severely affected "pure MD" group. The other three classes (characterized by agoraphobia, various specific phobias, and by high endorsement of all comorbid anxiety disorders, respectively) appear to differ meaningfully from MD alone. Risk for MD resulting from environmental and psychosocial factors may also predispose individuals to GAD, and less consistently, other anxiety disorders. Presentations of MD with certain phobias display distinguishably different patterns of risk, however, and are therefore likely qualitatively distinct. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Subtypes of depression and their overlap in a naturalistic inpatient sample of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Richard; Seemüller, Florian; Meyer, Sebastian; Spellmann, Ilja; Adli, Mazda; Bauer, Michael; Kronmüller, Klaus-Thomas; Brieger, Peter; Laux, Gerd; Bender, Wolfram; Heuser, Isabella; Fisher, Robert; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Schennach, Rebecca; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Riedel, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Subtyping depression is important in order to further delineate biological causes of depressive syndromes. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical and outcome characteristics of distinct subtypes of depression and to assess proportion and features of patients fulfilling criteria for more than one subtype. Melancholic, atypical and anxious subtypes of depression were assessed in a naturalistic sample of 833 inpatients using DSM-IV specifiers based on operationalized criteria. Baseline characteristics and outcome criteria at discharge were compared between distinct subtypes and their overlap. A substantial proportion of patients (16%) were classified with more than one subtype of depression, 28% were of the distinct anxious, 7% of the distinct atypical and 5% of the distinct melancholic subtype. Distinct melancholic patients had shortest duration of episode, highest baseline depression severity, but were more often early improvers; distinct anxious patients had higher NEO-Five Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) neuroticism scores compared with patients with unspecific subtype. Melancholic patients with overlap of anxious features had worse treatment outcome compared to distinct melancholic and distinct anxious subtype. Distinct subtypes differed in only few variables and patients with overlap of depression subtypes may have independent clinical and outcome characteristics. Studies investigating biological causes of subtypes of depression should take influence of features of other subtypes into account. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Efficacy of Pharmacotherapy and Cognitive Therapy, Alone and in Combination in Major Depressive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    A. Rahimi; F. Shamsaie; M.K. Zarabian; M. Sedehi

    2008-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Patients with Major depressive are difficult to treat, and the relative efficacy of medications and cognitive therapy in the treatment of depression is still a matter of deabath. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacies of antidepressant medication, cognitive therapy and combination of cognitive therapy and antidepressant medication. Materials & Methods: In an experimental study, 120 depressive patients were randomly selected and divided in three grou...

  10. Genetic variants within the serotonin transporter associated with familial risk for major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Ardesheer; Guffanti, Guia; Odgerel, Zagaa; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Malm, Heli; Sourander, Andre; Brown, Alan S.; Wickramaratne, Priya J.; Gingrich, Jay A.; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the serotonin transporter promoter linked polymorphism (5HTTLPR) in depression, despite much research, remains unclear. Most studies compare persons with and without depression to each other. We show offspring at high (N=192) as compared to low (N=101) familial risk for major depressive disorder were almost four times as likely to have two copies of the short allele at 5HTTLPR, suggesting that incorporation of family history could be helpful in identifying genetic differences. PMID:25920807

  11. Impulsivity in adolescents with major depressive disorder: A comparative tunisian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemakhem, Khaoula; Boudabous, Jaweher; Cherif, Leila; Ayadi, Hela; Walha, Adel; Moalla, Yousr; Hadjkacem, Imen; Ghribi, Farhat

    2017-08-01

    The association between impulsivity and depressive disorders in adolescence has been little studied at the literature and in our country, yet impulsivity is a major risk factor for suicide. Thus we aimed on this study to evaluate impulsivity in 25 adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder MDD compared to a control sample and to analyze the correlations between impulsivity and clinical features of MDD. Employing a matched case-control design, participants included 25 adolescents with MDD and 75 controls. We have administered the Barratt Impulsivity Scale BIS-11 for the two groups to evaluate impulsivity. Semi structured interviews according DSM 5 criteria were conducted for adolescents with MDD. The Child Depressive Inventory CDI was used to measure depressive symptoms in the control sample. Adolescents with MDD were more impulsive compared to controls according to the BIS-11 in its three domains: motor (24.96±6.26 against 20.6±4.84; p=0.000), attentional (20.88±5.03 against 16.64±3.2; p=0.000) and non planning (28.2±7.26 against 24.44±4.32; p=0.02). Impulsivity was not correlated with clinical features of MDD (suicide attempts, psychiatric comorbidities, antidepressant medication …). Adolescents with MDD seem to be more impulsive than control subjects regardless their clinical features. Whether it is a specific characteristic or a symptom among others of MDD, impulsivity predicts health-related behaviors and associated damage that need to be detected and prevented in time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. IRRITABLE MOOD IN ADULT MAJOR DEPRESSIVE DISORDER: RESULTS FROM THE WORLD MENTAL HEALTH SURVEYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovess-Masfety, Viviane; Alonso, Jordi; Angermeyer, Matthias; Bromet, Evelyn; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Jonge, Peter; Demyttenaere, Koen; Florescu, Silvia E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Gureje, Oye; Hu, Chiyi; Huang, Yueqin; Karam, Elie G.; Jin, Robert; Lépine, Jean-Pierre; Levinson, Daphna; McLaughlin, Katie A.; Medina-Mora, María E.; O’Neill, Siobhan; Ono, Yutaka; Posada-Villa, José A.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Scott, Kate M.; Shahly, Victoria; Stein, Dan J.; Viana, Maria C.; Zarkov, Zahari; Kessler, Ronald C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although irritability is a core symptom of DSM-IV major depressive disorder (MDD) for youth but not adults, clinical studies find comparable rates of irritability between nonbipolar depressed adults and youth. Including irritability as a core symptom of adult MDD would allow detection of depression-equivalent syndromes with primary irritability hypothesized to be more common among males than females. We carried out a preliminary examination of this issue using cross-national community-based survey data from 21 countries in the World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys (n = 110,729). Methods The assessment of MDD in the WHO Composite International Diagnostic Interview includes one question about persistent irritability. We examined two expansions of the definition of MDD involving this question: (1) cases with dysphoria and/or anhedonia and exactly four of nine Criterion A symptoms plus irritability; and (2) cases with two or more weeks of irritability plus four or more other Criterion A MDD symptoms in the absence of dysphoria or anhedonia. Results Adding irritability as a tenth Criterion A symptom increased lifetime prevalence by 0.4% (from 11.2 to 11.6%). Adding episodes of persistent irritability increased prevalence by an additional 0.2%. Proportional prevalence increases were significantly higher, but nonetheless small, among males compared to females. Rates of severe role impairment were significantly lower among respondents with this irritable depression who did not meet conventional DSM-IV criteria than those with DSM-IV MDD. Conclusion Although limited by the superficial assessment in this single question on irritability, results do not support expanding adult MDD criteria to include irritable mood. PMID:23364997

  13. Revisiting the Dexamethasone Suppression Test in unipolar major depression: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihmer Zoltan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Important methodological questions still exist concerning the Dexamethasone Suppression Test (DST, including the possibility of a better way of interpreting it. The aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of an alternative way of interpreting DST results. Methods A total of 50 patients with major depression aged 41.0 ± 11.4 years old participated in the study. Past and present suicide attempts were recorded. Psychometric assessment included the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS, the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAS, the Newcastle Depression Diagnostic Scale (NDDS, the Diagnostic Melancholia Scale (DMS and the General Assessment of Functioning (GAF scale. The 1 mg DST protocol was used. Analysis methods included the chi square test and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA with Fisher least significant difference (LSD as post hoc tests. Results In all, 34 patients (68% were suppressors, 16 (32% were non-suppressors and 14 patients had cortisol values above 5 μg/dl at baseline. Baseline cortisol level did not influence the classical DST interpretation. A total of 18 patients (36% showed an increase of their cortisol levels after dexamethasone administration and 32 patients (64% showed a decrease. Reducers had less melancholic features, similar levels of depression, better sleep and less suicidal thoughts in comparison to increasers. No relationship of DST to suicidality was found. Discussion The present study explored the pattern of cortisol response to dexamethasone suppression and suggested an alternative way of coding and interpreting the DST on the basis of whether the cortisol levels remain stable or increase vs decrease after the administration of cortisol. The results put forward a complex way of understanding the relationship of the DST results with clinical symptoms.

  14. Major depressive disorder: mechanism-based prescribing for personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saltiel PF

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Philip F Saltiel,1 Daniel I Silvershein2 1Department of Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine/Langone Medical Center New York University Behavioral Health Programs, New York University Pearl Barlow Center for Memory Evaluation and Treatment, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine/Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Individual patients with depression present with unique symptom clusters – before, during, and even after treatment. The prevalence of persistent, unresolved symptoms and their contribution to patient functioning and disease progression emphasize the importance of finding the right treatment choice at the onset and the utility of switching medications based on suboptimal responses. Our primary goal as clinicians is to improve patient function and quality of life. In fact, feelings of well-being and the return to premorbid levels of functioning are frequently rated by patients as being more important than symptom relief. However, functional improvements often lag behind resolution of mood, attributed in large part to persistent and functionally impairing symptoms – namely, fatigue, sleep/wake disturbance, and cognitive dysfunction. Thus, patient outcomes can be optimized by deconstructing each patient’s depressive profile to its component symptoms and specifically targeting those domains that differentially limit patient function. This article will provide an evidence-based framework within which clinicians may tailor pharmacotherapy to patient symptomatology for improved treatment outcomes. Keywords: MDD, tailored pharmacotherapy, patient-specific profile, individualized pharmacotherapy

  15. Effect of Mirtazapine Treatment on Serum Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in Patients of Major Depressive Disorder with Severe Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rachna; Gupta, Keshav; Tripathi, A K; Bhatia, M S; Gupta, Lalit K

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the clinical efficacy of mirtazapine and its effect on serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels in patients of major-depressive disorder (MDD) with severe depression. Patients (aged 18-60) with MDD diagnosed by DSM-IV criteria, and Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) score ≥25 were included (n = 30). Mirtazapine was given in the doses of 30 mg/day. All patients were followed up for 12 weeks for the evaluation of clinical efficacy, safety along with serum BDNF and TNF-α levels. HAM-D score at the start of treatment was 30.1 ± 1.92, which significantly (p depressed patients and treatment response is associated with an increase in serum BDNF and a decrease in serum TNF-α levels. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Happiness, depression and human benevolence beliefs in institutionalized and non institutionalized major adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter L. Arias

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyze the relations between happiness, depression and human benevolence beliefs in a group of major people who live in asylums (24 and others who live with their families (38. We use Lima’s happiness scale, Yesavage’s Geriatric depression scale and Belief in human scale. We found that there were no significant differences between two groups of major adults in depression levels, but in happiness, positive sense of life and satisfaction with life, non institutionalized older adults had higher punctuations than major people who lived in asylums.

  17. Associations of 5HTTLPR polymorphism with major depressive disorder and alcohol dependence: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Khine Zin; Aung, Ye Kyaw; Jenkins, Mark A; Win, Aung Ko

    2016-09-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is understood to control mood and drug response. Carrying a genetic variant in the serotonin transporter gene (5HTT) may increase the risk of major depressive disorder and alcohol dependence. Previous estimates of the association of the S allele of 5HTTLPR polymorphism with major depressive disorder and alcohol dependence have been inconsistent. For the systematic review, we used PubMed MEDLINE and Discovery of The University of Melbourne to search for all relevant case-control studies investigating the associations of 5HTTLPR polymorphism with major depressive disorder and alcohol dependence. Summary odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. To investigate whether year of publication, study population or diagnostic criteria used were potential sources of heterogeneity, we performed meta-regression analyses. Publication bias was assessed using Funnel plots and Egger's statistical tests. We included 23 studies of major depressive disorder without alcohol dependence containing 3392 cases and 5093 controls, and 11 studies of alcohol dependence without major depressive disorder containing 2079 cases and 2273 controls. The summary OR for homozygote carriers of the S allele of 5HTTLPR polymorphism compared with heterozygote and non-carriers combined (SS vs SL+LL genotype) was 1.33 (95% CI = [1.19, 1.48]) for major depressive disorder and 1.18 (95% CI = [1.01, 1.38]) for alcohol dependence. The summary OR per S allele of 5HTTLPR polymorphism was 1.16 (95% CI = [1.08, 1.23]) for major depressive disorder and 1.12 (95% CI = [1.01, 1.23]) for alcohol dependence. Meta-regression models showed that the associations did not substantially change after adjusting for year of publication, study population and diagnostic criteria used. There was no evidence for publication bias of the studies included in our meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis confirms that individuals with the homozygous S allele of 5HTTLPR

  18. Sex Differences in Serum Markers of Major Depressive Disorder in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M Ramsey

    Full Text Available Women have a consistently higher prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD than men. Hypotheses implicating hypothalamic-pituitary -adrenal, -gonadal, and -thyroid axes, immune response, genetic factors, and neurotransmitters have emerged to explain this difference. However, more evidence for these hypotheses is needed and new explanations must be explored. Here, we investigated sex differences in MDD markers using multiplex immunoassay measurements of 171 serum molecules in individuals enrolled in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NMDD = 231; Ncontrol = 365. We found 28 sex-dependent markers of MDD, as quantified by a significant interaction between sex and log2-transformed analyte concentration in a logistic regression with diagnosis (MDD/control as the outcome variable (p<0.05; q<0.30. Among these were a number of male-specific associations between MDD and elevated levels of proteins involved in immune response, including C-reactive protein, trefoil factor 3, cystatin-C, fetuin-A, β2-microglobulin, CD5L, FASLG receptor, and tumor necrosis factor receptor 2. Furthermore, only male MDD could be classified with an accuracy greater than chance using the measured serum analytes (area under the ROC curve = 0.63. These findings may have consequences for the generalization of inflammatory hypotheses of depression to males and females and have important implications for the development of diagnostic biomarker tests for MDD. More studies are needed to validate these results, investigate a broader range of biological pathways, and integrate this data with brain imaging, genetic, and other relevant data.

  19. Major depression and suicide attempts in patients with liver disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Strat, Yann; Le Foll, Bernard; Dubertret, Caroline

    2015-07-01

    Depression is common in patients with liver disease. Moreover, alcohol use is intricately linked with both major depression and liver disease, and has also been linked with suicidal behaviours, suggesting that the alcohol use may have an intermediate role in the relationship between liver disease and major depression or suicidal behaviours. This study presents nationally representative data on the prevalence of major depression in patients with liver disease in the United States and its association with suicide attempts. Data were drawn from the 2001-2002 National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). The NESARC is a survey of 43 093 adults aged 18 years and older in the United States. Medically recognized liver diseases were self-reported, and diagnoses of major depression were based on the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV version. The prevalence of liver disease was estimated at 0.7%. Respondents with a liver disease reported 12-month rates of major depression (17.2%) that were significantly higher than among respondents without liver disease (7.0%; Adjusted OR:2.2; CI: 1.2-4.1). Lifetime rates of suicide attempts among participants with a major depression were also higher in participants with a liver disease (33.2%) than among respondents without liver disease (13.7%; OR: 3.1; CI: 1.3-7.6). Liver diseases are associated with major depression and suicide attempts among adults in the community. Adjustment for the amount of alcohol used or sociodemographical factors did not explain the observed association of liver disease with both major depression and suicide attempts. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Association of translocator protein total distribution volume with duration of untreated major depressive disorder: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Elaine; Attwells, Sophia; Wilson, Alan A; Mizrahi, Romina; Rusjan, Pablo M; Miler, Laura; Xu, Cynthia; Sharma, Sarita; Kish, Stephen; Houle, Sylvain; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2018-02-26

    F-FEPPA PET to measure TSPO V T . We investigated the duration of untreated major depressive disorder, and the combination of total duration of disease and duration of antidepressant treatment, as predictor variables of TSPO V T , assessing their significance. Between Sept 1, 2009, and July 6, 2017, we screened 134 participants for eligibility, of whom 81 were included in the study (current major depressive episode n=51, healthy n=30). We excluded one participant with a major depressive episode from the analysis because of unreliable information about previous medication use. Duration of untreated major depressive disorder was a strong predictor of TSPO V T (pdepressive disorder for 10 years or longer, TSPO V T was 29-33% greater in the prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and insula than in participants who were untreated for 9 years or less. TSPO V T was also 31-39% greater in the three primary grey-matter regions of participants with long duration of untreated major depressive disorder compared with healthy participants (p=0·00047). Microglial activation, as shown by TSPO V T , is greater in patients with chronologically advanced major depressive disorder with long periods of no antidepressant treatment than in patients with major depressive disorder with short periods of no antidepressant treatment, which is strongly suggestive of a different illness phase. Consistent with this, the yearly increase in microglial activation is no longer evident when antidepressant treatment is given. Canadian Institutes of Health Research and Neuroscience Catalyst Fund. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Longitudinal Joint Effect of Obesity and Major Depression on Work Performance Impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigatu, Yeshambel T.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Schoevers, Robert A.; Bultmann, Ute

    Objectives. We examined the longitudinal effect of obesity, major depression, and their combination on work performance impairment (WPI). Methods. We collected longitudinal data (2004-2013) on 1726 paid employees from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety at baseline and 2-, 4-, and 6-year

  2. The longitudinal joint effect of obesity and major depression on work performance impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nigatu, Y.T.; Reijneveld, S.A.; Penninx, B.W.; Schoevers, R.A.; Bultmann, U.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We examined the longitudinal effect of obesity, major depression, and their combination on work performance impairment (WPI). Methods: We collected longitudinal data (2004-2013) on 1726 paid employees from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety at baseline and 2-, 4-, and 6-year

  3. Recovery from Major Depressive Disorder among Female Adolescents: A Prospective Test of the Scar Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevers, Christopher G.; Rohde, Paul; Stice, Eric; Nolen-Hoeksema, Susan

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the psychosocial consequences of experiencing major depressive disorder (MDD). In a 7-year longitudinal study of 496 female adolescents, the authors identified 49 girls who experienced their first episode of MDD and then recovered. They were compared with a randomly selected group of 98 never depressed participants on 13…

  4. A central role for the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system in neurogenesis and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbins, Erich; Walter, Silke; Becker, Katrin Anne; Halmer, Ramona; Liu, Yang; Reichel, Martin; Edwards, Michael J; Müller, Christian P; Fassbender, Klaus; Kornhuber, Johannes

    2015-07-01

    Major depressive disorder is a severe and chronic illness with high lifetime prevalence and a high incidence of suicide as the cause of death for patients with this diagnosis. Major depressive disorder is often treated with anti-depressants. Although these drugs have been used for many years, their exact mode of action is still unknown. It has been suggested that many anti-depressants act by increasing the concentrations of serotonergic transmitters in the synaptic space. However, recent studies have examined the effects of anti-depressants on neurogenesis in the hippocampus, the restoration of hippocampal neuronal networks that may be affected by major depression, and the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by immature neurons in the hippocampus. Here, we present and discuss a novel hypothesis suggesting that these events are regulated by the concentrations of sphingolipids, in particular ceramide, in the hippocampus. These concepts suggest that the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide system plays a central role in the pathogenesis of major depression and may be a novel target for anti-depressants. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Cost-effectiveness of interpersonal psychoterapy for elderly primary care patients with major depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, J.E.; van Schaik, D.J.; Heijmans, M.W.; van Marwijk, H.W.J.; Hout, H.P. van; de Bruijne, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Major depression is common in elderly patients. Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) is a potentially effective treatment for depressed elderly patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of IPT delivered by mental health workers in primary care practices,

  6. Psychotherapy, Antidepressants, and Their Combination for Chronic Major Depressive Disorder: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, J.; Straten, A. van; Bockting, C.L.H.; Meeuwissen, J.A.C.; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Recommendations for treatment of chronic major depressive disorder (cMDD) are mostly based on clinical experiences and on the literature on treatment-resistant depression (TRD) but not on a systematic review of the literature. Method: We conducted a systematic review of 10 randomized

  7. Psychotherapy, antidepressants, and their combination for chronic major depressive disorder : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijker, Jan; van Straten, Annemieke; Bockting, Claudi L.H.; Meeuwissen, Jolanda A.C.; van Balkom, Anton J.L.M.

    OBJECTIVE: Recommendations for treatment of chronic major depressive disorder (cMDD) are mostly based on clinical experiences and on the literature on treatment-resistant depression (TRD) but not on a systematic review of the literature. METHOD: We conducted a systematic review of 10 randomized

  8. The role of obesity measures in the development and persistence of major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gibson-Smith, Deborah; Bot, Mariska; Paans, Nadine Pg; Visser, Marjolein; Brouwer, Ingeborg; Penninx, Brenda Wjh

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of obesity with the development of major depressive disorder (MDD) requires conformation and whether obesity contributes to more chronic depression in persons with established (MDD) is unknown. This study examined the longitudinal relationship of body mass index (BMI) and waist

  9. Psychosocial Treatments for Major Depression and Dysthymia in Older Adults: A Review of the Research Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalaquett, Carlos P.; Stens, Andrea N.

    2006-01-01

    Older adults represent a growing segment of the population with the highest suicide rate and an increasing need of counseling services for major depression and dysthymia. The present study examined the literature with the purpose of identifying research addressing psychosocial treatments of depression in later life. A summary of treatments…

  10. Structural MRI correlates for vulnerability and resilience to major depressive disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amico, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    In major depressive disorder (MDD), it is unclear to what extent structural brain changes are associated with depressive episodes or represent part of the mechanism by which the risk for illness is mediated. The aim of this study was to investigate whether structural abnormalities are related to risk for the development of MDD.

  11. Major depressive disorder and accelerated cellular aging: results from a large psychiatric cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, J.E.; Revesz, D.; Epel, E.S.; Lin, J.; Wolkowitz, O.M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) have an increased onset risk of aging-related somatic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, obesity and cancer. This suggests mechanisms of accelerated biological aging among the depressed, which can be indicated by a shorter length of telomeres. We

  12. Genetic distribution and association analysis of DRD2 gene polymorphisms with major depressive disorder in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mei; Yan, Hong; Duan, Zhao-Xia; Qu, Wei; Gong, Hai-Yan; Fan, Zheng-Li; Kang, Jian-Yi; Li, Bing-Cang; Wang, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine D2 receptor is involved in reward-mediating mesocorticolimbic pathways. It plays an important role in major depressive disorder (MDD). Three gene polymorphisms Taq1A, C957T and -141C ins/del, were identified in the DRD2 gene among the Western population. These variants in the DRD2 gene might be associated with the susceptibility of MDD patients through affecting the bioeffects of endogenous dopamine neurotransmission. However, little is known about their occurrence in Chinese population and their association with the susceptibility of patients with major depressive disorder. In this study, a total of 338 unrelated adult Chinese Han population, including 224 healthy volunteers and 114 patients with major depressive disorder, were recruited. DRD2 polymorphisms (Taq1A and -141C ins/del) were detected using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and the C957T were detected by sequencing directly. As a result, three polymorphisms were identified in Chinese Han population and all were common SNP. However, we could detect no evidence of genetic association between 3 markers in DRD2 and major depressive disorder in the Chinese Han population. To conclude, this result suggests that Taq1A, C957T and -141C ins/del of DRD2 gene may not be associated with major depressive disorder, also may be the sample sizes too small to allow a meaningful test.

  13. The criterion validity of the web-based Major Depression Inventory when used on clinical suspicion of depression in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen MG

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Marie Germund Nielsen,1 Eva Ørnbøl,2 Per Bech,3 Mogens Vestergaard,1,4 Kaj Sparle Christensen1 1Research Unit for General Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, 2Research Clinic for Functional Disorders and Psychosomatics, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 3Psychiatric Research Unit, Psychiatric Centre North Zealand, University Hospital of Copenhagen, Hillerød, 4Section for General Medical Practice, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Background: The Major Depression Inventory (MDI is widely used in Danish general practice as a screening tool to assess depression in symptomatic patients. Nevertheless, no validation studies of the MDI have been performed. The aim of this study was to validate the web-based version of the MDI against a fully structured telephone interview in a population selected on clinical suspicion of depression (ie, presence of two or three core symptoms of depression in general practice.Materials and methods: General practitioners (GPs invited consecutive persons suspected of depression to complete the web-based MDI in a primary care setting. The validation was based on the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview (M-CIDI by phone. GPs in the 22 practices in our study included 132 persons suspected of depression. Depression was rated as yes/no according to the MDI and M-CIDI. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10 algorithms of the MDI were examined.Results: According to the M-CIDI interview, 87.9% of the included population was depressed and 64.4% was severely depressed. According to the MDI scale, 59.1% of the population was depressed and 31.8% was severely depressed. The sensitivity of the MDI for depression was 62.1% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 52.6–70.9 and the specificity was 62.5% (95% CI: 35.4–84.8. The sensitivity for severe depression was 42.2% (95% CI

  14. Copy number variation in subjects with major depressive disorder who attempted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlis, Roy H; Ruderfer, Douglas; Hamilton, Steven P; Ernst, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is one of the top ten leading causes of death in North America and represents a major public health burden, particularly for people with Major Depressive disorder (MD). Many studies have suggested that suicidal behavior runs in families, however, identification of genomic loci that drive this efffect remain to be identified. Using subjects collected as part of STAR D, we genotyped 189 subjects with MD with history of a suicide attempt and 1073 subjects with Major Depressive disorder that had never attempted suicide. Copy Number Variants (CNVs) were called in Birdsuite and analyzed in PLINK. We found a set of CNVs present in the suicide attempter group that were not present in in the non-attempter group including in SNTG2 and MACROD2 - two brain expressed genes previously linked to psychopathology; however, these results failed to reach genome-wide signifigance. These data suggest potential CNVs to be investigated further in relation to suicide attempts in MD using large sample sizes.

  15. Endocrine and inflammatory profiles in type 2 diabetic patients with and without major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Adriana; Faccioli, Jose; Guinzbourg, Mónica; Castex, María M; Bayón, Claudia; Masson, Walter; Bluro, Ignacio; Kozak, Andrea; Sorroche, Patricia; Capurro, Lina; Grosembacher, Luis; Proietti, Adrián; Finkelsztein, Carlos; Costa, Lucas; Fainstein Day, Patricia; Cagide, Arturo; Litwak, León E; Golden, Sherita H

    2013-02-14

    There is a high prevalence of depression in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Depressive disorders are associated with increased medical morbidity and mortality in individuals with diabetes. It has been demonstrated that there is a higher prevalence of diabetic complications among individuals with diabetes and depression compared to those without depression. Several biological alterations have been reported in individuals with depressive disorders, particularly abnormal levels of endocrine-inflammatory markers.This study aims to determine the prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) in type 2 diabetes patients, the prevalence of cardiovascular events in individuals with and without MDD and to compare the endocrine-inflammatory profile between groups. The study was approved by the "Comité de Etica de Protocolos de Investigación del Departamento de Docencia e Investigación del Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires" with the number "1262" and included only patients who provided written informed consent. The study was conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and the Habeas Data law on protection of personal data (Law Nª 25326, Argentina).Type 2 diabetes patients (n = 61) were included and they were classified as having MDD or not according to DSM-IV. Macrovascular disease was obtained from the medical history. Additionally, the intima-media thickness of the common carotid, carotid bifurcations and internal carotid arteries was measured non-invasively by two-dimensional ultrasound imaging. Fasting glucose, fasting lipid profile, inflammatory (CRP, TNF-α) and endocrine (urine free cortisol and saliva cortisol) markers. Student t tests were used to compare means for normally distributed variables and Mann-Whitney test for variables without normal distribution. Relative frequencies were calculated and a chi-square analysis was conducted. Data were expressed as mean ± standard deviation (SD) or median and interquartile range. Multivariable

  16. Church attendance and new episodes of major depression in a community study of older adults: the Cache County Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Maria C; Singh, Archana; Skoog, Ingmar; Corcoran, Christopher; Tschanz, Joann T; Zandi, Peter P; Breitner, John C S; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Steffens, David C

    2008-05-01

    We examined the relation between church attendance, membership in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS), and major depressive episode, in a population-based study of aging and dementia in Cache County, Utah. Participants included 2,989 nondemented individuals aged between 65 and 100 years who were interviewed initially in 1995 to 1996 and again in 1998 to 1999. LDS church members reported twice the rate of major depression that non-LDS members did (odds ratio = 2.56, 95% confidence interval = 1.07-6.08). Individuals attending church weekly or more often had a significantly lower risk for major depression. After controlling for demographic and health variables and the strongest predictor of future episodes of depression, a prior depression history, we found that church attendance more often than weekly remained a significant protectant (odds ratio = 0.51, 95% confidence interval = 0.28-0.92). Results suggest that there may be a threshold of church attendance that is necessary for a person to garner long-term protection from depression. We discuss sociological factors relevant to LDS culture.

  17. Serotonin and Dopamine Gene Variation and Theory of Mind Decoding Accuracy in Major Depression: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahavi, Arielle Y.; Sabbagh, Mark A.; Washburn, Dustin; Mazurka, Raegan; Bagby, R. Michael; Strauss, John; Kennedy, James L.; Ravindran, Arun; Harkness, Kate L.

    2016-01-01

    Theory of mind–the ability to decode and reason about others’ mental states–is a universal human skill and forms the basis of social cognition. Theory of mind accuracy is impaired in clinical conditions evidencing social impairment, including major depressive disorder. The current study is a preliminary investigation of the association of polymorphisms of the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4), dopamine transporter (DAT1), dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4), and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) genes with theory of mind decoding in a sample of adults with major depression. Ninety-six young adults (38 depressed, 58 non-depressed) completed the ‘Reading the Mind in the Eyes task’ and a non-mentalistic control task. Genetic associations were only found for the depressed group. Specifically, superior accuracy in decoding mental states of a positive valence was seen in those homozygous for the long allele of the serotonin transporter gene, 9-allele carriers of DAT1, and long-allele carriers of DRD4. In contrast, superior accuracy in decoding mental states of a negative valence was seen in short-allele carriers of the serotonin transporter gene and 10/10 homozygotes of DAT1. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for integrating social cognitive and neurobiological models of etiology in major depression. PMID:26974654

  18. Genome-wide Association for Major Depression Through Age at Onset Stratification : Major Depressive Disorder Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Power, Robert A; Tansey, Katherine E; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Bigdeli, Tim; Hall, Lynsey S; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lee, S Hong; Ripke, Stephan; Steinberg, Stacy; Teumer, Alexander; Viktorin, Alexander; Wray, Naomi R; Arolt, Volker; Baune, Bernard T; Boomsma, Dorret I; Børglum, Anders D; Byrne, Enda M; Castelao, Enrique; Craddock, Nick; Craig, Ian W; Dannlowski, Udo; Deary, Ian J; Degenhardt, Franziska; Forstner, Andreas J; Gordon, Scott D; Grabe, Hans J; Grove, Jakob; Hamilton, Steven P; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hocking, Lynne J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke J; Kloiber, Stefan; Krogh, Jesper; Landén, Mikael; Lang, Maren; Levinson, Douglas F; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J; Madden, Pamela A F; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McIntosh, Andrew M; Middeldorp, Christel M; Milaneschi, Yuri; Montgomery, Grant W; Mors, Ole; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nyholt, Dale R; Oskarsson, Hogni; Owen, Michael J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pergadia, Michele L.; Porteous, David J; Potash, James B; Preisig, Martin; Rivera, Margarita; Shi, Jianxin; Shyn, Stanley I; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Smit, Johannes H; Smith, Blair H; Stefansson, Hreinn; Stefansson, Kari; Strohmaier, Jana; Sullivan, Patrick F; Thomson, Pippa; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Van der Auwera, Sandra; Weissman, Myrna M; Breen, Gerome; Lewis, Cathryn M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a disabling mood disorder, and despite a known heritable component, a large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies revealed no replicable genetic risk variants. Given prior evidence of heterogeneity by age at onset in MDD, we tested whether

  19. The potential of transcranial photobiomodulation therapy for treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehpour, Farzad; Rasta, Seyed Hossein

    2017-05-24

    Major depressive disorder is a common debilitating mood disorder that affects quality of life. Prefrontal cortex abnormalities, an imbalance in neurotransmitters, neuroinflammation, and mitochondrial dysfunction are the major factors in the etiology of major depressive disorder. Despite the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of major depressive disorder, 30%-40% of patients do not respond to antidepressants. Given this, exploring the alternative therapies for treatment or prevention of major depressive disorder has aroused interest among scientists. Transcranial photobiomodulation therapy is the use of low-power lasers and light-emitting diodes in the far-red to near-infrared optical region for stimulation of neuronal activities. This non-invasive modality improves the metabolic capacity of neurons due to more oxygen consumption and ATP production. Beneficial effects of transcranial photobiomodulation therapy in the wide range of neurological and psychological disorders have been already shown. In this review, we focus on some issue relating to the application of photobiomodulation therapy for major depressive disorder. There is some evidence that transcranial photobiomodulation therapy using near-infrared light on 10-Hz pulsed mode appears to be a hopeful technique for treatment of major depressive disorder. However, further studies are necessary to find the safety of this method and to determine its effective treatment protocol.

  20. Aggression Protects Against the Onset of Major Depressive Episodes in Individuals With Bipolar Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tommy H; Freed, Rachel D; Titone, Madison K; Stange, Jonathan P; Weiss, Rachel B; Abramson, Lyn Y; Alloy, Lauren B

    2017-05-01

    A growing body of research suggests that bipolar spectrum disorders (BSDs) are associated with high aggression. However, little research has prospectively examined how aggression may affect time to onset of hypomanic/manic versus major depressive episodes. In a longitudinal study, we tested the hypothesis that aggression would prospectively predict a shorter time to the onset of hypomanic/manic episodes and a longer time to the onset of major depressive episodes, based on the behavioral approach system theory of BSDs. Young adults (N = 120) diagnosed with cyclothymia, bipolar II disorder, or bipolar disorder not otherwise specified were followed every 4 months for an average of 3.55 years. Participants completed measures of depressive and manic symptoms, family history of mood disorder, impulsivity, and aggression at baseline and were followed prospectively with semistructured diagnostic interview assessments of hypomanic/manic and major depressive episodes and treatment seeking for mood problems. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses indicated that overall, physical, and verbal aggression predicted a longer time to major depressive episode onset, even after controlling for baseline depressive and manic symptoms, family history of mood disorder, treatment seeking for mood problems, and impulsivity. Aggression, however, did not significantly predict time to onset of hypomanic/manic episodes, controlling for the same covariates. The findings suggest that approach-related behaviors may be utilized to delay the onset of major depressive episodes among people with BSDs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Fear extinction as a model for synaptic plasticity in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Marion; Höger, Nora; Feige, Bernd; Blechert, Jens; Normann, Claus; Nissen, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    The neuroplasticity hypothesis of major depressive disorder proposes that a dysfunction of synaptic plasticity represents a basic pathomechanism of the disorder. Animal models of depression indicate enhanced plasticity in a ventral emotional network, comprising the amygdala. Here, we investigated fear extinction learning as a non-invasive probe for amygdala-dependent synaptic plasticity in patients with major depressive disorder and healthy controls. Differential fear conditioning was measured in 37 inpatients with severe unipolar depression (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, criteria) and 40 healthy controls. The eye-blink startle response, a subcortical output signal that is modulated by local synaptic plasticity in the amygdala in fear acquisition and extinction learning, was recorded as the primary outcome parameter. After robust and similar fear acquisition in both groups, patients with major depressive disorder showed significantly enhanced fear extinction learning in comparison to healthy controls, as indicated by startle responses to conditioned stimuli. The strength of extinction learning was positively correlated with the total illness duration. The finding of enhanced fear extinction learning in major depressive disorder is consistent with the concept that the disorder is characterized by enhanced synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and the ventral emotional network. Clinically, the observation emphasizes the potential of successful extinction learning, the basis of exposure therapy, in anxiety-related disorders despite the frequent comorbidity of major depressive disorder.

  2. Fear extinction as a model for synaptic plasticity in major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Kuhn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neuroplasticity hypothesis of major depressive disorder proposes that a dysfunction of synaptic plasticity represents a basic pathomechanism of the disorder. Animal models of depression indicate enhanced plasticity in a ventral emotional network, comprising the amygdala. Here, we investigated fear extinction learning as a non-invasive probe for amygdala-dependent synaptic plasticity in patients with major depressive disorder and healthy controls. METHODS: Differential fear conditioning was measured in 37 inpatients with severe unipolar depression (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision, criteria and 40 healthy controls. The eye-blink startle response, a subcortical output signal that is modulated by local synaptic plasticity in the amygdala in fear acquisition and extinction learning, was recorded as the primary outcome parameter. RESULTS: After robust and similar fear acquisition in both groups, patients with major depressive disorder showed significantly enhanced fear extinction learning in comparison to healthy controls, as indicated by startle responses to conditioned stimuli. The strength of extinction learning was positively correlated with the total illness duration. CONCLUSIONS: The finding of enhanced fear extinction learning in major depressive disorder is consistent with the concept that the disorder is characterized by enhanced synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and the ventral emotional network. Clinically, the observation emphasizes the potential of successful extinction learning, the basis of exposure therapy, in anxiety-related disorders despite the frequent comorbidity of major depressive disorder.

  3. Comparing Effects of Melatonin versus Trazodone on Sleep Quality in Major Depressed Patients Receiving Sertraline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Mirsepassi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background_ Sleep disturbance is a common complaint in major depressive disorder (MDD including impairment of both subjective and objective parameters, Also SSRIs as antidepressant drugs can affect sleep architecture (SA.Aim _This randomized trial was designed to compare the effects of trazodone with melatonin on sleep quality (SQ of patients with MDD based on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders –5th edition (DSM-5 criteria.Method_ Sixty patients who have the study criteria were entered in this study and were divided into two groups receiving either trazodone or melatonin. They were evaluated for sleep quality and depression severity by using Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI and Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D at baseline and after 4 and 8 weeks.Result_ Thirty two patients complete the study. Fourteen patients received 3mg of melatonin and eighteen patients received 50mg of trazodone before sleep time. After 4 and 8 weeks treatment with melatonin or Trazodone, significant improvements in SQ were showed in both groups. Additionally, a significant reduction in sleep latency (SL was showed after 4 weeks of treatment with melatonin but not with trazodone.Conclusion_ This study demonstrated that both Melatonin and Trazodone improved SQ in outpatients with MDD after 8 weeks of treatment but melatonin created greater reduction in SL than trazodone after 4 weeks.

  4. Cannabis use and the course and outcome of major depressive disorder: A population based longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, Daniel; Rehm, Jürgen; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2017-05-01

    Cannabis use has been reported to affect the course of various psychiatric disorders, however its effect on the course of major depressive disorder (MDD) is not yet clear. We used data from Wave 1 and Wave 2 of the National Epidemiologic survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Individuals with baseline MDD (N=2,348) were included in the study. Cannabis users without a Cannabis Use Disorder (CUDs) and individuals with a CUD were compared to nonusers using linear and logistic regression analyses controlling for sociodemographics, psychiatric disorders and substance use disorders at baseline. No differences were found in rates of remission between the groups. Level of cannabis use was associated with significantly more depressive symptoms at follow-up, particularly anhedonia, changes in body weight, insomnia or hypersomnia and psychomotor problems. After adjusting for baseline confounding factors, no associations were found between cannabis use and suicidality, functionality and quality of life. We conclude that many of the associations between cannabis use and a more severe course of MDD do not seem to be attributed to cannabis use itself but to associated sociodemographic and clinical factors. Further longitudinal studies using depression severity indices are required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Diurnal Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Measures and Inflammatory Marker Correlates in Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Doolin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and inflammatory systems is a consistent finding in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD. Cortisol is often assessed by measurement of the cortisol awakening response (CAR and/or diurnal cortisol levels. Some methods of cortisol measurement overestimate cortisol concentration due to detection of other glucocorticoids including the relatively inert cortisone, therefore this study aimed to assess the presence of both cortisol and cortisone, and the cortisol-cortisone catalyzing enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroiddehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1, in depressed patients and controls. Because the HPA axis is known to regulate the body’s immune system, relationships between measures of cytokines and cortisol were also assessed. Saliva samples were collected from 57 MDD patients and 40 healthy controls at five post-wakening time points (0, +30, +60, +720 and +750 min. Glucocorticoid concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Whole blood mRNA expression of several inflammatory markers was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. This study replicated the common finding of elevated morning cortisol and reduced CAR reactivity in MDD and found no differences in cortisone or 11β-HSD1 mRNA measures. There was a negative association between interleukin 1-β (IL-1β mRNA and morning cortisol reactivity within the depressed group, indicating that dysregulation of the HPA axis and immune system may be interconnected.

  6. Adjunctive pregabalin in partial responders with major depressive disorder and residual anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Mario; Tedeschini, Enrico; Mistretta, Martino; Fehling, Kiki; Aceti, Franca; Ceccanti, Mauro; Fava, Maurizio

    2013-02-01

    Anxiety symptoms in depression result often in treatment resistance, residual symptoms, and persistent functional impairment. To assess the effectiveness and safety of adjunctive pregabalin to antidepressants for residual anxiety in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). A retrospective chart review was conducted to identify partial responders among patients with MDD with residual anxiety. Twenty such patients (age, 58.4 ± 11.2 years; 15 women; baseline Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS], 17.1 ± 3.5) who received adjunctive pregabalin for residual anxiety were included. Antidepressants augmented were the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (n = 12), mirtazapine (n = 2), and selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (n = 6). Twenty patients received at least 4 weeks of pregabalin treatment after 8 weeks of antidepressant therapy. At week 1 (9 weeks after initiating treatment), pregabalin was prescribed at a mean ± SD dose of 71.2 ± 31.7 mg, and the mean maximum pregabalin dose prescribed was 156.2 ± 76.5 mg (range, 75-300 mg). At week 8, there were 13 responders (13/20 [65%]), and 7 of these 13 patients achieved remission (HDRS17 anxiety/somatization subscale scores (6.3 ± 2 to 3.6 ± 1.7, P anxiety in MDD.

  7. Neuroimaging Mechanisms of Therapeutic Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation for Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip, Noah S; Barredo, Jennifer; Aiken, Emily; Carpenter, Linda L

    2018-03-01

    Research into therapeutic transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for major depression has dramatically increased in the last decade. Understanding the mechanism of action of TMS is crucial to improve efficacy and develop the next generation of therapeutic stimulation. Early imaging research provided initial data supportive of widely held assumptions about hypothesized inhibitory or excitatory consequences of stimulation. Early work also indicated that while TMS modulated brain activity under the stimulation site, effects at deeper regions, in particular, the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex, were associated with clinical improvement. Concordant with earlier findings, functional connectivity studies also demonstrated that clinical improvements were related to changes distal, rather than proximal, to the site of stimulation. Moreover, recent work suggests that TMS modulates and potentially normalizes functional relationships between neural networks. An important observation that emerged from this review is that similar patterns of connectivity changes are observed across studies regardless of TMS parameters. Though promising, we stress that these imaging findings must be evaluated cautiously given the widespread reliance on modest sample sizes and little implementation of statistical validation. Additional limitations included use of imaging before and after a course of TMS, which provided little insight into changes that might occur during the weeks of stimulation. Furthermore, as studies to date have focused on depression, it is unclear whether our observations were related to mechanisms of action of TMS for depression or represented broader patterns of functional brain changes associated with clinical improvement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Neurobiological effects of exercise on major depressive disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Felipe Barreto; Deslandes, Andrea Camaz; Stubbs, Brendon; Gosmann, Natan Pereira; Silva, Cristiano Tschiedel Belem da; Fleck, Marcelo Pio de Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Exercise displays promise as an efficacious treatment for people with depression. However, no systematic review has evaluated the neurobiological effects of exercise among people with major depressive disorder (MDD). The aim of this article was to systematically review the acute and chronic biological responses to exercise in people with MDD. Two authors conducted searches using Medline (PubMed), EMBASE and PsycINFO. From the searches, twenty studies were included within the review, representing 1353 people with MDD. The results demonstrate that a single bout of exercise increases atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), copepetin and growth hormone among people with MDD. Exercise also potentially promotes long-term adaptations of copeptin, thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) and total mean frequency (TMF). However, there is limited evidence that exercise promotes adaptations on neurogenesis, inflammation biomarkers and brain structure. Associations between depressive symptoms improvement and hippocampus volume and IL-1β were found. Nevertheless, the paucity of studies and limitations presented within, precludes a more definitive conclusion of the underlying neurobiological explanation for the antidepressant effect of exercise in people with MDD. Further trials should utilize appropriate assessments of neurobiological markers in order to build upon the results of our review and further clarify the potential mechanisms associated with the antidepressant effects of exercise. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A review of the role of social cognition in major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael James Weightman

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social cognition – the ability to identify, perceive and interpret socially-relevant information – is an important skill that plays a significant role in successful interpersonal functioning. Social cognitive performance is recognised to be impaired in several psychiatric conditions, but the relationship with major depressive disorder is less well understood. The aim of this review is to characterise the current understanding of (i the different domains of social cognition and a possible relationship with major depressive disorder, (ii the clinical presentation of social cognition in acute and remitted depressive states, and (iii the effect of severity of depression on social cognitive performance.Methods: Electronic databases were searched to identify clinical studies investigating social cognition in a major depressive disorder population, yielding 31 studies for this review.Results: Patients with major depressive disorder appear to interpret social cognitive stimuli differently to healthy controls: depressed individuals may interpret emotion through a mood-congruent bias and have difficulty with cognitive theory of mind tasks requiring interpretation of complex mental states. Social cognitive performance appears to be inversely associated with severity of depression, whilst the bias toward negative emotions persists even in remission. Some deficits may normalise following effective pharmacotherapy.Conclusions: The difficulties with social interaction observed in major depressive disorder may, at least in part, be due to an altered ability to correctly interpret emotional stimuli and mental states. These features seem to persist even in the remitted state, although some may respond to intervention. Further research is required in this area to better understand the functional impact of these findings and the way in which targeted therapy could aid depressed individuals with social interactions.

  10. A review of the role of social cognition in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weightman, Michael James; Air, Tracy Michele; Baune, Bernhard Theodor

    2014-01-01

    Social cognition - the ability to identify, perceive, and interpret socially relevant information - is an important skill that plays a significant role in successful interpersonal functioning. Social cognitive performance is recognized to be impaired in several psychiatric conditions, but the relationship with major depressive disorder is less well understood. The aim of this review is to characterize the current understanding of: (i) the different domains of social cognition and a possible relationship with major depressive disorder, (ii) the clinical presentation of social cognition in acute and remitted depressive states, and (iii) the effect of severity of depression on social cognitive performance. Electronic databases were searched to identify clinical studies investigating social cognition in a major depressive disorder population, yielding 31 studies for this review. Patients with major depressive disorder appear to interpret social cognitive stimuli differently to healthy controls: depressed individuals may interpret emotion through a mood-congruent bias and have difficulty with cognitive theory of mind tasks requiring interpretation of complex mental states. Social cognitive performance appears to be inversely associated with severity of depression, whilst the bias toward negative emotions persists even in remission. Some deficits may normalize following effective pharmacotherapy. The difficulties with social interaction observed in major depressive disorder may, at least in part, be due to an altered ability to correctly interpret emotional stimuli and mental states. These features seem to persist even in remission, although some may respond to intervention. Further research is required in this area to better understand the functional impact of these findings and the way in which targeted therapy could aid depressed individuals with social interactions.

  11. A Review of the Role of Social Cognition in Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weightman, Michael James; Air, Tracy Michele; Baune, Bernhard Theodor

    2014-01-01

    Background: Social cognition – the ability to identify, perceive, and interpret socially relevant information – is an important skill that plays a significant role in successful interpersonal functioning. Social cognitive performance is recognized to be impaired in several psychiatric conditions, but the relationship with major depressive disorder is less well understood. The aim of this review is to characterize the current understanding of: (i) the different domains of social cognition and a possible relationship with major depressive disorder, (ii) the clinical presentation of social cognition in acute and remitted depressive states, and (iii) the effect of severity of depression on social cognitive performance. Methods: Electronic databases were searched to identify clinical studies investigating social cognition in a major depressive disorder population, yielding 31 studies for this review. Results: Patients with major depressive disorder appear to interpret social cognitive stimuli differently to healthy controls: depressed individuals may interpret emotion through a mood-congruent bias and have difficulty with cognitive theory of mind tasks requiring interpretation of complex mental states. Social cognitive performance appears to be inversely associated with severity of depression, whilst the bias toward negative emotions persists even in remission. Some deficits may normalize following effective pharmacotherapy. Conclusions: The difficulties with social interaction observed in major depressive disorder may, at least in part, be due to an altered ability to correctly interpret emotional stimuli and mental states. These features seem to persist even in remission, although some may respond to intervention. Further research is required in this area to better understand the functional impact of these findings and the way in which targeted therapy could aid depressed individuals with social interactions. PMID:25566100

  12. Data-driven subtypes of major depressive disorder : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Loo, Hanna M.; de Jonge, Peter; Romeijn, Jan-Willem; Kessler, Ronald C.; Schoevers, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: According to current classification systems, patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) may have very different combinations of symptoms. This symptomatic diversity hinders the progress of research into the causal mechanisms and treatment allocation. Theoretically founded subtypes of

  13. Bipolar polygenic loading and bipolar spectrum features in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiste, Anna; Robinson, Elise B.; Milaneschi, Yuri; Meier, Sandra; Ripke, Stephan; Clements, Caitlin C.; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M.; Rietschel, Marcella; Penninx, Brenda W.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Perlis, Roy H.

    Objectives Family and genetic studies indicate overlapping liability for major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether this shared genetic liability influences clinical presentation. Methods A polygenic risk score for bipolar disorder,

  14. Impaired Attribution of Emotion to Facial Expressions in Anxiety and Major Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demenescu, Liliana R.; Kortekaas, Rudie; den Boer, Johan A.; Aleman, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recognition of others' emotions is an important aspect of interpersonal communication. In major depression, a significant emotion recognition impairment has been reported. It remains unclear whether the ability to recognize emotion from facial expressions is also impaired in anxiety

  15. Plasma amino acid profiling in major depressive disorder treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hye-In; Chun, Mi-Ryung; Yang, Jeong-Soo; Lim, Shinn-Won; Kim, Min-Ji; Kim, Seon-Woo; Myung, Woo-Jae; Kim, Doh-Kwan; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2015-05-01

    Amino acids are important body metabolites and seem to be helpful for understanding pathogenesis and predicting therapeutic response in major depressive disorder (MDD). We performed amino acid profiling to discover potential biomarkers in major depressive patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Amino acid profiling using aTRAQ™ kits for Amino Acid Analysis in Physiological Fluids on a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) system was performed on 158 specimens at baseline and at 6 weeks after the initiation of SSRI treatment for 68 patients with MDD and from 22 healthy controls. Baseline alpha-aminobutyric acid (ABA) discriminated the patients according to the therapeutic response. Plasma glutamic acid concentration and glutamine/glutamic acid ratio were different between before and after SSRI treatment only in the response group. Comparing patients with MDD with healthy controls, alterations of ten amino acids, including alanine, beta-alanine, beta-aminoisobutyric acid, cystathionine, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, homocystine, methionine, O-phospho-L-serine, and sarcosine, were observed in MDD. Metabolism of amino acids, including ABA and glutamic acid, has the potential to contribute to understandings of pathogenesis and predictions of therapeutic response in MDD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Leukocyte telomere length in major depression: correlations with chronicity, inflammation and oxidative stress--preliminary findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen M Wolkowitz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Depression is associated with an unusually high rate of aging-related illnesses and early mortality. One aspect of "accelerated aging" in depression may be shortened leukocyte telomeres. When telomeres critically shorten, as often occurs with repeated mitoses or in response to oxidation and inflammation, cells may die. Indeed, leukocyte telomere shortening predicts early mortality and medical illnesses in non-depressed populations. We sought to determine if leukocyte telomeres are shortened in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, whether this is a function of lifetime depression exposure and whether this is related to putative mediators, oxidation and inflammation.Leukocyte telomere length was compared between 18 unmedicated MDD subjects and 17 controls and was correlated with lifetime depression chronicity and peripheral markers of oxidation (F2-isoprostane/Vitamin C ratio and inflammation (IL-6. Analyses were controlled for age and sex.The depressed group, as a whole, did not differ from the controls in telomere length. However, telomere length was significantly inversely correlated with lifetime depression exposure, even after controlling for age (p<0.05. Average telomere length in the depressed subjects who were above the median of lifetime depression exposure (≥9.2 years' cumulative duration was 281 base pairs shorter than that in controls (p<0.05, corresponding to approximately seven years of "accelerated cell aging." Telomere length was inversely correlated with oxidative stress in the depressed subjects (p<0.01 and in the controls (p<0.05 and with inflammation in the depressed subjects (p<0.05.These preliminary data indicate that accelerated aging at the level of leukocyte telomeres is proportional to lifetime exposure to MDD. This might be related to cumulative exposure to oxidative stress and inflammation in MDD. This suggest that telomere shortening does not antedate depression and is not an intrinsic feature. Rather, telomere shortening

  17. Interpersonal problems, dependency, and self-criticism in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Ulrike; Barrett, Marna S; Zimmermann, Johannes; Schauenburg, Henning; Wright, Aidan G C; Renner, Fritz; Zilcha-Mano, Sigal; Barber, Jacques P

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present research was the examination of overlap between 2 research traditions on interpersonal personality traits in major depression. We hypothesized that Blatt's (2004) dimensions of depressive experiences around the dimensions of relatedness (i.e., dependency) and self-definition (i.e., self-criticism) are associated with specific interpersonal problems according to the interpersonal circumplex model (Leary, 1957). In addition, we examined correlations of interpersonal characteristics with depression severity. Analyses were conducted on 283 patients with major depressive disorder combined from 2 samples. Of the patients, 151 participated in a randomized controlled trial in the United States, and 132 patients were recruited in an inpatient unit in Germany. Patients completed measures of symptomatic distress, interpersonal problems, and depressive experiences. Dependency was associated with more interpersonal problems related to low dominance and high affiliation, while self-criticism was associated with more interpersonal problems related to low affiliation. These associations were independent of depression severity. Self-criticism showed high overlap with cognitive symptoms of depression. The findings support the interpersonal nature of Blatt's dimensions of depressive experiences. Self-criticism is associated with being too distant or cold toward others as well as greater depression severity, but is not related to the dimension of dominance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Neural correlates of self-perceptions in adolescents with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Kailyn A L; Colcombe, Stan; Henderson, Sarah E; Alonso, Carmen M; Milham, Michael P; Gabbay, Vilma

    2016-06-01

    Alteration in self-perception is a salient feature in major depression. Hyperactivity of anterior cortical midline regions has been implicated in this phenomenon in depressed adults. Here, we extend this work to depressed adolescents during a developmental time when neuronal circuitry underlying the sense of self matures by using task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and connectivity analyses. Twenty-three depressed adolescents and 18 healthy controls (HC) viewed positive and negative trait words in a scanner and judged whether each word described them ('self' condition) or was a good trait to have ('general' condition). Self-perception scores were based on participants' endorsements of positive and negative traits during the fMRI task. Depressed adolescents exhibited more negative self-perceptions than HC. Both groups activated cortical midline regions in response to self-judgments compared to general-judgments. However, depressed adolescents recruited the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus more for positive self-judgments. Additionally, local connectivity of the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex was reduced during self-reflection in depressed adolescents. Our findings highlight differences in self-referential processing network function between depressed and healthy adolescents and support the need for further investigation of brain mechanisms associated with the self, as they may be paramount to understanding the etiology and development of major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Neural correlates of self-perceptions in adolescents with major depressive disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kailyn A.L. Bradley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alteration in self-perception is a salient feature in major depression. Hyperactivity of anterior cortical midline regions has been implicated in this phenomenon in depressed adults. Here, we extend this work to depressed adolescents during a developmental time when neuronal circuitry underlying the sense of self matures by using task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and connectivity analyses. Twenty-three depressed adolescents and 18 healthy controls (HC viewed positive and negative trait words in a scanner and judged whether each word described them (‘self’ condition or was a good trait to have (‘general’ condition. Self-perception scores were based on participants’ endorsements of positive and negative traits during the fMRI task. Depressed adolescents exhibited more negative self-perceptions than HC. Both groups activated cortical midline regions in response to self-judgments compared to general-judgments. However, depressed adolescents recruited the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus more for positive self-judgments. Additionally, local connectivity of the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex was reduced during self-reflection in depressed adolescents. Our findings highlight differences in self-referential processing network function between depressed and healthy adolescents and support the need for further investigation of brain mechanisms associated with the self, as they may be paramount to understanding the etiology and development of major depressive disorder.

  20. The effects of combined sertraline and aspirin therapy on depression severity among patients with major depressive disorder: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrmanesh, Zahra; Fahimi, Hosein; Akasheh, Goudarz; Davoudi, Mohamadreza; Gilasi, Hamidreza; Ghaderi, Amir

    2017-11-01

    Different studies have been conducted to find the best adjuvant therapies for depression management. There are controversies over the effects of aspirin as an adjuvant therapy for depression. To determine the effects of combined sertraline and aspirin therapy on depression severity among patients with major depressive disorder. This randomized clinical trial was conducted at Kargarnejad Psychiatric Hospital in Kashan, Isfahan, Iran, from September 1, 2016 to November 1, 2016. The study participants included 100 patients with major depressive disorder who were assigned to aspirin and placebo groups by the use of computer-generated random numbers. Patients in these groups respectively received sertraline-aspirin and sertraline-placebo for eight consecutive weeks. Patients were prescribed 80 milligrams of aspirin twice a day. Also, sertraline was administered at a dose of 50-200 milligrams daily. Beck Depression Inventory was employed for depression severity assessment at four time points, namely before, two, four, and eight weeks after the beginning of the intervention. Medication side effects were also assessed eight weeks after the beginning of the intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 12.0, using Chi-square and the Independent-samples t-test (α=0.05). Both groups were matched in terms of age (p=0.46), gender (p=0.539), and depression severity (p=0.509, with mean score 33.5±4.1 vs. 32.8±5.9) at baseline. However, depression scores were reduced significantly four and eight weeks after initiation of therapy just in the sertraline-aspirin group (pdepression severity among patients with major depressive disorder. Yet, further studies are needed to prove the effectiveness of aspirin and other anti-inflammatory agents in reducing depression severity. The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT2016082829556N1. The authors received financial support from Research Deputy of Kashan University

  1. A Comparison of Sexual Dysfunctions in Female Patients with Major Depressive Disorder and Panic Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Tonguç Demir Berkol; Süheyla Doðan Bulut; Esra Alataþ; Dicle Görkem; Esra Çavdar; Ýlker Özyýldýrým

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is assessment of sexual dysfunction in female patients with major depressive disorder and panic disorder and compare the two groups. Methods: Total 76 female patients with primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder ( 46 patients) and panic disorder ( 30 patients) according to DSM-IV, who is sexually active and not use psychotropic medication were inclued. Sociodemographic data aqcusition form and the Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX) were adminis...

  2. Organizational justice and major depressive episodes in Japanese employees: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Akiomi; Kawakami, Norito; Tsuno, Kanami; Tomioka, Kimiko; Nakanishi, Mayuko

    2013-01-01

    Several European studies showed that low organizational justice (i.e., procedural justice and interactional justice) was associated with major depressive disorders. In these studies, however, the diagnosis of major depressive disorders may be underestimated because they identified only individuals who visited a doctor and received a diagnosis. Moreover, these studies did not consider neurotic personality traits, which can affect the occurrence of major depressive disorders. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cross-sectional association of organizational justice with major depressive episodes in the past 12 months more precisely in Japanese employees. A total of 425 males and 708 females from five branches of a manufacturing company in Japan completed self-administered questionnaires measuring organizational justice, other job stressors (i.e., job strain, social support at work, and effort-reward imbalance), neuroticism, and demographic characteristics. A web-based self-administered version of the computerized Composite International Diagnostic Interview Version 3.0 (CIDI 3.0) was used to assess major depressive episodes. Logistic regression analyses were conducted. In the univariate analysis, low procedural justice and low interactional justice were significantly associated with major depressive episodes in the past 12 months. After adjusting for other job stressors and demographic characteristics, only the association of interactional justice remained significant. The moderating effect of neuroticism on the association of organizational justice with major depressive episodes in the past 12 months was not significant. Low interactional justice may be associated with major depressive disorders regardless or other job stressors or neurotic personality traits.

  3. Factors Related to Marital Satisfaction in Women with Major Depressive Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Amiri, Shahrokh; Khousheh, Mohsen; Ranjbar, Fatemeh; Fakhari, Ali; Mohagheghi, Arash; Farnam, Alireza; Abdi, Salman; Alizadeh, Amineh

    2012-01-01

    Objective Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders which affects married couples frequently.The present study aims to explain the role of family processes, social support and demographic factors in marital satisfaction of women with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Method In this cross-sectional study, 188 women with MDD were randomly selected among the patients who visited Bozorgmehr Clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. The sample selection ...

  4. Plasma galanin is a biomarker for severity of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Jun; Yang, Yu-Tao; Li, Hui; Liu, Po-Zi; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Xu, Zhi-Qing David

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the association between plasma galanin level and depression severity. The severity of depression symptoms of 79 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD; 52 women and 27 men, 71 patients in onset, 8 in remission) was assessed using the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Venous fasting blood samples (5 mL) were taken from the 79 MDD patients, 35 healthy siblings, and 19 healthy controls, and plasma samples were prepared. Galanin levels in the plasma were measured by radioimmunoassay. Plasma galanin in MDD patients was significantly higher than that of remission patients, healthy siblings, or healthy controls (P 0.05). There was a significant positive correlation between plasma galanin levels and depression severity in women MDD patients (r = 0.329, df = 42, P = 0.020), but not in men patients. Plasma galanin levels may be an important biomarker for depression severity, especially in female patients.

  5. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies may be effective interventions for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment...

  6. Adequate follow-up can’t be optional : Improving the management of major depression in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergouwen, Antonius Cornelius Maria

    2006-01-01

    Depressive illness is a public health issue of major significance. Despite proven efficacy of antidepressant medication, few patients with major depression receive levels of treatment consistent with guidelines. Moreover, effectiveness of antidepressant medication is reduced by patients’

  7. Rapid and Longer-Term Antidepressant Effects of Repeated Ketamine Infusions in Treatment-Resistant Major Depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murrough, James W.; Perez, Andrew M.; Pillemer, Sarah; Stern, Jessica; Parides, Michael K.; aan het Rot, Marije; Collins, Katherine A.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Charney, Dennis S.; Iosifescu, Dan V.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ketamine is reported to have rapid antidepressant effects; however, there is limited understanding of the time-course of ketamine effects beyond a single infusion. A previous report including 10 participants with treatment-resistant major depression (TRD) found that six ketamine

  8. A comparison of the major depression inventory (MDI) and the beck depression inventory (BDI) in severely depressed patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konstantinidis, Anastasios; Martiny, Klaus; Bech, Per

    2011-01-01

    We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression.......We set out to examine the psychometric properties of the MDI in comparison to the BDI in a mixed group of patients with primary depression....

  9. C-reactive protein: A differential biomarker for major depressive disorder and bipolar II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui Hua; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, I Hui; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Kao Chin; Huang, San-Yuan; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band; Chen, Po See

    2017-02-01

    Objectives We aimed to examine whether the C-reactive protein (CRP) level could be used to differentiate between major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar II disorder (BD II). Methods Ninety-six healthy controls, 88 BD II and 72 MDD drug-naïve patients in their major depressive episodes were enrolled. The fasting plasma level of high-sensitivity CRP was assessed at baseline and after treatment. Results The BD II patients presented significantly higher 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores and CRP levels at baseline when adjustment for age, gender, and body mass index (P biomarker to differentiate between MDD and BD II depression in both their depressed and euthymic state.

  10. Peripheral Immune Alterations in Major Depression: The Role of Subtypes and Pathogenetic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Euteneuer

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Depression has been associated with peripheral inflammatory processes and alterations in cellular immunity. Growing evidence suggests that immunological alterations may neither be necessary nor sufficient to induce depression in general, but seem to be associated with specific features. Using baseline data from the Outcome of Psychological Interventions in Depression trial, this exploratory study examines associations between depression subtypes and pathogenetic characteristics (i.e., melancholic vs non-melancholic depression, chronic vs non-chronic depression, age of onset, cognitive-affective and somatic symptom dimensions with plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin (IL-6, IL-10, and numbers of leukocyte subpopulations in 98 patients with major depression (MD and 30 age and sex-matched controls. Patients with MD exhibited higher CRP levels, higher neutrophil and monocyte counts, lower IL-10 levels, and an increased neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR than controls. Patient with later age of onset had higher levels of two inflammatory markers (CRP, NLR and lower cytotoxic T cell counts after adjusting for sociodemographics, lifestyle factors, and antidepressants. Furthermore, lower anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels were related to more severe somatic depressive symptoms. These results confirm and extend previous findings suggesting that increased levels of CRP are associated with a later onset of depression and demonstrate that also NLR as a subclinical inflammatory marker is related to a later onset of depression.

  11. The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report: a psychometric evaluation in patients with asthma and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E Sherwood; Murray, Michelle; Carmody, Thomas J; Kennard, Beth D; Hughes, Carroll W; Khan, David A; Rush, A John

    2008-05-01

    Despite the high co-occurrence between depression and asthma, few studies have addressed methods assessing the severity of depressive symptoms among patients with asthma. To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report (QIDS-SR16), a 16-item measure of depressive symptom severity, in patients with asthma. The psychometric properties of the QIDS-SR16 were compared at treatment exit with those of the 30-item self-report Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-SR30) and the 17-item clinician-rated Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) in 73 outpatients with asthma who were treated with citalopram or placebo for nonpsychotic major depressive disorder. Correlations between the depression rating scales and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire were calculated. Internal consistency at exit was strong for the QIDS-SR16 (Cronbach alpha values are .87 for the QIDS-SR16, .95 for the IDS-SR30, and .87 for the HRSD17). The QIDS-SR16 and HRSD17 total scores were highly correlated (r = 0.85), as were the QIDS-SR16 and IDS-SR30 total scores (r = 0.97). All QIDS-SR16 item total score correlations were significant (P SR30, and HRSD17 showed comparable sensitivity to symptom change, indicating high concurrent validity for all 3 scales. The total QIDS-SR16 baseline to exit change score demonstrated a significant negative correlation (r = -0.49, P < .001) with the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire. Thus, greater depressive symptom severity was associated with lower asthma-related quality of life. The QIDS-SR16 showed good reliability and impressive construct validity. Strong psychometric properties of this brief self-report format and its sensitivity to treatment change suggest that the QIDS-SR16 is a valuable clinical tool.

  12. The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology–Self-report: a psychometric evaluation in patients with asthma and major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. Sherwood; Murray, Michelle; Carmody, Thomas J.; Kennard, Beth D.; Hughes, Carroll W.; Khan, David A.; Rush, A. John

    2012-01-01

    Background Despite the high co-occurrence between depression and asthma, few studies have addressed methods assessing the severity of depressive symptoms among patients with asthma. Objective To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology–Self-report (QIDS-SR16), a 16-item measure of depressive symptom severity, in patients with asthma. Methods The psychometric properties of the QIDS-SR16 were compared at treatment exit with those of the 30-item self-report Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-SR30) and the 17-item clinician-rated Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) in 73 outpatients with asthma who were treated with citalopram or placebo for nonpsychotic major depressive disorder. Correlations between the depression rating scales and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire were calculated. Results Internal consistency at exit was strong for the QIDS-SR16 (Cronbach α values are .87 for the QIDS-SR16, .95 for the IDS-SR30, and .87 for the HRSD17). The QIDS-SR16 and HRSD17 total scores were highly correlated (r = 0.85), as were the QIDS-SR16 and IDS-SR30 total scores (r = 0.97). All QIDS-SR16 item total score correlations were significant (P SR30, and HRSD17 showed comparable sensitivity to symptom change, indicating high concurrent validity for all 3 scales. The total QIDS-SR16 baseline to exit change score demonstrated a significant negative correlation (r = −0.49, P < .001) with the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire. Thus, greater depressive symptom severity was associated with lower asthma-related quality of life. Conclusions The QIDS-SR16 showed good reliability and impressive construct validity. Strong psychometric properties of this brief self-report format and its sensitivity to treatment change suggest that the QIDS-SR16 is a valuable clinical tool. PMID:18517074

  13. Unexplained Painful Physical Symptoms in Patients with Major Depressive Disorder: Prevalence, Pathophysiology and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaracz, Jan; Gattner, Karolina; Jaracz, Krystyna; Górna, Krystyna

    2016-04-01

    Patients with major depression often report pain. In this article, we review the current literature regarding the prevalence and consequences, as well as the pathophysiology, of unexplained painful physical symptoms (UPPS) in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). UPPS are experienced by approximately two-thirds of depressed patients. The presence of UPPS makes a correct diagnosis of depression more difficult. Moreover, UPPS are a predictor of a poor response to treatment and a more chronic course of depression. Pain, in the course of depression, also has a negative impact on functioning and quality of life. Frequent comorbidity of depression and UPPS has inspired the formulation of an hypothesis regarding a shared neurobiological mechanism of both conditions. Evidence from neuroimaging studies has shown that frontal-limbic dysfunction in depression may explain abnormal pain processing, leading to the presence of UPPS. Increased levels of proinflamatory cytokines and substance P in patients with MDD may also clarify the pathophysiology of UPPS. Finally, dysfunction of the descending serotonergic and noradrenergic pathways that normally suppress ascending sensations has been proposed as a core mechanism of UPPS. Psychological factors such as catastrophizing also play a role in both depression and chronic pain. Therefore, pharmacological treatment and/or cognitive therapy are recommended in the treatment of depression with UPPS. Some data suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are more effective than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the alleviation of depression and UPPS. However, the pooled analysis of eight randomised clinical trials showed similar efficacy of duloxetine (an SNRI) and paroxetine (an SSRI) in reducing UPPS in depression. Further integrative studies examining genetic factors (e.g. polymorphisms of genes for interleukins, serotonin transporter and receptors), molecular factors (e.g. cytokines

  14. Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes in major depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtaki, Junichi

    1992-01-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in patients with major depression and in normal controls was measured by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using N-isopropyl-p [ 123 I]-iodoamphetamine (IMP). The subjects were 22 patients with major depression and 14 normal controls. The rCBF was calculated by the ratio of activity per pixel in the cortical regions to activity per pixel in the cerebellum. IMP-SPECT was conducted in patients with major depression under the depressive and remitted states. rCBF values in the frontal, parietal, temporal, basal ganglia and the occipital regions, and the mean rCBF values were significantly lower in depressive patients than in the controls. Increased rCBF values were observed, and the mean rCBF became normal in the state of remittence. There was no significant difference in mean rCBF between depressive patients and the controls. Therefore, because the lower rCBF was normalized following improvement in expressive symptoms, the rCBF values could be useful as 'state dependent markers' in patients with major depression. (author)

  15. Anxiety, depression and quality of life in patients with beta thalassemia major and their caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yengil, Erhan; Acipayam, Can; Kokacya, Mehmet Hanifi; Kurhan, Faruk; Oktay, Gonul; Ozer, Cahit

    2014-01-01

    Mental health and health related quality of life is commonly affected in patients with chronic problems and their caregivers. In the present study, it was aimed to assess depression and anxiety in patients with beta thalassemia major (BTM) and in their caregivers; and to evaluate effects of these disorders on quality of life. The study was carried out in a district Hereditary Hemoglobinopathy Center and included 88 patients with BTM and 63 of their caregivers. All subjects were assessed using Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Short Form-36 (SF-36) by a trained psychiatry resident via face-to-face interview. The BDI scores were 17 or above in 20.5% of the patients with BTM and 28.6% of their caregivers (P = 0.248). Of the patients with BTM, there were mild anxiety symptoms in 19.3%, while moderate and severe anxiety symptoms in 14.8% and 4.5%, respectively. Anxiety levels were similar between the patients with BTM and their caregivers (P = 0.878). It was found that BDI and BAI scores were negatively correlated to scores of physical health and mental health components of SF-36 in patients with BTM and their caregivers. In linear regression analysis, it was seen that depression affected physical and mental health of the patients with BTM and their caregivers regardless from anxiety. BTM leads an increase in the frequency of depression and anxiety in both patients and their caregivers, and affects negatively physical and mental components of quality of life.

  16. A randomised controlled trial of dietary improvement for adults with major depression (the 'SMILES' trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacka, Felice N; O'Neil, Adrienne; Opie, Rachelle; Itsiopoulos, Catherine; Cotton, Sue; Mohebbi, Mohammedreza; Castle, David; Dash, Sarah; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Chatterton, Mary Lou; Brazionis, Laima; Dean, Olivia M; Hodge, Allison M; Berk, Michael

    2017-01-30

    The possible therapeutic impact of dietary changes on existing mental illness is largely unknown. Using a randomised controlled trial design, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of a dietary improvement program for the treatment of major depressive episodes. 'SMILES' was a 12-week, parallel-group, single blind, randomised controlled trial of an adjunctive dietary intervention in the treatment of moderate to severe depression. The intervention consisted of seven individual nutritional consulting sessions delivered by a clinical dietician. The control condition comprised a social support protocol to the same visit schedule and length. Depression symptomatology was the primary endpoint, assessed using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes included remission and change of symptoms, mood and anxiety. Analyses utilised a likelihood-based mixed-effects model repeated measures (MMRM) approach. The robustness of estimates was investigated through sensitivity analyses. We assessed 166 individuals for eligibility, of whom 67 were enrolled (diet intervention, n = 33; control, n