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Sample records for included interviews questionnaires

  1. Questionnaires, in-depth interviews and focus groups

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Anne; Cox, Anna L.

    2008-01-01

    With fast changing technologies and related human interaction issues, there is an increased need for timely evaluation of systems with distributed users in varying contexts (Pace, 2004). This has led to the increased use of questionnaires, in-depth interviews and focus groups in commercial usability and academic research contexts. Questionnaires are usually paper based or delivered online and consist of a set of questions which all participants are asked to complete. Once the questionnaire ha...

  2. The heritability of Cluster B personality disorders assessed both by personal interview and questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgersen, Svenn; Myers, John; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Røysamb, Espen; Kubarych, Thomas S; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2012-12-01

    Whereas the heritability of common personality traits has been firmly established, the results of the few published studies on personality disorders (PDs) are highly divergent, with some studies finding high heredity and others very low. A problem with assessing personality disorders by means of interview is errors connected with interviewer bias. A way to overcome the problem is to use self-report questionnaires in addition to interviews. This study used both interview and questionnaire for assessing DSM-IV Cluster B personality disorders: antisocial personality disorder (APD), borderline (BPD), narcissistic (NPD), and histrionic (HPD). We assessed close to 2,800 twins from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel using a self-report questionnaire and, a few years later, the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality (SIDP-IV). Items from the self-report questionnaire that best predicted the PDs captured by the interview were then selected. Measurement models combining questionnaire and interview information were applied and were fitted using Mx. Whereas the heritability of Cluster B PDs assessed by interview was around .30, and around .40-.50 when assessed by self-report questionnaire, the heritability of the convergent latent factor, including information from both interview and self-report questionnaire was .69 for APD, .67 for BPD, .71 for NPD, and .63 for HPD. As is usually found for personality, the effect of shared-in families (familial) environment was zero. In conclusion, when both interview and self-report questionnaire are taken into account, the heritability of Cluster B PD appears to be in the upper range of previous findings for mental disorders.

  3. The Heritability of Cluster B Personality Disorders Assessed both by Personal Interview and Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgersen, Svenn; Myers, John; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Røysamb, Espen; Kubarych, Thomas S.; Kendler, Kenneth S.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas the heritability of common personality traits has been firmly established, the results of the few published studies on personality disorders (PDs) are highly divergent, with some studies finding high heredity and others very low. A problem with assessing personality disorders by means of interview is errors connected with interviewer bias. A way to overcome the problem is to use self-report questionnaires in addition to interviews. This study used both interview and questionnaire for assessing DSM-IV Cluster B personality disorders: antisocial personality disorder (APD), borderline (BPD), narcissistic (NPD), and histrionic (HPD). We assessed close to 2,800 twins from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel using a self-report questionnaire and, a few years later, the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality (SIDP-IV). Items from the self-report questionnaire that best predicted the PDs captured by the interview were then selected. Measurement models combining questionnaire and interview information were applied and were fitted using Mx. Whereas the heritability of Cluster B PDs assessed by interview was around .30, and around .40–.50 when assessed by self-report questionnaire, the heritability of the convergent latent factor, including information from both interview and self-report questionnaire was .69 for APD, .67 for BPD, .71 for NPD, and .63 for HPD. As is usually found for personality, the effect of shared-in families (familial) environment was zero. In conclusion, when both interview and self-report questionnaire are taken into account, the heritability of Cluster B PD appears to be in the upper range of previous findings for mental disorders. PMID:23281671

  4. Sexual behavior and HPV infection in British women, by postal questionnaires and telephone interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almonte, Maribel; Silva, Isabel Dos Santos; Asare, Akua; Gilham, Clare; Sargent, Alexandra; Bailey, Andrew; Turner, Andrew; Desai, Mina; Kitchener, Henry C; Peto, Julian

    2011-07-01

    Sexually transmitted human papillomaviruses (HPVs), most frequently HPV 16, are the primary cause of cervical carcinogenesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between sexual behavior and prevalence and acquisition of HPV infection among British women attending regular cervical screening who responded to postal questionnaires and/or telephone interviews. A total of 1,880 women who had been tested for HPV in the ARTISTIC (A Randomized Trial In Screening To Improve Cytology) trial were randomized to three methods of data collection: group 1 (questionnaire including sexual history, no interview), group 2 (questionnaire excluding sexual history, short interview including sexual history), and group 3 (questionnaire and long interview including sexual history in both). Questions on sexual history included age at first sexual intercourse, sexually transmitted diseases, lifetime (total and regular) sexual partners, and number of partners in the last 5 years (total and new). Demographics, reproductive, cervical screening, and smoking history were also collected in questionnaires. The overall participation rate was 35%. There was good agreement (87.4-95.5%) on sexual behavior answers in questionnaires and interviews in women in group 3 and no significant differences between data obtained by questionnaire or interview. Odds ratios (OR) for both HPV prevalence and acquisition increased consistently with increasing numbers of lifetime sexual partners, regular partners, and new partners in the last 5 years (recent partners). No significant association was found for other characteristics investigated. The effect of recent sexual partners on HPV acquisition (OR for 2+ recent partners: 4.4, 95% CI: 1.7-11.2) was stronger than that of earlier (> 5 years ago) partners (OR for 2+ earlier partners: 2.2, 95% CI: 0.7-6.7) suggesting that most incident HPV infections are newly acquired rather than recurrent. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Interviewing Objects: Including Educational Technologies as Qualitative Research Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.; Thompson, Terrie Lynn

    2011-01-01

    This article argues the importance of including significant technologies-in-use as key qualitative research participants when studying today's digitally enhanced learning environments. We gather a set of eight heuristics to assist qualitative researchers in "interviewing" technologies-in-use (or other relevant objects), drawing on concrete…

  6. Cognitive interviewing methods for questionnaire pre-testing in homeless persons with mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Carol E; Holland, Anna C; Patterson, Michelle L; Mason, Kate S; Goering, Paula N; Hwang, Stephen W

    2012-02-01

    In this study, cognitive interviewing methods were used to test targeted questionnaire items from a battery of quantitative instruments selected for a large multisite trial of supported housing interventions for homeless individuals with mental disorders. Most of the instruments had no published psychometrics in this population. Participants were 30 homeless adults with mental disorders (including substance use disorders) recruited from service agencies in Vancouver, Winnipeg, and Toronto, Canada. Six interviewers, trained in cognitive interviewing methods and using standard interview schedules, conducted the interviews. Questions and, in some cases, instructions, for testing were selected from existing instruments according to a priori criteria. Items on physical and mental health status, housing quality and living situation, substance use, health and justice system service use, and community integration were tested. The focus of testing was on relevance, comprehension, and recall, and on sensitivity/acceptability for this population. Findings were collated across items by site and conclusions validated by interviewers. There was both variation and similarity of responses for identified topics of interest. With respect to relevance, many items on the questionnaires were not applicable to homeless people. Comprehension varied considerably; thus, both checks on understanding and methods to assist comprehension and recall are recommended, particularly for participants with acute symptoms of mental illness and those with cognitive impairment. The acceptability of items ranged widely across the sample, but findings were consistent with previous literature, which indicates that "how you ask" is as important as "what you ask." Cognitive interviewing methods worked well and elicited information crucial to effective measurement in this unique population. Pretesting study instruments, including standard instruments, for use in special populations such as homeless

  7. The heritability of avoidant and dependent personality disorder assessed by personal interview and questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerde, L C; Czajkowski, N; Røysamb, E; Orstavik, R E; Knudsen, G P; Ostby, K; Torgersen, S; Myers, J; Kendler, K S; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T

    2012-12-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) have been shown to be modestly heritable. Accurate heritability estimates are, however, dependent on reliable measurement methods, as measurement error deflates heritability. The aim of this study was to estimate the heritability of DSM-IV avoidant and dependent personality disorder, by including two measures of the PDs at two time points. Data were obtained from a population-based cohort of young adult Norwegian twins, of whom 8045 had completed a self-report questionnaire assessing PD traits. 2794 of these twins subsequently underwent a structured diagnostic interview for DSM-IV PDs. Questionnaire items predicting interview results were selected by multiple regression, and measurement models of the PDs were fitted in Mx. The heritabilities of the PD factors were 0.64 for avoidant PD and 0.66 for dependent PD. No evidence of common environment, that is, environmental factors that are shared between twins and make them similar, was found. Genetic and environmental contributions to avoidant and dependent PD seemed to be the same across sexes. The combination of both a questionnaire- and an interview assessment of avoidant and dependent PD results in substantially higher heritabilities than previously found using single-occasion interviews only. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Interviewer versus self-administered health-related quality of life questionnaires - Does it matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackatz Lori E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient-reported outcomes are measured in many epidemiologic studies using self- or interviewer-administered questionnaires. While in some studies differences between these administration formats were observed, other studies did not show statistically significant differences important to patients. Since the evidence about the effect of administration format is inconsistent and mainly available from cross-sectional studies our aim was to assess the effects of different administration formats on repeated measurements of patient-reported outcomes in participants with AIDS enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications of AIDS. Methods We included participants enrolled in the Longitudinal Study of Ocular Complications in AIDS (LSOCA who completed the Medical Outcome Study [MOS] -HIV questionnaire, the EuroQol, the Feeling Thermometer and the Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ 25 every six months thereafter using self- or interviewer-administration. A large print questionnaire was available for participants with visual impairment. Considering all measurements over time and adjusting for patient and study site characteristics we used linear models to compare HRQL scores (all scores from 0-100 between administration formats. We defined adjusted differences of ≥0.2 standard deviations [SD] to be quantitatively meaningful. Results We included 2,261 participants (80.6% males with a median of 43.1 years of age at enrolment who provided data on 23,420 study visits. The self-administered MOS-HIV, Feeling Thermometer and EuroQol were used in 70% of all visits and the VFQ-25 in 80%. For eight domains of the MOS-HIV differences between the interviewer- and self- administered format were Conclusions Our large study provides evidence that administration formats do not have a meaningful effect on repeated measurements of patient-reported outcomes. As a consequence, longitudinal studies may not need to consider the effect of

  9. 76 FR 12979 - Submission for OMB Review: Comment Request; Questionnaire Cognitive Interviewing and Pretesting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-09

    ...Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) a request to review and approve the information collection listed below. This proposed information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on December 17, 2010 (75 FR 79009) and allowed 60 days for public comment. No public comments were received. The purpose of this notice is to allow an additional 30 days for public comment. The National Institutes of Health may not conduct or sponsor, and the respondent is not required to respond to, an information collection that has been extended, revised, or implemented on or after October 1, 1995, unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Questionnaire Cognitive Interview and Pretesting. Type of Information Collection Request: Extension. Need and Use of Information Collection: The purpose of the data collection is to conduct cognitive interviews, focus groups, Pilot household interviews, and experimental research in laboratory and field settings, both for applied questionnaire evaluation and more basic research on response errors in surveys. The most common evaluation method is the cognitive interview, in which a questionnaire design specialist interviews a volunteer participant. The interviewer administers the draft survey questions as written, but also probes the participant in depth about interpretations of questions, recall processes used to answer them, and adequacy of response categories to express answers, while noting points of confusion and errors in responding. Interviews are generally conducted in small rounds of 10-15 interviews. When possible, cognitive interviews are conducted in the survey's intended mode of administration. Cognitive interviewing provides useful information on questionnaire performance at minimal cost and

  10. Consequences of infertility in developing countries: results of a questionnaire and interview survey in the South of Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Wiersema, Nicole J; Drukker, Anouck J; Dung, Mai Ba Tien; Nhu, Giang Huynh; Nhu, Nguyen Thanh; Lambalk, Cornelis B

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background This study explores the psychological, socio-cultural and economic consequences of infertility on couples' life. The purpose of this research is to improve knowledge about the potentially serious implications of infertility in the South of Vietnam. Methods This study included 118 infertile couples who filled in questionnaires and 28 men and women who were interviewed. Results Data of the questionnaire show men and women do not differ in their responses and attitudes toward...

  11. Validation of the generic medical interview satisfaction scale: the G-MISS questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice-Szamburski, Axel; Michel, Pierre; Loundou, Anderson; Auquier, Pascal

    2017-02-14

    Patients have about seven medical consultations a year. Despite the importance of medical interviews in the healthcare process, there is no generic instrument to assess patients' experiences in general practices, medical specialties, and surgical specialties. The main objective was to validate a questionnaire assessing patients' experiences with medical consultations in various practices. The G-MISS study was a prospective multi-center trial that enrolled patients from May to July 2016. A total of 2055 patients were included from general practices, medical specialties, and surgical specialties. Patients filled out a questionnaire assessing various aspects of their experience and satisfaction within 1 week after their medical interview. The validation process relied on item response theory. Internal validity was examined using exploratory factorial analysis. The statistical model used the root mean square error of approximation, confirmatory fit index, and standard root mean square residual as fit indices. Scalability and reliability were assessed with the Rasch model and Cronbach's alpha coefficients, respectively. Scale properties across the three subgroups were explored with differential item functioning. The G-MISS final questionnaire contained 16 items, structured in three dimensions of patients' experiences: "Relief", "Communication", and "Compliance". A global index of patients' experiences was computed as the mean of the dimension scores. All fit indices from the statistical model were satisfactory (RMSEA = 0.03, CFI = 0.98, SRMR = 0.06). The overall scalability had a good fit to the Rasch model. Each dimension was reliable, with Cronbach's alpha ranging from 0.73 to 0.86. Differential item functioning across the three consultation settings was negligible. Patients undergoing medical or surgical specialties reported higher scores in the "Relief" dimension compared with general practice (83.0 ± 11.6 or 82.4 ± 11.6 vs. 73.2 ± 16

  12. Cognitive Interviewing: A Qualitative Tool for Improving Questionnaires in Sport Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Hanno; Ehrlenspiel, Felix

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive models postulate that respondents to a questionnaire follow a four-stage process when answering a question: comprehension, memory retrieval, decision, and response. Cognitive interviewing is a qualitative tool to gain insight into this process by means of letting respondents think aloud or asking them specific questions (Willis, 2005).…

  13. Qualitative analysis of cognitive interviews with school children: A web-based food intake questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of computers to administer dietary assessment questionnaires has shown potential, particularly due to the variety of interactive features that can attract and sustain children's attention. Cognitive interviews can help researchers to gain insights into how children understand and elaborate t...

  14. The heritability of cluster A personality disorders assessed by both personal interview and questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Myers, John; Torgersen, Svenn; Neale, Michael C; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted

    2007-05-01

    Personality disorders (PDs) as assessed by questionnaires and personal interviews are heritable. However, we know neither how much unreliability of measurement impacts on heritability estimates nor whether the genetic and environmental risk factors assessed by these two methods are the same. We wish to know whether the same set of PD vulnerability factors are assessed by these two methods. A total of 3334 young adult twin pairs from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health Twin Panel (NIPHTP) completed a questionnaire containing 91 PD items. One to 6 years later, 1386 of these pairs were interviewed with the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality (SIDP-IV). Self-report items predicting interview results were selected by regression. Measurement models were fitted using Mx. In the best-fit models, the latent liabilities to paranoid personality disorder (PPD), schizoid personality disorder (SPD) and schizotypal personality disorder (STPD) were all highly heritable with no evidence of shared environmental effects. For PPD and STPD, only unique environmental effects were specific to the interview measure whereas both environmental and genetic effects were found to be specific to the questionnaire assessment. For SPD, the best-fit model contained genetic and environmental effects specific to both forms of assessment. The latent liabilities to the cluster A PDs are highly heritable but are assessed by current methods with only moderate reliability. The personal interviews assessed the genetic risk for the latent trait with excellent specificity for PPD and STPD and good specificity for SPD. However, for all three PDs, the questionnaires were less specific, also indexing an independent set of genetic risk factors.

  15. Qualitative Analysis of Cognitive Interviews With School Children: A Web-Based Food Intake Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes Davies, Vanessa; Kupek, Emil; Faria Di Pietro, Patricia; Altenburg de Assis, Maria Alice; Gk Vieira, Francilene; Perucchi, Clarice; Mafra, Rafaella; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Thomas

    2016-11-28

    The use of computers to administer dietary assessment questionnaires has shown potential, particularly due to the variety of interactive features that can attract and sustain children's attention. Cognitive interviews can help researchers to gain insights into how children understand and elaborate their response processes in this type of questionnaire. To present the cognitive interview results of children who answered the WebCAAFE, a Web-based questionnaire, to obtain an in-depth understanding of children's response processes. Cognitive interviews were conducted with children (using a pretested interview script). Analyses were carried out using thematic analysis within a grounded theory framework of inductive coding. A total of 40 children participated in the study, and 4 themes were identified: (1) the meaning of words, (2) understanding instructions, (3) ways to resolve possible problems, and (4) suggestions for improving the questionnaire. Most children understood questions that assessed nutritional intake over the past 24 hours, although the structure of the questionnaire designed to facilitate recall of dietary intake was not always fully understood. Younger children (7 and 8 years old) had more difficulty relating the food images to mixed dishes and foods eaten with bread (eg, jam, cheese). Children were able to provide suggestions for improving future versions of the questionnaire. More attention should be paid to children aged 8 years or below, as they had the greatest difficulty completing the WebCAAFE. ©Vanessa Fernandes Davies, Emil Kupek, Patricia Faria Di Pietro, Maria Alice Altenburg de Assis, Francilene GK Vieira, Clarice Perucchi, Rafaella Mafra, Debbe Thompson, Thomas Baranowski. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 28.11.2016.

  16. Development of the adult and child complementary medicine questionnaires fielded on the National Health Interview Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The 2002, 2007, and 2012 complementary medicine questionnaires fielded on the National Health Interview Survey provide the most comprehensive data on complementary medicine available for the United States. They filled the void for large-scale, nationally representative, publicly available datasets on the out-of-pocket costs, prevalence, and reasons for use of complementary medicine in the U.S. Despite their wide use, this is the first article describing the multi-faceted and largely qualitative processes undertaken to develop the surveys. We hope this in-depth description enables policy makers and researchers to better judge the content validity and utility of the questionnaires and their resultant publications. PMID:24267412

  17. Interview versus questionnaire for assessing physical loads in the population-based MUSIC-Norrtälje Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktorin, C; Vingård, E; Mortimer, M; Pernold, G; Wigaeus-Hjelm, E; Kilbom, A; Alfredsson, L

    1999-05-01

    MUSIC-Norrtälje study is a case-referent study, the aim of which is to find risk and health factors for low back and neck/shoulder disorders. In this part of the study, the interview technique and the self-administered questionnaire used for assessment of physical loads are described and the inter-method reliability of parts of the self-administered questionnaire is estimated. The distribution of exposure levels in a general population is also described. The study period was three years from November 1993 to November 1996, and the study subjects totaled 2,480 persons (813 female and 610 male referents, 380 female and 315 male low back cases, 252 female and 106 male neck/shoulder cases). The interview concerned "a typical working day" during the preceding 12 months and comprised assessment of energy expenditure, work postures, and manual materials handling for work and leisure time, including regular sport activities. The self-administered questionnaire comprised 18 questions, each covering 5 different points of time: right now, 5, 10, 15, 20 years ago. The answers to eight of the questions about current conditions were compared to corresponding interview responses. The interview was considered as the "gold standard." Ninety-eight percent of the subjects completed the interview without any great difficulties. According to the interview, the distributions of different exposure levels were generally positively skewed, i.e., the frequency of highly exposed subjects was low in the study base. The correlation between interview and questionnaire responses among the referents was high for time spent "sitting at work" (r = 0.82), "VDU work" (r = 0.87), and work related "motor vehicle driving" (r = 0.80). The correlation was moderate for work-related "hands above shoulder level" (rs = 0.63), and "hands below knee level (trunk flexion)" (rs = 0.66). The correlation was lower for leisure time activities such as "domestic work" (r = 0.55), "time for own activities" (r = 0

  18. Diagnostic validity Polish language version of the questionnaire MINI-KID (Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview for Children and Adolescent).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowska, Sylwia; Sylwia, Adamowska; Adamowski, Tomasz; Tomasz, Adamowski; Frydecka, Dorota; Dorota, Frydecka; Kiejna, Andrzej; Andrzej, Kiejna

    2014-10-01

    Since over forty years structuralized interviews for clinical and epidemiological research in child and adolescent psychiatry are being developed that should increase validity and reliability of diagnoses according to classification systems (DSM and ICD). The aim of the study is to assess the validity of the Polish version of MINI-KID (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview for Children and Adolescents) in comparison to clinical diagnosis made by a specialist in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry. There were 140 patients included in the study (93 boys, 66.4%, mean age 11.8±3.0 and 47 girls 33.5%, mean age 14.0±2.9). All the patients were diagnosed by the specialist in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry according to ICD-10 criteria and by the independent interviewer with the Polish version of MINI-KID (version 2.0, 2001). There was higher agreement between clinical diagnoses and diagnoses based on MINI-KID interview with respect to eating disorders and externalizing disorders (κ 0.43-0.56) and lower in internalizing disorders (κ 0.13-0.45). In the clinical interview, there was smaller number of diagnostic categories (maximum 3 diagnoses per one patient) in comparison to MINI-KID (maximum 10 diagnoses per one patient), and the smaller percentage of patients with one diagnosis (65,7%) in comparison to MINI-KID interview (72%). Our study has shown satisfactory validity parameters of MINI-KID questionnaire, promoting its use for clinical and epidemiological settings. The Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview for Children and Adolescent (MINI-KID) is the first structuralized diagnostic interview for assessing mental status in children and adolescents, which has been translated into Polish language. Our validation study demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties of the questionnaire, enabling its use in clinical practice and in research projects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Cognitive interviews guide design of a new CAM patient expectations questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Karen J; Eaves, Emery R; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Hsu, Clarissa; Cherkin, Daniel C; Turner, Judith A

    2014-01-25

    No consistent relationship exists between pre-treatment expectations and therapeutic benefit from various complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies in clinical trials. However, many different expectancy measures have been used in those studies, with no validated questionnaires clearly focused on CAM and pain. We undertook cognitive interviews as part of a process to develop and validate such a questionnaire. We reviewed questions about expectations of benefits of acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, or yoga for pain. Components of the questions - verbs, nouns, response options, terms and phrases describing back pain - were identified. Using seven different cognitive interview scripts, we conducted 39 interviews to evaluate how individuals with chronic low back pain understood these individual components in the context of expectancy questions for a therapy they had not yet received. Chosen items were those with the greatest agreement and least confusion among participants, and were closest to the meanings intended by the investigators. The questionnaire drafted for psychometric evaluation had 18 items covering various domains of expectancy. "Back pain" was the most consistently interpreted descriptor for this condition. The most understandable response options were 0-10 scales, a structure used throughout the questionnaire, with 0 always indicating no change, and 10 anchored with an absolute descriptor such as "complete relief". The use of words to describe midpoints was found to be confusing. The word "expect" held different and shifting meanings for participants. Thus paired items comparing "hope" and "realistically expect" were chosen to evaluate 5 different aspects of treatment expectations (back pain; back dysfunction and global effects; impact of back pain on specific areas of life; sleep, mood, and energy; coping). "Impact of back pain" on various areas of life was found to be a consistently meaningful concept, and more global than "interference

  20. Convergence of Scores on the Interview and Questionnaire Versions of the Eating Disorder Examination: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kelly C.; Peterson, Carol B.; Frazier, Patricia; Crow, Scott J.

    2011-01-01

    Significant discrepancies have been found between interview- and questionnaire-based assessments of psychopathology; however, these studies have typically compared instruments with unmatched item content. The Eating Disorder Examination (EDE), a structured interview, and the questionnaire version of the EDE (EDE-Q) are considered the preeminent…

  1. Qualitative assessment of the primary care outcomes questionnaire: a cognitive interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Mairead; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Salisbury, Chris

    2018-02-01

    The Primary Care Outcomes Questionnaire (PCOQ) is a new patient-reported outcome measure designed specifically for primary care. This paper describes the developmental process of improving the item quality and testing the face validity of the PCOQ through cognitive interviews with primary care patients. Two formats of the PCOQ were developed and assessed: the PCOQ-Status (which has an adjectival scale) and the PCOQ-Change (which has the same items as the PCOQ-Status, but a transitional scale). Three rounds of cognitive interviews were held with twenty patients from four health centres in Bristol. Patients seeking healthcare were recruited directly by their GP or practice nurse, and others not currently seeking healthcare were recruited from patient participation groups. An adjusted form of Tourangeau's model of cognitive processing was used to identify problems. This contained four categories: general comprehension, temporal comprehension, decision process, and response process. The resultant pattern of problems was used to assess whether the items and scales were working as intended, and to make improvements to the questionnaires. The problems identified in the PCOQ-Status reduced from 41 in round one to seven in round three. It was noted that the PCOQ-Status seemed to be capturing a subjective view of health which might not vary with age or long-term conditions. However, as it is designed to be evaluative (measuring change over time) as opposed to discriminative (measuring change between different groups of people), this does not present a problem for validity. The PCOQ-Status was both understood by patients and was face valid. The PCOQ-Change had less face validity, and was misunderstood by three out of six patients in round 1. It was not taken forward after this round. The cognitive interviews successfully contributed to the development of the PCOQ. Through this study, the PCOQ-Status was found to be well understood by patients, and it was possible to improve

  2. Reliability and Validity of the Self- and Interviewer-Administered Versions of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne H Y Chu

    Full Text Available The Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ was originally designed to be interviewer-administered by the World Health Organization in assessing physical activity. The main aim of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of a self-administered GPAQ with the original interviewer-administered approach. Additionally, this study explored whether using different accelerometry-based physical activity bout definitions might affect the questionnaire's validity.A total of 110 participants were recruited and randomly allocated to an interviewer- (n = 56 or a self-administered (n = 54 group for test-retest reliability, of which 108 participants who met the wear time criteria were included in the validity study. Reliability was assessed by administration of questionnaires twice with a one-week interval. Criterion validity was assessed by comparing against seven-day accelerometer measures. Two definitions for accelerometry-data scoring were employed: (1 total-min of activity, and (2 10-min bout.Participants had similar baseline characteristics in both administration groups and no significant difference was found between the two formats in terms of validity (correlations between the GPAQ and accelerometer. For validity, the GPAQ demonstrated fair-to-moderate correlations for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA for self-administration (rs = 0.30 and interviewer-administration (rs = 0.46. Findings were similar when considering 10-min activity bouts in the accelerometer analysis for MVPA (rs = 0.29 vs. 0.42 for self vs. interviewer. Within each mode of administration, the strongest correlations were observed for vigorous-intensity activity. However, Bland-Altman plots illustrated bias toward overestimation for higher levels of MVPA, vigorous- and moderate-intensity activities, and underestimation for lower levels of these measures. Reliability for MVPA revealed moderate correlations (rs = 0.61 vs. 0.63 for self vs. interviewer

  3. The impact of self-interviews on response patterns for sensitive topics: a randomized trial of electronic delivery methods for a sexual behaviour questionnaire in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harling, Guy; Gumede, Dumile; Mutevedzi, Tinofa; McGrath, Nuala; Seeley, Janet; Pillay, Deenan; Bärnighausen, Till W; Herbst, Abraham J

    2017-08-17

    Self-interviews, where the respondent rather than the interviewer enters answers to questions, have been proposed as a way to reduce social desirability bias associated with interviewer-led interviews. Computer-assisted self-interviews (CASI) are commonly proposed since the computer programme can guide respondents; however they require both language and computer literacy. We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of using electronic methods to administer quantitative sexual behaviour questionnaires in the Somkhele demographic surveillance area (DSA) in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We conducted a four-arm randomized trial of paper-and-pen-interview, computer-assisted personal-interview (CAPI), CASI and audio-CASI with an age-sex-urbanicity stratified sample of 504 adults resident in the DSA in 2015. We compared respondents' answers to their responses to the same questions in previous surveillance rounds. We also conducted 48 cognitive interviews, dual-coding responses using the Framework approach. Three hundred forty (67%) individuals were interviewed and covariates and participation rates were balanced across arms. CASI and audio-CASI were significantly slower than interviewer-led interviews. Item non-response rates were higher in self-interview arms. In single-paper meta-analysis, self-interviewed individuals reported more socially undesirable sexual behaviours. Cognitive interviews found high acceptance of both self-interviews and the use of electronic methods, with some concerns that self-interview methods required more participant effort and literacy. Electronic data collection methods, including self-interview methods, proved feasible and acceptable for completing quantitative sexual behaviour questionnaires in a poor, rural South African setting. However, each method had both benefits and costs, and the choice of method should be based on context-specific criteria.

  4. The impact of self-interviews on response patterns for sensitive topics: a randomized trial of electronic delivery methods for a sexual behaviour questionnaire in rural South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Harling

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-interviews, where the respondent rather than the interviewer enters answers to questions, have been proposed as a way to reduce social desirability bias associated with interviewer-led interviews. Computer-assisted self-interviews (CASI are commonly proposed since the computer programme can guide respondents; however they require both language and computer literacy. We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of using electronic methods to administer quantitative sexual behaviour questionnaires in the Somkhele demographic surveillance area (DSA in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods We conducted a four-arm randomized trial of paper-and-pen-interview, computer-assisted personal-interview (CAPI, CASI and audio-CASI with an age-sex-urbanicity stratified sample of 504 adults resident in the DSA in 2015. We compared respondents’ answers to their responses to the same questions in previous surveillance rounds. We also conducted 48 cognitive interviews, dual-coding responses using the Framework approach. Results Three hundred forty (67% individuals were interviewed and covariates and participation rates were balanced across arms. CASI and audio-CASI were significantly slower than interviewer-led interviews. Item non-response rates were higher in self-interview arms. In single-paper meta-analysis, self-interviewed individuals reported more socially undesirable sexual behaviours. Cognitive interviews found high acceptance of both self-interviews and the use of electronic methods, with some concerns that self-interview methods required more participant effort and literacy. Conclusions Electronic data collection methods, including self-interview methods, proved feasible and acceptable for completing quantitative sexual behaviour questionnaires in a poor, rural South African setting. However, each method had both benefits and costs, and the choice of method should be based on context-specific criteria.

  5. Interview

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    New column in ECHO The editorial team would like to give the â€ワpeople at CERN” the chance to have their say. Through regular interviews, it wishes to highlight the particularities of those who help CERN remain a centre of excellence.

  6. Does the COPD assessment test (CAT(TM)) questionnaire produce similar results when self- or interviewer administered?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agusti, A; Soler-Cataluña, J J; Molina, J; Morejon, E; Garcia-Losa, M; Roset, M; Badia, X

    2015-10-01

    The COPD assessment test (CAT) is a questionnaire that assesses the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) on health status, but some patients have difficulties filling it up by themselves. We examined whether the mode of administration of the Spanish version of CAT (self vs. interviewer) influences its scores and/or psychometric properties. Observational, prospective study in 49 Spanish centers that includes clinically stable COPD patients (n = 153) and patients hospitalized because of an exacerbation (ECOPD; n = 224). The CAT was self-administered (CAT-SA) or administered by an interviewer (CAT-IA) based on the investigator judgment of the patient's capacity. To assess convergent validity, the Saint George's Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (SGRQ) and the London Chest Activity of Daily Living (LCADL) instrument were also administered. Psychometric properties were compared across modes of administration. A total of 118 patients (31 %) completed the CAT-SA and 259 (69 %) CAT-IA. Multiple regression analysis showed that mode of administration did not affect CAT scores. The CAT showed excellent psychometric properties in both modes of administration. Internal consistency coefficients (Cronbach's alpha) were high (0.86 for CAT-SA and 0.85 for CAT-IA) as was test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.83 for CAT-SA and CAT-IA). Correlations with SGRQ and LCADL were moderate to strong both in CAT-SA and CAT-IA, indicating good convergent validity. Similar results were observed when testing longitudinal validity. The mode of administration does not influence CAT scores or its psychometric properties. Hence, both modes of administration can be used in clinical practice depending on the physician judgment of patient's capacity.

  7. Consequences of infertility in developing countries: results of a questionnaire and interview survey in the South of Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nhu Nguyen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study explores the psychological, socio-cultural and economic consequences of infertility on couples' life. The purpose of this research is to improve knowledge about the potentially serious implications of infertility in the South of Vietnam. Methods This study included 118 infertile couples who filled in questionnaires and 28 men and women who were interviewed. Results Data of the questionnaire show men and women do not differ in their responses and attitudes towards infertility. Almost one-third of the participants require psychological support. Interviewees experience secrecy, social pressure and economic hardship. Conclusion Offspring are very important to Vietnamese couples. Their future depends on children. Family plays an important role in the experiences of the infertile couple. Economic consequences are a particular distressing factor. There is a need for psychological counselling in the treatment of infertile couples in the South of Vietnam. It should be realised that in developing countries, despite overpopulation, unwanted childlessness is an important social and economical burden that needs attention.

  8. Themes and situations that cause embarrassment among participants in research in which questionnaires or interviews are used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Dias Reis Pessalacia

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To recognize the themes and situations that could make research participants feel embarrassed when questionnaires or interviews are used. Methodology. Quantitative and descriptive study, developed in 2008, involving a stratified sample of 1,1149 subjects who qualified the degree of shame in view of potentially embarrassing themes and situations. Results. For the research participants, it is embarrassing to answer questions related to the following themes: betrayal (50%, physical violence (42%, sexual harassment (42%, psychological violence (40% and death of loved ones (38%. The situations that most frequently causes embarrassment were: start of the survey or interview without requesting informed consent (83%; lack of information about the type of questions that would be addressed (79%, lack of guaranteed anonymity (78%, or use of images (66% or a recorder (58%. Conclusion. Themes and situations were identified that caused embarrassment among participants in research in which questionnaires or interviews were used, which should be considered in the ethical evaluation of studies.

  9. Cognitive Interviews Conducted in Spanish: A Method for Enhancing a Hispanic Infant Feeding Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Gwenyth R; Feldman, Robert H; Anliker, Jean

    Research indicates that using cognitive interview techniques, that are qualitative in nature, can enhance the quality of health survey instruments. This study was conducted during the formative phase of the Un Bebe Saludable: Un Regalo Muy Especial (A Healthy Baby: A Very Special Gift) program. Cognitive interviews were conducted in Spanish in an effort to improve the quality of a Hispanic infant feeding behavior survey designed to evaluate a peer education program for Latina mothers participating in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC). Results indicate that a small sample of cognitive interviews can improve the level of question comprehension and the ease at which respondents can process the information from specific survey items. Our experience suggests that adding cognitive interviewing to conventional field pre-testing and back-translation techniques during the development of Hispanic health surveys may enhance the quality of the health behavior data that are generated.

  10. Interview and questionnaire guide: Quantification of food losses and waste in primary production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svanes, Erik; Hartikainen, Hanna; Mogensen, Lisbeth

    This interview guide was developed within the Nordic project “Food losses and waste in primary production” (Franke et al. 2016). One of the main purposes of the project was to test research methods for the quantification of food losses and waste (in the project called 'side flow') from primary...

  11. The Productivity of the Three-Step Test-Interview (TSTI) Compared to an Expert Review of a Self-administered Questionnaire on Alcohol Consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.M. Jansen (Harrie); A. Hak (Tony)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe three-step test interview (TSTI) is a recently developed observation-based procedure for the identification of response problems in self-administered survey questionnaires. The TSTI was applied in field test interviews to a quantity-frequency-variability questionnaire on alcohol

  12. Burnout and psychiatric morbidity among medical students entering clinical training: a three year prospective questionnaire and interview-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Runeson Bo

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental distress among medical students is often reported. Burnout has not been studied frequently and studies using interviewer-rated diagnoses as outcomes are rarely employed. The objective of this prospective study of medical students was to examine clinically significant psychiatric morbidity and burnout at 3rd year of medical school, considering personality and study conditions measured at 1st year. Methods Questionnaires were sent to 127 first year medical students who were then followed-up at 3rd year of medical school. Eighty-one of 3rd year respondents participated in a diagnostic interview. Personality (HP5-i and Performance-based self-esteem (PBSE-scale were assessed at first year, Study conditions (HESI, Burnout (OLBI, Depression (MDI at 1st and 3rd years. Diagnostic interviews (MINI were used at 3rd year to assess psychiatric morbidity. High and low burnout at 3rd year was defined by cluster analysis. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of high burnout and psychiatric morbidity, controlling for gender. Results 98 (77% responded on both occasions, 80 (63% of these were interviewed. High burnout was predicted by Impulsivity trait, Depressive symptoms at 1st year and Financial concerns at 1st year. When controlling for 3rd year study conditions, Impulsivity and concurrent Workload remained. Of the interviewed sample 21 (27% had a psychiatric diagnosis, 6 of whom had sought help. Unadjusted analyses showed that psychiatric morbidity was predicted by high Performance-based self-esteem, Disengagement and Depression at 1st year, only the later remained significant in the adjusted analysis. Conclusion Psychiatric morbidity is common in medical students but few seek help. Burnout has individual as well as environmental explanations and to avoid it, organisational as well as individual interventions may be needed. Early signs of depressive symptoms in medical students may be important to address. Students

  13. The Three-Step Test-Interview (TSTI: An observation-based method for pretesting self-completion questionnaires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Hak

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Three-Step Test-Interview (TSTI is a method for pretesting a self-completion questionnaire by first observing actual instances of interaction between the instrument and respondents (the response process before exploring the reasons for this behavior. The TSTI consists of the following three steps: 1. (Respondent-driven observation of response behavior. 2. (Interviewer-driven follow-up probing aimed at remedying gaps in observational data. 3. (Interviewer-driven debriefing aimed at eliciting experiences and opinions. We describe the aims and the techniques of these three steps, and then discuss pilot studies in which we tested the feasibility and the productivity of the TSTI by applying it in testing three rather different types of questionnaires. In the first study, the quality of a set of questions about alcohol consumption was assessed. The TSTI proved to be productive in identifying problems that resulted from a mismatch between the ‘theory’ underlying the questions on the one hand, and features of a respondent’s actual behavior and biography on the other hand. In the second pilot study, Dutch and Norwegian versions of an attitude scale, the 20-item Illegal Aliens Scale, were tested. The TSTI appeared to be productive in identifying problems that resulted from different ‘response strategies’. In the third pilot, a two-year longitudinal study, the TSTI appeared to be an effective method for documenting processes of ‘response shift’ in repeated measurements of health-related Quality of Life (QoL.

  14. Can 'partial' PTSD explain differences in diagnosis of PTSD by questionnaire self-report and interview after head injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalton, L D; McMillan, T M

    2009-02-01

    Can the concept of 'partial' PTSD explain the disparity between the relatively high incidence of PTSD found using self-report questionnaires and the relatively low incidence using structured interview? It was hypothesized that self-report of greater PTSD symptom severity is associated with increased heart rate and movement when responding to questions about the traumatic event, if 'partial' PTSD is an explanation. A within participants single group design. Twenty-one adults with head injury underwent self-report (Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Scale) and interview (Clinical Assessment of PTSD) assessments of PTSD, the Traumatic Memory Interview, self-report of mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and cognitive assessment (Wechsler Test of Adult Reading, Auditory Verbal Learning Test, Hayling Test, Digit Symbol Test), during which heart rate and motor activity were recorded. Self-report of greater PTSD symptom severity was not associated with increases in heart rate or movement during questions about the traumatic event. In fact, heart rate decreased from baseline in those with higher self-report scores for PTSD, consistent with curiosity about the traumatic event and not 'partial' PTSD. These preliminary findings agree with an emerging theme suggesting that, although PTSD can occur after head injury, it is easily over-diagnosed.

  15. More than reflections: empathy in motivational interviewing includes language style synchrony between therapist and client.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Sarah Peregrine; Sheng, Elisa; Imel, Zac E; Baer, John; Atkins, David C

    2015-05-01

    Empathy is a basic psychological process that involves the development of synchrony in dyads. It is also a foundational ingredient in specific, evidence-based behavioral treatments like motivational interviewing (MI). Ratings of therapist empathy typically rely on a gestalt, "felt sense" of therapist understanding and the presence of specific verbal behaviors like reflective listening. These ratings do not provide a direct test of psychological processes like behavioral synchrony that are theorized to be an important component of empathy in psychotherapy. To explore a new objective indicator of empathy, we hypothesized that synchrony in language style (i.e., matching how statements are phrased) between client and therapists would predict gestalt ratings of empathy over and above the contribution of reflections. We analyzed 122 MI transcripts with high and low empathy ratings based on the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity global rating scale. Linguistic inquiry and word count was used to estimate language style synchrony (LSS) of adjacent client and therapist talk turns. High-empathy sessions showed greater LSS across 11 language style categories compared with low-empathy sessions (p<.01), and overall, average LSS was notably higher in high-empathy versus low-empathy sessions (d=0.62). Regression analyses showed that LSS was predictive of empathy ratings over and above reflection counts; a 1 SD increase in LSS is associated with a 2.4 times increase in the odds of a high-empathy rating, controlling for therapist reflections (odds ratio=2.4; 95% CI: 1.36; 4.24, p<.01). These findings suggest empathy ratings are related to synchrony in language style, over and above synchrony of content as measured by therapist reflections. Novel indicators of therapist empathy may have implications for the study of MI process as well as the training of therapists. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. More than reflections: Empathy in motivational interviewing includes language style synchrony between therapist and client

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Sarah Peregrine; Sheng, Elisa; Imel, Zac E.; Baer, John; Atkins, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Empathy is a basic psychological process that involves the development of synchrony in dyads. It is also a foundational ingredient in specific, evidence-based behavioral treatments like motivational interviewing (MI). Ratings of therapist empathy typically rely on a gestalt, “felt sense” of therapist understanding and the presence of specific verbal behaviors like reflective listening. These ratings do not provide a direct test of psychological processes like behavioral synchrony that are theorized to be an important component of empathy in psychotherapy. To explore a new objective indicator of empathy, we hypothesized that synchrony in language style (i.e., matching how statements are phrased) between client and therapists would predict gestalt ratings of empathy over and above the contribution of reflections. We analyzed 122 MI transcripts with high and low empathy ratings based on the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity (MITI) global rating scale. Linguistic inquiry and word count was used to estimate language style synchrony (LSS) of adjacent client and therapist talk turns. High empathy sessions showed greater LSS across 11 language style categories compared to low empathy sessions (p empathy vs. low empathy sessions (d = 0.62). Regression analyses showed that LSS was predictive of empathy ratings over and above reflection counts; a 1 SD increase in LSS is associated with 2.4 times increase in the odds of a high empathy rating, controlling for therapist reflections (odds ratio = 2.4, 95% CI: 1.36, 4.24, p empathy ratings are related to synchrony in language style, over and above synchrony of content as measured by therapist reflections. Novel indicators of therapist empathy may have implications for the study of MI process as well as the training of therapists. PMID:25892166

  17. Exploring patients' experience of receiving information about cancer: a comparison of interview and questionnaire methods of data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Kristian; Moghaddam, Nima; Cox, Karen; Wilson, Eleanor; Howard, Penny

    2011-03-01

    Patient information is widely regarded both as a resource and an entitlement: a means of 'empowering' patients to behave as 'consumers' of health care. Patient 'satisfaction' has come to be regarded as an important outcome of care. This article presents qualitative interview data regarding the experience of patient information provision and the results of a self-completed Information Satisfaction Questionnaire (ISQ) among patients and relatives affected by cancer. It considers the implications of the differences between these for service evaluation and current policy implementation promoting patients as informed and expert consumers of health care. The study findings contribute to growing evidence that the high rate of patients' expressed satisfaction with different aspects of service provision as indicated by structured questionnaire responses is largely an artefact of the method of data collection. Accounts of negative experiences were common, but did not translate into expressed criticism or overt dissatisfaction. It is important that the limitations of such surveys are contextualized in relation to qualitative findings such as those of the present study. Especially in the face of serious and life-threatening illness, professional constructs such as 'information delivery', 'satisfaction' and 'shared decision making' have little resonance for many patients, who prefer to trust in professional expertise and to eschew the acquisition of specialist knowledge and active involvement in decisions about health care.

  18. The relationship between interviewer-respondent race match and reporting of energy intake using food frequency questionnaires in the rural South United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the observational study was to determine whether interviewer race influences food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) reporting accuracy in a Deep South, largely African American cohort. A secondary analysis was conducted to investigate the influence of interviewer race on energy reporting ...

  19. Response patterns on interview and questionnaire versions of the Eating Disorder Examination and their impact on latent structure analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kelly C; Swanson, Sonja A; Stiles-Shields, E Colleen; Eddy, Kamryn T; Peterson, Carol B; Le Grange, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the latent structures of the interview (EDE) and questionnaire (EDE-Q) versions of the Eating Disorder Examination. Participants were 280 children, adolescents, and young adults seeking eating disorder treatment. Two separate latent structure analyses (LSAs) were conducted; one used variables from the EDE as indicators and the other used the corresponding variables from the EDE-Q as indicators. The EDE and EDE-Q models both yielded four-class solutions. Three of the four classes from the EDE-Q model demonstrated moderate to high concordance with their paired class from the EDE model. Using the EDE-Q to detect the EDE, the sensitivity and specificity of measuring certain classes varied from poor (18.6%) to excellent (93.7%). The overall concordance was moderate (κ=.49). These data suggest that LSAs using the EDE and EDE-Q may be directly compared; however, differences between results may represent inconsistencies in response patterns rather than true differences in psychopathology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Motives for choosing growth-enhancing hormone treatment in adolescents with idiopathic short stature: a questionnaire and structured interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-van Balen, Hanneke; Geenen, Rinie; Kamp, Gerdine A; Huisman, Jaap; Wit, Jan M; Sinnema, Gerben

    2005-06-08

    Growth-enhancing hormone treatment is considered a possible intervention in short but otherwise healthy adolescents. Although height gain is an obvious measure for evaluating hormone treatment, this may not be the ultimate goal for the person, but rather a means to reach other goals such as the amelioration of current height-related psychosocial problems or the enhancement of future prospects in life and society. The aim of our study was to clarify the motives of adolescents and their parents when choosing to participate in a growth-enhancing trial combining growth hormone and puberty-delaying hormone treatment. Participants were early pubertal adolescents (25 girls, 13 boys) aged from 11 to 13 years (mean age 11.5 years) with a height standard deviation score (SDS) ranging from -1.03 to -3.43. All had been classified as idiopathic short stature or persistent short stature born small for the gestational age (intrauterine growth retardation) on the basis of a height SDS below -2, or had a height SDS between -1 and -2 and a predicted adult height SDS below -2. The adolescents and their parents completed questionnaires and a structured interview on the presence of height-related stressors, parental worries about their child's behavior and future prospects, problems in psychosocial functioning, and treatment expectations. Questionnaire scores were compared to norms of the general Dutch population. The adolescents reported normal psychosocial functioning and highly positive expectations of the treatment in terms of height gain, whereas the parents reported that their children encountered some behavioral problems (being anxious/depressed, and social and attention problems) and height-related stressors (being teased and juvenilized). About 40% of the parents were worried about their children's future prospects for finding a spouse or job. The motives of the adolescents and their parents exhibited rather different profiles. The most prevalent parental worries related to

  1. Understanding health care provider barriers to hospital affiliated medical fitness center facility referral: a questionnaire survey and semi structured interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smock, Carissa; Alemagno, Sonia

    2017-08-03

    The purpose of this study is to understand health care provider barriers to referring patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities within an affiliated teaching hospital system using referral of diabetic services as an example. The aims of this study include: (1) to assess health care providers' awareness and use of facilities, (2) to determine barriers to referring patients to facilities, (3) identify current and needed resources and/or changes to increase referral to facilities. A 20-item electronic survey and requests for semi-structured interviews were administered to hospital system directors and managers (n = 51). Directors and managers instructed physicians and staff to complete the survey and interviews as applicable. Perceived barriers, knowledge, utilization, and referral of patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities were collected and examined. Descriptive statistics were generated regarding practice characteristics, provider characteristics, and referral. Of the health care providers surveyed and interviewed (n = 25) 40% indicated verbally suggesting use of facilities, 24% provided a flyer about the facilities. No respondents indicated that they directly referred patients to the facilities. However, 16% referred patients to other locations for physical activity - including their own department's management and prevention services. 20% do not refer to Medical Fitness Center Facilities or any other lifestyle programs/locations. Lack of time (92%) and lack of standard guidelines and operating procedures (88%) are barriers to referral. All respondents indicated a strong ability to refer patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities if given education about referral programs available as well as standard clinical guidelines and protocol for delivery. The results of this study indicate that, although few healthcare providers are currently referring patients to Medical Fitness Center Facilities, health care providers with an affiliated Medical Fitness

  2. How to capture patients’ concerns and related changes: Comparing the MYCaW questionnaire, semi-structured interview and a priority list of outcome areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostenfeld-Rosenthal, Ann; Johannessen, Helle

    2014-01-01

    as rehabilitation after colorectal cancer, a sub-sample of 31 participants completed the MYCaW questionnaire and the priority list and were interviewed before, during and after the treatment period. Setting Treatments were provided in healers’ clinics in Denmark. Main outcome measures For each participant...... of concerns and markings are stable. Interviews are well suited to disclose concerns regarding sensitive issues, e.g. anxiety of relapse, and experiences of subtle, non-specific changes....

  3. [Childhood Experiences of Care and Abuse (CECA) - validation of the German version of the questionnaire and interview, and results of an investigation of correlations between adverse childhood experiences and suicidal behaviour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaess, Michael; Parzer, Peter; Mattern, Margarete; Resch, Franz; Bifulco, Antonia; Brunner, Romuald

    2011-07-01

    Validation of the German translation of a questionnaire and the corresponding interview for the assessment of adverse childhood experiences within the family environment and investigation of an association of these experiences with suicidal behaviour. The questionnaire was tested in a consecutively recruited sample of 125 psychiatric inpatients (aged 13 to 25 years) at the University Hospital Heidelberg. Retests and corresponding interviews were also performed. Suicidal behaviour was measured by the Paykel Suicide Scale. The questionnaire and interview showed very good internal consistency and retest reliability; the interrater reliability of the interview was good, and there was a significant correlation between the questionnaire and the interview. Suicidal behaviour was significantly associated to all adverse childhood experiences, but maternal neglect and antipathy proved to be the best predictors of suicidal behaviour. The CECA instruments are reliable and valid instruments for the assessment of adverse childhood experiences. They assess a broad spectrum of adverse childhood experiences including negative bonding experiences. The association of these experiences to higher levels of suicidal behaviour shows the importance of assessing such experiences in research and therapy.

  4. The structured interview and questionnaire methods of assessing coronary-prone behavior in male and female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, J M; Dembroski, T M; Musante, L

    1979-03-01

    Several self-report measures of type A behavior were compared with the Rosenman and Friedman structured interview method of assessment in male and female college students. The student version of the Jenkins Activity Survey was found to correlate relatively weakly with the interview for both males and females, while scales derived from the Gough and Thurstone inventories showed moderate correlations with interview typing for both sexes. A brief scale derived from a recent reanalysis of the Framingham study correlated with the interview appreciably greater for females than for males. In all, these data suggest the need for caution in using only paper-and-pencil tests to assess type A behavior.

  5. Motives for choosing growth-enhancing hormone treatment in adolescents with idiopathic short stature: a questionnaire and structured interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huisman Jaap

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growth-enhancing hormone treatment is considered a possible intervention in short but otherwise healthy adolescents. Although height gain is an obvious measure for evaluating hormone treatment, this may not be the ultimate goal for the person, but rather a means to reach other goals such as the amelioration of current height-related psychosocial problems or the enhancement of future prospects in life and society. The aim of our study was to clarify the motives of adolescents and their parents when choosing to participate in a growth-enhancing trial combining growth hormone and puberty-delaying hormone treatment. Methods Participants were early pubertal adolescents (25 girls, 13 boys aged from 11 to 13 years (mean age 11.5 years with a height standard deviation score (SDS ranging from -1.03 to -3.43. All had been classified as idiopathic short stature or persistent short stature born small for the gestational age (intrauterine growth retardation on the basis of a height SDS below -2, or had a height SDS between -1 and -2 and a predicted adult height SDS below -2. The adolescents and their parents completed questionnaires and a structured interview on the presence of height-related stressors, parental worries about their child's behavior and future prospects, problems in psychosocial functioning, and treatment expectations. Questionnaire scores were compared to norms of the general Dutch population. Results The adolescents reported normal psychosocial functioning and highly positive expectations of the treatment in terms of height gain, whereas the parents reported that their children encountered some behavioral problems (being anxious/depressed, and social and attention problems and height-related stressors (being teased and juvenilized. About 40% of the parents were worried about their children's future prospects for finding a spouse or job. The motives of the adolescents and their parents exhibited rather different profiles

  6. Evaluating Questionnaires Used to Assess Self-Reported Physical Activity and Psychosocial Outcomes Among Survivors of Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer: A Cognitive Interview Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurz, Amanda; Brunet, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Physical activity is increasingly being studied as a way to improve psychosocial outcomes (e.g., quality of life, self-efficacy, physical self-perceptions, self-esteem, body image, posttraumatic growth) among survivors of adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer. Assessing levels of and associations between self-reported physical activity and psychosocial outcomes requires clear, appropriate, and relevant questionnaires. To explore how survivors of AYA cancer interpreted and responded to the following eight published questionnaires: Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire, Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale, Physical Self-Description Questionnaire, Rosenberg Global Self-Esteem Scale, Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire, Posttraumatic Growth Inventory, Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G), RAND 36-Item Health Survey 1.0 (RAND-36), cognitive interviews were conducted with three men and four women age 18-36 years who were diagnosed with cancer at age 16-35 years. Initially, the first seven questionnaires listed above were assessed. Summaries of the interviews were prepared and compared across participants. Potential concerns were identified with the FACT-G; thus, a second interview was conducted with participants to explore the clarity, appropriateness, and relevance of the RAND-36. Concerns identified for the FACT-G related mostly to the lack of relevance of items pertaining to cancer-specific aspects of quality of life given that participants were posttreatment. No or few concerns related to comprehension and/or structure/logic were identified for the other questionnaires. In general, the questionnaires assessed were clear, appropriate, and relevant. Participants' feedback suggested they could be used to assess self-reported physical activity and varied psychosocial outcomes in studies with survivors of AYA cancer, either with or without slight modifications.

  7. Medical students are afraid to include abortion in their future practices: in-depth interviews in Maharastra, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöström, Susanne; Essén, Birgitta; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Klingberg-Allvin, Marie

    2016-01-12

    Unsafe abortions are estimated to cause eight per-cent of maternal mortality in India. Lack of providers, especially in rural areas, is one reason unsafe abortions take place despite decades of legal abortion. Education and training in reproductive health services has been shown to influence attitudes and increase chances that medical students will provide abortion care services in their future practice. To further explore previous findings about poor attitudes toward abortion among medical students in Maharastra, India, we conducted in-depth interviews with medical students in their final year of education. We used a qualitative design conducting in-depth interviews with twenty-three medical students in Maharastra applying a topic guide. Data was organized using thematic analysis with an inductive approach. The participants described a fear to provide abortion in their future practice. They lacked understanding of the law and confused the legal regulation of abortion with the law governing gender biased sex selection, and concluded that abortion is illegal in Maharastra. The interviewed medical students' attitudes were supported by their experiences and perceptions from the clinical setting as well as traditions and norms in society. Medical abortion using mifepristone and misoprostol was believed to be unsafe and prohibited in Maharastra. The students perceived that nurse-midwives were knowledgeable in Sexual and Reproductive Health and many found that they could be trained to perform abortions in the future. To increase chances that medical students in Maharastra will perform abortion care services in their future practice, it is important to strengthen their confidence and knowledge through improved medical education including value clarification and clinical training.

  8. [A psychological profile of subjects from industrial sectors with cardiovascular diseases interviewed via the H. J. Eysenck questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murăraşu, D; Bălăceanu, G; Mocanu, D; Toma, V; Iliescu, F; Dănulescu, E

    1990-01-01

    Authors in the literature are unanimous in considering type A personality as an individual characteristic susceptible to cardiovascular risk. The latter, in its turn, is regarded, after H. J. Eysenck [4], as an association of the scores of extroversion and neurosis. Starting from this assumption, we set out to outline a profile of the cardiovascular patient using the "Eysenck" questionnaire. The study population included 126 industrial workers compared to a matching control set. The resulting profile displayed neurotic components within an ego perpetually frustrated in its needs of well-being, emotional satisfaction and rewarding social relations (-1,dark blue, Lüscher colour test in its shortened variant). Stress and introversion foster neuroticism and encourage the ego in its compulsive quest for autonomy, "eccentric" behaviour in actual situations and egocentric attitudes in reserve. Findings suggest that the "H. J. Eysenck" test for introversion-extroversion and neuroticism, as well as the Lüscher colour test (the shortened variant) are likely to be useful predictive tools in cardiovascular disease.

  9. Development of the European Health Interview Survey - Physical Activity Questionnaire (EHIS-PAQ) to monitor physical activity in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Jonas D; Tafforeau, Jean; Gisle, Lydia; Oja, Leila; Ziese, Thomas; Thelen, Juergen; Mensink, Gert B M; Lange, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    A domain-specific physical activity questionnaire (EHIS-PAQ) was developed in the framework of the second wave of the European Health Interview Survey (EHIS). This article presents the EHIS-PAQ and describes its development and evaluation processes. Research institutes from Belgium, Estonia and Germany participated in the Improvement of the EHIS (ImpEHIS) Grant project issued by Eurostat. The instrument development process comprised a non-systematic literature review and a systematic HIS/HES database search for physical activity survey questions. The developed EHIS-PAQ proposal was reviewed by survey experts. Cognitive testing of the EHIS-PAQ was conducted in Estonia and Germany. The EHIS-PAQ was further tested in a pilot survey in Belgium, Estonia and Germany in different modes of data collection, face-to-face paper and pencil interview (PAPI) and computer assisted telephone interview (CATI). The EHIS-PAQ is a rather pragmatic tool aiming to evaluate how far the population is physically active in specific public health relevant settings. It assesses work-related, transport-related and leisure-time physical activity in a typical week. Cognitive testing revealed that the EHIS-PAQ worked as intended. The pilot testing showed the feasibility of using the EHIS-PAQ in an international health interview survey setting in Europe. It will be implemented in all 28 European Union Member States via European Union implementing regulation in the period between 2013 and 2015. This will be a first opportunity to get comparable data on domain-specific physical activity in all 28 EU MS and to publish indicators at the EU level. The EHIS-PAQ is a short, domain-specific PA questionnaire based on PA questions which have been used in large-scale health interview surveys before. It was designed by considering the respondents' perspective in answering PA questions.

  10. Translating questionnaire items for a multi-lingual worker population: the iterative process of translation and cognitive interviews with English-, Spanish-, and Chinese-speaking workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujishiro, Kaori; Gong, Fang; Baron, Sherry; Jacobson, C Jeffery; DeLaney, Sheli; Flynn, Michael; Eggerth, Donald E

    2010-02-01

    The increasing ethnic diversity of the US workforce has created a need for research tools that can be used with multi-lingual worker populations. Developing multi-language questionnaire items is a complex process; however, very little has been documented in the literature. Commonly used English items from the Job Content Questionnaire and Quality of Work Life Questionnaire were translated by two interdisciplinary bilingual teams and cognitively tested in interviews with English-, Spanish-, and Chinese-speaking workers. Common problems across languages mainly concerned response format. Language-specific problems required more conceptual than literal translations. Some items were better understood by non-English speakers than by English speakers. De-centering (i.e., modifying the English original to correspond with translation) produced better understanding for one item. Translating questionnaire items and achieving equivalence across languages require various kinds of expertise. Backward translation itself is not sufficient. More research efforts should be concentrated on qualitative approaches to developing useful research tools. Published 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Shifting Gears: Consequences of Including Two Negatively Worded Items in the Middle of a Positively Worded Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowski, Michael J.; Soven, Margot

    2010-01-01

    A questionnaire used in student evaluations of interdisciplinary courses during six semesters contained two Likert items stated in a direct negative mode which were embedded in a questionnaire (14-18 items) in which the remaining items were phrased in a direct positive mode. In the seventh semester and thereafter, the two negative items were…

  12. Physical activity surveillance in the European Union: reliability and validity of the European Health Interview Survey-Physical Activity Questionnaire (EHIS-PAQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumeister, Sebastian E; Ricci, Cristian; Kohler, Simone; Fischer, Beate; Töpfer, Christine; Finger, Jonas D; Leitzmann, Michael F

    2016-05-23

    The current study examined the reliability and validity of the European Health Interview Survey-Physical Activity Questionnaire (EHIS-PAQ), a novel questionnaire for the surveillance of physical activity (PA) during work, transportation, leisure time, sports, health-enhancing and muscle-strengthening activities over a typical week. Reliability was assessed by administering the 8-item questionnaire twice to a population-based sample of 123 participants aged 15-79 years at a 30-day interval. Concurrent (inter-method) validity was examined in 140 participants by comparisons with self-report (International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Long Form (IPAQ-LF), 7-day Physical Activity Record (PAR), and objective criterion measures (GT3X+ accelerometer, physical work capacity at 75% (PWC(75%)) from submaximal cycle ergometer test, hand grip strength). The EHIS-PAQ showed acceptable reliability, with a median intraclass correlation coefficient across PA domains of 0.55 (range 0.43-0.73). Compared to the GT3X+ (counts/minutes/day), the EHIS-PAQ underestimated moderate-to-vigorous PA (median difference -11.7, p-value = 0.054). Spearman correlation coefficients (ρ) for validity were moderate-to-strong (ρ's > 0.41) for work-related PA (IPAQ = 0.64, GT3X + =0.43, grip strength = 0.48), transportation-related PA (IPAQ = 0.62, GT3X + =0.43), walking (IPAQ = 0.58), and health-enhancing PA (IPAQ = 0.58, PAR = 0.64, GT3X + =0.44, PWC(75%) = 0.48), and fair-to-poor (ρ's PAQ showed good evidence for reliability and validity for the measurement of PA levels at work, during transportation and health-enhancing PA.

  13. Psychometric properties of the Iranian interview-administered version of the World Health Organization's Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL-BREF: A population-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kazem

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of the current study was to translate and validate the Iranian version of the WHOQOL-BREF. Methods A forward-backward translation procedure was followed to develop the Iranian version of the questionnaire. A stratified random sample of individuals aged 18 and over completed the questionnaire in Tehran, Iran. Psychometric properties of the instrument including reliability (internal consistency, and test-retest analysis, validity (known groups' comparison and convergent validity, and items' correlation with their hypothesized domains were assessed. Results In all 1164 individuals entered into the study. The mean age of the participants was 36.6 (SD = 13.2 years, and the mean years of their formal education was 10.7 (SD = 4.4. In general the questionnaire received well and all domains met the minimum reliability standards (Cronbach's alpha and intra-class correlation > 0.7, except for social relationships (alpha = 0.55. Performing known groups' comparison analysis, the results indicated that the questionnaire discriminated well between subgroups of the study samples differing in their health status. Since the WHOQOL-BREF demonstrated statistically significant correlation with the Iranian version of the SF-36 as expected, the convergent validity of the questionnaire was found to be desirable. Correlation matrix also showed satisfactory results in all domains except for social relationships. Conclusion This study has provided some preliminary evidence of the reliability and validity of the WHOQOL-BREF to be used in Iran, though further research is required to challenge the problems of reliability in one of the dimensions and the instrument's factor structure.

  14. The Effects of including a replacement questionnaire in the first follow-up to an industrial population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Stendahl

    2006-01-01

    was identical in all cases. The study compared the impact on response rates, costs, timeliness and quality. The response rate between the first and second reminders was significantly higher in the replacement group, but the second reminder evens out most of this difference. In addition, logistic-regression......  This study reports on a field experiment in which the effects of manipulating the contents of the first reminder in an industrial survey were investigated. Every second non-responding company received a replacement questionnaire with the first mailed reminder, while the second reminder...... models revealed significant differences in the reaction from different industries and regions. For the replacement group, the cost/response rate was 20% higher and the marginal cost per extra response was four times that of the responses to the first mailing. However, the questionnaires were returned...

  15. Differences between questionnaire- and interview-based measures of activities of daily living (ADL) ability and their association with observed ADL ability in women with rheumatoid arthritis, knee osteoarthritis, and fibromyalgia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæhrens, E E; Bliddal, H; Danneskiold-Samsøe, B

    2012-01-01

    Although self-report based on questionnaire is the common method to obtain information about activities of daily living (ADL) ability in rheumatic diseases, little is known about the relationship between measures of ADL ability based on questionnaire, interview, and observation. The present study...... examined whether measures of self-reported ADL ability based on questionnaire and interview yielded different results, determined whether the magnitude of the difference varied among women with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), knee osteoarthritis (OA), and fibromyalgia (FM), and investigated the relationships...

  16. Questionnaires for assessment of female sexual dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giraldi, Annamaria; Rellini, Alessandra; Pfaus, James G

    2011-01-01

    There are many methods to evaluate female sexual function and dysfunction (FSD) in clinical and research settings, including questionnaires, structured interviews, and detailed case histories. Of these, questionnaires have become an easy first choice to screen individuals into different categories...

  17. [Questionnaire about the intake of and hypersensitivity to fruits, vegetables and nuts including birch pollen related foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tetsuo; Asakura, Kohji; Shirasaki, Hideaki; Himi, Tetsuo

    2013-07-01

    In Hokkaido and Scandinavia, birch pollen allergic persons are common and they often report oral and pharyngeal hypersensitivity to fruits and vegetables (oral allergy syndrome, OAS), because of immunological cross-reactivity. In Scandinavia, nuts as well as Rosaceae fruits such as apples were the foods most often reported to elicit symptoms. On the other hand, nuts are minor foods causing hypersensitivity in Japan. Even in Japan, regional differences of foods causing hypersensitivity have been reported, which may be related to the regional differences of elementary habit and pollen dispersion. In the present study, we evaluated the intake history of the foods and the frequency of food hypersensitivity in adults from the general population. Three hundreds and thirty nine subjects (20-67 years old) took part in the study. With a questionnaire survey, we asked them about their intake history and hypersensitive symptoms for 33 kinds of fruit, vegetables, and nuts. 30% of subjects had eaten Brazil nuts, 80% had eaten pomegranates, and 81% had eaten hazelnuts. And over 95% of subjects had eaten the other 30 foods. Those who had lived in Hokkaido for more than 20 years had a higher frequency of plum consumption than the others. Those who had lived in Hokkaido for more than 20 years had a lower frequency of loquat, fig and pomegranate consumption than the others. Food hypersensitivity was found in 52 subjects (15.3%). The most common symptom was OAS (46 subjects, 13.6%), and foods most frequently causing OAS were peach (21 subjects, 6.2%), cherry (19 subjects, 5.6%) and apple (17 subjects, 5.0%). 26 subjects (7.7%) reported OAS to Rosaceae fruits. The ratio of having OAS to consuming Rosaceae fruits was 11.0% in the group who had lived in Hokkaido for more than 20 years, which was higher than the group who has lived in Hokkaido for less than 20 years. The intake history of hazelnuts and Brazil nuts was very low, with a correspondingly low frequency of food

  18. Comparison of self-report and interview administration methods based on the Brazilian versions of the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire in patients with rotator cuff disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Diniz Lopes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to compare self-report and interview administration methods using the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (DASH in patients with rotator cuff disorders. METHODS: Thirty male and female patients over 18 years of age with rotator cuff disorders (tendinopathy or rotator cuff tear and Brazilian Portuguese as their primary language were recruited for assessment via administration of the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire. A randomization method was used to determine whether the questionnaires would be self-reported (n=15 or administered by an interviewer (n=15. Pearson correlation coefficients were used to evaluate the correlation between the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire in each group. The t-test was used to determine whether the difference in mean questionnaire scores and administration time was statistically significant. For statistical analysis, the level of significance was set at 5%. RESULTS: The mean subject age was 55.07 years, ranging from 27 to 74 years. Most patients had a diagnosis of tendinopathy (n=21. With regard to level of schooling, the majority (n=26 of subjects had completed a college degree or higher. The mean questionnaire scores and administration times did not significantly differ between the two groups (p>0.05. There were statistically significant correlations (p<0.05 between Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire, and strong correlations were found between the questionnaires in both groups. CONCLUSION: There are no differences between the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire administration methods with regard to administration time or correlations between the

  19. A Validation Study of an Interviewer-Administered Short Food Frequency Questionnaire in Assessing Dietary Vitamin D and Calcium Intake in Swedish Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Lotta; Lind, Torbjörn; Karlsland Åkeson, Pia; Sandström, Ann-Kristin; Hernell, Olle; Öhlund, Inger

    2017-06-30

    Vitamin D and calcium are essential nutrients with a range of biological effects of public health relevance. This study aimed to validate a short food frequency questionnaire (SFFQ) against a three-day food record (3D record), assessing the intake of vitamin D and calcium in Swedish children during wintertime. In a double-blinded, randomized food-based intervention study on the effect of feeding different daily doses of vitamin D supplement to 5-7-year-old children ( n = 85), 79 (93%) participants completed SFFQ1 at baseline and SFFQ2 after the intervention, and 72 were informed to fill in a 3D record. The 28 (39%) children who completed the 3D record were included in this validation study. The baseline level of serum-25 hydroxy vitamin D [S-25(OH)D] was used as a biomarker. The correlation between all three instruments were moderate to strong. SFFQ2 and the 3D record correlated moderately to S-25(OH)D. Bland-Altman analysis showed that SFFQ2 overestimated vitamin D intake by on average 0.6 μg/day, (limits of agreement (LOA) 5.7 and -4.6 μg/day), whereas the intake of calcium was underestimated by on average 29 mg/day, (LOA 808 and -865 mg/day). Finally, the validity coefficient calculated for vitamin D using the method of triad was high (0.75). In conclusion, this SFFQ, assessed by a dietician, is a valid tool to assess dietary vitamin D and calcium intake in groups of young children.

  20. Computer interviewing in urogynaecology: concept, development and psychometric testing of an electronic pelvic floor assessment questionnaire in primary and secondary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radley, S C; Jones, G L; Tanguy, E A; Stevens, V G; Nelson, C; Mathers, N J

    2006-02-01

    To develop and evaluate a Web-based, electronic pelvic floor symptoms assessment questionnaire (e-PAQ)1 for women. A cross-sectional study in primary and secondary care. Two general practices, two community health clinics and a secondary care urogynaecology clinic. A total of 432 women (204 in primary care and 228 in secondary care) were recruited between June 2003 and January 2004. The e-PAQ was located on a workstation (computer, touchscreen and printer). Women completed the e-PAQ prior to their appointment. Untreated women in primary care were asked to return seven days later to complete the e-PAQ a second time (test-retest). Factor analysis, reliability, validity, patient satisfaction, completion times and system costs. In secondary care, factor analysis identified 14 domains within the four dimensions (urinary, bowel, vaginal and sexual symptoms) with internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha)>or=0.7 in 11 of these. In primary care, alpha values were all>or=0.7 and test-retest analysis found acceptable intraclass correlations of 0.50-0.95 (PPAQ offers a user-friendly clinical tool, which provides valid and reliable data. The system offers comprehensive symptoms and quality of life evaluation and may enhance the clinical episode as well as the quality of care for women with pelvic floor disorders.

  1. Validity and reproducibility of an interviewer-administered food frequency questionnaire in Austrian adults at risk of or with overt diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farukuoye, Michaela; Strassburger, Klaus; Kacerovsky-Bielesz, Gertrud; Giani, Guido; Roden, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) provide an inexpensive tool for dietary assessment. Given the scarcity of data on their validity for nutritional analysis in persons with overt diabetes mellitus or with increased risk of diabetes (relatives of patients with diabetes), this study tests the hypothesis that an FFQ, adapted to local dietary habits, yields a reliable estimate of nutrient intake when compared with 7-day food record (7DR) in healthy, prediabetes, and diabetes cohorts. One hundred three volunteers (50 persons with overt diabetes mellitus, 24 relatives of patients with diabetes, and 29 nondiabetic individuals without a family history of diabetes) completed both FFQ and 7DR. A second FFQ was completed by 100 of these volunteers after 3 months to evaluate its reproducibility. Data were compared by correlation and Bland-Altman analyses. Across the entire group, estimates for gram intakes of nutrients and total energy were associated with wide limits of agreement between FFQ and 7DR (correlation coefficients, 0.23-0.72; P < .02). Compared with 7DR, the FFQ overestimated intakes of saturated fat in the entire group (+6.6 ± 14 g; P < .001) and in persons with overt diabetes mellitus (+7.6 ± 15 g; P < .001) but underestimated protein intake in relatives of patients with diabetes (-16.36 ± 31 g; P = .01). The repeated FFQ revealed variable agreement (correlation coefficients, 0.34-0.72; P < .001) and underestimated (P < .01) macronutrient and total energy intakes, with slightly better performance in persons with overt diabetes mellitus and relatives of patients with diabetes than in nondiabetic individuals without a family history of diabetes. Hence, the FFQ allows measuring intakes of total energy and macronutrients in prediabetes and diabetes cohorts but reveals limitations when assessing dietary composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Including Youth with Intellectual Disabilities in Health Promotion Research: Development and Reliability of a Structured Interview to Assess the Correlates of Physical Activity among Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Carol; Bandini, Linda G.; Must, Aviva; Phillips, Sarah; Maslin, Melissa C. T.; Lo, Charmaine; Gleason, James M.; Fleming, Richard K.; Stanish, Heidi I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The input of youth with intellectual disabilities in health promotion and health disparities research is essential for understanding their needs and preferences. Regular physical activity (PA) is vital for health and well-being, but levels are low in youth generally, including those with intellectual disabilities. Understanding the…

  3. Timeline interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain and discuss timeline interviews as a method for doing life history research. It is a ‘how to’ article explaining the strengths and weaknesses of using a timeline when conducting qualitative interviews. The method allows the interviewee to participate...... in the reporting of the interview which may give raise to ownership and sharing of the analytical power in the interview situation. Exactly for this reason, it may not be the most appropriate method for interviewing elites or for conducting insider interviews where positionality can be at play. The use...... of the timeline should not lead the nterviewer or the interviewee to assume linearity and coherence; it is an rganising principle for the events. It provides an opportunity for linking the story with the wider social, political and environmental context during the interview. hile the method is very suitable...

  4. Narrative interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Claire; Kirkpatrick, Susan

    2016-06-01

    Introduction Narrative interviews place the people being interviewed at the heart of a research study. They are a means of collecting people's own stories about their experiences of health and illness. Narrative interviews can help researchers to better understand people's experiences and behaviours. Narratives may come closer to representing the context and integrity of people's lives than more quantitative means of research. Methodology Researchers using narrative interview techniques do not set out with a fixed agenda, rather they tend to let the interviewee control the direction, content and pace of the interview. The paper describes the interview process and the suggested approach to analysis of narrative interviews, We draw on the example from a study that used series of narrative interviews about people's experiences of taking antidepressants. Limitations Some people may find it particularly challenging to tell their story to a researcher in this way rather than be asked a series of questions like in a television or radio interview. Narrative research like all qualitative research does not set out to be generalisable and may only involve a small set of interviews.

  5. Being a quantitative interviewer: qualitatively exploring interviewers' experiences in a longitudinal cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derrett Sarah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies of health outcomes rely on data collected by interviewers administering highly-structured (quantitative questionnaires to participants. Little appears to be known about the experiences of such interviewers. This paper explores interviewer experiences of working on a longitudinal study in New Zealand (the Prospective Outcomes of injury Study - POIS. Interviewers administer highly-structured questionnaires to participants, usually by telephone, and enter data into a secure computer program. The research team had expectations of interviewers including: consistent questionnaire administration, timeliness, proportions of potential participants recruited and an empathetic communication style. This paper presents results of a focus group to qualitatively explore with the team of interviewers their experiences, problems encountered, strategies, support systems used and training. Methods A focus group with interviewers involved in the POIS interviews was held; it was audio-recorded and transcribed. The analytical method was thematic, with output intended to be descriptive and interpretive. Results Nine interviewers participated in the focus group (average time in interviewer role was 31 months. Key themes were: 1 the positive aspects of the quantitative interviewer role (i.e. relationships and resilience, insights gained, and participants' feedback, 2 difficulties interviewers encountered and solutions identified (i.e. stories lost or incomplete, forgotten appointments, telling the stories, acknowledging distress, stories reflected and debriefing and support, and 3 meeting POIS researcher expectations (i.e. performance standards, time-keeping, dealing exclusively with the participant and maintaining privacy. Conclusions Interviewers demonstrated great skill in the way they negotiated research team expectations whilst managing the relationships with participants. Interviewers found it helpful to have a research protocol in

  6. Psychological factors including sense of coherence and some lifestyles are related to general health questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) in elderly workers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Ichiyo; Sagara, Takiko; Ohshita, Yoshiko; Nagase, Hirofumi; Ogino, Keiki; Eboshida, Akira; Sasahara, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Hiroyuki

    2007-03-01

    The number of elderly workers has also been increasing and poor psychological well-being in elderly workers has been reported. The aim of this study is to elucidate the factors that are related to poor psychological well-being in elderly workers. We administered General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12) as an indicator of psychological well-being to 330 male elderly workers in the age range of 50-69, and analyzed different psychological factors, namely sense of coherence (SOC), and physical and lifestyle variables such as blood pressure, serum total cholesterol, smoking frequency, alcohol intake, exercise frequency, and body mass index (BMI) that are related to GHQ-12. When the cut-off point of GHQ-12 was 2/3, 97 workers who showed high GHQ-12 score were classified as one group having poor psychological well-being. A statistically significantly lower SOC score, higher stress score, lower frequency of exercise, higher smoking score and higher BMI, but not longer working hours or higher shift work score in the workers with higher GHQ-12 scores were observed than in the workers with normal GHQ-12 scores. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the low SCO score, low frequency of exercise, high smoking frequency and high BMI significantly contributed to the high GHQ-12 score. A low SOC score in elderly workers is assumed to be directly related to poor psychological well-being, or via the development of lifestyle problems such as lack of exercise, obesity, and smoking in elderly workers. This assumption must be confirmed by conducting future intervention studies on lifestyle.

  7. The Social Explanatory Styles Questionnaire: assessing moderators of basic social-cognitive phenomena including spontaneous trait inference, the fundamental attribution error, and moral blame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Michael J; Andreychik, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    Why is he poor? Why is she failing academically? Why is he so generous? Why is she so conscientious? Answers to such everyday questions--social explanations--have powerful effects on relationships at the interpersonal and societal levels. How do people select an explanation in particular cases? We suggest that, often, explanations are selected based on the individual's pre-existing general theories of social causality. More specifically, we suggest that over time individuals develop general beliefs regarding the causes of social events. We refer to these beliefs as social explanatory styles. Our goal in the present article is to offer and validate a measure of individual differences in social explanatory styles. Accordingly, we offer the Social Explanatory Styles Questionnaire (SESQ), which measures three independent dimensions of social explanatory style: Dispositionism, historicism, and controllability. Studies 1-3 examine basic psychometric properties of the SESQ and provide positive evidence regarding internal consistency, factor structure, and both convergent and divergent validity. Studies 4-6 examine predictive validity for each subscale: Does each explanatory dimension moderate an important phenomenon of social cognition? Results suggest that they do. In Study 4, we show that SESQ dispositionism moderates the tendency to make spontaneous trait inferences. In Study 5, we show that SESQ historicism moderates the tendency to commit the Fundamental Attribution Error. Finally, in Study 6 we show that SESQ controllability predicts polarization of moral blame judgments: Heightened blaming toward controllable stigmas (assimilation), and attenuated blaming toward uncontrollable stigmas (contrast). Decades of research suggest that explanatory style regarding the self is a powerful predictor of self-functioning. We think it is likely that social explanatory styles--perhaps comprising interactive combinations of the basic dimensions tapped by the SESQ--will be

  8. Life adversity in depressed and non-depressed older adults: A cross-sectional comparison of the brief LTE-Q questionnaire and life events and difficulties interview as part of the CASPER study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Hjördis M; Traviss-Turner, Gemma D; House, Allan O; Lewis, Helen; Gilbody, Simon

    2016-03-15

    There is a paucity of research on the nature of life adversity in depressed and non-depressed older adults. Early life events work used in-depth interviews; however, larger epidemiological trials investigate life adversity using brief questionnaires. This study investigates the type of life adversity experienced in later life and its association with depression and compares adversity captured using a brief (LTE-Q) and in-depth (LEDS) measure. 960 participants over 65 years were recruited in UK primary care to complete the PHQ-9 and LTE-Q. A sub-sample (n=19) completed the LEDS and a question exploring the subjective experience of the LTE-Q and LEDS. Important life adversity was reported on the LTE-Q in 48% of the sample. In the LTE-Q sample the prevalence of depression (PHQ-9≥10) was 12%. Exposure to recent adversity was associated with doubling of the odds of depression. The LTE-Q only captured a proportion of adversity measured by the LEDS (42% vs 84%). Both measures showed health, bereavement and relationship events were most common. The cross-sectional design limits the extent to which inferences can be drawn around the direction of causality between adversity and depression. Recall in older adults is questionable. UK older adults face adversity in areas of health, bereavement and relationships which are associated with depression. This has clinical relevance for psychological interventions for older adults to consider social context and social support. It helps identify the strengths and weaknesses of a brief adversity measure in large scale research. Further research is needed to explore the mechanisms of onset and direction of causality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Motivational interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Kamilla; Humaidan, Peter; Sørensen, Lise H

    2013-01-01

    This is a retrospective study to investigate whether motivational interviewing increases weight loss among obese or overweight women prior to fertility treatment. Women with body mass index (BMI) > 30 kg/m(2) approaching the Fertility Clinic, Regional Hospital Skive, were given advice about diet...... in weight loss programs for obese and overweight women prior to fertility treatment....... and physical activity with the purpose of weight loss. In addition, they were asked if they wanted to receive motivational interviewing. Among other data, age, height and weight were obtained. Main outcomes were weight loss measured in kg and decrease in BMI. We studied 187 women: 110 received sessions...

  10. Food frequency questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Rodrigo, Carmen; Aranceta, Javier; Salvador, Gemma; Varela-Moreiras, Gregorio

    2015-02-26

    Food Frequency Questionnaires are dietary assessment tools widely used in epidemiological studies investigating the relationship between dietary intake and disease or risk factors since the early '90s. The three main components of these questionnaires are the list of foods, frequency of consumption and the portion size consumed. The food list should reflect the food habits of the study population at the time the data is collected. The frequency of consumption may be asked by open ended questions or by presenting frequency categories. Qualitative Food Frequency Questionnaires do not ask about the consumed portions; semi-quantitative include standard portions and quantitative questionnaires ask respondents to estimate the portion size consumed either in household measures or grams. The latter implies a greater participant burden. Some versions include only close-ended questions in a standardized format, while others add an open section with questions about some specific food habits and practices and admit additions to the food list for foods and beverages consumed which are not included. The method can be self-administered, on paper or web-based, or interview administered either face-to-face or by telephone. Due to the standard format, especially closed-ended versions, and method of administration, FFQs are highly cost-effective thus encouraging its widespread use in large scale epidemiological cohort studies and also in other study designs. Coding and processing data collected is also less costly and requires less nutrition expertise compared to other dietary intake assessment methods. However, the main limitations are systematic errors and biases in estimates. Important efforts are being developed to improve the quality of the information. It has been recommended the use of FFQs with other methods thus enabling the adjustments required. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2015. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  11. Interview with Danny Kaplan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Kaplan, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Danny Kaplan is DeWitt Wallace Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science at Macalester College. He received Macalester's Excellence in teaching Award in 2006 and the CAUSE/USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2017. This interview took place via email on March 4-June 17, 2017. Topics covered in the interview include: (1) the current state of…

  12. Interviewing to Understand Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hass, Michael R.

    2018-01-01

    Interviewing clients about their strengths is an important part of developing a complete understanding of their lives and has several advantages over simply focusing on problems and pathology. Prerequisites for skillfully interviewing for strengths include the communication skills that emerge from a stance of not knowing, developing a vocabulary…

  13. Ethics of justice and ethics of care. Values and attitudes among midwifery students on adolescent sexuality and abortion in Vietnam and their implications for midwifery education: a survey by questionnaire and interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie; Van Tam, Vu; Nga, Nguyen Thu; Ransjo-Arvidson, Anna-Berit; Johansson, Annika

    2007-01-01

    Adolescent's sexuality and related reproductive health and rights problems are sensitive issues in Vietnam. Globalisation has had an impact on the lifestyles of young people, and rising numbers of abortion and STI/HIV risks among youth are posing major health concerns in the country. These problems need to be addressed. Midwives belong to a key category of health personnel in Vietnam, whose task it is to promote adolescents' sexual and reproductive health and prevent reproductive ill health. It is important to understand future midwives' perceptions and attitudes in order to improve their education and training programmes. The aim of this study was to investigate Vietnamese midwifery students' values and attitudes towards adolescent sexuality, abortion and contraception and their views on professional preparation. A quantitative survey including 235 midwifery students from four different secondary medical colleges in northern Vietnam was carried out in 2003. A qualitative study addressing similar questions was performed and 18 midwifery students were individually interviewed. Findings revealed a general disapproval of adolescent pre-marital sexual relations and abortion-'an ethics of justice'-but also an empathic attitude and willingness to support young women, who bear the consequences of unwanted pregnancies and social condemnation-'an ethics of care'. Gender-based imbalance in sexual relationships, limited knowledge about reproductive health issues among youth, and negative societal attitudes were concerns expressed by the students. The students saw their future tasks mainly related to childbearing and less to other reproductive health issues, such as abortion and prevention of STI/HIV. Midwifery education in Vietnam should encourage value-reflective thinking around gender inequality and ethical dilemmas, in order to prepare midwives to address adolescents' reproductive health needs.

  14. Validation of the Falls Efficacy Scale and Falls Efficacy Scale International in geriatric patients with and without cognitive impairment: results of self-report and interview-based questionnaires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauer, Kristiane; Yardley, L; Beyer, N

    2010-01-01

    Frail, old patients with and without cognitive impairment are at high risk of falls and associated medical and psychosocial issues. The lack of adequate, validated instruments has partly hindered research in this field. So far no questionnaire documenting fall-related self-efficacy/fear of falling...

  15. [Medical questionnaire, sleep diary, actigraphy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizaki, Masanori; Kume, Kazuhiko

    2015-06-01

    Sleep disorders, including insomnia are common in older people. Since the sleep problems are generally subjective, intensive medical interviews using various sleep questionnaires are critical in the diagnosis and assessment. As an objective examination of sleep quality, an overnight polysomnography at a hospital is the gold standard, but sleep diary and actigraphy, which record sleep for a prolonged period at home, are useful to examine the sleep habit and sleep phase. In older people, the discrepancy between sleep diary and actigraphy sometimes become broader, and the prevalence of comorbidity increase. Thus, the systematic assessment using both subjective and objective measurements becomes more important.

  16. Senior medical student opinions regarding the ideal urology interview day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jesse C; Guralnick, Michael L; Sandlow, Jay I; Langenstroer, Peter; Begun, Frank P; See, William A; O'Connor, Robert Corey

    2014-01-01

    Applicant interviews for urology residency positions are a stressful and costly process for students, faculty, and staff. We conducted a prospective survey to better determine what urology applicants perceive as an ideal interview process to gain sufficient knowledge about a training program. A questionnaire was anonymously completed by all urology residency applicants interviewing at the Medical College of Wisconsin from 2007 to 2013. Questionnaire subject headings included "ideal interview format," "factors contributing to understanding the residency program," and "factors contributing to final rank list order." Questionnaires were distributed to and completed by 221 senior medical students applying for a urology residency position. Most respondents (>80%) reported they would prefer to partake in 5 to 7 faculty interviews in an office setting with the total interview process spanning half to three-fourths of the workday. Spending time with current residents was considered the most valuable tool to acquire knowledge about a residency program. The most important criteria when ranking a program were resident satisfaction, resident operative experience, and perceived strength of faculty. Academic urology programs may wish to consider applicant ideals when organizing residency interviews. Interaction with current residents appears to be the most valuable resource allowing applicants to garner knowledge about a urology training program. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Student Expenses in Residency Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Nilsen, Kari; Callaway, Paul; Grothusen, Jill; Gillenwater, Cole; King, Samantha; Unruh, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    The student costs of residency interviewing are of increasing concern but limited current information is available. Updated, more detailed information would assist students and residency programs in decisions about residency selection. The study objective was to measure the expenses and time spent in residency interviewing by the 2016 graduating class of the University of Kansas School of Medicine and assess the impact of gender, regional campus location, and primary care application. All 195 students who participated in the 2016 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) received a 33 item questionnaire addressing interviewing activity, expenses incurred, time invested and related factors. Main measures were self-reported estimates of expenses and time spent interviewing. Descriptive analyses were applied to participant characteristics and responses. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and chi-square tests compared students by gender, campus (main/regional), and primary care/other specialties. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) on the dependent variables provided follow-up tests on significant MANOVA results. A total of 163 students (84%) completed the survey. The average student reported 38 (1-124) applications, 16 (1-54) invitations, 11 (1-28) completed interviews, and spent $3,500 ($20-$12,000) and 26 (1-90) days interviewing. No significant differences were found by gender. After MANOVA and ANOVA analyses, non-primary care applicants reported significantly more applications, interviews, and expenditures, but less program financial support. Regional campus students reported significantly fewer invitations, interviews, and days interviewing, but equivalent costs when controlled for primary care application. Cost was a limiting factor in accepting interviews for 63% and time for 53% of study respondents. Students reported investing significant time and money in interviewing. After controlling for other variables, primary care was associated with significantly

  18. Behaviour Questionnaire

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    symptoms signifying a hostile-aggressive dimension, factor 2 an anxious-fearful dimension, and factor 3 emerged as a ... Objective. This paper examines the factor structure of the. Yoruba translation of the Children's Behaviour Questionnaire .... Twitches/mannerisms/tics. Sucks thumb/finger. Bites nails. Often disobedient.

  19. Interviews within experimental frameworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, CarrieLynn D.

    2010-01-01

    -making processes in relatively inexperienced people as they engage with virtual worlds.  In order to understand the sense-making of virtual worlds, a method to record the interpretive process, as well as physical actions, was required.  In order to understand the sense-making processes involved in new experiences......, an amount of control was required over the nature of those experiences.  With these requirements, a hybrid study was designed by deconstructing the conceptualization of "the experiment" and utilizing both quantitative and qualitative methods.  The resulting study involved the following: a within-subjects......, and afterwards when they were asked to recall and compare these situations in open-ended questionnaires and interviews structured using Dervin's Sense-Making Methodology.  Having completed the study using this mixed method(ology) approach, I discuss the effectiveness of this approach, and where the approach...

  20. Needs Analysis for Nursing Students Utilizing Questionnaires and Interviews

    OpenAIRE

    Miyake, Misuzu; Tremarco, John

    2005-01-01

    ESP (English for Specific Purposes) is defined by Hutchinson and Waters (1987) as ""an approach to language teaching in which all decisions as to content and method are based on the learner's reason for learning."" Following on from this concept, it is essential to gain an understanding of the needs of our learners if we are to aid EFL (English as a Foreign Language) teachers in deciding what to teach and how best to go about implementing pedagogical-driven choices. The aims of this paper wer...

  1. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The calendar for the 2002/2003 annual interview programme is confirmed as normally from 15 November 2002 to 15 February 2002 as foreseen in Administrative Circular N° 26 (rev. 2). However, where it is preferred to be as close as possible to 12 months since the last interview, supervisors and staff concerned may agree to the interview taking place up to 15 March 2003. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of divisional re-restructurings and detachments this year. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage leads directly to the page with the form. In collaboration with AS Division, the MAPS form including the personal data for the first page can be generated via the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application. For this exercise each staff member can now generate his/her own MAPS form. Information about how to do this is available here. Human Resources Division Tel. ...

  2. Diet History Questionnaire: Suggested Citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  3. An Interview with Stella Adler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotte, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Details the life of Stella Adler, an actor, director, and teacher who studied with Stanislavsky. Includes an interview (conducted in 1974) which touches on her influences, teachers, theatre groups, and styles of acting. (PM)

  4. Sensibility assessment of the HIV Disability Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Bayoumi, Ahmed M; Bereket, Tarik; Swinton, Marilyn; Alexander, Rob; King, Kenneth; Solomon, Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Our purpose was to assess the sensibility of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Disability Questionnaire (HDQ), the first HIV-specific disability questionnaire. We administered the HDQ, a sensibility questionnaire and a structured qualitative interview to 22 adults living with HIV and five experienced clinicians. We considered the HDQ sensible if median scores on the sensibility questionnaire were ≥5 for adults living with HIV and ≥4 for clinicians for at least 80% of the items. We analyzed the interview data using directed qualitative content analytical techniques. Questionnaire scores were ≥5 for 88% (15/17) of the items and ≥4 for 100% (17/17) of the items for adults living with HIV and clinicians, respectively. The interview analysis indicated participants felt the HDQ possessed face and content validity in all disability dimensions, had adequate response options, was easy to complete, and adequately captured the episodic nature of disability. Participants had mixed responses about the questionnaire title and provided recommendations to refine item wording and response options. The HDQ appears sensible for use with adults living with HIV. Next steps include further measurement property assessment. The HDQ may be used by rehabilitation clinicians and researchers to assess disability experienced by adults living with HIV. • As people with HIV infection live longer, individuals may face a range of health-related challenges due to the disease, concurrent health conditions and the potential adverse effects of treatment. Together, these health-related challenges may be termed disability. • The HIV Disability Questionnaire (HDQ) is the first HIV-specific instrument developed to describe the presence, severity and episodic nature of the disability experienced by adults living with HIV. The HDQ is comprised of four domains including symptoms and impairments, uncertainty about future health, difficulties carrying out day-to-day activities, and challenges

  5. Enhancing motivational interviewing training in a family medicine clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltman, Stacey; WinklerPrins, Vincent; Serrano, Adriana; Talisman, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of unhealthy behaviors among patients in the healthcare system, traditional medical training involves little or no exposure to effective behavior change techniques such as Motivational Interviewing. An online learning community for enhanced training in Motivational Interviewing was developed for 3rd-year medical students. The website included educational materials about Motivational Interviewing as well as problematic health behaviors, a repository of exemplar videos and student videos with feedback, and a discussion board. Student participants were given the opportunity to record an encounter with a patient and to receive feedback on their use of Motivational Interviewing from a faculty member. Student volunteers in the Family Medicine Clerkship at Georgetown University School of Medicine were randomized to enhanced training, which included the online learning community, or training as usual. All student volunteers completed a questionnaire assessing self-efficacy initially and at the end of the clerkship. Students also participated in an Observed Structured Clinical Exam, which was subsequently coded by a blinded rater for behavioral counts of Motivational Interviewing techniques, key steps in Motivational Interviewing, and overall Motivational Interviewing style. Students in the enhanced training arm were rated as having significantly higher scores in Motivational Interviewing style in the Observed Structured Clinical Exam than training as usual students. A significant increase in self-efficacy from pre- to posttest in the overall sample was observed but between-group differences were not significant. Student feedback was particularly positive regarding video recorded practice sessions with patients and individualized feedback. The results of this study as well as student feedback suggest that future work should include patient practice sessions and individualized feedback in developing Motivational Interviewing curricula.

  6. Interview als Text vs. Interview als Interaktion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnulf Deppermann

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Das Interview ist nach wie vor das beliebteste sozialwissenschaftliche Verfahren des Datengewinns. Ökonomie der Erhebung, Vergleichbarkeit und die Möglichkeit, Einsicht in Praxisbereiche und historisch-biografische Dimensionen zu erhalten, die der direkten Beobachtung kaum zugänglich sind, machen seine Attraktivität aus. Zugleich mehren sich Kritiken, die seine Leistungsfähigkeit problematisieren, indem sie auf die begrenzte Reichweite der Explikationsfähigkeiten der Befragten, die Reaktivität der Erhebung oder die Differenz zwischen Handeln und dem Bericht über Handeln verweisen. Im Beitrag wird zwischen Ansätzen, die das Interview als Text, und solchen, die es als Interaktion verstehen, unterschieden. Nach dem Text-Verständnis werden Interviews unter inhaltlichen Gesichtspunkten analysiert und als Zugang zu einer vorgängigen sozialen oder psychischen Wirklichkeit angesehen. Das Interaktions-Verständnis versteht Interviews dagegen als situierte Praxis, in welcher im Hier und Jetzt von InterviewerInnen und Befragten gemeinsam soziale Sinnstrukturen hergestellt werden. Anhand ubiquitärer Phänomene der Interviewinteraktion – Fragen, Antworten und die Selbstpositionierung von InterviewerInnen und Befragten – werden Praktiken des interaktiv-performativen Handelns im Interview dargestellt. Ihre Relevanz für die Interviewkonstitution und ihre Erkenntnispotenziale für die Interviewauswertung werden aufgezeigt. Es wird dafür plädiert, die interaktive Konstitutionsweise von Interviews empirisch zu erforschen und methodisch konsequent zu berücksichtigen. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1303131

  7. The Interviewer in the Respondent's Shoes: What Can We Learn from the Way Interviewers Answer Survey Questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Celine; Loosveldt, Geert

    2017-01-01

    Previous research shows that interviewers to some extent fail to expend the effort that is needed to collect high-quality survey data. We extend the idea of interviewer satisficing to a related task, in which the interviewers themselves answer survey questions. We hypothesize that interviewers who self-administer the questionnaire in a careless…

  8. Interview without a subject

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2010-01-01

    This article contributes to the rethinking of qualitative interview research into intercultural issues. It suggests that the application of poststructuralist thought should not be limited to the analysis of the interview material itself, but incorporate the choice of interviewees and the modalities...... for the accomplishment of interviews. The paper focuses on a discussion of theoretical and methodological considerations of design, approach and research strategy. These discussions are specified in relation to a project on gender and ethnicity in cultural encounters at Universities. In the paper, I introduce a research...... design named Cultural interviewing, present an approach to the design of interviews named Interview without a subject, and offer an analytic strategy directed towards the analysis of interview transcripts named Interview on the level of the signifier. The paper concludes that even though it is relevant...

  9. Coding interview questions concepts, problems, interview questions

    CERN Document Server

    Karumanchi, Narasimha

    2016-01-01

    Peeling Data Structures and Algorithms: * Programming puzzles for interviews * Campus Preparation * Degree/Masters Course Preparation * Instructor’s * GATE Preparation * Big job hunters: Microsoft, Google, Amazon, Yahoo, Flip Kart, Adobe, IBM Labs, Citrix, Mentor Graphics, NetApp, Oracle, Webaroo, De-Shaw, Success Factors, Face book, McAfee and many more * Reference Manual for working people

  10. Disrupting the habit of interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Honan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the growing domain of ‘post-qualitative’ research and experiments with a new (representational form to move away from traditional and clichéd descriptions of research methods. In this paper, I want to interrogate the category of interview, and the habit of interviewing, to disrupt the clichés, so as to allow thinking of different ways of writing/speaking/representing the interactions between researcher and researched that will breathe new life into qualitative inquiries. I will attempt to flatten and shred, destabilise and disrupt our common-sense ideas about interview, including those held most sacred to the qualitative community, that of anonymity and confidentiality, as well as the privilege of the ‘transcript’ in re-presenting interview data.

  11. Life-history interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2010-01-01

    My first encounter with life history research was during my Ph.D. research. This concerned a multi-method study of nomadic mobility in Senegal. One method stood out as yielding the most interesting and in-depth data: life story interviews using a time line. I made interviews with the head...... of a time line for making life story interviews. I decided that the lack of authoritative literature should not omit me from teaching my students how to make a time line interview. After an introduction, they had to use the tool for making an interview each other concerning their learning journey to DPU...... for conducting life history research. While I also consider time line interviews useful for other types of research, that story will have to wait for another paper....

  12. Creativity in ethnographic interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Lene Teglhus

    2014-01-01

    The article discusses interviews as participatory reflexive observation. It is based on experiences of interviewing policymakers and researchers about knowledge and evidence in health promotion. This particular group of informants challenged an approach to interviews as getting informants to desc...... of knowledge production and points out the role of the researcher as an active participant in the creative process....... to describe their everyday work life. By employing a methodological framework focusing on reflexive processes, interviews became consensual interactions, and the content of the interviews turned out to be analyses, interpretations and meaning making, that is, knowledge production. Interpretation and meaning...... making drew on ideologies, norms and values central to the field and thereby the strategies employed by the informants as well as by the researcher could be seen as wayfaring strategies; creating the paths in the field as they go along. Such an approach to interviews opens up the creative character...

  13. [Motivational interview: supporting change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fond, Guillaume; Ducasse, Déborah

    2015-01-01

    The motivational interview aims to help patients to resolve their ambivalence regarding problematic behaviors and to guide them into change. It differs from other therapeutic approaches mainly through the attitude of the therapist. In motivational interviewing, the therapist defends the statu quo. By reactance, the patient defends the change and enhance her/his motivation. This article provides a summary of the other concepts of motivational interviewing and its applications in the psychiatric daily practice. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Doing Dirty Interviewing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Tanggaard, Lene

    in the position of a psychologist with past experiences within supervision and consultation/coaching. The framing of the interview was build around the theme “My role in keeping students out from dropping out of the Vocational Educational Training College.” We will discuss how both the interviewer...... and the interviewee might seduce each other to develop a conversation in which intersections between supervision/coaching and interviewing merge. The example clearly demonstrates how subjectivity influences the knowledge that is being produced in an interview situation, which should be recognized and reflected upon...

  15. Det kvalitative interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmann, Svend

    Bogen begynder med en teoretisk funderet introduktion til det kvalitative interview gennem en skildring af de mange forskellige måder, hvorpå samtaler er blevet brugt til produktion af viden. Opmærksomheden henledes specielt på de komplementære positioner, der kendetegner det oplevelsesfokuserede...... interview (fænomenologiske positioner) og det sprogfokuserede interview (diskursorienterede positioner), som henholdsvis fokuserer på interviewsamtalen som rapporter (om interviewpersonens oplevelser) og redegørelser (foranlediget af interviewsituationen). De følgende kapitler omhandler forskellige måder...... forskningsresultater baseret på kvalitative interview....

  16. Sleep quality in children: questionnaires available in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela Cavalheiro

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this paper was to evaluate and compare the questionnaires regarding sleep quality among children aged up to 12 years old, used in the Portuguese language in Brazil. Material and methods: A search at the literature databases of Lilacs, Scielo and Pubmed was performed using keywords “sleep quality” and “children”. Selected Articles were analysed for age of the studied population, the number of questions and the issues addressed thereby, who realized the application, the analysis of the results, and content. Results: Out of 9377 titles, 11 studies were included, performing 7 different questionnaires: Questionnaire to measure quality of life among children with enlarged palatine and pharyngeal tonsils (translation of OSD-6 (1; Inventory of Sleep Habits for Preschool Children (2; the Questionnaire on Obstructive Sleep Apnoea-18 (OSA-18 (3, Sleep Questionnaire by Reimão and Lefévre - QRL (4; the Questionnaire on Sleep Behaviour Patterns (5 and the translation of the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (6; Brief Infant Sleep Questionnaire - BISQ (7 . Six of the questionnaires have covered the following issues: snoring and daytime sleepiness. Conclusions: A total of 7 protocols were found to be available in Brazil, the most commonly mentioned being OSA-18 and OSD-6. The use of protocols as a guided interview helps to define diagnosis and treatment among the paediatric population, but its large variability makes it difficult to compare a standardised monitoring process.

  17. Interview, observation og dokumentanalyse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstrøm, Maria Duclos

    2014-01-01

    Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer.......Kapitlet giver et eksempel på hvordan man indenfor en mixed methods-tradition (metodekombination) kan kombinere interviews, dokumentanalyse og etnografiske observationer....

  18. Interviewing like a researcher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evald, Majbritt Rostgaard; Freytag, Per Vagn; Nielsen, Suna Løwe

    2018-01-01

    the transformation that neutral research methods go through, we consider an often-used method in business research, which researchers often become familiar with or have opinions about, which is the personal interview. The illustration of how the personal interview can be influenced by three different paradigms lays...

  19. Interview with Ron Wasserstein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmann, Allan; Wasserstein, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Ron Wasserstein is Executive Director of the American Statistical Association (ASA). He previously served as Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Professor of Statistics at Washburn University. This interview took place via email on January 21- February 24, 2014. Topics covered in this interview are as follows: 1) Beginnings, 2) Teaching…

  20. Interview as intraviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kit Stender

    2014-01-01

    In this article I will illustrate how our understanding of the interview situation changes when we rethink it with some of the concepts from Karen Barad’s notion of agential realism. With concepts such as ‘apparatuses’, ‘phenomena‘, ‘intra-action’ and ‘material-discursive’ (Barad, 2007) it become...... the children’s ways of responding to my questions and re-negotiated the positions of interviewer and interviewee....... possible to focus more extensively on how matter matters in the interview situation. Re-thinking the interview as an intraview1, I argue that Barad’s concepts will enhance our awareness not only of how the researcher affects the interview but also of how certain kinds of materiality in interview situations...... do not merely refer to passive entities but must be understood as matter that matters. To illustrate my points I will analyse how bringing a puppet with me to interviews with 4-6 year old children seemed to interfere with the interview situation creating unforeseen diversions in ways that influenced...

  1. Philosophical Hermeneutic Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxanne K. Vandermause PhD, RN

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes, exemplifies and discusses the use of the philosophical hermeneutic interview and its distinguishing characteristics. Excerpts of interviews from a philosophical hermeneutic study are used to show how this particular phenomenological tradition is applied to research inquiry. The purpose of the article is to lay out the foundational background for philosophical hermeneutics in a way that clarifies its unique approach to interviewing and its usefulness for advancing health care knowledge. Implications for health care research and practice are addressed.

  2. Mathematical people profiles and interviews

    CERN Document Server

    Albers, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This unique collection contains extensive and in-depth interviews with mathematicians who have shaped the field of mathematics in the twentieth century. Collected by two mathematicians respected in the community for their skill in communicating mathematical topics to a broader audience, the book is also rich with photographs and includes an introduction by Philip J. Davis.

  3. National Health Interview Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States...

  4. Interview with Henry Jenkins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TWC Editor

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available An interview with Henry Jenkins focussing on Transformative Works and Cultures (TWC, the Organization for Transformative Works (OTW, and Jenkins' academic research into fan and participatory cultures.

  5. The Effect of Standardized Interviews on Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman Dincer, Pelin; Birtan, Deniz; Arslantas, Mustafa Kemal; Tore Altun, Gulbin; Ayanoglu, Hilmi Omer

    2018-03-01

    Organ donation is the most important stage for organ transplant. Studies reveal that attitudes of families of brain-dead patients toward donation play a significant role in their decision. We hypothesized that supporting family awareness about the meaning of organ donation, including saving lives while losing a loved one, combined with being informed about brain death and the donation process must be maintained by intensive care unit physicians through standardized interviews and questionnaires to increase the donation rate. We retrospectively evaluated the final decisions of families of 52 brain-dead donors treated at our institution between 2014 and 2017. Data underwent descriptive analyses. The standard interview content was generated after literature search results were reviewed by the authors. Previously, we examined the impact of standardized interviews done by intensive care unit physicians with relatives of potential brain-dead donors regarding decisions to donate or reasons for refusing organ donation. After termination of that study, interviews were done according to the intensivist's orientation, resulting in significantly decreased donation rates. Standardized interviews were then started again, resulting in increased donation rates. Of 17 families who participated in standardized interviews, 5 families (29.4%) agreed to donate organs of their brain-dead relatives. In the other group of families, intensivists governed informing the families of donation without standardized interviews. In this group of 35 families, 5 families (14.3%) approved organ donation. The decision regarding whether to agree to organ donation was statistically different between the 2 family groups (P donation process resulted in an increased rate of organ donation compared with routine protocols.

  6. Interview with Gavin Butt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse Jørgensen, Stina; Alexandra Sofie, Jönsson

    2008-01-01

    We have interviewed Gavin Butt about his research interest in the cross-field between performance and performativity in the visual arts: queer theory, queer cultures and their histories, post-second world war U.S. art, contemporary art and critical theory.......We have interviewed Gavin Butt about his research interest in the cross-field between performance and performativity in the visual arts: queer theory, queer cultures and their histories, post-second world war U.S. art, contemporary art and critical theory....

  7. Interviews with information receivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    The Waste Policy Institute (WPI), through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (OST), conducted telephone interviews with people who requested OST publications to better understand why they wanted information from OST, how they used the information, and whether the information met their needs. Researchers selected 160 people who requested one of the two OST publications-either the Technology Summary Series (Rainbow Books) or the Initiatives newsletter. Of the 160 selected, interviewers spoke with 79 people nationwide representing six stakeholder audience categories

  8. New Materialism: Interviews & Cartographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Tuin, I.; Dolphijn, R.

    2012-01-01

    This book is the first monograph on the theme of “new materialism,” an emerging trend in 21st century thought that has already left its mark in such fields as philosophy, cultural theory, feminism, science studies, and the arts. The first part of the book contains elaborate interviews with some of

  9. Interviewing the moderator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2004-01-01

    a concrete example of its use in a recently completed research project. They discuss several advantages of the interview, among them that it provides information about group interaction and participant behavior, and furnishes additional data on what is discussed when the tape recorder is turned off....

  10. Interview with Srinivasa Varadhan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 9. Interview with Srinivasa Varadhan. S Varadhan R Sujatha. Face to Face Volume 17 Issue 9 September 2012 pp 903-912. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/09/0903-0912 ...

  11. Interviewing media workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Graf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on the use of Niklas Luhmann’s systems theoretical approach in order to analyse interviews conducted with media workers concerning their experiences of ethnic diversity in newsrooms. Applying systems theory means constructing the interview as a social system and seeing the “data” as observations produced by the observer and not as representations of a reality. The first part of the article describes the interview methodology and the second part provides examples, from the current study, of how systems theory can be applied in order to analyse interviews. Using a difference-theoretical approach means looking at the distinctions the informants make when talking about their experiences. These main guiding distinctions can be summarised as immigrant background/competence as well as advantage/competence. Using the guiding distinction of inclusion/exclusion when interpreting the interviewees’ statements, the interdependencies of mechanisms of inclusion and exclusion in newsrooms related to ethnic background can be examined.

  12. Interview with Louise Lonabocker

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Munkwitz-Smith, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This issue of "College and University" marks a transition in the Editor-in-Chief Position, with the interview of Louise Lonabocker, who has served in this capacity for the past ten years. She has also served as President of AACRAO, and in both positions, Lonabocker has been a role model for many AACRAO leaders. Lonabocker describes the…

  13. Interview with Jessica Utts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Utts, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a transcript of author Allan Rossman's interview with Jessica Utts, Professor and Chair of Statistics at the University of California-Irvine. Utts is also a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and a recipient of a Founders Award from ASA. Additionally, she has been elected as President of ASA for the year 2016. The…

  14. Interview with Steve Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Jennifer Hitchcock interviews community activist and director of Syracuse University's Composition and Cultural Rhetoric doctoral program, Steve Parks. They discuss Parks's working-class background, career path, influences, and activism. Parks also considers the direction of the field of composition and rhetoric and expresses optimism for the…

  15. Interview with Christine Franklin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, Allan; Franklin, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Chris Franklin is Senior Lecturer, Undergraduate Coordinator, and Lothar Tresp Honoratus Honors Professor of Statistics at the University of Georgia. She is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and received the USCOTS Lifetime Achievement Award in 2013. This interview took place via email on August 16, 2013-October 9, 2013. Franklin…

  16. The Unstructured Clinical Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2010-01-01

    In mental health, family, and community counseling settings, master's-level counselors engage in unstructured clinical interviewing to develop diagnoses based on the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; "DSM-IV-TR"; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). Although counselors receive education about…

  17. The psychiatric interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Sass, Louis A; Parnas, Josef

    2012-01-01

    faithful distinctions in this particular domain, we need a more adequate approach, that is, an approach that is guided by phenomenologically informed considerations. Our theoretical discussion draws upon clinical examples derived from structured and semi-structured interviews. We conclude that fully...

  18. Interview with Srinivasa Varadhan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 9. Interview with Srinivasa Varadhan. S Varadhan R Sujatha. Face to Face Volume 17 Issue 9 September 2012 pp 903-912. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/09/0903-0912 ...

  19. Preparing and conducting interviews to collect data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Owen; Noonan, Maria

    2013-05-01

    To describe three styles of interviews and discuss issues regarding planning and conducting interviews. Interviews are probably the approach most used to collect data in studies. They are particularly useful in uncovering the story behind a participant's experiences. Researchers can follow a line of questions to gain information about a topic, or further explore responses or findings. But the researcher needs to plan and decide the format of the interview before collecting data. The authors included papers on structured, unstructured and semi-structured interviews published in a peer-reviewed joumrnal and in English. Interviews are one of the most common metods of data collection in qualitative research. However they require the researcher to have a sound understanding of their use and appropriateness. The ability to conduct interviews is one that develops over time and to aid the researcher in developing their interview skills they should consult with other researchers, seeking comments and advice and, critically, to appraise audio recordings. This article aims to support students who are undertaking research modules as part of their academic studies, writing a research proposal or novice researchers who are about to use interviews as a means of data collection. To conduct a successful interview, researchers need to develop their interview technique, choose the right method and carefully plan for all aspects of the process.

  20. Nijmegen Continuity Questionnaire: development and testing of a questionnaire that measures continuity of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uijen, A.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Weel, C. van; Schers, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: To develop and pilot test a generic questionnaire to measure continuity of care from the patient's perspective across primary and secondary care settings. We developed the Nijmegen Continuity Questionnaire (NCQ) based on a systematic literature review and analysis of 30 patient interviews.

  1. An Interview with Dorry M. Kenyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Nathan; Vongumivitch, Viphavee

    2001-01-01

    Includes an interview with a noted figure in the field of language assessment. Focuses on a range of test development projects, including several related to the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) scale. (Author/VWL)

  2. Nijmegen Continuity Questionnaire: development and testing of a questionnaire that measures continuity of care.

    OpenAIRE

    Uijen, A.A.; Schellevis, F.G.; Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Weel, C. van; Schers, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: To develop and pilot test a generic questionnaire to measure continuity of care from the patient's perspective across primary and secondary care settings. We developed the Nijmegen Continuity Questionnaire (NCQ) based on a systematic literature review and analysis of 30 patient interviews. The questionnaire consisted of 16 items about the patient-provider relationship to be answered for five different care providers and 14 items each on the collaboration between four groups of care ...

  3. Software Process Automation: Interviews, Survey, and Workshop Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Christie, Alan

    1997-01-01

    ...: First, in-depth interviews were conducted to assess the state of the practice. Second, a survey questionnaire was distributed to a wider number of organizations to obtain more quantitative data...

  4. [Motivational interviewing in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev-Ran, Shaul; Nitzan, Uri

    2011-09-01

    Harmful behaviors and low adherence to medical treatment significantly contribute to an increased rate of hospitalizations, mortality and morbidity. Leading health organizations worldwide are making great efforts to find and develop efficient strategies in order to recruit patients to adhere to medical treatment and adopt a healthier lifestyle. Motivational interviewing is an evidence-based approach that the physician can apply in numerous health care situations in order to increase patients' adherence to treatment. It is a patient-centered approach, based on principles of collaboration, autonomy and evocation. Research indicates that the patient's verbal commitment towards change is directly correlated to future behavioral change. Therefore, the approach includes learnable techniques which assist in allowing the patient to speak about the advantages of behavioral change and treatment. Thus, motivational interviewing helps patients adopt a healthier lifestyle while contributing to the professionalism of physicians and their sense of satisfaction from work.

  5. Structured Interviews: Developing Interviewing Skills in Human Resource Management Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Jessica L.

    2018-01-01

    Structured interviews are widely used in the employment process; however, students often have little experience asking and responding to structured interview questions. In a format similar to "speed dating," this exercise actively engages students in the interview process. Students pair off to gain experience as an interviewer by asking…

  6. Interviewer-Respondent Interactions in Conversational and Standardized Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittereder, Felicitas; Durow, Jen; West, Brady T.; Kreuter, Frauke; Conrad, Frederick G.

    2018-01-01

    Standardized interviewing (SI) and conversational interviewing are two approaches to collect survey data that differ in how interviewers address respondent confusion. This article examines interviewer-respondent interactions that occur during these two techniques, focusing on requests for and provisions of clarification. The data derive from an…

  7. Interview: Joseph Agassi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Agassi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Agassi is an Israeli scholar born in Jerusalem on May 7, 1927. He has many books and articles published contributing to the fields of logic, scientific method, foundations of sciences, epistemology and, most importantly for this Journal, in the historiography of science. He studied with Karl Popper, who was definitely his biggest influence. He taught around the world in different universities. He currently lives in Herzliya, Israel. For his important contribution to the historiography of science, we chose to open the first issue of this journal with this interview recognizing his importance for the field, as well as paying our homage to him.

  8. Interview with Karol Modzelewski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Guglielmotti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The first section of this interview addresses the political and cultural milieu that shaped Karol Modzelewski’s education (in Poland and Italy, too, the relations with both his mentor Aleksander Gieysztor and the historians of the previous generation, the condition of education in Poland especially in the ’60s, his political involvement, the selection of his research interests and the development the latter underwent. Then the interview examines Modzelewski’s relations with scholars belonging to other historiographical schools, with particular attention to the issue of ethnogenesis, the methodology concerning the structure of sources to reconstruct the history of the Barbarian world in the first millennium, the matter of the “Barbaric collectivism”, the reception of his study L’Europa dei barbari (‘The Europe of the Barbarians’, 2004, and finally how research is organized and evaluated in Poland. Quotable as Intervista a Karol Modzelewski, a cura di Paola Guglielmotti e Gian Maria Varanini, "Reti Medievali - Rivista", 11, 1 (2010, p. 509-579, url: .

  9. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For the performance appraisal of reference year 2003, the interview calendar has been fixed between 1 January and 31 March 2004. This new calendar gives a better time schedule to the supervisors to conduct the interviews. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of the new CERN structure as from 2004. With this later time limit, the new departments are invited to strictly respect the target date of 31 March. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage: http://cern.ch/hr-div will lead directly to the page with the form. The personal data for the first page of the form can be generated by each divisional hierarchy, by the Divisional Administrative Officer (DAO) or by the staff member himself via HRT. Following discussions about the first two years of MAPS, and in order to improve the performance appraisal process, some modifications have been brought to section 2 (Assessme...

  10. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, Anita J; DeBruyn, Rebecca; Essén, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    , and perceptions of care, has been created--the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ)--in three languages (English, French and Spanish). It is completed in 45 minutes via interview administration several months post-birth. CONCLUSIONS: A 4-stage process of questionnaire development...... Initiative; adaptations of these recommendations specific to maternity care have yet to be elucidated and validated. We aimed to develop a questionnaire measuring migrant-friendly maternity care (MFMC) which could be used in a range of maternity care settings and countries. METHODS: This study was conducted...... in four stages. First, questions related to migrant friendly maternity care were identified from existing questionnaires including the Migrant Friendliness Quality Questionnaire, developed in Europe to capture recommended general hospital care for migrants, and the Mothers In a New Country (MINC...

  11. Interview: Drew Feustel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Sliker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An interview with Andrew J. (Drew Feustel, Purdue alum, geophysicist and NASA astronaut. Dr. Feustel's first spaceflight in May 2009 (STS-125 repaired the Hubble Space Telescope. His second spaceflight in May 2011 (STS-134 was the penultimate journey of the Space Shuttle program. At Purdue University, Feustel served as a Residence Hall Counselor for two years at Cary Quadrangle and he was a Research Assistant and Teaching Assistant in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. His MS thesis investigated physical property measurements of rock specimens under elevated hydrostatic pressures simulating Earth’s deep crustal environments. While at Purdue, Feustel served for three years as Grand Prix Chairman and team Kart driver for Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity.

  12. Interview with Clive Phillpot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Maroto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Clive Phillpot is an English curator, writer, and librarian. Between 1977 and 1994 he was the Director of the Library at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA in New York, where he founded and curated the Artist Book´s Collection. Previously, he was the librarian at the Chelsea School of Art in London. He has written and edited numerous articles and books on the topic of the artist’s book, whose concept he decisively contributed to define. In the 1960s and 1970s the artist’s book emerged as an accessible art medium by being cheap, portable, and mass distributed. In this interview I try to learn whether those expectations have survived, updated and transformed in the contemporary phenomenon of the artist’s novel.

  13. Validation of a self-administered questionnaire for assessing occupational and environmental exposures of pregnant women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eskenazi, B.; Pearson, K.

    1988-01-01

    The present investigation sought to determine whether a self-administered questionnaire could be used to obtain occupational information from pregnant women attending the obstetrical clinics at the University of California, San Francisco from July to November 1986. The authors compared the accuracy of responses of 57 women on the self-administered questionnaire with those obtained on a detailed clinical interview by an occupational health professional. The self-administered questionnaire and the clinical interview included information on the woman's job title, the type of company she worked for, the level of physical activity, her exposures on the job and at home, and her partner's occupation. The authors also examined whether the validity of the self-administered questionnaire could be improved on review by an industrial hygienist. The questionnaire took less than 20 minutes to complete, with over 90% of the women answering three-quarters of it. It was substantially accurate in obtaining information on number of hours worked during pregnancy, type of shift worked, and stress level in the workplace; exposure to radiation, video display terminals, fumes, gases, and cigarette smoke in the workplace; and exposure to pesticides, paint, and cigarette smoke at home. On those variables for which the responses on the self-administered questionnaire were less accurate, review by the industrial hygienist improved the level of accuracy considerably. These findings suggest that a self-administered questionnaire can be used to obtain valid information from pregnant women attending a prenatal clinic

  14. The MPC and A Questionnaire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Danny H.; Elwood, Robert H. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The questionnaire is the instrument used for recording performance data on the nuclear material protection, control, and accountability (MPC and A) system at a nuclear facility. The performance information provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the MPC and A system. The goal for the questionnaire is to provide an accurate representation of the performance of the MPC and A system as it currently exists in the facility. Performance grades for all basic MPC and A functions should realistically reflect the actual level of performance at the time the survey is conducted. The questionnaire was developed after testing and benchmarking the material control and accountability (MC and A) system effectiveness tool (MSET) in the United States. The benchmarking exercise at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) proved extremely valuable for improving the content and quality of the early versions of the questionnaire. Members of the INL benchmark team identified many areas of the questionnaire where questions should be clarified and areas where additional questions should be incorporated. The questionnaire addresses all elements of the MC and A system. Specific parts pertain to the foundation for the facility's overall MPC and A system, and other parts pertain to the specific functions of the operational MPC and A system. The questionnaire includes performance metrics for each of the basic functions or tasks performed in the operational MPC and A system. All of those basic functions or tasks are represented as basic events in the MPC and A fault tree. Performance metrics are to be used during completion of the questionnaire to report what is actually being done in relation to what should be done in the performance of MPC and A functions.

  15. Interview with Peter Jenni

    CERN Multimedia

    PH Newsletter

    2013-01-01

    Peter Jenni, former spokesperson of the ATLAS Collaboration, discusses the challenges and satisfactions from his long-standing career in high-energy physics in this month’s PH Newsletter.   Peter Jenni. Following a long career at CERN that dates back to 1970 (ranging from Summer Student to Fellow and to Staff), Peter Jenni recently retired after about 40 years marked by exciting discoveries (from the first two-photon production of eta-prime at SPEAR to the Higgs boson at the LHC). Peter was involved in the LHC from its very beginnings and was spokesperson of the ATLAS Collaboration until February 2009. Peter Jenni will continue working with ATLAS as a guest scientist with the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, and when he's not travelling he still spends most of his time in his office in Building 40, where he met with interviewer Panos Charitos. Panos Charitos: When did you first arrive to CERN? Peter Jenni: I first came to CERN as a Summer Student in ...

  16. Interview with Lenny Kaye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Garrigós

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Lenny Kaye has been Patti Smith’s long term guitarist, friend and collaborator, ever since they first began together in the early 1970s. He grew up between New York and New Jersey, graduating in American History from Rutgers University, where he later taught a course in the Department of American Studies on the History of American Rock, which became famous because of the large number of students who wanted to enroll in it. A very prolific writer and musician, he has produced an important number of records, as well as collaborated with numerous music magazines. He is the author of two books, Waylon Jennings: An Autobiography (1996 and You Call it Madness, The Sensuous Song of the Croon (2004. Nuggets (1972, his anthology of 60s garage music, is famous for defining the genre. This interview took place when he was visiting Spain in November 2012 with the Patti Smith Group. In it, we discussed the New York scene of the 70s, music, literature, drugs, politics, and many other things.

  17. Content validity and reliability of the Copenhagen social relations questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rikke; Nielsen, Lene Snabe; Henriksen, Pia Wichmann

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present article is to describe the face and content validity as well as reliability of the Copenhagen Social Relations Questionnaire (CSRQ). METHOD: The face and content validity test was based on focus group discussions and individual interviews with 31 informants....... Another 94 men and women participated in an 8-day test-retest analysis. RESULTS: Informants generally expressed that the questions and response categories were relevant and easy to understand. Themes on structure of social relations, social support, and negative aspects of social relations emerged clearly...... from the interviews. Two additional themes not covered by CSRQ on dynamics and reciprocity of social relations were identified. DISCUSSION: CSRQ holds satisfactory face and content validity as well as reliability, and is suitable for measuring structure and function of social relations including...

  18. Wesleyan University Student Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagen, C. Hess

    This questionnaire assesses marijuana use practices in college students. The 30 items (multiple choice or free response) are concerned with personal and demographic data, marijuana smoking practices, use history, effects from smoking marijuana, present attitude toward the substance, and use of other drugs. The Questionnaire is untimed and…

  19. Public Participation Guide: Stakeholder Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interviews with stakeholders are one-to-one conversations about a specific topic or issue. The primary purpose of these interviews is to obtain project-relevant information and elicit stakeholder reactions and suggestions.

  20. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  1. Planning for the Job Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Close, Elizabeth, Ed.; Ramsey, Katherine, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Offers advice from middle school educators (a principal, a supervisor, and a teacher) on job interviews for teaching positions: how applicants are selected from the stack of applications, what happens during an interview, and what truly makes a difference. (SR)

  2. Medical Student Mock Interviews to Improve Residency Interviewing and Match Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueston, William J; Holloway, Richard L

    2016-04-01

    Using a quasi-experimental approach, we examined student and faculty satisfaction with a mock residency interview program. We also examined whether self-selected participants had match rates that differed from nonparticipants. Interviews were arranged on a specified evening between students and a physician in the specialty to which the student wished to apply. Interviews were structured as similarly to residency interviews as possible, but included 10 minutes of verbal feedback and subsequent written feedback to all students. Students completed surveys indicating their satisfaction with the mock interview immediately following the interview and 5 months later (after their actual resident interviews). Faculty feedback to students and their satisfaction with the program also was collected. Out of 189 (55%) students in the senior class, 104 volunteered to participate. Immediately following the mock interview, over 90% of students who participated either strongly agreed or agreed that the interview feedback was helpful, seemed realistic, and helped them identify strengths and weaknesses. Responses collected 5 months later were still favorable, but less positive. Faculty identified 7 students who they believed had poor interview techniques and an additional 13 who interviewers believed would be unlikely to match in their specialty. Final match results for the group participating in the mock interview showed a primary match rate of 99%, which was higher than students who did not participate (94%, P interviews were useful in improving student match success compared to students who did not participate in the mock interview program. Because all students were not required to participate, it is unclear whether this tactic would be successful for all students.

  3. THE WRITTEN DISCOURSE OF INTERVIEWING STYLE FOR A MAGAZINE INTERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessie Barrot

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper examines the written discourse of interviewing style for the purpose of print publication. Specifically, this paper sought to describe and explain the phases of interviewing procedures, the typology of the questions, and the transitional strategies executed by Oprah Winfrey during her interviews for O Magazine. One hundred and ten (110 response-soliciting statements were subjected to discourse analytic procedure to determine the features of such utterances. The results showed that her interview procedure follows a certain pattern that contributes to her ability to maintain the intimacy, familiarity, and dynamics of conversation. Further, results revealed that the interviewer employs a variety of response-soliciting strategies and transitional strategies that unconsciously put the control and authority in the conversation to the interviewees. Finally, some pedagogical implications were also presented for classroom use. Keywords: discourse analysis, interviewing style, interview questions, written discourse

  4. STS-101: Crew Interview / Jeffrey N. Williams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Jeffrey N. Williams is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Williams became an astronaut, and the events that led to his interest. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is his reaction to and the reasons for the change of the mission objectives. Williams also mentions the scheduled space-walk that he will perform, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the repairs of equipment, and the change of the batteries.

  5. STS-106 Crew Interviews: Scott D. Altman

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott D. Altman is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Altman became a pilot, the events that led to his interest, his career path through the Navy, and then finally, his selection by NASA as an astronaut. Other interesting information discussed in this one-on-one interview was his work on the movie set of "Top Gun," the highlights of his Navy career, and possible shorter time frame turnarounds for missions. Altman also mentions the scheduled docking with the new International Space Station (ISS) after the arrival of the Zvezda Service Module.

  6. STS-103 Crew Interviews: Scott Kelly

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Kelly is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Kelly became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is an explanation of the why this required mission to service the Hubble Space Telescope must take place at such an early date, replacement of the gyroscopes, transistors, and computers. Also discussed are the Chandra X Ray Astrophysics Facility, and a brief touch on Kelly's responsibility during any of the given four space walks scheduled for this mission.

  7. Development of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: constructing an item pool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly L

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Laura Kelly, Crispin Jenkinson, Sarah Dummett, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, David Morley Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Purpose: The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire is a patient-reported outcome measure in development that is grounded on the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF. The study reported here aimed to inform and generate an item pool for the new measure, which is specifically designed for the assessment of participation and activity in patients experiencing a range of health conditions. Methods: Items were informed through in-depth interviews conducted with 37 participants spanning a range of conditions. Interviews aimed to identify how their condition impacted their ability to participate in meaningful activities. Conditions included arthritis, cancer, chronic back pain, diabetes, motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, and spinal cord injury. Transcripts were analyzed using the framework method. Statements relating to ICF themes were recast as questionnaire items and shown for review to an expert panel. Cognitive debrief interviews (n=13 were used to assess items for face and content validity. Results: ICF themes relevant to activities and participation in everyday life were explored, and a total of 222 items formed the initial item pool. This item pool was refined by the research team and 28 generic items were mapped onto all nine chapters of the ICF construct, detailing activity and participation. Cognitive interviewing confirmed the questionnaire instructions, items, and response options were acceptable to participants. Conclusion: Using a clear conceptual basis to inform item generation, 28 items have been identified as suitable to undergo further psychometric testing. A large-scale postal survey will follow in order to refine the instrument further and

  8. Using Qualitative Methods to Assess the Measurement Property of a New HIV Disability Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly K. O'Brien PhD, BScPT

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to describe our experience using a qualitative team approach and predetermined theoretical framework to assess sensibility of a newly developed HIV disability questionnaire. Two interviewers conducted structured qualitative interviews with 22 adults living with HIV, asking participants how well the questionnaire characterized the disability they experienced living with HIV. Data collection and analysis occurred over six stages with four analysts who met throughout. Strengths of our approach included the ability to assess the sensibility of the questionnaire from the perspective of adults living with HIV, collect and analyze data across multiple sites, establish a systematic team analytical process, and enhance rigour through multiple coding, team reflexivity, and interviewer and analyst triangulation. Challenges included increased resources required to coordinate and implement this approach, differential recruitment rates, initial divergent analytical styles, and the potential to miss emerging codes given the structured nature of the analysis. This article offers a methodological process for researchers to use a qualitative team approach with directed content analysis to assess the sensibility of a new health status questionnaire.

  9. Online interviewing with interpreters in humanitarian contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiumento, Anna; Machin, Laura; Rahman, Atif; Frith, Lucy

    2018-12-01

    Recognising that one way to address the logistical and safety considerations of research conducted in humanitarian emergencies is to use internet communication technologies to facilitate interviews online, this article explores some practical and methodological considerations inherent to qualitative online interviewing. Reflections from a case study of a multi-site research project conducted in post-conflict countries are presented.  Synchronous online cross-language qualitative interviews were conducted in one country.  Although only a small proportion of interviews were conducted online (six out of 35), it remains important to critically consider the impact upon data produced in this way. A range of practical and methodological considerations are discussed, illustrated with examples.  Results suggest that whilst online interviewing has methodological and ethical potential and versatility, there are inherent practical challenges in settings with poor internet and electricity infrastructure.  Notable methodological limitations include barriers to building rapport due to partial visual and non-visual cues, and difficulties interpreting pauses or silences. Drawing upon experiences in this case study, strategies for managing the practical and methodological limitations of online interviewing are suggested, alongside recommendations for supporting future research practice.  These are intended to act as a springboard for further reflection, and operate alongside other conceptual frameworks for online interviewing.

  10. A Content Analysis of Medical School Admissions Interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Altmaier

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prospective medical school applicants use Internet websites to gain information about medical school interviews as well as to offer their experience in such interviews. This study examined applicants’ reported experiences of interviews and compared them to the purposes of the interview as purported by medical schools. Method. Content analysis of student feedback regarding medical school interviews at 161 medical schools was conducted for entries of over 4600 students applying to medical school who anonymously and voluntarily completed an online questionnaire. Results. Across all medical schools, nearly one half of all cited interview questions addressed non-cognitive characteristics of the applicants. Top ranked medical schools were reported to ask significantly more interpersonal and illegal questions and fewer academic/general knowledge questions than other medical schools. Lower ranked schools did not differ significantly in the types of questions reportedly asked applicants compared to other medical schools. Discussion. Medical school interviews are generally gathering types of information about applicants that admissions personnel identify as important in the admission decision. In addition to measuring interpersonal characteristics, medical school admissions interviews are assessing cognitive abilities and ethical decision-making. Sources on the Internet provide actual medical school interview questions to prospective students. This practice can help them gain an undue advantage in interviewing. Admissions committees and faculty who interview students may want to consider how best to obtain accurate and valid responses from applicants.

  11. Development and validation of the Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joakim; Carlsson, Sigrid; Johansson, Mia; Pauli, Nina; Rydén, Anna; Fagerberg-Mohlin, Bodil; Finizia, Caterina

    2012-08-01

    To develop and validate a comprehensive, self-administered questionnaire for patients with limited ability to open the mouth, trismus. We derived the Gothenburg Trismus Questionnaire (GTQ) from empirical evidence in the medical literature and interviews with medical experts as well as patients. The draft version was tested in a pilot study (n=18). Patients with a maximal incisal opening (MIO) of ⩽35mm were included. The study comprised patients with benign jaw-related conditions (n=51), patients treated for head and neck (H&N) cancer (n=78) and an age- and gender-matched control group without trismus (n=129). The GTQ instrument was well accepted by the patients, with satisfactory compliance and low rates of missing items. After item reduction, due to items not being conceptually relevant and/or low factor loadings, the GTQ demonstrated high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.72-0.90), good construct validity and known-group validity. We developed a trismus-specific self-administered questionnaire, the GTQ, that showed good psychometric properties. We suggest this questionnaire, that has clear clinical relevance, to be adopted and used in clinical practice and in research, acting as a screening tool as well as an endpoint in intervention and jaw physiotherapy/rehabilitation studies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Interview with Andrew Dalby

    OpenAIRE

    Mac Con Iomaire, Máirtín

    2016-01-01

    Andrew Dalby (born 1947 in Liverpool) is an English linguist, translator and historian and author of numerous articles and several books on a wide range of topics including food history, language, and Classical texts. Dalby studied Latin, French and Greek at the Bristol Grammar School and University of Cambridge. Here he also studied Romance languages and linguistics, earning a bachelor's degree in 1970. Dalby worked for fifteen years at Cambridge University Library, eventually specialising i...

  13. Interview with Iveta Kestere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Bellatalla

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Iveta Kestere is a Professor at the Faculty of Education, Psychology and Art, University of Latvia and an expert in the history of education at the Latvian Council of Science. Her current academic interest is in the research methodology for the history of education and education under dictatorship, including history of school reality and history of teaching profession. She is the author of numerous articles devoted to the history of education and the author or co-editor of nine books, among them The Visual Image of the Teacher (2012 and History of Pedagogy and Educational Sciences in the Baltic Countries from 1940 to 1990: an Overview (2013. She was a guest researcher and lecturer at the KU Leuven, Belgium. She is included in the editorial board of academic journals in Lithuania and Italy. She is a co-convenor of 17th Network (history of education at The European Conference on Educational Research (ECER and the Board member of the Baltic Association of Historians of Pedagogy.

  14. Interview with Alison Goate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goate, Alison

    2008-12-01

    Alison M Goate is the Samuel & Mae S Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry, Professor of Genetics and Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis (MO, USA). Dr Goate studied for her undergraduate degree in biochemistry at the University of Bristol (UK) and received her graduate training at Oxford University (UK). She performed postdoctoral studies with Professor Theodore Puck, Professor Louis Lim and Dr John Hardy before receiving a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to support her independent research program at St Mary's Hospital Medical School in London. In 1991, Dr Goate and colleagues reported the first mutation linked to an inherited form of Alzheimer's disease, in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene on chromosome 21. The mutation was found to be linked to inherited cases of early-onset Alzheimer's disease. In 1992, Dr Goate moved to Washington University as an Associate Professor in Genetics and Psychiatry. Dr Goate and colleagues have since identified mutations in four other genes, including two that cause Alzheimer's disease and two that cause the related dementia frontotemporal dementia. In addition to her work on dementia, Dr Goate's laboratory also studies the genetics of alcohol and nicotine dependence. Dr Goate has received numerous awards including the Potamkin Award from the American Academy of Neurology, the Zenith Award from the Alzheimer's Association, the Senior Investigator Award from the Metropolitan Life Foundation, the St Louis Academy of Science Innovation Award and the Carl and Gerty Cori Faculty Achievement Award at Washington University. Dr Goate has been a member of many scientific Review Boards and currently serves on the Editorial Boards of several journals.

  15. Psychosocial aspects of hereditary cancer (PAHC) questionnaire: development and testing of a screening questionnaire for use in clinical cancer genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijzenga, W; Bleiker, E M A; Hahn, D E E; Kluijt, I; Sidharta, G N; Gundy, C; Aaronson, N K

    2014-08-01

    Up to three-quarters of individuals who undergo cancer genetic counseling and testing report psychosocial problems specifically related to that setting. The objectives of this study were to develop and evaluate the screening properties of a questionnaire designed to assess specific psychosocial problems related to cancer genetic counseling. We adopted the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Group guidelines to develop the Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer (PAHC) questionnaire, a 26-item questionnaire organized into six problem domains: genetics, practical issues, family, living with cancer, emotions, and children. The Distress Thermometer and a question per domain on the perceived need for extra psychosocial services were included as well. We administered the questionnaire and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale to 127 counselees at the time of genetic counseling and 3 weeks after DNA test disclosure. As a gold standard to evaluate the screening properties of the questionnaire, participants underwent a semi-structured interview with an experienced social worker who assessed the presence and severity of problems per domain. A cutoff score representing responses of 'quite a bit' or 'very much' to one or more items within a given problem domain yielded moderate to high sensitivity across domains. A cutoff of 4 on the Distress Thermometer yielded high sensitivity. The questions regarding the perceived need for extra psychosocial services yielded high specificity and negative predictive values. The Psychosocial Aspects of Hereditary Cancer questionnaire in combination with the Distress Thermometer can be used as a first-line screener for psychosocial problems within the cancer genetic counseling setting. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Modified personal interviews: resurrecting reliable personal interviews for admissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Mark D; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan Mahan; Woods, Nicole N; Fechtig, Lindsey; Anderson, Geoff

    2012-10-01

    Traditional admissions personal interviews provide flexible faculty-student interactions but are plagued by low inter-interview reliability. Axelson and Kreiter (2009) retrospectively showed that multiple independent sampling (MIS) may improve reliability of personal interviews; thus, the authors incorporated MIS into the admissions process for medical students applying to the University of Toronto's Leadership Education and Development Program (LEAD). They examined the reliability and resource demands of this modified personal interview (MPI) format. In 2010-2011, LEAD candidates submitted written applications, which were used to screen for participation in the MPI process. Selected candidates completed four brief (10-12 minutes) independent MPIs each with a different interviewer. The authors blueprinted MPI questions to (i.e., aligned them with) leadership attributes, and interviewers assessed candidates' eligibility on a five-point Likert-type scale. The authors analyzed inter-interview reliability using the generalizability theory. Sixteen candidates submitted applications; 10 proceeded to the MPI stage. Reliability of the written application components was 0.75. The MPI process had overall inter-interview reliability of 0.79. Correlation between the written application and MPI scores was 0.49. A decision study showed acceptable reliability of 0.74 with only three MPIs scored using one global rating. Furthermore, a traditional admissions interview format would take 66% more time than the MPI format. The MPI format, used during the LEAD admissions process, achieved high reliability with minimal faculty resources. The MPI format's reliability and effective resource use were possible through MIS and employment of expert interviewers. MPIs may be useful for other admissions tasks.

  17. Validity of Self Completed Health Questionnaire among Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective of this study is to determine the degree of validity of self completed health questionnaire among oral surgery patient at the Capitol Dental when compared with a structured oral interview. A prospective random selection method was applied using a standardized questionnaire. The cohorts are patients attending ...

  18. Developing a patient-centered outcome measure for complementary and alternative medicine therapies II: refining content validity through cognitive interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer J; Kelly, Kimberly L; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Hopkins, Allison L; Sims, Colette M; Coons, Stephen J

    2011-12-29

    Available measures of patient-reported outcomes for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) inadequately capture the range of patient-reported treatment effects. The Self-Assessment of Change questionnaire was developed to measure multi-dimensional shifts in well-being for CAM users. With content derived from patient narratives, items were subsequently focused through interviews on a new cohort of participants. Here we present the development of the final version in which the content and format is refined through cognitive interviews. We conducted cognitive interviews across five iterations of questionnaire refinement with a culturally diverse sample of 28 CAM users. In each iteration, participant critiques were used to revise the questionnaire, which was then re-tested in subsequent rounds of cognitive interviews. Following all five iterations, transcripts of cognitive interviews were systematically coded and analyzed to examine participants' understanding of the format and content of the final questionnaire. Based on this data, we established summary descriptions and selected exemplar quotations for each word pair on the final questionnaire. The final version of the Self-Assessment of Change questionnaire (SAC) includes 16 word pairs, nine of which remained unchanged from the original draft. Participants consistently said that these stable word pairs represented opposite ends of the same domain of experience and the meanings of these terms were stable across the participant pool. Five pairs underwent revision and two word pairs were added. Four word pairs were eliminated for redundancy or because participants did not agree on the meaning of the terms. Cognitive interviews indicate that participants understood the format of the questionnaire and considered each word pair to represent opposite poles of a shared domain of experience. We have placed lay language and direct experience at the center of questionnaire revision and refinement. In so doing, we provide

  19. Mexican Parenting Questionnaire (MPQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halgunseth, Linda C.; Ispa, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study was conducted in four phases and constructed a self-report parenting instrument for use with Mexican immigrant mothers of children aged 6 to 10. The 14-item measure was based on semistructured qualitative interviews with Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 10), was refined by a focus group of Mexican immigrant mothers (N = 5), and was…

  20. Weekly Community Interviews With High-Risk Participants: Operational Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Carol A.; Mulvey, Edward P.; Lidz, Charles W.; Gardner, William P.; Skeem, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    To address several key questions in social science research, repeated interviews of individuals drawn from difficult populations are required. This article describes an approach for addressing the challenges associated with longitudinal interview studies, including locating research participants, obtaining reliable and valid interview data over…

  1. The Otitis Media-6 questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heidemann, Christian Hamilton; Godballe, Christian; Kjeldsen, Anette Drøhse

    2013-01-01

    The Otitis Media-6 questionnaire (OM-6) is the most frequently used instrument to measure health related quality of life in children with otitis media. The main objectives of this study are 1) to translate and cross-culturally adapt the OM-6 into Danish, and 2) to assess important psychometric...... properties including structural validity and interpretability of the OM-6 in a Danish population of children suffering from otitis media....

  2. Motivational interviewing for improving recovery after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Daobin; Qu, Zhanli; Huang, Jianyi; Xiao, Yousheng; Luo, Hongye; Wang, Jin

    2015-06-03

    Psychological problems are common complications following stroke that can cause stroke survivors to lack the motivation to take part in activities of daily living. Motivational interviewing provides a specific way for enhancing intrinsic motivation, which may help to improve activities of daily living for stroke survivors. To investigate the effect of motivational interviewing for improving activities of daily living after stroke. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group's Trials Register (November 2014), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1948 to March 2015), EMBASE (1980 to March 2015), CINAHL (1982 to March 2015), AMED (1985 to March 2015), PsycINFO (1806 to March 2015), PsycBITE (March 2015) and four Chinese databases. In an effort to identify further published, unpublished and ongoing trials, we searched ongoing trials registers and conference proceedings, checked reference lists, and contacted authors of relevant studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing motivational interviewing with no intervention, sham motivational interviewing or other psychological therapy for people with stroke were eligible. Two review authors independently selected studies for inclusion, extracted eligible data and assessed risk of bias. Outcome measures included activities of daily living, mood and death. One study involving a total of 411 participants, which compared motivational interviewing with usual care, met our inclusion criteria. The results of this review did not show significant differences between groups receiving motivational interviewing or usual stroke care for participants who were not dependent on others for activities of daily living, nor on the death rate after three-month and 12-month follow-up, but participants receiving motivational interviewing were more likely to have a normal mood than those who received usual care at three-months and 12-months follow-up. There is insufficient evidence to support

  3. Presenting the Prenatal Caregiving Experiences Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røhder, Katrine; Trier, Christopher Høier; Brennan, Jessica

    to the child´s attachment system. The Prenatal Caregiving Experiences Questionnaire (PCEQ) (Brennan, George, & Solomon, 2013) is the first questionnaire that directly assesses prenatal caregiving representation. This poster presentation brings together different researchers who use the instrument in ongoing...... longitudinal research projects. The poster includes a description of the development of the PCEQ questionnaire, the theoretical background, as well as preliminary data on future mothers and fathers from the WARM study....

  4. Close up on remote interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Mike

    2014-10-21

    Embrace it or shy away from it, the march of technology moves onwards relentlessly. Job interviews, often seen as the most human part of the recruitment process, are increasingly moving to video conference or services such as Skype or FaceTime, especially for a first interview.

  5. news interview talk: Organisational properties

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    informational and debate news interviews in the political sphere manifested themselves in the. South African data. ... the fact that Clayman's (1991) analysis focuses solely on a corpus of political-news interview talk. Given that an ..... through the dry seasons, a gene from an arctic fish could protect tomatoes from frost.

  6. Aikido Politics in Interview Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Phyllis Ghim Lian

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes how less powerful subjects in an unequal encounter, an admission interview in an educational institution, were able to counter the power directed at them by the more powerful subject through "aikido" strategies. In the context of the interview, harmonizing with the ideological discursive formation of the institution in question…

  7. BUSINESS ETIQUETTE IN JOB INTERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGEEVA JULIA VICTOROVNA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of job interview transcripts from the perspective of dominant communicant’s (HR manager communicative behavior. The interviewer uses various etiquette forms that facilitate a more productive dialogue and stipulate cooperative strategies and tactics in order to achieve the main goal - to determine whether the job applicant meets the requirements of the employer.

  8. Motivational Interviewing in Relational Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Responds to M. Stanton's comments on the current author's original article. One of the puzzles of motivational interviewing is why it works at all. How can it be that an individual interview or two yields change in a long-standing problem behavior even without any effort to alter social context? The time involved is such a tiny part of the…

  9. Det foto-eliciterede interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    Det foto-eliciterede interview fremkalder informationer og fortællinger ud af fotografier, og støtter børn i at ytre sig.......Det foto-eliciterede interview fremkalder informationer og fortællinger ud af fotografier, og støtter børn i at ytre sig....

  10. An Interview with Noam Chomsky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Gavin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a transcript of an interview that the author conducted with Noam Chomsky. In this interview, Chomsky talks about language acquisition and his theory of Universal Grammar. He then explains how the USA best exemplifies the individualist national culture. He also cites the challenges researchers should address in intercultural…

  11. Standardised Nordic questionnaires for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuorinka, I; Jonsson, B; Kilbom, A; Vinterberg, H; Biering-Sørensen, F; Andersson, G; Jørgensen, K

    1987-09-01

    Standardised questionnaires for the analysis of musculoskeletal symptoms in an ergonomic or occupational health context are presented. The questions are forced choice variants and may be either self-administered or used in interviews. They concentrate on symptoms most often encountered in an occupational setting. The reliability of the questionnaires has been shown to be acceptable. Specific characteristics of work strain are reflected in the frequency of responses to the questionnaires.

  12. Physical Activity Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostencka Alicja

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of the study was to determine the weekly energy expenditure measuring MET/min/week based on data collected through the Canada Fitness Survey (CFS, according to the classification used in the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ, and to verify the adopted method to assess the level of physical activity in students of physical education.

  13. Penn State Worry Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjørn, Barbara Hoff; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise; Caspersen, Ida Dyhr

    2013-01-01

    and valid assessment tools are essential to identify at-risk children. The present study investigates (i) the factor structure of the Penn State Worry Questionnaire for Children (PSWQ-C) using a large Danish community sample (N¿=¿933), and (ii) its treatment sensitivity in clinically anxious children (N...

  14. Questionnaire typography and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, M

    1975-06-01

    This article describes the typographic principles and practice which provide the basis of good design and print, the relevant printing processes which can be used, and the graphic designer's function in questionnaire production. As they impose constraints on design decisions to be discussed later in the text, the various methods of printing and production are discussed first.

  15. Motivational interviewing for substance abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedslund, Geir; Berg, Rigmor C; Hammerstrøm, Karianne T; Steiro, Asbjørn; Leiknes, Kari A; Dahl, Helene M; Karlsen, Kjetil

    2011-05-11

    There are 76.3 million people with alcohol use disorders worldwide and 15.3 million with drug use disorders. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a client-centred, semi-directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence. The intervention is used widely, and therefore it is important to find out whether it helps, harms or is ineffective. To assess the effectiveness of motivational interviewing for substance abuse on drug use, retention in treatment, readiness to change, and number of repeat convictions. We searched 18 electronic databases, 5 web sites, 4 mailing lists, and reference lists from included studies and reviews. Search dates were November 30, 2010 for Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase and PsychINFO. Randomized controlled trials with persons dependent or abusing substance. Interventions were MI or motivational enhancement therapy. The outcomes were extent of substance abuse, retention in treatment, motivation for change, repeat conviction. Three authors independently assessed studies for inclusion, and two authors extracted data. Results were categorized into (1) MI versus no-treatment control, (2) MI versus treatment as usual, (3) MI versus assessment and feedback, and (4) MI versus other active treatment. Within each category, we computed meta-analyses separately for post-intervention, short, medium and long follow-ups. We included 59 studies with a total of 13,342 participants. Compared to no treatment control MI showed a significant effect on substance use which was strongest at post-intervention SMD 0.79, (95% CI 0.48 to 1.09) and weaker at short SMD 0.17 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.26], and medium follow-up SMD 0.15 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.25]). For long follow-up, the effect was not significant SMD 0.06 (95% CI-0.16 to 0.28). There were no significant differences between MI and treatment as usual for either follow-up post-intervention, short and medium follow up. MI did better than assessment and feedback for medium

  16. Development and validation of a self-efficacy questionnaire (SE-12) measuring the clinical communication skills of health care professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axboe, Mette K; Christensen, Kaj Sparle; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2016-01-01

    instrument. We consider the questionnaire useful for self-evaluation of clinical communication skills; the SE-12 is user-friendly and can be administered as an electronic questionnaire. However, future research should explore potential needs for adjustments to reduce the identified ceiling effect.......BACKGROUND: The outcome of communication training is widely measured by self-efficacy ratings, and different questionnaires have been used. Nevertheless, none of these questionnaires have been formally validated through systematic measurement of assessment properties. Consequently, we decided...... of the theoretical approach applied in the communication course, statements from former course participants, teachers, and experts in the field. The questionnaire was initially validated through face-to-face interviews with 9 staff members following a test-retest including 195 participants. RESULTS: After minor...

  17. Simulated job interview improves skills for adults with serious mental illnesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humm, Laura Boteler; Olsen, Dale; Be, Morris; Fleming, Michael; Smith, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Adults with serious mental illnesses (e.g., Autism Spectrum Disorder [ASD], schizophrenia, post-traumatic stress disorder [PTSD]) often have difficulties obtaining employment. The Job Interview Training System with Molly Porter, developed in collaboration with Yale and Northwestern Universities and vocational rehabilitation specialists with funding from The National Institutes of Health (R43/44MH080496), allows learners to practice job interviews on computers in a stress free environment. The system includes user-driven educational materials, an interactive job application, a practice simulation with a fictional interviewer (Molly Porter), and extensive feedback. SIMmersion's PeopleSIM™ technology allows each conversation with Molly to provide a unique interview experience, enabling users to gain confidence while building skills. The on-screen coach provides insight during the conversation, and a comprehensive after-action review provides learners with feedback on the entire interview. In a randomized control trial, the system was proven effective at improving participants' interview skills and confidence. Ninety-six (96) unemployed adults with ASD (n=26), schizophrenia/other (n=37) or PTSD (n=33) were recruited. Participants were randomized into control (n=32) and experimental (n=64) conditions. The control group was "wait-listed" to receive training, and the experimental group used the training system with Molly Porter. Both groups completed pre- and post-intervention role-play interviews and self-assessment questionnaires. Analyses of covariance showed that the simulation provided a highly significant training effect, with experimental group participants scoring better in the role-play interviews and self-assessing higher than control group participants. By increasing skills and confidence, this system may ultimately reduce the length of unemployment for adults with mental illnesses.

  18. Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Fellowship Interviews: Structure and Organization of the Interview Day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haislup, Brett D; Kraeutler, Matthew J; Baweja, Rishi; McCarty, Eric C; Mulcahey, Mary K

    2017-12-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a trend toward an increasing subspecialization in orthopaedic surgery, with orthopaedic sports medicine being one of the most competitive subspecialties. Information regarding the application and interview process for sports medicine fellowships is currently lacking. To survey orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship program directors (PDs) to better define the structure of the sports medicine fellowship interview and to highlight important factors that PDs consider in selecting fellows. Cross-sectional study. A complete list of accredited programs was obtained from the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) website. An anonymous survey was distributed to fellowship PDs of all Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited orthopaedic sports medicine fellowships in the United States. The survey included 12 questions about the fellowship interview and selection process. Of the 95 orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship PDs surveyed, 38 (40%) responded. Of these, 16 (42.1%) indicated that they interview between 21 and 30 applicants per year. Eleven of the 38 fellowship programs (28.9%) have only 1 fellow per year at their respective program. Most programs (27/37, 73%) reported that between 0 and 5 faculty members interview applicants, and 29 of the 38 programs (76.3%) arrange for applicants to have ≥4 interviews during their interview day. Large group interviews are conducted at 36 of 38 (94.7%) sports medicine fellowship programs, and most programs (24/38, 63.2%) hold individual interviews that last between 5 and 15 minutes. The most important applicant criterion taken into account by PDs was the quality of the interview, with an average score of 8.68 of 10. The most significant factor taken into account by PDs when deciding how to rank applicants was the quality of the interview. Many orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs interview between 21 and 30 applicants per year

  19. Accuracy of the Smoking Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sponsiello-Wang Zheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The smoking questionnaire (SQ, a multidimensional questionnaire covering the major dimensions of cigarette smoking, was developed to address the heterogeneity in the assessment of smoking exposure. It consists of eight questions and can be completed within a few minutes. Test-retest reliability of the SQ and concurrent validity with the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS 2011 questionnaire were examined in a clinical study conducted in adult US current menthol cigarette smokers. The SQ and the BRFSS were self-administrated twice before and after randomization with a 6-day interval. The inter-temporal analyses included current smokers aged 22 to 66 years who completed the SQ at both timepoints. The percent agreement of items and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for the comparisons between the two timepoints and between the SQ and the BRFSS questionnaire. To evaluate the feasibility of the SQ and to capture subjects’ opinions about the SQ, a meta-questionnaire was administrated. High test-retest reliability levels (percent agreement of > 70 to 100% between the two timepoints were found for SQ smoking behavior items, in particular for items related to current smoking status, 100-cigarettes lifetime, regular smoking, age of initiation and preferred brand. Moderate (55% agreement to high test-retest reliability (84% agreement was found for daily consumption of manufactured cigarettes. The comparison between the SQ and the BRFSS 2011 showed a high concurrent validity (98 to 100% agreement. The SQ was completed on average in 3 to 4 min and was assessed as easy to use. The findings demonstrate that the SQ is reliable in smokers and a practical tool to assess smoking exposure in clinical studies.

  20. Interview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozes, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    Programmed for this year, the debate for the Act concerning energy transition comes at a crucial moment in Francois Hollande's five year term of office. What is in store for the programme of renewable energy development? How will France reduce its nuclear energy share? Consultant Stephane Rozes invites elected representatives and State authorities to avoid being dogmatic. (author)

  1. Interview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarauw, Laura Louise; Hollesen, Laika

    2011-01-01

    Det såkaldte humboldtske universitetsideal står i frit fald. Så det burde ikke komme som nogen overraskelse, at det demokratiske fundament slår revner. Det kommer i hvert fald ikke bag på Laura Louise Sarauw fra Københavns Universitet, der i sin ph.d.-afhandling har sat stort spørgsmålstegn ved d...

  2. Technology to Support Motivational Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Ford, Loretta C; Aldrich, Heather; Oetzel, Keri Bolton; Cook, Paul; Schmiege, Sarah; Wold, Mary

    This paper reports the findings of motivational interviewing (MI) training with and without technology support on school-based health center (SBHC) providers' satisfaction with MI training, providers' self-report of behavioral counseling related to childhood overweight/obesity, and parents' perception of care after training. The effects of training and technology on MI is part of a larger comparative effectiveness, cluster randomized trial. Twenty-four SBHCs in six states received virtual training on MI. Half the sites received HeartSmartKids™, a bilingual (English/Spanish), decision-support technology. The technology generated tailored patient education materials. Standard growth charts were plotted and health risks were highlighted to support MI counseling. The results of the MI training included provider satisfaction with MI training and parent assessment of the components of MI in their child's care. Providers and parents were surveyed at baseline, after training, and six months after training. Providers were satisfied with training and reported improvements in counseling proficiency (ptechnology group reported significant improvement in provider support for healthy eating (p=0.04). Virtual training has the potential of preparing providers to use MI to address childhood obesity. Technology improved parent support for healthy eating. Future research should evaluate the impact of technology to support MI on patient outcomes. Childhood obesity guidelines emphasize that MI should be used to promote healthy weight in children. Training providers on MI may help more providers incorporate obesity guidelines in their practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An Interview About Hunting a Black Bear

    OpenAIRE

    G.yu lha

    2009-01-01

    The respondent describes the first time he killed a black bear while hunting. The fifty one audio and nine video files in this collection include: villages’ life stories, circle-dancing songs and performance, local history, folk tales, and interviews from Siyuewu Village, Puxi Township, Rangtang County, Aba Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan Province, China. World Oral Literature Project

  4. Motivational Interviewing and the Social Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Comments on the article by Miller and Rose (September 2009). As Miller and Rose opened "the black box of treatment to examine linkages between processes of delivery and client outcomes" (p. 529) in motivational interviewing (MI), it is important that their model include factors from the social context that may explain conditions that enhance or…

  5. Building and mining web-based questionnaires and surveys with SySQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarica, Alessia; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Cannataro, Mario

    2013-09-01

    A questionnaire is a method for collecting data that can come from many sources such as observations, telephone interviews or documentary sources. Whatever the source of data is, the questionnaire provides a framework of questions that facilitate researcher's work. A manual approach for collecting data using questionnaire presents some limitations and introduces several sources of errors. A second issue regards the statistical and data mining of data that often is conducted using different tools than the questionnaire system, which may introduce errors in the analysis pipeline. For instance, common methods applied to data set concern the normality test, the association and correlation discovery, linear regression, classification and clustering. Usually this analysis is performed using external tools, often not free, such as SPSS, SAS, STATA, Weka, or Clementine.We present a web-based software system, to automatize the analysis pipeline and to support researchers involved in the collection of questionnaire data, such as in epidemiology, aiming to reduce the errors listed above and including some basic functions to conduct statistical analysis on collected data. Our system allows researchers to create questionnaires, adding sections and structured questions. It provides a preview of the questionnaire, the exportation of saved data into statistical software compatible formats, or it permits to analyze them directly applying statistical methods and common data mining techniques from the main interface.

  6. Using Concept Mapping to Enhance the Research Interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M. Kinchin BSc, MPhil, PhD, CBiol, FSB.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors report the use of concept mapping as a means of summarizing interview transcripts in the study of the information-seeking behavior of employees in an organization. Concept mapping differs from traditional methods of textual coding for interview analysis by making underlying cognitive structures transparent and giving a focus to the sets of propositions by which individuals construct meaning. Concept map structure correlates with the perceived richness of interview data. They provide quick summaries of the interview quality and may help to identify topics for further probing to elicit new information. In this study rich interviews provide complex concept map structures, whereas less successful interviews provide simpler, spoke structures. Issues in using concept maps with research interviews are discussed, including use as a retrospective interview probe, as a check on evidence saturation, as a form of data display or as a form of creative coding.

  7. Selected Interviews with Doug Lowy

    Science.gov (United States)

    In these selected interviews, Douglas R. Lowy, M.D., Deputy Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), talks with media and scientific institutions about basic science, clinical research, and the work of NCI.

  8. Interview with Martha C. Nussbaum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizia Abbate

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Here's the interview granted by Martha Nussbaum to Fabrizia Abbate about the role of preference in social dynamics. How important are aesthetic preferences in the development of moral attitudes and choices ?

  9. Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Ane; Bentsen, Peter; Hindhede, Anette Lykke

    . An example is to use the BMI-curve as a tool to inform about the overweight, and to use it with the spirit of motivational interviewing for evoking the child’s own concern, as illustrated in the following quote: “I show the BMI-curve and the dot where the child is placed on the curve. The goal is to make......Title: Motivational Interviewing by School Nurses: Spirit, Techniques, and Dilemmas in the Prevention of Child Obesity Introduction : School nurses play a central role in school-based, preventive health services in Denmark (National Board of Health, 2011), and they may play an important role...... a prevention strategy targeting children with a high risk of obesity with an intervention conducted by school nurses using motivational interviewing.Motivational interviewing is a counselling method to bring about behavioural change (Miller and Rollnick 1995). Effect has been documented for a range of problem...

  10. An Interview with Zvi Griliches

    OpenAIRE

    Alan B. Krueger; Timothy Taylor

    2000-01-01

    Alan Krueger and Timothy Taylor interviewed Zvi Griliches, Paul M. Warburg Professor of Economics at Harvard University, at his home near the Harvard campus on June 21, 1999. The interview touches on his harrowing journey from Lithuania to Chicago; years at the University of Chicago; the move to Harvard University; work on diffusion and technology and on returns to education; thoughts on the data infrastructure; government service and economic research; and hobbies.

  11. Professionalism in intercultural job interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Iben

    2005-01-01

    The article is a slightly revised manuscript from my keynote speech at the NIC conference 2003 in Göteborg, Sweden. The aim of the speech was to put forward research towards a critical intercultural multiperspectivism in order to understand professional intercultural communication in multicultura...... societies. This is discussed in relation to a case, a job interview with an untrained Danish interviewer and a Chinese candidate....

  12. STS-93: Crew Interview - Cady Coleman

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Catherine G. Coleman is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Coleman wanted to be an astronaut, why she wanted to become a chemist, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) will influence little girls. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and her responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Coleman mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deploy Chandra, and the design configuration of Chandra that will allow for the transfer of information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) experiment, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  13. STS-99 Crew Interviews: Kevin R. Kregel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Commander Kevin R. Kregel is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Kregel became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, his career path through the Air Force and later the Navy, and then finally, his selection by NASA as an astronaut. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the purpose for the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), with specific focus placed on why this SRTM flight is important, and what we will learn from the 3D topographic map of the Earth. The two antennas that will be taking the pictures, the involvement of the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA), EARTHCAM, a student-controlled camera on the Endeavour Orbiter, and Kregel's responsibility during this 24 hour mission are also discussed.

  14. STS-101 Crew Interview / Scott Horowitz

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Pilot Scott J. Horowitz is seen. The interview addresses many different questions including why Horowitz became an astronaut, the events that led to his interest, any role models that he had, and his inspiration. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the reaction and reasons for the splitting-up of the objectives for STS-101 with STS-106. Horowitz also mentions the scheduled space-walk, docking with the International Space Station (ISS), the new glass cockpit of Atlantis, the repairs of equipment and change of the batteries. Horowitz also discusses his responsibilities during the space-walk, and docking of the spacecraft. He stresses that he will have an added challenge during the space-walk, his inability to see where he needs to place the Extravehicular Activities (EVA) crew.

  15. [Health behavior change: motivational interviewing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pócs, Dávid; Hamvai, Csaba; Kelemen, Oguz

    2017-08-01

    Public health data show that early mortality in Hungary could be prevented by smoking cessation, reduced alcohol consumption, regular exercise, healthy diet and increased adherence. Doctor-patient encounters often highlight these aspects of health behavior. There is evidence that health behavior change is driven by internal motivation rather than external influence. This finding has led to the concept of motivational interview, which is a person-centered, goal-oriented approach to counselling. The doctor asks targeted questions to elicit the patient's motivations, strengths, internal resources, and to focus the interview around these. The quality and quantity of the patient's change talk is related to better outcomes. In addition, the interview allows the patient to express ambivalent feelings and doubts about the change. The doctor should use various communication strategies to resolve this ambivalence. Furthermore, establishing a good doctor-patient relationship is the cornerstone of the motivational interview. An optimal relationship can evoke change talk and reduce the patient's resistance, which can also result in a better outcome. The goal of the motivational interview is to focus on the 'why' to change health behavior rather than the 'how', and to utilize internal motivation instead of persuasion. This is the reason why motivational interview has become a widely-accepted evidence based approach. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(34): 1331-1337.

  16. The development of indonesian online game addiction questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jap, Tjibeng; Tiatri, Sri; Jaya, Edo Sebastian; Suteja, Mekar Sari

    2013-01-01

    Online game is an increasingly popular source of entertainment for all ages, with relatively prevalent negative consequences. Addiction is a problem that has received much attention. This research aims to develop a measure of online game addiction for Indonesian children and adolescents. The Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire draws from earlier theories and research on the internet and game addiction. Its construction is further enriched by including findings from qualitative interviews and field observation to ensure appropriate expression of the items. The measure consists of 7 items with a 5-point Likert Scale. It is validated by testing 1,477 Indonesian junior and senior high school students from several schools in Manado, Medan, Pontianak, and Yogyakarta. The validation evidence is shown by item-total correlation and criterion validity. The Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire has good item-total correlation (ranging from 0.29 to 0.55) and acceptable reliability (α = 0.73). It is also moderately correlated with the participant's longest time record to play online games (r = 0.39; ponline games (ρ = 0.43; ponline games (ρ = 0.41; ponline games (ρ = 0.30; ponline game addiction, and the score of 22 and above may indicate online game addiction. Overall, the result shows that Indonesian Online Game Addiction Questionnaire has sufficient psychometric property for research use, as well as limited clinical application.

  17. Third-person Diagnostic Interview on the Cognitive Insight Level of Psychotic Patients with an Insight at the Denial Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Mahsa; Rezaei, Omid

    2016-01-01

    According to the previous findings, the third-person technique improved the clinical insight of psychotic patients, therefore the present study aims to examine the effect of a third-person interview compared to a first-person interview on the level of cognitive insight of psychotic patients with an insight at the denial level. In this study, using interviews and questionnaires, a total number of 44 patients of Razi Psychiatric Educational and Treatment Center with an insight at the denial level being assessed using diagnostic interviews were divided randomly into two groups. Then, the two groups of patients' cognitive insights were evaluated using Beck Cognitive Insight Scale. The findings indicated that in psychotic patients with an insight at the denial level, the third-person technique of interview compared to the first-person had little effect on the improvement of overall cognitive insight and its components, including self-reflection and self-assurance; however, this effect was not strong enough to make a significant difference between the two groups of patients. According to the study findings, we can conclude that the third-person interview compared to the first-person interview has no effect on the improvement of the cognitive insight of psychotic patients with an insight at the denial level. This finding is consistent with the previous studies indicating that although the theory of mind has some correlations with the clinical insight of patients, it has no effect on their cognitive insight.

  18. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, Danny H.; Elwood, Robert H. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC and A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC and A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC and A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC and A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC and A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC and A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A

  19. Development of an Elderly Low Vision Quality of Life Questionnaire for less-developed areas of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoman; Chen, Jie; Xu, Gengui; Zhong, Yin; Jang, Longfei; Lin, Li; Lu, Fan

    2015-10-01

    To develop a quality of life questionnaire appropriate for elderly low-vision patients in less-developed areas of China. The study was conducted at the Wenzhou Medical University Affiliated Eye Hospital. In the initial development of the questionnaire, we identified visual function concerns with individual interviews and designed a questionnaire and an empirical assessment of the questionnaire. Each individual visual function concern was then transformed into a question and put into a rating scale from 0 to 4. Then, questionnaire interviews were conducted on 188 low-vision patients and 63 normal control patients for item reduction and evaluation of psychometric properties. We first identified 24 concerns that older adults with serious vision loss thought most affected their daily lives. The initial item list of the Elderly Low Vision Quality of Life Questionnaire (ELVQoL) consisted of 28 items, including the 24 identified items and 4 additional concerns about general vision. Psychometric item reduction removed 9 items, and a 19-item questionnaire was generated. Assessment showed that the resulting questionnaire had acceptable internal consistency, reliability, and validity (Cronbach's α > 0.9, mean item-total correlations >0.6, test-retest reliability >0.9, and concurrent validity range from 0.6 to 0.9). Low education level, need for a full range of working distances, and retinal diseases were all predictors of reduced visually related quality of life. A patient-derived ELVQoL Questionnaire was developed specifically for elderly, uneducated, rural Chinese. All the psychometric properties met accepted levels for a disease-specific Qol Questionnaire.

  20. A systematic review and comparison of questionnaires in the management of spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis and the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, B; Stothers, L; Macnab, A; Lazare, D; Nigro, M

    2016-03-01

    Validated questionnaires are increasingly the preferred method used to obtain historical information. Specialized questionnaires exist validated for patients with neurogenic disease including neurogenic bladder. Those currently available are systematically reviewed and their potential for clinical and research use are described. A systematic search via Medline and PubMed using the key terms questionnaire(s) crossed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) for the years 1946 to January 22, 2014 inclusive. Additional articles were selected from review of references in the publications identified. Only peer reviewed articles published in English were included. 18 questionnaires exist validated for patients with neurogenic bladder; 14 related to MS, 3 for SCI, and 1 for neurogenic bladder in general; with 4 cross-validated in both MS and SCI. All 18 are validated for both male and female patients; 59% are available only in English. The domains of psychological impact and physical function are represented in 71% and 76% of questionnaires, respectively. None for the female population included elements to measure symptoms of prolapse. The last decade has seen an expansion of validated questionnaires to document bladder symptoms in neurogenic disease. Disease specific instruments are available for incorporation into the clinical setting for MS and SCI patients with neurogenic bladder. The availability of caregiver and interview options enhances suitability in clinical practice as they can be adapted to various extents of disability. Future developments should include expanded language validation to the top 10 global languages reported by the World Health Organization. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Motivational interviewing in inflammatory bowel disease patients: a useful tool for outpatient counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocciaro, Filippo; Di Mitri, Roberto; Russo, Giuseppina; Leone, Salvo; Quercia, Valerio

    2014-10-01

    Most inflammatory bowel disease patients miss follow-up visits and are non-adherent to therapy due to the lack of an engaging patient-physician relationship. Motivational interviewing is a patient-centred counselling method used to elicit/strengthen motivation towards change. The aim of this study was to assess the role of motivational interviewing in patients affected by inflammatory bowel disease. The study included consecutive patients with inflammatory bowel disease presenting for the first consultation (June 2012-February 2013). All consultations were carried out applying the motivational interviewing approach. After each consultation, patients filled out a questionnaire asking demographic data, and their past and current experience. Overall, 23 males (51.1%) and 22 females (48.9%), mean age 36.1±15.2 years, were enrolled. Before and after experiencing the motivational interviewing approach (mean visit duration 41.5±8.7min) "overall satisfaction rate", "physician's communication skills", and "perceived empathy" were 60% vs 100%, 40% vs 95.6%, and 40% vs 100%, respectively. Satisfaction was lower in patients affected by indeterminate colitis (p=0.004), and of younger age (p=0.02). The motivational interview approach is appreciated by inflammatory bowel disease patients. Despite being time-consuming, the motivational interview appears considerably worthwhile at the first visit and in younger patients. Motivational interviewing can help physicians to deal with their patients, moving from "cure" to "care". Copyright © 2014 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. What does the multiple mini interview have to offer over the panel interview?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Pau

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper compares the panel interview (PI performance with the multiple mini interview (MMI performance and indication of behavioural concerns of a sample of medical school applicants. The acceptability of the MMI was also assessed. Materials and methods: All applicants shortlisted for a PI were invited to an MMI. Applicants attended a 30-min PI with two faculty interviewers followed by an MMI consisting of ten 8-min stations. Applicants were assessed on their performance at each MMI station by one faculty. The interviewer also indicated if they perceived the applicant to be a concern. Finally, applicants completed an acceptability questionnaire. Results: From the analysis of 133 (75.1% completed MMI scoresheets, the MMI scores correlated statistically significantly with the PI scores (r=0.438, p=0.001. Both were not statistically associated with sex, age, race, or pre-university academic ability to any significance. Applicants assessed as a concern at two or more stations performed statistically significantly less well at the MMI when compared with those who were assessed as a concern at one station or none at all. However, there was no association with PI performance. Acceptability scores were generally high, and comparison of mean scores for each of the acceptability questionnaire items did not show statistically significant differences between sex and race categories. Conclusions: Although PI and MMI performances are correlated, the MMI may have the added advantage of more objectively generating multiple impressions of the applicant's interpersonal skill, thoughtfulness, and general demeanour. Results of the present study indicated that the MMI is acceptable in a multicultural context.

  3. QUESTIONNAIRE 5YR 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    CERN must remain the centre of excellence that it has been for the last sixty years. Therefore, the Organization must continue to be able to attract, motivate and retain the best specialists coming from all the Member States. This is why, every five years, on the occasion of a five-yearly review, our employment conditions are compared with bodies having similar activities.In order to prepare the next five-yearly review, the topics of which will be decided by the CERN Council in June 2014, the Staff Association has drawn up a questionnaire that gives you the opportunity to tell us what you think about your current employment conditions. You can also indicate how you wish to see them evolve, and to help you we present some proposals for improvement on which you can give your opinion. Above all, do not hesitate, by using the comments’ fields available in the questionnaire, to formulate your own suggestions in all areas of your conditions of employment that are of interest to you. Your replies will hel...

  4. Development of the Fogg Intent-to-Screen for HIV (ITS HIV) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Catherine J; Mawn, Barbara Ellen; Porell, Frank

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, we describe the development and psychometric properties of the Fogg Intent-to-Screen for HIV questionnaire (ITS HIV), which measures peoples' beliefs and intentions toward HIV screening. The ITS HIV was developed using the Theory of Planned Behavior as the framework for a developmental process that included qualitative interviews, a validation phase, two pilot tests, and a field test of the final 55-item questionnaire. The field test involved 312 homeless persons from five New England states. Cronbach alphas of the direct measures scales ranged from .72 to .90. Findings from a path analysis verified the construct validity. The psychometric estimates from these analyses suggest the ITS HIV questionnaire is appropriate for use in clinical practice or to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Motivational Interviewing and Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Stéphanie; Menon, Usha; Szalacha, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Objective This article focuses on design, training, and delivery of MI in a longitudinal randomized controlled trial intended to assess the efficacy of two separate interventions designed to increase colorectal screening when compared to a usual care, control group. One intervention was a single-session, telephone-based motivational interview (MI), created to increase colorectal cancer screening within primary care populations. The other was tailored health counseling. We present the rationale, design, and process discussions of the one-time motivational interview telephone intervention. We discuss in this paper the training and supervision of study interventionists, in order to enhance practice and research knowledge concerned with fidelity issues in motivational interview interventions. Methods To improve motivational interview proficiency and effectiveness, we developed a prescribed training program adapting MI to a telephone counseling session. Results The four interventionists trained in MI demonstrate some MI proficiency assessed by the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Scale. In the post-intervention interview, 20.5% of the MI participants reported having had a CRC screening test, and another 19.75% (n = 16) had scheduled a screening test. Almost half of the participants (43%) indicated that the phone conversation helped them to overcome the reasons why they had not had a screening test. Conclusions Ongoing supervision and training (post MI workshop) are crucial to supporting MI fidelity. The trajectory of learning MI demonstrated by the interventionists is consistent with the eight stages of learning MI. The MI roadmap created for the interventionists has shown to be more of a distraction than a facilitator in the delivery of the telephone intervention. MI can, however, be considered a useful tool for health education and warrants further study. Practice Implications MI training should include consistent training and process evaluation. MI can

  6. Induction interview form in EDH

    CERN Multimedia

    Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group

    2007-01-01

    As part of the efforts to rationalise administrative procedures, the IT and HR Departments have developed a new EDH form for induction interviews, which can be accessed using the link below. In accordance with Administrative Circular No. 2 ('Recruitment, Appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of Staff Members', Rev. 3), the work and training objectives to be achieved during the probation period shall be specified in writing to all new staff members during an induction interview. The interview shall take place between the new staff member and his supervisor within six weeks of his taking up his duties at the latest. https://edh.cern.ch/Document/MAPS/Induction1) (or from the EDH desktop, by clicking on 'Other Tasks' and going to the 'HR & Training' heading) Please note that this form is to be used exclusively for new staff members. A separate EDH form will be developed for fellows.Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group Human Re...

  7. Podcast - Interview with Anna Sfard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    During the 14th - 17th of November PhD Students and researchers from e-learning lab attended a PhD course called "Perspectives on Identity in Learning and Education Research". This course was co-organised by three local doctoral schools; The International Doctoral school of Technology and Science......, The Doctoral School of Human Centered Informatics (HCI) and The Doctoral school of Education, Learning and Philosophy. During the course Thomas Ryberg had the opportunity to interview the invited guest speakers about their views on the notion of identity within learning and educational research. The first...... interview was with Anna Sfard who at present holds a joint appointment in Michigan State University in US (as Lappan-Phillips-Fitzgerald Professor of Mathematics Education) and in the University of Haifa, Israel. During the interview Anna talks about her research on identity and two metaphors on learning...

  8. Induction interview form in EDH

    CERN Multimedia

    Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group,

    2007-01-01

    As part of the efforts to rationalise administrative procedures, the IT and HR Departments have developed a new EDH form for induction interviews, which can be accessed using the link below. In accordance with Administrative Circular No. 2 ('Recruitment, Appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of Staff Members', Rev. 3), the work and training objectives to be achieved during the probation period shall be specified in writing to all new staff members during an induction interview. The interview shall take place between the new staff member and his supervisor within six weeks of him taking up his duties at the latest. https://edh.cern.ch/Document/MAPS/Induction (or from the EDH desktop, by clicking on 'Other Tasks' and going to the 'HR & Training' heading) Please note that this form is to be used exclusively for new staff members. A separate EDH form will be developed for fellows. Information technology Department, AIS (Administrative Information Services) Group Human...

  9. Dental Hygienist Students’ Learning About Motivational Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Christin Johansson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate whether dental hygienist students through peer-learning can increase their ability to conduct motivational interviewing (MI compared with students who follow the regular curriculum. The aim was also to get an insight into the process of learning of MI. Materials and Methods: Ten dental hygienist students were randomly selected to either the intervention group (IG or the control group (CG. Students in the IG performed two MI sessions, which were discussed in a peer group and with a tutor. Thereafter the students performed the third MI sessions, which was evaluated by “Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Code, Version 3.1”. The CG consisted of five students who followed the regular curriculum in the education and they conducted one MI session. A questionnaire was used to study how students reflected before and after these MI sessions. The analysis was performed by using descriptive statistics and for the comparison between groups the Mann-Whitney test was used. Results: The students in the IG used significantly more, simple and complex reflections (p < 0.05 compared to the CG. The IG gave also significantly less information during the counseling, and thereby asked more open-ended questions than the CG (p < 0.05. Both groups planned their MI sessions carefully by preparing questions before they met the patients. Conclusion: Dental hygienist students in the present study increased their skills in motivational interviewing by peer-learning from other students and from a tutor, compared to a control group.

  10. Development of a Saudi Food Frequency Questionnaire and testing its reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosadi, Ibrahim M; Alatar, Abdullah A; Otayf, Mojahed M; AlJahani, Dhaherah M; Ghabbani, Hisham M; AlRajban, Waleed A; Alrsheed, Abdullah M; Al-Nasser, Khalid A

    2017-06-01

    To create a food frequency questionnaire specifically designed to capture the dietary habits of Saudis and test its validity and reliability. Methods: This investigation is a longitudinal, test-retest study conducted in King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between December 2015 and March 2016. A list of 140 food items was included in the questionnaire where a closed-ended and open-ended approach was used. Regarding past   year food frequency consumption and 24 hours dietary recall, body weight and height were collected. Internal consistency, test-retest reliability, completeness of the food list, and criterion validity were assessed. Results: One-hundred and thirty eight participants were interviewed to complete the 24 hours dietary recall and the constructed questionnaire. Approximately 85% of the food items reported in the dietary recall were covered in the food frequency questionnaire. The association of body mass index with meats (regression coefficients: 2.28) and dairy products consumption frequency was statistically significant (regression coefficients: 2.31). A high overall reproducibility rate of the questionnaire was detected (Pearsons' correlation coefficient: 0.78 p less than 0.001).  Conclusion: The developed questionnaire has a high reliability and reasonable validity, and suitable for use in nutritional epidemiological investigations in Saudi Arabia.

  11. An Interview with Lance Olsen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Segal

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With over twenty books to his name, as editor or author, Lance Olsen is a cultural force unto himself. His latest book with Trevor Dodge, Architectures of Possibility (Raw Dog Screaming Press, is a writer's guide against transparent language, and predictable patterned literary convention. In this interview Olsen discusses radical pedagogy and experimental narrative theory and its practice.

  12. Job Interviews: Keys for Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donald S.; Catt, Stephen E.; Slocombe, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Many students seem disinterested in learning to handle employment interviews effectively. This article discusses students' motivation to become skilled interviewees and steps educators and counselors can take to increase students' interest in this crucial career activity. The article also discusses mistakes students frequently make during…

  13. An Interview with Howard Gardner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschenbaum, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    This interview with Howard Gardner, author of such books as "The Theory of Multiple Intelligences" and professor of education, addresses such concerns as the nature of cognitive science; parenting; the importance of human relationships in education; the meaning of "intelligence,""talent,""and giftedness";…

  14. Ian Stevenson: An Omega Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Presents interview with Professor of Psychiatry and Director, Division of Personality Studies, in Department of Psychiatric Medicine at University of Virginia (Charlottesville). Discusses one controversial topic in area of death studies, cases suggestive of reincarnation. Describes first case he investigated, method of inquiry used to investigate…

  15. Interviews with Selectively Mute Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omdal, Heidi; Galloway, David

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of selective mutism usually takes place in a clinic, where the child often refuses to speak to the therapist. The challenge when trying to understand the child's own perspective is to find a medium for communication. Three selectively mute children were interviewed using Raven's Controlled Projection for Children (RCPC). The…

  16. Primary Science Interview: Science Sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    In this "Primary Science" interview, Lynne Bianchi talks with Emma Vanstone about "Science Sparks," which is a website full of creative, fun, and exciting science activity ideas for children of primary-school age. "Science Sparks" started with the aim of inspiring more parents to do science at home with their…

  17. A comprehensive Fabry-related pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üçeyler, Nurcan; Magg, Barbara; Thomas, Phillip; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Pain may be the earliest symptom in Fabry disease and presents with a distinct phenotype including triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and chronic pain. Current pain questionnaires do not reflect the special phenotype of Fabry disease-associated pain, which hampers its systematic evaluation as the basis of correct diagnosis and effective treatment. A questionnaire specifically designed to assess Fabry disease-associated pain is thus urgently needed. At the Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Therapy (FAZIT), Germany, we developed and validated the first face-to-face Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. The initial version of the FPQ was tested in a pilot study with 20 consecutive Fabry disease patients. The performance of the revised FPQ was assessed in a first (n=56) and second (n=20) validation phase in consecutive Fabry disease patients. For this, patients were interviewed at baseline and 2 weeks later. We determined the test-retest reliability and validity of the FPQ in comparison to data obtained with the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the 4 pain phenotypes of Fabry disease (pain attacks, pain crises, evoked pain, chronic pain) in childhood and adulthood, on pain development during life with and without enzyme replacement therapy, and on everyday life impairment due to pain. This first disease-specific questionnaire is a valuable tool for baseline and follow-up assessment of pain in Fabry disease patients and may guide treatment in this distinct pain phenotype. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Motivational interviewing with hazardous drinkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Nancy

    2007-02-01

    To test the effectiveness of motivational interviewing in a population of hazardous drinkers utilizing community health care centers in rural southeastern Idaho. This study targeted rural people at risk for alcohol dependence utilizing low-income community health care centers in rural southeastern Idaho. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) was used to screen interested clients' alcohol use. Clients achieving an AUDIT score indicating hazardous alcohol use were recruited into the study and randomized into a control or treatment group. Twenty-six hazardous drinkers attending five low-income community health centers participated in the study. The experimental group participated in one motivational interviewing session with the investigator, a family nurse practitioner (NP). The comparison group received no treatment. Alcohol use was tracked for 6 weeks after successful recruitment into the program. Participants in the study significantly decreased their average number of drinks per day. At time 1 (pretreatment), the control group drank 4.37 drinks per day and the treatment group drank 4.65 drinks per day. At time 2 (posttest), the control group drank 3.77 drinks per day and the treatment group drank 1.95 drinks per day. The effects of the motivational interviewing treatment on hazardous drinking also were measured by serum gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), a liver function test. There was also a significant decrease in the GGT from pretest to posttest in the treatment group. The results of this investigation found that motivational interviewing shows promise as an effective intervention for hazardous drinkers attending low-income community clinics. Although other possible explanations could be postulated for the positive changes in sample participants, the data indicate that the motivational interviewing approach was responsible for a significant portion of the positive changes within the current sample. The information collected from the study adds

  19. Interview techniques for UX practitioners a user-centered design method

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Chauncey

    2014-01-01

    Much of the work of user-centered design practitioners involves some type of interviewing. While interviewing is an important skill, many colleagues have little or no formal training in interviewing methods and often learn on the job with limited feedback on the quality of their interviews. This book teaches readers about the three basic interview methods: structured interviews, semi-structured interviews, and unstructured interviews. The author discusses the various strengths, weaknesses, issues with each type of interview, and includes best practices and procedures for conducing effective

  20. Expressions of shame in investigative interviews with Australian Aboriginal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Gemma; Brubacher, Sonja P; Powell, Martine B

    2016-01-01

    This study inspected a sample of 70 interview transcripts with Australian Aboriginal children to gain a sense of how frequently verbal shame responses were occurring in investigative interviews regarding alleged sexual abuse. Transcripts were examined to determine how children articulated shame, how interviewers reacted to these responses, and how shame related to children's accounts. Examination of frequencies revealed that verbal shame responses occurred in just over one-quarter of the interviews. One-way analyses of variance indicated that children who expressed shame within the interview spoke the same amount as children who did not express shame, however, they required more interviewer prompts before a disclosure was made. Interviews where children expressed shame also included a greater number of interviewer reminders compared to interviews without shame responses. Results emphasize the importance of interviewer awareness of shame, and also point to the value of reassurance, patience, and persistence with non-leading narrative prompting when interviewing children who express shame during discussions of sexual abuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. An interview with Angela Nieto. Interviewed by Eva Amsen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Angela

    2012-04-01

    Angela Nieto is Full Professor at the Instituto de Neurociencias (CSIC-UMH) in Alicante, Spain, and Head of the institute's Developmental Neurobiology Unit. She is also the current president of the Spanish Society for Developmental Biology (Sociedad Española de Biología del Desarollo, SEBD). We interviewed her to talk about the plans of the SEBD for the coming years.

  2. Transcript of Interview: Mark K. Craig

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, Howard E.

    1992-01-01

    This document is a transcript of an interview given by Howard E. McCurdy to Mark K. Craig. Craig gives details on his background including information on his family, education, and career path, his reaction to the news that America was planning to put a man on the Moon, why he thinks we should go to Mars, and the political speeches made at the time of early human space exploration planning.

  3. Impact of Motivational Interviewing on Medication Adherence in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwaal, Faith Marie

    2015-01-01

    This literature review addresses the question of whether motivational interviewing (MI) is effective at improving medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia. The databases PsycINFO, OVID Medline, and PubMed were searched using the keywords "schizophrenia," "medication adherence," and one of the following: "motivational interviewing," "adherence therapy," or "compliance therapy." Relevant studies from the last ten years were included, resulting in six studies being included in this literature review. One study presented evidence for a direct relationship between motivational interviewing and medication adherence. Most studies did not support this relationship. Some studies found evidence for a relationship between motivational interviewing and other outcomes such as improved psychotic symptoms and decreased re-hospitalization rates. Motivational interviewing may be beneficial for some patients with schizophrenia but should not be considered a first line therapy. Clinicians not already using motivational interviewing in providing care to their patients with schizophrenia should not implement it for this population.

  4. Challenges in accessing and interviewing participants with severe mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Daniel; O'Reilly, Pauline; Lee, Siew Hwa; Kennedy, Catriona

    2017-06-22

    Background Interviews are widely used in qualitative research to collect data. However, little has been written about interviewing people with severe mental illness (SMI). Aim To report and analyse an experience of addressing the ethical and practical challenges of interviewing people with SMI. Discussion Semi-structured interviews were conducted as part of a doctoral study to explore how service users and healthcare professionals built relationships with each other. Conclusion Although interviewing participants with SMI was challenging, rich data illustrating their experiences were gathered. Careful planning around ethical considerations, such as obtaining informed consent, was required to maximise the opportunities to gather in-depth information during the interviews. The relationship established between researcher and the participants assisted with sensitive disclosures and allowed participants to tell their stories. Implications for research This paper provides strategies to help guide researchers planning interviews with vulnerable populations, including those with SMI. These strategies include how to discuss sensitive issues and promote engagement. Listening to participants' life stories is an intense experience, requiring support for the interviewer to stay neutral during interviews. It is also important to be aware of the differences between the roles of nurse and nurse researcher before undertaking in-depth qualitative interviews, particularly with vulnerable participants.

  5. Orthopedic Surgery Applicants: What They Want in an Interview and How They Are Influenced by Post-Interview Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Christopher L; Sousa, Paul L; Hanssen, Arlen D; Karam, Matthew D; Haidukewych, George J; Oakes, Daniel A; Turner, Norman S

    2016-01-01

    Common strategies for orthopedic residency programs to attract competitive applicants include optimizing the interview day and contacting favorably ranked applicants postinterview. The purpose of this work was to determine (1) applicants' perspectives on the ideal interview day, (2) how frequently applicants are contacted postinterview, and (3) the influence of this contact on rank order lists (ROL). Prospective Comparative Survey Mayo Clinic Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rochester, MN, USA PARTICIPANTS: A survey was completed by 312 successfully matched orthopedic surgery residency applicants following the 2015 match regarding their views of the ideal interview day, components they valued most, post-interview contact, and how that contact influenced their ROL. Applicants stated they preferred interviews that lasted 15 (55%) minutes, a mean of 1.7 (range: 1-5) interviewers present per interview, 5 total interviews (range: 1-10) in a day, an interview with residents (96%), and interviews days lasting only a half day (88%). The majority (94%) desire a social event attended by only residents (54%) or staff and residents (46%). Few wanted an assessment of surgical skills (36%) or orthopedic knowledge (23%). The interview day was rated very valuable in determining their ROL (4.4 out of 5.0). Applicants told a mean of 1.7 (range: 0-11) programs they were "ranking the program highly" and 0.8 (range: 0-5) programs they were "going to rank them #1." Of the 116 (40%) applicants contacted by programs following interviews, 24 (21%) moved programs higher and 3 (3%) moved programs lower on their ROL. Orthopedic Surgery applicants have clear preferences for what they consider to be the ideal interview day and many alter their ROL following post-interview contact. These data may be beneficial to programs looking to optimize the interview experience for applicants. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Equal Opportunities Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The initiative to promote Equal Opportunities at CERN started in 1993. The first Equal Opportunities Officer was appointed in 1996 followed by the creation of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel in 1998. Initially the concern was mainly the fair treatment of women in the work-place. Today the emphasis has evolved to ensuring that diversity is used to increase creativity and productivity in the work-place. In order to ensure that all aspects of Equal Opportunities and Diversity are covered, CERN’s Equal Opportunities team has prepared a survey to obtain your input. Your answers are confidential and will only be used for generating statistics. The questionnaire is on-line and can be accessed via: https://espace.cern.ch/EOQ. We hope that you will take a few minutes of your time to give your input and would be grateful if you could reply before 15/10/07. For further information about Equal Opportunities at CERN see: http://cern.ch/equal-opportunities The Equal Opportuni...

  7. Equal Opportunities Questionnaire

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The initiative to promote Equal Opportunities at CERN started in 1993. The first Equal Opportunities Officer was appointed in 1996, which was followed by the creation of the Equal Opportunities Advisory Panel in 1998. Initially the concern was mainly the fair treatment of women in the work-place. Today the emphasis has evolved to ensuring that diversity is used to increase creativity and productivity in the work-place. In order to ensure that all aspects of Equal Opportunities and Diversity are covered, CERN’s Equal Opportunities team has prepared a survey to obtain your input. Your answers are confidential and will only be used for generating statistics. The questionnaire is on-line and can be accessed via: https://espace.cern.ch/EOQ. We hope that you will take a few minutes of your time to give your input and would be grateful if you could reply before 15/10/07. For further information about Equal Opportunities at CERN see: http://cern.ch/equal-opportunities The Equa...

  8. Validation of the self-completed Cambridge-Hopkins questionnaire (CH-RLSq) for ascertainment of restless legs syndrome (RLS) in a population survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard P; Burchell, Brendan J; MacDonald, Ben; Hening, Wayne A; Earley, Christopher J

    2009-12-01

    Epidemiological studies of restless legs syndrome (RLS) have been limited by lack of a well validated patient-completed diagnostic questionnaire that has a high enough specificity to provide a reasonable positive predictive value. Most of the currently used patient completed diagnostic questionnaires have neither been validated nor included items facilitating the differential diagnosis of RLS from conditions producing similar symptoms. The Cambridge-Hopkins diagnostic questionnaire for RLS (CH-RLSq) was developed with several iterations to include items covering the basic diagnostic features of RLS and to provide some basic differential diagnosis. This validation study sought to determine the sensitivity and specificity of the RLS diagnosis based on this questionnaire. The CH-RLSq was completed by 2005 blood donors who were asked to consent to being contacted for a telephone diagnostic interview. A scoring criterion was established for ascertainment of RLS based on the clinical definition of the disorder and the exclusion of "mimic" conditions. A weighted sample (N=185) of all completed questionnaires was selected for expert clinical diagnosis of RLS using the validated Hopkins Telephone Diagnostic Interview (HDTI). The telephone interviewers were blinded to all questionnaire responses. A telephone diagnosis was obtained on 183 of the sample's 185 questionnaires. The questionnaire's normalized sensitivity and specificity were 87.2% and 94.4%, respectively, for RLS compared to not RLS. The positive predictive values in this sample were 85.5%. The Cambridge-Hopkins RLS questionnaire provides a reasonable level of sensitivity and specificity for ascertainment of RLS in population-based studies.

  9. Development of the young spine questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Hestbæk, Lise

    2013-01-01

    primarily been on the working age population, and therefore specific questionnaires to measure spinal pain and its consequences, specifically aimed at children and adolescents are absent. The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire for schoolchildren filling this gap. Methods The Young Spine...... Questionnaire (YSQ) was developed in three phases -- a conceptualisation, development and testing phase. The conceptualisation phase followed the Wilson and Cleary model and included questions regarding spinal prevalence estimates, pain frequency and intensity, activity restrictions, care seeking behaviour...... and influence of parental back trouble. Items from existing questionnaires and the "Revised Faces Pain Scale" (rFPS) were included during the development phase. The testing phase consisted of a mixed quantitative and qualitative iterative method carried out in two pilot tests using 4th grade children...

  10. The Cornella Health Interview Survey Follow-Up (CHIS.FU Study: design, methods, and response rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perez Gloria

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this report is to describe the main characteristics of the design, including response rates, of the Cornella Health Interview Survey Follow-up Study. Methods The original cohort consisted of 2,500 subjects (1,263 women and 1,237 men interviewed as part of the 1994 Cornella Health Interview Study. A record linkage to update the address and vital status of the cohort members was carried out using, first a deterministic method, and secondly a probabilistic one, based on each subject's first name and surnames. Subsequently, we attempted to locate the cohort members to conduct the phone follow-up interviews. A pilot study was carried out to test the overall feasibility and to modify some procedures before the field work began. Results After record linkage, 2,468 (98.7% subjects were successfully traced. Of these, 91 (3.6% were deceased, 259 (10.3% had moved to other towns, and 50 (2.0% had neither renewed their last municipal census documents nor declared having moved. After using different strategies to track and to retain cohort members, we traced 92% of the CHIS participants. From them, 1,605 subjects answered the follow-up questionnaire. Conclusion The computerized record linkage maximized the success of the follow-up that was carried out 7 years after the baseline interview. The pilot study was useful to increase the efficiency in tracing and interviewing the respondents.

  11. Predicting multicultural effectiveness of international students : the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oudenhoven, J.P.; Van der Zee, K.I.

    2002-01-01

    The present study considered the reliability and validity of the 78-item revised version of the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire, a multidimensional instrument aimed at measuring multicultural effectiveness of expatriate employees and students. The questionnaire includes scales for cultural

  12. Predicting multicultural effectiveness of international students : The Multicultural Personality Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oudenhoven, Jan Pieter; Van der Zee, K.I.

    2002-01-01

    The present study considered the reliability and validity of the 78-item revised version of the Multicultural Personality Questionnaire, a multidimensional instrument aimed at measuring multicultural effectiveness of expatriate employees and students. The questionnaire includes scales for cultural

  13. Diet History Questionnaire: International Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ARP staff adapted the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) for use by Canadian populations in collaboration with the Alberta Cancer Board. This questionnaire takes into account the different food fortification polices of the U.S. and Canada.

  14. Financial and Time Burdens for Medical Students Interviewing for Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Paul; Melhado, Trisha; Walling, Anne; Groskurth, Jordan

    2017-02-01

    Interviewing for residency positions is increasingly stressful for students and challenging for programs. Little information is available about the costs and time invested by students in interviewing or about the key factors in decisions to accept interview offers. Our objective was to assess the time and financial costs of residency interviewing for an entire class at a regional campus and explore factors influencing student decisions to accept interviews. We used a 14-item survey administered electronically immediately following National Resident Matching Program results. The response rate was 75% (49 of 65 students). About half interviewed in primary care specialties. Thirty students (63%) applied to 20 or more programs, and 91% were offered multiple interviews out of state. Seventy percent limited interviews by time and cost. Other important factors included personal "fit," program reputation, and the quality of residents. About 50% of the students spent more than 20 days and $1,000-$5,000 interviewing; 29% reported spending over $5,000. Students used multiple funding sources, predominantly loans and savings. Primary care applicants applied to fewer out-of-state programs, reported fewer interview days and lower expenses, but received more financial support from programs. Students invested considerable time and resources in interviewing, and these factors significantly influenced their decisions about accepting interviews. The other major factors in interview decisions concerned personal comfort with the program, especially the residents. The costs and time reported in this study could be greater than other schools due to the regional campus location or lower due to the high proportion of students interviewing in primary care.

  15. Suppression mental questionnaire: a preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore Settineri; Emanuele Maria Merlo; Irene Pagano Dritto; Maria Midili; Antonio Bruno; Carmela Mento

    2016-01-01

    Authors postulate that the difference between suppression and repression, highlighted in particular by the Societè Psychanalitique de Paris, enables the development of a quantitative instrument, since suppression is a defense accessible to consciousness and therefore quantifiable like scales and questionnaires. The idea of constructing a questionnaire, included the identification of thirty variables having somehow a plausible relationship with this mechanism. The factor exploratory analysis w...

  16. 75 FR 79009 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Questionnaire Cognitive Interview and Pretesting (NCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... comment on proposed data collection projects, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic summaries of proposed projects to be submitted to the Office of... adopted by other Federal agencies, as well as by academic and commercial survey organizations. There are...

  17. The 1993 Indonesian Family Life Survey: Appendix B, Community-Facility Questionnaires and Interviewer Manual. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-04-01

    3. Is the candidate pregnant at this moment ? 4." Is she breastfeeding the baby at this moment ? 5. Does she have varices at her foot ? 6...this moment ? 5. Does she have varices at her foot ? 6. History of heart disease 7. History of jaundice 8. History of hypertension 1. 2. 3...moment ? 5. Does she have varices at her foot ? 6. History of heart disease 7. History of jaundice 8. History of hypertension 13. What do you

  18. Man-Materiel Systems. Questionnaire and Interview Design (Subjective Testing Techniques). Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-25

    experimental design and statistical procedures to be employed. Mnally, a check must be made of all questions to insure complete and accurate coverage of all...provides a system- atic approach for the developaent of a valid and useful subjective test instruaent. The chapters which follow elaborate on each...check one or more) Ü Coffee n Water O Tea a Milk a Hot chocolate o Other o (b) Which of the following items of footwear did you wear with the

  19. Testing the usability of a personalized system: comparing the use of interviews, questionnaires and thinking -aloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velsen, Lex Stefan; van der Geest, Thea; Klaassen, R.F.

    2007-01-01

    Personalized systems present each user with tailored content or output. Testing the usability of such a system must take some specific usability issues and the suitability of the personalized output into account. In this study, we evaluated a personalized search engine to compare the use of

  20. JAVA Interview Questions with Answers

    OpenAIRE

    Mikky, James

    2014-01-01

    JAVA Interview Questions with Answers from ComputerTrainingsOnline.com is n interactive java online training provider to establish a standard present in programming languages training. It is a great opportunity to the people who wants to learn object oriented programming languages like java at their own pace as per the flexible schedules. Here you can share your views and thought procedures with our online community and clarify the queries in java with our core professional team. You can lear...

  1. An Interview with Roy Ellen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejm Benessaiah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available I decided to undertake this interview with Professor Ellen, simply because I thought such a distinguished career deserved to be marked as he was retiring. Roy was happy to make time for our interviews, in the form of loosely structured conversation which, like the Arabian Nights, Roy pointed out, could have gone on forever, but I decided to draw the line at three sessions. Perhaps it could, and will go on to form part of a more in-depth biography, as I continued to discover other aspects and adventures of Roy’s interesting life in the course of other contexts, much as one does in the field. Much is known about what ethnobiologists and anthropologists say about another people’s lives; less is known about their own, apart from rare reflections, diaries and memoires. I found Roy’s reflections a source of comfort as I embarked on my own PhD fieldwork, reassuring me as I fumbled around, making my own unique but comparable mistakes among the insights I gleaned. The following is an edited version of the original interview. I hope it will be as enjoyable to the reader as it was to me working on it.

  2. Psychiatric diagnostic interviews for children and adolescents: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angold, Adrian; Erkanli, Alaattin; Copeland, William; Goodman, Robert; Fisher, Prudence W.; Costello, E. Jane

    2012-01-01

    Objective To compare examples of 3 styles of psychiatric interviews for youth: the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC) (“respondent-based”), the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment (CAPA) (“Interviewer-based”), and the Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) (“expert judgment”). Method Roughly equal numbers of males and females and White and African American participants aged 9–12 and 13–16 were recruited from primary care pediatric clinics. Participants (N=646) were randomly assigned to receive two of the three interviews, in counterbalanced order. Five modules were used: any depressive disorder, anxiety disorders, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder. At 2 sessions about 1 week apart, parent and child completed 1 of 2 interviews plus 5 screening questionnaires. Results When interviewed with the DAWBA, 17.7% of youth had 1 or more diagnoses, compared with 47.1% (DISC) and 32.4% (CAPA). The excess of DISC diagnoses was accounted for by specific phobias. Agreement between interview pairs was .13–.48 for DAWBA-DISC comparisons, .21–.61 for DISC-CAPA comparisons, and .23–.48 for CAPA-DAWBA comparisons. DAWBA cases were associated with higher parent-report questionnaire scores than DISC/DAWBA cases, but equivalent child-report scores. Conclusions The DAWBA is shorter and cases were probably more severe, making it a good choice for clinical trials, but the user cannot examine the data in detail. The DISC and CAPA are similar in length and training needs. Either would be a better choice where false negatives must be avoided, as in case-control genetic studies, or when researchers need to study individual symptoms in detail. PMID:22525957

  3. A comparison of interview methods to ascertain fluoroquinolone exposure before tuberculosis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Heijden, Y F; Maruri, F; Holt, E; Mitchel, E; Warkentin, J; Sterling, T R

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY Fluoroquinolone use before tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis delays the time to diagnosis and treatment, and increases the risk of fluoroquinolone-resistant TB and death. Ascertainment of fluoroquinolone exposure could identify such high-risk patients. We compared four methods of ascertaining fluoroquinolone exposure in the 6 months prior to TB diagnosis in culture-confirmed TB patients in Tennessee from January 2007 to December 2009. The four methods included a simple questionnaire administered to all TB suspects by health department personnel (FQ-Form), an in-home interview conducted by research staff, outpatient and inpatient medical record review, and TennCare pharmacy database review. Of 177 TB patients included, 72 (41%) received fluoroquinolones during the 6 months before TB diagnosis. Fluoroquinolone exposure determined by review of inpatient and outpatient medical records was considered the gold standard for comparison. The FQ-Form had 61% [95% confidence interval (CI) 48-73] sensitivity and 93% (95% CI 85-98) specificity (agreement 79%, kappa = 0.56) while the in-home interview had 28% (95% CI 18-40) sensitivity and 99% (94-100%) specificity (agreement 68%, kappa = 0.29). A simple questionnaire administered by health department personnel identified fluoroquinolone exposure before TB diagnosis with moderate reliability.

  4. Questionnaire use among nordic neuropsychologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeland, Jens; Norup, Anne; Persson, Bengt A.

    2017-01-01

    , or are diagnostic tools. The study showed an average use of 8.4 questionnaires (SD 6.4), with a range from 4.5 in Finland to 11 in Norway. Emotional symptoms were most frequently assessed, closely followed by questionnaires of cognition. There was a very low usage rate of personality measures, even though...... the ecological validity of questionnaires. Thus, many neuropsychologists have advocated more use of questionnaires, but it is not known whether professional practice has changed. Until recently, personality instruments were the only widespread questionnaires in frequent use among neuropsychologists. We studied...... the inventory use of 702 Nordic neuropsychologists. The most used questionnaires are listed, and differences between countries are analyzed. In addition, the questionnaires are grouped with regard to whether they map cognition, behavior not observable during consultations, emotional symptoms, personality...

  5. The use of questionnaires for acquiring information on public perception of natural hazards and risk mitigation - a review of current knowledge and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, D. K.

    2009-07-01

    Questionnaires are popular and fundamental tools for acquiring information on public knowledge and perception of natural hazards. Questionnaires can provide valuable information to emergency management agencies for developing risk management procedures. Although many natural hazards researchers describe results generated from questionnaires, few explain the techniques used for their development and implementation. Methodological detail should include, as a minimum, response format (open/closed questions), mode of delivery, sampling technique, response rate and access to the questionnaire to allow reproduction of or comparison with similar studies. This article reviews current knowledge and practice for developing and implementing questionnaires. Key features include questionnaire design, delivery mode, sampling techniques and data analysis. In order to illustrate these aspects, a case study examines methods chosen for the development and implementation of questionnaires used to obtain information on knowledge and perception of volcanic hazards in a tourist region in southern Iceland. Face-to-face interviews highlighted certain issues with respect to question structure and sequence. Recommendations are made to overcome these problems before the questionnaires are applied in future research projects. In conclusion, basic steps that should be disclosed in the literature are provided as a checklist to ensure that reliable, replicable and valid results are produced from questionnaire based hazard knowledge and risk perception research.

  6. Stackwalker: Interviews: 2008-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newby, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Documentation from Simon Yuill's Stackwalker project, a parallel study made from audio interviews relating to crofting communities in the West of Scotland and migrant workers in fishing and food production in the North East of Scotland.The project reflects upon issues of spatial agency (land use,...... in context.This artist's book follows the exhibition, Fields, Factories and Workshops at the Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow, 7 August – 18 September 2010.English language text with Gaelic, Polish, Russian, Latvian and Lithuanian sections....

  7. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  8. Interview with Dr Anna Matamala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinea Marcelino Villela

    2016-09-01

    In this interview, which took place in June 2016, Dr Anna Matamala described some details about her long professional experience in Audiovisual Translation, especially in dubbing from English into Catalan, and we talked about many other things like her interest in lexicography, her point of view on some contemporary topics in Audiovisual Translation Studies: the use of technology, the relation between AVT and Accessibility Studies, AVT and Filmmaking fields, the importance of keeping in touch with other countries and even continents outside Europe, and she also gave some advice to the new generation of Translation students.

  9. Questionnaire surveys of dentists on radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelley, A M; Brunton, P; Horner, K

    2012-05-01

    Survey by questionnaire is a widely used research method in dental radiology. A major concern in reviews of questionnaires is non-response. The objectives of this study were to review questionnaire studies in dental radiology with regard to potential survey errors and to develop recommendations to assist future researchers. A literature search with the software search package PubMed was used to obtain internet-based access to Medline through the website www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed. A search of the English language peer-reviewed literature was conducted of all published studies, with no restriction on date. The search strategy found articles with dates from 1983 to 2010. The medical subject heading terms used were "questionnaire", "dental radiology" and "dental radiography". The reference sections of articles retrieved by this method were hand-searched in order to identify further relevant papers. Reviews, commentaries and relevant studies from the wider literature were also included. 53 questionnaire studies were identified in the dental literature that concerned dental radiography and included a report of response rate. These were all published between 1983 and 2010. In total, 87 articles are referred to in this review, including the 53 dental radiology studies. Other cited articles include reviews, commentaries and examples of studies outside dental radiology where they are germane to the arguments presented. Non-response is only one of four broad areas of error to which questionnaire surveys are subject. This review considers coverage, sampling and measurement, as well as non-response. Recommendations are made to assist future research that uses questionnaire surveys.

  10. Self-administered version of the Fabry-associated pain questionnaire for adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magg, Barbara; Riegler, Christoph; Wiedmann, Silke; Heuschmann, Peter; Sommer, Claudia; Üçeyler, Nurcan

    2015-09-17

    Fabry-associated pain may be the first symptom of Fabry disease (FD) and presents with a unique phenotype including mostly acral burning triggerable pain attacks, evoked pain, pain crises, and permanent pain. We recently developed and validated the first Fabry Pain Questionnaire (FPQ) for adult patients. Here we report on the validation of the self-administered version of the FPQ that no longer requires a face-to-face interview but can be filled in by the patients themselves allowing more flexible data collection. At our Würzburg Fabry Center for Interdisciplinary Treatment, Germany, we have developed the self-administered version of the FPQ by adapting the questionnaire to a self-report version. To do this, consecutive Fabry patients with current or past pain history (n = 56) were first interviewed face-to-face. Two weeks later patients' self-reported questionnaire results were collected by mail (n = 55). We validated the self-administered version of the FPQ by assessing the inter-rater reliability agreement of scores obtained by supervised administration and self-administration of the FPQ. The FPQ contains 15 questions on the different pain phenotypes, on pain development during life with and without therapy, and on impairment due to pain. Statistical analysis showed that the majority of questions were answered in high agreement in both sessions with a mean AC1-statistic of 0.857 for 55 nominal-scaled items and a mean ICC of 0.587 for 9 scores. This self-administered version of the first pain questionnaire for adult Fabry patients is a useful tool to assess Fabry-associated pain without a time-consuming face-to-face interview but via a self-reporting survey allowing more flexible usage.

  11. Determining the interviewer effect on CQ Index outcomes: A multilevel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.M. Winters-van der Meer (Sjenny); M.M.H. Strating (Mathilde); N.S. Klazinga (Niek); R.B. Kool; R. Huijsman (Robbert)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The CQ Index for the elderly, a quality-of-care questionnaire administered by conducting interviews, is used to assess clients' experiences in Dutch nursing homes and homes for the elderly. This article describes whether inter-interviewer differences influence the perceived

  12. Determining the interviewer effect on CQ Index outcomes: a multilevel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, Sjenny; Strating, Mathilde H.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Kool, Rudolf B.; Huijsman, Robbert

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The CQ Index for the elderly, a quality-of-care questionnaire administered by conducting interviews, is used to assess clients' experiences in Dutch nursing homes and homes for the elderly. This article describes whether inter-interviewer differences influence the perceived

  13. Psychometric properties of the stress index radiooncology (SIRO) - a new questionnaire measuring quality of life of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehlen, S.; Fahmueller, H.; Lenk, M.; Duehmke, E.; Herschbach, P.; Aydemir, U.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: In the course of radiotherapy oncological patients often experience considerable psychosocial distress. For its measurement however, no specific questionnaire is available. The stress index radiooncology (SIRO), which is based upon the results of extensive preliminary studies, will be made available as a screening-instrument to facilitate measurement of psychosocial distress of cancer patients, including radiotherapy-induced distress. The aim of this study is, to psychometrically evaluate the preliminary version of the questionnaire, to transfer it to the final version (SIRO) and to gain information about the psychosocial distress of radiooncological patients at the beginning of radiotherapy. Patients and Methods: 104 cancer patients (18 to 85 years) with different diagnoses have been included in the study (Table 1). The data have been assessed by means of the preliminary version of the new questionnaire SIRO, the HADS, EORTC QLQ-C30 and LS. With 25 patients semistructured clinical interviews have been conducted. (orig.) [de

  14. Effects of motivational interviewing intervention on blackouts among college freshmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Donna M; Levine, Maureen J; Dmochowski, Jacek; Nies, Mary A; Sun, Linman

    2013-09-01

    Alcohol and illicit drug abuse is a serious public health issue facing college students. This study examined the impact of motivational interviewing (MI) as an intervention on the rate of blackouts among freshmen who engaged in high-risk drinking and illicit drug use. A sample of 188 volunteer freshmen from a university were administered the Daily Drinking Questionnaire, the Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index, and the Government Performance and Results Act at baseline and again at 6 months postintervention. MI was applied at baseline and then again at 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Generalized estimated equations and logistic regression models were used to determine associations between the rate of blackouts and time, ethnicity, gender, illicit drug use, and alcohol consumption. At 6 months, the rate of blackouts decreased from 40% at baseline to 16% (p drug use also decreased significantly (p drug use. The findings support the importance of using MI with freshmen college students to decrease drinking and the associated negative consequences, including blackouts, which has particular relevance for advanced practice registered nurses, physicians, and community health nurses who conduct MI as an intervention with college students. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. What do IPAQ questions mean to older adults? Lessons from cognitive interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Robert L

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most questionnaires used for physical activity (PA surveillance have been developed for adults aged ≤65 years. Given the health benefits of PA for older adults and the aging of the population, it is important to include adults aged 65+ years in PA surveillance. However, few studies have examined how well older adults understand PA surveillance questionnaires. This study aimed to document older adults' understanding of questions from the International PA Questionnaire (IPAQ, which is used worldwide for PA surveillance. Methods Participants were 41 community-dwelling adults aged 65-89 years. They each completed IPAQ in a face-to-face semi-structured interview, using the "think-aloud" method, in which they expressed their thoughts out loud as they answered IPAQ questions. Interviews were transcribed and coded according to a three-stage model: understanding the intent of the question; performing the primary task (conducting the mental operations required to formulate a response; and response formatting (mapping the response into pre-specified response options. Results Most difficulties occurred during the understanding and performing the primary task stages. Errors included recalling PA in an "average" week, not in the previous 7 days; including PA lasting Conclusions These findings indicate a need for caution in administering IPAQ to adults aged ≥65 years. Most errors resulted in over-reporting, although errors resulting in under-reporting were also noted. Given the nature of the errors made by participants, it is possible that similar errors occur when IPAQ is used in younger populations and that the errors identified could be minimized with small modifications to IPAQ.

  16. STS-93: Crew Interview - Steve Hawley

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Live footage of a preflight interview with Mission Specialist Steven A. Hawley is presented. The interview addresses many different questions including why Hawley wanted to be an astronaut, his career path, and how this historic flight (first female Commander of a mission) draws attention from the media. Other interesting information that this one-on-one interview discusses is the deployment of the Chandra satellite, why people care about x ray energy, whether or not Chandra will compliment the other X Ray Observatories currently in operation, and his responsibilities during the major events of this mission. Hawley mentions the Inertial Upper Stage (IUS) rocket that will deployed the Chandra Telescope, and the design configuration of Chandra to gather and transfer information. The Southwest Research Ultraviolet Imaging System (SWUIS) Telescope on board Columbia, the Plant Growth Investigation in Microgravity (PGIM) and Gelation of Sols: Applied Microgravity Research (GOSAMR) experiments, and the two observatories presently in orbit (Gamma Ray Observatory, and Hubble Space Telescope) are also discussed.

  17. Nijmegen Continuity Questionnaire: development and testing of a questionnaire that measures continuity of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uijen, Annemarie A; Schellevis, François G; van den Bosch, Wil J H M; Mokkink, Henk G A; van Weel, Chris; Schers, Henk J

    2011-12-01

    To develop and pilot test a generic questionnaire to measure continuity of care from the patient's perspective across primary and secondary care settings. We developed the Nijmegen Continuity Questionnaire (NCQ) based on a systematic literature review and analysis of 30 patient interviews. The questionnaire consisted of 16 items about the patient-provider relationship to be answered for five different care providers and 14 items each on the collaboration between four groups of care providers. The questionnaire was distributed among patients with a chronic disease recruited from general practice. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to identify subscales. We refined the factors by excluding several items, for example, items with a high missing rate. In total, 288 patients filled out the questionnaire (response rate, 72%). PCA yielded three subscales: "personal continuity: care provider knows me," "personal continuity: care provider shows commitment," and "team/cross-boundary continuity." Internal consistency of the subscales ranged from 0.82 to 0.89. Interscale correlations varied between 0.42 and 0.61. The NCQ shows to be a comprehensive, reliable, and valid instrument. Further testing of reliability, construct validity, and responsiveness is needed before the NCQ can be more widely implemented. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. PIRLS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 1: International Version of the PIRLS 2011, Background Questionnaires and Curriculum Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Drucker, Kathleen T., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The PIRLS 2011 international database includes data for all questionnaires administered as part of the PIRLS 2011 assessment. This supplement contains the international version of the PIRLS 2011 background questionnaires and curriculum questionnaires in the following 5 sections: (1) Student Questionnaire; (2) Home Questionnaire (Learning to Read…

  19. An Interview with Adolf Muschg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Ricker-Abderhalden

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Adolf Muschg, a popular writer, teacher and aesthetician, is one of the comparatively few contemporary Swiss writers who has been able to establish himself firmly in Germany. In recent years, he has begun to attract the attention of American critics and Germanists as well. In the interview, Adolf Muschg deals with a wide spectrum of issues. He identifies the authors and works that mean most to him. He traces, for instance, his changing relationship to Goethe, whom he recently rediscovered. In Goethe's works, above all in his scientific studies, Muschg finds issues that are of central importance to the survival of our planet. He detects a kinship between Goethe and the "Greens" of the seventies and looks back critically on the turbulent sixties. He provides an analysis of the current tensions between the USA and Western Europe, while confirming his keen and very personal involvement with the USA. But at the core of the interview are his extensive comments on the creative processes and the perils inherent in writing fiction. There he deals with the complex relationship between literature and therapy, the therapeutic potential of literature for the writer and the reader. By describing the novelist's difficult journey on the narrow path between self-revelation and indiscretion, he also reflects upon the related issue of literary narcissism.

  20. On Farmers’ Ground: Wisconsin Dairy Farm Nutrient Management Survey Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    This questionnaire was used during quarterly, face-to-face interviews with the fifty-four Wisconsin dairy farmers who participated in the ‘On Farmers’ Ground’ nutrient management research project. It was designed to systematically and consistently compile information on herd size and composition, l...

  1. The Danish anal sphincter rupture questionnaire: Validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Ottesen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To revise, validate and test for reliability an anal sphincter rupture questionnaire in relation to construct, content and face validity. Setting and background. Since 1996 women with anal sphincter rupture (ASR) at one of the public university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark have been...... among health care personnel, followed by an expert panel discussion. Ten women were interviewed about their understanding and attitude toward answering the questionnaire and it was pre-tested on 52 women with ASR. The questionnaire was revised five times during the validation process. The final version...... was test-retested among 20 women with ASR. Results. The questionnaire revealed typical problems after ASR. The length, use of language, and the way the questionnaire was constructed, was deemed appropriate. The reliability test showed good to very good correlation (Kappa values from 0.733 to 0.923) in all...

  2. Physical Appearance Concern Questionnaire (PACQ in Iranian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katayoun Khademi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study is to make questionnaire for screening body dysmorphic disorder sufferers in cosmetic clinics. Methods: A sample of 150 female patients with age average 29.4 years completed Physical Appearance Concern Questionnaire. It has been used as screening tool for screening patients with body dysmorphic disorder symptoms in cosmetic clinics. Results: Result of reliability analysis (α=0.908 and validity have shown the effectiveness of this questionnaire for recognizing individuals with BDD symptoms. Discussion: Physical appearance concern questionnaire can be used in cosmetic clinics for identifying BDD sufferers among clients, with score for the severity of symptoms. Almost all of the researches have been studying in cosmetic clinics or dermatology settings and there is no investigation for people with special needs, thus further research is required in the development of a screening questionnaire or interview for identifying patients with BDD with special needs.

  3. The Danish anal sphincter rupture questionnaire: Validity and reliability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Ulla; Ottesen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To revise, validate and test for reliability an anal sphincter rupture questionnaire in relation to construct, content and face validity. Setting and background. Since 1996 women with anal sphincter rupture (ASR) at one of the public university hospitals in Copenhagen, Denmark have been...... among health care personnel, followed by an expert panel discussion. Ten women were interviewed about their understanding and attitude toward answering the questionnaire and it was pre-tested on 52 women with ASR. The questionnaire was revised five times during the validation process. The final version...... offered pelvic floor muscle examination and instruction by a specialist physiotherapist. In relation to that, a non-validated questionnaire about anal and urinary incontinence was to be answered six months after childbirth. Method. The original questionnaire was revised and a pilot test was performed...

  4. 10 CFR 15.25 - Personal interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Personal interviews. 15.25 Section 15.25 Energy NUCLEAR... interviews. (a) The NRC may seek an interview with the debtor at the offices of the NRC when— (1) A matter...; or (3) An agreement for payment might be negotiated. (b) The NRC shall grant an interview with a...

  5. 8 CFR 245.6 - Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interview. 245.6 Section 245.6 Aliens and... ADMITTED FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCE § 245.6 Interview. Each applicant for adjustment of status under this part shall be interviewed by an immigration officer. This interview may be waived in the case of a child...

  6. 8 CFR 245a.19 - Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interviews. 245a.19 Section 245a.19 Aliens... Interviews. (a) All aliens filing applications for adjustment of status with the Service under this section must be personally interviewed, except that the adjudicative interview may be waived for a child under...

  7. 37 CFR 1.133 - Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interviews. 1.133 Section 1... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Interviews § 1.133 Interviews. (a)(1) Interviews with examiners concerning applications and other matters pending before the...

  8. 49 CFR 1018.22 - Personal interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Personal interviews. 1018.22 Section 1018.22... § 1018.22 Personal interviews. (a) The Board may seek an interview with the debtor at the offices of the... grant an interview with a debtor upon the debtor's request. The Board will not reimburse a debtor's...

  9. 8 CFR 1245.6 - Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interview. 1245.6 Section 1245.6 Aliens and... OF STATUS TO THAT OF PERSON ADMITTED FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCE § 1245.6 Interview. Each applicant for adjustment of status under this part shall be interviewed by an immigration officer. This interview may be...

  10. Use of interviews in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Gary

    2015-06-24

    Conducting interviews is one of the most common ways of collecting data in healthcare research. In particular, interviews are associated with qualitative research, where researchers seek to understand participants' experiences through their own words and perspectives. This article will help healthcare researchers prepare to carry out interviews as part of their research. It will also emphasise important skills to consider during the interview process. Consideration will also be given to remedying interviews that do not go according to plan, as well as identifying appropriate debriefing processes post-interview. With this knowledge, healthcare researchers are more likely to conduct effective interviews that will yield better quality data and protect the participant.

  11. The adaptation of a Danish version of the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Marianne U; Rydahl-Hansen, Susan; Amris, Kirstine

    2016-01-01

    clinic. The PSEQ was translated and adapted to a Danish setting using a standard stepw-ise forward-backward translation procedure, followed by initial testing and focus group interview. Reliability was examined by analysing internal consistency and test-retest agreement. Construct validity was exami......The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Pain Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) in a population of patients with fibromyalgia in Denmark. The study sample included 102 patients diagnosed with fibromyalgia referred to a specialist...

  12. Questionnaire for low back pain in the garment industry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Supreet; Sinha, A G K; Benjamin, A I

    2013-05-01

    Low back pain affects up to 90% of the world's population at some point in their lives. Until date no questionnaire has been designed for back pain in the garment industry workers. Therefore, the objective of this study is to design a questionnaire to determine the prevalence, risk factors, impact, health care service utilization and back pain features in the garment industry workers and gain preliminary experience of its use. The content validity and reliability of the questionnaire was established. Items showing acceptable internal consistency and moderate to high test re-test reliability were retained in the questionnaire. Items showing unacceptable internal consistency, low test re-test reliability or poor differentiation were reworded, redrafted and re-tested on the workers. It took 20 min to complete one interview schedule. Environmental factors such as the absence of the garment industry owner/supervisor or co-workers at the time of the interview and interview during leisure hours need to be standardized. Thus, final questionnaire is ready for use after necessary amendments and will be used on the larger sample size in the main study.

  13. Paper to Electronic Questionnaires: Effects on Structured Questionnaire Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.

    2009-01-01

    With the use of computers, paper questionnaires are being replaced by electronic questionnaires. The formats of traditional paper questionnaires have been found to effect a subject's rating. Consequently, the transition from paper to electronic format can subtly change results. The research presented begins to determine how electronic questionnaire formats change subjective ratings. For formats where subjects used a flow chart to arrive at their rating, starting at the worst and middle ratings of the flow charts were the most accurate but subjects took slightly more time to arrive at their answers. Except for the electronic paper format, starting at the worst rating was the most preferred. The paper and electronic paper versions had the worst accuracy. Therefore, for flowchart type of questionnaires, flowcharts should start at the worst rating and work their way up to better ratings.

  14. STS-106 Crew Interviews: Boris Morukov

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) video production presents an STS-106 pre-launch interview with Russian Cosmonaut/Mission Specialist Boris Morukov, M.D., Ph.D. Among other topics, Morukov discusses his background in studying weightlessness at the Russian Institute for Biomedical Problems and how his experiences prepared him to become a Cosmonaut candidate. STS-106 is International Space Station assembly flight ISS-2A.2b and will utilize the SPACEHAB Double Module and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) to take supplies to the station. The mission will also include 2 spacewalks.

  15. STS-106 Crew Interviews: Yuri Malenchenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) video production presents an STS-106 pre-launch interview with Russian Cosmonaut/Mission Specialist Yuri Malenchenko, Col. Russian Air Force. Among other topics, Malenchenko discusses his 125-day space mission on Russian Space Station MIR in 1994, and his planned spacewalk to complete the connection between the Russian service module Svezda and the International Space Station (ISS). STS-106 is International Space Station assembly flight ISS-2A.2b and will utilize the SPACEHAB Double Module and the Integrated Cargo Carrier (ICC) to take supplies to the station. The mission will also include 2 spacewalks.

  16. STS-105 Crew Interview: Scott Horowitz

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-105 Commander Scott Horowitz is seen during a prelaunch interview. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, training for the mission, and his role in the mission's activities. He gives details on the mission's goals, which include the transfer of supplies from the Discovery Orbiter to the International Space Station (ISS) and the change-over of the Expedition 2 and Expedition 3 crews (the resident crews of ISS). Horowitz discusses the importance of the ISS in the future of human spaceflight.

  17. Summon Post Implementation Interviews Study - Executive Summary

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2017-04-12

    This executive report summarizes the interview findings on the use of Summon by our community. Summon is the library\\'s new webscale discovery layer that was launched in May 2016. The findings highlighted that Google Scholar remains the popular resource to search for articles. In addition to that, library website (Koral / Summon) is commonly used to search for known items such as book / electronic book titles. The report also includes the author\\'s short and long term recommendations to address the shortcomings of the present situation.

  18. An Interview with Ralph Clare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Gonzalez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fictions Inc., and this interview, offers detailed readings of a diverse body of texts that, in one way or another, push readers to think about the role of the corporation in 20th and 21st century America. Using a complex set of critical tools—historicizing the rise in the pharmaceutical industry in the 1980s to read White Noise; drawing on Slavoj Žižek and Louis Althusser to explain the model of resistance that appears in Crying of Lot 49; looking at 1980s gentrification policies and government outsourcing while discussing Ghostbusters—Clare generates a series of insights about the fears and the desires embodied in the corporation. What he finds is that older avenues of resistance to consumer capitalism have closed, but the desire to imagine new ones, and maybe create them, remains open.

  19. STS-112 Crew Interviews: Yurchikhin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A preflight interview with mission specialist Fyodor Yurchikhin is presented. He worked for a long time in Energia in the Russian Mission Control Center (MCC). Yurchikhin discusses the main goal of the STS-112 flight, which is to install the Integrated Truss Assembly S1 (Starboard Side Thermal Radiator Truss) on the International Space Station. He also talks about the three space walks required to install the S1. After the installation of S1, work with the bolts and cameras are performed. Yurchikhin is involved in working with nitrogen and ammonia jumpers. He expresses the complexity of his work, but says that he and the other crew members are ready for the challenge.

  20. STS-112 Crew Interviews - Magnus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    STS-112 Mission Specialist 2 Sandra H. Magnus is seen during a prelaunch interview. She answers questions about her inspiration to become an astronaut and her career path. She gives details on the mission's goals, the most significant of which will be the installation of the S-1 truss structure on the International Space Station (ISS). The installation, one in a series of truss extending missions, will be complicated and will require the use of the robotic arm as well as extravehicular activity (EVA) by astronauts. Magnus also describes her function in the performance of transfer operations. Brief descriptions are given of experiments on board the ISS as well as on board the Shuttle.

  1. Leaning in to "muddy" interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippke, Lena; Tanggaard, Lene

    2014-01-01

    situated identities among the participants cross each other. We emphasize the value of daring to lean in to the muddiness of peopled research, use it as an analytical tool and present it in its imperfect form. This approach contributes to transparency in qualitative research, opens up the data in a new way......Over the last few decades, qualitative research has been acknowledged as a peopled practice in which subjectivities come into play. The main argument presented in this article is that qualitative research involves “muddy,” troublesome, interactional passages, because of a complex interplay between...... subjectivities, situated identities, emotions, and conversational genres. Based on ethnographic fieldwork at a Danish Vocational Educational Training College, we introduce the concept of “leaning in” to provide an analytical grasp of the “muddy” interactional tension field in an interview situation, in which...

  2. A Diversity Exit Interview/Survey for the Military

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knouse, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    The exit interview and survey are means for identifying organizational problems, including diversity issues, through individuals separating from the organization, who are in a unique position to supply candid feedback...

  3. Implementation of audio computer-assisted interviewing software in HIV/AIDS research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhar, Erika; McDonnell Holstad, Marcia; Yeager, Katherine A; Denzmore-Nwagbara, Pamela; Corkran, Carol; Fielder, Bridget; McCarty, Frances; Diiorio, Colleen

    2007-01-01

    Computer-assisted interviewing (CAI) has begun to play a more prominent role in HIV/AIDS prevention research. Despite the increased popularity of CAI, particularly audio computer-assisted self-interviewing (ACASI), some research teams are still reluctant to implement ACASI technology because of lack of familiarity with the practical issues related to using these software packages. The purpose of this report is to describe the implementation of one particular ACASI software package, the Questionnaire Development System (QDS; Nova Research Company, Bethesda, MD), in several nursing and HIV/AIDS prevention research settings. The authors present acceptability and satisfaction data from two large-scale public health studies in which they have used QDS with diverse populations. They also address issues related to developing and programming a questionnaire; discuss practical strategies related to planning for and implementing ACASI in the field, including selecting equipment, training staff, and collecting and transferring data; and summarize advantages and disadvantages of computer-assisted research methods.

  4. The Effectiveness of Motivational Interviewing on Adherence to Treatment in Obese Patients Undergoing Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: Adherence is the degree of patient's success to do the health experts recommendations. The aim of present research was study the effects of motivational interviewing on adherence to in obese patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy surgery. Methods: The design of present semi- experimental study was pre-test, post-test with control group. The statistical population included all obese patients (BMI≥35 that undergone laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy surgery in Shiraz Ghadir Mother & Child Subspecialty Hospital, during the winter of 1394 and the spring of 1395. 30 of them were selected by using available sampling method and they randomly were asssigned to experimental (n=15 and control groups (n=15. The post bariatic surgery self-management behaviors questionnaire was used to collect data in two steps (pre-test and post-test. Motivational interviewing was implemented for the experimental group in four weeks (each week a 1/5 hour session. Data were analysed by using multivariate covariance analysis (MANCOVA. Results: MANCOVA results show that motivational interviewing led to a statistically significant difference between pre-test and post-test BSSQ total scores (P0/07. Conclusion: According to this study results, implementation of motivational interviewing is effective and appropriate in order to enhance adherence and self-management behaviors, achieve favorable weight loss & reduce postoperative complications, in obese patients undergoing sleeve gastrectomy surgery, but it appears that longer interventions are necessary to increase the rate of physical activity. Keywords: Motivational Interviewing, Adherence, Obese Patients, Sleeve Gastrectomy Surgery

  5. [Predonation interview by a trained and authorized paramedical staff: feasibility, reliability and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffe, C; Romieu, B; Adjou, C; Giraudeau, B; Bastard, B; Danic, B; Pelletier, B

    2011-04-01

    Predonation interview accounts for a major step in transfusion safety. In France, it must be performed by a physician, following a methodical questioning and a standardized questionnaire. Faced with this evolution, the value of a strictly medical expertise has been progressively losing importance. In many countries, blood donor selection is being organized by non medical trained staff (Québec, Switzerland, e.g.). A decree of April 30, 2006 allowed the Établissement français du sang to experiment a predonation interview by an authorized paramedical staff in the form of a two-phase prospective multicenter study over a year. Phase I "experimental situation": six physician/nurse teams among three blood transfusion centres interviewed 1940 blood-donation candidates, including 253 new donors (13% out of total). Phase 2 "observational study": 3222 blood-donation candidates were interviewed either by a physician or a nurse. In phase I, nurses were able to make a decision without the physician's help in 1921 cases. A total of 1628 candidates were decided capable of donating blood both by physicians and nurses, 174 donors were rejected both by physicians and nurses and 69 were rejected either by physicians or nurses. In phase 2, out of 3222 blood-donation candidates, an average of 12.1% were rejected by nurses and 10% by physicians. The study reported a weaker variability among nurses. Results show that nurses were able to perform predonation interviews with high reliability, without additional risk. The reproducibility of their answers in the field of recipient-risk evaluation was better than the physicians. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  6. Effect of Motivational Interviewing on Weight Efficacy Lifestyle among Women with Overweight and Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkarimi, Kamal; Kabir, Mohammad Javad; Honarvar, Mohammad Reza; Ozouni-Davaji, Rahman Berdi; Eri, Maryam

    2017-03-01

    Obesity and overweight have become increasingly a major public health problem across the world. This study aimed at exploring the effects of motivational interviewing on weight efficacy lifestyle among women with obesity and overweight. A single-blind randomized clinical trial study was conducted on 100 overweight and obese women who attended a nutrition clinic. The samples were selected based on the clinical records and assigned into two groups, namely motivational interviewing arm (50 samples) and nutrition education arm (50 samples). Data were collected using a standard validated questionnaire entitled "weight efficacy lifestyle". The intervention was designed according to five motivation sessions and four nutrition education programs, such that the participants of the nutrition education arm were also provided with the nutrition pamphlets related to weight control. Data were finally analyzed using the SPSS statistical software by performing the independent t-test, chi-square, LSD and repeated measures ANOVA tests. Pmotivational interviewing arms, respectively. Compared with the control group, the score of the motivational interviewing group was statistically significant in terms of weight efficacy lifestyle P=0.0001) and all subscales including social pressure (P=0.0001), physical discomfort (P=0.005), food accessibility (P=0.0001), positive and entertainment activities (P=0.0001), as well as negative emotions (P=0.003). Motivational interviewing appeared to be effective in increasing weight efficacy lifestyle among women with overweight and obesity. IRCT2014051817736N1.

  7. Development and Preliminary Face and Content Validation of the "Which Health Approaches and Treatments Are You Using?" (WHAT Questionnaires Assessing Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use in Pediatric Rheumatology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine Toupin April

    Full Text Available Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM is commonly used by children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, yet no validated questionnaires assess that use. The objective of this study was to develop child self- and parent proxy-report questionnaires assessing CAM use and to determine the face and content validity of the "Which Health Approaches and Treatments are you using?" (WHAT questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology.A sequential phased mixed methods approach was used to develop the questionnaires. A Delphi Survey of 126 experts followed by an interdisciplinary consensus conference of 14 stakeholders in CAM, general pediatrics and pediatric rheumatology was held to develop consensus on the content of the questionnaires using a nominal group technique. To determine face and content validity of the questionnaires, two groups, including (a a purposive sample of 22 children with JIA 8 to 18 years and their parents from the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario and the Hospital for Sick Children, and (b 21 Canadian pediatric rheumatology experts, participated in interviews. Participants were independently asked about the goal, understandability and comprehensiveness of the WHAT questionnaires, as well as the relevance of items.Consensus was reached on 17 items of the WHAT questionnaires. The domains found to be relevant were child's CAM use, factors associated with CAM use, perceived impact of CAM use, and communication about CAM. A total of 15 items in the parent proxy-report questionnaire and 13 items in the child report questionnaire showed adequate content validity.Consensus was reached by experts on the content of a pediatric CAM questionnaire. Face and content validity testing and modifications made to the WHAT questionnaires have helped ensure adequate preliminary validity for use in pediatric rheumatology. This constitutes the basis for further testing of these questionnaires in pediatric rheumatology and for adaptation to other

  8. Predicting work Performance through selection interview ratings and Psychological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liziwe Nzama

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish whether selection interviews used in conjunction with psychological assessments of personality traits and cognitive functioning contribute to predicting work performance. The sample consisted of 102 managers who were appointed recently in a retail organisation. The independent variables were selection interview ratings obtained on the basis of structured competency-based interview schedules by interviewing panels, fve broad dimensions of personality defned by the Five Factor Model as measured by the 15 Factor Questionnaire (15FQ+, and cognitive processing variables (current level of work, potential level of work, and 12 processing competencies measured by the Cognitive Process Profle (CPP. Work performance was measured through annual performance ratings that focused on measurable outputs of performance objectives. Only two predictor variables correlated statistically signifcantly with the criterion variable, namely interview ratings (r = 0.31 and CPP Verbal Abstraction (r = 0.34. Following multiple regression, only these variables contributed signifcantly to predicting work performance, but only 17.8% of the variance of the criterion was accounted for.

  9. Audio computer-assisted self interview compared to traditional interview in an HIV-related behavioral survey in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Linh Cu; Vu, Lan T H

    2012-10-01

    group, versus 11.4% in the face-to-face group and 11.1% in the self-administered paper questionnaire group. The pattern was consistent for both male and female respondents and in both urban and rural settings. Men in the audio computer-assisted self-interview group also reported higher levels of high-risk sexual behavior--such as sex with sex workers and a higher average number of sexual partners--than did women in the same group. Importantly, item refusal rates on sensitive topics tended to be lower with audio computer-assisted self interview than with the other two methods. Combined with existing data from other countries and previous studies in Vietnam, these findings suggest that researchers should consider using audio computer-assisted self interview for future studies of sensitive and stigmatized topics, especially for men.

  10. [Validity of a French screening questionnaire for binge eating disorders in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, I; Kruseman, M; Di Capua, D; Suringar, V; Chamay Weber, C

    2013-10-01

    Binge eating disorder is often associated with obesity. It has many psychosocial and somatic consequences and affects obesity treatment outcome. Binge eating has been observed in very young populations. Studies have shown that complications associated with binge eating disorder can appear in children, even when all the criteria included in the definition of the disorder for adults are not met. Therefore, provisional criteria have been proposed to investigate binge eating disorder among children and adolescents. There is an urgent need to enhance the screening of binge eating disorder in the young population, first in order to document the disorder and second to allow for tailored treatment of these populations. Currently, there is no scale in French to detect this type of disorder among children or adolescents. The aim of this study was to develop a self-administered questionnaire in French, which could be used as a screening tool for binge eating disorder among adolescents. We have developed a self-administered questionnaire, based on a previous questionnaire and provisional criteria proposed in the English-speaking world. In the present study, we assessed how the target population understood the expressions used in the questionnaire and refined terminology according to the results. Nineteen adolescents aged 11-18 years (normal weight or with obesity) were interviewed about their understanding of the questionnaire, using a structured individual interview. After completing the questions on their own, because the goal was to end up with a self-administered tool, they were asked to explain their own understanding of each question and to reformulate the terms used. The results highlighted that some words or sentences were misunderstood by adolescents, and we developed more adequate formulations as a consequence. Some terms used in their figurative sense had to be modified. Respondents found it difficult to assess duration and frequency of their behavior and suggested

  11. Diet History Questionnaire Paper-based Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DHQ-1 is the standard version of the NCI's Diet History Questionnaire. It was originally printed in 1998, reprinted in 2002 with minor changes to the front page and the development of a Spanish translation, and reprinted again in 2007 with changes to the Today's Date field to include the years 2007-2011.

  12. Video interview with Michael Dell

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Michael Dell, founder and presently Chairman of the Board of Directors and Chief Executive Office of the DELL computer company visited CERN on Tuesday 26th January 2010. The Bulletin and the Video productions team had the opportunity to meet him. The video interview is transcribed for your convenience.   Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer. What motivated you to come and visit CERN? I obviously heard about the great science and research has going on here, and DELL is very pleased to be a partner and providing a lot of the computers to analyse the data and I really wanted to see for myself in person, some of the great science that is going on here. What is your view on fundamental research in IT, and in general? I think if you look at the field of science in the last hundred years, we have been able to solve a lot of problems, but there are still lots of unsolved problems and unsolved mysteries. And it is only through basic fundamental research that we will address these probl...

  13. Development of a new disease-specific quality-of-life questionnaire to adults living with haemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, P; Remor, E; Quintana, M; Villar, A; Díaz, J L; Moreno, M; Monteagudo, J; Ugarriza, A; Soto, I; Pérez, R; Chacón, J; García-Luaces, M; Cid, A; Balda, I; López, M F; Gutíerrez, M J; Martínez, E; Marrero, C; Prieto, M; Sedano, C; Vaca, R; Altisent, C; Hernández-Navarro, F

    2004-07-01

    A haemophilia-specific health-related quality-of-life questionnaire (named 'Hemofilia-QoL') was developed to assess quality-of-life in adults with haemophilia, and was psychometrically tested. Seventy-three interviews with haemophilia patients and health care professionals were used to generate the items included in the questionnaire, and expert ratings on the items formulated were used to screen them for potential omission. This was followed by psychometric testing in a sample of 35 patients. Preliminary psychometric testing of the revised questionnaire version, which contains 10 domains (physical health, physical role, joint damage, pain, treatment satisfaction, emotional role, mental health, social support), showed acceptable reliability (alpha = 0.94 for the Hemofilia-QoL total score) and validity, and this will be examined in a subsequent study with a larger patient sample.

  14. Applicant Personality and Procedural Justice Perceptions of Group Selection Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Hege H; Sandal, Gro M

    2016-01-01

    We investigated how job applicants' personalities influence perceptions of the structural and social procedural justice of group selection interviews (i.e., a group of several applicants being evaluated simultaneously). We especially addressed trait interactions between neuroticism and extraversion (the affective plane) and extraversion and agreeableness (the interpersonal plane). Data on personality (pre-interview) and justice perceptions (post-interview) were collected in a field study among job applicants ( N  = 97) attending group selection interviews for positions as teachers in a Norwegian high school. Interaction effects in hierarchical regression analyses showed that perceptions of social and structural justice increased with levels of extraversion among high scorers on neuroticism. Among emotionally stable applicants, however, being introverted or extraverted did not matter to justice perceptions. Extraversion did not impact on the perception of social justice for applicants low in agreeableness. Agreeable applicants, however, experienced the group interview as more socially fair when they were also extraverted. The impact of applicant personality on justice perceptions may be underestimated if traits interactions are not considered. Procedural fairness ratings for the group selection interview were high, contrary to the negative reactions predicted by other researchers. There was no indication that applicants with desirable traits (i.e., traits predictive of job performance) reacted negatively to this selection tool. Despite the widespread use of interviews in selection, previous studies of applicant personality and fairness reactions have not included interviews. The study demonstrates the importance of previously ignored trait interactions in understanding applicant reactions.

  15. Suppression mental questionnaire: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Settineri

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Authors postulate that the difference between suppression and repression, highlighted in particular by the Societè Psychanalitique de Paris, enables the development of a quantitative instrument, since suppression is a defense accessible to consciousness and therefore quantifiable like scales and questionnaires. The idea of constructing a questionnaire, included the identification of thirty variables having somehow a plausible relationship with this mechanism. The factor exploratory analysis were identified three factors, named respectly “repressive function”,  “regression to the ego service” and “rationalization”, the first of which is the closest to the theoretical construct postulated.

  16. Validation of a maternal questionnaire on correlates of physical activity in preschool children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inskip Hazel M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valid measures of physical activity correlates in preschool children are lacking. This study aimed to assess the validity, factor structure and internal consistency of a maternal questionnaire on potential correlates of four-year-old children's physical activity. Methods The questionnaire was designed to measure the following constructs: child personal factors; parental support and self-efficacy for providing support; parental rules and restrictions; maternal attitudes and perceptions; maternal behaviour; barriers to physical activity; and the home and local environments. Two separate studies were conducted. Study I included 24 mothers of four-year-old children who completed the questionnaire then participated in a telephone interview covering similar items to the questionnaire. To assess validity, the agreement between interview and questionnaire responses was assessed using Cohen's kappa and percentage agreement. Study II involved 398 mothers of four-year-old children participating in the Southampton Women's Survey. In this study, principal components analysis was used to explore the factor structure of the questionnaire to aid future analyses with these data. The internal consistency of the factors identified was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. Results Kappa scores showed 30% of items to have moderate agreement or above, 23% to have fair agreement and 47% to have slight or poor agreement. However, 89% of items had fair agreement as assessed by percentage agreement (≥ 66%. Limited variation in responses to variables is likely to have contributed to some of the low kappa values. Six questions had a low kappa and low percentage agreement (defined as poor validity; these included questions from the child personal factors, maternal self-efficacy, rules and restrictions, and local environment domains. The principal components analysis identified eleven factors and found several variables to stand alone. Eight of the composite

  17. The validated sun exposure questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster, B; Søndergaard, J; Nielsen, J B

    2017-01-01

    Few questionnaires used in monitoring sun-related behavior have been tested for validity. We established criteria validity of a developed questionnaire for monitoring population sun-related behavior. During May-August 2013, 664 Danes wore a personal electronic UV-dosimeter for one week...... that measured the outdoor time and dose of erythemal UVR exposure. In the following week, they answered a questionnaire on their sun-related behavior in the measurement week. Outdoor time measured by dosimetry correlated strongly with both outdoor time and the developed exposure scale measured....... The weekly sunburn fraction correlated strongly with the number of ambient sun hours (r=0.73, p

  18. Reliability of GMFCS family report questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rackauskaite, Gija; Thorsen, Poul; Uldall, Peter Vilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the reliability of the web-based GMFCS Family Report Questionnaire (GMFCS-FR) between 8 and 11 years old children, compared with the GMFCS-Expanded and Revised (GMFCS-E&R). Method: The GMFCS-FR was translated from the English GMFCS-FR into Danish after the CanChild guidelines...... Danish children with CP. The tendency for less-ability rating by families is important when performing and comparing results from epidemiological studies based on GMFCS-FR and GMFCS-E&R. [Box: see text].......; only the order of levels was chosen like in the GMFCS-E&R. Families of 30 children with spastic and dystonic cerebral palsy (age from 8 to 11 years, randomly selected from a cerebral palsy register) answered the GMFCS-FR and were later interviewed by two physiotherapists. Participants and non...

  19. Using motivational interviewing for weight feedback to parents of young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Anna M; Brown, Deirdre A; Cox, Adell; Williams, Sheila M; Treacy, Lee; Haszard, Jill; Meredith-Jones, Kim; Hargreaves, Elaine; Taylor, Barry J; Ross, Jim; Taylor, Rachael W

    2014-06-01

    To determine whether a single session of motivational interviewing (MI) for feedback of a child's overweight status promotes engagement in treatment following screening. One thousand ninety-three children aged 4-8 years were recruited through primary and secondary care to attend health screening, including assessment of parenting practices and motivation (questionnaire). Families with normal-weight children were informed about their child's weight but had no further involvement. Parents of overweight (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) children (n = 271) were randomised to receive weight feedback via MI or best practice care (BPC) using a traffic light concept to indicate degree of health risk. Follow-up interviews were held 2 weeks later to examine intervention uptake, changes to motivation and behaviour, and parental response to feedback. Recruitment into the intervention was high (76%) and not altered by feedback condition (percentage difference 6.6 (95% confidence interval -2.9, 16.0). High scores on the Health Care Climate Questionnaire (rating of the interviewer) indicated satisfaction with how the information was provided to parents. No differences were observed in multiple indicators of harm. However, self-determined motivation for healthy life-styles was significantly higher in the MI condition at follow-up (0.18: 0.00, 0.35), after only a single session of MI. MI and BPC were both successful in encouraging parents to participate in a family-based intervention, with MI offering little significant benefit over BPC. A traffic light approach to weight feedback is a suitable way of providing sensitive information to parents not expecting such news. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2014 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  20. Using Joint Interviews to Add Analytic Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Louisa; Green, Judith

    2016-10-01

    Joint interviewing has been frequently used in health research, and is the subject of a growing methodological literature. We review this literature, and build on it by drawing on a case study of how people make decisions about taking statins. This highlights two ways in which a dyadic approach to joint interviewing can add analytic value compared with individual interviewing. First, the analysis of interaction within joint interviews can help to explicate tacit knowledge and to illuminate the range of often hard-to-access resources that are drawn upon in making decisions. Second, joint interviews mitigate some of the weaknesses of interviewing as a method for studying practices; we offer a cautious defense of the often-tacit assumption that the "naturalness" of joint interviews strengthens their credibility as the basis for analytic inferences. We suggest that joint interviews are a particularly appropriate method for studying complex shared practices such as making health decisions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Motivational Interviewing and Rehabilitation Counseling Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C. C.; McMahon, B. T.

    2004-01-01

    This article explores commonalities between rehabilitation counseling and the counseling approach known as motivational interviewing. Motivational interviewing is an empirically supported, clientcentered, directive counseling approach designed to promote client motivation and reduce motivational conflicts and barriers to change. The underpinnings…

  2. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television.......Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television....

  3. Post-Cruise Questionnaire - Legacy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Post-Cruise Questionnaire is a mandatory post trip legal document that observers fill out after every trip they have completed.

  4. 28 CFR 540.63 - Personal interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Personal interviews. 540.63 Section 540... WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Contact With News Media § 540.63 Personal interviews. (a) An inmate may not receive compensation or anything of value for interviews with the news media. (b) Either an inmate...

  5. Interviewing Child Victims of Sexual Exploitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, William

    The interviewing of the child victim of sexual exploitation is one of the first and most important steps in solving and prosecuting a case of child exploitation and is the topic of this document. The first chapter discusses the interviewer's role, focusing on improving communication, dealing with emotion, the interviewer's response, male or female…

  6. Interpersonal Stance in Conflict Conversation: Police Interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijnes, Merijn

    2013-01-01

    In this work we focus on the dynamics of the conflict that often arises in a police interview between suspects and police officers. Police interviews are a special type of social encounter, primarily because of the authority role of the police interviewer and the often uncooperative stance that the

  7. Adjusting the Interview to Avoid Cultural Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Frances Eileen

    1992-01-01

    Considers cultural bias in employment interviews. Compares white American and Navajo interview styles and suggests new approach for recruiters to make interviewing less culturally biased. Recommends that recruiters not ask direct questions about personal achievements, try indirect approach, avoid making judgments on first impressions and…

  8. Interview "Problems" as Topics for Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roulston, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    In this article the author argues that interactional difficulties and questioning practices identified in the methodological literature on qualitative interviewing as "problems" provide topics of analysis. Methodological examinations of interview data drawing on conversation analysis also explicate how interview "problems" may be conceptualized in…

  9. Development and validation of a self-efficacy questionnaire (SE-12) measuring the clinical communication skills of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axboe, Mette K; Christensen, Kaj S; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ammentorp, Jette

    2016-10-18

    The outcome of communication training is widely measured by self-efficacy ratings, and different questionnaires have been used. Nevertheless, none of these questionnaires have been formally validated through systematic measurement of assessment properties. Consequently, we decided to further develop a self-efficacy questionnaire which has been used in previous studies. This study aims to examine the content, internal structure, and relations with other variables of the new version of the self-efficacy questionnaire (SE-12). The questionnaire was developed on the basis of the theoretical approach applied in the communication course, statements from former course participants, teachers, and experts in the field. The questionnaire was initially validated through face-to-face interviews with 9 staff members following a test-retest including 195 participants. After minor adjustments, the SE-12 questionnaire demonstrated evidence of content validity. An explorative factor analysis indicated unidimensionality with highly correlated items. A Cronbach's α of 0.95 and a Loevinger's H coefficient of 0.71 provided evidence of statistical reliability and scalability. The test-retest reliability had a value of 0.71 when evaluated using intra-class correlation. Expected relations with other variables were partially confirmed in two of three hypotheses, but a ceiling effect was present in 9 of 12 items. The SE-12 scale should be regarded a reliable and partially valid instrument. We consider the questionnaire useful for self-evaluation of clinical communication skills; the SE-12 is user-friendly and can be administered as an electronic questionnaire. However, future research should explore potential needs for adjustments to reduce the identified ceiling effect.

  10. Data from Interviews with 95 Respondents Recollecting Repeated Dental Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca M. Willén

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, Swedish dental care patients (n = 95 participated in a quasi-experiment in which they were interviewed twice about dental visits they had made between 2002 and 2012. For verification purposes, the participants' narratives were compared to the dental records. The qualitative data was quantified, stored as a .csv file, and supplemented with a codebook in plain text. All study materials are freely available online. The data can be reused to further analyse memory for repeated events. The data can be used both as data from an experiment (including both interviews and as single interview data (including data only from the first interview, i.e., before the respondents were provided with memory cues.

  11. Pain-related impairment of daily activities after thoracic surgery: a questionnaire validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringsted, Thomas K; Wildgaard, Kim; Kreiner, Svend; Kehlet, Henrik

    2013-09-01

    Persistent postoperative pain is an acknowledged entity that reduces daily activities. Evaluation of the post-thoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is often measured using traditional pain scales without in-depth questions on pain impairment. Thus, the purpose was to create a procedure-specific questionnaire for assessment of functional impairment due to PTPS. Activities were obtained from the literature supplemented by interviews with patients and surgeons. The questionnaire was validated using the Rasch model in order to describe an underlying pain impairment scale. Four of 17 questions were redundant. The remaining 13 questions from low to intensive activity described functional impairment following persistent pain from thoracotomy and video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). No evidence for differential item functioning for gender, age or differences between open or VATS, were found. A generalized log-linear Rasch model including local dependence was constructed. Though local dependence influenced reliability, the test-retest reliability estimated under the log-linear Rasch model was high (0.88-0.96). Correlation with items from the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (quick) questionnaire supported validity (γ = 0.46, P impairment questionnaire measured 2 qualitatively different pain dimensions although highly correlated (γ = 0.76). This study presents method, results and validation of a new unidimensional scale measuring procedure specific functional impairment due to PTPS following open surgery and VATS. Procedure specific tools such as this could provide important outcomes measures for future trials on persistent postsurgical pain states allowing better assessment of interventions (250).

  12. [Perception in chronic illnesses: linguistic validation of the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire for a Spanish population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Huergo, Valeria; Viladrich, Carme; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta; Cabezas-Peña, Carmen; Núñez, Montserrat; Roura-Olmeda, Pilar; Amado-Guirado, Ester; Núñez, Esther; Del Val, José Luis

    2012-05-01

    To obtain adapted versions for the Spanish population of a specific version of the Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire Revised (IPQ-R(e)) and the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire (BIPQ), conceptually and linguistically equivalent to the original questionnaires. Cultural adaptation of questionnaires: linguistic validation. Five primary care centres and a tertiary hospital. A multidisciplinary team was selected. A pilot study was performed on 30 people with chronic diseases (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, stable ischaemic heart disease, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or osteoarthritis) The project proceeded in 3 phases: I) Double forward-translation, II) Pilot study and III) Double back-translation. Three consensus meetings were held, one in each phase. Another meeting was held with one of the authors of the original questionnaire, where we knew about a short version, the BIPQ. It was also included in the study. Double forward and back-translations were performed and consensus was reached in both stages. Phase I) The majority of IPQ-R(e) items did not raise problems of translation. Phase II) In the pilot study we detected that patients found some difficulties in connection with the comprehension and self administration of some items. Therefore it was decided to employ trained interviewers, to introduce changes in the IPQ-R(e) format and vocabulary and to adapt a specific version with fewer items that solved most of these difficulties Phase III) Back-translations were very similar to the original version. The BIPQ forward and back-translation process caused no difficulties. After lingüistic validation, IPQ-R(e) and BIPQ versions conceptually and lingüistically equivalent to original instruments were obtained. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and Initial Validation of a Questionnaire to Measure Health-Related Quality of Life of Adults with Common Variable Immune Deficiency: The CVID_QoL Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinti, Isabella; Pulvirenti, Federica; Giannantoni, Patrizia; Hajjar, Joud; Canter, Debra L; Milito, Cinzia; Abeni, Damiano; Orange, Jordan S; Tabolli, Stefano

    Generic health status quality of life (QoL) instruments have been used in patients with common variable immune deficiency (CVID). However, by their nature, these tools may over- or underestimate the impact of diseases on an individual's QoL. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a questionnaire to measure specific-health-related QoL for adults with CVID (CVID_QoL). The 32-item content of the CVID_QoL questionnaire was developed using focus groups and individual patient interviews. Validation studies included 118 adults with CVID who completed Short Form-36, Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire, General Health Questionnaire-12, and EuroQol-5D questionnaire in a single session. Principal component and factor analysis solutions identified 3 scores to be similar in number and content for each solution. Validation of 3 factor scores was performed by construct validity. Reproducibility, reliability, convergent validity, and discriminant validity were evaluated. Matrices consisting of correlations between the 32 items in the CVID_QOL were calculated. Factor analysis identified 3 dimensions: emotional functioning (EF), relational functioning (RF), and gastrointestinal and skin symptoms (GSS). The instrument had good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha, min. 0.74 for GSS, max. 0.84 for RF, n = 118) and high reproducibility (intraclass correlation coefficient, min. 0.79 for RF, max 0.90 for EF, n = 27). EF and RF scores showed good convergent validity correlating with conceptually similar dimensions of other study scales. Acute and relapsing infections had a significant impact on EF and RF. This study provides evidence of the reliability and construct validity of the CVID_QoL to identify QoL issues in patients with CVID that may not be addressed by generic instruments. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [The application of motivational interviewing in nursing practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Chen; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2009-04-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) is a client-centered approach aimed to enhance a client's motivation to change behaviors and to move him or her to action. MI focuses on client desires, thoughts and feelings as a way to encourage clients to express their own barriers to change and to explore and resolve ambivalence to behavioral change. Motivational interviewing has been applied in a variety of conditions, including substance abuse cessation, obesity treatment, treatment adherence, enhance of diet and exercise behaviors and the prevention and management of chronic diseases. Evidence from research has demonstrated that motivational interviewing is effective in improving client lifestyle and health outcomes. There are four guiding principles in conducting motivational interviews include expressing empathy, developing discrepancies, backing off when encountering resistance, and supporting self-efficacy. In addition, five basic therapeutic skills are often used in the interview process, including reflective listening, asking open questions, affirming, weight of cons and pros, summarizing. The principles and skills discussed in this paper will help nurses better understand the "spirit" of motivational interviewing and facilitate their further application them in clinical practice to promote client self-awareness and instill a motivation to change health behaviors.

  15. Construction and characteristics of questionnaire for the assessment of defense mechanisms: MOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džamonja-Ignjatović Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Defense mechanisms are psychological constructs of key importance for the assessment of personality and planning therapeutic process. Their assessment is mainly based on interview, observation and projective techniques. Questionnaires, as the self-assessment techniques, apparently are not suitable method for unconscious processes such as defense mechanisms. The paper presents the results of construction of the questionnaire for the assessment of defense mechanisms, abbreviated called MOD (Mechanisms of Defense, which represents an attempt to clarify conceptualization and operationalization of these constructs through a variety of behavioral and emotional manifestations, personal attitudes and beliefs, patterns of interpersonal relationships and feedback from environment. Research objectives included testing of metric characteristics and the factor structure of the questionnaire, as well as its validity for differentiating subjects from clinical and non-clinical populations. The questionnaire has 110 items assessed at the 5-point Likert scale for evaluation of 20 defense mechanisms. The sample consisted of 194 subjects of both sexes, of which 136 students of psychology and social work and 58 nonpsychotic patients from clinical populations. The results showed that the reliability of the scale varies from high to unsatisfactory (Cronbach alpha .82- .35, although for most subscales is around .65-.70. The most of defense mechanisms has one factor structure, whereas from about a third of the subscales two principal components were isolated. Analysis of the structure of mature defense mechanisms clearly derived out four factors corresponding to the presumed mechanisms of defense, while for the groups of neurotic and immature mechanisms were not obtained pure solutions. The questionnaire successfully differentiate clinical from non-clinical sample, based on higher scores on mature and lower scores on immature mechanisms, while the groups did not differ

  16. Development and conceptual validation of a questionnaire to help contraceptive choice: CHLOE (Contraception: HeLping for wOmen's choicE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, Christian Georges; Häusler, Gunther; Lobo Abascal, Paloma; Fiala, Christian; Lete Lasa, Luis Ignacio; Nappi, Rossella Elena; Micheletti, Marie-Christine; Fernández-Dorado, Ana; Pintiaux, Axelle; Chabbert-Buffet, Natalie

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this research was to develop a questionnaire to facilitate choice of the most appropriate contraceptive method for individual women. A literature review was conducted to identify key aspects influencing contraceptive choice and inform development of a questionnaire for online completion. Questionnaire development was overseen by a steering committee consisting of eight gynaecologists from across Europe. The initial draft underwent conceptual validation through cognitive debriefing interviews with six native English-speaking women. A qualitative content analysis was conducted to accurately identify potential issues and areas for questionnaire improvement. A revised version of the questionnaire then underwent face-to-face and online evaluation by 115 international gynaecologists/obstetricians with expertise in contraception, prior to development of a final version. The final conceptually validated Contraception: HeLping for wOmen's choicE (CHLOE) questionnaire takes ≤10 min to complete and includes three sections to elicit general information about the individual, the health conditions that might influence contraceptive choice, and the woman's needs and preferences that might influence contraceptive choice. The questionnaire captures the core aspects of personalisation, efficacy and safety, identified as key attributes influencing contraceptive choice, and consists of 24 closed-ended questions for online completion prior to a health care provider (HCP) consultation. The HCP receives a summary of the responses. The CHLOE questionnaire has been developed to help women choose the contraception that best suits their needs and situation while optimising the HCP's time.

  17. Profile Interview: Dr Desiree Witte

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -preventable diseases in children ... (UNHCR) to set-up a medical aid program, including vaccinations, for the Mauritanian refugees in ... In the Nineties, many Districts in Malawi were headed by a. Dutch District Health Officer (DHO) as part of a ...

  18. How to improve the validity of sexual behaviour reporting: systematic review of questionnaire delivery modes in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhaug, Lisa F; Sherr, Lorraine; Cowan, Frances M

    2010-03-01

    To systematically review comparative research from developing countries on the effects of questionnaire delivery mode. We searched Medline, EMbase and PsychINFO and ISSTDR conference proceedings. Randomized control trials and quasi-experimental studies were included if they compared two or more questionnaire delivery modes, were conducted in a developing country, reported on sexual behaviours and occurred after 1980. A total of 28 articles reporting on 26 studies met the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity of reported trial outcomes between studies made it inappropriate to combine trial outcomes. Eighteen studies compared audio computer-assisted survey instruments (ACASI) or its derivatives [personal digital assistant (PDA) or computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI)] against another self-administered questionnaires, face-to-face interviews or random response technique. Despite wide variation in geography and populations sampled, there was strong evidence that computer-assisted interviews lowered item-response rates and raised rates of reporting sensitive behaviours. ACASI also improved data entry quality. A wide range of sexual behaviours were reported including vaginal, oral, anal and/or forced sex, age of sexual debut, condom use at first and/or last sex. Validation of self-reports using biomarkers was rare. These data reaffirm that questionnaire delivery modes do affect self-reported sexual behaviours and that use of ACASI can significantly reduce reporting bias. Its acceptability and feasibility in developing country settings should encourage researchers to consider its use when conducting sexual health research. Triangulation of self-reported data using biomarkers is recommended. Standardizing sexual behaviour measures would allow for meta-analysis.

  19. Have We Come as Far as We Had Hoped? Discrimination in the Residency Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessel, Kara; DiPasco, Peter; Kilgore, Lyndsey; Shelley, Casey; Perry, Alvin; Wagner, Jamie

    The primary objective was to use a pilot survey of fourth-year medical students at our institution to determine if female residency applicants were asked potentially illegal questions regarding family status and childbearing more frequently than male applicants. Secondary objectives included comparing the use of potentially illegal questions in surgical versus nonsurgical specialties and between community and academic residency programs. A 20-item questionnaire was distributed to all fourth-year medical students at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. Data were analyzed in SPSS using descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, and multivariate analysis. University of Kansas Health System, Tertiary Care Center. Fourth-year medical students from the University of Kansas School of Medicine. There were 57 survey respondents (51% male and 49% female). Female applicants were more likely to report being asked about their desire to have a family than male applicants (32% vs. 3%, respectively, p = 0.041). However, male and female students were equally likely to report being asked specifically if they had or intended to have children (p = 0.194). No significant differences were found in potentially illegal question-asking between surgical and nonsurgical specialties or between community-based and academic programs. Although women now represent 47% of the applicant pool, gender discrimination in the residency interview has not been eradicated. Women are more likely to report potentially illegal questions regarding their desire to have a family on residency interviews than men. Community and academic programs appear to ask similar numbers and types of potentially illegal questions. Further study is warranted to determine if these findings apply to the entire applicant pool. Further education of interviewers is necessary regarding potentially illegal questions during the residency interview process. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery

  20. Primary care nurses' performance in motivational interviewing: a quantitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlund, Ann-Sofi; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena; Häggström, Elisabeth; Wadensten, Barbro

    2015-07-25

    Motivational interviewing is a collaborative conversational style intended to strengthen motivation to change. It has been shown to be effective in addressing many different lifestyle problems as well as in chronic disease management, and many disease prevention guidelines promote use of motivational interviewing. The aim of the present study was twofold: to assess to what extent the primary care nurses in the study perform motivational interviewing according to the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity Code and to investigate how the participating primary care nurses rated their own performance in motivational interviewing. The study was based on twelve primary care nurses' audio-recorded motivational interviewing sessions with patients (total 32 sessions). After each session, the nurses completed a questionnaire regarding their experience of their own performance in motivational interviewing. The audio-recorded sessions were analyzed using Motivational Interviewing Integrity Code 3.1.1. None of the nurses achieved beginning proficiency in all parts of any motivational interviewing sessions and two nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency in any parts or sessions. Making more complex than simple reflections was the specific verbal behavior/summary score that most nurses achieved. Beginning proficiency/competency in "percent open questions" was the summary score that fewest achieved. Primary care nurses did not achieve beginning proficiency/competency in all aspects of motivational interviewing in their recorded sessions with patients, where lifestyle change was discussed. This indicates a need for improvement and thus additional training, feedback and supervision in clinical practice with motivational interviewing.

  1. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  2. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2016-01-01

    There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ), which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and EQ-5D-5L. Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach's α: 0.81-0.96), as was test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83-0.92). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ- 5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in a range of further conditions, and additional properties, such as responsiveness, will also be assessed in the next phase of the instrument's development.

  3. Evaluation of the effect of motivational interviewing counselling on hypertension care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chunhua; Zhou, Ying; Zhou, Wei; Huang, Chunfeng

    2014-05-01

    This study tests the effectiveness of motivational interviewing compared with the usual care for Chinese hypertensive patients. A randomised controlled trial was used. One hundred and twenty eligible participants were randomly assigned to either the control group (usual care group) or the intervention group (motivational interviewing group). The results of this study demonstrated that the total scores and the mean scores for each dimension of the adherence questionnaire were increased in the intervention group (Pmotivational interviewing counselling (Pmotivational interviewing for hypertensive patients is a promising approach for sustaining the clinical benefits of adherence behaviour. Motivational interviewing should be provided to hypertensive patients at hospitals and community health centres to assist patients in controlling their BP and to enhance treatment adherence. A series of training courses on the motivational interviewing technique should be provided to nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The World Health Organisation. Interview with the director general. Interview by Fiona Godlee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, H

    1995-03-04

    Dr Hiroshi Nakajima was elected director general of WHO in 1988. Born in Japan, he trained as a psychiatrist before joining WHO in 1973. He was WHO's regional director for the Western Pacific from 1979 to 1988. His term of office has been marked by criticism of his management style and allegations of misuse of WHO's funds. I spoke to him at WHO's headquarters in Geneva in July. I have presented the interview in the form of questions and answers. It would be misleading, however, not to make clear that in doing so I have transcribed conversation which was at times extremely difficult to follow. I feel that it is important to emphasise this in the context of an interview with an international leader, one of whose primary tasks must be to communicate his views on health to people across the world. The interviews gave me first hand experience of the difficulties in communication that staff, diplomats, and others, including Japanese leaders, have consistently commented on since Dr Nakajima took office.

  5. QUESTIONNAIRES PRETESTING IN MARKETING RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA-MIHAELA BABONEA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Designing the perfect survey questionnaire is impossible. However, researchers can still create an effective research. To make your questionnaire effective, it is necessary to pretest it before actually using it. The following paper reveals some general guidelines on pretesting and what to do for a more effective marketing research giving the fact that the existing literature highlights the importance and indispensability of pretesting and on the other hand, does not provide sufficient information in terms of methodology about it. Also, we have tried to explain the importance of questionnaires pretesting before applying them in order to obtain the best results in marketing research and we’ve kept in mind that high quality in this domain means using new tools and improving the existing ones if one searches for efficient results.

  6. ACADEMIC TRAINING LECTURES-QUESTIONNAIRE

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2004-01-01

    ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz tel. 73127 academic.training@cern.ch SUGGEST AND WIN! Its time to plan the 2004-2005 lecture series. From today until March 19 you have the chance to give your contribution to planning for next year's Academic Training Lecture Series. At the web site: http://cern.ch/Academic.Training/questionnaire you will find questionnaires proposing topics in high energy physics, applied physics and science and society. Answering the questionnaire will help ensure that the selected topics are as close as possible to your interests. In particular requests and comments from students will be much appreciated. To encourage your contribution, the AT Committee will reward one lucky winner with a small prize, a 50 CHF coupon for a book purchase at the CERN bookshop.

  7. Medical oncology patients' preferences with regard to health care : development of a patient-driven questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, H.; Wynia, K.; Sixma, H.J.; de Heus, M.; Schipper, M.; Woltjer, G.T.; Teunissen, S.C.; Voest, E.E.

    2009-01-01

    Patients and methods: Items were generated using 10 focus group interviews with 51 cancer patients. A preliminary questionnaire was handed out to 681 patients of seven Dutch departments of medical oncology. Explorative factor analysis was carried out on the 386 returned questionnaires (response

  8. Optical modulator including grapene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  9. Exit interviews to reduce turnover amongst healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Flint, Anndrea

    2014-08-19

    Exit interviews are widely used in healthcare organisations to identify reasons for staff attrition, yet their usefulness in limiting turnover is unclear. To determine the effectiveness of various exit interview strategies in decreasing turnover rates amongst healthcare professionals. We searched the Cochrane EPOC Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 11, 2012; MEDLINE, Ovid (1950- ); EMBASE, Ovid (1947- ); CINAHL, EbscoHost (1980- ), and PsycINFO, OVID (1806-) between October 31 and November 6, 2012. We also screened the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews; and searched trial registries for planned and on-going studies. We did not restrict searches by language or publication date. Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies comparing turnover rates between healthcare professionals who had undergone one form of exit interview with another form of exit interview or with no interview. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The original search identified 1560 citations, of which we considered 19 potentially relevant. The two authors independently reviewed the abstracts of these studies and retrieved the full texts of eight studies. We excluded all eight following independent assessment; they were either interviews, commentaries on how to do an exit interview or descriptive studies about reasons for leaving. We found no studies that matched our inclusion criteria. For this first update, we screened 2220 citations and identified no new studies. Evidence about the effectiveness of exit interviews to reduce turnover is currently not available. However, exit interviews may provide useful information about the work environment which, in turn, may be useful in the development of interventions to reduce turnover.

  10. Assessing obstetric patient experience: a SERVQUAL questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, Francesca; Narayan, Harini

    2013-01-01

    Across health services, there is a drive to respond to patient feedback and to incorporate their views into service improvement. The SERVQUAL method has been used in several clinical settings to quantify whether services meet patient expectations. However, work has been limited in the obstetric population. This paper seeks to address these issues. This study used an adapted SERVQUAL questionnaire to assess a reconfigured antenatal clinic service. The most important care aspects, as rated by patients, were used to construct the SERVQUAL questions. The questionnaire was administered to eligible women in two parts. The first was completed before their first hospital antenatal appointment and the second either at home (a postal-chasing exercise) or while waiting for their next appointment. Only fully completed questionnaires (both parts) were analysed. Service strengths included staff politeness, patient respect and privacy. Areas for improvement included hand cleanliness, women's involvement in decision making and communicating risk. However, the low variability in patient responses makes concrete conclusions difficult and methodological issues complicate evaluating hand cleanliness. The new antenatal clinic service received low negative weighted and un-weighted overall scores. The SERVQUAL measure was developed from patient feedback and used to further improve services. The SERVQUAL-based measure allowed an internal evaluation of patient experience and highlighted areas for improvement. However, without validation, the questionnaire cannot be used as an outcome measure and variation between published SERVQUAL questionnaires makes comparisons difficult. This highlights an important balance in patient evaluation measures--between locally responsive and externally comparable. The SERVQUAL approach allows healthcare teams to evaluate patient experience, while accounting for variation in their expectations and priorities. The study highlights several areas that are

  11. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley D

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available David Morley, Sarah Dummett, Laura Kelly, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, Crispin JenkinsonNuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKBackground: With an ageing population and increasing demands on health and social care services, there is growing importance attached to the management of long-term conditions, including maximizing the cost-effectiveness of treatments. In line with this, there is increasing emphasis on the need to keep people both active and participating in daily life. Consequently, it is essential that well developed and validated instruments that can meaningfully assess levels of participation and activity are widely available. Current measures, however, are largely focused on disability and rehabilitation, and there is no measure of activity or participation for generic use that fully meets the standards set by regulatory bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration. Here we detail a protocol for the development and validation of a new patient-reported outcome measure (PROM for assessment of participation and activity in people experiencing a variety of health conditions, ie, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ. The stages incorporated in its development are entirely in line with current regulations and represent best practice in the development of PROMs.Methods: Development of the Ox-PAQ is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The project incorporates a new strategy of engaging with stakeholders from the outset in an attempt to identify those characteristics of PROMs considered most important to a range of potential users. Items will be generated through interviews with patients from a range of conditions. Pretesting of the instrument will be via cognitive interviews and focus groups. A postal survey will be conducted, with data subject to factor and Rasch analysis in order to

  12. Giving residents tools to talk about behavior change: a motivational interviewing curriculum description and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Julie W; Bost, James E; Kraemer, Kevin L; Cluss, Patricia A; Spagnoletti, Carla L; Gonzaga, Alda Maria R; Arnold, Robert M

    2012-11-01

    To determine whether a motivational interviewing (MI) curriculum is effective in teaching internal medicine residents core MI skills and the empathic, nonjudgmental MI style. Nineteen third-year residents met for 12 h with a faculty instructor. Teaching methods included lecture, written exercises, a simulated patient exercise, and discussion of residents' behavior change issues. Residents' adoption of MI skills was evaluated before and after the course with the Helpful Responses Questionnaire. Residents decreased use of closed-ended questions (from a score of 1.13 to 0.37, p=0.036) and MI roadblocks (4.00-1.08, pcommunication skills in a written measure, and was highly rated. Future work should examine whether teaching of the empathic, collaborative MI stance impacts patient outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An examination of the association between interviewer question type and story-grammar detail in child witness interviews about abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltis, Brooke B; Powell, Martine B; Snow, Pamela C; Hughes-Scholes, Carolyn H

    2010-06-01

    This study compared the effects of open-ended versus specific questions, and various types of open-ended questions, in eliciting story-grammar detail in child abuse interviews. The sample included 34 police interviews with child witnesses aged 5-15 years (M age=9 years, 9 months). The interviewers' questions and their relative sub-types were classified according to definitions reported in the child interview training literature. The children's responses were classified according to the proportion of story grammar and the prevalence of individual story grammar elements as defined by Stein and Glenn (1979). Open-ended questions were more effective at eliciting story grammar than specific questions. This finding was revealed across three age groups, two interview phases and irrespective of how question effectiveness was measured. However, not all types of open-ended questions were equally effective. Open-ended questions that encouraged a broad response, or asked the child to elaborate on a part of their account, elicited more story-grammar detail compared to open-ended questions that requested clarification of concepts or descriptions of the next (or another) activity or detail within a sequence. This study demonstrates that children's ability to provide story-grammar detail is maximised when there is minimal prompting from the interviewer. Given the association between story grammar production and victim credibility, greater guidance is warranted in interviewer training programs in relation to the effects and administration of different types of open-ended questions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Role of Motivational Interviewing in Depression and Psychological Well-Being in Mothers of Students Having Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soheila Imanparvar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of motivational interviewing on the minimising of depression symptoms and improvement of psychological well-being among mothers of students having learning disabilities were studied. The methodology was based on the comparison of pretest-posttest Vs control-groups. The statistical data included all mothers of primary-school students having learning disabilities (50 subjects and normal students (50 subjects residing in the city of Ardabil, Iran. Subject selections were made through simple random sampling method and group counselling sessions focused on motivational interviewing were held for the experimental group for total eight "60-minute sessions". The structure of the motivational interviewing sessions was extracted from a prescribed prescript of group therapy. To tabulate the data; Ryff’s Scales of Psychological Well-Being, Beck Depression Inventory, and Colorado Learning Difficulties Questionnaire were used. As per the statistical analysis the motivational interviewing can reduce depression symptoms and improve psychological well-being in mothers of students having learning disabilities.

  15. Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Hestbæk, Lise

    Title Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire Authors & Affiliations Henrik Hein Lauridsen1, Lise Hestbæk1,2 1. Research Unit for Clinical Biomechanics, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Clinical Locomotion Network, Campusvej 55, DK-5230...... and adolescents are absent. The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument for children aged 9-12 years which could fill this gap in the literature. Methods The Young Spine Questionnaire (YSQ) was developed in three phases – the conceptualisation, development and testing phase. We used the conceptual...... model of Wilson and Cleary (1995) and divided the YSQ into two parts: part one included spinal prevalence estimates (including pictures of spinal area) and part two questions regarding pain, activity restrictions, care seeking behaviour and influence of parental back trouble. During the developing phase...

  16. An Interview with DOROTHY E. DENNING, Oral History 424

    OpenAIRE

    Yost, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Computer Security History Project Computer security pioneer Dorothy Denning discusses her career including her Lattice Model for Computer Security, research on database security, intrusion detection, and other areas, such as her influential textbooks. The interview also addresses computer security research infrastructure and collaborators at various institutions where she worked including Purdue University, SRI International, Digital Equipment Corporation, Georgetown University, and Naval ...

  17. Determining the interviewer effect on CQ Index outcomes: a multilevel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winters Sjenny

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CQ Index for the elderly, a quality-of-care questionnaire administered by conducting interviews, is used to assess clients' experiences in Dutch nursing homes and homes for the elderly. This article describes whether inter-interviewer differences influence the perceived quality of healthcare services reported by residents, the size of this interviewer effect and the influence of the interviewer characteristics on CQ Index dimensions for public reporting. Methods Data from 4345 questionnaires was used. Correlations were calculated, reliability analyses were performed, and a multilevel analysis was used to calculate the degree of correlation between two interviewers within one health care institution. Five models were constructed and the Intra Class Correlation (ICC was calculated. Healthcare institutions were given 1-5 stars on every quality dimensions (1 = worst and 5 = best, adjusted for resident and interviewer characteristics. The effect of these characteristics on the assignment of the stars was investigated. Results In a multilevel approach, the ICC showed a significant amount of variance on five quality dimensions. Of the interviewer characteristics, only previous interviewing experience, the reason of interviewing and general knowledge of health care had a significant effect on the quality dimensions. Adjusting for interviewer characteristics did not affect the overall star assignment to the institutions regarding 7 of 12 quality dimensions. For the other five dimensions (Shared decision-making, Meals, Professional competency, Autonomy, and Availability of personnel a minor effect was found. Conclusions We have shown that training, the use of experienced interviewers, written instructions, supervision and educational meetings do not automatically prevent interviewer effects. While the results of this study can be used to improve the quality of services provided by these institutions, several CQ index dimensions

  18. [Interview - technique of art (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estl, M

    1976-01-01

    Interview is defined as "action-like discussion by medium of dialogue with a diagnostic object in view" (SCHRAML), at the same time the importance of the dialogue-purpose and of the motivation of the subject is pointed out. Several methods may be used for conducting the dialogue, their selection being mainly dependent on the vocational training of the investigator. The personality of the investigator plays an important role when interviewing. The interviewer has to take into account the ever present subjectivity to prevent diagnostic mistakes. On the other hand this subjectivity enables the interviewer to get a special diagnostic access when his own ability of empathy and intuition is consciously used. The knowledge of difficult interviewing-techniques is not sufficient, only an integrative coherence awards the single results from the dialogue and simultaneously observation of the subject the adequate position, this makes an interview to an art, whose command is only given to a few.

  19. Active Mobility and Environment: A Pilot Qualitative Study for the Design of a New Questionnaire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Hess

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that active mobility, mainly walking and cycling, contributes to people's physical and mental health. One of the current challenges is to improve our understanding of this type of behaviour. This study aims to identify factors from the daily-life environment that may be related to active mobility behaviours, in order to design a new questionnaire for a quantitative study of a large adult population. The new questionnaire obtained through this pilot study combines information from interviews with existing questionnaires materials in order to introduce new factors while retaining the factors already assessed. This approach comprises three stages. The first was a content analysis (Reinert method of interviews with a sample of participants about daily living activities as well as mobility. This stage led to a typology of factors suggested by interviews. The second was a scoping review of the literature in order to identify the active mobility questionnaires currently used in international literature. The last stage was a cross-tabulation of the factors resulting from the written interviews and the questionnaires. A table of the inter-relationships between the interview-based typology and the questionnaires shows discrepancies between factors considered by the existing questionnaires, and factors coming from individual interviews. Independent factors which were ignored in or absent from the questionnaires are the housing situation within the urban structure, overall consideration of the activity space beyond the limits of the residential neighbourhood, the perception of all the transportation modes, and the time scheduling impacting the modes actually used. Our new questionnaire integrates both the usual factors and the new factors that may be related to active mobility behaviours.

  20. The well-being questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pouwer, F; Snoek, Frank J; Van Der Ploeg, Henk M

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Well-being Questionnaire (W-BQ) has been designed to measure psychological well-being in people with a chronic somatic illness and is recommended by the World Health Organization for widespread use. However, studies into the factor structure of this instrument are still limited...

  1. Diet History Questionnaire: Canadian Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) and the DHQ nutrient database were modified for use in Canada through the collaborative efforts of Dr. Amy Subar and staff at the Risk Factor Monitoring and Methods Branch, and Dr. Ilona Csizmadi and colleagues in the Division of Population Health and Information at the Alberta Cancer Board in Canada.

  2. Manual Health and Labour Questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van Hakkaart-van Roijen (Leona); M.L.E. Essink-Bot (Marie-Louise)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWhen the indirect costs form a part of an economical evaluation, a standardised method for measuring production losses, as a result of illness, is required. Standardisation will increase the comparability and transparency of the results. The Health and Labour Questionnaire (HLQ) is

  3. 572 OR questionnaire.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-04-27

    Apr 27, 2010 ... Original Research: Patients' perception and knowledge of anaesthesia and anaesthetists – a questionnaire survey. 2010;16(4) ... determine patients' knowledge of anaesthesia and of the qualifications and role of anaesthetists in patient care. Methods: ..... information leaflets on anaesthesia and focus group.

  4. Reliability of Multiple Mini-Interviews and traditional interviews within and between institutions: a study of five California medical schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Jerant

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many medical schools use admissions Multiple Mini-Interviews (MMIs rather than traditional interviews (TIs, partly because MMIs are thought to be more reliable. Yet prior studies examined single-school samples of candidates completing either an MMI or TI (not both. Using data from five California public medical schools, the authors examined the within- and between-school reliabilities of TIs and MMIs. Methods The analyses included applicants interviewing at ≥1 of the five schools during 2011–2013. Three schools employed TIs (TI1, TI2, TI3 and two employed MMIs (MMI1, MMI2. Mixed linear models accounting for nesting of observations within applicants examined standardized TI and MMI scores (mean = 0, SD = 1, adjusting for applicant socio-demographics, academic metrics, year, number of interviews, and interview date. Results A total of 4993 individuals (completing 7516 interviews [TI = 4137, MMI = 3379] interviewed at ≥1 school; 428 (14.5% interviewed at both MMI schools and 687 (20.2% at more than one TI school. Within schools, inter-interviewer consistency was generally qualitatively lower for TI1, TI2, and TI3 (Pearson’s r 0.07, 0.13, and 0.29, and Cronbach’s α, 0.40, 0.44, and 0.61, respectively than for MMI1 and MMI 2 (Cronbach’s α 0.68 and 0.60, respectively. Between schools, the adjusted intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.27 (95% CI 0.20–0.35 for TIs and 0.47 (95% CI 0.41–0.54 for MMIs. Conclusions Within and between-school reliability was qualitatively higher for MMIs than for TIs. Nonetheless, TI reliabilities were higher than anticipated from prior literature, suggesting TIs may not need to be abandoned on reliability grounds if other factors favor their use.

  5. Improving reliability of a residency interview process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Michael J; Serres, Michelle L; Gundrum, Todd E

    2013-10-14

    To improve the reliability and discrimination of a pharmacy resident interview evaluation form, and thereby improve the reliability of the interview process. In phase 1 of the study, authors used a Many-Facet Rasch Measurement model to optimize an existing evaluation form for reliability and discrimination. In phase 2, interviewer pairs used the modified evaluation form within 4 separate interview stations. In phase 3, 8 interviewers individually-evaluated each candidate in one-on-one interviews. In phase 1, the evaluation form had a reliability of 0.98 with person separation of 6.56; reproducibly, the form separated applicants into 6 distinct groups. Using that form in phase 2 and 3, our largest variation source was candidates, while content specificity was the next largest variation source. The phase 2 g-coefficient was 0.787, while confirmatory phase 3 was 0.922. Process reliability improved with more stations despite fewer interviewers per station-impact of content specificity was greatly reduced with more interview stations. A more reliable, discriminating evaluation form was developed to evaluate candidates during resident interviews, and a process was designed that reduced the impact from content specificity.

  6. Development and validation of health related quality of life questionnaire (Indian scenario) in diabetic foot ulcer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateel, Ramya; Augustine, Alfred J; Ullal, Sheetal; Prabhu, Shivananda; Bhat, Rahul; Adhikari, Prabha

    2017-12-01

    To develop and validate Health Related Quality of Life Questionnaire in Diabetic Foot Ulcer Patients (HRQLQDFU) for Indian scenario. This study was conducted in two phases. First phase was Development of HRQLQDFU which included literature search and expert interview. Second phase was validation of HRQLQDFL which included face validation, content validation and construct validation. Face validation was done by ten diabetic foot ulcer patients, ten practicing nurses and ten care givers. They were asked to read and respond to questionnaire and report any difficulty in understanding the questions. Further they were asked to add any item to the questionnaire which according to them has a significant effect on quality of life. Content validation was done by six subject experts who judged the content relevance of questionnaire with score ranging from zero to four; zero being least relevant and four being most relevant. Content validity index was calculated for each question. Questions having content validity index≥0.8 were selected for the study. Reliability was tested by calculating Cronbach's alpha. In the development phase a questionnaire containing 37 questions with six domains was developed. None of patient had difficulty in understanding questions. After content validation a new questionnaire containing 20 questions was developed. Cronbach's alpha was 0.86 which shows good reliability. The new health related quality of life questionnaire on diabetic foot ulcer patients for an Indian scenario is validated and can be a reliably measure for quality of life in diabetic foot ulcer patients. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A semi-structured, phenomenologically oriented psychiatric interview: Descriptive congruens in assessing anomalous subjective experience and mental status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Julie Elisabeth Nordgaard; Parnas, Josef Stefan Stanislaw

    2012-01-01

    the interrater congruens between experienced clinicians with a semi structured, phenomenologically oriented psychopathological interview assessing anomalous self-experience and mental status. Method: Seventeen inpatients were interviewed by one of the raters, with both raters were present. The interview......-introduced rater, since it is that kind of researchers that are typically enrolled for the empirical data collections.......Objective: The contemporary methodology in obtaining psychopathological information relies almost exclusively on the use of structured questionnaires and interview schedules. These interviews yield high interrater reliability and reduce cost. The assessments of anomalous self...

  8. 78 FR 68907 - Agency Information Collection (Foot (Including Flatfeet (pes planus)) Conditions Disability...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... planus)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data collection. Abstract... (Including Flatfeet (pes planus)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY...)) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...

  9. Interview with Ramadan Shallah, Secretary General, Palestinian Islamic Jihad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Atran

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available On December 14-16, 2009, a delegation from the World Federation of Scientists, including the authors, traveled to Damascus to interview senior Syrian and Palestinian leaders from Syria and various Palestinian factions, including the members of the leadership of Hamas and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. The objective was to gain insight from field interviews into how to further advance scientific understanding of cultural and political conflict in order to create new theoretical and practical frameworks for negotiation and cooperation.

  10. District nurses' and registered nurses' training in and use of motivational interviewing in primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Östlund, Ann-Sofi; Wadensten, Barbro; Häggström, Elisabeth; Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena

    2014-08-01

    To examine to what extent district nurses and registered nurses have training in motivational interviewing, to what extent they use it and what prerequisites they have for using it; to compare district nurses and registered nurses, as well as to compare users and nonusers of motivational interviewing; and to examine possible relationships between use of motivational interviewing and the variables training, supervision and feedback in motivational interviewing and prerequisites for use. Motivational interviewing is an effective method for motivating patients to change their lifestyle, used increasingly in primary care. A cross-sectional survey study. A study-specific questionnaire was sent to all district nurses and registered nurses (n = 980) in primary care in three counties in Sweden, from September 2011-January 2012; 673 (69%) responded. Differences between groups as well as relationships between study variables were tested. According to self-reports, 59% of the respondents had training in motivational interviewing and 57% used it. Approximately 15% of those who reported using it had no specific training in the method. More district nurses than registered nurses had training in motivational interviewing and used it. The following factors were independently associated with the use of motivational interviewing: training in and knowledge of motivational interviewing, conditions for using it, time and absence of 'other' obstacles. Having knowledge in motivational interviewing and personal as well as workplace prerequisites for using it may promote increased use of motivational interviewing. Having the prerequisites for using motivational interviewing at the workplace is of significance to the use of motivational interviewing. In the context of primary care, district nurses seem to have better prerequisites than registered nurses for using motivational interviewing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morley D

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available David Morley, Sarah Dummett, Laura Kelly, Jill Dawson, Ray Fitzpatrick, Crispin Jenkinson Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK Purpose: There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ, which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization's International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Methods: Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson's disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and EQ-5D-5L. Results: Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach's α: 0.81–0.96, as was test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83–0.92. Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ-5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Conclusion: Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in

  12. Validity of occupational energy expenditure assessed by interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernold, Gunilla; Tornqvist, Ewa Wigaeus; Wiktorin, Christina; Mortimer, Monica; Karlsson, Eva; Kilbom, Asa; Vingård, Eva

    2002-01-01

    Measuring physical activity at work has been a field of growing interest in recent decades, and there is a need for reliable, standardized assessment instruments for application in large population studies. The present study examined the validity of a task-oriented interview for assessing energy expenditure in occupational work. The interview was developed for use in the MUSIC-Norrtälje study, a population study with the overall aim of identifying risk and preventive factors for musculoskeletal disorders. Twenty-seven persons were included in the study. Each respondent defined all tasks performed during a typical workday and estimated their durations. For each task the interviewer then assessed the level of energy expenditure in multiples of the resting metabolic rate (MET) and calculated a time-weighted average MET (TWA-MET) for a typical workday. Measurements of oxygen consumption and observations of duration of each work task were performed during 2 workdays in all the interviewed subjects. The validity was tested by comparing TWA-MET derived from the interviews with those derived from measurements; the product moment correlation coefficient was 0.70. The interview may offer sufficient validity for assessment of energy expenditure in large population studies.

  13. Three Decades Investigating Humor and Laughter: An Interview With Professor Rod Martin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Martin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the start of the 21st century, the investigation of various psychological aspects of humor and laughter has become an increasingly prominent topic of research. This growth can be attributed, in no small part, to the pioneering and creative work on humor and laughter conducted by Professor Rod Martin. Dr. Martin’s research interests in humor and laughter began in the early 1980s and continued throughout his 32 year long career as a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Western Ontario. During this time, Dr. Martin published numerous scholarly articles, chapters, and books on psychological aspects of humor and laughter. Professor Martin has just retired in July 2016, and in the present interview he recounts a number of research highlights of his illustrious career. Dr. Martin’s earliest influential work, conducted while he was still in graduate school, stemmed from an individual difference perspective that focused on the beneficial effects of sense of humor on psychological well-being. This research focus remained evident in many of Professor Martin’s subsequent investigations, but became increasingly refined as he developed several measures of different components of sense of humor, including both adaptive and maladaptive humor styles. In this interview, Dr. Martin describes the conceptualization, development and use of the Humor Styles Questionnaire, along with suggestions for future research and development. In doing so, he also discusses the three main components of humor (i.e., cognitive, emotional and interpersonal, as well as the distinctions and similarities between humor and laughter. Further highlights of this interview include Professor Martin’s comments on such diverse issues as the genetic versus environmental loadings for sense of humor, the multifaceted nature of the construct of humor, and the possible limitations of teaching individuals to use humor in a beneficial manner to cope with stress and

  14. Three Decades Investigating Humor and Laughter: An Interview With Professor Rod Martin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rod; Kuiper, Nicholas A

    2016-08-01

    Since the start of the 21st century, the investigation of various psychological aspects of humor and laughter has become an increasingly prominent topic of research. This growth can be attributed, in no small part, to the pioneering and creative work on humor and laughter conducted by Professor Rod Martin. Dr. Martin's research interests in humor and laughter began in the early 1980s and continued throughout his 32 year long career as a professor of clinical psychology at the University of Western Ontario. During this time, Dr. Martin published numerous scholarly articles, chapters, and books on psychological aspects of humor and laughter. Professor Martin has just retired in July 2016, and in the present interview he recounts a number of research highlights of his illustrious career. Dr. Martin's earliest influential work, conducted while he was still in graduate school, stemmed from an individual difference perspective that focused on the beneficial effects of sense of humor on psychological well-being. This research focus remained evident in many of Professor Martin's subsequent investigations, but became increasingly refined as he developed several measures of different components of sense of humor, including both adaptive and maladaptive humor styles. In this interview, Dr. Martin describes the conceptualization, development and use of the Humor Styles Questionnaire, along with suggestions for future research and development. In doing so, he also discusses the three main components of humor (i.e., cognitive, emotional and interpersonal), as well as the distinctions and similarities between humor and laughter. Further highlights of this interview include Professor Martin's comments on such diverse issues as the genetic versus environmental loadings for sense of humor, the multifaceted nature of the construct of humor, and the possible limitations of teaching individuals to use humor in a beneficial manner to cope with stress and enhance their social and

  15. [Validation of the Russian language version of the SSQ questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufatulin, G Sh; Artyushkin, S A

    2016-01-01

    The Speech, Spatial and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ) is applied worldwide as a highly reliable tool for the characteristic of the quality of life and subjective sensations of the patients presenting with hearing impairment as well as for the estimation of the efficiency of hearing aids. The objective of the present study was to validate and adapt the Russian language version of the SSQ questionnaire (SSQrus) for its application in the audiological practice under conditions of this country. After the cultural and language adaptation of SSQrus, it was validated by means of repeat interviewing of three groups of the respondents (a total of 93 subjects with normal, moderately and severely impaired hearing). The results of the validation give evidence of the high reliability of the modified questionnaire. Specifically, high reproducibility of the data estimated from the results of the second interview has been demonstrated (r=0.85--0.99). High sensitivity of SSQruswas confirmed by the agreement between the results of the estimation (in scores) and the degree of the observed loss of hearing. The estimates obtained by the application of the SSQrus questionnaire are comparable with those reported by the foreign authors. It is concluded that the SSQrus questionnaire can be used in routine audiological practice as an additional diagnostic instrument for the estimation of hearing problems experienced by a patient, monitoring efficiency of therapy and surgical treatment of hearing impairment, improvement of hearing aids, and hearing dysfunction research.

  16. Designing and determining validity and reliability of a questionnaire to identify factors affecting nutritional behavior among patients with metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseh Esmaeili

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : A number of studies have shown a clear relationship between diet and component of metabolic syndrome. Based on the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA, attitude and subjective norm are factors affecting behavioral intention and subsequently behavior. The aim of the present study is to design a valid questionnaire identifying factors affecting nutritional behavior among patients with metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: Via literature review, six focus group discussion and interview with nutrition specialists were performed to develop an instrument based on the theory of reasoned action. To determine validity of the instrument, content and face validity analyses with 15 expert panels conducted and also to determine reliability, Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient performed. Results: A draft of 100 items questionnaire was developed and after evaluation of validity and reliability, final questionnaire included 46 items: 17 items for attitude, 13 items for subjective norms and 16 items for behavioral intention. For the final questionnaire average of content validity index was 0/92 and Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient was 0/85. Conclusion: Based on the results of the current study the developed questionnaire is a valid and reliable instrument and it can be used to identify factors affecting nutritional behavior among people with metabolic syndrome based on the theory of reasoned action.

  17. Interview at the level of the signifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rittenhofer, Iris

    2012-01-01

    The research strategy interview at the level of the signifier was developed in relation to a qualitative interview project into cross-cultural encounters temporarily and spatially framed by academic organizational settings. The research interest is gender and ethnicity. However, neither happens all...

  18. Interview and talk by Tom Bingham

    OpenAIRE

    Bingham, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Talk by Tom Bingham at the Cambridge Rotarians, and interview by Alan Macfarlane on 31st March 2009. Edited by Sarah Harrison. Interview of Tom Bingham and talk at the Cambridge Rotarians. Bingham was Lord Chief Justice, Master of the Rolls and an important Law Lord. He talks about his life and work in the law.

  19. Teaching Focus Group Interviewing: Benefits and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Focus group interviewing is widely used by academic and applied researchers. Given the popularity and strengths of this method, it is surprising how rarely focus group interviewing is taught in the undergraduate classroom and how few resources exist to support instructors who wish to train students to use this technique. This article fills the gap…

  20. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  1. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  2. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  3. Motivational interviewing and concordance with antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Michelle; Bennett, Clare

    Concordance with therapy is essential in maintaining quality of life for individuals who have human immunodeficiency virus. This article examines the use of motivational interviewing in assisting people to increase their concordance with antiretroviral therapy. It investigates the evidence base for motivational interviewing and discusses its principles and techniques. The article highlights the benefits of adopting a holistic approach to the intervention.

  4. Interview with Stella Ting-Toomey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisa Perez Canado, Maria

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Stella Ting-Toomey, an author of several books and articles on communicative interaction. Ting-Toomey's interview focuses on the factors that play in the relationship between culture and communication. She also talks about the role of conflict in culture, the underlying characteristics of international…

  5. An Abnormal Psychology Community Based Interview Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1977-01-01

    A course option in abnormal psychology involves students in interviewing and observing the activities of individuals in the off-campus community who are concerned with some aspect of abnormal psychology. The technique generates student interest in the field when they interview people about topics such as drug abuse, transsexualism, and abuse of…

  6. Reading an Interviewer Like a Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Ellen

    1988-01-01

    Describes how to psychologically evaluate and take advantage of the four basic personality types that are encountered in job interviews. Discusses each personality type and makes generalizations about their dress, office, thinking patterns, and preferences. Summarizes how each might react to a woman in an interview situation. (CW)

  7. 14 CFR 1213.105 - Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... regarding NASA policy, programmatic, and budget issues. (b) In response to media interview requests, NASA will offer articulate and knowledgeable spokespersons who can best serve the needs of the media and the... INFORMATION MEDIA § 1213.105 Interviews. (a) Only spokespersons designated by the Assistant Administrator for...

  8. Reconsidering Rapport: Interviewing as Postmodern Inquiry Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    Interviewing has been a recognized mainstay of ethnographic fieldwork for more than 100 years. Coupled with participant observation, it was taken to be the complete corpus of anthropological and sociological inquiry activity. Although the repertoire of fieldwork inquirers has grown, interviewing remains a primary data collection technique,…

  9. The Long-Term Conditions Questionnaire: conceptual framework and item development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Michele; Potter, Caroline M; Kelly, Laura; Hunter, Cheryl; Gibbons, Elizabeth; Jenkinson, Crispin; Coulter, Angela; Forder, Julien; Towers, Ann-Marie; A'Court, Christine; Fitzpatrick, Ray

    2016-01-01

    To identify the main issues of importance when living with long-term conditions to refine a conceptual framework for informing the item development of a patient-reported outcome measure for long-term conditions. Semi-structured qualitative interviews (n=48) were conducted with people living with at least one long-term condition. Participants were recruited through primary care. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed by thematic analysis. The analysis served to refine the conceptual framework, based on reviews of the literature and stakeholder consultations, for developing candidate items for a new measure for long-term conditions. Three main organizing concepts were identified: impact of long-term conditions, experience of services and support, and self-care. The findings helped to refine a conceptual framework, leading to the development of 23 items that represent issues of importance in long-term conditions. The 23 candidate items formed the first draft of the measure, currently named the Long-Term Conditions Questionnaire. The aim of this study was to refine the conceptual framework and develop items for a patient-reported outcome measure for long-term conditions, including single and multiple morbidities and physical and mental health conditions. Qualitative interviews identified the key themes for assessing outcomes in long-term conditions, and these underpinned the development of the initial draft of the measure. These initial items will undergo cognitive testing to refine the items prior to further validation in a survey.

  10. Skype interviewing: the new generation of online synchronous interview in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janghorban, Roksana; Latifnejad Roudsari, Robab; Taghipour, Ali

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used method for data collection in qualitative research is interviewing. With technology changes over the last few decades, the online interview has overcome time and financial constraints, geographical dispersion, and physical mobility boundaries, which have adversely affected onsite interviews. Skype as a synchronous online service offers researchers the possibility of conducting individual interviews as well as small focus groups, comparable to onsite types. This commentary presents the characteristics of the Skype interview as an alternative or supplemental choice to investigators who want to change their conventional approach of interviewing.

  11. An adapted postdonation motivational interview enhances blood donor retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kadian S; Campbell, Tavis S; Carey, Patricia M; Langevin, Eric; Bowser, Brent; France, Christopher R

    2010-08-01

    Blood donors may hold conflicting thoughts about future donation. While they may perceive the direct benefit to themselves and others, they often report compelling reasons not to give again. As a result the standard encouragements to return may not be sufficient to motivate some donors. This study examined the effects of a postdonation adapted motivational interview (AMI) on blood donor attitudes and repeat donation behavior. Donors (n = 215) were randomly assigned to either an AMI or a no-interview control group. Approximately 1 month after their index donation, donors in the AMI group completed a brief telephone interview to clarify individual-specific motivations and values concerning blood donation and address potential barriers. They were then asked to complete questionnaires regarding donation attitudes, anxiety, self-efficacy, and intention to donate. Donors in the control group were also contacted 1 month after donation and asked to complete the same series of questionnaires. Donors in the AMI group reported greater intention to provide a future donation (F = 8.13, p < 0.05), more positive donation attitudes (F = 4.59, p < 0.05), and greater confidence in their ability to avoid adverse reactions (F = 10.26, p < 0.01). Further, AMI was associated with higher rates of attempted donation at 12 months (odds ratio, 2.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-4.87). Application of an AMI may be an effective strategy to increase the donor pool by enhancing retention of existing donors. © 2010 American Association of Blood Banks.

  12. Are Two Interviews Better Than One? Eyewitness Memory across Repeated Cognitive Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odinot, Geralda; Memon, Amina; La Rooy, David; Millen, Ailsa

    2013-01-01

    Eyewitnesses to a filmed event were interviewed twice using a Cognitive Interview to examine the effects of variations in delay between the repeated interviews (immediately & 2 days; immediately & 7 days; 7 & 9 days) and the identity of the interviewers (same or different across the two repeated interviews). Hypermnesia (an increase in total amount of information recalled in the repeated interview) occurred without any decrease in the overall accuracy. Reminiscence (the recall of new information in the repeated interview) was also found in all conditions but was least apparent in the longest delay condition, and came with little cost to the overall accuracy of information gathered. The number of errors, increased across the interviews, but the relative accuracy of participants’ responses was unaffected. However, when accuracy was calculated based on all unique details provided across both interviews and compared to the accuracy of recall in just the first interview it was found to be slightly lower. The identity of the interviewer (whether the same or different across interviews) had no effects on the number of correct details. There was an increase in recall of new details with little cost to the overall accuracy of information gathered. Importantly, these results suggest that witnesses are unlikely to report everything they remember during a single Cognitive Interview, however exhaustive, and a second opportunity to recall information about the events in question may provide investigators with additional information. PMID:24098471

  13. Development and validation of a questionnaire to identify severe maternal morbidity in epidemiological surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parpinelli Mary A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective to develop and validate a questionnaire on severe maternal morbidity and to evaluate the maternal recall of complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. Design: validity of a questionnaire as diagnostic instrument. Setting: a third level referral maternity in Campinas, Brazil. Population: 386 survivors of severe maternal complications and 123 women that delivered without major complications between 2002 and 2007. Methods eligible women were traced and interviewed by telephone on the occurrence of obstetric complications and events related to their treatment. Their answers were compared with their medical records as gold standard. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios plus their correspondent 95% confidence intervals were used as main estimators of accuracy. Main outcomes: diagnosis of severe maternal morbidity associated with past pregnancies, including hemorrhage, eclampsia, infections, jaundice and related procedures (hysterectomy, admission to ICU, blood transfusion, laparotomy, inter-hospital transfer, mechanical ventilation and post partum stay above seven days. Results Women did not recall accurately the occurrence of obstetric complications, especially hemorrhage and infection. The likelihood ratios were Conclusion Process indicators are better recalled by women than obstetric complication and should be considered when applying a questionnaire on severe maternal morbidity.

  14. Low back pain functional disability in athletes; conceptualization and initial development of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Elham; Kordi, Ramin; Nourian, Ruhollah; Noorian, Negin; Memari, Amir Hossein; Shariati, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Low Back Pain (LBP) is one of the most prevalent causes of disability not only in the general population but also in athletes. Despite a large number of self-reported back specific disability questionnaires, there is no specific, well documented, outcome measure for athletes suffering from back pain. This study aimed to identify the main descriptive themes representing functional disability in athletes due to LBP. We conducted a qualitative study using in-depth interviews to characterize the experiences of athletes with LBP. Twenty athletes with LBP were recruited and the main descriptive elements of their LBP related disability were extracted. Then a preliminary questionnaire using these themes was proposed. The main disability indicators were pain intensity; stretching exercises, strengthening exercises, sport specific skills, back range of motion (ROM), sitting, walking, sleep patterns, self-care, and recreational activities, fear of pain and avoidance behavior, and changes in sexual activity. The findings of this study suggest that apart from non-sports items, some sport related items should be included in the assessment of LBP disability levels in athletes. Our results have also been organized as a preliminary LBP disability questionnaire for athletes.

  15. Elements of programming interviews the insider's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Aziz, Adnan; Prakash, Amit

    2015-01-01

    This is a larger-format version of Elements of Programming Interviews. The language is C++. Specifically, the font size is larger, and the page size is 7"x10" (the regular format uses 6"x9"). The content is identical. Have you ever... Wanted to work at an exciting futuristic company? Struggled with an interview problem that could have been solved in 15 minutes? Wished you could study real-world computing problems? If so, you need to read Elements of Programming Interviews (EPI). EPI is your comprehensive guide to interviewing for software development roles. The core of EPI is a collection of over 250 problems with detailed solutions. The problems are representative of interview questions asked at leading software companies. The problems are illustrated with 200 figures, 300 tested programs, and 150 additional variants. The book begins with a summary of the nontechnical aspects of interviewing, such as strategies for a great interview, common mistakes, perspectives from the other side of the table,...

  16. Facial Attractiveness Assessment using Illustrated Questionnairers

    Science.gov (United States)

    MESAROS, ANCA; CORNEA, DANIELA; CIOARA, LIVIU; DUDEA, DIANA; MESAROS, MICHAELA; BADEA, MINDRA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. An attractive facial appearance is considered nowadays to be a decisive factor in establishing successful interactions between humans. In relation to this topic, scientific literature states that some of the facial features have more impact then others, and important authors revealed that certain proportions between different anthropometrical landmarks are mandatory for an attractive facial appearance. Aim. Our study aims to assess if certain facial features count differently in people’s opinion while assessing facial attractiveness in correlation with factors such as age, gender, specific training and culture. Material and methods. A 5-item multiple choice illustrated questionnaire was presented to 236 dental students. The Photoshop CS3 software was used in order to obtain the sets of images for the illustrated questions. The original image was handpicked from the internet by a panel of young dentists from a series of 15 pictures of people considered to have attractive faces. For each of the questions, the images presented were simulating deviations from the ideally symmetric and proportionate face. The sets of images consisted in multiple variations of deviations mixed with the original photo. Junior and sophomore year students from our dental medical school, having different nationalities were required to participate in our questionnaire. Simple descriptive statistics were used to interpret the data. Results. Assessing the results obtained from the questionnaire it was observed that a majority of students considered as unattractive the overdevelopment of the lower third, while the initial image with perfect symmetry and proportion was considered as the most attractive by only 38.9% of the subjects. Likewise, regarding the symmetry 36.86% considered unattractive the canting of the inter-commissural line. The interviewed subjects considered that for a face to be attractive it needs to have harmonious proportions between the different facial

  17. Portuguese validation of the Cambridge pulmonary hypertension outcome review (CAMPHOR) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Abílio; Twiss, James; Vicente, Margarida; Gonçalves, Fabienne; Carvalho, Luísa; Meireles, José; Melo, Alzira; McKenna, Stephen P; Almeida, Luís

    2016-07-26

    Patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and other forms of precapillary pulmonary hypertension (PH) have impaired quality of life (QoL). The Cambridge Pulmonary Hypertension Outcome Review (CAMPHOR) is a PH-specific patient-reported outcome measure that assesses symptoms, activity limitations and QoL. It was originally developed in UK-English. The main objective of this study was to create an adaptation of the CAMPHOR suitable for a Portuguese-speaking population. A multi-step approach was followed: bilingual and lay panel translation; cognitive debriefing interviews; and psychometric testing in repeated postal surveys (2 weeks apart) including assessment of internal consistency, reproducibility and validity. The Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) questionnaire was used as a comparator instrument to test convergent validity. The CAMPHOR was translated without difficulty by the two panels. Cognitive debriefing interviews showed the questionnaire was easily understood and considered relevant to patients' experience with their illness. Psychometric evaluation was performed with 50 PAH patients (47 ± 14 years, 37 women). Cronbach's alpha coefficients showed good internal consistency for the three CAMPHOR scales [Symptoms = 0.95; Activities = 0.93 and QoL = 0.94]. Test-retest coefficients showed that all scales had excellent reliability (Symptoms = 0.94; Activities = 0.89 and QoL = 0.93), indicating low levels of random measurement error. The CAMPHOR correlated as expected with the NHP. The magnitude of correlations followed a similar pattern to those in the original development study. The CAMPHOR also exhibited evidence of known group validity in its ability to distinguish between self-reported severity and general health groups. A valid and reliable version of the CAMPHOR questionnaire for the European Portuguese-speaking population was developed and is recommended for use.

  18. A Randomized Trial of Motivational Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catley, Delwyn; Goggin, Kathy; Harris, Kari Jo; Richter, Kimber P.; Williams, Karen; Patten, Christi; Resnicow, Ken; Ellerbeck, Edward F.; Bradley-Ewing, Andrea; Lee, Hyoung S.; Moreno, Jose L.; Grobe, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite limitations in evidence, the current Clinical Practice Guideline advocates Motivational Interviewing for smokers not ready to quit. This study evaluated the efficacy of Motivational Interviewing (MI) for inducing cessation-related behaviors among smokers with low motivation to quit. Design Randomized clinical trial. Setting/participants Two-hundred fifty-five daily smokers reporting low desire to quit smoking were recruited from an urban community during 2010–2011 and randomly assigned to Motivational Interviewing, health education, or brief advice using a 2:2:1 allocation. Data were analyzed from 2012 to 2014. Intervention Four sessions of Motivational Interviewing utilized a patient-centered communication style that explored patients’ own reasons for change. Four sessions of health education provided education related to smoking cessation while excluding elements characteristic of Motivational Interviewing. A single session of brief advice consisted of brief, personalized advice to quit. Main outcomes measures Self-reported quit attempts, smoking abstinence (biochemically verified), use of cessation pharmacotherapies, motivation, and confidence to quit were assessed at baseline and 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Results Unexpectedly, no significant differences emerged between groups in the proportion who made a quit attempt by 6-month follow-up (Motivational Interviewing, 52.0%; health education, 60.8%; brief advice, 45.1%; p=0.157). Health education had significantly higher biochemically verified abstinence rates at 6 months (7.8%) than brief advice (0.0%) (8% difference, 95% CI=3%, 13%, p=0.003), with the Motivational Interviewing group falling in between (2.9% abstinent, 3% risk difference, 95% CI=0%, 6%, p=0.079). Both Motivational Interviewing and health education groups showed greater increases in cessation medication use, motivation, and confidence to quit relative to brief advice (all pmotivation relative to Motivational Interviewing

  19. How does interview style affect applicants´ perception of fairness of the job interview?

    OpenAIRE

    Danielsen, Einar Bruvik; Ueland, Pontus Erik

    2017-01-01

    Masteroppgave(MSc) in Master of Science in Leadership and Organizational Psychology - Handelshøyskolen BI, 2017 In this study we examine the differences between the structured and unstructured interview in regards to an applicant’s perception of fairness. Despite extensive research on the predictive validity of future job performance of the two interview types, research is limited on how these interviews affect the applicant's perception of fairness of the job interview. In thi...

  20. Starting Age and Other Influential Factors: Insights from Learner Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The present study uses oral interviews with foreign language learners in search of influential factors in their language learning histories. The sample for the study was drawn from a larger sample of intermediate/advanced learners of English as a foreign language with a minimum of 10 years of exposure/instruction. The sample includes 6 early…

  1. Battling Creaticide: An Interview with David C. Berliner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Don

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with David C. Berliner, a Regents' Professor in the College of Education at Arizona State University. His books include "Educational Psychology," "The Manufactured Crisis," and "The Handbook of Educational Psychology." He has served as president of the American Educational Research Association and of the…

  2. Landamatics Ten Years Later: An Interview with Lev N. Landa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Technology, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Provides the transcript of an interview with Dr. Lev Landa that addressed issues related to his algorithmico-heuristic theories of learning and instruction, called Landamatics. Highlights include teaching thinking versus knowledge; algorithms; instructional design; improving training and performance in industry, business, and government;…

  3. Challenge without Threat: An Interview with Tom Dewell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Tom Dewell, a professional physical educator with 28 years of experience and a fixture in Dallas physical education. Dewell has melded a background in movement education and adapted physical education with early childhood theory, including Montessori. The bulk of his experience has been in private, parochial…

  4. Acceptability of motivational interviewing among hemodialysis clinic staff: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronk, Nikole J; Russell, Cynthia L; Knowles, Norma; Matteson, Michelle; Peace, Leanne; Ponferrada, Leonor

    2012-01-01

    This pilot study investigated the acceptability of motivational interviewing among a group of dialysis clinic staff. A non-experimental, posttest-only design was used for this pilot study. Dialysis clinic staff (N = 8) were recruited from a Midwestern non-profit, freestanding hemodialysis clinic. Staff received three three-hour training sessions in motivational interviewing and monthly individual coaching sessions with a motivational interviewing expert for three months. Staff then completed anonymous questionnaires and participated in a focus group discussion. Staff reported liking the motivational interviewing skills they learned and finding them useful; however, staff reported disagreement with statements indicating they used motivational interviewing skills effectively on a regular basis, that their work environments were supportive of motivational interviewing, and that motivational interviewing was consistent with their natural patient care approach. Results indicate that staff are receptive to motivational interviewing skills, and with sufficient training and feedback to enhance confidence, dialysis staff will develop further motivational interviewing competence and comfort for long-term use.

  5. Mental toughness in sport questionnaire – MTSQ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Przybylski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Stress resistance is very substantial and interesting for scientists, competitors, coaches, and psychologists. The main aim of the article was the psychometric examination of mental toughness in the sport questionnaire (MTSQ. Participants and procedure The group of participants consisted of athletes presenting different levels of experience: Olympians, first-league, national team: N = 421 athletes, including 190 women and 231 men, age M = 20.40, SD = 5.30. Test procedure: 124 statements were selected for exploratory factor analysis with the method of main components with rotation of intercorrelational orthogonal factors. It was used in order to check the factor structure of the tool and for the clear interpretation of isolated factors. As a result of the validation, 42 statements were finally selected measuring three dimensions of mental toughness. Each subscale consisted of 14 items. Next the reliability and the validity of the questionnaire were analysed. Results The three-factor structure of the measured model of stress resistance accurately reflects the relation among stress resistances factors. Individual scales, at least mutually correlated, present accurate and reliable operationalisation of dimensions of the stress resistance. Conclusions The mental toughness in sport questionnaire (MTSQ presents accurate and reliable operationalisation of stress resistance dimensions.

  6. Danish translation and validation of the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre questionnaires on overuse injuries and health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, J E; Rathleff, C R; Rathleff, M S; Andreasen, J

    2016-12-01

    The Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre Overuse Injury Questionnaire (OSTRC-O) and the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre questionnaire on Health Problems (The OSTRC-H) make it possible to monitor illness and injury at regular intervals capturing prevalence and incidence of acute injury, overuse injury, and illnesses. The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt, and establish the face validity of the OSTRC-O and the OSTRC-H into a Danish context (DK) through cognitive interviews and the assessment of test-retest reliability. The OSTRC-O.DK was distributed to 57 heterogenous respondents; response rate was 89%. The OSTRC-H was distributed to 58 heterogenous respondents; response rate was 86%. No major disagreements were observed between the original and translated versions of the questionnaires. The OSTRC-O had high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.80-0.93). The primary reliability analyses including all participants, showed reliability ICC: 0.62 (95% CI: 0.42-0.77. The secondary reliability analyses that only included subjects who did not change injury region from the test to the retest showed an ICC of 0.86 (95% CI: 0.77-0.92).The questionnaires were found to be valid, reliable, and acceptable for use in a Danish population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. 75 FR 31462 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Comment Request; Record of Employee Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... reporting requirements on covered HUD- assisted construction and maintenance work. Enforcement activities include conducting interviews with laborers and mechanics employed on HUD-assisted projects concerning...

  8. Writing Interview Protocols and Conducting Interviews: Tips for Students New to the Field of Qualitative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Stacy A.; Furgerson, S. Paige

    2012-01-01

    Students new to doing qualitative research in the ethnographic and oral traditions, often have difficulty creating successful interview protocols. This article offers practical suggestions for students new to qualitative research for both writing interview protocol that elicit useful data and for conducting the interview. This piece was originally…

  9. Evidence-informed health policy 3 – Interviews with the directors of organizations that support the use of research evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moynihan Ray

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Only a small number of previous efforts to describe the experiences of organizations that produce clinical practice guidelines (CPGs, undertake health technology assessments (HTAs, or directly support the use of research evidence in developing health policy (i.e., government support units, or GSUs have relied on interviews and then only with HTA agencies. Interviews offer the potential for capturing experiences in great depth, particularly the experiences of organizations that may be under-represented in surveys. Methods We purposively sampled organizations from among those who completed a questionnaire in the first phase of our three-phase study, developed and piloted a semi-structured interview guide, and conducted the interviews by telephone, audio-taped them, and took notes simultaneously. Binary or categorical responses to more structured questions were counted when possible. Themes were identified from among responses to semi-structured questions using a constant comparative method of analysis. Illustrative quotations were identified to supplement the narrative description of the themes. Results We interviewed the director (or his or her nominee in 25 organizations, of which 12 were GSUs. Using rigorous methods that are systematic and transparent (sometimes shortened to 'being evidence-based' was the most commonly cited strength among all organizations. GSUs more consistently described their close links with policymakers as a strength, whereas organizations producing CPGs, HTAs, or both had conflicting viewpoints about such close links. With few exceptions, all types of organizations tended to focus largely on weaknesses in implementation, rather than strengths. The advice offered to those trying to establish similar organizations include: 1 collaborate with other organizations; 2 establish strong links with policymakers and stakeholders; 3 be independent and manage conflicts of interest; 4 build capacity; 5 use good

  10. Interviewing Practices, Conversational Practices, and Rapport: Responsiveness and Engagement in the Standardized Survey Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarski, Dana; Schaeffer, Nora Cate; Dykema, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    "Rapport" has been used to refer to a range of positive psychological features of an interaction -- including a situated sense of connection or affiliation between interactional partners, comfort, willingness to disclose or share sensitive information, motivation to please, or empathy. Rapport could potentially benefit survey participation and response quality by increasing respondents' motivation to participate, disclose, or provide accurate information. Rapport could also harm data quality if motivation to ingratiate or affiliate caused respondents to suppress undesirable information. Some previous research suggests that motives elicited when rapport is high conflict with the goals of standardized interviewing. We examine rapport as an interactional phenomenon, attending to both the content and structure of talk. Using questions about end-of-life planning in the 2003-2005 wave of the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, we observe that rapport consists of behaviors that can be characterized as dimensions of responsiveness by interviewers and engagement by respondents. We identify and describe types of responsiveness and engagement in selected question-answer sequences and then devise a coding scheme to examine their analytic potential with respect to the criterion of future study participation. Our analysis suggests that responsive and engaged behaviors vary with respect to the goals of standardization-some conflict with these goals, while others complement them.

  11. Evaluation of the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Sue

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS is a chronic/common condition that causes a significant effect on the individual (reduced quality of life, society (time lost off work and health services. Comparison of studies evaluating the management of IBS has been hindered by the lack of a widely adopted validated symptom score. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a disease specific score to measure the symptoms of patients with IBS. Methods A self-administered 14-item symptom questionnaire (based on Rome II criteria was mailed to 533 persons included in a prevalence study of IBS. The reliability of each underlying dimension identified was measured by Cronbach's α. Validity was assessed by comparing symptom scores with concurrent IBS specific quality of life (QoL scores. Reproducibility was measured by the test-retest method and responsiveness measured by effect size. Results 379 (71% questionnaires were returned. The underlying dimensions identified were pain, diarrhoea and constipation. Cronbach's α was 0.74 for pain, 0.90 for diarrhoea and 0.79 for constipation. Pain and diarrhoea dimensions had good external validity (r = -0.3 to -0.6, constipation dimension had moderate external validity (r = -0.2 to -0.3. All dimensions were reproducible (ICCs 0.75 to 0.81. Effect sizes of 0.27 to 0.53 were calculated for those with a reported improvement in symptoms. Conclusion The Birmingham IBS Symptom Questionnaire has been developed and tested. It has been shown to be suitable for self-completion and acceptable to patients. The questionnaire has 3 internal dimensions which have good reliability, external validity and are responsive to a change in health status.

  12. Evaluation of the Birmingham IBS symptom questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roalfe, Andrea K; Roberts, Lesley M; Wilson, Sue

    2008-07-23

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a chronic/common condition that causes a significant effect on the individual (reduced quality of life), society (time lost off work) and health services. Comparison of studies evaluating the management of IBS has been hindered by the lack of a widely adopted validated symptom score. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a disease specific score to measure the symptoms of patients with IBS. A self-administered 14-item symptom questionnaire (based on Rome II criteria) was mailed to 533 persons included in a prevalence study of IBS. The reliability of each underlying dimension identified was measured by Cronbach's alpha. Validity was assessed by comparing symptom scores with concurrent IBS specific quality of life (QoL) scores. Reproducibility was measured by the test-retest method and responsiveness measured by effect size. 379 (71%) questionnaires were returned. The underlying dimensions identified were pain, diarrhoea and constipation. Cronbach's alpha was 0.74 for pain, 0.90 for diarrhoea and 0.79 for constipation. Pain and diarrhoea dimensions had good external validity (r = -0.3 to -0.6), constipation dimension had moderate external validity (r = -0.2 to -0.3). All dimensions were reproducible (ICCs 0.75 to 0.81). Effect sizes of 0.27 to 0.53 were calculated for those with a reported improvement in symptoms. The Birmingham IBS Symptom Questionnaire has been developed and tested. It has been shown to be suitable for self-completion and acceptable to patients. The questionnaire has 3 internal dimensions which have good reliability, external validity and are responsive to a change in health status.

  13. Comparing appropriateness and equivalence of email interviews to phone interviews in qualitative research on reproductive decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Patricia E; Kavanaugh, Karen

    2017-10-01

    Despite an increasing use of qualitative email interviews by nurse researchers, there is little understanding about the appropriateness and equivalence of email interviews to other qualitative data collection methods, especially on sensitive topics research. The purpose is to describe our procedures for completing asynchronous, email interviews and to evaluate the appropriateness and equivalency of email interviews to phone interviews in two qualitative research studies that examined reproductive decisions. Content analysis guided the methodological appraisal of appropriateness and equivalency of in-depth, asynchronous email interviews to single phone interviews. Appropriateness was determined by: (a) participants' willingness to engage in email or phone interviews, (b) completing data collection in a timely period, and (c) participants' satisfaction with the interview. Equivalency was evaluated by: (a) completeness of the interview data, and (b) insight obtained from the data. Of the combined sample in the two studies (N=71), 31% of participants chose to participate via an email interview over a phone interview. The time needed to complete the email interviews averaged 27 to 28days and the number of investigator probe-participant response interchanges was 4 to 5cycles on average. In contrast, the phone interviews averaged 59 to 61min in duration. Most participants in both the email and phone interviews reported they were satisfied or very satisfied with their ability to express their true feelings throughout the interview. Regarding equivalence, 100% of the email and phone interviews provided insight into decision processes. Although insightful, two of the email and one phone interview had short answers or, at times, underdeveloped responses. Participants' quotes and behaviors cited within four published articles, a novel evaluation of equivalency, revealed that 20% to 37.5% of the citations about decision processes were from email participants, which is

  14. Effect of Motivational Interviewing on Weight Efficacy Lifestyle among Women with Overweight and Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mirkarimi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and overweight have become increasingly a major public health problem across the world. This study aimed at exploring the effects of motivational interviewing on weight efficacy lifestyle among women with obesity and overweight. A single-blind randomized clinical trial study was conducted on 100 overweight and obese women who attended a nutrition clinic. The samples were selected based on the clinical records and assigned into two groups, namely motivational interviewing arm (50 samples and nutrition education arm (50 samples. Data were collected using a standard validated questionnaire entitled “weight efficacy lifestyle”. The intervention was designed according to five motivation sessions and four nutrition education programs, such that the participants of the nutrition education arm were also provided with the nutrition pamphlets related to weight control. Data were finally analyzed using the SPSS statistical software by performing the independent t-test, chi-square, LSD and repeated measures ANOVA tests. P<0.05 were considered statistically significant. The mean age of women was 39.9±9.1 and 36.3±8.9 years in the control and motivational interviewing arms, respectively. Compared with the control group, the score of the motivational interviewing group was statistically significant in terms of weight efficacy lifestyle P=0.0001 and all subscales including social pressure (P=0.0001, physical discomfort (P=0.005, food accessibility (P=0.0001, positive and entertainment activities (P=0.0001, as well as negative emotions (P=0.003. Motivational interviewing appeared to be effective in increasing weight efficacy lifestyle among women with overweight and obesity. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014051817736N1

  15. Patient perspective on quality of geriatric care and rehabilitation--development and psychometric testing of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wressle, Ewa; Eriksson, Lennart; Fahlander, Amie; Rasmusson, Ing-Marie; Tedemalm, Ulla; Tängmark, Karin

    2006-06-01

    The aim was to develop and test a questionnaire for use in telephone interviews concerning patient evaluation of geriatric care and rehabilitation. Instrument development was performed comprising qualitative interviews, construction of items, content validation, pilot study and data collection for evaluation of care and rehabilitation, clinical utility, reliability and construct validity. Qualitative interviews were performed with 12 elderly participants. The qualitative interviews formed the basis for the construction of 45 items. An expert panel performed a content validation of the questionnaire resulting in a revised version. A pilot study comprised 29 participants recently discharged from geriatric wards and the main data collection comprised 221 participants. Inclusion criteria were being able to perform a telephone interview and willingness to participate. Clinical utility was examined through questions to the interviewers, answered in writing. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.79. According to a factor analysis and the evaluation of clinical utility, the underlying dimensions of the final revised questionnaire concern 'Respect and safety', 'Information and participation' and 'Rehabilitation interventions', scored in 18 items. In addition, one global item concerns satisfaction with care, resulting in 19 items in total. The revised questionnaire was named PaPeR, Patient Perspective on care and Rehabilitation. The questionnaire is considered valid, reliable and judged to have good clinical utility. The time consumption for the telephone interview is about 10-20 minutes. The questionnaire is useful in defining areas for potential quality improvement in geriatric wards.

  16. Interview with Science Education Pioneer Bob Yager

    OpenAIRE

    Stiles, John

    2016-01-01

    In a recent interview, Dr. Yager spoke about his participation in the changing field of science education, the challenges that still persist in implementing exemplary science teaching, STEM Education and his views on the current science education standards.

  17. E-Interview: Norma Fox Mazer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, Ann

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Norma Fox Mazer, a writer of children's books. Describes how she creates a story. Discusses how writing a story, whether a short story or a novel, is an intricate balance of character, event, and voice. (SG)

  18. Willem Hendrik Gispen--an interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, P R

    2013-11-05

    This text is based on three long interviews in Utrecht University's Faculty Club, and on almost 40 years of working together in the same city, the same department, the same university. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Implementation of Motivational Interviewing in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte; Louise Rasmussen, Line

    Implementation of Motivational Interviewing in practice Background In 2012 at Department of Nephrology an investigation among patients showed, that the patient’s did not experience acknowledgement during admission, though the nurses was educated in 'Motivational Interviewing'. Objectives To improve...... with the nurses. Implementation process in 3 phases - Preparation - Implementation (4 selected keypersons) - Follow-up Result The four selected keypersons aroused curiosity and motivation for a patient-centred admission interview. The nurses experienced the interaction with the patient became more dynamic. Data...... patient satisfaction during admission To maintain and improve the nurses competencies in patient-centred communication. Methods Literature study Breakthrough series method and Plan Do Study Act circles. Training by Mooney and Brinkerhoff (development of nurses competences) Pre - focus group interviews...

  20. Interviewing in a Multicultural/Multilingual Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Tara

    1995-01-01

    This article addresses the challenges of conducting interviews in a multicultural/multilingual setting, focusing on an ethnographic case study of bilingual life and language choice in a Canadian factory mostly staffed with Portuguese immigrant workers. (nine references) (MDM)

  1. An Interview with Robert E. Valett.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academic Therapy, 1981

    1981-01-01

    An interview with psychologist-educator Robert Valett focuses on his interests in the thinking patterns of children, his Developmental Survey of Basic Learning Abilities, and his involvement in humanistic education. (CL)

  2. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  3. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  4. TECHNICAL EDUCATION PERFORMANCE INSPECTION (II): INTERVIEWS

    OpenAIRE

    José Francisco Pérez Aguilar

    2014-01-01

    Education inspectors interview technique applied in conjunction with the observation, prior or subsequent to this, allowing triangulate the information obtained to visit the classroom or continue with the collection of evidence. The interview requires the inspector planning a number of aspects to these expected results are obtained and becomes an opportunity to continue to seek or contrasting information available. Also, this technique is a good way to develop the advisory role for inspect...

  5. Using reflexivity to enhance in-depth interviewing skills for the clinician researcher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegarty Kelsey

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary health care clinicians are being encouraged to undertake qualitative research, however the in-depth interviewing skills required are not as straightforward as might be first supposed. While there are benefits and certain skills that clinicians can bring to interview-based research, there are important new skills to develop. To date there has been neither discussion about these new skills, nor any preparatory guidelines for clinicians entering into interview-based research in the qualitative research literature. In the absence of formal guidelines, we suggest the use of reflexivity throughout the interview process as a means to become more accomplished in this area. We present our own experiences as a novice general practitioner (GP researcher undertaking a PhD study and her experienced supervisors. The PhD study used critical phenomenology through in-depth interviews to understand the experience of the patient-doctor relationship between same-sex attracted women and their usual GP in Australia. Results We used reflexivity to improve the rigour of the data collection. This enabled improved probing, fewer assumptions, avoidance of premature interpretation, and an accentuated sense of curiosity during interviews. We also enlisted reciprocity between interviewer and interviewee as a tool to improve engagement and trust, share interview control, and ultimately improve the depth of the interview content. Conclusion Preparatory recommendations for novice clinician research interviewers include the importance of recognising the multiple identities that they bring to the interview. In this setting in particular this involves acknowledging the clinician interviewer as a potential insider in relation to interviewees and negotiating shared understanding to avoid insider assumptions. Other essential requirements are having an experienced research supervisor, arranging pilot interviews that include active feedback on interviewing

  6. Using reflexivity to enhance in-depth interviewing skills for the clinician researcher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Ruth; Taft, Angela; Hegarty, Kelsey

    2008-11-09

    Primary health care clinicians are being encouraged to undertake qualitative research, however the in-depth interviewing skills required are not as straightforward as might be first supposed. While there are benefits and certain skills that clinicians can bring to interview-based research, there are important new skills to develop. To date there has been neither discussion about these new skills, nor any preparatory guidelines for clinicians entering into interview-based research in the qualitative research literature. In the absence of formal guidelines, we suggest the use of reflexivity throughout the interview process as a means to become more accomplished in this area. We present our own experiences as a novice general practitioner (GP) researcher undertaking a PhD study and her experienced supervisors. The PhD study used critical phenomenology through in-depth interviews to understand the experience of the patient-doctor relationship between same-sex attracted women and their usual GP in Australia. We used reflexivity to improve the rigour of the data collection. This enabled improved probing, fewer assumptions, avoidance of premature interpretation, and an accentuated sense of curiosity during interviews. We also enlisted reciprocity between interviewer and interviewee as a tool to improve engagement and trust, share interview control, and ultimately improve the depth of the interview content. Preparatory recommendations for novice clinician research interviewers include the importance of recognising the multiple identities that they bring to the interview. In this setting in particular this involves acknowledging the clinician interviewer as a potential insider in relation to interviewees and negotiating shared understanding to avoid insider assumptions. Other essential requirements are having an experienced research supervisor, arranging pilot interviews that include active feedback on interviewing style from interviewees, and being reflexive during

  7. [In-depth interviews and the Kano model to determine user requirements in a burns unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Revaldería, J; Holguín-Holgado, P; Lumbreras-Marín, E; Núñez-López, G

    To determine the healthcare requirements of patients in a Burns Unit, using qualitative techniques, such us in-depth personal interviews and Kano's methodology. Qualitative methodology using in-depth personal interviews (12 patients), Kano's conceptual model, and the SERVQHOS questionnaire (24 patients). All patients had been hospitalised in the last 12 months in the Burns Unit. Using Kano's methodology, service attributes were grouped by affinity diagrams, and classified as follows: must-be, attractive (unexpected, great satisfaction), and one-dimensional (linked to the degree of functionality of the service). The outcomes were compared with those obtained with SERVQHOS questionnaire. From the analysis of in-depth interviews, 11 requirements were obtained, referring to hotel aspects, information, need for closer staff relationship, and organisational aspects. The attributes classified as must-be were free television and automatic TV disconnection at midnight. Those classified as attractive were: individual room for more privacy, information about dressing change times in order to avoid anxiety, and additional staff for in-patients. The results were complementary to those obtained with the SERVQHOS questionnaire. In-depth personal interviews provide extra knowledge about patient requirements, complementing the information obtained with questionnaires. With this methodology, a more active patient participation is achieved and the companion's opinion is also taken into account. Copyright © 2016 SECA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality of life after first-ever stroke: An interview- based study from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stroke. Twenty-five stroke patients (ten women) were interviewed with the. NEWSQOL questionnaire. Good functional outcome (lower mRS score) was positively associated ... In a study from Kenya of young post-stroke patients, gender made a difference: men ... haemorrhagic from ischaemic strokes. Patients without brain.

  9. ADHD and Health Services Utilization in the National Health Interview Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffe, Steven P.; Moore, Charity G.; McKeown, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Describe the general health, comorbidities and health service use among U.S. children with ADHD. Method: The 2001 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) contained the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ; used to determine probable ADHD), data on medical problems, overall health, and health care utilization. Results: Asthma…

  10. Distance interviews in the field of qualitative health research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila da Silva Gonçalo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we aimed to present and discuss the results of a systematic literature review on the use of Distance Interviews (DI in qualitative health research. Searches were conducted in the PubMed and CINAHL databases and 37 references were included. Data were organized according to author, year of publication, journal title, and manuscript objective. The results revealed that the most recurrent theme was the comparison of Distance Interviews with other methods of data collection. Low cost, easier access to respondents, higher participation rates, and recruitment of volunteers were identified as the main benefits offered by DI. Distance Interviews were used for various purposes, from validation of instruments for data collection to diagnosis. We concluded that there is a need to expand on the theme explored in this article, because the incorporation of information and communication technologies in the healthcare field represents a valuable access route in capturing qualitative data.

  11. The Literary Interview. Critics and Fictions of Ricardo Piglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Porras

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we try to analyze the strategies that Ricardo Piglia has used to deliver us a poetical art in his book Critique and fiction, which constitutes a summary of interviews that the author has offered. In this case, we speak about a poetic writing. Piglia has carried out his process of selection and reconstruction of the material all by himself, and has supported his own structure of the interviews in the book, which does of the exchange with other one an indispensable condition, in order to construct a personal perspective that condense his ideas as writer and intellectually. In this perspective, Piglia give us examples about how a literary interview can and must be conceived: It is a productive dialog that promotes a thought that include the literature and the culture.

  12. [Motivational interviewing with alcohol-dependent patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, Michael; Bleich, Stefan; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Motivational interviewing with alcohol-dependent patients Alcohol-dependent patients do not need to be motivated from the outside. They are mostly ambivalent, and the inner voice, which already speaks for change (change talk), is heard through motivational interviewing, carefully strengthened and developed together with the patient. The practitioner has to deal with the human spirit of motivational interviewing and should be able to communicate with empathy, respect, congruence, and openness. The patient's autonomy should always be maintained. Advice is only given upon request. The conversation style is directive-guiding instead of authoritariansteering. OARS and the EPE principle are the motivational interviewing basics, which are consistently applied over 4 processes of motivational interviewing: engaging, focusing, evocing, and planning. The likelihood of change talk increases as soon as discrepancies between life goals and alcohol consumption emerge. An increased rate of change talk makes a change in behavior more likely. If a patient argues against change (sustain talk), one should not confront, but should consistently work with reflections, reframing, and an emphasis on autonomy. Motivational interviewing can be applied in different settings and populations, should be learned by the entire team (best professional guidance) in teamwork, and be subjected to a critical and constant evaluation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Magnitude of placebo response and response variance in antidepressant clinical trials using structured, taped and appraised rater interviews compared to traditional rating interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Arif; Faucett, James; Brown, Walter A

    2014-04-01

    The high failure rate of antidepressant clinical trials is due in part to a high magnitude of placebo response and considerable variance in placebo response. In some recent trials enhanced patient interview techniques consisting of Structured Interview Guide for the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (SIGMA) interviews, audiotaping of patient interviews and 'central' appraisal with Rater Applied Performance Scale (RAPS) criteria have been implemented in the hope of increasing reliability and thus reducing the placebo response. However, the data supporting this rationale for a change in patient interview technique are sparse. We analyzed data from depressed patients assigned to placebo in antidepressant clinical trials conducted at a single research site between 2008 and 2012. Three trials included 34 depressed patients undergoing SIGMA depression interviews with taping and RAPS appraisal and 4 trials included 128 depressed patients using traditional interview methods. Using patient level data we assessed the mean decrease in total MADRS scores and the variability of the decrease in MADRS scores in trials using SIGMA interviews versus trials using traditional interviews. Mean decrease in total MADRS score was significantly higher in the 3 trials that used SIGMA interviews compared to the 4 trials using traditional interviews (M = 13.0 versus 8.3, t(df = 160) = 2.04, p = 0.047). Furthermore, trials using SIGMA had a larger magnitude of response variance based on Levene's test for equality of variance (SD = 12.3 versus 9.4, F = 7.3, p = 0.008). The results of our study suggest that enhanced patient interview techniques such as SIGMA interviews, audiotaping and RAPS appraisal may not result in the intended effect of reducing the magnitude of placebo response and placebo variance. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. The validity of questionnaire self-report of psychopathology and parent-child relationship quality in juvenile delinquents with psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuk, R E; Clauser, C A C; Stams, G J J M; Slot, N W; Doreleijers, T A H

    2007-10-01

    The present study focuses on the validity of questionnaire self-report of psychopathology and parent-child relationship quality for juvenile delinquents with severe behavioural and psychiatric disorders by comparing information derived from questionnaire self-report with information from other sources, including parent report, in-depth interviewing, behavioural observation by clinicians, and official criminal records. The sample consisted of N=33 juvenile delinquents with psychiatric disorders. The juvenile delinquents did not report increased levels of psychopathology or poor relationships with their parents, which is inconsistent with the fact that all juvenile delinquents were in day treatment for severe behavioural maladaptation and relationship problems. Moreover, parent ratings of psychopathology were consistently in the clinical range and relationship quality was evaluated as very poor by the parents (d>.80). We conclude that screening instruments for psychopathology and assessment of relationship quality relying on questionnaire self-report may not yield valid scores in this (extreme) population of juvenile delinquents.

  15. Improving the Quality of Adult Mortality Data Collected in Demographic Surveys: Validation Study of a New Siblings' Survival Questionnaire in Niakhar, Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helleringer, Stéphane; Pison, Gilles; Masquelier, Bruno; Kanté, Almamy Malick; Douillot, Laetitia; Duthé, Géraldine; Sokhna, Cheikh; Delaunay, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Background In countries with limited vital registration, adult mortality is frequently estimated using siblings' survival histories (SSHs) collected during Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS). These data are affected by reporting errors. We developed a new SSH questionnaire, the siblings' survival calendar (SSC). It incorporates supplementary interviewing techniques to limit omissions of siblings and uses an event history calendar to improve reports of dates and ages. We hypothesized that the SSC would improve the quality of adult mortality data. Methods and Findings We conducted a retrospective validation study among the population of the Niakhar Health and Demographic Surveillance System in Senegal. We randomly assigned men and women aged 15–59 y to an interview with either the DHS questionnaire or the SSC. We compared SSHs collected in each group to prospective data on adult mortality collected in Niakhar. The SSC reduced respondents' tendency to round reports of dates and ages to the nearest multiple of five or ten (“heaping”). The SSC also had higher sensitivity in recording adult female deaths: among respondents whose sister(s) had died at an adult age in the past 15 y, 89.6% reported an adult female death during SSC interviews versus 75.6% in DHS interviews (p = 0.027). The specificity of the SSC was similar to that of the DHS questionnaire, i.e., it did not increase the number of false reports of deaths. However, the SSC did not improve the reporting of adult deaths among the brothers of respondents. Study limitations include sample selectivity, limited external validity, and multiple testing. Conclusions The SSC has the potential to collect more accurate SSHs than the questionnaire used in DHS. Further research is needed to assess the effects of the SSC on estimates of adult mortality rates. Additional validation studies should be conducted in different social and epidemiological settings. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN06849961

  16. Improving the quality of adult mortality data collected in demographic surveys: validation study of a new siblings' survival questionnaire in Niakhar, Senegal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Helleringer

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In countries with limited vital registration, adult mortality is frequently estimated using siblings' survival histories (SSHs collected during Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS. These data are affected by reporting errors. We developed a new SSH questionnaire, the siblings' survival calendar (SSC. It incorporates supplementary interviewing techniques to limit omissions of siblings and uses an event history calendar to improve reports of dates and ages. We hypothesized that the SSC would improve the quality of adult mortality data.We conducted a retrospective validation study among the population of the Niakhar Health and Demographic Surveillance System in Senegal. We randomly assigned men and women aged 15-59 y to an interview with either the DHS questionnaire or the SSC. We compared SSHs collected in each group to prospective data on adult mortality collected in Niakhar. The SSC reduced respondents' tendency to round reports of dates and ages to the nearest multiple of five or ten ("heaping". The SSC also had higher sensitivity in recording adult female deaths: among respondents whose sister(s had died at an adult age in the past 15 y, 89.6% reported an adult female death during SSC interviews versus 75.6% in DHS interviews (p = 0.027. The specificity of the SSC was similar to that of the DHS questionnaire, i.e., it did not increase the number of false reports of deaths. However, the SSC did not improve the reporting of adult deaths among the brothers of respondents. Study limitations include sample selectivity, limited external validity, and multiple testing.The SSC has the potential to collect more accurate SSHs than the questionnaire used in DHS. Further research is needed to assess the effects of the SSC on estimates of adult mortality rates. Additional validation studies should be conducted in different social and epidemiological settings.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN06849961

  17. Acromegaly Quality of Life Questionnaire (AcroQoL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Nuria

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acromegaly is a chronic disease with an important impact on patients, Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL. The ability to effectively measure Health Related Quality of Life is central to describing the impacts of disease or treatment upon the patient, therefore the importance of having a disease specific questionnaire for acromegaly. For the development of the AcroQoL questionnaire different sources of information were used: first a literature search was performed to identify relevant papers describing the impact of acromegaly in HRQoL, second the main domains of impact on HRQoL were identified by 10 experts endocrinologists, and third ten in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted in acromegalic patients to identify domains and items related to the self-perceived impact of acromegaly in patients' life. After a proper qualitative analysis a preliminary 38 item questionnaire was obtained. Rasch analysis concluded with a final 22 item questionnaire. The measurement properties (validity and reliability of the resulting final questionnaire were tested and compared using standard procedures (Cronbach's Alpha and item-total correlation. The evaluation of the item parameters confirmed the construct validity of the new instrument. Responsiveness to change was assessed in a small sample of 32 acromegalic patients with active disease in Spain who were administered the AcroQoL and the generic questionnaire EuroQoL 5-D. The results showed a statistically significant relationship between all the dimensions of AcroQoL and the VAS (visual analogic scale of EQ-5D. An improvement in the global score of AcroQoL was related to a global improvement in the VAS of the EQ-5D. Following the current recommended standard methodology the Spanish questionnaire was translated into eleven other languages.

  18. Phase 1-3 of the cross-cultural development of an EORTC questionnaire for the assessment of sexual health in cancer patients: the EORTC SHQ-22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberguggenberger, Anne Sophie; Nagele, Eva; Inwald, Elisabeth C; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof; Lanceley, Anne; Nordin, Andy; Creutzberg, Carien L; Kuljanic, Karin; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Schmalz, Claudia; Arraras, Juan; Costantini, Anna; Almont, Thierry; Wei-Chu, Chie; Dehandschutter, Sara; Winters, Zoe; Greimel, Elfriede

    2018-03-01

    To develop and pretest an European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Sexual Health Questionnaire (EORTC SHQ-22) for the assessment of physical, psychological, and social aspects of sexual health (SH) in male and female cancer patients and survivors. Questionnaire construction started with creating a list of relevant SH issues based on a comprehensive literature review. Issues were subsequently evaluated for relevance and prioritization by 78 healthcare professionals (HCP) and 107 patients from 12 countries during in-depth interviews (phase 1). Extracted issues were operationalized into items (phase 2). Phase 3 focused on pretesting the preliminary questionnaire in a cross-cultural patient sample (n = 171) using debriefing interviews. Psychometric properties were preliminary determined using a principal component analysis and Cronbach's alpha. We derived 53 relevant SH issues from the literature. Based on HCP and patient interviews, 22 of these 53 issues were selected and operationalized into items. Testing the preliminary 22-item short questionnaire resulted in a change of wording in five items and two communication-related items; no items were removed. Preliminary psychometric analysis revealed a two-factor solution and 11 single items; both scales showed good reliability indicated by a Cronbach's alpha of 0.87 (sexual satisfaction) and 0.82 (sexual pain). Cross-cultural pretesting of the preliminary EORTC SH questionnaire has indicated excellent applicability, patient acceptance, and comprehensiveness as well as good psychometric properties. The final development phase, that is psychometric validation (phase four) including large-scale, cross-cultural field testing of the EORTC SHQ-22, has commenced. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire: study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2013-01-01

    With an ageing population and increasing demands on health and social care services, there is growing importance attached to the management of long-term conditions, including maximizing the cost-effectiveness of treatments. In line with this, there is increasing emphasis on the need to keep people both active and participating in daily life. Consequently, it is essential that well developed and validated instruments that can meaningfully assess levels of participation and activity are widely available. Current measures, however, are largely focused on disability and rehabilitation, and there is no measure of activity or participation for generic use that fully meets the standards set by regulatory bodies such as the US Food and Drug Administration. Here we detail a protocol for the development and validation of a new patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) for assessment of participation and activity in people experiencing a variety of health conditions, ie, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ). The stages incorporated in its development are entirely in line with current regulations and represent best practice in the development of PROMs. Development of the Ox-PAQ is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. The project incorporates a new strategy of engaging with stakeholders from the outset in an attempt to identify those characteristics of PROMs considered most important to a range of potential users. Items will be generated through interviews with patients from a range of conditions. Pretesting of the instrument will be via cognitive interviews and focus groups. A postal survey will be conducted, with data subject to factor and Rasch analysis in order to identify appropriate dimensions and redundant items. Reliability will be assessed by Cronbach's alpha and item-total correlations. A second, large-scale postal survey will follow, with the Ox-PAQ being

  20. Investigating cultural variability in rater judgements of oral proficiency interviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Stassenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is concerned if the cultural background of non-native raters could lead to substantial differences in the assessment of students’ oral performances during the national examination in the English language in Estonia. The discussion involves the analysis of the ratings of twenty video-recordings of oral proficiency interviews by two rater groups of the Estonian and Russian origin, and a questionnaire study investigating rater perceptions of the national examination. Despite the lack of any marked cultural bias being displayed in the raters’ behaviour, the results of the study reveal a number of significant differences in their perceptions of various aspects of the national examination as well as their own behaviour during the rating process.

  1. Stimulated recall interviews for describing pragmatic epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubert, Christopher W.; Meredith, Dawn C.

    2015-12-01

    Students' epistemologies affect how and what they learn: do they believe physics is a list of equations, or a coherent and sensible description of the physical world? In order to study these epistemologies as part of curricular assessment, we adopt the resources framework, which posits that students have many productive epistemological resources that can be brought to bear as they learn physics. In previous studies, these epistemologies have been either inferred from behavior in learning contexts or probed through surveys or interviews outside of the learning context. We argue that stimulated recall interviews provide a contextually and interpretively valid method to access students' epistemologies that complement existing methods. We develop a stimulated recall interview methodology to assess a curricular intervention and find evidence that epistemological resources aptly describe student epistemologies.

  2. So you Really Want to Interview Me?: Navigating “Sensitive” Qualitative Research Interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winsome Chunnu Brayda PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the qualitative interviewing techniques that the authors used to conduct their respective dissertation research in Jamaica and South Carolina. (The research in Jamaica examined the implementation of primary education policies. The research in South Carolina delved into the life history of Benner C. Turner, a controversial college president. Most of the literature about interviewing focuses on asking the right questions; in contrast, this article discusses the challenges of interviewing. In this article, selected interviews are used from both studies to examine the difficulties these researchers encountered when conducting “sensitive” interviews, the risks female researchers face in unfamiliar places, and the challenges of working in international settings (which requires interpersonal skills and cultural competency. While the task of research interviewing is complex, the authors provide ideas that can be used to navigate such moments.

  3. Development and preliminary validation of the food intolerance Quality of Life Questionnaire (FIQLQ): Adult Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DunnGalvin, Audrey; Barnett, Julie; Begen, Fiona M; Ryan, Kathleen; Lucas, Jane S

    2018-04-01

    Approximately 20% of children and adults avoid certain foods because of perceived food intolerance. Valid and reliable health-related quality of life instruments are needed to measure changes following clinical, therapeutic or policy interventions. However, there are no disease-specific quality of life instruments for adults with food intolerances. To develop the Food Intolerance Quality of Life Questionnaire FIQLQ. Then to conduct psychometric validation including reliability and construct validity. We adapted the existing Food Allergy Quality of Life questionnaire (FAQLQ) for interviews with 14 adults with food intolerance. For preliminary psychometric validation, 229 adults with food intolerances completed the online electronic version of FIQLQ. The resultant FIQLQ had 18 items which loaded onto 3 subscales-Emotional Impact, Social and Dietary Restrictions, Reactions and Avoidance. Each subscale had excellent internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α 0.81-0.94). Content, convergent and construct validity was supported by significant correlations of FIQLQ subscale scores with hypothesised variables including age, numbers of symptoms and level of stress experienced due to intolerance. The FIQLQ has good reliability, construct validity and internal consistency. It is short and easy to use, providing a good tool for evaluating quality of life in the clinical research setting and to inform health and regulatory policies.

  4. Validation of the urgency questionnaire in Portuguese: A new instrument to assess overactive bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Rodolfo Pacheco de; Silva, Jonas Lopes da; Calado, Adriano Almeida; Cavalcanti, Geraldo de Aguiar

    2018-01-01

    Overactive Bladder (OAB) is a clinical condition characterized by symptoms reported by patients. Therefore, measurement instruments based on reported information are important for understanding its impact and treatment benefits. The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Urgency Questionnaire (UQ) in Portuguese. Initially, the UQ was translated and culturally adapted to Portuguese. Sixty-three volunteers were enrolled in the study and were interviewed for responding the Portuguese version of the UQ and the validated Portuguese version of the Overactive Bladder Questionnaire short-form (OABq-SF), used as the gold standard measurement for the validation process. Psychometric properties such as criterion validity, stability, and reliability were tested. Forty-six subjects were included in the symptomatic group (presence of "urgency"), and seventeen were included in the asymptomatic group (control group). There was difference between symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects on all of the subscales (p≤0.001). The UQ subscales correlated with the OABq-SF subscales (p≤0.01), except the subscale "time to control urgency" and the item "impact" from the visual analog scales (VAS). However, these scales correlated with the OABq-SF - Symptom Bother Scale. The UQ subscales demonstrated stability over time (pPortuguese version of the UQ proved to be a valid tool for the evaluation of OAB in individuals whose native language is Portuguese. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  5. An Interview with Arlie Russell Hochschild

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willig, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    This is the second of two interviews with Arlie Russell Hochschild, Professor Emerita of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. In her work, Hochschild explores the many ways we manage our emotions in personal life and perform emotional labor in the workplace.......This is the second of two interviews with Arlie Russell Hochschild, Professor Emerita of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. In her work, Hochschild explores the many ways we manage our emotions in personal life and perform emotional labor in the workplace....

  6. An Interview with Dr. Walter Lear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Editors

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of the English version of Social Medicine we are publishing the first of several pamphlets loaned to us by the US Health Activism History Collection. To introduce this collection we travelled to Philadelphia on June 18, 2008 to interview Dr. Walter J. Lear. Dr Lear, born in 1923, is the person responsible for the collection. In a wide-ranging interview in his home Dr. Lear discussed his personal background, the origins and purpose of the collection, the impact of the McCarthy period on the US health left, as well as his vision for the future.

  7. Creativity and Marketing: Interview With Marie Taillard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Taillard

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this interview Dr. Taillard discusses her interest and ongoing research in the areas of marketing, consumer behaviour and creativity. She considers how academic training can be applied to a business context and describes the newly formed Creativity Marketing Centre at ESCP Europe. Exploring the multiple intersections between creativity and marketing represents not only a paradigmatic change for those interested in business and consumer behaviour but also for researchers of creativity who can start envisioning and studying consumption as a creative act. This interview will offer valuable points of reflection for all those interested to know more about this approach.

  8. Computational Complexities of University Interview Timetabling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Naoyuki; Kiyonari, Yuuki; Miyano, Eiji; Miyazaki, Shuichi; Yamanaka, Katsuhisa

    This paper introduces a new timetabling problem on universities, called interview timetabling. In this problem, some constant number, say three, of referees are assigned to each of 2n graduate students. Our task is to construct a presentation timetable of these 2n students using n timeslots and two rooms, so that two students evaluated by the same referee must be assigned to different timeslots. The optimization goal is to minimize the total number of movements of all referees between two rooms. This problem comes from the real world in the interview timetabling in Kyoto University. We propose two restricted models of this problem, and investigate their time complexities.

  9. The Diabetes Intention, Attitude, and Behavior Questionnaire: evaluation of a brief questionnaire to measure physical activity, dietary control, maintenance of a healthy weight, and psychological antecedents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traina, Shana B; Mathias, Susan D; Colwell, Hilary H; Crosby, Ross D; Abraham, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed measurement properties of the 17-item Diabetes Intention, Attitude, and Behavior Questionnaire (DIAB-Q), which measures intention to engage in self-care behaviors, including following a diabetes diet and engaging in appropriate physical activity. The DIAB-Q includes questions based on the Theory of Planned Behavior. Items were developed using published literature, input from health care professionals, and qualitative research findings in patients with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In Stage I of the study, 23 adults with T2DM were interviewed to evaluate the content and clarity of the DIAB-Q. In Stage II 1,015 individuals with T2DM completed the DIAB-Q and supplemental questionnaires, including the Short Form-36 acute (SF-36), section III of the Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire, the Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities questionnaire, and self-administered items relevant to the treatment and management of T2DM (eg, blood pressure and glycated hemoglobin [HbA1c]) at baseline and 3-7 days later. Once the DIAB-Q scale structure was determined, its test-retest reliability, construct validity, and known-groups validity were evaluated, and minimal clinically important change was estimated. In Stage I, the 23 respondents surveyed generally reported that the DIAB-Q was clear and comprehensive and endorsed questions as relevant to their intentions to engage in diabetes-related self-care activities. Most subjects in Stage II were male, Caucasian, and married. Mean age was 63 years. Factor analysis revealed six psychological constructs (Behavior, Planning, Intention, Perceived Behavioral Control, Attitude, and Subjective Norm). Test-retest reliability was acceptable (≥0.70) for all scales, except Perceived Behavioral Control. Construct validity was demonstrated based on correlations with diabetes-specific items/scales and the SF-36. Known-groups validity was confirmed for Behavior, Planning, and Intention when respondents were

  10. Towards Tailored Patient's Management Approach: Integrating the Modified 2010 ACR Criteria for Fibromyalgia in Multidimensional Patient Reported Outcome Measures Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Miedany, Yasser; El Gaafary, Maha; Youssef, Sally; Ahmed, Ihab

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To assess the validity, reliability, and responsiveness to change of a patient self-reported questionnaire combining the Widespread Pain Index and the Symptom Severity Score as well as construct outcome measures and comorbidities assessment in fibromyalgia patients. Methods. The PROMs-FM was conceptualized based on frameworks used by the WHO Quality of Life tool and the PROMIS. Initially, cognitive interviews were conducted to identify item pool of questions. Item selection and reduction were achieved based on patients as well as an interdisciplinary group of specialists. Rasch and internal consistency reliability analyses were implemented. The questionnaire included the modified ACR criteria main items (Symptom Severity Score and Widespread Pain Index), in addition to assessment of functional disability, quality of life (QoL), review of the systems, and comorbidities. Every patient completed HAQ and EQ-5D questionnaires. Results. A total of 146 fibromyalgia patients completed the questionnaire. The PROMs-FM questionnaire was reliable as demonstrated by a high standardized alpha (0.886-0.982). Content construct assessment of the functional disability and QoL revealed significant correlation (p < 0.01) with both HAQ and EQ-5D. Changes in functional disability and QoL showed significant (p < 0.01) variation with diseases activity status in response to therapy. There was higher prevalence of autonomic symptoms, CVS risk, sexual dysfunction, and falling. Conclusions. The developed PROMs-FM questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for assessment of fibromyalgia patients. A phased treatment regimen depending on the severity of FMS as well as preferences and comorbidities of the patient is the best approach to tailored patient management.

  11. Importance of questionnaire context for a physical activity question

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M. E.; Sørensen, Mette Rosenlund; Ekholm, O.

    2013-01-01

    Adequate information about physical activity habits is essential for surveillance, implementing, and evaluating public health initiatives in this area. Previous studies have shown that question order and differences in wording result in systematic differences in people's responses to questionnaires......; however, this has never been shown for physical activity questions. The aim was to study the influence of different formulations and question order on self-report physical activity in a population-based health interview survey. Four samples of each 1000 adults were drawn at random from the National Person...

  12. Integrated System Validation Usability Questionnaire: Computerized Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcés, Ma. I.; Torralba, B.

    2015-01-01

    The Research and Development (R&D) project on “Theoretical and Methodological Approaches to Integrated System Validation of Control Rooms, 2014-2015”, in which the research activities described in this report are framed, has two main objectives: to develop the items for an usability methodology conceived as a part of the measurement framework for performance-based control room evaluation that the OECD Halden Reactor Project will test in the experiments planned for 2015; and the statistical analysis of the data generated in the experimental activities of the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLAB) facility, with previous usability questionnaires, in 2010 and 2011. In this report, the procedure designed to meet the first goal of the project is described, in particular, the process followed to identify the items related to operating procedures, both computer and paper-based, one of the elements to be included in the usability questionnaire. Three phases are performed, in the first one, the approaches developed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NRC, are reviewed, the models used by the nuclear industry and their technical support organizations, mainly, the Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI, are analyzed, and scientist advances are also explored. In the remaining stages, general and specific guidelines for computerized and paper-based procedures are compared and criteria for the preliminary selection of the items that should be incorporated into the usability questionnaire are defined. This proposal will be reviewed and adapted by the Halden Reactor Project to the design of the specific experiments performed in HAMLAB.

  13. Cognitive Biases Questionnaire for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Emmanuelle R; Moritz, Steffen; Schwannauer, Matthias; Wiseman, Zoe; Greenwood, Kathryn E; Scott, Jan; Beck, Aaron T; Donaldson, Catherine; Hagen, Roger; Ross, Kerry; Veckenstedt, Ruth; Ison, Rebecca; Williams, Sally; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Garety, Philippa A

    2014-03-01

    The Cognitive Biases Questionnaire for psychosis (CBQp) was developed to capture 5 cognitive distortions (jumping to conclusions, intentionalising, catastrophising, emotional reasoning, and dichotomous thinking), which are considered important for the pathogenesis of psychosis. Vignettes were adapted from the Cognitive Style Test (CST),(1) relating to "Anomalous Perceptions" and "Threatening Events" themes. Scale structure, reliability, and validity were investigated in a psychosis group, and CBQp scores were compared with those of depressed and healthy control samples. The CBQp showed good internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The 5 biases were not independent, with a 2-related factor scale providing the best fit. This structure suggests that the CBQp assesses a general thinking bias rather than distinct cognitive errors, while Anomalous Perception and Threatening Events theme scores can be used separately. Total CBQp scores showed good convergent validity with the CST, but individual biases were not related to existing tasks purporting to assess similar reasoning biases. Psychotic and depressed populations scored higher than healthy controls, and symptomatic psychosis patients scored higher than their nonsymptomatic counterparts, with modest relationships between CBQp scores and symptom severity once emotional disorders were partialled out. Anomalous Perception theme and Intentionalising bias scores showed some specificity to psychosis. Overall, the CBQp has good psychometric properties, although it is likely that it measures a different construct to existing tasks, tentatively suggested to represent a bias of interpretation rather than reasoning, judgment or decision-making processes. It is a potentially useful tool in both research and clinical arenas.

  14. Including Gypsy Travellers in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Gwynned; Stead, Joan

    2002-01-01

    Examined the educational exclusion and inclusion of Gypsy Traveller students, exploring how some Scottish schools responded to Traveller student culture and how this led to exclusion. Interviews with school staff, Traveller students, and parents indicated that continuing prejudice and harassment promoted inappropriate school placement and…

  15. Selection bias in follow-up interviews with individuals attending the emergency department for occupational injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oesterlund, Anna H; Lander, Flemming; Rytter, Søren

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether supplementary interview participation was comparable for occupationally injured patients attending two hospital emergency departments and to investigate the magnitude of selection bias in relation to sex, age, severity, job tasks and industry risk level. METHODS......: Workers aged 18-70 years who contacted the two emergency departments for an acute occupational injury in 2013 were eligible and given a short questionnaire. Following written consent, a semi-structured interview concerning health and transient risk factors was conducted by telephone. The two departments...... were compared for study recruitment by age and sex. Respondents and non-respondents to the interview were compared for age, sex, injury severity, job tasks and industry risk level. RESULTS: Of 4002 patients attending the two hospitals, 1693 (42%) participated in the interview. One hospital had...

  16. A structured interview for the assessment of the Five-Factor Model of personality: facet-level relations to the axis II personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, T J; Widiger, T A; Burr, R

    2001-04-01

    The Structured Interview for the Five-Factor Model (SIFFM; Trull & Widiger, 1997) is an 120-item semistructured interview that assesses both adaptive and maladaptive features of the personality traits included in the five-factor model of personality, or "Big Five." In this article, we evaluate the ability of SIFFM scores to predict personality disorder symptomatology in a sample of 232 adults (46 outpatients and 186 nonclinical college students). Personality disorder symptoms were assessed using the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire-Revised (PDQ-R; Hyler & Rider, 1987). Results indicated that many of the predicted associations between lower-order personality traits and personality disorders were supported. Further, many of these associations held even after controlling for comorbid personality disorder symptoms. These findings may help inform conceptualizations of the personality disorders, as well as etiological theories and treatment.

  17. Validation of a questionnaire for self-rating of urological and gynaecological morbidity after treatment of gynaecological cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Tine; Klee, Marianne Carol; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    in the same way. The patient's written response before interview was compared with an observer rating of the patient's open-ended audio-taped responses to the same questionnaire, administered as an interview. Qualitative recordings by the observer were made to describe potential misinterpretations. RESULTS...

  18. Validation of a stroke symptom questionnaire for epidemiological surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Ivana Makita; Goulart, Alessandra Carvalho; Santos Júnior, Waldyr Rodrigues; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Benseñor, Isabela Martins

    2010-07-01

    Stroke is a relevant issue within public health and requires epidemiological surveillance tools. The aim here was to validate a questionnaire for evaluating individuals with stroke symptoms in the Stroke Morbidity and Mortality Study (Estudo de Mortalidade e Morbidade do Acidente Vascular Cerebral, EMMA), São Paulo, Brazil. This was a cross-sectional study performed among a sample of the inhabitants of Butantã, an area in the western zone of the city of São Paulo. For all households in the coverage area of a primary healthcare unit, household members over the age of 35 years answered a stroke symptom questionnaire addressing limb weakness, facial weakness, speech problems, sensory disorders and impaired vision. Thirty-six participants were randomly selected for a complete neurological examination (gold standard). Considering all the questions in the questionnaire, the sensitivity was 72.2%, specificity was 94.4%, positive predictive value was 92.9% and negative predictive value was 77.3%. The positive likelihood ratio was 12.9, the negative likelihood ratio was 0.29 and the kappa coefficient was 0.67. Limb weakness was the most sensitive symptom, and speech problems were the most specific. The stroke symptom questionnaire is a useful tool and can be applied by trained interviewers with the aim of identifying community-dwelling stroke patients, through the structure of the Family Health Program.

  19. Validation of the IOF quality of life questionnaire for patients with wrist fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, P.T.A.M.; Jameson, K.; Bianchi, M.L.; Goemaere, S.; Boonen, S.; Reeve, J.; Stepan, J.; Johnell, O.; van Schoor, N.M.; Dennison, E.; Kanis, J.A.; Cooper, C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Wrist fracture causes pain and decreased physical, social and emotional function. The International Osteoporosis Foundation has developed a specific questionnaire to assess quality of life in patients with wrist fracture. This questionnaire, including 12 questions, was validated in a

  20. Tips for a physician in getting the right job, part XVII: after the interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay

    2014-12-01

    The applicant should inquire about the follow-up after an interview, including the timeline for decision making, whether there will be a second interview, and how future communication will be made. Thank-you notes from the interviewee should be sent out immediately after the interview, not only as a courtesy, but also to include additional comments about why the candidate is an excellent fit for the job. The job seeker should also reflect carefully on what he/she did right or wrong during the interview and about what was learned about the job.

  1. A Motivational Interviewing Intervention for the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Catherine M.; Howard Sharp, Katianne M.; Berman, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite attempts to engage students, undergraduate instructors are often challenged by low motivation among students to study outside of the classroom. The current study adapted motivational interviewing, which is often used with therapy clients ambivalent to change, to target college student motivation to study for exams. Findings indicated…

  2. Preventing mismatch answers in standardized survey interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongena, Yfke P.; Dijkstra, Wil

    Interaction analysis of question–answer sequences from a telephone survey shows that so-called mismatch answers, i.e. answers that do not correspond to the required answering format, are the most frequently occurring problematic verbal behavior. They also are likely to trigger suggestive interviewer

  3. STS-98 Crew Interview: Tom Jones

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The STS-98 Mission Specialist Tom Jones is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut, his career path, and his training. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, and the payload and hardware it brings to the International Space Station (ISS). Mr. Jones discusses his role in the mission's spacewalks and activities.

  4. Recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Peter S

    2017-02-01

    A series of 100 recorded interviews with human and medical geneticists has been carried out and some general results are reported here. Twenty countries across the world are represented, mostly European, with a particular emphasis on the United Kingdom. A priority was given to older workers, many of whom were key founders of human genetics in their own countries and areas of work, and over 20 of whom are now no longer living. The interviews also give valuable information on the previous generation of workers, as teachers and mentors of the interviewees, thus extending the coverage of human genetics back to the 1930s or even earlier. A number of prominent themes emerge from the interview series; notably the beginnings of human cytogenetics from the late 1950s, the development of medical genetics research and its clinical applications in the 1960s and 1970s, and more recently the beginnings and rapid growth of human molecular genetics. The interviews provide vivid personal portraits of those involved, and also show the effects of social and political issues, notably those arising from World War 2 and its aftermath, which affected not only the individuals involved but also broader developments in human genetics, such as research related to risks of irradiation. While this series has made a start in the oral history of this important field, extension and further development of the work is urgently needed to give a fuller picture of how human genetics has developed.

  5. Documenting Art Therapy Clinical Knowledge Using Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev, Dafna

    2017-01-01

    Practicing art therapists have vast stores of knowledge and experience, but in most cases, their work is not documented, and their clinical knowledge does not enter the academic discourse. This article proposes a systematic approach to the collection of practice knowledge about art therapy based on conducting interviews with art therapists who…

  6. Follow-up interviews after eclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersgaard, Alice Beathe; Herbst, Andreas; Johansen, Marianne

    2008-01-01

    hundred and twenty-three women (59%) were followed up with a structured telephone interview, 6-24 months (median 11) after their eclamptic fit. Results: At the time of follow-up, 63 women (51%) had at least one persistent symptom; 2 patients had severe neurological sequels (hemiparesis and dysarthria), 11...

  7. Debriefing interviews and coaching conversations: Strategies to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was found that the strategies of debriefing interviews and coaching conversations promote self-awareness and methodological awareness, transformation, learning and support, and increase students' capability to act and react more quickly to research challenges. However, bracketing of personal epistemological beliefs ...

  8. Training in motivational interviewing in obstetrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, Christina L; Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Mogensen, Ole

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether a three day training course in motivational interviewing which is an approach to helping people to change could improve the communication skills of obstetric healthcare professionals in their interaction with obese pregnant women. DESIGN: Intervention study. SETTING:...

  9. Teaching Geographical Thought Through Student Interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Denis

    1981-01-01

    Outlines advantages and disadvantages of a history of postwar geographical thought course, focusing on student-led interviews of geography staff. Students examine geographical career of a lecturer, discuss courses s/he has taken, character of departments s/he has experienced, his/her awareness at different stages of philosophical and…

  10. Cross-Cultural Training in Motivational Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R.; Hendrickson, Stacey M. L.; Venner, Kamilla; Bisono, Ani; Daugherty, Mikyta; Yahne, Carolina E.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the cross-cultural transportability of motivational interviewing (MI), an evidence-based addiction treatment method. Free clinical training in MI was offered in separate targeted workshops for 86 African American, Native American, and Spanish-speaking addiction treatment providers. Audiotaped pre- and posttraining clinical…

  11. Computer-Administered Interviews and Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garb, Howard N.

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the value of computer-administered interviews and rating scales, the following topics are reviewed in the present article: (a) strengths and weaknesses of structured and unstructured assessment instruments, (b) advantages and disadvantages of computer administration, and (c) the validity and utility of computer-administered interviews…

  12. Interviews: Linking Leadership Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Deborah N.; Roebuck, Deborah B.

    2010-01-01

    Leadership educators use various tools to enable their students to learn about leadership. This article describes the assignment "Interview with a Leader" which the authors have incorporated into several different leadership courses. Grounded in constructivist and social learning theories, the authors have found this assignment to be…

  13. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Lennart Carleson is the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration i Oslo, Carleson was interviewed by Martin Raussen of Aalborg University and Christian Skau of the Norwegian University of Science...

  14. An Interview with Lawrence M. Lieberman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Academic Therapy, 1986

    1986-01-01

    An interview with L. Lieberman, a teacher educator and author, touches on such topics as departmentalization at the secondary and elementary level, the use of triple level tests to allow students to stay in mainstreamed settings, and the importance of emphasizing skill development rather than subject matter instruction in secondary resource rooms.…

  15. Polychronicity in modern Madrid: an interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, S.J.; van Eerde, W.

    2012-01-01

    This research is the result of 30 interviews with middle-management and senior executives from several different organizations in Madrid. The focus was on different aspects of time use in a professional context: - Monophasia or polyphasia, - Time tangibility - Attention to people. The results

  16. LIFE-STYLE SEGMENTATION WITH TAILORED INTERVIEWING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KAMAKURA, WA; WEDEL, M

    The authors present a tailored interviewing procedure for life-style segmentation. The procedure assumes that a life-style measurement instrument has been designed. A classification of a sample of consumers into life-style segments is obtained using a latent-class model. With these segments, the

  17. [The motivational interview in the educational approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudan, Corinne

    2014-12-01

    The motivational interview helps nurses trained in this technique to optimise the motivational approach with the patient. This communication tool also gives them greater understanding of the resistance of people confronted with a chronic disease and to support them more effectively towards change.

  18. Motivational interviewing in the health care setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol use disorders are related to many negative health, emotional, societal, and economic consequences. These disorders are often difficult to treat because individuals suffering from them tend to be ambivalent about and resistant to change. Motivational interviewing (MI) provides healthcare prov...

  19. What Can Motivational Interviewing Do for You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Brian L.

    2011-01-01

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a promising 25-year-old therapeutic approach that integrates relationship-building principles and more directive strategies to move clients toward behavioral change. A large and expanding number of controlled research studies of MI have demonstrated its efficacy for addictive behaviors ranging from use of alcohol,…

  20. A motivational interviewing course for pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, Kathy; Hawes, Starlyn M; Duval, Elizabeth R; Spresser, Carrie D; Martínez, David A; Lynam, Ian; Barnes, Amy; Hinton-Dampf, Amber M; Murphy, Meghan E; Marken, Patricia A; Catley, Delwyn

    2010-05-12

    To create, implement, and evaluate a pharmacy course on motivational interviewing. A 3-hour elective course was created to train doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students in brief patient-centered motivational interviewing counseling strategies that have proven effective with the types of health issues most commonly addressed in pharmacy settings. Students were assisted in developing their skills through required readings, interactive lectures, in-class demonstrations and practice sessions, out of class skills practice, one-on-one supervision provided by doctoral level clinical health psychology students, and written reflections on each class session. Students demonstrated significant improvement in motivational interviewing skills and a high level of motivation for and confidence in using these skills in their future practice. Students overall assessment of the course and supervision process was highly positive. This patient-centered counseling skills course was feasible and produced improvements in PharmD students' counseling skills and increased their motivation and confidence to use motivational interviewing skills in their future communications with patients.

  1. Toward a Theory of Motivational Interviewing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William R.; Rose, Gary S.

    2009-01-01

    The widely disseminated clinical method of motivational interviewing (MI) arose through a convergence of science and practice. Beyond a large base of clinical trials, advances have been made toward "looking under the hood" of MI to understand the underlying mechanisms by which it affects behavior change. Such specification of outcome-relevant…

  2. Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    Motivational interviewing, which began as a counseling technique in addiction recovery, is a client-centered tool for making changes, increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors. It relies on an individual's intrinsic motivation and interest in change, using a non-confrontational approach to frame goals in a practical,…

  3. TECHNICAL EDUCATION PERFORMANCE INSPECTION (II: INTERVIEWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Francisco Pérez Aguilar

    2014-05-01

    This article addressed on the one hand, interviews, and other meetings, commissions, boards and tribunals. In each of the two sections most relevant aspects were addressed and that are directly related to the educational inspection, special importance which are imported from the qualitative or ethnographic research since, with nuances usually applied by education inspectors.

  4. Analyzing Storytelling in TESOL Interview Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Gabriele; Prior, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Autobiographic research interviews have become an accepted and valued method of qualitative inquiry in TESOL and applied linguistics more broadly. In recent discussions surrounding the epistemological treatment of autobiographic stories, TESOL researchers have increasingly called for more attention to the ways in which stories are embedded in…

  5. Understanding Infidelity: An Interview with Gerald Weeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Travis

    2011-01-01

    In this interview, Gerald Weeks shares his expertise on the topic of infidelity and couples counseling. Dr. Weeks defines infidelity, presents assessment strategies for treating the issue of infidelity, and discusses an intersystemic model for infidelity treatment when counseling couples. Dr. Weeks also provides insight into common mistakes made…

  6. Interview mit Benoît Godin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Ufer

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this interview for TATuP, conducted at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique in Montreál, Benoît Godin responds to Ulrich Ufer’s questions about the history of the concept of innovation and its uses in present and past discourses on social change.

  7. Enhancing Student Experiential Learning with Structured Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Robert M.; Johnson, Carol B.; Schwartz, William C., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Learning through experience can be rewarding but intimidating. To maximize the benefits of experiential learning assignments, students need to have confidence in their abilities. The authors report how a structured-interview instrument effectively facilitated experiential learning for accounting students without extensive content-specific…

  8. Excerpt of the Interview with Mathew Sands

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 9. Excerpt of the Interview with Mathew Sands. Mathew Sands Finn Aaserud. Face to Face Volume 16 Issue 9 September 2011 pp 881-885. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Interview met professor Joan Wallach Scott

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijl, Greetje; Tijhoff, Esmeralda

    2012-01-01

    Joan Scott, professor at the School of Social Science in the Institute for Avanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey (USA), was the keynote speaker at the conference 'Uitsluitend emancipatie' in de Beurs van Berlage in Amsterdam in October 2012. An interview on gender, history, feminism and her book

  10. Photo-Interviewing to Explore Everyday Occupation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bukhave, Elise Bromann; Huniche, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article sheds light on the potential and the limitations of photo-interviewing for the study of human occupation and in so doing, reflects the rapid growth in the use of participatory visual methods in a number of other disciplines. Using a study that explored first person perspecti...

  11. Frances Rauscher: Music and Reasoning. Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Neal

    1995-01-01

    Reports on an interview with Frances Rauscher, a research psychologist and musician who has studied the effects of music on the brain. Maintains that students who have studied music have enhanced spatial reasoning. Recommends that music education begin at younger ages. (CFR)

  12. An Interview with Arthur W. Combs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolliver, Robert H.; Patterson, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Presents biographical summary of Arthur Combs, well known for his perceptual point of view to earlier generation of humanistic educators, counselors, and psychologists. Discusses Combs's background, placing emphasis on academic career. Interview focuses on Combs's entry into humanistic education, his implementation of teacher education program…

  13. How to Survive an Academic Job Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herreid, Clyde Freeman; Full, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Career development is an important issue, and there are aspects of finding the right position that are particular to science faculty. This article offers a checklist of questions to ask in an academic job interview. Some queries are more appropriate for the chairperson and other administrators; others are better asked of faculty or students. With…

  14. Unit 2: Application Letters & The Job Interview

    OpenAIRE

    Aleson Carbonell, Marian

    2007-01-01

    Unit 2a_ Letters of Application and the CV: Reading the employment section. Unit 2b_Letters of Application and the CV:Writing Letters and the Job Hunting Process. Unit 2c_ Letters of Application and the CV: The Job Interview.

  15. Dimensions of Satisfaction in the Supervision Interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Elizabeth L.; Wampold, Bruce E.

    While supervisory research focuses on trainee performance in counseling situations as the primary outcome criterion, few instruments have been developed for evaluating behavior in the supervision interview. To develop a scale that reflects critical factors in the supervisory relationship, the Supervisor Personal Reaction Scale (SPRS) and the…

  16. Surveys and questionnaires in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona

    2015-06-17

    Surveys and questionnaires are often used in nursing research to elicit the views of large groups of people to develop the nursing knowledge base. This article provides an overview of survey and questionnaire use in nursing research, clarifies the place of the questionnaire as a data collection tool in quantitative research design and provides information and advice about best practice in the development of quantitative surveys and questionnaires.

  17. Assessing an individual's fitness to be interviewed in police custody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Matthew

    2017-05-31

    Nurses working in police custody settings may be called on to assess a detainee's fitness to be interviewed by police, for example where the person is thought to have a mental disorder or vulnerability. This article outlines the role of the custody nurse in the fitness-to-interview assessment. This assessment is complex and multifaceted. It requires custody nurses to assess a detainee's medical, mental health, educational and social history, as well as any substance misuse. It should include a mental state examination and, where appropriate, a physical examination. Fitness-to-interview decisions should be rigorous to prevent miscarriages of justice or significant harm to detainees. Custody nurses should advocate for detainees who are mentally vulnerable and ensure appropriate safeguards are in place, where necessary. Further work is required to reduce the subjectivity of the fitness-to-interview assessment, along with increased investment in appropriate adult services. Equally, custody nurses working at this advanced level of practice require relevant postgraduate knowledge and skills.

  18. Split Questionnaire Design for Massive Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adiguzel, F.; Wedel, M.

    2008-01-01

    Companies are conducting more and longer surveys than ever before. Massive questionnaires are pervasive in marketing practice. As an alternative to the heuristic methods that are currently used to split questionnaires, this study develops a methodology to design the split questionnaire in a way that

  19. Validation of a New Questionnaire with Generic and Disease-Specific Qualities: The Mcgill Copd Quality of Life Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita Pakhale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A validated health-related quality of life questionnaire in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD with advantages of both generic- and disease-specific questionnaires is needed to capture patients’ perspectives of severity and impact of the disease. The McGill COPD questionnaire was created to include these advantages in English and French. It assesses three domains: symptoms, physical function and feelings with 29 items (12 from the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey with 17 from the previously developed COPD-specific module.

  20. Development and reproducibility of a short questionnaire to measure use and usability of custom-made orthopaedic shoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Jannink, M.J.A.; Geertzen, Jan H.B.; Postema, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To develop a short and easy to use questionnaire to measure use and usability of custom-made orthopaedic shoes, and to investigate its reproducibility. Design: Development of the questionnaire (Monitor Orthopaedic Shoes) was based on a literature search, expert interviews, 2 expert

  1. DEVELOPMENT AND REPRODUCIBILITY OF A SHORT QUESTIONNAIRE TO MEASURE USE AND USABILITY OF CUSTOM-MADE ORTHOPAEDIC SHOES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Netten, Jaap J.; Hijmans, Juha M.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Postema, Klaas

    2009-01-01

    Objective:To develop it short and easy to use questionnaire to measure use and usability of custom-made orthopaedic shoes, and to investigate its reproducibility. Design: Development of the questionnaire (Monitor Orthopaedic Shoes) was based on a literature search. expert interviews. 2 expert

  2. Reliability and Validity of a Questionnaire to Measure Consumer Knowledge regarding Safe Practices to Prevent Microbiological Contamination in Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggioni, Paula Lazzarin; Salay, Elisabette

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a validated and reliable questionnaire to measure consumer knowledge regarding safe practices to prevent microbiological contamination in restaurants and commercial kitchens. Methods: Non-probabilistic samples of individuals were interviewed in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Questionnaire items…

  3. Situating and Constructing Diversity in Semi-Structured Interviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Michele J.; Morse, Janice M.

    2015-01-01

    Although semi-structured interviews (SSIs) are used extensively in research, scant attention is given to their diversity, underlying assumptions, construction, and broad applications to qualitative and mixed-method research. In this three-part article, we discuss the following: (a) how the SSI is situated historically including its evolution and diversification, (b) the principles of constructing SSIs, and (c) how SSIs are utilized as a stand-alone research method, and as strategy within a mixed-method design. PMID:28462313

  4. Developing Employment Interview and Interviewing Skills in Small-group Project Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the value of communications skills in geographical education. Describes the use of realistic interviews that were a part of small-group project work. Explains that students wrote job specifications, a curriculum vitae, a cover letter, and conducted interview panels. (CMK)

  5. A linguistic study of patient-centered interviewing: emergent interactional effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesson, Ashley M; Sarinopoulos, Issidoros; Frankel, Richard M; Smith, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate interactional effects of patient-centered interviewing (PCI) compared to isolated clinician-centered interviewing (CCI). We conducted a pilot study comparing PCI (N=4) to CCI (N=4) for simulated new-patient visits. We rated interviews independently and measured patient satisfaction with the interaction via a validated questionnaire. We conducted interactional sociolinguistic analysis on the interviews and compared across three levels of analysis: turn, topic, and interaction. We found significant differences between PCI and CCI in physician responses to patients' psychosocial cues and concerns. The number and type of physician questions also differed significantly across PCI and CCI sets. Qualitatively, we noted several indicators of physician-patient attunement in the PCI interviews that were not present in the CCI interviews. They spanned diverse aspects of physician and patient speech, suggesting interactional accommodation on the part of both participants. This small pilot study highlights a variety of interactional variables that may underlie the effects associated with patient-centered interviewing (e.g., positive relationships, health outcomes). Question form, phonological accommodation processes, and use of stylistic markers are relatively unexplored in controlled studies of physician-patient interaction. This study characterizes several interactional variables for larger scale studies and contributes to models of patient-centeredness in practice. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. What happens during annual appraisal interviews? How leader-follower interactions unfold and impact interview outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinecke, Annika L; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Kauffeld, Simone

    2017-07-01

    Despite a wealth of research on antecedents and outcomes of annual appraisal interviews, the ingredients that make for a successful communication process within the interview itself remain unclear. This study takes a communication approach to highlight leader-follower dynamics in annual appraisal interviews. We integrate relational leadership theory and recent findings on leader-follower interactions to argue (a) how supervisors' task- and relation-oriented statements can elicit employee involvement during the interview process and (b) how these communication patterns affect both supervisors' and employees' perceptions of the interview. Moreover, we explore (c) how supervisor behavior is contingent upon employee contributions to the appraisal interview. We audiotaped 48 actual annual appraisal interviews between supervisors and their employees. Adopting a multimethod approach, we used quantitative interaction coding (N = 32,791 behavioral events) as well as qualitative open-axial coding to explore communication patterns among supervisors and their employees. Lag sequential analysis revealed that supervisors' relation-oriented statements triggered active employee contributions and vice versa. These relation-activation patterns were linked to higher interview success ratings by both supervisors and employees. Moreover, our qualitative findings highlight employee disagreement as a crucial form of active employee contributions during appraisal interviews. We distinguish what employees disagreed about, how the disagreement was enacted, and how supervisors responded to it. Overall employee disagreement was negatively related to ratings of supervisor support. We discuss theoretical implications for performance appraisal and leadership theory and derive practical recommendations for promoting employee involvement during appraisal interviews. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Short assessment of the Big Five: robust across survey methods except telephone interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Frieder R; John, Dennis; Lüdtke, Oliver; Schupp, Jürgen; Wagner, Gert G

    2011-06-01

    We examined measurement invariance and age-related robustness of a short 15-item Big Five Inventory (BFI-S) of personality dimensions, which is well suited for applications in large-scale multidisciplinary surveys. The BFI-S was assessed in three different interviewing conditions: computer-assisted or paper-assisted face-to-face interviewing, computer-assisted telephone interviewing, and a self-administered questionnaire. Randomized probability samples from a large-scale German panel survey and a related probability telephone study were used in order to test method effects on self-report measures of personality characteristics across early, middle, and late adulthood. Exploratory structural equation modeling was used in order to test for measurement invariance of the five-factor model of personality trait domains across different assessment methods. For the short inventory, findings suggest strong robustness of self-report measures of personality dimensions among young and middle-aged adults. In old age, telephone interviewing was associated with greater distortions in reliable personality assessment. It is concluded that the greater mental workload of telephone interviewing limits the reliability of self-report personality assessment. Face-to-face surveys and self-administrated questionnaire completion are clearly better suited than phone surveys when personality traits in age-heterogeneous samples are assessed.

  8. An Adapted Post-Donation Motivational Interview Enhances Blood Donor Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Kadian S.; Campbell, Tavis S.; Carey, Patricia M.; Langevin, Eric; Bowser, Brent; France, Christopher R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Blood donors may hold conflicting thoughts about future donation. While they may perceive the direct benefit to themselves and others, they often report compelling reasons not to give again. As a result the standard encouragements to return may not be sufficient to motivate some donors. The present study examined the effects of a post-donation adapted motivational interview on blood donor attitudes and repeat donation behavior. Study Design and Methods Donors (n=215) were randomly assigned to either an adapted motivational interview (AMI) or a no-interview control group. Approximately one month after their index donation, donors in the AMI group completed a brief telephone interview to clarify individual-specific motivations and values concerning blood donation and address potential barriers. They were then asked to complete questionnaires regarding donation attitudes, anxiety, self-efficacy and intention to donate. Donors in the control group were also contacted one month post-donation and asked to complete the same series of questionnaires. Results Donors in the AMI group reported greater intention to provide a future donation, F = 8.13, p motivational interview may be an effective strategy to increase the donor pool by enhancing retention of existing donors. PMID:20456674

  9. Feedforward interview technique in obstetrics and gynaecology residents: a fact or fallacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sami, Shehla; Ahmad, Amina

    2015-01-01

    To determine the role of Feedforward Interview (FFI) technique in motivating residents of Obstetrics and Gynaecology for better learning and performance. An explorative study with mixed method approach being employed. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Sandeman (Provincial) Hospital, Quetta, from November 2010 till May 2013. Feedforward interview technique was complimented by survey questionnaire employing similar philosophy of FFI to triangulate data through two methods. Survey questionnaire was filled-up by 21 residents and analysed by SPSS version 17. Fourteen of these participants were identified for in-depth Feedforward Interviews (FFI), based on nonprobability purposive sampling after informed consent, and content analysis was done. Feedforward interview technique enabled majority of residents in recalling minimum of 3 positive experiences, mainly related to surgical experiences, which enhanced their motivation to aspire for further improvement in this area. Hard work was the main personal contributing factor both in FFI and survey. In addition to identifying clinical experiences enhancing desire to learn, residents also reported need for more academic support as an important factor which could also boost motivation to attain better performance. Feedforward interview technique not only helps residents in recalling positive learning experiences during their training but it also has a significant influence on developing insight about one's performance and motivating residents to achieve higher academic goals.

  10. Validation of online versions of tinnitus questionnaires translated into Swedish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Müller

    2016-11-01

    questionnaires on tinnitus are significantly related, indicating that these questionnaires measure different aspects of the same construct. The data supported good clinical validity of the tinnitus-related questionnaires. ConclusionOur results suggest that most Swedish adaptations of the questionnaires are suitable for clinical and research settings and should facilitate the assessment of treatment outcomes using a more holistic approach by including measures of tinnitus fears, emotional burden, and quality of life.

  11. Validation of Online Versions of Tinnitus Questionnaires Translated into Swedish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Karolina; Edvall, Niklas K.; Idrizbegovic, Esma; Huhn, Robert; Cima, Rilana; Persson, Viktor; Leineweber, Constanze; Westerlund, Hugo; Langguth, Berthold; Schlee, Winfried; Canlon, Barbara; Cederroth, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    almost all questionnaires on tinnitus are significantly related, indicating that these questionnaires measure different aspects of the same construct. The data supported good clinical validity of the tinnitus-related questionnaires. Conclusion: Our results suggest that most Swedish adaptations of the questionnaires are suitable for clinical and research settings and should facilitate the assessment of treatment outcomes using a more holistic approach by including measures of tinnitus fears, emotional burden, and quality of life. PMID:27920720

  12. Interview with the Creators of Love/Hate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolan, Stuart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available On 25th November 2015, Studies in Arts and Humanities (SAH Journal hosted a public interview with leading Irish film and television producer James Flynn (Octagon Productions and creator/writer of the groundbreaking Irish television drama Love/Hate Stuart Carolan. The interview was conducted by Conor Murphy (Editor-in-Chief, SAH Journal at Filmbase Ireland before a live audience comprising students and faculty from the film schools of Dublin Business School, Filmbase and Pulse College. This lively and thought-provoking interview provided key insights into the artistic and production processes behind the making of a successful TV drama. James Flynn gave a detailed overview of the funding and legislative frameworks in which the modern day film producer operates both in Ireland and overseas. He provided a fascinating timeline of developments in the filmmaking industry in Ireland in parallel with his own career over the last twenty years. Stuart Carolan explained how the rich and varied characters that inhabit Love/Hate come into being and offered an insight into the daily writing rituals that shaped the development of character, plot and pace. He also spoke about the significance of casting in Love/Hate on the development of the story. The casting of John Connors, for example, influenced Stuart to develop a traveller theme to a greater extent than initially intended. Stuart’s passion for social justice and equality was evident throughout the interview. The interview is replete with analysis of the process of developing Love/Hate including the logistics of shooting in multiple locations and the tight deadlines under which they operated. In addition, James and Stuart offered focussed, helpful and encouraging advice for emerging screenwriters and filmmakers.

  13. Qualitative interviews regarding pharmacist prescribing in the community setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehan, Michael; Durante, Richard; Ruble, Jim; Munger, Mark A

    2016-09-15

    The perceived demand for and barriers to pharmacist prescribing in the community pharmacy setting were studied. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 19 consumers, 20 community pharmacists, and 8 reimbursement decision-makers from payer organizations between April and June 2015. Respondents were invited to participate in a daylong interview process online. Interviews with consumers and pharmacists were conducted using online bulletin board technology. Telephone interviews were conducted with reimbursement decision-makers. As with all qualitative research, the sample sizes used were restrictive and sufficient to gauge the perceptions of those respondents only. Interview responses were not intended to be generalizable to the groups or populations from which the respondents came. There was a continuum of interest in pharmacist prescribing across the three constituencies. Consumers were predominantly resistant to the notion; however, one third were more positive about the idea. Community pharmacists were more open, particularly when prescribing was restricted to a limited set of conditions or medications. Reimbursement decision-makers were most receptive to the notion. Key barriers to pharmacist prescribing included low awareness of current pharmacist prescribing authority among consumers, concerns about the adequacy of pharmacist training, potential conflicts of interest when the prescriber was also a dispenser, and potential liability issues. Consumer respondents were generally resistant to the notion of pharmacist prescribing, with most viewing pharmacists as dispensers and not prescribers. Community pharmacists were more open to the idea, while reimbursement decision-makers were the most receptive to the notion of pharmacist prescribing. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Post-Mortem diagnosis of dementia by informant interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Renata Eloah de Lucena; Damin, Antonio Eduardo; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi; Morillo, Lilian Schafirovits; Perroco, Tibor Rilho; Campora, Flávia; Moreira, Eliza Guccione; Balbino, Érika Silvério; Lima, Maria do Carmo de Ascenção; Battela, Camila; Ruiz, Lumena; Grinberg, Lea Tenenholz; Farfel, José Marcelo; Leite, Renata Elaine Paraiso; Suemoto, Claudia Kimie; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Nitrini, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    The diagnosis of normal cognition or dementia in the Brazilian Brain Bank of the Aging Brain Study Group (BBBABSG) has relied on postmortem interview with an informant. To ascertain the sensitivity and specificity of postmortem diagnosis based on informant interview compared against the diagnosis established at a memory clinic. A prospective study was conducted at the BBBABSG and at the Reference Center for Cognitive Disorders (RCCD), a specialized memory clinic of the Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo Medical School. Control subjects and cognitively impaired subjects were referred from the Hospital das Clínicas to the RCCD where subjects and their informants were assessed. The same informant was then interviewed at the BBBABSG. Specialists' panel consensus, in each group, determined the final diagnosis of the case, blind to other center's diagnosis. Data was compared for frequency of diagnostic equivalence. For this study, the diagnosis established at the RCCD was accepted as the gold standard. Sensitivity and specificity were computed. Ninety individuals were included, 45 with dementia and 45 without dementia (26 cognitively normal and 19 cognitively impaired but non-demented). The informant interview at the BBBABSG had a sensitivity of 86.6% and specificity of 84.4% for the diagnosis of dementia, and a sensitivity of 65.3% and specificity of 93.7% for the diagnosis of normal cognition. The informant interview used at the BBBABSG has a high specificity and sensitivity for the diagnosis of dementia as well as a high specificity for the diagnosis of normal cognition.

  15. Effect of Motivational Interviewing on Physical Activity Intention among Obese and Overweight Women Using Protection Motivation Theory: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mirkarimi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As a growing problem, obesity is one of the most important worldwide health problems. One of the major factors leading to obesity is the sedentary lifestyle. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of motivational interviewing on the physical activity intention in the obese or overweight women, using the protection motivation theory (PMT. Materials & Methods: In the clinical trial study, 60 obese or overweight women referred to the health centers of Gorgan were studied in 2015. The subjects, selected via non-probable and available sampling method, were randomly divided into two groups including control and motivational interviewing groups. Data was collected using a researcher-made questionnaire before the intervention and 2 and 6 months after in both groups. Data was analyzed by SPSS 18 software using independent T, Chi-square, repeated measures ANOVA, LSD, and one-variable and multivariable linear regression tests. Findings: The scores of all the constructs of PMT in motivational interviewing group significantly increased 2 and 6 months after he intervention (p0.05. The most powerful constructs predicting the intention towards the physical activities 2 months after the intervention were perceived-reply efficiency, self-efficiency, and perceived intensity, successively. In addition, such factors 6 months after the intervention were attitude and perceived intensity, successively. Conclusion: The motivational interviewing increases the scores of all the constructs of PMT, which leads to an increase in the physical activity intention in the obese or overweight women.

  16. Adelina Anthony Interview with Aimee Carrillo Rowe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Adelina; Carrillo Rowe, Aimee

    2017-07-03

    This interview explores how performing artist, activist, writer, director, performer Adelina Anthony stages queer women of color affects as a complex terrain to mobilize a decolonial imaginary. Anthony's characters are complex, contradictory, surly, and resilient with whom audience members connect and feel deeply. Especially for queer women of color, who rarely get to see their own experiences on film or on stage, Anthony's work provides a critical forum for discussing, imagining, naming, and envisioning the connections between our personal struggles and broader forces of imperialism, heterosexual capitalism, and settler colonialism. Through the "medicina" of gritty truth-telling and side-splitting laughter, Anthony discusses her own positionality as a coyote curandera. Through the exploratory genre of the interview, Anthony helps readers palpably engage a queer woman of color "theory in the flesh" to imagine their own creative potentialities through a compassionate lens of humility and humor.

  17. INTERVIEW: Knowledge and Terminology Management at Crisplant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Margrethe H.; Toft, Birthe

    2012-01-01

    Margrethe H. Møller interviews Lisbeth Kjeldgaard Almsten (translator/coauthor: Birthe Toft) “If you think that terminology work is simply a matter of buying terminology management software and getting started, you are in for trouble” At Crisplant, we have been doing terminology management for th...... management really is, in enterprise practice as well as in education.......Margrethe H. Møller interviews Lisbeth Kjeldgaard Almsten (translator/coauthor: Birthe Toft) “If you think that terminology work is simply a matter of buying terminology management software and getting started, you are in for trouble” At Crisplant, we have been doing terminology management...... for the past 20 years. Today, term bases are used not just for terminology-oriented term management. Recording other types of master data needed by all kinds of professionals in the enterprise is equally important. Within the past year, Crisplant has been acquired by the German BEUMER group, which means...

  18. The Selective Mutism Questionnaire: Measurement Structure and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letamendi, Andrea M.; Chavira, Denise A.; Hitchcock, Carla A.; Roesch, Scott C.; Shipon-Blum, Elisa; Stein, Murray B.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the 17-item Selective Mutism Questionnaire. Method Diagnostic interviews were administered via telephone to 102 parents of children identified with selective mutism (SM) and 43 parents of children without SM from varying U.S. geographic regions. Children were between the ages of 3 and 11 inclusive and comprised 58% girls and 42% boys. SM diagnoses were determined using the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children - Parent Version (ADIS-C/P); SM severity was assessed using the 17-item Selective Mutism Questionnaire (SMQ); and behavioral and affective symptoms were assessed using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted to investigate the dimensionality of the SMQ and a modified parallel analysis procedure was used to confirm EFA results. Internal consistency, construct validity, and incremental validity were also examined. Results The EFA yielded a 13-item solution consisting of three factors: a) Social Situations Outside of School, b) School Situations, and c) Home and Family Situations. Internal consistency of SMQ factors and total scale ranged from moderate to high. Convergent and incremental validity were also well supported. Conclusions Measure structure findings are consistent with the 3-factor solution found in a previous psychometric evaluation of the SMQ. Results also suggest that the SMQ provides useful and unique information in the prediction of SM phenomenon beyond other child anxiety measures. PMID:18698268

  19. An interview with Hyeon-Shik Hwang

    OpenAIRE

    Thiesen, Guilherme; de Ara?jo, Telma Martins; Freitas, Maria Perp?tua Mota; da Motta, Alexandre Trindade Sim?es

    2016-01-01

    It gives me great pleasure to interview Dr. Hyeon-Shik Hwang, an innovative orthodontist who has developed many creative techniques over his career. Dr. Hwang was born in Korea and received his DDS and PhD degrees from Yonsei University in Seoul. He is professor and chairman of the Department of Orthodontics at Chonnam National University School of Dentistry, Gwangju, Korea. Dr. Hwang, as a faculty at the university hospital, has maintained a successful clinical practice for more than 25 year...

  20. STS-100 Crew Interview: Scott Parazynski

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    STS-100 Mission Specialist Scott Parazynski is seen being interviewed. He answers questions about his inspiration to become an astronaut and his career path. He gives details on the mission's goals and significance, the rendezvous and docking of Endeavour with the International Space Station (ISS), the mission's spacewalks, and installation and capabilities of the Space Station robotic arm, UHF antenna, and Rafaello Logistics Module. Parazynski then discusses his views about space exploration as it becomes an international collaboration.