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Sample records for included insulin sensitivity

  1. Insulin sensitivity and albuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilz, Stefan; Rutters, Femke; Nijpels, Giel

    2014-01-01

    was assessed by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps, expressed as the M/I value. Oral glucose tolerance test-based insulin sensitivity (OGIS), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), and urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) were determined at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS......OBJECTIVE: Accumulating evidence suggests an association between insulin sensitivity and albuminuria, which, even in the normal range, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated whether insulin sensitivity is associated with albuminuria in healthy subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN...... AND METHODS: We investigated 1,415 healthy, nondiabetic participants (mean age 43.9 ± 8.3 years; 54.3% women) from the RISC (Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease) study, of whom 852 participated in a follow-up examination after 3 years. At baseline, insulin sensitivity...

  2. Overfeeding Dairy Cattle During Late-Pregnancy Alters Hepatic PPARα-Regulated Pathways Including Hepatokines: Impact on Metabolism and Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Jawad; Jacometo, Carolina B; Graugnard, Daniel E; Corrêa, Marcio N; Schmitt, Eduardo; Cardoso, Felipe; Loor, Juan J

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic metabolic gene networks were studied in dairy cattle fed control (CON, 1.34 Mcal/kg) or higher energy (overfed (OVE), 1.62 Mcal/kg) diets during the last 45 days of pregnancy. A total of 57 target genes encompassing PPARα-targets/co-regulators, hepatokines, growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) axis, lipogenesis, and lipoprotein metabolism were evaluated on −14, 7, 14, and 30 days around parturition. OVE versus CON cows were in more negative energy balance (NEB) postpartum and had greater serum non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), and liver triacylglycerol (TAG) concentrations. Milk synthesis rate did not differ. Liver from OVE cows responded to postpartal NEB by up-regulating expression of PPARα-targets in the fatty acid oxidation and ketogenesis pathways, along with gluconeogenic genes. Hepatokines (fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21), angiopoietin-like 4 (ANGPTL4)) and apolipoprotein A-V (APOA5) were up-regulated postpartum to a greater extent in OVE than CON. OVE led to greater blood insulin prepartum, lower NEFA:insulin, and greater lipogenic gene expression suggesting insulin sensitivity was not impaired. A lack of change in APOB, MTTP, and PNPLA3 coupled with upregulation of PLIN2 postpartum in cows fed OVE contributed to TAG accumulation. Postpartal responses in NEFA and FGF21 with OVE support a role of this hepatokine in diminishing adipose insulin sensitivity. PMID:24737933

  3. Basal plasma insulin and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) are indicators of insulin sensitivity in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, D J; Rand, J S; Sunvold, G D

    2005-06-01

    The objective of this study was to compare simpler indices of insulin sensitivity with the minimal model-derived insulin sensitivity index to identify a simple and reliable alternative method for assessing insulin sensitivity in cats. In addition, we aimed to determine whether this simpler measure or measures showed consistency of association across differing body weights and glucose tolerance levels. Data from glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity tests performed in 32 cats with varying body weights (underweight to obese), including seven cats with impaired glucose tolerance, were used to assess the relationship between Bergman's minimal model-derived insulin sensitivity index (S(I)), and various simpler measures of insulin sensitivity. The most useful overall predictors of insulin sensitivity were basal plasma insulin concentrations and the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), which is the product of basal glucose and insulin concentrations divided by 22.5. It is concluded that measurement of plasma insulin concentrations in cats with food withheld for 24 h, in conjunction with HOMA, could be used in clinical research projects and by practicing veterinarians to screen for reduced insulin sensitivity in cats. Such cats may be at increased risk of developing impaired glucose tolerance and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Early detection of these cats would enable preventative intervention programs such as weight reduction, increased physical activity and dietary modifications to be instigated.

  4. A model to estimate insulin sensitivity in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holtenius Kjell

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Impairment of the insulin regulation of energy metabolism is considered to be an etiologic key component for metabolic disturbances. Methods for studies of insulin sensitivity thus are highly topical. There are clear indications that reduced insulin sensitivity contributes to the metabolic disturbances that occurs especially among obese lactating cows. Direct measurements of insulin sensitivity are laborious and not suitable for epidemiological studies. We have therefore adopted an indirect method originally developed for humans to estimate insulin sensitivity in dairy cows. The method, "Revised Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index" (RQUICKI is based on plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin and free fatty acids (FFA and it generates good and linear correlations with different estimates of insulin sensitivity in human populations. We hypothesized that the RQUICKI method could be used as an index of insulin function in lactating dairy cows. We calculated RQUICKI in 237 apparently healthy dairy cows from 20 commercial herds. All cows included were in their first 15 weeks of lactation. RQUICKI was not affected by the homeorhetic adaptations in energy metabolism that occurred during the first 15 weeks of lactation. In a cohort of 24 experimental cows fed in order to obtain different body condition at parturition RQUICKI was lower in early lactation in cows with a high body condition score suggesting disturbed insulin function in obese cows. The results indicate that RQUICKI might be used to identify lactating cows with disturbed insulin function.

  5. Insulin sensitivity : modulation by the brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, Claudia Pascalle

    2012-01-01

    The studies in this thesis contribute to the understanding of the role of the brain in insulin sensitivity. We demonstrate that disturbances in circadian rhythm resulting in alterations in SCN output, can contribute to the development of insulin resistance. We also shown that insulin-stimulated

  6. Salt sensitivity correlates positively with insulin sensitivity in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; Voordouw, JJ; Bakker, SJL; Gans, ROB

    Background The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between insulin sensitivity and salt sensitivity in healthy subjects who display a wide range of insulin sensitivity. As a secondary objective, we assessed the relationship between salt sensitivity and the other characteristics of the

  7. Insulin Sensitivity and Albuminuria: The RISC Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilz, S.; Rutters, F.; Nijpels, G.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Hojlund, K.; Nolan, J.J.; Balkau, B.; Dekker, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Accumulating evidence suggests an association between insulin sensitivity and albuminuria, which, even in the normal range, is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases.We evaluated whether insulin sensitivity is associated with albuminuria in healthy subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

  8. Probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics and insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y A; Keogh, J B; Clifton, P M

    2017-10-17

    Animal studies indicate that the composition of gut microbiota may be involved in the progression of insulin resistance to type 2 diabetes. Probiotics and/or prebiotics could be a promising approach to improve insulin sensitivity by favourably modifying the composition of the gut microbial community, reducing intestinal endotoxin concentrations and decreasing energy harvest. The aim of the present review was to investigate the effects of probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics (a combination of probiotics and prebiotics) on insulin resistance in human clinical trials and to discuss the potential mechanisms whereby probiotics and prebiotics improve glucose metabolism. The anti-diabetic effects of probiotics include reducing pro-inflammatory cytokines via a NF-κB pathway, reduced intestinal permeability, and lowered oxidative stress. SCFA play a key role in glucose homeostasis through multiple potential mechanisms of action. Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors on L-cells by SCFA promotes the release of glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY resulting in increased insulin and decreased glucagon secretion, and suppressed appetite. SCFA can decrease intestinal permeability and decrease circulating endotoxins, lowering inflammation and oxidative stress. SCFA may also have anti-lipolytic activities in adipocytes and improve insulin sensitivity via GLUT4 through the up-regulation of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase signalling in muscle and liver tissues. Resistant starch and synbiotics appear to have favourable anti-diabetic effects. However, there are few human interventions. Further well-designed human clinical studies are required to develop recommendations for the prevention of type 2 diabetes with pro- and prebiotics.

  9. Variability of HOMA and QUICKI insulin sensitivity indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žarković, Miloš; Ćirić, Jasmina; Beleslin, Biljana; Stojković, Mirjana; Savić, Slavica; Stojanović, Miloš; Lalić, Tijana

    2017-07-01

    Assessment of insulin sensitivity based on a single measurement of insulin and glucose, is both easy to understand and simple to perform. The tests most often used are HOMA and QUICKI. The aim of this study was to assess the biological variability of estimates of insulin sensitivity using HOMA and QUICKI indices. After a 12-h fast, blood was sampled for insulin and glucose determination. Sampling lasted for 90 min with an intersample interval of 2 min. A total of 56 subjects were included in the study, and in nine subjects sampling was done before and after weight reduction, so total number of analyzed series was 65. To compute the reference value of the insulin sensitivity index, averages of all 46 insulin and glucose samples were used. We also computed point estimates (single value estimates) of the insulin sensitivity index based on the different number of insulin/glucose samples (1-45 consecutive samples). To compute the variability of point estimates a bootstrapping procedure was used using 1000 resamples for each series and for each number of samples used to average insulin and glucose. Using a single insulin/glucose sample HOMA variability was 26.18 ± 4.31%, and QUICKI variability was 3.30 ± 0.54%. For 10 samples variability was 11.99 ± 2.22% and 1.62 ± 0.31% respectively. Biological variability of insulin sensitivity indices is significant, and it can be reduced by increasing the number of samples. Oscillations of insulin concentration in plasma are the major cause of variability of insulin sensitivity indices.

  10. Increased skeletal muscle capillarization enhances insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkerström, Thorbjörn; Laub, Lasse; Vedel, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    that Prazosin was cleared from the blood stream. Whole-body insulin sensitivity was measured in conscious, unrestrained rats by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. Tissue specific insulin sensitivity was assessed by administration of 2-deoxy-[(3)H]-Glucose during the plateau phase of the clamp. Whole-body...... was enhanced independent of improvements in skeletal muscle insulin signaling to glucose uptake and glycogen synthesis, suggesting that the improvement in insulin-stimulated muscle glucose uptake could be due to improved diffusion conditions for glucose in the muscle. The Prazosin treatment did not affect...

  11. Brain GLP-1 and insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Darleen; Sisley, Stephanie R

    2015-12-15

    Type 2 diabetes is often treated with a class of drugs referred to as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs. GLP-1 is a peptide secreted by the gut that acts through only one known receptor, the GLP-1 receptor. The primary function of GLP-1 is thought to be lowering of postprandial glucose levels. Indeed, medications utilizing this system, including the long-acting GLP-1 analogs liraglutide and exenatide, are beneficial in reducing both blood sugars and body weight. GLP-1 analogs were long presumed to affect glucose control through their ability to increase insulin levels through peripheral action on beta cells. However, multiple lines of data point to the ability of GLP-1 to act within the brain to alter glucose regulation. In this review we will discuss the evidence for a central GLP-1 system and the effects of GLP-1 in the brain on regulating multiple facets of glucose homeostasis including glucose tolerance, insulin production, insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, muscle glucose uptake, and connections of the central GLP-1 system to the gut. Although the evidence indicates that GLP-1 receptors in the brain are not necessary for physiologic control of glucose regulation, we discuss the research showing a strong effect of acute manipulation of the central GLP-1 system on glucose control and how it is relevant to type 2 diabetic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cerebral blood flow links insulin resistance and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John P; Sheu, Lei K; Verstynen, Timothy D; Onyewuenyi, Ikechukwu C; Gianaros, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance confers risk for diabetes mellitus and associates with a reduced capacity of the arterial baroreflex to regulate blood pressure. Importantly, several brain regions that comprise the central autonomic network, which controls the baroreflex, are also sensitive to the neuromodulatory effects of insulin. However, it is unknown whether peripheral insulin resistance relates to activity within central autonomic network regions, which may in turn relate to reduced baroreflex regulation. Accordingly, we tested whether resting cerebral blood flow within central autonomic regions statistically mediated the relationship between insulin resistance and an indirect indicator of baroreflex regulation; namely, baroreflex sensitivity. Subjects were 92 community-dwelling adults free of confounding medical illnesses (48 men, 30-50 years old) who completed protocols to assess fasting insulin and glucose levels, resting baroreflex sensitivity, and resting cerebral blood flow. Baroreflex sensitivity was quantified by measuring the magnitude of spontaneous and sequential associations between beat-by-beat systolic blood pressure and heart rate changes. Individuals with greater insulin resistance, as measured by the homeostatic model assessment, exhibited reduced baroreflex sensitivity (b = -0.16, p baroreflex sensitivity was statistically mediated by cerebral blood flow in central autonomic regions, including the insula and cingulate cortex (mediation coefficients baroreflex sensitivity. Our observations may help to characterize the neural pathways by which insulin resistance, and possibly diabetes mellitus, relates to adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  13. Nasal insulin changes peripheral insulin sensitivity simultaneously with altered activity in homeostatic and reward-related human brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heni, M; Kullmann, S; Ketterer, C; Guthoff, M; Linder, K; Wagner, R; Stingl, K T; Veit, R; Staiger, H; Häring, H-U; Preissl, H; Fritsche, A

    2012-06-01

    Impaired insulin sensitivity is a major factor leading to type 2 diabetes. Animal studies suggest that the brain is involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. We investigated whether insulin action in the human brain regulates peripheral insulin sensitivity and examined which brain areas are involved. Insulin and placebo were given intranasally. Plasma glucose, insulin and C-peptide were measured in 103 participants at 0, 30 and 60 min. A subgroup (n = 12) was also studied with functional MRI, and blood sampling at 0, 30 and 120 min. For each time-point, the HOMA of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated as an inverse estimate of peripheral insulin sensitivity. Plasma insulin increased and subsequently decreased. This excursion was accompanied by slightly decreased plasma glucose, resulting in an initially increased HOMA-IR. At 1 h after insulin spray, the HOMA-IR subsequently decreased and remained lower up to 120 min. An increase in hypothalamic activity was observed, which correlated with the increased HOMA-IR at 30 min post-spray. Activity in the putamen, right insula and orbitofrontal cortex correlated with the decreased HOMA-IR at 120 min post-spray. Central insulin action in specific brain areas, including the hypothalamus, may time-dependently regulate peripheral insulin sensitivity. This introduces a potential novel mechanism for the regulation of peripheral insulin sensitivity and underlines the importance of cerebral insulin action for the whole organism.

  14. Insulin sensitivity in post-obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toubro, S; Western, P; Bülow, J

    1994-01-01

    1. Both increased and decreased sensitivity to insulin has been proposed to precede the development of obesity. Therefore, insulin sensitivity was measured during a 2 h hyperinsulinaemia (100 m-units min-1 m-2) euglycaemic (4.5 mmol/l) glucose clamp combined with indirect calorimetry in nine weight......-1 kg-1, not significant). Basal plasma concentrations of free fatty acids were similar, but at the end of the clamp free fatty acids were lower in the post-obese women than in the control women (139 +/- 19 and 276 +/- 48 mumol/l, P = 0.02). 3. We conclude that the insulin sensitivity of glucose...... metabolism is unaltered in the post-obese state. The study, however, points to an increased antilipolytic insulin action in post-obese subjects, which may favour fat storage and lower lipid oxidation rate postprandially.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  15. Microbial Modulation of Insulin Sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, Muhammad Tanweer; Nieuwdorp, Max; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    The gut microbiota has emerged as an integral factor that impacts host metabolism and has been suggested to play a vital role in metabolic diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. In humans, cross-sectional studies have identified microbiota profiles

  16. How can we measure insulin sensitivity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovorka, R.

    1999-01-01

    Insulin resistance is common in general population and prevalent in patients with obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Insulin sensitivity, reciprocal to insulin resistance, can be measured with a variety of experimental methods ranging from the 'gold' standard glucose clamp to the simple HOMA assessment. Each method has its merit and is applicable under different circumstances. Adoption of glucose tracers in the experimental protocols and more specifically in glucose clamp and minimal model allows hepatic vs. peripheral insulin sensitivity to be discriminated and estimated separately. The objective of this review is to give an account of the minimal modelling approach and provide summary information about other measurement methods together with information about reproducibility of the most popular methods, the minimal model and the glucose clamp techniques. (author)

  17. Intensive insulin therapy improves insulin sensitivity and mitochondrial function in severely burned children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fram, Ricki Y; Cree, Melanie G; Wolfe, Robert R; Mlcak, Ronald P; Qian, Ting; Chinkes, David L; Herndon, David N

    2010-06-01

    To institute intensive insulin therapy protocol in an acute pediatric burn unit and study the mechanisms underlying its benefits. Prospective, randomized study. An acute pediatric burn unit in a tertiary teaching hospital. Children, 4-18 yrs old, with total body surface area burned > or =40% and who arrived within 1 wk after injury were enrolled in the study. Patients were randomized to one of two groups. Intensive insulin therapy maintained blood glucose levels between 80 and 110 mg/dL. Conventional insulin therapy maintained blood glucose < or =215 mg/dL. Twenty patients were included in the data analysis consisting of resting energy expenditure, whole body and liver insulin sensitivity, and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function. Studies were performed at 7 days postburn (pretreatment) and at 21 days postburn (posttreatment). Resting energy expenditure significantly increased posttreatment (1476 +/- 124 to 1925 +/- 291 kcal/m(2) x day; p = .02) in conventional insulin therapy as compared with a decline in intensive insulin therapy. Glucose infusion rate was identical between groups before treatment (6.0 +/- 0.8 conventional insulin therapy vs. 6.8 +/- 0.9 mg/kg x min intensive insulin therapy; p = .5). Intensive insulin therapy displayed a significantly higher glucose clamp infusion rate posttreatment (9.1 +/- 1.3 intensive insulin therapy versus 4.8 +/- 0.6 mg/kg x min conventional insulin therapy, p = .005). Suppression of hepatic glucose release was significantly greater in the intensive insulin therapy after treatment compared with conventional insulin therapy (5.0 +/- 0.9 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.6 mg/kg x min; intensive insulin therapy vs. conventional insulin therapy; p = .03). States 3 and 4 mitochondrial oxidation of palmitate significantly improved in intensive insulin therapy (0.9 +/- 0.1 to 1.7 +/- 0.1 microm O(2)/CS/mg protein/min for state 3, p = .004; and 0.7 +/- 0.1 to 1.3 +/- 0.1 microm O(2)/CS/mg protein/min for state 4, p < .002), whereas conventional

  18. Exercise, pregnancy, and insulin sensitivity--what is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Breitowicz, Bettina; Hegaard, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by a marked physiological insulin resistance. Overweight and obesity or lack of physical activity can aggravate this reduced insulin sensitivity further. Increased insulin resistance has been associated with serious pregnancy complications, such as gestational diabetes...

  19. Prediction of clamp-derived insulin sensitivity from the oral glucose insulin sensitivity index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tura, Andrea; Chemello, Gaetano; Szendroedi, Julia

    2018-01-01

    that underwent both a clamp and an OGTT or meal test, thereby allowing calculation of both the M value and OGIS. The population was divided into a training and a validation cohort (n = 359 and n = 154, respectively). After a stepwise selection approach, the best model for M value prediction was applied......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp is the gold-standard method for measuring insulin sensitivity, but is less suitable for large clinical trials. Thus, several indices have been developed for evaluating insulin sensitivity from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). However......, most of them yield values different from those obtained by the clamp method. The aim of this study was to develop a new index to predict clamp-derived insulin sensitivity (M value) from the OGTT-derived oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (OGIS). METHODS: We analysed datasets of people...

  20. Discipline-specific insulin sensitivity in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Liang; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da; Chou, Shih-Wei; Hsieh, Po-Shiuan; Hsieh, City C; Huang, Yueh-Guey; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Weight status and abnormal liver function are the two factors that influence whole-body insulin sensitivity. The main goal of the study was to compare insulin sensitivity in athletes (n=757) and physically active controls (n=670) in relation to the two factors. Homeostatic metabolic assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), weight status, and abnormal liver function (alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase) were determined from 33 sports disciplines under morning fasted condition. This study was initiated in autumn 2006 and repeated in autumn 2007 (n=1508) to ensure consistency of all observations. In general, HOMA-IR and blood pressure levels in athletes were significantly greater than those in physically active controls but varied widely with sport disciplines. Rowing and short-distance track athletes had significantly lower HOMA-IR values and archery and field-throwing athletes had significantly higher values than the control group. Intriguingly, athletes from 22 sports disciplines displayed significantly greater body mass index values above control values. Multiple regression analysis showed that, for non-athlete controls, body mass index was the only factor that contributed to the variations in HOMA-IR. For athletes, body mass index and alanine aminotransferase independently contributed to the variation of HOMA-IR. This is the first report documenting HOMA-IR values in athletes from a broad range of sport disciplines. Weight status and abnormal liver function levels appear to be the major contributors predicting insulin sensitivity for the physically active population.

  1. Fasting insulin sensitivity indices are not better than routine clinical variables at predicting insulin sensitivity among Black Africans: a clamp study in sub-Saharan Africans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the predictive utility of common fasting insulin sensitivity indices, and non-laboratory surrogates [BMI, waist circumference (WC) and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR)] in sub-Saharan Africans without diabetes. Methods We measured fasting glucose and insulin, and glucose uptake during 80/mU/m2/min euglycemic clamp in 87 Cameroonians (51 men) aged (SD) 34.6 (11.4) years. We derived insulin sensitivity indices including HOMA-IR, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI), fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI) and glucose-to-insulin ratio (GIR). Indices and clinical predictors were compared to clamp using correlation tests, robust linear regressions and agreement of classification by sex-specific thirds. Results The mean insulin sensitivity was M = 10.5 ± 3.2 mg/kg/min. Classification across thirds of insulin sensitivity by clamp matched with non-laboratory surrogates in 30-48% of participants, and with fasting indices in 27-51%, with kappa statistics ranging from −0.10 to 0.26. Fasting indices correlated significantly with clamp (/r/=0.23-0.30), with GIR performing less well than fasting insulin and HOMA-IR (both p insulin sensitivity indices are modest predictors of insulin sensitivity measured by euglycemic clamp, and do not perform better than clinical surrogates in this population. PMID:25106496

  2. Assessment of insulin sensitivity/resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutch, Manish; Kumar, Sukriti; Razi, Syed Mohd; Gupta, Kumar Keshav; Gupta, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is one pretty troublesome entity which very commonly aggravates metabolic syndrome. Many methods and indices are available for the estimation of insulin resistance. It is essential to test and validate their reliability before they can be used as an investigation in patients. At present, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and intravenous glucose tolerance test are the most reliable methods available for estimating insulin resistance and are being used as a reference standard. Some simple methods, from which indices can be derived, have been validated e.g. homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI). For the clinical uses HOMA-insulin resistance, QUIKI, and Matsuda are suitable, while HES, McAuley, Belfiore, Cederholm, Avignon and Stumvoll index are suitable for epidemiological/research purposes. With increasing number of these available indices of IR, it may be difficult for clinicians to select the most appropriate index for their studies. This review provides guidelines that must be considered before performing such studies.

  3. Assessment of insulin sensitivity/resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gutch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is one pretty troublesome entity which very commonly aggravates metabolic syndrome. Many methods and indices are available for the estimation of insulin resistance. It is essential to test and validate their reliability before they can be used as an investigation in patients. At present, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and intravenous glucose tolerance test are the most reliable methods available for estimating insulin resistance and are being used as a reference standard. Some simple methods, from which indices can be derived, have been validated e.g. homeostasis model assessment (HOMA, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI. For the clinical uses HOMA-insulin resistance, QUIKI, and Matsuda are suitable, while HES, McAuley, Belfiore, Cederholm, Avignon and Stumvoll index are suitable for epidemiological/research purposes. With increasing number of these available indices of IR, it may be difficult for clinicians to select the most appropriate index for their studies. This review provides guidelines that must be considered before performing such studies.

  4. Insulin level and insulin sensitivity indices among healthy children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballerini, María G; Bergadá, Ignacio; Rodríguez, María E; Keselman, Ana; Bengolea, Viviana S; Pipman, Viviana; Domené, Horacio M; Jasper, Héctor G; Ropelato, María G

    2016-08-01

    Information on insulin reference values and insulin sensitivity indices in the field of pediatrics is scarce. To describe insulin range and insulin sensitivity surrogate indices during childhood. Fasting insulin level range and surrogate indices, such as the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), among healthy children and adolescents by age, body mass index, pubertal stage (PS), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), total cholesterol, and triglycerides. Two hundred and twenty-six healthy children and adolescents (1-18 years old) were included. Insulin increased with age, body mass index, pubertal stage, IGF-1 and triglyceride levels (r2= 0.38, p 〈 0.0001). Prepubertal children 〉 7.5 years old had higher insulin levels [median (P3 and P97) pIU/mL: 5.0 (1.7-9.6)] than prepubertal children 〈 7.5 years old [2.9 pIU/ mL (1.3-10.9), p 〈 0.01]. During puberty (from PS II to PS V), insulin was higher in girls than in boys [7.4 (1.8-16.9) versus 5.8 (1.8-12.9), p 〈 0.01]. The HOMA-IR index increased in the group of prepubertal children 〉 7.5 years old: 1.1 (0.32.0) versus children 〈 7.5 years old: 0.6 (0.3-1.4, p 〈 0.01). The insulin level and HOMA-IR results were higher in pubertal children compared to the prepubertal group (p 〈 0.001). Known physiological changes were observed inboth insulin levels and the HOMA-IR index among children and adolescents. A fasting blood insulin level of 10 pIU/mL in prepubertal children and of 17 pIU/mL and 13 pIU/mL in pubertal girls and boys, respectively, may be considered as an acceptable cut-off value in healthy children. A HOMA-IR value 〉 2.0 and 〉 2.6 in prepubertal and pubertal children, respectively, may be considered a warning sign for pediatricians to further investigate insulin resistance. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  5. The brain modulates insulin sensitivity in multiple tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parlevliet, Edwin T.; Coomans, Claudia P.; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Insulin sensitivity is determined by direct effects of circulating insulin on metabolically active tissues in combination with indirect effects of circulating insulin, i.e. via the central nervous system. The dose-response effects of insulin differ between the various physiological effects of

  6. Comparison of insulin signaling gene expression in insulin sensitive tissues between cats and dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, A; Lee, P; Takemitsu, H; Sako, T; Arai, T

    2009-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common endocrine disease in cats and dogs with increasing prevalence. Type 1 DM appears to be the most common form of diabetes in dogs whereas Type 2 DM prevails for cats. Since insulin resistance is more frequently encountered in cats than dogs, our laboratory was interested in determining whether differences at the insulin signaling pathway level and differences in glucose and lipid metabolism could be observed between cats and dogs. Insulin resistance has been positively correlated to insulin signaling pathway abnormalities. As such, this study measured insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS-2), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) P-85alpha mRNA expression levels in classical insulin-responsive sensitive tissues (liver, skeletal muscle, and abdominal fat) and peripheral leukocytes between cats and dogs by qRT-PCR. Different tissues were sampled because it is currently unknown where insulin-resistance arises from. In addition, enzymes involved in glucose and lipid metabolism, malate dehydrogenase (MDH), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were also assessed since glucose and lipid metabolism differs between cats and dogs. Overall, IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3-K, MDH, G6DPH, and FAS mRNA tissue expression profiles demonstrated different levels of expression, in various tissues for both canines and felines, which was expected. No distinct expression pattern emerged; however, differences were noted between canines and felines. In addition, IRS-1, IRS-2, PI3-K, MDH, G6DPH, and FAS mRNA expression was significantly higher in canine versus feline tissues, including peripheral leukocytes. Remarkable differences in insulin signaling gene expression between felines and canines indicate that cats may have an underlying low insulin sensitivity level due to low IRS-1, IRS-2, and PI3-K P-85alpha mRNA expression levels which would predispose cats to develop insulin resistance. Moreover

  7. Insulin sensitivity : modulation by neuropeptides and hormones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, Anita van den

    2006-01-01

    Nowadays, obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally. It can lead to several chronic diseases, including insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes mellitus. Feeding behaviour is regulated in the hypothalamus of the brain by two opposing pathways: NPY/AgRP neurons vs. POMC/CART neurons. In addition,

  8. The relationship between bone turnover and insulin sensitivity and secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frost, Morten; Balkau, Beverley; Hatunic, Mensud

    2018-01-01

    Bone metabolism appears to influence insulin secretion and sensitivity, and insulin promotes bone formation in animals, but similar evidence in humans is limited. The objectives of this study are to explore if bone turnover markers were associated with insulin secretion and sensitivity and to det...

  9. Insulin sensitizer prevents and ameliorates experimental type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valitsky, Michael; Hoffman, Amnon; Unterman, Terry; Bar-Tana, Jacob

    2017-12-01

    Insulin-dependent type-1 diabetes (T1D) is driven by autoimmune β-cell failure, whereas systemic resistance to insulin is considered the hallmark of insulin-independent type-2 diabetes (T2D). In contrast to this canonical dichotomy, insulin resistance appears to precede the overt diabetic stage of T1D and predict its progression, implying that insulin sensitizers may change the course of T1D. However, previous attempts to ameliorate T1D in animal models or patients by insulin sensitizers have largely failed. Sensitization to insulin by MEthyl-substituted long-chain DICArboxylic acid (MEDICA) analogs in T2D animal models surpasses that of current insulin sensitizers, thus prompting our interest in probing MEDICA in the T1D context. MEDICA efficacy in modulating the course of T1D was verified in streptozotocin (STZ) diabetic rats and autoimmune nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. MEDICA treatment normalizes overt diabetes in STZ diabetic rats when added on to subtherapeutic insulin, and prevents/delays autoimmune T1D in NOD mice. MEDICA treatment does not improve β-cell insulin content or insulitis score, but its efficacy is accounted for by pronounced total body sensitization to insulin. In conclusion, potent insulin sensitizers may counteract genetic predisposition to autoimmune T1D and amplify subtherapeutic insulin into an effective therapeutic measure for the treatment of overt T1D. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. A novel insulin sensitizer (S15511) enhances insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, N; Selmer Buhl, E; Pold, R; Schmitz, O; Lund, S

    2008-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes is preceded by the presence of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, and drugs that increase insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle prevent the disease. S15511 is an original compound with demonstrated effects on insulin sensitivity in animal models of insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms behind the insulin-sensitizing effect of S15511 are unknown. The aim of our study was to explore whether S15511 improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscles. Insulin sensitivity was assessed in skeletal muscles from S15511-treated rats by measuring intracellular insulin-signaling activity and insulin-stimulated glucose transport in isolated muscles. In addition, GLUT4 expression and glycogen levels were assessed after treatment. S15511 treatment was associated with an increase in insulin-stimulated glucose transport in type IIb fibers, while type I fibers were unaffected. The enhanced glucose transport was mirrored by a fiber type-specific increase in GLUT4 expression, while no improvement in insulin-signaling activity was observed. S15511 is a novel insulin sensitizer that is capable of improving glucose homeostasis in nondiabetic rats. The compound enhances skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity and specifically targets type IIb muscle fibers by increasing GLUT4 expression. Together these data show S15511 to be a potentially promising new drug in the treatment and prevention of type 2 diabetes.

  11. Improved insulin sensitivity after exercise: focus on insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Richter, Erik

    2009-01-01

    After a single bout of exercise, the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake is markedly improved locally in the previously active muscles. This makes exercise a potent stimulus counteracting insulin resistance characterizing type 2 diabetes (T2D). It is believed that at least part...... of the mechanism relates to an improved ability of insulin to stimulate translocation of glucose transporters (GLUT4) to the muscle membrane after exercise. How this is accomplished is still unclear; however, an obvious possibility is that exercise interacts with the insulin signaling pathway to GLUT4...... translocation allowing for a more potent insulin response. Parallel to unraveling of the insulin signaling cascade, this has been investigated within the past 25 years. Reviewing existing studies clearly indicates that improved insulin action can occur independent of interactions with proximal insulin signaling...

  12. Prediction of clamp-derived insulin sensitivity from the oral glucose insulin sensitivity index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tura, Andrea; Chemello, Gaetano; Szendroedi, Julia; Göbl, Christian; Færch, Kristine; Vrbíková, Jana; Pacini, Giovanni; Ferrannini, Ele; Roden, Michael

    2018-05-01

    The euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp is the gold-standard method for measuring insulin sensitivity, but is less suitable for large clinical trials. Thus, several indices have been developed for evaluating insulin sensitivity from the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). However, most of them yield values different from those obtained by the clamp method. The aim of this study was to develop a new index to predict clamp-derived insulin sensitivity (M value) from the OGTT-derived oral glucose insulin sensitivity index (OGIS). We analysed datasets of people that underwent both a clamp and an OGTT or meal test, thereby allowing calculation of both the M value and OGIS. The population was divided into a training and a validation cohort (n = 359 and n = 154, respectively). After a stepwise selection approach, the best model for M value prediction was applied to the validation cohort. This cohort was also divided into subgroups according to glucose tolerance, obesity category and age. The new index, called PREDIcted M (PREDIM), was based on OGIS, BMI, 2 h glucose during OGTT and fasting insulin. Bland-Altman analysis revealed a good relationship between the M value and PREDIM in the validation dataset (only 9 of 154 observations outside limits of agreement). Also, no significant differences were found between the M value and PREDIM (equivalence test: p < 0.0063). Subgroup stratification showed that measured M value and PREDIM have a similar ability to detect intergroup differences (p < 0.02, both M value and PREDIM). The new index PREDIM provides excellent prediction of M values from OGTT or meal data, thereby allowing comparison of insulin sensitivity between studies using different tests.

  13. Insulin secretion and sensitivity in space flight: diabetogenic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Uchakin, Peter N.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.

    2002-01-01

    Nearly three decades of space flight research have suggested that there are subclinical diabetogenic changes that occur in microgravity. Alterations in insulin secretion, insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and metabolism of protein and amino acids support the hypothesis that insulin plays an essential role in the maintenance of muscle mass in extended-duration space flight. Experiments in flight and after flight and ground-based bedrest studies have associated microgravity and its experimental paradigms with manifestations similar to those of diabetes, physical inactivity, and aging. We propose that these manifestations are characterized best by an etiology that falls into the clinical category of "other" causes of diabetes, including, but not restricted to, genetic beta-cell defects, insulin action defects, diseases of the endocrine pancreas, endocrinopathies, drug or chemically induced diabetes, infections, immune-mediated metabolic alteration, and a host of genetic related diseases. We present data showing alterations in tumor necrosis factor-alpha production, insulin secretion, and amino acid metabolism in pancreatic islets of Langerhans cultured in a ground-based cell culture bioreactor that mimics some of the effects of microgravity. Taken together, space flight research, ground-based studies, and bioreactor studies of pancreatic islets of Langerhans support the hypothesis that the pancreas is unable to overcome peripheral insulin resistance and amino acid dysregulation during space flight. We propose that measures of insulin secretion and insulin action will be necessary to design effective countermeasures against muscle loss, and we advance the "disposition index" as an essential model to be used in the clinical management of space flight-induced muscle loss.

  14. Current understanding of increased insulin sensitivity after exercise - emerging candidates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maarbjerg, Stine Just; Sylow, Lykke; Richter, Erik

    2011-01-01

    signaling component in the insulin signaling pathway such as aPKC, Rac1, TBC1D4 and TBC1D1 have been described. These are all affected by both insulin and exercise which means that they are likely converging points in promoting GLUT4 translocation and therefore possible candidates for regulating insulin...... sensitivity after exercise. Whereas TBC1D1 does not appear to regulate insulin sensitivity after exercise, correlative evidence in contrast suggests TBC1D4 to be a relevant candidate. Little is known about aPKC and Rac1 in relation to insulin sensitivity after exercise. Besides mechanisms involved...

  15. Reduced Circulating Insulin Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Old Mice and Extends Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M. Templeman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The causal relationships between insulin levels, insulin resistance, and longevity are not fully elucidated. Genetic downregulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1 signaling components can extend invertebrate and mammalian lifespan, but insulin resistance, a natural form of decreased insulin signaling, is associated with greater risk of age-related disease in mammals. We compared Ins2+/− mice to Ins2+/+ littermate controls, on a genetically stable Ins1 null background. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of livers from 25-week-old mice suggested potential for healthier aging and altered insulin sensitivity in Ins2+/− mice. Halving Ins2 lowered circulating insulin by 25%–34% in aged female mice, without altering Igf1 or circulating Igf1. Remarkably, decreased insulin led to lower fasting glucose and improved insulin sensitivity in aged mice. Moreover, lowered insulin caused significant lifespan extension, observed across two diverse diets. Our study indicates that elevated insulin contributes to age-dependent insulin resistance and that limiting basal insulin levels can extend lifespan.

  16. Reduced Circulating Insulin Enhances Insulin Sensitivity in Old Mice and Extends Lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Nicole M; Flibotte, Stephane; Chik, Jenny H L; Sinha, Sunita; Lim, Gareth E; Foster, Leonard J; Nislow, Corey; Johnson, James D

    2017-07-11

    The causal relationships between insulin levels, insulin resistance, and longevity are not fully elucidated. Genetic downregulation of insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 (Igf1) signaling components can extend invertebrate and mammalian lifespan, but insulin resistance, a natural form of decreased insulin signaling, is associated with greater risk of age-related disease in mammals. We compared Ins2 +/- mice to Ins2 +/+ littermate controls, on a genetically stable Ins1 null background. Proteomic and transcriptomic analyses of livers from 25-week-old mice suggested potential for healthier aging and altered insulin sensitivity in Ins2 +/- mice. Halving Ins2 lowered circulating insulin by 25%-34% in aged female mice, without altering Igf1 or circulating Igf1. Remarkably, decreased insulin led to lower fasting glucose and improved insulin sensitivity in aged mice. Moreover, lowered insulin caused significant lifespan extension, observed across two diverse diets. Our study indicates that elevated insulin contributes to age-dependent insulin resistance and that limiting basal insulin levels can extend lifespan. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Trans fatty acids, insulin sensitivity and type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Risérus, Ulf

    2006-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) could affect cell membrane functions, and may therefore influence peripheral insulin sensitivity and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It is important to understand whether low amounts of TFA consumed during long periods may promote insulin resistance and have clinically relevant effects on diabetes risk. Data from controlled intervention studies examining the effects of TFA on insulin sensitivity and type 2 diabetes are reviewed. The results show no consistent e...

  18. Partial sleep restriction decreases insulin sensitivity in type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke [Leiden Univ., LUMC; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P. L. M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44

  19. Skeletal Muscle Angiogenesis and Its Relation to Insulin Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindqvist, Anna Maria Charlotte K

    with improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity however a direct causal relationship has not previously been established. The main hypothesis of this thesis was that skeletal muscle capillarization is important for skeletal muscle glucose uptake and thereby whole-body insulin sensitivity...

  20. Higher intramuscular triacylglycerol in women does not impair insulin sensitivity and proximal insulin signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Louise; Roepstorff, Carsten; Thiele, Maja

    2009-01-01

    ) or Akt expression or the ability of insulin to stimulate Akt (thr308) or Akt (ser473) phosphorylation. However, a 30% higher (ptype 1 muscle fiber expressed pr. area in the vastus lateralis muscle were noted in women than in matched males. It is concluded...... that despite 47% higher IMTG levels in women in the follicular phase whole body as well as leg insulin sensitivity are higher than in matched men. This was not explained by sex differences in proximal insulin signalling in women. In women it seems that a high capillary density and type 1 muscle fiber......Women have been shown to have higher muscle tricylglycerol (IMTG) levels than men and could therefore be expected to have lower insulin sensitivity than men, since previous studies have linked high IMTG to decreased insulin sensitivity. Thus, insulin sensitivity of whole body and leg glucose uptake...

  1. Environmental factors and dam characteristics associated with insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in newborn Holstein calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, M.M.; Van Eetvelde, M.; Bogaert, H.; Hostens, M.; Vandaele, L.; Shamsuddin, M.; Opsomer, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The objective of the present retrospective cohort study was to evaluate potential associations between environmental factors and dam characteristics, including level of milk production during gestation, and insulin traits in newborn Holstein calves. Birth weight and gestational age of the calves at delivery were determined. On the next day, heart girth, wither height and diagonal length of both the calves and their dams were measured. Parity, body condition score and age at calving were recorded for all dams. For the cows, days open before last gestation, lactation length (LL), lenght of dry period (DP) and calving interval were also calculated. The magnitude and shape of the lactation curve both quantified using the MilkBot model based on monthly milk weights, were used to calculate the amount of milk produced during gestation. Using the same procedure, cumulative milk production from conception to drying off (MGEST) was calculated. A blood sample was collected from all calves (n=481; 169 born to heifers and 312 born to cows) at least 5 h after a milk meal on day 3 of life to measure basal glucose and insulin levels. In addition, an intravenous glucose-stimulated insulin secretion test was performed in a subset of the calves (n=316). After descriptive analysis, generalized linear mixed models were used to identify factors that were significantly associated with the major insulin traits (Insb, basal insulin level; QUICKI, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index; AIR, acute insulin response; DI, disposition index) of the newborn calves. The overall average birth weight of the calves was 42.7 ± 5.92 kg. The insulin traits were significantly associated with MGEST (P=0.076) and longer DP (P=0.034). The QUICKI was estimated to be lower in calves born to the cows having passed a higher MGEST (P=0.030) and longer DP (P=0.058). Moreover, the AIR (P=0.009) and DI (P=0.049) were estimated to be lower in male compared with female calves. Furthermore, the AIR

  2. Assessment of insulin sensitivity/resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Gutch, Manish; Kumar, Sukriti; Razi, Syed Mohd; Gupta, Kumar Keshav; Gupta, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance is one pretty troublesome entity which very commonly aggravates metabolic syndrome. Many methods and indices are available for the estimation of insulin resistance. It is essential to test and validate their reliability before they can be used as an investigation in patients. At present, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and intravenous glucose tolerance test are the most reliable methods available for estimating insulin resistance and are being used as a reference standard...

  3. Insulin sensitivity in clinically healthy individuals with microalbuminuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Borch-Johnsen, K; Jensen, G

    1996-01-01

    (whole body glucose disposal) was similar in the two groups ((mean (95% C.I.)) 351 (321-381) vs. 364 (339-388) mg/(m2 x min); P = 0.51). Among urinary albumin excretion rate, blood pressure, serum lipid concentrations, body mass index waist-hip ratio, fasting concentrations of serum insulin and blood...... glucose, tobacco and alcohol consumption, physical activity, and age and sex, fasting serum insulin concentration was the only variable independently associated with insulin sensitivity (r = -0.55; P = 0.0001). It is concluded that microalbuminuria is not associated with impaired insulin sensitivity...

  4. Relationship between Inflammation markers, Coagulation Activation and Impaired Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Healthy Women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.Et; Shousha, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity, insulin resistance syndrome, and atherosclerosis are closely linked phenomena, often connected with a chronic low grade inflammatory state and pro thrombotic hypo fibrinolytic condition. This study investigated the relationship between impaired insulin sensitivity and selected markers of inflammation and thrombin generation in obese healthy women. The study included 36 healthy obese women (body mass index ≥ 30), with normal insulin sensitivity (NIS, n = 18) or impaired insulin sensitivity (IIS, n 18), and 10 non obese women (body mass index < 25).Impaired insulin sensitivity patients had significantly higher levels of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), transforming growth factor -β1(TGF-β1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), activated factor VII (VIIa), and prothrombin fragments 1 + 2 (F1 + 2) compared with either control subjects or normal insulin sensitivity patients. On the other hand, NIS patients had higher hs-CRP, TGF-β1, PAI-1, and factor VIIa, but not F1 + 2, levels than controls. Significant inverse correlations were observed between the insulin sensitivity index and TGF-β1, hs-CRP, PAI-1; factor VIIa, and F1 + 2 levels. Moreover, significant direct correlations were noted between TGF-β1 and CRP, PAI-1, factor VIIa, and F1 + 2 concentrations. Finally, multiple regressions revealed that TGF-β1 and the insulin sensitivity index were independently related to F1 + 2. These results document an in vivo relationship between insulin sensitivity and coagulation activation in obesity. Here we report that obesity is associated with higher TGF-β, PAI-1, prothrombin fragments 1 and 2 (F1 + 2), and activated factor VII (VIIa) plasma levels, and that insulin resistance exacerbates these alterations. The elevated TGF-β1 levels detected in the obese population may provide a biochemical link between insulin resistance and an increased risk for cardiovascular disease

  5. Low ethanol consumption increases insulin sensitivity in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.T. Furuya

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Several human studies suggest that light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with enhanced insulin sensitivity, but these studies are not free of conflicting results. To determine if ethanol-enhanced insulin sensitivity could be demonstrated in an animal model, male Wistar rats were fed a standard chow diet and received drinking water without (control or with different ethanol concentrations (0.5, 1.5, 3, 4.5 and 7%, v/v for 4 weeks ad libitum. Then, an intravenous insulin tolerance test (IVITT was performed to determine insulin sensitivity. Among the ethanol groups, only the 3% ethanol group showed an increase in insulin sensitivity based on the increase of the plasma glucose disappearance rate in the IVITT (30%, P<0.05. In addition, an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT was performed in control and 3% ethanol animals. Insulin sensitivity was confirmed in 3% ethanol rats based on the reduction of insulin secretion in the IVGTT (35%, P<0.05, despite the same glucose profile. Additionally, the 3% ethanol treatment did not impair body weight gain or plasma aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities. Thus, the present study established that 3% ethanol in the drinking water for 4 weeks in normal rats is a model of increased insulin sensitivity, which can be used for further investigations of the mechanisms involved.

  6. Diabetes mellitus and insulin in an aspirin sensitive asthmatic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplin, I

    1976-03-01

    The infrequency of diabetes mellitus and asthma in the same individual is re-examined. The antagonism between epinephrine and insulin, as suggested by Konig in 1935, is indeed accurate. The assays done by the Eli Lilly Research Department revealed no in vitro effect of insulin on the CAMP and GMP level of mast cells as occurs in liver cells. It is felt that this effect is probably an in vivo effect produced via the vagus nerve and alpha-adrenergic receptor system stimulation. This would explain the mechanism of aggravation of asthma by excess insulin. Dr. Petersen's studies, the negative intradermal skin tests to insulin and the absence of change on either beef or pork insulin usage by our patient all point to a nonatopic factor in the aggravation of the asthma of this patient. In the uncommon occurrence of asthma and diabetes in the same patient, insulin dosage should be considered as a factor in all such asthmatics who do not respond well to conventional therapy. Two additional asthmatics who also have diabetes did improve with cessation of nocturnal asthma by a reduction of their evening dose of insulin. A high fat, low carbohydrate diet, as suggested by Abrahamson to avoid dietary hyperinsulinism, is certainly worth considering in patients with nocturnal asthma. If patients cannot be made to follow a diet requiring frequent feedings high in protein and fats and low in carbohydrates, another approach suggests itself. Abrahamson was able to relieve the patients who developed nocturnal asthma with hypoglycemia by having them drink a glass of milk. Assuming other causes have been eliminated and a patient awakens each day at 3:00 a.m., an alarm clock could be set at 2:00 a.m. Milk or a milk substitute in milk sensitive patients could be taken at 2:00 a.m. to raise the blood sugar and hopefully prevent the asthma associated with hypoglycemia. Also to be noted is the ubiquitous use of tartrazine in so many drugs, including those used to relieve asthmatic symptoms

  7. [Effect of moderate alcohol consumption on insulin sensitivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Tatjána; Fehér, János

    2009-12-06

    Moderate alcohol consumption has been reported to be associated with lower risk for both cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. An explanation for these epidemiologic observations is not entirely clear. Alcohol raises high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels. Other potential beneficial mechanisms have been proposed including anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects. The association between moderate alcohol consumption and insulin sensitivity is still under debate. Possible mechanisms include elevation of adiponectin level, reduction of C-reactive protein and suppression of free fatty acid release from adipose tissue.

  8. Genetic Variants Associated With Glycine Metabolism and Their Role in Insulin Sensitivity and Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, W. J.; Wood, A. R.; Lyssenko, V.

    2013-01-01

    Circulating metabolites associated with insulin sensitivity may represent useful biomarkers, but their causal role in insulin sensitivity and diabetes is less certain. We previously identified novel metabolites correlated with insulin sensitivity measured by the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp....

  9. Exercise, pregnancy, and insulin sensitivity--what is new?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damm, Peter; Breitowicz, Bettina; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine

    2007-01-01

    Pregnancy is characterized by a marked physiological insulin resistance. Overweight and obesity or lack of physical activity can aggravate this reduced insulin sensitivity further. Increased insulin resistance has been associated with serious pregnancy complications, such as gestational diabetes...... mellitus (GDM) and pre-eclampsia. Recent studies clearly indicate that physical activity before and during pregnancy can reduce the risk of GDM and pre-eclampsia....

  10. Depressive symptoms, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the RISC cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bot, M; Pouwer, F; De Jonge, P

    2013-01-01

    . highest quartile of beta-cell rate sensitivity was 2.04; P=0.01). Also, significant depressive symptoms were associated with a statistically significant decrease in the potentiation factor ratio in unadjusted models, but not in the fully adjusted model. CONCLUSION: Depressive symptoms were not related......AIM: This study explored the association of depressive symptoms with indices of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in a cohort of non-diabetic men and women aged 30 to 64 years. METHODS: The study population was derived from the 3-year follow-up of the Relationship between Insulin...... Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk (RISC) study. Presence of significant depressive symptoms was defined as a Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) score ≥ 16. Standard oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Insulin sensitivity was assessed with the oral glucose insulin...

  11. Euglycemic clamp insulin sensitivity and longitudinal systolic blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrie, John R; Malik, Muhammad Omar; Balkau, Beverley

    2013-01-01

    and Cardiovascular disease (RISC) study, we measured insulin sensitivity (M/I) using the euglycemic clamp technique in 1073 healthy European adults (587 women, 486 men) aged 30 to 60 years followed up 3 years later. Systolic BP (SBP) at baseline was higher in insulin-resistant women (ie, those in the low sex...

  12. Reactive oxygen species enhance insulin sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Loh, Kim; Deng, Haiyang; Fukushima, Atsushi; Cai, Xiaochu; Boivin, Benoit; Galic, Sandra; Bruce, Clinton; Shields, Benjamin J.; Skiba, Beata; Ooms, Lisa M.; Stepto, Nigel; Wu, Ben; Mitchell, Christina A.; Tonks, Nicholas K.; Watt, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by mitochondria may contribute to the development of insulin resistance, a primary feature of type 2 diabetes. In recent years it has become apparent that ROS generation in response to physiological stimuli such as insulin may also facilitate signaling by reversibly oxidizing and inhibiting protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). Here we report that mice lacking one of the key enzymes involved in the elimination of physiological ROS, glutathione ...

  13. Estimation of insulin sensitivity in children: methods, measures and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rebecca J; Yanovski, Jack A

    2014-05-01

    Insulin resistance is defined as a state where insulin produces a diminished biological response, primarily in its capacity as a glucose-regulating hormone. Insulin resistance is commonly diagnosed by pediatric clinicians, but is rarely measured directly in children or adolescents. This review provides an overview of the techniques that can be used to assess insulin sensitivity in children, summarizing the methods involved, the assumptions, pitfalls, and appropriate uses of each technique, as well as their validation and reproducibility in pediatric samples. Published 2014. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Insulin sensitivity and metabolic flexibility following exercise training among different obese insulin resistant phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malin, Steven K; Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    ) and were instructed to maintain a eucaloric diet. A euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU/m(2)/min) with [6,6-(2)H]-glucose was used to determine peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity. Non-oxidative glucose disposal and metabolic flexibility (insulin-stimulated respiratory quotient [RQ] minus...

  15. Prediction of the insulin sensitivity index using Bayesian networks

    OpenAIRE

    Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Dethlefsen, Claus

    2006-01-01

    The insulin sensitivity index () can be used in assessing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. An intravenous study is used to determine using Bergmans minimal model. However, an intravenous study is time consuming and expensive and therefore not suitable for large scale epidemiological studies. In this paper we learn the parameters and structure of several Bayesian networks relating measurements from an oral glucose tolerance test to the insulin sensitivity index determined from an intrav...

  16. A two-week reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa

    2009-01-01

    US adults take between ~2,000 to ~12,000 steps per day, a wide range of ambulatory activity, that at the low range could increase risk for developing chronic metabolic diseases. Dramatic reductions in physical activity induce insulin resistance; however it is uncertain if and how low ambulatory...... activity would influence peripheral insulin sensitivity. We aimed to explore if healthy, non-exercising subjects who went from a normal to a low level of ambulatory activity for two weeks would display metabolic alterations including reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity. -To do this, ten healthy young...... possible biological cause for the public health problem of type 2 diabetes has been identified. Reduced ambulatory activity for two weeks in healthy, non-exercising young men significantly reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular fitness, and lean leg mass. Key words: Inactivity, Insulin...

  17. Threshold for improvement in insulin sensitivity with adolescent weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Pamela; Levitt Katz, Lorraine E; Moore, Reneé H; Xanthopoulos, Melissa S; Bishop-Gilyard, Chanelle T; Wadden, Thomas A; Berkowitz, Robert I

    2013-09-01

    To assess the association of weight loss and insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and metabolic syndrome (MS) in obese adolescents following weight loss treatment, and to determine the threshold amount of weight loss required to observe improvements in these measures. A randomized, controlled behavioral weight loss trial was conducted with 113 obese adolescents. Changes in fasting insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, whole body insulin sensitivity index (WBISI), body mass index (BMI), and MS criteria were assessed at baseline and at month 4. There was significant improvement in all measures of insulin sensitivity at month 4. Mean fasting insulin dropped from 22.3 to 16.6 μU/mL (P adolescents. An approximate decrease in BMI of 8% was the threshold level at which insulin sensitivity improved. As more weight loss programs are designed for obese adolescents, it will be important to have reasonable weight loss goals that will yield improvements in metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  18. Insulin Sensitivity Determines Effects of Insulin and Meal Ingestion on Systemic Vascular Resistance in Healthy Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; Meijer, Rick I; Eringa, Etto C; Hoekstra, Trynke; Smulders, Yvo M; Serné, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    In addition to insulin's metabolic actions, insulin can dilate arterioles which increase blood flow to metabolically active tissues. This effect is blunted in insulin-resistant subjects. Insulin's effect on SVR, determined by resistance arterioles, has, however, rarely been examined directly. We determined the effects of both hyperinsulinemia and a mixed meal on SVR and its relationship with insulin sensitivity. Thirty-seven lean and obese women underwent a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, and 24 obese volunteers underwent a mixed-meal test. SVR was assessed using CPP before and during hyperinsulinemia as well as before and 60 and 120 minutes after a meal. SVR decreased significantly during hyperinsulinemia (-13%; p Insulin decreased SVR more strongly in insulin-sensitive individuals (standardized β: -0.44; p = 0.01). In addition, SVR at 60 minutes after meal ingestion was inversely related to the Matsuda index (β: -0.39; p = 0.04) and the change in postprandial SVR was directly related to postprandial glycemia (β: 0.53; p insulin resistance. This suggests that resistance to insulin-induced vasodilatation contributes to regulation of vascular resistance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Bioactives in Blueberries Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Obese, Insulin-Resistant Men and Women1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stull, April J.; Cash, Katherine C.; Johnson, William D.; Champagne, Catherine M.; Cefalu, William T.

    2010-01-01

    Dietary supplementation with whole blueberries in a preclinical study resulted in a reduction in glucose concentrations over time. We sought to evaluate the effect of daily dietary supplementation with bioactives from blueberries on whole-body insulin sensitivity in men and women. A double-blinded, randomized, and placebo-controlled clinical study design was used. After screening to resolve study eligibility, baseline (wk 0) insulin sensitivity was measured on 32 obese, nondiabetic, and insulin-resistant subjects using a high-dose hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (insulin infusion of 120 mU(861 pmol)⋅m−2⋅min−1). Serum inflammatory biomarkers and adiposity were measured at baseline. At the end of the study, insulin sensitivity, inflammatory biomarkers, and adiposity were reassessed. Participants were randomized to consume either a smoothie containing 22.5 g blueberry bioactives (blueberry group, n = 15) or a smoothie of equal nutritional value without added blueberry bioactives (placebo group, n = 17) twice daily for 6 wk. Both groups were instructed to maintain their body weight by reducing ad libitum intake by an amount equal to the energy intake of the smoothies. Participants’ body weights were evaluated weekly and 3-d food records were collected at baseline, the middle, and end of the study. The mean change in insulin sensitivity improved more in the blueberry group (1.7 ± 0.5 mg⋅kg FFM−1⋅min−1) than in the placebo group (0.4 ± 0.4 mg⋅kg FFM−1⋅min−1) (P = 0.04). Insulin sensitivity was enhanced in the blueberry group at the end of the study without significant changes in adiposity, energy intake, and inflammatory biomarkers. In conclusion, daily dietary supplementation with bioactives from whole blueberries improved insulin sensitivity in obese, nondiabetic, and insulin-resistant participants. PMID:20724487

  20. Insulin Sensitivity and Inflammation Mediate the Impact of Fitness on Cerebrovascular Health in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Po Lai; Ross, Naima; Tirsi, Andrew; Arif, Arslan; Ozinci, Zeynep; Convit, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    To investigate in adolescents the relationships between retinal vessel diameter, physical fitness, insulin sensitivity, and systemic inflammation. We evaluated 157 adolescents, 112 with excessive weight and 45 lean, all without type 2 diabetes mellitus. All received detailed evaluations, including measurements of retinal vessel diameter, insulin sensitivity, levels of inflammation, and physical fitness. Overweight/obese adolescents had significantly narrower retinal arteriolar and wider venular diameters, significantly lower insulin sensitivity, and physical fitness. They also had decreased levels of anti-inflammatory and increased levels of proinflammatory markers as well as an overall higher inflammation balance score. Fitness was associated with larger retinal arteriolar and narrower venular diameters and these relationships were mediated by insulin sensitivity. We demonstrate that inflammation also mediates the relationship between fitness and retinal venular, but not arterial diameter; insulin sensitivity and inflammation balance score jointly mediate this relationship with little overlap in their effects. Increasing fitness and insulin sensitivity and reducing inflammation among adolescents carrying excess weight may improve microvascular integrity. Interventions to improve physical fitness and insulin function and reduce inflammation in adolescents, a group likely to benefit from such interventions, may reduce not only cardiovascular disease in middle age, but also improve cerebrovascular function later in life.

  1. Hot topic: Ceramide inhibits insulin sensitivity in primary bovine adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, J E; Myers, W A; Laub, D J; Davis, A N; Zeng, Q; McFadden, J W

    2018-04-01

    In nonruminants, the sphingolipid ceramide inhibits insulin sensitivity by inactivating protein kinase B (AKT) within the insulin-signaling pathway. We have established that ceramide accrual develops with impaired systemic insulin action in ruminants during the transition from gestation to lactation, dietary palmitic acid supplementation, or controlled nutrient restriction. We hypothesized that ceramide promotes AKT inactivation and antagonizes insulin sensitivity in primary bovine adipocytes. Stromal-vascular cells were grown from bovine adipose tissue explants and cultured in differentiation media. To modify ceramide supply, we treated differentiated adipocytes with (1) myriocin, an inhibitor of de novo ceramide synthesis, or (2) cell-permeable C2:0-ceramide. Insulin-stimulated AKT activation (i.e., phosphorylation) and 2-deoxy-D-[ 3 H]-glucose (2DOG) uptake were measured. Treatment of adipocytes with myriocin consistently decreased concentrations of ceramide, monohexosylceramide, and lactosylceramide. The insulin-stimulated ratio of phosphorylated AKT to total AKT was increased with myriocin but decreased with C2:0-ceramide. Moreover, adipocyte insulin-stimulated 2DOG uptake was decreased with C2:0-ceramide and increased with myriocin. We conclude that ceramide inhibits insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by downregulating AKT activation in primary bovine adipocytes. Copyright © 2018 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of 7 days of exercise training on insulin sensitivity and responsiveness in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirwan, John P; Solomon, Thomas; Wojta, Daniel M

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine whether 1) the improvement in insulin action induced by short-term exercise training in patients with type 2 diabetes is due to an improvement in insulin sensitivity, an improvement in insulin responsiveness, or a combination of improved insulin...... sensitivity and responsiveness and 2) short-term exercise training results in improved suppression of hepatic glucose production by insulin. Fourteen obese patients with type 2 diabetes, age 64 +/- 2 yr, underwent a two-stage hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp procedure, first stage 40 mU.m(-2).min(-1) insulin...... of vigorous exercise training can induce significant improvements in insulin action in type 2 diabetes. These improvements include increased peripheral insulin sensitivity and responsiveness as well as enhanced suppression of hepatic glucose production....

  3. Lipid-anthropometric index optimization for insulin sensitivity estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, J.; Wong, S.; Encalada, L.; Herrera, H.; Severeyn, E.

    2015-12-01

    Insulin sensitivity (IS) is the ability of cells to react due to insulińs presence; when this ability is diminished, low insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance (IR) is considered. IR had been related to other metabolic disorders as metabolic syndrome (MS), obesity, dyslipidemia and diabetes. IS can be determined using direct or indirect methods. The indirect methods are less accurate and invasive than direct and they use glucose and insulin values from oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The accuracy is established by comparison using spearman rank correlation coefficient between direct and indirect method. This paper aims to propose a lipid-anthropometric index which offers acceptable correlation to insulin sensitivity index for different populations (DB1=MS subjects, DB2=sedentary without MS subjects and DB3=marathoners subjects) without to use OGTT glucose and insulin values. The proposed method is parametrically optimized through a random cross-validation, using the spearman rank correlation as comparator with CAUMO method. CAUMO is an indirect method designed from a simplification of the minimal model intravenous glucose tolerance test direct method (MINMOD-IGTT) and with acceptable correlation (0.89). The results show that the proposed optimized method got a better correlation with CAUMO in all populations compared to non-optimized. On the other hand, it was observed that the optimized method has better correlation with CAUMO in DB2 and DB3 groups than HOMA-IR method, which is the most widely used for diagnosing insulin resistance. The optimized propose method could detect incipient insulin resistance, when classify as insulin resistant subjects that present impaired postprandial insulin and glucose values.

  4. Sexual dimorphism in hepatic, adipose tissue and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity in obese humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper W. ter Horst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and lipid metabolism differ between men and women, and women tend to have better whole-body or muscle insulin sensitivity. This may be explained, in part, by differences in sex hormones and adipose tissue distribution. Few studies have investigated gender differences in hepatic, adipose tissue and whole-body insulin sensitivity between severely obese men and women. In this study, we aimed to determine the differences in glucose metabolism between severely obese men and women using tissue-specific measurements of insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity was compared between age and body mass index (BMI-matched obese men and women by a two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose. Basal endogenous glucose production and insulin sensitivity of the liver, adipose tissue and peripheral tissues were assessed. Liver fat content was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a subset of included subjects. We included 46 obese men and women (age, 48±2 vs 46±2 years, p=0.591; BMI, 41±1 vs 41±1 kg/m2, p=0.832. There was no difference in basal endogenous glucose production (14.4±1.0 vs 15.3±0.5 µmol•kg fat-free mass-1•min-1, p=0.410, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of free fatty acids, 71.6±3.6 vs 76.1±2.6%, p=0.314 or peripheral insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated rate of disappearance of glucose, 26.2±2.1 vs 22.7±1.7 µmol•kg-1•min-1, p=0.211. Obese men were characterized by lower hepatic insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production, 61.7±4.1 vs 72.8±2.5% in men vs women, resp., p=0.028. Finally, these observations could not be explained by differences in liver fat content (men vs women, 16.5±3.1 vs 16.0±2.5%, p=0.913, n=27.We conclude that obese men have lower hepatic, but comparable adipose tissue and peripheral tissue, insulin sensitivity compared to similarly obese women. Hepatic insulin resistance may

  5. Insulin and Insulin-Sensitizing Drugs in Neurodegeneration: Mitochondria as Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula I. Moreira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin, besides its glucose lowering effects, is involved in the modulation of lifespan, aging and memory and learning processes. As the population ages, neurodegenerative disorders become epidemic and a connection between insulin signaling dysregulation, cognitive decline and dementia has been established. Mitochondria are intracellular organelles that despite playing a critical role in cellular metabolism are also one of the major sources of reactive oxygen species. Mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, hallmarks of neurodegeneration, can result from impaired insulin signaling. Insulin-sensitizing drugs such as the thiazolidinediones are a new class of synthetic compounds that potentiate insulin action in the target tissues and act as specific agonists of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ. Recently, several PPAR agonists have been proposed as novel and possible therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders. Indeed, the literature shows that these agents are able to protect against mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis. This review discusses the role of mitochondria and insulin signaling in normal brain function and in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, the potential protective role of insulin and insulin sensitizers in Alzheimer´s, Parkinson´s and Huntington´s diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will be also discussed.

  6. Maternal periodontal disease in rats decreases insulin sensitivity and insulin signaling in adult offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakashi, Daisy J; Leal, Rosana P; Colombo, Natalia H; Chiba, Fernando Y; Garbin, Cléa A S; Jardim, Elerson G; Antoniali, Cristina; Sumida, Doris H

    2013-03-01

    Periodontal disease during pregnancy has been recognized as one of the causes of preterm and low-birth-weight (PLBW) babies. Several studies have demonstrated that PLBW babies are prone to developing insulin resistance as adults. Although there is controversy over the association between periodontal disease and PLBW, the phenomenon known as programming can translate any stimulus or aggression experienced during intrauterine growth into physiologic and metabolic alterations in adulthood. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether the offspring of rats with periodontal disease develop insulin resistance in adulthood. Ten female Wistar rats were divided into periodontal disease (PED) and control (CN) groups. All rats were mated at 7 days after induction of periodontal disease. Male offspring were divided into two groups: 1) periodontal disease offspring (PEDO; n = 24); and 2) control offspring (CNO; n = 24). Offspring body weight was measured from birth until 75 days. When the offspring reached 75 days old, the following parameters were measured: 1) plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, fructosamine, lipase, amylase, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α); 2) insulin sensitivity (IS); and 3) insulin signal transduction (IST) in insulin-sensitive tissues. Low birth weight was not detected in the PEDO group. However, plasma concentrations of glucose, insulin, fructosamine, lipase, amylase, and TNF-α were increased and IS and IST were reduced (P PEDO group compared with the CNO group. Maternal periodontal disease may induce insulin resistance and reduce IST in adult offspring, but such alterations are not attributable to low birth weight.

  7. What dietary modification best improves insulin sensitivity and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weickert, Martin O

    2012-10-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) has been proposed as the strongest single predictor for incident type 2 diabetes and is mainly caused by adiposity as a result of chronic excessive energy intake. Loss of body weight and fat mass improve insulin sensitivity. However, independent of energy intake and changes in body weight/composition, dietary content and specific metabolic effects of certain nutrients may play significant additional roles in influencing IR. These effects are mainly relatively modest, with modulation of IR and diabetes risk within the range of 10-30%, but could be of major relevance on a population level. Examples include dietary concepts and patterns such as the traditional Mediterranean diet; the isoenergetic modulation of the composition of types of fatty acids in the diet; low-carbohydrate-high-protein diets; the quality of carbohydrate-rich foods, which includes the concepts of glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load; and, not necessarily related to the GI concept, specific metabolic effects of high-fibre diets, with relevant differences between the type of fibre consumed. Effects of further selected foods (e.g. coffee, tea and nuts) and micronutrients (e.g. magnesium, selenium and zinc) on the modulation of IR have been reviewed elsewhere. This study focuses on changes in IR by isoenergetic modulation of the main macronutrients (fat, carbohydrates including dietary fibre, and dietary protein), with discussion of novel concepts and the potential interplay of food components in the current dietary concepts. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Circulating docosahexaenoic acid levels are associated with fetal insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Ping Zhao

    Full Text Available Arachidonic acid (AA; C20∶4 n-6 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; C22∶6 n-3 are important long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA in maintaining pancreatic beta-cell structure and function. Newborns of gestational diabetic mothers are more susceptible to the development of type 2 diabetes in adulthood. It is not known whether low circulating AA or DHA is involved in perinatally "programming" this susceptibility. This study aimed to assess whether circulating concentrations of AA, DHA and other fatty acids are associated with fetal insulin sensitivity or beta-cell function, and whether low circulating concentrations of AA or DHA are involved in compromised fetal insulin sensitivity in gestational diabetic pregnancies.In a prospective singleton pregnancy cohort, maternal (32-35 weeks gestation and cord plasma fatty acids were assessed in relation to surrogate indicators of fetal insulin sensitivity (cord plasma glucose-to-insulin ratio, proinsulin concentration and beta-cell function (proinsulin-to-insulin ratio in 108 mother-newborn pairs. Cord plasma DHA levels (in percentage of total fatty acids were lower comparing newborns of gestational diabetic (n = 24 vs. non-diabetic pregnancies (2.9% vs. 3.5%, P = 0.01. Adjusting for gestational age at blood sampling, lower cord plasma DHA levels were associated with lower fetal insulin sensitivity (lower glucose-to-insulin ratio, r = 0.20, P = 0.036; higher proinsulin concentration, r = -0.37, P <0.0001. The associations remained after adjustment for maternal and newborn characteristics. Cord plasma saturated fatty acids C18∶0 and C20∶0 were negatively correlated with fetal insulin sensitivity, but their levels were not different between gestational diabetic and non-diabetic pregnancies. Cord plasma AA levels were not correlated with fetal insulin sensitivity.Low circulating DHA levels are associated with compromised fetal insulin sensitivity, and may be involved in

  9. Characterization of the insulin sensitivity of ghrelin receptor KO mice using glycemic clamps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We and others have demonstrated previously that ghrelin receptor (GhrR knock out (KO mice fed a high fat diet (HFD have increased insulin sensitivity and metabolic flexibility relative to WT littermates. A striking feature of the HFD-fed GhrR KO mouse is the dramatic decrease in hepatic steatosis. To characterize further the underlying mechanisms of glucose homeostasis in GhrR KO mice, we conducted both hyperglycemic (HG and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic (HI-E clamps. Additionally, we investigated tissue glucose uptake and specifically examined liver insulin sensitivity. Results Consistent with glucose tolerance-test data, in HG clamp experiments, GhrR KO mice showed a reduction in glucose-stimulated insulin release relative to WT littermates. Nevertheless, a robust 1st phase insulin secretion was still achieved, indicating that a healthy β-cell response is maintained. Additionally, GhrR KO mice demonstrated both a significantly increased glucose infusion rate and significantly reduced insulin requirement for maintenance of the HG clamp, consistent with their relative insulin sensitivity. In HI-E clamps, both LFD-fed and HFD-fed GhrR KO mice showed higher peripheral insulin sensitivity relative to WT littermates as indicated by a significant increase in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd, and decreased hepatic glucose production (HGP. HFD-fed GhrR KO mice showed a marked increase in peripheral tissue glucose uptake in a variety of tissues, including skeletal muscle, brown adipose tissue and white adipose tissue. GhrR KO mice fed a HFD also showed a modest, but significant decrease in conversion of pyruvate to glucose, as would be anticipated if these mice displayed increased liver insulin sensitivity. Additionally, the levels of UCP2 and UCP1 were reduced in the liver and BAT, respectively, in GhrR KO mice relative to WT mice. Conclusions These results indicate that improved glucose homeostasis of GhrR KO mice is

  10. A 2-wk reduction of ambulatory activity attenuates peripheral insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Thyfault, John P; Broholm, Christa

    2010-01-01

    US adults take between approximately 2,000 and approximately 12,000 steps per day, a wide range of ambulatory activity that at the low range could increase risk for developing chronic metabolic diseases. Dramatic reductions in physical activity induce insulin resistance; however, it is uncertain...... if and how low ambulatory activity would influence peripheral insulin sensitivity. We aimed to explore if healthy, nonexercising subjects who went from a normal to a low level of ambulatory activity for 2 wk would display metabolic alterations including reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity. To do this, ten...... possible biological cause for the public health problem of Type 2 diabetes has been identified. Reduced ambulatory activity for 2 wk in healthy, nonexercising young men significantly reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular fitness, and lean leg mass....

  11. [How to measure insulin sensitivity in clinical practice?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabasa-Lhoret, R; Laville, M

    2001-04-01

    Insulin resistance is common and cluster with glucose intolerance, dyslipidaemia and high blood pressure,. in type 2 diabetes mellitus it play a key role in the occurence of hyperglycemia. The importance of the insulin-resistant phenotype for the assessment of cardiovascular risk and response to intervention is increasingly being recognized. Therefore there is a need for accurate, reproducible and simple methods for measuring insulin resistance in vivo. The euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp is currently the best available standard technique but is not suitable for clinical practice. Thus, numerous index for insulin resistance estimation from fasting or post-load OGTT glycemia and insulinemia have been proposed. Although their simplicity is an obvious advantage, their application is subject to numerous limitations. The choice of the method to evaluate insulin sensitivity thus depend on objectives and available means. For clinical research, euglycemic clamp is the gold standard. In the case of epidemiologic studies, validated models like HOMA model are suitable. Finally in clinical practice, for type 2 diabetic patients, evaluation of insulin resistance should be made from clinical and biological context eventually associated with an estimation of respectives roles of insulinopenia and insulin resistance with a validated index like the HOMA model.

  12. Role of AMPK in Regulating Muscle Insulin Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøbsted, Rasmus

    obtained during this PhD support a role of AMPK in regulating muscle insulin sensitivity, which may occur through phosphorylation of the downstream target TBC1D4. We find that prior AICAR treatment (pharmacological AMPK activator) and in situ contraction enhance mouse muscle insulin sensitivity in an AMPK...... prevail in healthy lean subjects. In the present thesis, experimental results from the three studies as well as unpublished observations are placed in the context of existing literature in order to provide a general overview of the current understandings within this field of research....

  13. Prediction of the insulin sensitivity index using Bayesian networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøttcher, Susanne Gammelgaard; Dethlefsen, Claus

    The insulin sensitivity index () can be used in assessing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. An intravenous study is used to determine using Bergmans minimal model. However, an intravenous study is time consuming and expensive and therefore not suitable for large scale epidemiological studies....... In this paper we learn the parameters and structure of several Bayesian networks relating measurements from an oral glucose tolerance test to the insulin sensitivity index determined from an intravenous study on the same individuals. The networks can then be used in prediction of from an oral glucose tolerance...

  14. Partial Sleep Restriction Decreases Insulin Sensitivity in Type 1 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P.L.M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44 ± 7 years, BMI 23.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, and A1C 7.6 ± 0.3%. They were studied once after a night of normal sleep duration and once after a night of only 4 h of sleep...

  15. Spectroscopic study of the interaction of insulin and its aptamer – sensitive optical detection of insulin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdian-Doghaei, A.; Housaindokht, M.R., E-mail: housain@um.ac.ir

    2015-03-15

    The binding of insulin to the insulin binding aptamer (IBA) was investigated with different spectroscopy techniques (UV/vis absorption, fluorescence, resonance light-scattering spectra (RLS), synchronous fluorescence, and three-dimensional fluorescence). The thermodynamic parameters (K{sub b}, ΔH, ΔG, and ΔS) of the insulin–IBA complex were further investigated by temperature-dependent fluorescence measurement over the range of 25–37 °C. The results of synchronous fluorescence, resonance light scattering (RLS) and three-dimensional fluorescence spectra showed that IBA would alter the structure of insulin. Folding of the dual-labeled insulin binding aptamer, FL-IBA, carrying 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM) and 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA) labels at termini of the insulin binding aptamer (IBA), into G-quadruplex leading to the contact quenching occurs as a result of the formation of a nonfluorescent complex between donor and acceptor. Significant fluorescent signal change when FL-IBA was bound to insulin is attributed to a conformational change in FL-IBA from a loose random coil to a compact G-quadruplex. Based on fluorescence quenching of IBA folding, a simple and sensitive insulin aptamer-based biosensor in the range of 2–70 nM was proposed. - Highlights: • The binding parameters were gotten from contact quenching data. • The binding of IBA induced some microenvironment and conformational changes in insulin. • The van der Waals interactions or hydrogen bonds play a major role on this binding. • A simple and sensitive insulin aptamer-based biosensor was proposed.

  16. Dietary Sodium Restriction Decreases Insulin Secretion Without Affecting Insulin Sensitivity in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Loretta M.; Yu, Chang; Wang, Thomas J.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Interruption of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system prevents incident diabetes in high-risk individuals, although the mechanism remains unclear. Objective: To test the hypothesis that activation of the endogenous renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system or exogenous aldosterone impairs insulin secretion in humans. Design: We conducted a randomized, blinded crossover study of aldosterone vs vehicle and compared the effects of a low-sodium versus a high-sodium diet. Setting: Academic clinical research center. Participants: Healthy, nondiabetic, normotensive volunteers. Interventions: Infusion of exogenous aldosterone (0.7 μg/kg/h for 12.5 h) or vehicle during low or high sodium intake. Low sodium (20 mmol/d; n = 12) vs high sodium (160 mmol/d; n = 17) intake for 5–7 days. Main Outcome Measures: Change in acute insulin secretory response assessed during hyperglycemic clamps while in sodium balance during a low-sodium vs high-sodium diet during aldosterone vs vehicle. Results: A low-sodium diet increased endogenous aldosterone and plasma renin activity, and acute glucose-stimulated insulin (−16.0 ± 5.6%; P = .007) and C-peptide responses (−21.8 ± 8.4%; P = .014) were decreased, whereas the insulin sensitivity index was unchanged (−1.0 ± 10.7%; P = .98). Aldosterone infusion did not affect the acute insulin response (+1.8 ± 4.8%; P = .72) or insulin sensitivity index (+2.0 ± 8.8%; P = .78). Systolic blood pressure and serum potassium were similar during low and high sodium intake and during aldosterone infusion. Conclusions: Low dietary sodium intake reduces insulin secretion in humans, independent of insulin sensitivity. PMID:25029426

  17. Partial sleep restriction decreases insulin sensitivity in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P L M; Corssmit, Eleonora P M; Romijn, Johannes A

    2010-07-01

    Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44 +/- 7 years, BMI 23.5 +/- 0.9 kg/m(2), and A1C 7.6 +/- 0.3%. They were studied once after a night of normal sleep duration and once after a night of only 4 h of sleep. Sleep characteristics were assessed by polysomnography. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies with an infusion of [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. RESULTS Sleep duration was shorter in the night with sleep restriction than in the unrestricted night (469 +/- 8.5 vs. 222 +/- 7.1 min, P = 0.02). Sleep restriction did not affect basal levels of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), or endogenous glucose production. Endogenous glucose production during the hyperinsulinemic clamp was not altered during the night of sleep restriction compared with the night of unrestricted sleep (6.2 +/- 0.8 vs. 6.9 +/- 0.6 micromol x kg lean body mass(-1) x min(-1), NS). In contrast, sleep restriction decreased the glucose disposal rate during the clamp (25.5 +/- 2.6 vs. 22.0 +/- 2.1 micromol x kg lean body mass(-1) x min(-1), P = 0.04), reflecting decreased peripheral insulin sensitivity. Accordingly, sleep restriction decreased the rate of glucose infusion by approximately 21% (P = 0.04). Sleep restriction did not alter plasma NEFA levels during the clamp (143 +/- 29 vs. 133 +/- 29 micromol/l, NS). Partial sleep deprivation during a single night induces peripheral insulin resistance in these seven patients with type 1 diabetes. Therefore, sleep duration is a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes.

  18. The adipose transcriptional response to insulin is determined by obesity, not insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydén, Mikael; Hrydziuszko, Olga; Mileti, Enrichetta

    2016-01-01

    non-obese (NO), 21 insulin-sensitive severely obese (ISO), and 30 insulin-resistant severely obese (IRO) subjects, before and 2 hr into a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp. ISO and IRO subjects displayed a clear but globally similar transcriptional response to insulin, which differed from the small...... effects observed in NO subjects. In the obese, 231 genes were altered; 71 were enriched in ISO subjects (e.g., phosphorylation processes), and 52 were enriched in IRO subjects (e.g., cellular stimuli). Common cardio-metabolic risk factors and gender do not influence these findings. This study demonstrates...... that differences in the acute transcriptional response to insulin are primarily driven by obesity per se, challenging the notion of healthy obese adipose tissue, at least in severe obesity....

  19. Quantitative Estimation of Insulin Sensitivity in Type 1 Diabetic Subjects Wearing a Sensor-Augmented Insulin Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Michele; Dalla Man, Chiara; Kudva, Yogish C.; Basu, Ananda; Cobelli, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal was to develop a new index of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes estimated from continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and subcutaneous insulin delivery data under carefully controlled conditions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The database consists of 12 subjects with type 1 diabetes, studied during breakfast, lunch, and dinner, in a clinical research unit, wearing both subcutaneous insulin pump and CGM device. Frequent blood samples were drawn for measurements of plasma glucose and insulin concentrations in order to estimate insulin sensitivity with the oral minimal model (SIMM). The new index of insulin sensitivity (SISP) was calculated with a simple algebraic formula for each meal, using only CGM and insulin pump data and compared with SIMM. RESULTS SISP was well correlated with SIMM (r = 0.825; P insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 1 diabetes on sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy has been presented. This new index correlates well with the reference oral minimal model estimate of insulin sensitivity. The knowledge of patient-specific insulin sensitivity and its diurnal variation can help in optimizing insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes and could also inform next-generation closed-loop control systems. PMID:24319120

  20. Environmental factors and dam characteristics associated with insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in newborn Holstein calves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, M.M.; Van Eetvelde, M.; Bogaert, H.; Hostens, M.; Vandaele, L.; Shamsuddin, M.; Opsomer, G.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present retrospective cohort study was to evaluate potential associations between environmental factors and dam characteristics, including level of milk production during gestation, and insulin traits in newborn Holstein calves

  1. Effect of Gymnema sylvestre Administration on Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Sensitivity, and Insulin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuñiga, Laura Y; González-Ortiz, Manuel; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza

    2017-08-01

    Gymnema sylvestre is a medicinal plant whose consumption has demonstrated benefits on lipid and glucose levels, blood pressure, and body weight (BWt). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of G. sylvestre administration on metabolic syndrome (MetS), insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 24 patients (without pharmacological treatment), 30-60 years old, with diagnosis of MetS in accordance with the modified International Diabetes Federation criteria. Patients were randomly assigned to receive G. sylvestre or placebo twice daily before breakfast and dinner in 300 mg capsules for a total of 600 mg per day for 12 weeks. Before and after the intervention, the components of MetS were evaluated as well as BWt, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). Area under the curve of glucose and insulin, phases of insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using Wilcoxon signed-rank, Mann-Whitney U, and chi-square tests; P ≤ .05 was considered statistically significant. After G. sylvestre administration, significant decreases in BWt (81.3 ± 10.6 kg vs. 77.9 ± 8.4 kg, P = .02), BMI (31.2 ± 2.5 kg/m 2 vs. 30.4 ± 2.2 kg/m 2 , P = .02), and VLDL levels (0.45 ± 0.15 mmol/dL vs. 0.35 ± 0.15 mmol/dL, P = .05) were observed, without modifying the components of MetS, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, G. sylvestre administration decreased BWt, BMI, and VLDL levels in subjects with MetS, without changes in insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity.

  2. Insulin sensitivity and carotid intima-media thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozakova, Michaela; Natali, Andrea; Dekker, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Despite a wealth of experimental data in animal models, the independent association of insulin resistance with early carotid atherosclerosis in man has not been demonstrated. APPROACH AND RESULTS: We studied a European cohort of 525 men and 655 women (mean age, 44±8 years) free of conditions known...... to affect carotid wall (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and dyslipidemia). All subjects received an oral glucose tolerance test, a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (M/I as a measure of insulin sensitivity), and B-mode carotid ultrasound. In 833 participants (380 men), the carotid ultrasound was repeated...

  3. Evaluation of insulin sensitivity status in polycystic ovarian syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma Delphine Silvia C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the risk arising from polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS which would help the clinician to make early interventions. Methods: Fasting and postprandial serum glucose and serum insulin levels were estimated in 26 cases of PCOS and 26 healthy women were selected as controls. Calculation of quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI in all the subjects was utilized to analyze its sensitivity and reliability. Also body mass index and waist circumference in all these subjects were measured as obesity plays a key role in the pathogenesis of PCOS. Results: Hyperglycemia was observed in 11% of the cases and hyperinsulinemia was a consistent feature in 46% of the patients. The postprandial insulin levels in cases were statistically significant (P=0.006. Sensitivity to insulin as indicated by QUICKI in the postprandial state was less in cases than in controls (P=0.13. The BMI was markedly raised in 15% and moderately raised in about 38% of the cases (P=0.024. Waist circumference was significantly raised in about 61% of the cases (>80 cm (P<0.001. Conclusions: Our study indicates that QUICKI, BMI and waist circumference are simple, quick and may act as early markers in identifying the risks of developing metabolic syndrome. Obesity, being a consistent finding in most cases suggested its key role in the pathogenesis of PCOS.

  4. Effects of turtle oil on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in insulin resistant cell model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Jing; Tian Yaping; Guo Duo

    2007-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of turtle oil on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in an insulin-resistant (IR) cell model which was established by the way of high concentration of insulin induction with HepG 2 cell in vitro culture. The IR cells were treated by turtle oil, the glucose consumption and 3 H-D-glucose incorporation rate in IR cells were detected by the way of glucose oxidase and 3 H-D-glucose incorporation assay respectively. The state of cell proliferation was tested by MTT method. The results showed that the incorporation rate of 3 H-D-glucose in IR cells was significantly lower than that in the control cells(P 3 H-D-glucose incorporation rate in either IR cells or control cells was increased with the increase of insulin concentration. Moreover, the 3 H-D-glucose incorporation rate of IR cells increased slower than that of control cells. The MTT assay showed that turtle oil can promote the proliferation of IR cell and control cell. The glucose uptake and glucose consumption in IR cell which treated with turtle oil was significantly increase than that in the control cells (P<0.05). Turtle oil can improve the insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in the IR cell model. (authors)

  5. Insulin sensitivity in relation to fat distribution and plasma adipocytokines among abusers of anabolic androgenic steroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jon Jarløv; Schou, Morten; Selmer, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is prevalent among young men, but information regarding effects on insulin sensitivity and fat distribution is limited. The objective was to investigate insulin sensitivity in relation to fat distribution and adipocytokines among current...

  6. Fine-mapping diabetes-related traits, including insulin resistance, in heterogeneous stock rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg Woods, Leah C; Holl, Katie L; Oreper, Daniel; Xie, Yuying; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Valdar, William

    2012-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a disease of relative insulin deficiency resulting from both insulin resistance and beta cell failure. We have previously used heterogeneous stock (HS) rats to fine-map a locus for glucose tolerance. We show here that glucose intolerance in the founder strains of the HS colony is mediated by different mechanisms: insulin resistance in WKY and an insulin secretion defect in ACI, and we demonstrate a high degree of variability for measures of insulin resistance and insulin secretion in HS rats. As such, our goal was to use HS rats to fine-map several diabetes-related traits within a region on rat chromosome 1. We measured blood glucose and plasma insulin levels after a glucose tolerance test in 782 male HS rats. Using 97 SSLP markers, we genotyped a 68 Mb region on rat chromosome 1 previously implicated in glucose and insulin regulation. We used linkage disequilibrium mapping by mixed model regression with inferred descent to identify a region from 198.85 to 205.9 that contains one or more quantitative trait loci (QTL) for fasting insulin and a measure of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index. This region also encompasses loci identified for fasting glucose and Insulin_AUC (area under the curve). A separate <3 Mb QTL was identified for body weight. Using a novel penalized regression method we then estimated effects of alternative haplotype pairings under each locus. These studies highlight the utility of HS rats for fine-mapping genetic loci involved in the underlying causes of T2D.

  7. The Effects of Carbohydrate, Unsaturated Fat, and Protein Intake on Measures of Insulin Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Gadgil, Meghana D.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Yeung, Edwina; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.; Sacks, Frank M.; Miller, Edgar R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired insulin sensitivity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Although calorie restriction and weight loss increase insulin sensitivity, the effects of modifying macronutrient composition on insulin sensitivity are uncertain. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects on insulin sensitivity of a carbohydrate-rich diet (CARB; similar to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] diet), a protein-rich diet (PROT; protein predominantly from plant sources...

  8. Calcineurin inhibitors acutely improve insulin sensitivity without affecting insulin secretion in healthy human volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øzbay, Aygen; Møller, Niels; Juhl, Claus

    2012-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT: New onset diabetes after transplantation is related to treatment with immunosuppressive medications. Clinical studies have shown that risk of new onset diabetes is greater with tacrolimus compared with ciclosporin. The diabetogenicity of ciclosporin...... of NODAT remains unclear. We sought to compare the impact of CsA and Tac on glucose metabolism in human subjects. METHODS: Ten healthy men underwent 5 h infusions of CsA, Tac and saline in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. During infusion glucose metabolism was investigated using following.......047), whereas first phase and pulsatile insulin secretion were unaffected. Coinciding with the CNI induced improved insulin sensitivity, glucose oxidation rates increased, while insulin clearance rates decreased, only non-significantly. Tac singularly lowered hsCRP concentrations, otherwise no changes were...

  9. Partial Sleep Restriction Decreases Insulin Sensitivity in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donga, Esther; van Dijk, Marieke; van Dijk, J. Gert; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Lammers, Gert-Jan; van Kralingen, Klaas; Hoogma, Roel P.L.M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.M.; Romijn, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Sleep restriction results in decreased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that sleep duration is also a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied seven patients (three men, four women) with type 1 diabetes: mean age 44 ± 7 years, BMI 23.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2, and A1C 7.6 ± 0.3%. They were studied once after a night of normal sleep duration and once after a night of only 4 h of sleep. Sleep characteristics were assessed by polysomnography. Insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp studies with an infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose. RESULTS Sleep duration was shorter in the night with sleep restriction than in the unrestricted night (469 ± 8.5 vs. 222 ± 7.1 min, P = 0.02). Sleep restriction did not affect basal levels of glucose, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), or endogenous glucose production. Endogenous glucose production during the hyperinsulinemic clamp was not altered during the night of sleep restriction compared with the night of unrestricted sleep (6.2 ± 0.8 vs. 6.9 ± 0.6 μmol · kg lean body mass−1 · min−1, NS). In contrast, sleep restriction decreased the glucose disposal rate during the clamp (25.5 ± 2.6 vs. 22.0 ± 2.1 μmol · kg lean body mass−1 · min−1, P = 0.04), reflecting decreased peripheral insulin sensitivity. Accordingly, sleep restriction decreased the rate of glucose infusion by ∼21% (P = 0.04). Sleep restriction did not alter plasma NEFA levels during the clamp (143 ± 29 vs. 133 ± 29 μmol/l, NS). CONCLUSIONS Partial sleep deprivation during a single night induces peripheral insulin resistance in these seven patients with type 1 diabetes. Therefore, sleep duration is a determinant of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:20357381

  10. Effect of arotinolol on insulin sensitivity in obese hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, S; Yamamoto, J; Mimura, A; Sakurai, T; Ishibashi, K; Isogai, Y

    1994-01-01

    Insulin sensitivity in terms of glucose disposal rate was determined by using the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp technique in seven obese hypertensive patients and nine normotensive control subjects. The technique was used on all study subjects at baseline and on the hypertensive patients after 12 weeks of arotinolol treatment. Mean supine systolic blood pressure decreased from 155 +/- 3 mm Hg before treatment to 133 +/- 6 mm Hg after treatment (P arotinolol was 10 mg/d, except for one patient who received 20 mg/d. The glucose disposal rate during the last 30 minutes of the glucose clamp procedure was not significantly affected by treatment with arotinolol. Compared with the hypertensive patients, the glucose disposal rate in the normotensive subjects was significantly increased, both before and after treatment (P arotinolol did not significantly affect insulin sensitivity.

  11. Grizzly bears exhibit augmented insulin sensitivity while obese prior to a reversible insulin resistance during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, O Lynne; Jansen, Heiko T; Galbreath, Elizabeth; Morgenstern, Kurt; Gehring, Jamie Lauren; Rigano, Kimberly Scott; Lee, Jae; Gong, Jianhua; Shaywitz, Adam J; Vella, Chantal A; Robbins, Charles T; Corbit, Kevin C

    2014-08-05

    The confluence of obesity and diabetes as a worldwide epidemic necessitates the discovery of new therapies. Success in this endeavor requires translatable preclinical studies, which traditionally employ rodent models. As an alternative approach, we explored hibernation where obesity is a natural adaptation to survive months of fasting. Here we report that grizzly bears exhibit seasonal tripartite insulin responsiveness such that obese animals augment insulin sensitivity but only weeks later enter hibernation-specific insulin resistance (IR) and subsequently reinitiate responsiveness upon awakening. Preparation for hibernation is characterized by adiposity coupled to increased insulin sensitivity via modified PTEN/AKT signaling specifically in adipose tissue, suggesting a state of "healthy" obesity analogous to humans with PTEN haploinsufficiency. Collectively, we show that bears reversibly cope with homeostatic perturbations considered detrimental to humans and describe a mechanism whereby IR functions not as a late-stage metabolic adaptation to obesity, but rather a gatekeeper of the fed-fasting transition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Glucose- and temperature-sensitive nanoparticles for insulin delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu JZ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Jun-Zi Wu,1 Gareth R Williams,2 He-Yu Li,1 Dongxiu Wang,3 Huanling Wu,1 Shu-De Li,4 Li-Min Zhu1 1College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2UCL School of Pharmacy, University College London, London, UK; 3Central Laboratory, Environmental Monitoring Center of Kunming, 4School of Basic Medical Sciences, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Glucose- and temperature-sensitive polymers of a phenylboronic acid derivative and diethylene glycol dimethacrylate (poly(3-acrylamidophenyl boronic acid-b-diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate; p(AAPBA-b-DEGMA were prepared by reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. Successful polymerization was evidenced by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy, and the polymers were further explored in terms of their glass transition temperatures and by gel permeation chromatography (GPC. The materials were found to be temperature sensitive, with lower critical solution temperatures in the region of 12°C–47°C depending on the monomer ratio used for reaction. The polymers could be self-assembled into nanoparticles (NPs, and the zeta potential and size of these particles were determined as a function of temperature and glucose concentration. Subsequently, the optimum NP formulation was loaded with insulin, and the drug release was studied. We found that insulin was easily encapsulated into the p(AAPBA-b-DEGMA NPs, with a loading capacity of ~15% and encapsulation efficiency of ~70%. Insulin release could be regulated by changes in temperature and glucose concentration. Furthermore, the NPs were non-toxic both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, the efficacy of the formulations at managing blood glucose levels in a murine hyperglycemic diabetes model was studied. The insulin-loaded NPs could reduce blood glucose levels over an extended period of 48 h. Since they

  13. The Effect of Regular Exercise on Insulin Sensitivity in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley L. Way

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of regular exercise training on insulin sensitivity in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM using the pooled data available from randomised controlled trials. In addition, we sought to determine whether short-term periods of physical inactivity diminish the exercise-induced improvement in insulin sensitivity. Eligible trials included exercise interventions that involved ≥3 exercise sessions, and reported a dynamic measurement of insulin sensitivity. There was a significant pooled effect size (ES for the effect of exercise on insulin sensitivity (ES, –0.588; 95% confidence interval [CI], –0.816 to –0.359; P<0.001. Of the 14 studies included for meta-analyses, nine studies reported the time of data collection from the last exercise bout. There was a significant improvement in insulin sensitivity in favour of exercise versus control between 48 and 72 hours after exercise (ES, –0.702; 95% CI, –1.392 to –0.012; P=0.046; and this persisted when insulin sensitivity was measured more than 72 hours after the last exercise session (ES, –0.890; 95% CI, –1.675 to –0.105; P=0.026. Regular exercise has a significant benefit on insulin sensitivity in adults with T2DM and this may persist beyond 72 hours after the last exercise session.

  14. Metabolic profiling of the human response to a glucose challenge reveals distinct axes of insulin sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaham, Oded; Wei, Ru; Wang, Thomas J; Ricciardi, Catherine; Lewis, Gregory D; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Carr, Steven A; Thadhani, Ravi; Gerszten, Robert E; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2008-01-01

    Glucose ingestion after an overnight fast triggers an insulin-dependent, homeostatic program that is altered in diabetes. The full spectrum of biochemical changes associated with this transition is currently unknown. We have developed a mass spectrometry-based strategy to simultaneously measure 191 metabolites following glucose ingestion. In two groups of healthy individuals (n=22 and 25), 18 plasma metabolites changed reproducibly, including bile acids, urea cycle intermediates, and purine degradation products, none of which were previously linked to glucose homeostasis. The metabolite dynamics also revealed insulin's known actions along four key axes—proteolysis, lipolysis, ketogenesis, and glycolysis—reflecting a switch from catabolism to anabolism. In pre-diabetics (n=25), we observed a blunted response in all four axes that correlated with insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis revealed that declines in glycerol and leucine/isoleucine (markers of lipolysis and proteolysis, respectively) jointly provide the strongest predictor of insulin sensitivity. This observation indicates that some humans are selectively resistant to insulin's suppression of proteolysis, whereas others, to insulin's suppression of lipolysis. Our findings lay the groundwork for using metabolic profiling to define an individual's 'insulin response profile', which could have value in predicting diabetes, its complications, and in guiding therapy. PMID:18682704

  15. Lipid metabolism disturbances contribute to insulin resistance and decrease insulin sensitivity by malathion exposure in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasram, Mohamed Montassar; Bouzid, Kahena; Douib, Ines Bini; Annabi, Alya; El Elj, Naziha; El Fazaa, Saloua; Abdelmoula, Jaouida; Gharbi, Najoua

    2015-04-01

    Several studies showed that organophosphorus pesticides disturb glucose homeostasis and can increase incidence of metabolic disorders and diabetes via insulin resistance. The current study investigates the influence of malathion on glucose metabolism regulation, in vivo, during subchronic exposure. Malathion was administered orally (200 mg/kg), once a day for 28 consecutive days. Plasma glucose, insulin and Glycated hemoglobin levels were significantly increased while hepatic glycogen content was decreased in intoxicated animals compared with the control group. Furthermore, there was a significant disturbance of lipid content in subchronic treated and post-treated rats deprived of malathion for one month. In addition, we used the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) to assess insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and pancreatic β-cell function (HOMA-β). Our results show that malathion increases insulin resistance biomarkers and decreases insulin sensitivity indices. Statistical analysis demonstrates that there was a positive and strong significant correlation between insulin level and insulin resistance indices, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β. Similarly, a negative and significant correlation was also found between insulin level and insulin sensitivity indices. For the first time, we demonstrate that malathion induces insulin resistance in vivo using homeostasis model assessment and these changes were detectable one month after the end of exposure. To explain insulin resistance induced by malathion we focus on lipid metabolism disturbances and their interaction with many proteins involved in insulin signaling pathways.

  16. Rebelling against the (Insulin Resistance: A Review of the Proposed Insulin-Sensitizing Actions of Soybeans, Chickpeas, and Their Bioactive Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime L. Clark

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Current methods for management of insulin resistance include pharmacological therapies and lifestyle modifications. Several clinical studies have shown that leguminous plants such as soybeans and pulses (dried beans, dried peas, chickpeas, lentils are able to reduce insulin resistance and related type 2 diabetes parameters. However, to date, no one has summarized the evidence supporting a mechanism of action for soybeans and pulses that explains their ability to lower insulin resistance. While it is commonly assumed that the biological activities of soybeans and pulses are due to their antioxidant activities, these bioactive compounds may operate independent of their antioxidant properties and, thus, their ability to potentially improve insulin sensitivity via alternative mechanisms needs to be acknowledged. Based on published studies using in vivo and in vitro models representing insulin resistant states, the proposed mechanisms of action for insulin-sensitizing actions of soybeans, chickpeas, and their bioactive compounds include increasing glucose transporter-4 levels, inhibiting adipogenesis by down-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, reducing adiposity, positively affecting adipokines, and increasing short-chain fatty acid-producing bacteria in the gut. Therefore, this review will discuss the current evidence surrounding the proposed mechanisms of action for soybeans and certain pulses, and their bioactive compounds, to effectively reduce insulin resistance.

  17. Modification and Validation of the Triglyceride-to-HDL Cholesterol Ratio as a Surrogate of Insulin Sensitivity in White Juveniles and Adults without Diabetes Mellitus: The Single Point Insulin Sensitivity Estimator (SPISE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulmichl, Katharina; Hatunic, Mensud; Højlund, Kurt; Jotic, Aleksandra; Krebs, Michael; Mitrakou, Asimina; Porcellati, Francesca; Tura, Andrea; Bergsten, Peter; Forslund, Anders; Manell, Hannes; Widhalm, Kurt; Weghuber, Daniel; Anderwald, Christian-Heinz

    2016-09-01

    The triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio was introduced as a tool to estimate insulin resistance, because circulating lipid measurements are available in routine settings. Insulin, C-peptide, and free fatty acids are components of other insulin-sensitivity indices but their measurement is expensive. Easier and more affordable tools are of interest for both pediatric and adult patients. Study participants from the Relationship Between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease [43.9 (8.3) years, n = 1260] as well as the Beta-Cell Function in Juvenile Diabetes and Obesity study cohorts [15 (1.9) years, n = 29] underwent oral-glucose-tolerance tests and euglycemic clamp tests for estimation of whole-body insulin sensitivity and calculation of insulin sensitivity indices. To refine the TG/HDL ratio, mathematical modeling was applied including body mass index (BMI), fasting TG, and HDL cholesterol and compared to the clamp-derived M-value as an estimate of insulin sensitivity. Each modeling result was scored by identifying insulin resistance and correlation coefficient. The Single Point Insulin Sensitivity Estimator (SPISE) was compared to traditional insulin sensitivity indices using area under the ROC curve (aROC) analysis and χ(2) test. The novel formula for SPISE was computed as follows: SPISE = 600 × HDL-C(0.185)/(TG(0.2) × BMI(1.338)), with fasting HDL-C (mg/dL), fasting TG concentrations (mg/dL), and BMI (kg/m(2)). A cutoff value of 6.61 corresponds to an M-value smaller than 4.7 mg · kg(-1) · min(-1) (aROC, M:0.797). SPISE showed a significantly better aROC than the TG/HDL-C ratio. SPISE aROC was comparable to the Matsuda ISI (insulin sensitivity index) and equal to the QUICKI (quantitative insulin sensitivity check index) and HOMA-IR (homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance) when calculated with M-values. The SPISE seems well suited to surrogate whole-body insulin sensitivity from inexpensive fasting single-point blood draw and BMI

  18. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure >15mmHg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% Females, 16% Blacks, BMI 28.5±4.2 Kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mmHg) as compared to high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mmHg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin and HOMA were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dl, 10.8±7.3 mIU/L and 2.6±1.9) as compared to high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dl, 9.4±5.8 mIU/L and 2.1±1.4) (p salt sensitive (N=193) versus salt resistant (N=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in HOMA on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt resistant subjects (p=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in HOMA after including age, BMI, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. PMID:25185125

  19. New measure of insulin sensitivity predicts cardiovascular disease better than HOMA estimated insulin resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Venkataraman

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Accurate assessment of insulin sensitivity may better identify individuals at increased risk of cardio-metabolic diseases. OBJECTIVES: To examine whether a combination of anthropometric, biochemical and imaging measures can better estimate insulin sensitivity index (ISI and provide improved prediction of cardio-metabolic risk, in comparison to HOMA-IR. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: Healthy male volunteers (96 Chinese, 80 Malay, 77 Indian, 21 to 40 years, body mass index 18-30 kg/m(2. Predicted ISI (ISI-cal was generated using 45 randomly selected Chinese through stepwise multiple linear regression, and validated in the rest using non-parametric correlation (Kendall's tau τ. In an independent longitudinal cohort, ISI-cal and HOMA-IR were compared for prediction of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD, using ROC curves. SETTING: The study was conducted in a university academic medical centre. OUTCOME MEASURES: ISI measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp, along with anthropometric measurements, biochemical assessment and imaging; incident diabetes and CVD. RESULTS: A combination of fasting insulin, serum triglycerides and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR provided the best estimate of clamp-derived ISI (adjusted R(2 0.58 versus 0.32 HOMA-IR. In an independent cohort, ROC areas under the curve were 0.77±0.02 ISI-cal versus 0.76±0.02 HOMA-IR (p>0.05 for incident diabetes, and 0.74±0.03 ISI-cal versus 0.61±0.03 HOMA-IR (p<0.001 for incident CVD. ISI-cal also had greater sensitivity than defined metabolic syndrome in predicting CVD, with a four-fold increase in the risk of CVD independent of metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Triglycerides and WHR, combined with fasting insulin levels, provide a better estimate of current insulin resistance state and improved identification of individuals with future risk of CVD, compared to HOMA-IR. This may be useful for estimating insulin sensitivity and cardio-metabolic risk in clinical and

  20. Heart Rate Variability, Insulin Resistance, and Insulin Sensitivity in Japanese Adults: The Toon Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isao Saito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although impaired cardiac autonomic function is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in Caucasians, evidence in Asian populations with a lower body mass index is limited. Methods: Between 2009–2012, the Toon Health Study recruited 1899 individuals aged 30–79 years who were not taking medication for diabetes. A 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was used to diagnose type 2 diabetes, and fasting and 2-h-postload glucose and insulin concentrations were measured. We assessed the homeostasis model assessment index for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR and Gutt’s insulin sensitivity index (ISI. Pulse was recorded for 5 min, and time-domain heart rate variability (HRV indices were calculated: the standard deviation of normal-to-normal intervals (SDNN and the root mean square of successive difference (RMSSD. Power spectral analysis provided frequency domain measures of HRV: high frequency (HF power, low frequency (LF power, and the LF:HF ratio. Results: Multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models showed decreased SDNN, RMSSD, and HF, and increased LF:HF ratio were associated significantly with increased HOMA-IR and decreased ISI. When stratified by overweight status, the association of RMSSD, HF, and LF:HF ratio with decreased ISI was also apparent in non-overweight individuals. The interaction between LF:HF ratio and decreased ISI in overweight individuals was significant, with the odds ratio for decreased ISI in the highest quartile of LF:HF ratio in non-overweight individuals being 2.09 (95% confidence interval, 1.41–3.10. Conclusions: Reduced HRV was associated with insulin resistance and lower insulin sensitivity. Decreased ISI was linked with parasympathetic dysfunction, primarily in non-overweight individuals.

  1. Effect of Chlorogenic Acid Administration on Glycemic Control, Insulin Secretion, and Insulin Sensitivity in Patients with Impaired Glucose Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuñiga, Laura Y; Aceves-de la Mora, Martha C Aceves-de; González-Ortiz, Manuel; Ramos-Núñez, Julia L; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza

    2017-12-20

    Chlorogenic acid has been described as a novel polyphenol with metabolic effects on glucose homeostasis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorogenic acid administration on glycemic control, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity in patients with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed in 30 patients with IGT; 15 patients randomly assigned to oral chlorogenic acid received 400 mg three times per day for 12 weeks, and the other 15 patients received placebo in the same way. Before and after the intervention, anthropometric and metabolic measurements, including fasting plasma glucose (FPG), glycated hemoglobin A1c, and a lipid profile, were performed. Area under the curve of glucose and insulin as well as the insulinogenic, Stumvoll, and Matsuda indices were calculated. Wilcoxon, Mann-Whitney U, and chi-square tests were performed, and P ≤ .05 was considered statistically significant. There were significant decreases in FPG (5.7 ± 0.4 vs. 5.5 ± 0.4 mmol/L, P = .002), insulinogenic index (0.71 ± 0.25 vs. 0.63 ± 0.25, P = .028), body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and very low-density lipoprotein levels in the chlorogenic acid group, with an increment in the Matsuda index (1.98 ± 0.88 vs. 2.30 ± 1.23, P = .002). There were no significant differences in the placebo group. In conclusion, chlorogenic acid administration in patients with IGT decreased FPG and insulin secretion, while increasing insulin sensitivity and improving both anthropometric evaluations and the lipid profile.

  2. Monomeric tartrate resistant acid phosphatase induces insulin sensitive obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pernilla Lång

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer.Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity.Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

  3. A low-fat Diet improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, AM; Almdal, Thomas Peter; Viggers, Lone

    2006-01-01

    AIMS: To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Thirteen Type 1 patients were...... included, of whom 10 completed the cross-over study. Ten non-diabetic, matched control subjects were also examined. Body composition was estimated by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) whole-body scanning, diet intake was monitored by 7-day dietary record and insulin sensitivity was measured...... by the insulin clamp technique at baseline and after each of the diet intervention periods. RESULTS: On an isocaloric low-fat diet, Type 1 diabetic patients significantly reduced the proportion of fat in the total daily energy intake by 12.1% (or -3.6% of total energy) as compared with a conventional diabetes...

  4. New measure of insulin sensitivity predicts cardiovascular disease better than HOMA estimated insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, Kavita; Khoo, Chin Meng; Leow, Melvin K S; Khoo, Eric Y H; Isaac, Anburaj V; Zagorodnov, Vitali; Sadananthan, Suresh A; Velan, Sendhil S; Chong, Yap Seng; Gluckman, Peter; Lee, Jeannette; Salim, Agus; Tai, E Shyong; Lee, Yung Seng

    2013-01-01

    Accurate assessment of insulin sensitivity may better identify individuals at increased risk of cardio-metabolic diseases. To examine whether a combination of anthropometric, biochemical and imaging measures can better estimate insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and provide improved prediction of cardio-metabolic risk, in comparison to HOMA-IR. Healthy male volunteers (96 Chinese, 80 Malay, 77 Indian), 21 to 40 years, body mass index 18-30 kg/m(2). Predicted ISI (ISI-cal) was generated using 45 randomly selected Chinese through stepwise multiple linear regression, and validated in the rest using non-parametric correlation (Kendall's tau τ). In an independent longitudinal cohort, ISI-cal and HOMA-IR were compared for prediction of diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), using ROC curves. The study was conducted in a university academic medical centre. ISI measured by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic glucose clamp, along with anthropometric measurements, biochemical assessment and imaging; incident diabetes and CVD. A combination of fasting insulin, serum triglycerides and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) provided the best estimate of clamp-derived ISI (adjusted R(2) 0.58 versus 0.32 HOMA-IR). In an independent cohort, ROC areas under the curve were 0.77±0.02 ISI-cal versus 0.76±0.02 HOMA-IR (p>0.05) for incident diabetes, and 0.74±0.03 ISI-cal versus 0.61±0.03 HOMA-IR (pHOMA-IR. This may be useful for estimating insulin sensitivity and cardio-metabolic risk in clinical and epidemiological settings.

  5. APPL1 potentiates insulin sensitivity by facilitating the binding of IRS1/2 to the insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jiyoon; Galan, Amanda K; Xin, Xiaoban; Dong, Feng; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Zhou, Lijun; Wang, Changhua; Li, Cuiling; Holmes, Bekke M; Sloane, Lauren B; Austad, Steven N; Guo, Shaodong; Musi, Nicolas; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Deng, Chuxia; White, Morris F; Liu, Feng; Dong, Lily Q

    2014-05-22

    Binding of insulin receptor substrate proteins 1 and 2 (IRS1/2) to the insulin receptor (IR) is essential for the regulation of insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. However, the mechanism of IRS1/2 recruitment to the IR remains elusive. Here, we identify adaptor protein APPL1 as a critical molecule that promotes IRS1/2-IR interaction. APPL1 forms a complex with IRS1/2 under basal conditions, and this complex is then recruited to the IR in response to insulin or adiponectin stimulation. The interaction between APPL1 and IR depends on insulin- or adiponectin-stimulated APPL1 phosphorylation, which is greatly reduced in insulin target tissues in obese mice. appl1 deletion in mice consistently leads to systemic insulin resistance and a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated IRS1/2, but not IR, tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that APPL1 sensitizes insulin signaling by acting at a site downstream of the IR. Our study uncovers a mechanism regulating insulin signaling and crosstalk between the insulin and adiponectin pathways. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. APPL1 Potentiates Insulin Sensitivity by Facilitating the Binding of IRS1/2 to the Insulin Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoon Ryu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Binding of insulin receptor substrate proteins 1 and 2 (IRS1/2 to the insulin receptor (IR is essential for the regulation of insulin sensitivity and energy homeostasis. However, the mechanism of IRS1/2 recruitment to the IR remains elusive. Here, we identify adaptor protein APPL1 as a critical molecule that promotes IRS1/2-IR interaction. APPL1 forms a complex with IRS1/2 under basal conditions, and this complex is then recruited to the IR in response to insulin or adiponectin stimulation. The interaction between APPL1 and IR depends on insulin- or adiponectin-stimulated APPL1 phosphorylation, which is greatly reduced in insulin target tissues in obese mice. appl1 deletion in mice consistently leads to systemic insulin resistance and a significant reduction in insulin-stimulated IRS1/2, but not IR, tyrosine phosphorylation, indicating that APPL1 sensitizes insulin signaling by acting at a site downstream of the IR. Our study uncovers a mechanism regulating insulin signaling and crosstalk between the insulin and adiponectin pathways.

  7. Acute Sleep Restriction Reduces Insulin Sensitivity in Adolescent Boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenberg, Lars; Chaput, Jean-Philippe; Holmbäck, Ulf; Visby, Trine; Jennum, Poul; Nikolic, Miki; Astrup, Arne; Sjödin, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Background: Short sleep duration has been linked to impaired glucose metabolism in many experimental studies. Moreover, studies have reported indications of an increased metabolic stress following sleep restriction. Objective: We aimed to investigate the effects of partial sleep deprivation on markers of glucose metabolism. Additionally, we aimed to investigate if short sleep duration induces a state of endocrine stress. Design: A randomized crossover design, with 2 experimental conditions: 3 consecutive nights of short sleep (SS, 4 h/night) and long sleep (LS, 9 h/night) duration. Subjects and Measurements: In 21 healthy, normal-weight male adolescents (mean ± SD age: 16.8 ± 1.3 y) we measured pre- and post-prandial glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and glucagon concentrations. Furthermore, we measured fasting cortisol, 24-h catecholamines, and sympathovagal balance. Results: Fasting insulin was 59% higher (P = 0.001) in the SS than the LS condition as was both fasting (24%, P sleep duration, whereas 24-h epinephrine was 24% lower (P = 0.013) in the SS condition. Neither daytime nor 24-h sympathovagal balance differed between sleep conditions. Short wave sleep was preserved in the SS condition. Conclusion: Short-term sleep restriction is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity in healthy normal-weight adolescent boys. There were no indications of endocrine stress beyond this. Citation: Klingenberg L; Chaput JP; Holmbäck U; Visby T; Jennum P; Nikolic M; Astrup A; Sjödin A. Acute Sleep Restriction Reduces Insulin Sensitivity in Adolescent Boys. SLEEP 2013;36(7):1085-1090. PMID:23814346

  8. Enhancing Exercise Responsiveness across Prediabetes Phenotypes by Targeting Insulin Sensitivity with Nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Gaitan, Julian M.; Weltman, Arthur; Malin, Steven K.

    2017-01-01

    Exercise is a cornerstone therapy for chronic diseases related to multiorgan insulin resistance. However, not all individuals show the anticipated improvement in insulin sensitivity following exercise and these individuals are considered exercise resistant. Caloric restriction is an approach to enhance the effect of exercise on increasing peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity, as replenishing expended calories blunts these benefits. Alternatively, restricting carbohydrate intake, indepen...

  9. Measuring beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity in youth: Does the hyperglycemic clamp suffice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    To compare beta-cell function relative to insulin sensitivity, disposition index (DI), calculated from two clamps (2cDI, insulin sensitivity from the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and first-phase insulin from the hyperglycemic clamp) with the DI calculated from the hyperglycemic clamp alone (hcD...

  10. The Effect of Acute Exercise on Serum Vaspin Level and Its Relation to Insulin Sensitivity in Overweight Elderly Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabbar Bashiri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vaspin is a new discovered adipocytokine which is a member of serine protease inhibitor family secreted from adipose tissue and might play a role in insulin sensitivity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute exercise on serum vaspin levels and its relation to insulin sensitivity in overweight elderly men. Materials and Methods: In this semi-experimental study, 12 healthy elderly men volunteers randomly selected and performed one session aerobic exercise including 30 minutes of cycling at 70-75% of HRmax, which was followed by 30 minutes of recovery. Three blood samples were taken before exercise, immediately after exercise and after 30 minutes of recovery. Data were analyzed by repeated measure ANOVA and Bonferroni test and Pearson’s correlations were performed to identify possible relationship among the assessed variables. Statistical significance was set at p≤0.05. Results: There were no significant differences for vaspin across time. Insulin and glucose concentration and insulin resistance decreased immediately after exercise. However insulin concentration and insulin resistance returned to pre-exercise level at the end of recovery. Furthermore, no significant correlations were observed among the variables assessed except for the expected between insulin level and insulin resistance. Conclusion: These results indicate that a sub-maximal aerobic workout does not result in significant changes in vaspin levels in elderly men. Furthermore, we observed that vaspin is not associated with insulin sensitivity in this study.

  11. Genome-wide association study of the modified Stumvoll Insulin Sensitivity Index identifies BCL2 and FAM19A2 as novel insulin sensitivity loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walford, Geoffrey A; Gustafsson, Stefan; Rybin, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have found few common variants that influence fasting measures of insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that a GWAS of an integrated assessment of fasting and dynamic measures of insulin sensitivity would detect novel common variants. We performed GWAS of the...

  12. The evolving relationship between adiponectin and insulin sensitivity in hepatitis C patients during viral clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Ling; Kuo, Chia-Jung; Pao, Li-Heng; Hsu, Chen-Ming; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The evolution of the relationship between adiponectin and insulin sensitivity in hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients during viral clearance is unclear and warrants investigation. Methods: A prospective study including 747 consecutive chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients, of whom 546 had completed a course of anti-HCV therapy and underwent pre-, peri- and post-therapy surveys for anthropomorphic, viral, metabolic and hepatic profiles and adiponectin levels, was conducted in a tertiary care center. Results: Multivariate analyses indicated associations of sex, triglyceride levels and hepatic steatosis with adiponectin levels and of triglyceride levels and interferon λ3 (IFNL3) genotype with homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) levels before anti-HCV therapy. In patients with a sustained virological response (SVR; n = 455), at 24 weeks post-therapy, sex, BMI, aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI), HOMA-IR and steatosis were associated with adiponectin levels, and IFNL3 genotype was associated with HOMA-IR levels. GEE analysis demonstrated that SVR affected longitudinal trends in adiponectin levels. Compared with pre-therapy levels, adiponectin and APRI levels decreased 24 weeks post-therapy in SVR patients, regardless of baseline insulin resistance (IR). However, HOMA-IR levels decreased in SVR patients with baseline IR but increased in those without baseline IR. Compared with controls, immunohistochemical studies showed that pre-therapy CHC patients had higher hepatic adiponectin expression associated with hepatic fibrosis. Conclusions: During HCV infection, adiponectin may affect insulin sensitivity through triglycerides. After viral clearance, adiponectin levels were directly associated with insulin sensitivity and decreased upon improved hepatic fibrosis; with a link to the IFNL3 genotype, insulin sensitivity improved only in patients with baseline IR. PMID:28267407

  13. The evolving relationship between adiponectin and insulin sensitivity in hepatitis C patients during viral clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Ling; Kuo, Chia-Jung; Pao, Li-Heng; Hsu, Chen-Ming; Chiu, Cheng-Tang

    2017-10-03

    The evolution of the relationship between adiponectin and insulin sensitivity in hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients during viral clearance is unclear and warrants investigation. A prospective study including 747 consecutive chronic hepatitis C (CHC) patients, of whom 546 had completed a course of anti-HCV therapy and underwent pre-, peri- and post-therapy surveys for anthropomorphic, viral, metabolic and hepatic profiles and adiponectin levels, was conducted in a tertiary care center. Multivariate analyses indicated associations of sex, triglyceride levels and hepatic steatosis with adiponectin levels and of triglyceride levels and interferon λ3 (IFNL3) genotype with homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) levels before anti-HCV therapy. In patients with a sustained virological response (SVR; n = 455), at 24 weeks post-therapy, sex, BMI, aspartate aminotransferase to platelet ratio index (APRI), HOMA-IR and steatosis were associated with adiponectin levels, and IFNL3 genotype was associated with HOMA-IR levels. GEE analysis demonstrated that SVR affected longitudinal trends in adiponectin levels. Compared with pre-therapy levels, adiponectin and APRI levels decreased 24 weeks post-therapy in SVR patients, regardless of baseline insulin resistance (IR). However, HOMA-IR levels decreased in SVR patients with baseline IR but increased in those without baseline IR. Compared with controls, immunohistochemical studies showed that pre-therapy CHC patients had higher hepatic adiponectin expression associated with hepatic fibrosis. During HCV infection, adiponectin may affect insulin sensitivity through triglycerides. After viral clearance, adiponectin levels were directly associated with insulin sensitivity and decreased upon improved hepatic fibrosis; with a link to the IFNL3 genotype, insulin sensitivity improved only in patients with baseline IR.

  14. Hormone-sensitive lipase null mice exhibit signs of impaired insulin sensitivity whereas insulin secretion is intact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulder, Hindrik; Sörhede-Winzell, Maria; Contreras, Juan Antonio

    2003-01-01

    of the HSL gene for glucose homeostasis were examined. HSL null mice were slightly hyperglycemic in the fasted, but not fed state, which was accompanied by moderate hyperinsulinemia. During glucose challenges, however, disposal of the sugar was not affected in HSL null mice, presumably because of release......-stimulated glucose uptake into soleus muscle, and lipogenesis in adipocytes were moderately reduced, suggesting additional sites of insulin resistance. Morphometric analysis of pancreatic islets revealed a doubling of beta-cell mass in HSL null mice, which is consistent with an adaptation to insulin resistance......Lipid metabolism plays an important role in glucose homeostasis under normal and pathological conditions. In adipocytes, skeletal muscle, and pancreatic beta-cells, lipids are mobilized from acylglycerides by the hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). Here, the consequences of a targeted disruption...

  15. Insulin sensitivity in relation to fat distribution and plasma adipocytokines among abusers of anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Jon Jarløv; Schou, Morten; Selmer, Christian; Johansen, Marie Louise; Gustafsson, Finn; Frystyk, Jan; Dela, Flemming; Faber, Jens; Kistorp, Caroline

    2017-09-01

    Abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is prevalent among young men, but information regarding effects on insulin sensitivity and fat distribution is limited. The objective was to investigate insulin sensitivity in relation to fat distribution and adipocytokines among current and former AAS abusers compared with controls. Cross-sectional study among men involved in recreational strength training. Current and former AAS abusers (n=37 and n=33) and controls (n=30) volunteered from the community. We assessed insulin sensitivity by Matsuda index (oral glucose tolerance test). Using overnight fasting blood samples, adiponectin and leptin were measured. Body composition and fat distribution, including visceral adipose tissue (VAT), were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Current and former AAS abusers displayed lower Matsuda index than controls (%-difference (95%CI) from controls, -26% (-45; -1) and -39% (-55; -18)). Testosterone was markedly higher among current AAS abusers and subnormal among former AAS abusers compared with controls. Current AAS abusers displayed higher mean VAT than controls (388 (17) vs 293 (12) cm 3 , Pfat %, adiponectin and leptin concentrations were lower. In contrast, former AAS abusers showed highest leptin concentrations and body fat %. Multivariate linear regressions identified VAT as independent predictor of lower Matsuda index among current AAS abusers compared with controls; while body fat % independently predicted lower Matsuda index among former AAS abusers. Both current and former AAS abusers displayed lower insulin sensitivity which could be mediated by higher VAT and total body fat %, respectively. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The impact of kidney transplantation on insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten B; Hornum, Mads; van Hall, Gerrit

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the impact of kidney transplantation (KTx) on insulin sensitivity affecting glucose metabolism. 9 nondiabetic patients awaiting living donor KTx were examined prior to transplantation with an oral glucose tolerance test and a 3-h hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. The clamp...... was repeated 6 months after KTx. Nine age-, gender- and body mass index (BMI)-matched individuals with normal kidney function served as controls. Endogenous glucose production and glucose disappearance rate (N = 6) were measured in a subgroup of patients with corresponding controls. Results presented as mean...

  17. Intralipid decreases apolipoprotein M levels and insulin sensitivity in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apolipoprotein M (ApoM is a constituent of high-density lipoproteins (HDL. It plays a crucial role in HDL-mediated reverse cholesterol transport. Insulin resistance is associated with decreased ApoM levels. AIMS: To assess the effects of increased free fatty acids (FFAs levels after short-term Intralipid infusion on insulin sensitivity and hepatic ApoM gene expression. METHODS: Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD rats infused with 20% Intralipid solution for 6 h. Glucose infusion rates (GIR were determined by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp during Intralipid infusion and plasma FFA levels were measured by colorimetry. Rats were sacrificed after Intralipid treatment and livers were sampled. Human embryonic kidney 293T cells were transfected with a lentivirus mediated human apoM overexpression system. Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats were injected with the lentiviral vector and insulin tolerance was assessed. Gene expression was assessed by real-time RT-PCR and PCR array. RESULTS: Intralipid increased FFAs by 17.6 folds and GIR was decreased by 27.1% compared to the control group. ApoM gene expression was decreased by 40.4% after Intralipid infusion. PPARβ/δ expression was not changed by Intralipid. Whereas the mRNA levels of Acaca, Acox1, Akt1, V-raf murine sarcoma 3611 viral oncogene homolog, G6pc, Irs2, Ldlr, Map2k1, pyruvate kinase and RBC were significantly increased in rat liver after Intralipid infusion. The Mitogen-activated protein kinase 8 (MAPK8 was significantly down-regulated in 293T cells overexpressing ApoM. Overexpression of human ApoM in GK rats could enhance the glucose-lowering effect of exogenous insulin. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that Intralipid could decrease hepatic ApoM levels. ApoM overexpression may have a potential role in improving insulin resistance in vivo and modulating apoM expression might be a future therapeutic strategy against insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes.

  18. Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) increases glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity in muscle cells via multipathway mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Changkeun; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Jung, Eun-Sun; Seyedian, Ramin; Jo, MiNa; Kim, Jehein; Kim, Jong-Shu; Kim, Euikyung

    2012-12-15

    Saffron (Crocus sativus Linn.) has been an important subject of research in the past two decades because of its various biological properties, including anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and anti-atherosclerotic activities. On the other hand, the molecular bases of its actions have been scarcely understood. Here, we elucidated the mechanism of the hypoglycemic actions of saffron through investigating its signaling pathways associated with glucose metabolism in C(2)C(12) skeletal muscle cells. Saffron strongly enhanced glucose uptake and the phosphorylation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase)/ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) and MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases), but not PI 3-kinase (Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/Akt. Interestingly, the co-treatment of saffron and insulin further improved the insulin sensitivity via both insulin-independent (AMPK/ACC and MAPKs) and insulin-dependent (PI 3-kinase/Akt and mTOR) pathways. It also suggested that there is a crosstalk between the two signaling pathways of glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle cells. These results could be confirmed from the findings of GLUT4 translocation. Taken together, AMPK plays a major role in the effects of saffron on glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle cells. Our study provides important insights for the possible mechanism of action of saffron and its potential as a therapeutic agent in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Insulin-Sensitizing Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Lost in Translation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antigoni Z. Lalia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA of marine origin, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, have been long studied for their therapeutic potential in the context of type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and glucose homeostasis. Glaring discordance between observations in animal and human studies precludes, to date, any practical application of n-3 PUFA as nutritional therapeutics against insulin resistance in humans. Our objective in this review is to summarize current knowledge and provide an up-to-date commentary on the therapeutic value of EPA and DHA supplementation for improving insulin sensitivity in humans. We also sought to discuss potential mechanisms of n-3 PUFA action in target tissues, in specific skeletal muscle, based on our recent work, as well as in liver and adipose tissue. We conducted a literature search to include all preclinical and clinical studies performed within the last two years and to comment on representative studies published earlier. Recent studies support a growing consensus that there are beneficial effects of n-3 PUFA on insulin sensitivity in rodents. Observational studies in humans are encouraging, however, the vast majority of human intervention studies fail to demonstrate the benefit of n-3 PUFA in type 2 diabetes or insulin-resistant non-diabetic people. Nevertheless, there are still several unanswered questions regarding the potential impact of n-3 PUFA on metabolic function in humans.

  20. [Primary study on characteristics of insulin secretion rate, metabolic clearance rate and sensitivity in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects from multiplex diabetic pedigrees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, J; Cheng, H; Li, F

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the characteristics of insulin secretion rate (ISR), metabolic clearance rate (MCR-I) and sensitivity and to explore their relationship with obesity in non-insulin-dependent diabetic subjects from multiplex diabetic pedigrees (MDP). Fifteen subjects with normal glucose tolerance and 11 non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients from MDP were included in the study. Frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test (FSIVGTT) was performed. Glucose, insulin (INS) and connecting-peptide (C-P) concentrations were measured. A computer procedure devised by our laboratory was used to calculate the value of ISR at each time point, then MCR-I was acquired. Insulin sensitivity index (SI) was calculated according to minimal model technique about glucose in FSIVGTT. The ISR curve in control group was biphasic, while in non-insulin. In non-insulin-dependent diabetic group, areas under the curves of C-P (AUCC) and ISR level (AUCS) measured during 0 approximately 16 min were 7.9 nmol.min(-1).L(-1) +/- 2.8 nmol.min(-1).L(-1), and 6.1 nmol +/- 2.2 nmol, respectively, which were significantly lower than those in control group 17.7 nmol.min(-1).L(-1) +/- 4.92 nmol.min(-1).L(-1) and 12.3 nmol +/- 3.9 nmol (P < 0.01). The two parameters were slightly higher than those in control group 155 nmol.min(-1).L(-1) +/- 44 nmol.min(-1).L(-1) vs 101 nmol.min(-1).L(-1) +/- 30 nmol.min(-1).L(-1) and 76 nmol +/- 26 nmol vs 54 nmol +/- 20.0 nmol (P < 0.05)measured during 16 approximately 180 min. There was no significant difference, between the two groups about the amount of insulin secretion during 3 hours (82 nmol +/- 28nmol vs 68 nmol +/- 21 nmol, P = 0.2). In control group, there were significant positive correlation, between AUCS, waist-hip ratio (WHR), and body surface area, (BSA) and significant negative correlation between MCR-I, SI and WHR, BSA (P < 0.01), and also between MCR-I and SI. In non-insulin-dependent diabetic group, AUCS were significantly correlated with body mass

  1. Enhanced muscle insulin sensitivity after contraction/exercise is mediated by AMPK

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøbsted, Rasmus; Munk-Hansen, Nanna; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2017-01-01

    Earlier studies have demonstrated that muscle insulin sensitivity to stimulate glucose uptake is enhanced several hours after an acute bout of exercise. Using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-ribonucleotide (AICAR), we recently demonstrated that prior activation of AMPK is sufficient to increase...... muscle and whole body insulin sensitivity in wild type (WT) mice, respectively. These effects were not found in AMPKα1α2 muscle-specific knockout mice. Prior in situ contraction did not increase insulin sensitivity in m. soleus from either genotype. Improvement in muscle insulin sensitivity...... was not associated with enhanced glycogen synthase activity or proximal insulin signaling. However, in WT EDL muscle prior in situ contraction enhanced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of TBC1D4 Thr(649) and Ser(711) Such findings are also evident in prior exercised and insulin sensitized human skeletal muscle...

  2. Down-regulation of Risa improves insulin sensitivity by enhancing autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuangao; Hu, Yanan; Sun, Chenxia; Zhuo, Shu; He, Zhishui; Wang, Hui; Yan, Menghong; Liu, Jun; Luan, Yi; Dai, Changgui; Yang, Yonggang; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Ben; Zhang, Fang; Zhai, Qiwei

    2016-09-01

    It has been reported that some small noncoding RNAs are involved in the regulation of insulin sensitivity. However, whether long noncoding RNAs also participate in the regulation of insulin sensitivity is still largely unknown. We identified and characterized a long noncoding RNA, regulator of insulin sensitivity and autophagy (Risa), which is a poly(A)(+) cytoplasmic RNA. Overexpression of Risa in mouse primary hepatocytes or C2C12 myotubes attenuated insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of insulin receptor, Akt, and Gsk3β, and knockdown of Risa alleviated insulin resistance. Further studies showed that overexpression of Risa in hepatocytes or myotubes decreased autophagy, and knockdown of Risa up-regulated autophagy. Moreover, knockdown of Atg7 or -5 significantly inhibited the effect of knockdown of Risa on insulin resistance, suggesting that knockdown of Risa alleviated insulin resistance via enhancing autophagy. In addition, tail vein injection of adenovirus to knock down Risa enhanced insulin sensitivity and hepatic autophagy in both C57BL/6 and ob/ob mice. Taken together, the data demonstrate that Risa regulates insulin sensitivity by affecting autophagy and suggest that Risa is a potential target for treating insulin-resistance-related diseases.-Wang, Y., Hu, Y., Sun, C., Zhuo, S., He, Z., Wang, H., Yan, M., Liu, J., Luan, Y., Dai, C., Yang, Y., Huang, R., Zhou, B., Zhang, F., Zhai, Q. Down-regulation of Risa improves insulin sensitivity by enhancing autophagy. © FASEB.

  3. Insulin sensitizers prevent fine particulate matter-induced vascular insulin resistance and changes in endothelial progenitor cell homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberzettl, Petra; McCracken, James P; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Conklin, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to fine particular matter (PM2.5) increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and Type 2 diabetes. Because blood vessels are sensitive targets of air pollutant exposure, we examined the effects of concentrated ambient PM2.5 (CAP) on vascular insulin sensitivity and circulating levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which reflect cardiovascular health. We found that CAP exposure for 9 days decreased insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in the aorta of mice maintained on control diet. This change was accompanied by the induction of IL-1β and increases in the abundance of cleaved IL-18 and p10 subunit of Casp-1, consistent with the activation of the inflammasome pathway. CAP exposure also suppressed circulating levels of EPCs (Flk-1(+)/Sca-1(+) cells), while enhancing the bone marrow abundance of these cells. Although similar changes in vascular insulin signaling and EPC levels were observed in mice fed high-fat diet, CAP exposure did not exacerbate diet-induced changes in vascular insulin resistance or EPC homeostasis. Treatment with an insulin sensitizer, metformin or rosiglitazone, prevented CAP-induced vascular insulin resistance and NF-κB and inflammasome activation and restored peripheral blood and bone marrow EPC levels. These findings suggest that PM2.5 exposure induces diet-independent vascular insulin resistance and inflammation and prevents EPC mobilization, and that this EPC mobilization defect could be mediated by vascular insulin resistance. Impaired vascular insulin sensitivity may be an important mechanism underlying PM2.5-induced vascular injury, and pharmacological sensitization to insulin action could potentially prevent deficits in vascular repair and mitigate vascular inflammation due to exposure to elevated levels of ambient air pollution. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  4. The effect of strength and endurance training on insulin sensitivity and fat distribution in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with lipodystrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, B; Hansen, T; Hvid, T

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Fat redistribution, insulin resistance, and low-grade inflammation characterize HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy. Currently, no effective therapies exist for the combined treatment of fat redistribution and insulin resistance. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to evaluate the effects...... endpoints were improved peripheral insulin sensitivity (euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with isotope-tracer infusion) and body fat composition (dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan). Secondary endpoints included fasting lipids and inflammatory markers. RESULTS: Insulin-mediated glucose uptake...... and increased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P improve peripheral insulin sensitivity, whereas only strength training reduces total body fat in HIV-infected patients with lipodystrophy....

  5. The Effect of a Diet Moderately High in Protein and Fiber on Insulin Sensitivity Measured Using the Dynamic Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion Test (DISST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Te Morenga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Evidence shows that weight loss improves insulin sensitivity but few studies have examined the effect of macronutrient composition independently of weight loss on direct measures of insulin sensitivity. We randomised 89 overweight or obese women to either a standard diet (StdD, that was intended to be low in fat and relatively high in carbohydrate (n = 42 or to a relatively high protein (up to 30% of energy, relatively high fibre (>30 g/day diet (HPHFib (n = 47 for 10 weeks. Advice regarding strict adherence to energy intake goals was not given. Insulin sensitivity and secretion was assessed by a novel method—the Dynamic Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion Test (DISST. Although there were significant improvements in body composition and most cardiometabolic risk factors on HPHFib, insulin sensitivity was reduced by 19.3% (95% CI: 31.8%, 4.5%; p = 0.013 in comparison with StdD. We conclude that the reduction in insulin sensitivity after a diet relatively high in both protein and fibre, despite cardiometabolic improvements, suggests insulin sensitivity may reflect metabolic adaptations to dietary composition for maintenance of glucose homeostasis, rather than impaired metabolism.

  6. Associations of reallocating sitting time into standing or stepping with glucose, insulin and insulin sensitivity: a cross-sectional analysis of adults at risk of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwardson, Charlotte L; Henson, Joe; Bodicoat, Danielle H; Bakrania, Kishan; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie J; Yates, Thomas

    2017-01-13

    To quantify associations between sitting time and glucose, insulin and insulin sensitivity by considering reallocation of time into standing or stepping. Cross-sectional. Leicestershire, UK, 2013. Adults aged 30-75 years at high risk of impaired glucose regulation (IGR) or type 2 diabetes. 435 adults (age 66.8±7.4 years; 61.7% male; 89.2% white European) were included. Participants wore an activPAL3 monitor 24 hours/day for 7 days to capture time spent sitting, standing and stepping. Fasting and 2-hour postchallenge glucose and insulin were assessed; insulin sensitivity was calculated by Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Secretion (HOMA-IS) and Matsuda-Insulin Sensitivity Index (Matsuda-ISI). Isotemporal substitution regression modelling was used to quantify associations of substituting 30 min of waking sitting time (accumulated in prolonged (≥30 min) or short (sitting to short sitting time and to standing was associated with 4% lower fasting insulin and 4% higher HOMA-IS; reallocation of prolonged sitting to standing was also associated with a 5% higher Matsuda-ISI. Reallocation to stepping was associated with 5% lower 2-hour glucose, 7% lower fasting insulin, 13% lower 2-hour insulin and a 9% and 16% higher HOMA-IS and Matsuda-ISI, respectively. Reallocation of short sitting time to stepping was associated with 5% and 10% lower 2-hour glucose and 2-hour insulin and 12% higher Matsuda-ISI. Results were not modified by IGR status or sex. Reallocating a small amount of short or prolonged sitting time with standing or stepping may improve 2-hour glucose, fasting and 2-hour insulin and insulin sensitivity. Findings should be confirmed through prospective and intervention research. ISRCTN31392913, Post-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Effect of Dapagliflozin With and Without Acipimox on Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Secretion in T2DM Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merovci, Aurora; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad; Mari, Andrea; Solis-Herrera, Carolina; Xiong, Juan; Daniele, Giuseppe; Tripathy, Devjit; DeFronzo, Ralph A

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the effect of lowering the plasma glucose and free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations with dapagliflozin and acipimox, respectively, on insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in T2DM individuals. Fourteen male T2DM patients received an oral glucose tolerance test and euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp at baseline and were treated for 3 weeks with dapagliflozin (10 mg per day). During week 3, acipimox (250 mg four times per day) treatment was added to dapagliflozin. The oral glucose tolerance test and insulin clamp were repeated at the end of weeks 2 and 3. Dapagliflozin caused glucosuria and significantly lowered the plasma glucose concentration (by 35 mg/dL; P insulin-mediated glucose disposal increased significantly at week 2 (from 4.48 ± 0.50 to 5.30 ± 0.50 mg/kg · min; P insulin-mediated glucose disposal at week 3 (after the addition of acipimox) did not differ significantly from that at week 2. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion at week 2 increased significantly compared to baseline, and it increased further and significantly at week 3 compared to week 2. Lowering the plasma glucose concentration with dapagliflozin improves both insulin sensitivity and β-cell function, whereas lowering plasma FFA concentration by addition of acipimox to dapagliflozin improves β-cell function without significantly affecting insulin sensitivity.

  8. Effect of Low Salt Diet on Insulin Resistance in Salt Sensitive versus Salt Resistant Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt sensitive versus salt resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after one week of high salt (200 mmol/day Na) and one week of low salt (10 mmol/day Na) diet. Salt sensitivit...

  9. Enhanced insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in young lambs with placental insufficiency-induced intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Leticia E; Chen, Xiaochuan; Hay, William W; Limesand, Sean W

    2017-08-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with persistent metabolic complications, but information is limited for IUGR infants. We determined glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) and insulin sensitivity in young lambs with placental insufficiency-induced IUGR. Lambs with hyperthermia-induced IUGR ( n = 7) were compared with control lambs ( n = 8). GSIS was measured at 8 ± 1 days of age, and at 15 ± 1 days, body weight-specific glucose utilization rates were measured with radiolabeled d-glucose during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HEC). IUGR lambs weighed 23% less ( P insulin concentrations were not different between IUGR and controls for either study. First-phase insulin secretion was enhanced 2.3-fold in IUGR lambs compared with controls. However, second-phase insulin concentrations, glucose-potentiated arginine-stimulated insulin secretion, and β-cell mass were not different, indicating that IUGR β-cells have an intrinsic enhancement in acute GSIS. Compared with controls, IUGR lambs had higher body weight-specific glucose utilization rates and greater insulin sensitivity at fasting (1.6-fold) and hyperinsulinemic periods (2.4-fold). Improved insulin sensitivity for glucose utilization was not due to differences in skeletal muscle insulin receptor and glucose transporters 1 and 4 concentrations. Plasma lactate concentrations during HEC were elevated in IUGR lambs compared with controls, but no differences were found for glycogen content or citrate synthase activity in liver and muscle. Greater insulin sensitivity for glucose utilization and enhanced acute GSIS in young lambs are predicted from fetal studies but may promote conditions that exaggerate glucose disposal and lead to episodes of hypoglycemia in IUGR infants. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Cinnamon improves insulin sensitivity and alters body composition in an animal model of the metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyphenols from cinnamon (CN) have been described recently as insulin sensitizers and antioxidants, but their effects on the glucose/insulin system in vivo have not been totally investigated. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of CN on insulin resistance and body composition, using ...

  11. Lipid droplet size and location in human skeletal muscle fibers are associated with insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim; Christensen, Anders E; Nellemann, Birgitte

    2017-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, an accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs) in the subsarcolemmal space is associated with insulin resistance, but the underlying mechanism is not clear. We aimed to investigate how the size, number and location of LDs are associated with insulin sensitivity and muscle fiber types...... are associated with insulin resistance in skeletal muscle....

  12. Insulin Sensitivity Determines Effects of Insulin and Meal Ingestion on Systemic Vascular Resistance in Healthy Subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; Meijer, Rick I; Eringa, Etto C; Hoekstra, T.; Smulders, Yvo M; Serné, Erik H

    OBJECTIVE: In addition to insulin's metabolic actions, insulin can dilate arterioles which increase blood flow to metabolically active tissues. This effect is blunted in insulin-resistant subjects. Insulin's effect on SVR, determined by resistance arterioles, has, however, rarely been examined

  13. Q192R Paraoxonase (PON)1 Polymorphism, Insulin Sensitivity, and Endothelial Function in Essential Hypertensive Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Omo, Giulia; Penno, Giuseppe; Pucci, Laura; Lucchesi, Daniela; Del Prato, Stefano; Pedrinelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Essential hypertension is characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation harmful for insulin sensitivity and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasomotor function, a noxious effect that paraoxonase (PON)1, an antioxidant circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-bound esterase, may counteract. The PON1 gene contains several polymorphisms including a glutamine (Q) to arginine (R) transition at position 192 encoding circulating allozymes with higher antioxidant activity that might influence both parameters. Q192R was determined by polymerase chain reaction in 72 never-treated, glucose-tolerant, uncomplicated essential hypertensive men. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and endothelial function by forearm vasodilation (strain-gage venous plethysmography) to intra-arterial acetylcholine (ACH) with sodium nitroprusside (NIP) as a NO-independent control. Additional evaluation variables included 24-hour blood pressure (BP), lipids, BMI, smoking status, and metabolic syndrome (MetS) by Adult Treatment Panel (ATP)-III criteria. R192 was considered as the rare allele, and its associations analyzed by dominant models (Q/Q vs. Q/R + R/R). Genotype frequencies were consistent with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. HOMA was lower and insulin resistance (the upper fourth of HOMA values distribution) less prevalent in Q/R + R/R carriers in whom ACH-mediated vasodilatation was greater and endothelial dysfunction (the bottom fourth of ACH(AUC) values distribution) less frequent than in Q/Q homozygotes. Q192R polymorphism and MetS were unrelated parameters despite their common association with insulin resistance. 24-hour BP, BMI, lipids, and smoking habits were homogeneously distributed across genotypes. Q192R polymorphism associates differentially with insulin sensitivity and endothelial function in essential hypertensive men.

  14. Q192R Paraoxonase (PON)1 Polymorphism, Insulin Sensitivity, and Endothelial Function in Essential Hypertensive Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell’Omo, Giulia; Penno, Giuseppe; Pucci, Laura; Lucchesi, Daniela; Prato, Stefano Del; Pedrinelli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    AIMS Essential hypertension is characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation harmful for insulin sensitivity and nitric oxide (NO)-mediated vasomotor function, a noxious effect that paraoxonase (PON)1, an antioxidant circulating high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-bound esterase, may counteract. The PON1 gene contains several polymorphisms including a glutamine (Q) to arginine (R) transition at position 192 encoding circulating allozymes with higher antioxidant activity that might influence both parameters. METHODS Q192R was determined by polymerase chain reaction in 72 never-treated, glucose-tolerant, uncomplicated essential hypertensive men. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and endothelial function by forearm vasodilation (strain-gage venous plethysmography) to intra-arterial acetylcholine (ACH) with sodium nitroprusside (NIP) as a NO-independent control. Additional evaluation variables included 24-hour blood pressure (BP), lipids, BMI, smoking status, and metabolic syndrome (MetS) by Adult Treatment Panel (ATP)-III criteria. R192 was considered as the rare allele, and its associations analyzed by dominant models (Q/Q vs. Q/R + R/R). RESULTS Genotype frequencies were consistent with the Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium. HOMA was lower and insulin resistance (the upper fourth of HOMA values distribution) less prevalent in Q/R + R/R carriers in whom ACH-mediated vasodilatation was greater and endothelial dysfunction (the bottom fourth of ACHAUC values distribution) less frequent than in Q/Q homozygotes. Q192R polymorphism and MetS were unrelated parameters despite their common association with insulin resistance. 24-hour BP, BMI, lipids, and smoking habits were homogeneously distributed across genotypes. CONCLUSIONS Q192R polymorphism associates differentially with insulin sensitivity and endothelial function in essential hypertensive men. PMID:25089090

  15. Effect of body weight gain on insulin sensitivity after retirement from exercise training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolkas, Constantine B.; Rodnick, Kenneth J.; Mondon, Carl E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of the body-weight gain after retirement from an exercise-training program on the retained increase in insulin sensitivity elicited by the training was investigated in exercise-trained (ET) rats. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by oral glucose tolerance and insulin suppression tests immediately after training and during retirement. Results show that, compared with sedentary controls, exercise training enhanced insulin-induced glucose uptake, but the enhanced sensitivity was gradually lost with the end of running activity until after seven days of retirement, when it became equal to that of controls. This loss of enhanced sensitivity to insulin was associated with an accelerated gain in body weight beginning one day after the start of retirement. However, those animals that gained weight only at rates similar to those of control rats, retained their enhanced sensitivity to insulin.

  16. Validation of different measures of insulin sensitivity of glucose metabolism in dairy cows using the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp test as the gold standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koster, J; Hostens, M; Hermans, K; Van den Broeck, W; Opsomer, G

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present research was to compare different measures of insulin sensitivity in dairy cows at the end of the dry period. To do so, 10 clinically healthy dairy cows with a varying body condition score were selected. By performing hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (HEC) tests, we previously demonstrated a negative association between the insulin sensitivity and insulin responsiveness of glucose metabolism and the body condition score of these animals. In the same animals, other measures of insulin sensitivity were determined and the correlation with the HEC test, which is considered as the gold standard, was calculated. Measures derived from the intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) are based on the disappearance of glucose after an intravenous glucose bolus. Glucose concentrations during the IVGTT were used to calculate the area under the curve of glucose and the clearance rate of glucose. In addition, glucose and insulin data from the IVGTT were fitted in the minimal model to derive the insulin sensitivity parameter, Si. Based on blood samples taken before the start of the IVGTT, basal concentrations of glucose, insulin, NEFA, and β-hydroxybutyrate were determined and used to calculate surrogate indices for insulin sensitivity, such as the homeostasis model of insulin resistance, the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, the revised quantitative insulin sensitivity check index and the revised quantitative insulin sensitivity check index including β-hydroxybutyrate. Correlation analysis revealed no association between the results obtained by the HEC test and any of the surrogate indices for insulin sensitivity. For the measures derived from the IVGTT, the area under the curve for the first 60 min of the test and the Si derived from the minimal model demonstrated good correlation with the gold standard. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Determining pancreatic β-cell compensation for changing insulin sensitivity using an oral glucose tolerance test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, Thomas; Malin, Steven K; Karstoft, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    Plasma glucose, insulin, and C-peptide responses during an OGTT are informative for both research and clinical practice in type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to use such information to determine insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion so as to calculate an oral glucose disposition index...... used to determine oral glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSISOGTT), and DIOGTT was calculated as the product of SI OGTT and GSISOGTT. Our novel SI OGTT showed high agreement with clamp-derived insulin sensitivity (typical error = +3.6%; r = 0.69, P

  18. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin-resistant individ......Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin...

  19. Enhanced insulin sensitivity in prepubertal children with constitutional delay of growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Dyanne A; Hofman, Paul L; Miles, Harriet L; Sato, Tim A; Billett, Nathalie E; Robinson, Elizabeth M; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2010-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that prepubertal children with presumed constitutional delay of growth and development (CDGD) have enhanced insulin sensitivity and, therefore, insulin sensitivity is associated with later onset of puberty. Twenty-one prepubertal children with presumed CDGD and 23 prepubertal control children, underwent a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test to evaluate insulin sensitivity and other markers of insulin, glucose, and growth regulation. Children in the CDGD group were shorter and leaner than control subjects. Children with presumed CDGD were 40% more insulin sensitive (17.0 x 10(-4) min(-1)/[mU/L] versus 12.1 x 10(-4) min(-1)/[mU/L]; P = .0006) and had reduced acute insulin response, thus maintaining euglycemia (216 mU/L versus 330 mU/L; P = .02) compared with control subjects. In addition, the CDGD group had lower serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 levels (3333 ng/mL versus 3775 ng/mL; P = .0004) and a trend toward lower serum insulin-like growth factor-II levels (794 ng/mL versus 911 ng/mL; P = .06). Prepubertal children with presumed CDGD have enhanced insulin sensitivity, supporting the hypothesis that insulin sensitivity is associated with timing of puberty. It may signify long-term biological advantages with lower risk of metabolic syndrome and malignancy. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. pH sensitive insulin-loaded nanohydrogel increases the effect of oral insulin in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnoosh-Yamchi, Jalil; Rahmati-Yamchi, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Davaran, Soodabeh; Ostad Rahimi, Ali Reza; Garnoosh, Khalil; Bahmani, Zahra; Ashoori, Mohammad; Mobasseri, Majid

    2017-09-01

    There are different methods for insulin administration in diabetic patient. Nano-hydrogel is one of the most talented drug carrier for its sensitivity to environmental stimulus. NIPAAm-MAA-HEM copolymers were synthesized by radical chain reaction. The copolymers were characterized with Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transient electron microscopy (TEM). Copolymers were loaded with regular insulin by modified double emulsion method. Diabetic rats are used for feeding insulin-loaded nanohydrogel. Analysis of the results from the measurement of the amount of blood insulin from the rats blood that received insulin in nanohydrogel loaded form compared with rats that received pure insulin is significantly high, which confirm that insulin has been able to pass from the stomach acid barrier by nanohydrogel and is absorbed from the intestine. Blood sugar levels from tested rats indicate that with increasing amount of insulin, blood sugar levels fall down. Our study confirms that insulin has been able to pass from the stomach acid barrier by nanohydrogel and be absorbed from the intestine.

  1. Insulin Sensitivity and Mortality Risk Estimation in Patients with Type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-15

    Jul 15, 2016 ... Keskin M, Kurtogu S, Kendira M, Atabek ME, Yazici C. Homeostasis model assessment is more reliable than fasting glucose/insulin ratio and quantitative insulin check index for assessing insulin resistance among obese children and adolescents. Paediatrics 2005;115:e500‑3. 8. Levey AS, Bosch JP, Lewis ...

  2. Role of PKCδ in Insulin Sensitivity and Skeletal Muscle Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Mengyao; Vienberg, Sara G; Bezy, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    metabolism by generating mice in which PKCδ was deleted specifically in muscle using Cre-lox recombination. Deletion of PKCδ in muscle improved insulin signaling in young mice, especially at low insulin doses; however, this did not change glucose tolerance or insulin tolerance tests done with pharmacological...

  3. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Ricardo K; Brito, Gleisson A P; Coelho, Isabela; Pequitto, Danielle C T; Yamaguchi, Adriana A; Borghetti, Gina; Schiessel, Dalton Luiz; Kryczyk, Marcelo; Machado, Juliano; Rocha, Ricelli E R; Aikawa, Julia; Iagher, Fabiola; Naliwaiko, Katya; Tanhoffer, Ricardo A; Nunes, Everson A; Fernandes, Luiz Claudio

    2011-04-28

    Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g body weight) was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C), coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO), fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO), obese control group (Ob), coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO) and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO). Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day) for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Obese animals (Ob) presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt) showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO) similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30%) and triacylglycerol (TG; 33%) compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day) was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms.

  4. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iagher Fabiola

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Methods Monosodium glutamate (MSG (4 mg/g body weight was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C, coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO, fish oil-treated normal weight group (FO, obese control group (Ob, coconut fat-treated obese group (ObCO and fish oil-treated obese group (ObFO. Obese insulin-resistant rats were supplemented with fish oil or coconut fat (1 g/kg/day for 4 weeks. Insulin sensitivity, fasting blood biochemicals parameters, and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism were analyzed. Results Obese animals (Ob presented higher Index Lee and 2.5 fold epididymal and retroperitoneal adipose tissue than C. Insulin sensitivity test (Kitt showed that fish oil supplementation was able to maintain insulin sensitivity of obese rats (ObFO similar to C. There were no changes in glucose and HDL-cholesterol levels amongst groups. Yet, ObFO revealed lower levels of total cholesterol (TC; 30% and triacylglycerol (TG; 33% compared to Ob. Finally, since exposed to insulin, ObFO skeletal muscle revealed an increase of 10% in lactate production, 38% in glycogen synthesis and 39% in oxidation of glucose compared to Ob. Conclusions Low dose of fish oil supplementation (1 g/kg/day was able to reduce TC and TG levels, in addition to improved systemic and muscle insulin sensitivity. These results lend credence to the benefits of n-3 fatty acids upon the deleterious effects of insulin resistance mechanisms.

  5. Associations between the intake of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and measures of insulin sensitivity and beta cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loopstra-Masters, R C; Liese, A D; Haffner, S M; Wagenknecht, L E; Hanley, A J

    2011-02-01

    Although protective relationships between coffee consumption and type 2 diabetes mellitus have consistently been observed, few studies have examined the relationships between coffee consumption and underlying pathophysiological defects that characterise diabetes aetiology. The aim of this study was to explore the associations between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption and measures of insulin sensitivity and secretion. The study population included 954 multi-ethnic non-diabetic adults from the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study (IRAS). Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the cross-sectional relationships between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee intake and insulin sensitivity and acute insulin response, measured by a frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance test, 2 h postload glucose measured by OGTT, fasting insulin, and proinsulin to C-peptide ratios. Caffeinated coffee intake was positively associated with insulin sensitivity (β = 0.054; SE = 0.026; p = 0.04) and inversely related to 2 h postload glucose (β = -0.37; SE = 0.10; p = 0.0003) in fully adjusted models. Caffeinated coffee intake was not associated with acute insulin response or proinsulin ratios. Decaffeinated coffee intake was inversely related to 2 h postload glucose (β = -0.47; SE = 0.18; p = 0.0096) and positively related to acute insulin response (β = 0.191; SE = 0.077; p = 0.0132). Decaffeinated coffee intake was inversely related to the ratios of both intact and split proinsulin to C-peptide (β = -0.150; SE = 0.061; p = 0.0148; β = -0.254; SE = 0.068; p = 0.0002, respectively). In this cross-sectional study, caffeinated coffee was positively related to insulin sensitivity and decaffeinated coffee was favourably related to measures of beta cell function. These results provide pathophysiological insight as to how coffee could impact the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  6. The effect of noise exposure on insulin sensitivity in mice may be mediated by the JNK/IRS1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijie; Fang, Cong; Yang, Jing; Zhang, Hongyu; Huang, Yi; Xuan, Chuanying; Wang, Yongfang; Li, Shengwei; Sha, Jun; Zha, Mingming; Guo, Min

    2018-02-12

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that noise exposure may increase the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and experimental studies have demonstrated that noise exposure can induce insulin resistance in rodents. The aim of the present study was to explore noise-induced processes underlying impaired insulin sensitivity in mice. Male ICR mice were randomly divided into four groups: a control group without noise exposure and three noise groups exposed to white noise at a 95-dB sound pressure level for 4 h/day for 1, 10, or 20 days (N1D, N10D, and N20D, respectively). Systemic insulin sensitivity was evaluated at 1 day, 1 week, and 1 month post-noise exposure (1DPN, 1WPN, and 1MPN) via insulin tolerance tests (ITTs). Several insulin-related processes, including the phosphorylation of Akt, IRS1, and JNK in the animals' skeletal muscles, were examined using standard immunoblots. Biomarkers of inflammation (circulating levels of TNF-α and IL-6) and oxidative stress (SOD and CAT activities and MDA levels in skeletal muscles) were measured via chemical analyses. The data obtained in this study showed the following: (1) The impairment of systemic insulin sensitivity was transient in the N1D group but prolonged in the N10D and N20D groups. (2) Noise exposure led to enhanced JNK phosphorylation and IRS1 serine phosphorylation as well as reduced Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscles in response to exogenous insulin stimulation. (3) Plasma levels of TNF-α and IL-6, CAT activity, and MDA concentrations in skeletal muscles were elevated after 20 days of noise exposure. Impaired insulin sensitivity in noise-exposed mice might be mediated by an enhancement of the JNK/IRS1 pathway. Inflammation and oxidative stress might contribute to insulin resistance after chronic noise exposure.

  7. Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Resistance in Non-Diabetic Middle-Aged Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archontogeorgis, K; Papanas, N; Nena, E; Tzouvelekis, A; Tsigalou, C; Voulgaris, A; Xanthoudaki, M; Mouemin, T; Froudarakis, M; Steiropoulos, P

    2017-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome ( OSAS) has been linked with abnormal glucose metabolism, insulin resistance (IR) and development of diabetes mellitus. Non-diabetic patients (n=69) with OSAS, diagnosed by polysomnography, were prospectively recruited. To evaluate IR among OSAS patients, the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) and Insulin sensitivity by Quantitative Insulin sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI) were used. HOMA-IR was positively associated with body-mass index (BMI) (ρ=0.364, p=0.002), time with oxyhaemoglobin saturation HOMA-IR was associated with sleep stage transitions, time with oxyhaemoglobin saturation <90%, average oxyhaemoglobin saturation, minimum oxyhaemoglobin saturation and arousal index. QUICKI was associated with oxygen desaturation index, sleep stage transitions, ESS score, minimum oxyhaemoglobin saturation and arousal index. An independent association between OSAS and IR in patients without pre-existing diabetes mellitus was observed. Recurrent hypoxia and sleep fragmentation in OSAS are associated with IR in these patients.

  8. Lack of effect of long-term amlodipine on insulin sensitivity and plasma insulin in obese patients with essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Courten, Maximilian; Ferrari, P; Schneider, M

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of long-term treatment antihypertensive with the dihydropyridine calcium antagonist amlodipine on insulin sensitivity, plasma insulin, and lipoprotein metabolism in obese hypertensive patients. We measured the insulin sensitivity index (SI), determined by the Minimal Model...... Method of Bergman, fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentrations, serum total triglyceride and lipoprotein cholesterol fractions, and blood pressure in 20 obese, non-diabetic patients with essential hypertension before and after 6 weeks of placebo and again after 6 months of amlodipine. Ten patients...... [mean body mass index (BMI) 30.2 kg.m-2] had been on prior treatment with a thiazide diuretic in low dosage and/or a beta-adrenoceptor blocker (group A), and 10 matched patients [BMI 31.8 kg.m-2] had been previously untreated (group B). Amlodipine was started in a dose of 5 mg and was increased to 10 mg...

  9. mTORC2 Regulation of Muscle Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian

    and skeletal muscle to take up blood glucose, ultimately lowering blood glucose levels. A hallmark of T2D is decreased organ sensitivity to the effects of the insulin. Therefore, an early event in the pathogenesis of T2D is an increase in insulin secretion in response to eating a meal, as more insulin...... that are initiated by insulin binding to its receptor on the muscle’s plasma membrane. The recently discovered mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) has been implicated as an integral member of this signaling chain and therefore might be necessary for insulin stimulated GLUT4 translocation and therefore...... is required to lower blood glucose levels. If insulin sensitivity is chronically decreased, this can stress the pancreas to the point of organ failure in genetically susceptible individuals, who therefore are unable to produce sufficient amounts of insulin. This highlights a) the importance of understanding...

  10. Insulin's acute effects on glomerular filtration rate correlate with insulin sensitivity whereas insulin's acute effects on proximal tubular sodium reabsorption correlate with salt sensitivity in normal subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Maaten, JC; Bakker, SJL; Serne, EH; ter Wee, PM; Gans, ROB

    1999-01-01

    Background. Insulin induces increasing distal tubular sodium reabsorption. Opposite effects of insulin to offset insulin-induced sodium retention are supposedly increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and decreases in proximal tubular sodium reabsorption. Defects in these opposing effects

  11. IRS2 and PTEN are key molecules in controlling insulin sensitivity in podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Beatriz; Marquez, Eva; Lay, Abigail; Carew, RoseaMarie M; González-Rodríguez, Águeda; Welsh, Gavin I; Ni, Lan; Hale, Lorna J; Ortiz, Alberto; Saleem, Moin A; Brazil, Derek P; Coward, Richard J; Valverde, Ángela M

    2015-12-01

    Insulin signaling to the glomerular podocyte is important for normal kidney function and is implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN). This study determined the role of the insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) in this system. Conditionally immortalized murine podocytes were generated from wild-type (WT) and insulin receptor substrate 2-deficient mice (Irs2(-/-)). Insulin signaling, glucose transport, cellular motility and cytoskeleton rearrangement were then analyzed. Within the glomerulus IRS2 is enriched in the podocyte and is preferentially phosphorylated by insulin in comparison to IRS1. Irs2(-/-) podocytes are significantly insulin resistant in respect to AKT signaling, insulin-stimulated GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake, filamentous actin (F-actin) cytoskeleton remodeling and cell motility. Mechanistically, we discovered that Irs2 deficiency causes insulin resistance through up-regulation of the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). Importantly, suppressing PTEN in Irs2(-/-) podocytes rescued insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, this study has identified for the first time IRS2 as a critical molecule for sensitizing the podocyte to insulin actions through its ability to modulate PTEN expression. This finding reveals two potential molecular targets in the podocyte for modulating insulin sensitivity and treating DN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dissociation of in vitro sensitivities of glucose transport and antilipolysis to insulin in NIDDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yki-Jaervinen, H.; Kubo, K.; Zawadzki, J.; Lillioja, S.; Young, A.; Abbott, W.; Foley, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    It is unclear from previous studies whether qualitative or only quantitative differences exist in insulin action in adipocytes obtained from obese subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) when compared with equally obese nondiabetic subjects. In addition, the role of changes in insulin binding as a cause of insulin resistance in NIDDM is still controversial. The authors compared the sensitivities of [ 14 C]-glucose transport and antilipolysis to insulin and measured [ 125 I]-insulin binding in abdominal adipocytes obtained from 45 obese nondiabetic, obese diabetic, and 15 nonobese female southwestern American Indians. Compared with the nonobese group, the sensitivities of glucose transport antilipolysis were reduced in both the obese nondiabetic and obese diabetic groups. Compared with the obese nondiabetic subjects, the ED 50 for stimulation of glucose transport was higher in the obese patients with NIDDM. In contrast, the ED 50 S for antilipolysis were similar in obese diabetic patients and obese nondiabetic subjects. No differences was found in insulin binding in patients with NIDDM when compared with the equally obese nondiabetic subjects. These data indicate 1) the mechanism of insulin resistance differs in NIDDM and obesity, and 2) the selective loss of insulin sensitivity in NIDDM precludes changes in insulin binding as a cause of insulin resistance in this disorder

  13. Importance of hepatitis C virus-associated insulin resistance: Therapeutic strategies for insulin sensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Sata, Michio

    2010-01-01

    Insulin resistance is one of the pathological features in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Generally, persistence of insulin resistance leads to an increase in the risk of life-threatening complications such as cardiovascular diseases. However, these complications are not major causes of death in patients with HCV-associated insulin resistance. Indeed, insulin resistance plays a crucial role in the development of various complications and events associated with HCV infection. ...

  14. GH Receptor Deficiency in Ecuadorian Adults Is Associated With Obesity and Enhanced Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Arlan L.; Balasubramanian, Priya; Teran, Enrique; Guevara-Aguirre, Marco; Guevara, Carolina; Procel, Patricio; Alfaras, Irene; De Cabo, Rafael; Di Biase, Stefano; Narvaez, Luis; Saavedra, Jannette

    2015-01-01

    Context: Ecuadorian subjects with GH receptor deficiency (GHRD) have not developed diabetes, despite obesity. Objective: We sought to determine the metabolic associations for this phenomenon. Design: Four studies were carried out: 1) glucose, lipid, adipocytokine concentrations; 2) metabolomics evaluation; 3) metabolic responses to a high-calorie meal; and 4) oral glucose tolerance tests. Setting: Clinical Research Institute in Quito, Ecuador. Subjects: Adults homozygous for the E180 splice mutation of the GH receptor (GHRD) were matched for age, gender, and body mass index with unaffected control relatives (C) as follows: study 1, 27 GHRD and 35 C; study 2, 10 GHRD and 10 C; study 3, seven GHRD and 11 C; and study 4, seven GHRD and seven C. Results: Although GHRD subjects had greater mean percentage body fat than controls, their fasting insulin, 2-hour blood glucose, and triglyceride levels were lower. The indicator of insulin sensitivity, homeostasis model of assessment 2%S, was greater (P < .0001), and the indicator of insulin resistance, homeostasis model of assessment 2-IR, was lower (P = .0025). Metabolomic differences between GHRD and control subjects were consistent with their differing insulin sensitivity, including postprandial decreases of branched-chain amino acids that were more pronounced in controls. High molecular weight and total adiponectin concentrations were greater in GHRD (P = .0004 and P = .0128, respectively), and leptin levels were lower (P = .02). Although approximately 65% the weight of controls, GHRD subjects consumed an identical high-calorie meal; nonetheless, their mean glucose concentrations were lower, with mean insulin levels one-third those of controls. Results of the 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test were similar. Main Outcome Measures: Measures of insulin sensitivity, adipocytokines, and energy metabolites. Conclusions: Without GH counter-regulation, GHRD is associated with insulin efficiency and obesity. Lower leptin levels

  15. Global transcriptome profiling identifies KLF15 and SLC25A10 as modifiers of adipocytes insulin sensitivity in obese women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agné Kulyté

    Full Text Available Although the mechanisms linking obesity to insulin resistance (IR and type 2 diabetes (T2D are not entirely understood, it is likely that alterations of adipose tissue function are involved. The aim of this study was to identify new genes controlling insulin sensitivity in adipocytes from obese women with either insulin resistant (OIR or sensitive (OIS adipocytes. Insulin sensitivity was first determined by measuring lipogenesis in isolated adipocytes from abdominal subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT in a large observational study. Lipogenesis was measured under conditions where glucose transport was the rate limiting step and reflects in vivo insulin sensitivity. We then performed microarray-based transcriptome profiling on subcutaneous WAT specimen from a subgroup of 9 lean, 21 OIS and 18 obese OIR women. We could identify 432 genes that were differentially expressed between the OIR and OIS group (FDR ≤5%. These genes are enriched in pathways related to glucose and amino acid metabolism, cellular respiration, and insulin signaling, and include genes such as SLC2A4, AKT2, as well as genes coding for enzymes in the mitochondria respiratory chain. Two IR-associated genes, KLF15 encoding a transcription factor and SLC25A10 encoding a dicarboxylate carrier, were selected for functional evaluation in adipocytes differentiated in vitro. Knockdown of KLF15 and SLC25A10 using siRNA inhibited insulin-stimulated lipogenesis in adipocytes. Transcriptome profiling of siRNA-treated cells suggested that KLF15 might control insulin sensitivity by influencing expression of PPARG, PXMP2, AQP7, LPL and genes in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Knockdown of SLC25A10 had only modest impact on the transcriptome, suggesting that it might directly influence insulin sensitivity in adipocytes independently of transcription due to its important role in fatty acid synthesis. In summary, this study identifies novel genes associated with insulin sensitivity in

  16. Association of obesity and insulin resistance with asthma and aeroallergen sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husemoen, L L N; Glümer, C; Lau, C

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that obesity and insulin resistance may play a role in the development of asthma and allergy. The aim of the study was to examine the association of obesity and insulin resistance with asthma and aeroallergen sensitization. METHODS: Cross-sectional population...... and aeroallergen sensitization. The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance was used to estimate the degree of insulin resistance. Body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and waist circumference were used as measures of obesity. Data were analyzed by multiple logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: Obesity...... was associated with increased risk of aeroallergen sensitization as well as allergic and nonallergic asthma. Insulin resistance was asssociated with aeroallergen sensitization and allergic asthma, but not nonallergic asthma. The associations of obesity with aeroallegen sensitization and allergic asthma became...

  17. Intranasal Insulin Restores Metabolic Parameters and Insulin Sensitivity in Rats with Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkach, K V; Ivantsov, A O; Chistyakova, O V; Sukhov, I B; Buzanakov, D M; Kulikova, A A; Shpakov, A O

    2017-06-01

    We studied the effect of 10-week treatment with intranasal insulin (0.5 IU/day) on glucose tolerance, glucose utilization, lipid metabolism, functions of pancreatic β cells, and insulin system in the liver of rats with cafeteria diet-induced metabolic syndrome. The therapy reduced body weight and blood levels of insulin, triglycerides, and atherogenic cholesterol that are typically increased in metabolic syndrome, normalized glucose tolerance and its utilization, and increased activity of insulin signaling system in the liver, thus reducing insulin resistance. The therapy did not affect the number of pancreatic islets and β cells. The study demonstrates prospects of using intranasal insulin for correction of metabolic parameters and reduction of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome.

  18. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Hyotylainen, Tuulia; Nielsen, Trine; Jensen, Benjamin A H; Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk; Prifti, Edi; Falony, Gwen; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joel; Mattila, Ismo; Plichta, Damian R; Pöhö, Päivi; Hellgren, Lars I; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Jørgensen, Torben; Holm, Jacob Bak; Trošt, Kajetan; Kristiansen, Karsten; Brix, Susanne; Raes, Jeroen; Wang, Jun; Hansen, Torben; Bork, Peer; Brunak, Søren; Oresic, Matej; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Pedersen, Oluf

    2016-07-21

    Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin-resistant individuals is characterized by increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which correlate with a gut microbiome that has an enriched biosynthetic potential for BCAAs and is deprived of genes encoding bacterial inward transporters for these amino acids. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus are identified as the main species driving the association between biosynthesis of BCAAs and insulin resistance, and in mice we demonstrate that P. copri can induce insulin resistance, aggravate glucose intolerance and augment circulating levels of BCAAs. Our findings suggest that microbial targets may have the potential to diminish insulin resistance and reduce the incidence of common metabolic and cardiovascular disorders.

  19. Effects of menopause and high-intensity training on insulin sensitivity and muscle metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrup, Camilla M; Egelund, Jon; Nyberg, Michael; Enevoldsen, Lotte Hahn; Kjær, Andreas; Clemmensen, Andreas E; Christensen, Anders Nymark; Suetta, Charlotte; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Steenberg, Dorte Enggaard; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F P; Hellsten, Ylva; Stallknecht, Bente M

    2018-02-01

    To investigate peripheral insulin sensitivity and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism in premenopausal and postmenopausal women, and evaluate whether exercise training benefits are maintained after menopause. Sedentary, healthy, normal-weight, late premenopausal (n = 21), and early postmenopausal (n = 20) women were included in a 3-month high-intensity exercise training intervention. Body composition was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, whole body glucose disposal rate (GDR) by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp (40 mU/m/min), and femoral muscle glucose uptake by positron emission tomography/computed tomography, using the glucose analog fluorodeoxyglucose, expressed as estimated metabolic rate (eMR). Insulin signaling was investigated in muscle biopsies. Age difference between groups was 4.5 years, and no difference was observed in body composition. Training increased lean body mass (estimate [95% confidence interval] 0.5 [0.2-0.9] kg, P training (eMR vastus lateralis muscle: 27.8 [19.6-36.0] μmol/min/kg, P training-induced increases in insulin sensitivity included increased expression of hexokinase (19.2 [5.0-24.7] AU, P = 0.02) and glycogen synthase (32.4 [15.0-49.8] AU, P training.

  20. Oleuropein activated AMPK and induced insulin sensitivity in C2C12 muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadrich, Fatma; Garcia, Marie; Maalej, Amina; Moldes, Marthe; Isoda, Hiroko; Feve, Bruno; Sayadi, Sami

    2016-04-15

    Oleuropein has been recognized as an important medicinal compound because of its various biological properties, including anti-cancer, antidiabetic and anti-atherosclerotic activities. Here, we evaluate the antioxidant activity as well as the mechanism of the hypoglycemic effects of oleuropein in C2C12 cells and we establish the mechanism underlying these effects. To perform this study, C2C12 cells viability was analyzed via MTT assay and the antioxidant activity was investigated by ROS and TBARS assays. Also, the effect of oleuropein on AMPK and PI3 kinase signaling pathways was evaluated. Treatment with oleuropein was able to protect cells against H2O2 induced stress in cells. On the other hand, the molecular bases of its actions have been scarcely understood. Oleuropein significantly enhanced glucose consumption and the phosphorylation of AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase/ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase)) and MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases), but not PI3 kinase (Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase)/Akt. However, the co-treatment of oleuropein and insulin improved the insulin sensitivity via insulin-dependent (PI3 kinase/Akt) and insulin independent (AMPK/ACC) pathways. These results could be confirmed from the findings of GLUT4 translocation which was strongly enhanced in the case of oleuropein. Our results provide important insights for the possible mechanism of action of oleuropein as a therapeutic agent in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic and fibrinolytic response to changed insulin sensitivity in users of oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kresten R.; Christiansen, Erik; Madsbad, Sten

    1999-01-01

    The fundamental role of insulin resistance for metabolic changes linked to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes is increasingly recognized. Oral contraceptives (OC) may affect insulin sensitivity, and a detailed characterization hereof, as well as the secondary effects on related metabolic...... systems, are relevant in the evaluation of the risk of developing vascular disorders or diabetes in OC users. We studied insulin sensitivity index (S(I)), glucose effectiveness (S(g)), and insulin response in young, healthy women by frequently sampled intravenous glucose tolerance tests before and after...

  2. The Relationship between 25-hydroxyvitamin D Levels, Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Secretion in Women 3 Years after Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tänczer, Tímea; Magenheim, Rita; Fürst, Ágnes; Domján, Beatrix; Janicsek, Zsófia; Szabó, Eszter; Ferencz, Viktória; Tabák, Ádám G

    2017-12-01

    There is a direct correlation between 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, women with gestational diabetes (GDM) may have lower levels of 25(OH)D compared to controls. The present study intended to investigate 25(OH)D levels and their association with insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in women with prior GDM and in controls 3.2 years after delivery. A total of 87 patients with prior GDM and 45 randomly selected controls (age range, 22 to 44 years) with normal glucose tolerance during pregnancy nested within a cohort of all deliveries at Saint Margit Hospital, Budapest, between January 1 2005, and December 31 2006, were examined. Their 25(OH) D levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Insulin sensitivity and fasting insulin secretion were estimated using the homeostasis model asssessment (HOMA) calculator and early insulin secretion by the insulinogenic index based on a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test. There was no significant difference in 25(OH)D levels between cases and controls (27.2±13.1 [±SD] vs. 26.9±9.8 ng/L). There was a positive association between HOMA insulin sensitivity and 25(OH)D levels (beta = 0.017; 95% CI 0.001 to 0.034/1 ng/mL) that was robust to adjustment for age and body mass index. There was a nonsignificant association between HOMA insulin secretion and 25(OH)D (p=0.099), while no association was found with the insulinogenic index. Prior GDM status was not associated with 25(OH)D levels; however, 25(OH) D levels were associated with HOMA insulin sensitivity. It is hypothesized that the association between HOMA insulin secretion and 25(OH)D levels is related to the autoregulation of fasting glucose levels because no association between 25(OH)D and insulinogenic index was found. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Statin Intake Is Associated With Decreased Insulin Sensitivity During Cardiac Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroaki; Carvalho, George; Sato, Tamaki; Hatzakorzian, Roupen; Lattermann, Ralph; Codere-Maruyama, Takumi; Matsukawa, Takashi; Schricker, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical trauma impairs intraoperative insulin sensitivity and is associated with postoperative adverse events. Recently, preprocedural statin therapy is recommended for patients with coronary artery disease. However, statin therapy is reported to increase insulin resistance and the risk of new-onset diabetes. Thus, we investigated the association between preoperative statin therapy and intraoperative insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic, dyslipidemic patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this prospective, nonrandomized trial, patients taking lipophilic statins were assigned to the statin group and hypercholesterolemic patients not receiving any statins were allocated to the control group. Insulin sensitivity was assessed by the hyperinsulinemic-normoglycemic clamp technique during surgery. The mean, SD of blood glucose, and the coefficient of variation (CV) after surgery were calculated for each patient. The association between statin use and intraoperative insulin sensitivity was tested by multiple regression analysis. RESULTS We studied 120 patients. In both groups, insulin sensitivity gradually decreased during surgery with values being on average ∼20% lower in the statin than in the control group. In the statin group, the mean blood glucose in the intensive care unit was higher than in the control group (153 ± 20 vs. 140 ± 20 mg/dL; P statin group (SD, P statin use was independently associated with intraoperative insulin sensitivity (β = −0.16; P = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS Preoperative use of lipophilic statins is associated with increased insulin resistance during cardiac surgery in nondiabetic, dyslipidemic patients. PMID:22829524

  4. Valsartan-induced improvement in insulin sensitivity is not paralleled by changes in microvascular function in individuals with impaired glucose metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zijl, Nynke J; Serné, Erik H; Goossens, Gijs H; Moors, Chantalle C M; Ijzerman, Richard G; Blaak, Ellen E; Diamant, Michaela

    2011-10-01

    Individuals with impaired glucose metabolism (IGM) are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is activated in insulin-resistant states and its inhibition resulted in delayed onset of T2DM. The underlying mechanisms may include improvement in microvascular structure and function, which may increase glucose and insulin delivery to insulin-sensitive tissues. We hypothesized that functional and structural capillary density is impaired in insulin-resistant individuals with IGM and that treatment with the angiotensin-receptor blocker valsartan (VAL) will improve insulin sensitivity and microvascular function. In this randomized controlled trial, individuals with IGM (n = 48) underwent a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp to assess insulin sensitivity (M-value) and capillaroscopy to examine baseline skin capillary density (BCD), capillary density after arterial occlusion (PRH) and capillary density during venous occlusion (VEN) before and after 26 weeks of VAL or placebo (PLB). Sixteen BMI-matched individuals with normal glucose metabolism (NGM) served as controls. Individuals with IGM were more insulin resistant (P < 0.001) and had impaired microvascular function compared with those with NGM (all P < 0.01). Univariate associations were found for microvascular function (BCD, PRH, VEN) and M-value (all P < 0.005). The relations were independent of age, sex and BMI. VAL improved insulin sensitivity (P = 0.034) and lowered blood pressure as compared with PLB, whereas microvascular function remained unchanged. In insulin-resistant individuals with IGM, impaired functional and structural capillary density was inversely associated with insulin sensitivity. VAL improved insulin sensitivity without affecting the functional and structural capillary density, indicating that other mechanisms may be stronger determinants in the VAL-mediated insulin-sensitizing effect.

  5. An isocaloric low glycemic index diet improves insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Suzanne; Reeves, Sue; Sharp, Kay; Jeanes, Yvonne M

    2013-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder affecting 5% to 10% of women worldwide. Approximately half of women with PCOS are lean, yet may still present with central obesity and metabolic disturbances. Low-glycemic index (GI) dietary intervention studies have demonstrated improvements in insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant populations; however, there is little evidence of this effect in women with PCOS. This research aimed to determine the efficacy of an isocaloric low-GI dietary intervention on insulin sensitivity, independent of weight change, in women with PCOS. A nonrandomized 12-week low-GI dietary intervention, preceded by a 12-week habitual diet control phase and proceeded by a 12-week follow-up phase was conducted. Dietary intake, body composition, and metabolic risk markers were determined at baseline, after completion of the habitual diet control phase, and after the low-GI dietary intervention. Twenty-six participants were recruited at baseline, 22 commenced and 21 participants completed the low-GI dietary intervention phase. The primary outcome was change in insulin sensitivity. Secondary outcomes included assessment of changes to lipids, body composition, and estimated macronutrient intake. Repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni correction were used to detect changes to outcomes across study timepoints. Twenty-one women with PCOS with mean (± standard deviation) age of 32.1±6.7 years completed the 12-week low-GI dietary intervention. As expected, no significant changes occurred during the 12-week habitual diet control phase. However, during the dietary intervention phase, dietary GI decreased from 54.5±3.5 to 48.6±5.1 (Pdiet in women with PCOS and findings may contribute to the limited research in this area. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Early insulin response and insulin sensitivity are equally important as predictors of glucose tolerance after correction for measurement errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Lars; Berne, Christian; Svärdsudd, Kurt; Garmo, Hans; Zethelius, Björn

    2009-12-01

    We estimated measurement error (ME) corrected effects of insulin sensitivity (M/I), from euglycaemic insulin clamp, and insulin secretion, measured as early insulin response (EIR) from oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), on fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c and type 2 diabetes longitudinally and cross-sectional. In a population-based study (n=1128 men) 17 men made replicate measurements to estimate ME at age 71 years. Effect of 1 SD decrease of predictors M/I and EIR on longitudinal response variables fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c at follow-ups up to 11 years, were estimated using uncorrected and ME-corrected (with the regression calibration method) regression models. Uncorrected effect on FPG at age 77 years was larger for M/I than for EIR (effect difference 0.10mmol/l, 95% CI 0.00;0.21), while ME-corrected effects were similar (0.02mmol/l, 95% CI -0.13;0.15mmol/l). EIR had greater ME-corrected impact than M/I on HbA1c at age 82 years (-0.11%, -0.28; -0.01%). Due to higher ME effect of EIR on glycaemia is underestimated as compared with M/I. By correcting for ME valid estimates of relative contributions of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity on glycaemia are obtained.

  7. Insulin Activates Vagal Afferent Neurons Including those Innervating Pancreas via Insulin Cascade and Ca(2+ Influx: Its Dysfunction in IRS2-KO Mice with Hyperphagic Obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusaku Iwasaki

    Full Text Available Some of insulin's functions, including glucose/lipid metabolism, satiety and neuroprotection, involve the alteration of brain activities. Insulin could signal to the brain via penetrating through the blood-brain barrier and acting on the vagal afferents, while the latter remains unproved. This study aimed to clarify whether insulin directly regulates the nodose ganglion neurons (NGNs of vagal afferents in mice. NGs expressed insulin receptor (IR and insulin receptor substrate-2 (IRS2 mRNA, and some of NGNs were immunoreactive to IR. In patch-clamp and fura-2 microfluorometric studies, insulin (10(-12∼10(-6 M depolarized and increased cytosolic Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+]i in single NGNs. The insulin-induced [Ca(2+]i increases were attenuated by L- and N-type Ca(2+ channel blockers, by phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K inhibitor, and in NGNs from IRS2 knockout mice. Half of the insulin-responsive NGNs contained cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript. Neuronal fibers expressing IRs were distributed in/around pancreatic islets. The NGNs innervating the pancreas, identified by injecting retrograde tracer into the pancreas, responded to insulin with much greater incidence than unlabeled NGNs. Insulin concentrations measured in pancreatic vein was 64-fold higher than that in circulation. Elevation of insulin to 10(-7 M recruited a remarkably greater population of NGNs to [Ca(2+]i increases. Systemic injection of glibenclamide rapidly released insulin and phosphorylated AKT in NGs. Furthermore, in IRS2 knockout mice, insulin action to suppress [Ca(2+]i in orexigenic ghrelin-responsive neurons in hypothalamic arcuate nucleus was intact while insulin action on NGN was markedly attenuated, suggesting a possible link between impaired insulin sensing by NGNs and hyperphagic obese phenotype in IRS2 knockout mice These data demonstrate that insulin directly activates NGNs via IR-IRS2-PI3K-AKT-cascade and depolarization-gated Ca(2+ influx. Pancreas

  8. Ghrelin differentially affects hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijboer, A. C.; van den Hoek, A. M.; Parlevliet, E. T.; Havekes, L. M.; Romijn, J. A.; Pijl, H.; Corssmit, E. P. M.

    2006-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of ghrelin on insulin's capacity to suppress endogenous glucose production and promote glucose disposal in mice. To establish whether the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor can mediate the putative effect of ghrelin on the action of insulin,

  9. Association between biomarkers of inflammation and insulin sensitivity index among Mongolian population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ke; Wei Xiaolin; Bu Xiaoqing; Tang Lingyan; Zhang Yonghong; Lu Hongmin; Zhao Li

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the association between the biomarkers of inflammation including C-reactive protein (CRP), soluble E-selectin (sE-selectin) and soluble inter-cellular adhesion molecule-l (sICAM-1) and insulin sensitivity index (ISI) in Mongolian population. Methods: Mongolian residents aged 20 and above were served as study subjects. Demographic characteristics and lifestyle risk factors were investigated by the questionnaire, and their body height, weight and blood pressure were measured, and blood lipids, blood glucose, insulin and inflammatory markers etc, were examined for all subjects. Multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to estimate the association between the biomarkers of inflammation and insulin sensitivity index. Results: Among the Mongolian residents, the risk of decreased ISI (ISI≤0.0130) was significantly increased (P<0.05) with increased CRP. Compared to lowest quartile of CRP and sE-selectin, odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of decreased ISI associated with highest quartile of CRP and sE-selectin were 1.324 (0.990∼1.771) and 1.986 (1.486∼2.654), respectively. However, there was no significant association between increased sICAM-1 and decreased ISI. Conclusion: Increased C-reactive protein and sE-selectin were associated with decreased ISI among Mongolian population. (authors)

  10. Serum vaspin concentrations in relation to insulin sensitivity following RYGB-induced weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handisurya, Ammon; Riedl, Michaela; Vila, Greisa; Maier, Christina; Clodi, Martin; Prikoszovich, Thomas; Ludvik, Bernhard; Prager, Gerhard; Luger, Anton; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2010-02-01

    Recently, vaspin was identified as a novel adipokine with insulin-sensitizing effects that might be implicated in endogenous glucose regulation. Our objective was to evaluate the impact of acute weight loss and metabolic changes on serum vaspin concentrations in morbidly obese subjects following laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery. Longitudinal, clinical intervention study in 33 morbidly obese subjects before and 12 months after RYGB was conducted. Fasting serum concentrations of vaspin were measured by a commercially available ELISA and correlated with BMI, parameters of insulin sensitivity, and other biochemical measurements. Fasting insulin sensitivity was estimated using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of insulin resistance. RYGB-induced weight loss resulted in a reduction of circulating vaspin, leptin, insulin, and C-peptide levels as well as of BMI, HbA1c, and HOMA (p RYGB-induced changes in BMI. Following RYGB surgery, changes in serum vaspin concentrations correlate significantly with the reduction of circulating leptin, insulin, and C-peptide levels and with the amelioration of insulin sensitivity. However, further studies have to elucidate whether vaspin is only a biomarker for body-weight-related changes of insulin sensitivity or whether it is implicated in the regulation of human glucose homeostasis.

  11. Effects of two commercially available feline diets on glucose and insulin concentrations, insulin sensitivity and energetic efficiency of weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coradini, M; Rand, J S; Morton, J M; Rawlings, J M

    2011-10-01

    A low-carbohydrate, high-protein (LCHP) diet is often recommended for the prevention and management of diabetes in cats; however, the effect of macronutrient composition on insulin sensitivity and energetic efficiency for weight gain is not known. The present study compared the effect in adult cats (n 32) of feeding a LCHP (23 and 47 % metabolisable energy (ME)) and a high-carbohydrate, low-protein (HCLP) diet (51 and 21 % ME) on fasting and postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations, and on insulin sensitivity. Tests were done in the 4th week of maintenance feeding and after 8 weeks of ad libitum feeding, when weight gain and energetic efficiency of each diet were also measured. When fed at maintenance energy, the HCLP diet resulted in higher postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. When fed ad libitum, the LCHP diet resulted in greater weight gain (P cats eating the LCHP diet had similar postprandial glucose concentrations to lean cats eating the HCLP diet. Insulin sensitivity was not different between the diets when cats were lean or overweight, but glucose effectiveness was higher after weight gain in cats fed the HCLP diet. According to the present results, LCHP diets fed at maintenance requirements might benefit cats with multiple risk factors for developing diabetes. However, ad libitum feeding of LCHP diets is not recommended as they have higher energetic efficiency and result in greater weight gain.

  12. Exercise increases human skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity via coordinated increases in microvascular perfusion and molecular signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Frøsig, Christian; Kjøbsted, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    and increased similarly in both legs during the clamp and L-NMMA had no effect on these insulin-stimulated signaling pathways. Therefore, acute exercise increases insulin sensitivity of muscle by a coordinated increase in insulin-stimulated microvascular perfusion and molecular signaling at the level of TBC1D4...... and glycogen synthase in muscle. This secures improved glucose delivery on the one hand and increased ability to take up and dispose of the delivered glucose on the other hand....

  13. Greater insulin sensitivity in calorie restricted rats occurs with unaltered circulating levels of several important myokines and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Naveen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calorie restriction (CR; ~60% of ad libitum, AL intake has been associated with substantial alterations in body composition and insulin sensitivity. Recently, several proteins that are secreted by nontraditional endocrine tissues, including skeletal muscle and other tissues, have been discovered to modulate energy metabolism, body composition, and insulin sensitivity. The aim of this study was to characterize the influence of CR by rats on plasma levels of six of these newly recognized metabolic hormones (BDNF, FGF21, IL-1β, myonectin, myostatin, and irisin. Body composition of 9-month old male Fischer-344/Brown Norway rats (AL and CR groups was determined by nuclear magnetic resonance. Blood sampled from the carotid artery of unanesthetized rats was used to measure concentrations of glucose and plasma proteins. As expected, CR versus AL rats had significantly altered body composition (reduced percent fat mass, increased percent lean mass and significantly improved insulin sensitivity (based on the homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance index. Also consistent with previous reports, CR compared to AL rats had significantly greater plasma levels of adiponectin and corticosterone. However, there were no significant diet-related differences in plasma levels of BDNF, FGF21, IL-1β, myonectin, myostatin, or irisin. In conclusion, these results indicate that alterations in plasma concentration of these six secreted proteins are not essential for the CR-related improvement in insulin sensitivity in rats.

  14. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase for regulating post-exercise insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøbsted, Rasmus; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Treebak, Jonas Thue

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle insulin resistance precedes development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). As skeletal muscle is a major sink for glucose disposal, understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in maintaining insulin sensitivity of this tissue could potentially benefit millions of people that are diagno......Skeletal muscle insulin resistance precedes development of type 2 diabetes (T2D). As skeletal muscle is a major sink for glucose disposal, understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in maintaining insulin sensitivity of this tissue could potentially benefit millions of people...... that are diagnosed with insulin resistance. Regular physical activity in both healthy and insulin-resistant individuals is recognized as the single most effective intervention to increase whole-body insulin sensitivity and thereby positively affect glucose homeostasis. A single bout of exercise has long been known...... to increase glucose disposal in skeletal muscle in response to physiological insulin concentrations. While this effect is identified to be restricted to the previously exercised muscle, the molecular basis for an apparent convergence between exercise- and insulin-induced signaling pathways is incompletely...

  15. Pioglitazone improves insulin sensitivity, reduces visceral fat and stimulates lipolysis in non diabetic dialyzed patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Zanchi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is common in dialyzed patients and is associated with increased mortality and protein-energy wasting. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of pioglitazone (PIO, a powerful insulin sensitizer, on insulin sensitivity, body composition and adipose tissue metabolism, in dialyzed patients. A double blind randomized cross-over study was performed in non diabetic dialysis patients. Each patient followed 2 treatment phases of 16 weeks, starting either with oral PIO 45 mg/d or placebo (PL, and then switched to the other phase. At the end of each phase, patients underwent hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, an abdominal CT, and extensive plasma biochemical analysis. Twelve patients including 8 HD (59.6±4.4 y and 4 PD patients (43.5±3.6 y were recruited. Nine patients completed both phases and 3 patients dropped out (renal transplantation/2 HD and peritonitis/1 PD. PIO was safe and well tolerated. Under PIO, insulin sensitivity improved, as assessed by increased total glucose disposal rate (1.98±0.24 for PIO versus 1.58±0.12 umol/kg/min for PL, p<0.05, and reduced glucose endogenous hepatic production. PIO did not affect post-dialysis body weight, total fat and lean body mass, but significantly reduced visceral adipose tissue (VAT area and the VAT/SAT (subcutaneous adipose tissue ratio. HDL-cholesterol significantly increased. PIO decreased CRP (3.96±1.44 mg/l vs 7.88±2.56, p<0.05, plasma leptin, and dramatically reduced leptin/adiponectin ratio. Glycerol turnover, circulating glycerol and non esterified fatty acids were paradoxically increased. In conclusion, the improvement in insulin sensitivity by PIO, in non diabetic dialyzed patients, was associated with favorable metabolic effects, reduction in inflammation and body fat redistribution. The stimulation of systemic lipolysis was a surprising finding which may reflect adipose tissue remodeling and/or a paradoxical lypolitic

  16. Prior AICAR stimulation increases insulin sensitivity in mouse skeletal muscle in an AMPK-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøbsted, Rasmus; Treebak, Jonas Thue; Fentz, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Acute exercise increases glucose uptake in skeletal muscle by an insulin-independent mechanism. In the period after exercise insulin sensitivity to increase glucose uptake is enhanced. The molecular mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon are poorly understood, but appear to involve an increased ...

  17. Metabolic and fibrinolytic response to changed insulin sensitivity in users of oral contraceptives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kresten R.; Christiansen, Erik; Madsbad, Sten

    1999-01-01

    The fundamental role of insulin resistance for metabolic changes linked to cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes is increasingly recognized. Oral contraceptives (OC) may affect insulin sensitivity, and a detailed characterization hereof, as well as the secondary effects on related metabolic...

  18. Effect of exercise on insulin sensitivity in healthy postmenopausal women : The SHAPE study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gemert, Willemijn A.; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; May, Anne M.; Peeters, Petra H.; Schuit, Albertine J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: An inactive lifestyle is a risk factor for several types of cancer. A proposed pathway through which exercise influences cancer risk is via insulin. We aim to investigate the effect of a oneyear exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity, and the role of body fat in this association,

  19. Effect of Exercise on Insulin Sensitivity in Healthy Postmenopausal Women: The SHAPE Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gemert, W.A.; Monninkhof, E.M.; May, A.M.; Peeters, P.H.; Schuit, A.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: An inactive lifestyle is a risk factor for several types of cancer. A proposed pathway through which exercise influences cancer risk is via insulin. We aim to investigate the effect of a oneyear exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity, and the role of body fat in this association,

  20. Effect of Moderate Alcohol Consumption on Adiponectin, Tumor Necrosis Factor-α, and Insulin Sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, A.; Patel, H.; Ouchi, N.; Kihara, S.; Funahashi, T.; Heine, R.J.; Grobbee, D.E.; Kluft, C.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Epidemiological studies suggest that moderate alcohol consumers have enhanced insulin sensitivity and a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin, an adipocyte-derived plasma protein, has been found to be negatively associated with adiposity and positively associated with insulin

  1. Physical activity and total serum bilirubin levels among insulin sensitive and insulin resistant U.S. adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Abbott, Kalen

    2014-01-01

    Total serum bilirubin has been identified as a novel biomarker for metabolic disease, with higher levels providing protection against metabolic disease. To our knowledge, only 3 studies, to date, have examined the association between physical activity and total serum bilirubin, with these studies reporting mixed findings. One potential reason for the mixed findings may be the exclusive use of self-report physical activity methodology. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between accelerometer-assessed physical activity and total serum bilirubin among a national sample of U.S. insulin sensitive and insulin resistant adults. Data from the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used. Physical activity was objectively-measured using an accelerometer over a 7 day period. Bilirubin levels were assessed from a blood sample. Data was analyzed in 2013. After adjusting for age, gender, race-ethnicity, BMI, comorbid illness, cotinine, and poverty level, moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was associated with bilirubin for insulin resistant individuals (β = 0.08; p = 0.04), but not insulin sensitive individuals (β = 0.02; p = 0.38). MVPA is associated with total serum bilirubin levels among U.S. adults with insulin resistance. Future experimental and prospective studies are needed, with further attention focused on the mechanisms that may help to explain the association between physical activity and bilirubin.

  2. Assessing the test–retest repeatability of insulin resistance measures: Homeostasis model assessment 2 and oral glucose insulin sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A.P. Crofts

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Insulin resistance is commonly assessed using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA variants. HOMA is potentially insensitive to change because of its high coefficient of variation. The repeatability coefficient is an alternative means of assessing test repeatability. To be confident of clinical change, rather than biological variation, a subsequent test needs to differ from the former by more than the repeatability coefficient using the equation. Test 1 = Test 2 ± repeatability coefficient. The repeatability coefficients for measures of insulin resistance are unknown. Aim: To compare the repeatability coefficient of HOMA2 variants (Beta-cell function [%B], insulin sensitivity [%S], insulin resistance [IR] to a dynamic measure of insulin resistance, and the oral glucose insulin sensitivity (OGIS test. Setting: The raw data from a previously used data set were reanalysed. Methods: Glycaemic and insulinaemic tests were performed on 32 men and women both with (n = 10 and without type 2 diabetes (n = 22. From these data, eight fasting tests and three 50-g oral glucose tolerance tests were used to calculate HOMA2 and OGIS. The methods of Bland and Altman assessed repeatability. Results: Repeatability coefficients for all participants for the HOMA2 %B, %S and IR variants were 72.91, 189.75 and 0.9, which equates to 89%, 135% and 89% of their respective grand means. By contrast, OGIS had a repeatability coefficient of 87.13, which equates to 21% of the grand mean. Conclusion: Because of the high repeatability coefficient relative to the grand mean, use of HOMA2 measures for assessing insulin resistance in small population studies should be reconsidered.

  3. Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM on insulin sensitivity and the systemic inflammatory response in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Anne Sofie; Larsen, Nadja; Pedersen-Skovsgaard, Theis

    2010-01-01

    According to animal studies, intake of probiotic bacteria may improve glucose homeostasis. We hypothesised that probiotic bacteria improve insulin sensitivity by attenuating systemic inflammation. Therefore, the effects of oral supplementation with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus...

  4. High intensity interval training improves liver and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Marcinko

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: These data indicate that HIIT lowers blood glucose levels by improving adipose and liver insulin sensitivity independently of changes in adiposity, adipose tissue inflammation, liver lipid content or AMPK phosphorylation of ACC.

  5. Aerobic Exercise Increases Peripheral and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Sedentary Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Gert-Jan; Toffolo, Gianna; Manesso, Erica; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Sunehag, Agneta L.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Data are limited on the effects of controlled aerobic exercise programs (without weight loss) on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in children and adolescents. Objective: To determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves peripheral and

  6. Effects of menopause and high-intensity training on insulin sensitivity and muscle metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Camilla M; Egelund, Jon; Nyberg, Michael

    2018-01-01

    To investigate peripheral insulin sensitivity and skeletal muscle glucose metabolism in premenopausal and postmenopausal women, and evaluate whether exercise training benefits are maintained after menopause. Sedentary, healthy, normal-weight, late premenopausal (n = 21), and early postmenopausal (n...

  7. Effect of training on insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake and lipolysis in human adipose tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Larsen, J J; Mikines, K J

    2000-01-01

    Training increases insulin sensitivity of both whole body and muscle in humans. To investigate whether training also increases insulin sensitivity of adipose tissue, we performed a three-step hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp in eight endurance-trained (T) and eight sedentary (S) young men...... (glucose only). Adipose tissue blood flow was measured by (133)Xe washout. In the basal state, adipose tissue blood flow tended to be higher in T compared with S subjects, and in both groups blood flow was constant during the clamp. The change from basal in arterial-interstitial glucose concentration......-time: T, 44 +/- 9 min (n = 7); S, 102 +/- 23 min (n = 5); P training enhances insulin sensitivity of glucose uptake in subcutaneous adipose tissue and in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, interstitial glycerol data suggest that training also increases insulin sensitivity of lipolysis...

  8. Similar weight-adjusted insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in short-duration late autoimmune diabetes of adulthood (LADA) and Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, C B; Bradley, U; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To explore insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in people with latent autoimmune diabetes in adulthood (LADA) compared with that in people with Type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A total of 12 people with LADA, defined as glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibody positivity and > 1 year...... of insulin independency (group A) were age-matched pairwise to people with Type 2 diabetes (group B) and to six people with Type 2 diabetes of similar age and BMI (group C). β-cell function (first-phase insulin secretion and assessment of insulin pulsatility), insulin sensitivity (hyperinsulinemic......-euglycemic clamp) and metabolic response during a mixed meal were studied. RESULTS: Both first-phase insulin secretion and insulin release during the meal were greater (P = 0.05 and P = 0.009, respectively) in Type 2 diabetes as compared with LADA; these differences were lost on adjustment for BMI (group C...

  9. Insulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information by Audience For Women Women's Health Topics Insulin Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... medicines. You can do it. Back to Top Insulin Safety Tips Never drink insulin. Do not share ...

  10. Stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose uptake by muscle involves the central nervous system in insulin-sensitive mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coomans, C.P.; Biermasz, N.R.; Geerling, J.J.; Guigas, B.; Rensen, P.C.N.; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE - Insulin inhibits endogenous glucose production (EGP) and stimulates glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. Hypothalamic insulin signaling is required for the inhibitory effects of insulin on EGP. We examined the contribution of central insulin signaling on circulating insulin-stimulated

  11. A low-fat diet improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in patients with Type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Almdal, T; Viggers, L

    2006-01-01

    To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes.......To compare the effects on insulin sensitivity, body composition and glycaemic control of the recommended standard weight-maintaining diabetes diet and an isocaloric low-fat diabetes diet during two, 3-month periods in patients with Type 1 diabetes....

  12. Natural history of insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in the progression from normal glucose tolerance to impaired fasting glycemia and impaired glucose tolerance: the Inter99 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faerch, Kristine; Vaag, Allan; Holst, Jens J

    2008-01-01

    of insulin sensitivity (HOMA-IS), early-phase insulin release (EPIR), and insulin secretion relative to insulin action (disposition index) were estimated. RESULTS: Five years before the pre-diabetes diagnoses (i-IFG, i-IGT, and IFG/IGT), ISI, HOMA-IS, EPIR, and disposition index were lower than...... in individuals who maintained NGT. During the 5-year follow-up, individuals developing i-IFG experienced a significant decline only in HOMA-IS, whereas individuals developing i-IGT experienced significant declines in ISI, EPIR, and disposition index. Individuals with IFG/IGT exhibited pronounced declines in ISI......, HOMA-IS, EPIR, and disposition index during the 5-year follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: A stationary reduced insulin secretion followed by a decline in primarily hepatic insulin sensitivity characterizes the transition from NGT to i-IFG. In contrast, low whole-body insulin sensitivity with a secondary lack...

  13. Adiponectin in mice with altered growth hormone action: links to insulin sensitivity and longevity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Ellen R.; List, Edward O.; Jara, Adam; Sackman-Sala, Lucila; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Gahete, Manuel D.; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Boparai, Ravneet; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J.; Berryman, Darlene E.

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is positively correlated with longevity and negatively correlated with many obesity-related diseases. While there are several circulating forms of adiponectin, the high molecular weight (HMW) version has been suggested to have the predominant bioactivity. Adiponectin gene expression and cognate serum protein levels are of particular interest in mice with altered growth hormone (GH) signaling as these mice exhibit extremes in obesity that are positively associated with insulin sensitivity and lifespan as opposed to the typical negative association of these factors. While a few studies have reported total adiponectin levels in young adult mice with altered GH signaling, much remains unresolved, including changes in adiponectin levels with advancing age, proportion of total adiponectin in the HMW form, adipose depot of origin, and differential effects of GH versus IGF1. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to address these issues using assorted mouse lines with altered GH signaling. Our results show that adiponectin is generally negatively associated with GH activity, regardless of age. Further, the amount of HMW adiponectin is consistently linked with the level of total adiponectin and not necessarily with previously reported lifespan or insulin sensitivity of these mice. Interestingly, circulating adiponectin levels correlated strongly with inguinal fat mass, implying the effects of GH on adiponectin are depot-specific. Interestingly rbGH, but not IGF1, decreased circulating total and HMW adiponectin levels. Taken together, these results fill important gaps in the literature related to GH and adiponectin and question the frequently reported associations of total and HMW adiponectin with insulin sensitivity and longevity. PMID:23261955

  14. Adiponectin in mice with altered GH action: links to insulin sensitivity and longevity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Ellen R; List, Edward O; Jara, Adam; Sackman-Sala, Lucila; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Gahete, Manuel D; Kineman, Rhonda D; Boparai, Ravneet; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J; Berryman, Darlene E

    2013-03-01

    Adiponectin is positively correlated with longevity and negatively correlated with many obesity-related diseases. While there are several circulating forms of adiponectin, the high-molecular-weight (HMW) version has been suggested to have the predominant bioactivity. Adiponectin gene expression and cognate serum protein levels are of particular interest in mice with altered GH signaling as these mice exhibit extremes in obesity that are positively associated with insulin sensitivity and lifespan as opposed to the typical negative association of these factors. While a few studies have reported total adiponectin levels in young adult mice with altered GH signaling, much remains unresolved, including changes in adiponectin levels with advancing age, proportion of total adiponectin in the HMW form, adipose depot of origin, and differential effects of GH vs IGF1. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to address these issues using assorted mouse lines with altered GH signaling. Our results show that adiponectin is generally negatively associated with GH activity, regardless of age. Further, the amount of HMW adiponectin is consistently linked with the level of total adiponectin and not necessarily with previously reported lifespan or insulin sensitivity of these mice. Interestingly, circulating adiponectin levels correlated strongly with inguinal fat mass, implying that the effects of GH on adiponectin are depot specific. Interestingly, rbGH, but not IGF1, decreased circulating total and HMW adiponectin levels. Taken together, these results fill important gaps in the literature related to GH and adiponectin and question the frequently reported associations of total and HMW adiponectin with insulin sensitivity and longevity.

  15. Meju, unsalted soybeans fermented with Bacillus subtilis and Aspergilus oryzae, potentiates insulinotropic actions and improves hepatic insulin sensitivity in diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Although soybeans have the ability to attenuate insulin resistance, it is insufficient to alleviate type 2 diabetic symptoms and different types of fermented soybeans may have even better anti-diabetic effects. Meju, unsalted fermented soybeans exhibited better insulin sensitizing and insulinotropic actions than unfermented cooked soybeans (CSB). We investigated whether meju fermented in the traditional (TMS) manner for 60 days and meju fermented in the standardized (MMS) method inoculating Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus oryzae for 6 days modulated insulin resistance, insulin secretion, and pancreatic β-cell growth and survival in 90% pancreatectomized (Px) diabetic rats, a moderate and non-obese type 2 diabetic animal model. Methods Diabetic rats were divided into 3 groups: 1) TMS (n = 20), 2) MMS (n = 20) or 3) casein (control; n = 20). Rats were provided with a high fat diet (40 energy % fat) containing assigned 10% meju for 8 weeks. At the end of experiment insulin resistance and insulin secretion capacity were measured by euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp and by hyperglycemic clamp, respectively. Additionally, β-cell mass and islet morphohometry were determined by immunohistochemistry and insulin signaling in the liver was measured by western blot. Results TMS and MMS increased isoflavonoid aglycones much more than CSB. CSB and TMS/MMS improved glucose tolerance in diabetic rats but the mechanism was different between treatments (P < 0.05). CSB enhanced peripheral insulin sensitivity including hepatic insulin sensitivity better than the control but TMS and MMS enhanced only hepatic insulin sensitivity through activating insulin signaling in diabetic rats (P < 0.05). However, TMS and MMS, but not CSB, potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and β-cell mass (P < 0.05). MMS had better insulinotropic actions than the control (P < 0.05). Conclusions The anti-diabetic action of MMS, especially when fermented with Bacillus subtilis and

  16. Polyunsaturated fatty acids acutely affect triacylglycerol-derived skeletal muscle fatty acid uptake and increases postprandial insulin sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jans, Anneke; Konings, Ellen; Goossens, Gijs H.; Bouwman, Freek G.; Moors, Chantalle C.; Boekschoten, Mark; Afman, Lydia; Muller, Michael; Mariman, Edwin C.; Blaak, Ellen E.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary fat quality may influence skeletal muscle lipid handling and fat accumulation, thereby modulating insulin sensitivity. Objective: To examine acute effects of meals with various fatty acid (FA) compositions on skeletal muscle FA handling and postprandial insulin sensitivity in obese insulin

  17. Resistance training, insulin sensitivity and muscle function in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dela, Flemming; Kjaer, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a loss in both muscle mass and in the metabolic quality of skeletal muscle. This leads to sarcopenia and reduced daily function, as well as to an increased risk for development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A major part, but not all, of these changes...... are associated with an age-related decrease in the physical activity level and can be counteracted by increased physical activity of a resistive nature. Strength training has been shown to improve insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in both healthy elderly individuals and patients with manifest diabetes...

  18. Maternal insulin sensitivity is associated with oral glucose-induced changes in fetal brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Katarzyna; Schleger, Franziska; Ketterer, Caroline; Fritsche, Louise; Kiefer-Schmidt, Isabelle; Hennige, Anita; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Preissl, Hubert; Fritsche, Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Fetal programming plays an important role in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether maternal metabolic changes during OGTT influence fetal brain activity. Thirteen healthy pregnant women underwent an OGTT (75 g). Insulin sensitivity was determined by glucose and insulin measurements at 0, 60 and 120 min. At each time point, fetal auditory evoked fields were recorded with a fetal magnetoencephalographic device and response latencies were determined. Maternal insulin increased from a fasting level of 67 ± 25 pmol/l (mean ± SD) to 918 ± 492 pmol/l 60 min after glucose ingestion and glucose levels increased from 4.4 ± 0.3 to 7.4 ± 1.1 mmol/l. Over the same time period, fetal response latencies decreased from 297 ± 99 to 235 ± 84 ms (p = 0.01) and then remained stable until 120 min (235 ± 84 vs 251 ± 91 ms, p = 0.39). There was a negative correlation between maternal insulin sensitivity and fetal response latencies 60 min after glucose ingestion (r = 0.68, p = 0.02). After a median split of the group based on maternal insulin sensitivity, fetuses of insulin-resistant mothers showed a slower response to auditory stimuli (283 ± 79 ms) than those of insulin-sensitive mothers (178 ± 46 ms, p = 0.03). Lower maternal insulin sensitivity is associated with slower fetal brain responses. These findings provide the first evidence of a direct effect of maternal metabolism on fetal brain activity and suggest that central insulin resistance may be programmed during fetal development.

  19. Do antioxidant vitamins ameliorate the beneficial effects of exercise training on insulin sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavie, Carl J; Milani, Jenna N

    2011-01-01

    Exercise training has numerous health benefits, and in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome, it can improve insulin sensitivity and glucose control. A recent publication suggests that antioxidant vitamins (C and E) block these effects on blood glucose. This investigation was undertaken to determine whether antioxidant vitamins ameliorate the beneficial effects of cardiac rehabilitation and exercise training (CRET) on insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). We assessed CHD risk factors, including clinical indices of glucose metabolism, and evaluated the effects of exercise training in 315 patients with CHD with diabetes mellitus and/or metabolic syndrome before and after a 3-month program of CRET. Patients were divided into 2 groups based on self-reported antioxidant vitamin (vitamins C and E) consumption. Both groups, 113 patients (36%) consuming vitamins (Vits group) and 202 patients (64%) who reported no vitamin use (no-Vits group) were statistically similar at baseline. Following CRET, patients improved exercise capacity (10%, P vitamin E and 500 mg of vitamin C) do not ameliorate the health benefits of exercise training, including fasting blood glucose, in CHD patients

  20. Effects of Substituting Palm Olein with Carbohydrates on Insulin Sensitivity: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim-Tiu, T.; Faun, C.L.

    2016-01-01

    The role of palm olein on insulin resistance, which predisposes to disease progression of type 2 diabetes, is unclear. This article summarises the effects of substituting palm olein with carbohydrates on insulin sensitivity. Two intervention studies have reported conflicting findings. The RISCK (Reading, Imperial, Surreys, Cambridge and King's) study suggested that saturated fat-enriched diet consisting of mainly palm oil and milk fat did not differ from both high and low glycemic carbohydrates on insulin sensitivity in subjects at risk of developing metabolic syndrome. However, another study reported reduced insulin sensitivity after a diet enriched with palm olein and butter compared with high carbohydrate intake. No epidemiological data exists in this context. More clinical trials using solely palm olein in this area are needed. Further well-controlled large scale studies are needed to furnish the information on palm olein replacement with carbohydrates in diabetes prevention. (author)

  1. Effects of exercise training on glucose control, lipid metabolism, and insulin sensitivity in hypertriglyceridemia and non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampman, R M; Schteingart, D E

    1991-06-01

    Exercise training has potential benefits for patients with hyperlipidemia and/or non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. In nondiabetic, nonobese subjects with hypertriglyceridemia, exercise training alone increased insulin sensitivity, improved glucose tolerance, and lowered serum triglyceride and cholesterol levels. These improvements did not occur when exercise training alone was given to similar patients with impaired glucose tolerance. In severely obese (X = 125 kg) subjects without diabetes melitus, a 600 calorie diet alone decreased glucose and insulin concentrations and improved glucose tolerance but did not increase insulin sensitivity. The addition of exercise training improved insulin sensitivity. Obese, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus subjects on sulfonylurea therapy alone increased insulin levels but failed to improve insulin sensitivity or glucose levels. In contrast, the addition of exercise training to this medication resulted in improved insulin sensitivity and lowered glucose levels. We conclude that exercise training has major effects on lowering triglyceride levels in hyperlipidemic subjects and can potentiate the effect of diet or drug therapy on glucose metabolism in patients with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus.

  2. Increased abundance of insulin/insulin-like growth factor-I hybrid receptors in skeletal muscle of obese subjects is correlated with in vivo insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, M; Porzio, O; Lauro, D; Borboni, P; Giovannone, B; Zucaro, L; Hribal, M L; Sesti, G

    1998-08-01

    We reported that in noninsulin-dependent diabetes melitus (NIDDM) patients expression of insulin/insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) hybrid receptors is increased in insulin target tissues. Whether this is a defect associated with NIDDM or represents a generalized abnormality associated with insulin resistant states is still unsettled. To address this, we applied a microwell-based immunoassay to measure abundance of insulin receptors, type 1 IGF receptors, and hybrid receptors in muscle of eight normal and eight obese subjects. Maximal insulin binding to insulin receptors was lower in obese than in control subjects (B/T = 1.8 +/- 0.20 and 2.6 +/- 0.30; P < 0.03, respectively) and was negatively correlated with insulinemia (r = -0.60; P < 0.01). Maximal IGF-I binding to type 1 IGF receptors was higher in obese than in controls (B/T = 1.9 +/- 0.20 and 0.86 +/- 0.10; P < 0.0001, respectively) and was negatively correlated with plasma IGF-I levels (r = -0.69; P < 0.003). Hybrid receptor abundance was higher in obese than in normal subjects (B/T = 1.21 +/- 0.14 and 0.44 +/- 0.06; P < 0.0003, respectively) and was negatively correlated with insulin binding (r = -0.60; P < 0.01) and positively correlated with IGF-I binding (r = 0.92; P < 0.0001). Increased abundance of hybrids was correlated with insulinemia (r = 0.70; P < 0.002) and body mass index (r = 0.71; P < 0.0019), whereas it was negatively correlated with in vivo insulin sensitivity measured by ITT (r = -0.67; P < 0.016). These results indicate that downregulation of insulin receptors or upregulation of type 1 IGF receptors because of changes in plasma insulin and IGF-I levels may result in modifications in hybrid receptor abundance.

  3. Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Women after Various Bariatric Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vrbikova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the effects of biliopancreatic diversion (BPD and laparoscopic gastric banding (LAGB on insulin sensitivity and secretion with the effects of laparoscopic gastric plication (P. Methods: A total of 52 obese women (age 30-66 years suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM were prospectively recruited into three study groups: 16 BPD; 16 LAGB, and 20 P. Euglycemic clamps and mixed meal tolerance tests were performed before, at 1 month and at 6 months after bariatric surgery. Beta cell function derived from the meal test parameters was evaluated using mathematical modeling. Results: Glucose disposal per kilogram of fat free mass (a marker of peripheral insulin sensitivity increased significantly in all groups, especially after 1 month. Basal insulin secretion decreased significantly after all three types of operations, with the most marked decrease after BPD compared with P and LAGB. Total insulin secretion decreased significantly only following the BPD. Beta cell glucose sensitivity did not change significantly post-surgery in any of the study groups. Conclusion: We documented similar improvement in insulin sensitivity in obese T2DM women after all three study operations during the 6-month postoperative follow-up. Notably, only BPD led to decreased demand on beta cells (decreased integrated insulin secretion, but without increasing the beta cell glucose sensitivity.

  4. Insulin Sensitivity and Secretion in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Women after Various Bariatric Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbikova, Jana; Kunesova, Marie; Kyrou, Ioannis; Tura, Andrea; Hill, Martin; Grimmichova, Tereza; Dvorakova, Katerina; Sramkova, Petra; Dolezalova, Karin; Lischkova, Olga; Vcelak, Josef; Hainer, Vojtech; Bendlova, Bela; Kumar, Sudhesh; Fried, Martin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effects of biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) and laparoscopic gastric banding (LAGB) on insulin sensitivity and secretion with the effects of laparoscopic gastric plication (P). A total of 52 obese women (age 30-66 years) suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were prospectively recruited into three study groups: 16 BPD; 16 LAGB, and 20 P. Euglycemic clamps and mixed meal tolerance tests were performed before, at 1 month and at 6 months after bariatric surgery. Beta cell function derived from the meal test parameters was evaluated using mathematical modeling. Glucose disposal per kilogram of fat free mass (a marker of peripheral insulin sensitivity) increased significantly in all groups, especially after 1 month. Basal insulin secretion decreased significantly after all three types of operations, with the most marked decrease after BPD compared with P and LAGB. Total insulin secretion decreased significantly only following the BPD. Beta cell glucose sensitivity did not change significantly post-surgery in any of the study groups. We documented similar improvement in insulin sensitivity in obese T2DM women after all three study operations during the 6-month postoperative follow-up. Notably, only BPD led to decreased demand on beta cells (decreased integrated insulin secretion), but without increasing the beta cell glucose sensitivity. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  5. Trajectories of glycaemia, insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in South Asian and white individuals before diagnosis of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulman, Adam; Simmons, Rebecca K; Brunner, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    (FPG), 2 h post-load plasma glucose (2hPG), fasting serum insulin (FSI), 2 h post-load serum insulin (2hSI), HOMA of insulin sensitivity (HOMA2-S) and secretion (HOMA2-B), and the Gutt insulin sensitivity index (ISI0,120) among 120 South Asian and 867 white participants who developed diabetes during.......03) and a higher FPG level at diagnosis (0.27 mmol/l; 95% CI 0.06, 0.48; p = 0.01). They also had higher FSI and 2hSI levels before and at diabetes diagnosis. South Asians had a faster decline and lower HOMA2-S (log e -transformed) at diagnosis compared with white individuals (0.33; 95% CI 0.21, 0.46; p ....001). HOMA2-B increased in both ethnic groups until 7 years before diagnosis and then declined; the initial increase was faster in white individuals. ISI0,120 declined steeply in both groups before diagnosis; levels were lower among South Asians before and at diagnosis. There were no ethnic differences in 2h...

  6. Normocaloric Diet Restores Weight Gain and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Enrico Lombardo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An increased incidence of obesity is registered worldwide, and its association with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes is closely related with increased morbidity and mortality for cardiovascular diseases. A major clinical problem in the management of obesity is the non-adherence or low adherence of patients to a hypo-caloric dietetic restriction. In this study we evaluated in obese mice the effects on insulin sensitivity of shifting from high-calorie foods to normal diet. Male C57BL/6JolaHsd mice (n=20 were fed with high fat diet for a 24 weeks period. Afterwards, body weight, energy and food intake were measured in all animals, together with parameters of insulin sensitivity by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance and plasma glucose levels in response to insulin administration. Moreover, in half of these mice, Glut4 mRNA levels were measured in muscle at the end of the high fat treatment, whereas the rest of the animals (n=10 were shifted to normocaloric diet for 10 weeks, after which the same analyses were carried out. A significant reduction of body weight was found after the transition from high to normal fat diet, and this decrease correlated well with an improvement in insulin sensitivity. In fact, we found a reduction in serum insulin levels and the recovery of insulin responsiveness in terms of glucose disposal measured by insulin tolerance test and Glut4 mRNA and protein expression. These results indicate that obesity related insulin resistance may be rescued by shifting from high fat diet to normocaloric diet.

  7. Insulin sensitivity : modulation by the gut-brain axis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijboer, Annemieke Corine

    2006-01-01

    Er zijn steeds meer aanwijzingen dat neuropeptiden in de hypothalamus en maagdarmhormonen die hun werking hebben op de hypothalamus en betrokken zijn bij de regulatie van voedselinname, ook betrokken zouden kunnen zijn bij de regulatie van insuline gevoeligheid. Daarom hebben we eerst de effecten

  8. Ghrelin differentially affects hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijboer, A.C.; Hoek, A.M. van den; Parlevliet, E.T.; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.; Pijl, H.; Corssmit, E.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of ghrelin on insulin's capacity to suppress endogenous glucose production and promote glucose disposal in mice. To establish whether the growth hormone secretagogue (GHS) receptor can mediate the putative effect of ghrelin on the

  9. Dietary Fat – Insulin Sensitivity and Molecular Substrate Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard, Annemarie

    with a high degree of energy surplus. The attenuation of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake during excess FA and energy intake was related to covalent PDH-E1α mediated downregulation of glucose oxidation. This substrate switch-induced lowering of glucose disposal did, presumably, reflect a sensible response...

  10. Variable reliability of surrogate measures of insulin sensitivity after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Svane, Maria S; Jørgensen, Nils B; Holst, Jens J; Richter, Erik A; Madsbad, Sten

    2017-05-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) induces weight loss and improves insulin sensitivity when evaluated by the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (HEC). Surrogate indices of insulin sensitivity calculated from insulin and glucose concentrations at fasting or after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) are frequently used, but have not been validated after RYGB. Our aim was to evaluate whether surrogate indices reliably estimate changes in insulin sensitivity after RYGB. Four fasting surrogates (inverse-HOMA-IR, HOMA2-%S, QUICKI, revised-QUICKI) and three OGTT-derived surrogates (Matsuda, Gutt, OGIS) were compared with HEC-estimated peripheral insulin sensitivity ( R d or R d /I, depending on how the index was originally validated) and the tracer-determined hepatic insulin sensitivity index (HISI) in patients with preoperative type 2 diabetes ( n = 10) and normal glucose tolerance ( n = 10) 1 wk, 3 mo, and 1 yr postoperatively. Post-RYGB changes in inverse-HOMA-IR and HOMA2-%S did not correlate with changes in R d at any visit, but were comparable to changes in HISI at 1 wk. Changes in QUICKI and revised-QUICKI correlated with R d /I after surgery. Changes in the Matsuda and Gutt indices did not correlate with changes in R d /I and R d , respectively, whereas OGIS changes correlated with R d changes at 1 yr post-RYGB. In conclusion, surrogate measures of insulin sensitivity may not reflect results obtained with gold standard methodology after RYGB, underscoring the importance of critical reflection when surrogate endpoints are used. Fasting surrogate indices may be particularly affected by post-RYGB changes in insulin clearance, whereas the validity of OGTT-derived surrogates may be compromised by surgical rearrangements of the gut. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. A common polymorphism near the interleukin-6 gene modifies the association between dietary fat intake and insulin sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuda C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Cuda1, Bibiana Garcia-Bailo1,2, Mohamed Karmali1,2, Ahmed El-Sohemy1, Alaa Badawi21Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, 2Office of Biotechnology, Genomics and Population Health, Public Health Agency of Canada, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaBackground: Increasing evidence suggests a role for inflammation in the development of type 2 diabetes. Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6, have been associated with insulin resistance, and dietary lipids can increase cytokine production. The objective of this study was to determine whether a single nucleotide polymorphism near the IL6 gene (rs7801406 modifies the relationship between dietary fat and markers of insulin sensitivity.Methods: Subjects were healthy men and women aged 20–29 years from the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Study. Dietary intake was estimated using a one-month semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were taken for genotyping and biomarker measurement.Results: The single nucleotide polymorphism was not associated with any of the measures of insulin sensitivity. However, it modified the relationship between total dietary fat and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P = 0.053 for interaction. Total fat intake was positively related to HOMA-IR in individuals homozygous for the G allele (ß = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = 0.03, but not among heterozygotes. There was an inverse relationship between total fat intake and HOMA-IR in individuals who were homozygous for the A allele (β= –0.012 ± 0.006, P = 0.047.Conclusion: These findings suggest that dietary fat influences insulin sensitivity differently depending on genotype.Keywords: interleukin-6, insulin sensitivity, nutrigenomics, dietary fat

  12. Life in the fat lane: seasonal regulation of insulin sensitivity, food intake, and adipose biology in brown bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigano, K S; Gehring, J L; Evans Hutzenbiler, B D; Chen, A V; Nelson, O L; Vella, C A; Robbins, C T; Jansen, H T

    2017-05-01

    Grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) have evolved remarkable metabolic adaptations including enormous fat accumulation during the active season followed by fasting during hibernation. However, these fluctuations in body mass do not cause the same harmful effects associated with obesity in humans. To better understand these seasonal transitions, we performed insulin and glucose tolerance tests in captive grizzly bears, characterized the annual profiles of circulating adipokines, and tested the anorectic effects of centrally administered leptin at different times of the year. We also used bear gluteal adipocyte cultures to test insulin and beta-adrenergic sensitivity in vitro. Bears were insulin resistant during hibernation but were sensitive during the spring and fall active periods. Hibernating bears remained euglycemic, possibly due to hyperinsulinemia and hyperglucagonemia. Adipokine concentrations were relatively low throughout the active season but peaked in mid-October prior to hibernation when fat content was greatest. Serum glycerol was highest during hibernation, indicating ongoing lipolysis. Centrally administered leptin reduced food intake in October, but not in August, revealing seasonal variation in the brain's sensitivity to its anorectic effects. This was supported by strong phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 labeling within the hypothalamus of hibernating bears; labeling virtually disappeared in active bears. Adipocytes collected during hibernation were insulin resistant when cultured with hibernation serum but became sensitive when cultured with active season serum. Heat treatment of active serum blocked much of this action. Clarifying the cellular mechanisms responsible for the physiology of hibernating bears may inform new treatments for metabolic disorders.

  13. Beneficial impact of Zingiber zerumbet on insulin sensitivity in fructose-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia Ju; Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Chang, Yuan-Shiun; Liu, I-Min

    2012-03-01

    Zingiber zerumbet (L) Smith (Zingiberaceae), commonly known as the pinecone or shampoo ginger, is distributed in many parts of Asia. It has been demonstrated that the aqueous extract of Z. zerumbet exerted a potential blood glucose lowering effect in normoglycemic and streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats. The present study was undertaken to clarify whether the ethanol extract of Zingiber zerumbet (EEZZ) is effective in improving insulin resistance. Insulin resistance was induced in rats by feeding a high-fructose diet for six weeks. Thereafter, rats were maintained on the same diet and treated with oral EEZZ or pioglitazone once daily for eight weeks. At the end of treatment, the degree of basal insulin resistance was measured by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Insulin sensitivity was calculated using the composite whole body insulin sensitivity index (ISIcomp). Protein expression was evaluated by immunoblotting. Phytochemicals in EEZZ were determined through liquid chromatography-tandem mass. Not only curcumin but also quercetin and kaempferol were abundant in EEZZ. EEZZ (300 mg/kg/day) displayed similar characteristics to pioglitazone (20 mg/kg/day) in reducing HOMA-IR and elevating ISIcomp as well as enhancing hepatic glycogen accumulation. Elevated glycosylated hemoglobin levels and hyperinsulinemia were ameliorated by EEZZ. Further, EEZZ enhanced the action of insulin on muscle glucose transporter subtype 4 translocation and attenuated hepatic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase expression. This study suggests that EEZZ may be an ethnomedicine for improving insulin sensitivity. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Low fish oil intake improves insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and muscle metabolism on insulin resistant MSG-obese rats

    OpenAIRE

    Iagher Fabiola; Aikawa Julia; Rocha Ricelli ER; Machado Juliano; Kryczyk Marcelo; Schiessel Dalton; Borghetti Gina; Yamaguchi Adriana A; Pequitto Danielle CT; Coelho Isabela; Brito Gleisson AP; Yamazaki Ricardo K; Naliwaiko Katya; Tanhoffer Ricardo A; Nunes Everson A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Obesity is commonly associated with diabetes, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. The purpose of this study was to determinate the effect of a lower dose of fish oil supplementation on insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, and muscle metabolism in obese rats. Methods Monosodium glutamate (MSG) (4 mg/g body weight) was injected in neonatal Wistar male rats. Three-month-old rats were divided in normal-weight control group (C), coconut fat-treated normal weight group (CO), fish...

  15. Sensitization and translocation of TRPV1 by insulin and IGF-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauza Mary E

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Insulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs maintain vital neuronal functions. Absolute or functional deficiencies of insulin or IGF-I may contribute to neuronal and vascular complications associated with diabetes. Vanilloid receptor 1 (also called TRPV1 is an ion channel that mediates inflammatory thermal nociception and is present on sensory neurons. Here we demonstrate that both insulin and IGF-I enhance TRPV1-mediated membrane currents in heterologous expression systems and cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. Enhancement of membrane current results from both increased sensitivity of the receptor and translocation of TRPV1 from cytosol to plasma membrane. Receptor tyrosine kinases trigger a signaling cascade leading to activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI(3K and protein kinase C (PKC-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1, which is found to be essential for the potentiation. These findings establish a link between the insulin family of trophic factors and vanilloid receptors.

  16. Exercise training reverses the negative effects of chronic L-arginine supplementation on insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueiro, Rafael Barrera; Gerlinger-Romero, Frederico; Guimarães-Ferreira, Lucas; de Castro Barbosa, Thais; Nunes, Maria Tereza

    2017-12-15

    L-Arginine has emerged as an important supplement for athletes and non-athletes in order to improve performance. Arginine has been extensively used as substrate for nitric oxide synthesis, leading to increased vasodilatation and hormonal secretion. However, the chronic consumption of arginine has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate whether chronic arginine supplementation associated with exercise training would have a beneficial impact on insulin sensitivity. We, therefore, treated Wistar rats for 4weeks with arginine, associated or not with exercise training (treadmill). We assessed the somatotropic activation, by evaluating growth hormone (GH) gene expression and protein content in the pituitary, as well is GH concentration in the serum. Additionally, we evaluate whole-body insulin sensitivity, by performing an insulin tolerance test. Skeletal muscle morpho-physiological parameters were also assessed. Insulin sensitivity was impaired in the arginine-treated rats. However, exercise training reversed the negative effects of arginine. Arginine and exercise training increased somatotropic axis function, muscle mass and body weight gain. The combination arginine and exercise training further decreased total fat mass. Our results confirm that chronic arginine supplementation leads to insulin resistance, which can be reversed in the association with exercise training. We provide further evidence that exercise training is an important tool to improve whole-body metabolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Autocrine effects of visfatin on hepatocyte sensitivity to insulin action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škop, V.; Kontrová, K.; Zídek, Václav; Pravenec, Michal; Kazdová, L.; Mikulík, Karel; Sajdok, J.; Zídková, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 4 (2010), s. 615-618 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110805; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MZd(CZ) NR9387; GA MZd(CZ) NR9359 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Visfatin * RNA interference * insulin mimetic effects Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism , Nutrition Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2010

  18. Temporal changes in sphingolipids and systemic insulin sensitivity during the transition from gestation to lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, J. Eduardo; Saed Samii, Sina; Mathews, Alice T.; Lovett, Jacqueline; Haughey, Norman J.; McFadden, Joseph W.

    2017-01-01

    Reduced insulin action develops naturally during the peripartum to ensure maternal nutrient delivery to the fetus and neonate. However, increased insulin resistance can facilitate excessive lipolysis which in turn promotes metabolic disease in overweight dairy cattle. Increased fatty acid availability favors the accumulation of the sphingolipid ceramide and is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, however, the relationship between sphingolipid metabolism and insulin resistance during the peripartum remains largely unknown. Our objectives were to characterize temporal responses in plasma and tissue sphingolipids in lean and overweight peripartal cows and to establish the relationships between sphingolipid supply and lipolysis, hepatic lipid deposition, and systemic insulin action. Twenty-one multiparous lean and overweight Holstein cows were enrolled in a longitudinal study spanning the transition from gestation to lactation (d -21 to 21, relative to parturition). Plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle samples were obtained, and sphingolipids were profiled using LC/MS/MS. Insulin sensitivity was assessed utilizing intravenous insulin and glucose challenges. Our results demonstrated the following: first, insulin resistance develops postpartum concurrently with increased lipolysis and hepatic lipid accumulation; second, ceramides and glycosylated ceramides accumulate during the transition from gestation to lactation and are further elevated in overweight cows; third, ceramide accrual is associated with lipolysis and liver lipid accumulation, and C16:0- and C24:0-ceramide are inversely associated with systemic insulin sensitivity postpartum; fourth, plasma sphingomyelin, a potential source of ceramides reaches a nadir at parturition and is closely associated with feed intake; fifth, select sphingomyelins are lower in the plasma of overweight cows during the peripartal period. Our results demonstrate that dynamic changes occur in peripartal sphingolipids

  19. Temporal changes in sphingolipids and systemic insulin sensitivity during the transition from gestation to lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Eduardo Rico

    Full Text Available Reduced insulin action develops naturally during the peripartum to ensure maternal nutrient delivery to the fetus and neonate. However, increased insulin resistance can facilitate excessive lipolysis which in turn promotes metabolic disease in overweight dairy cattle. Increased fatty acid availability favors the accumulation of the sphingolipid ceramide and is implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, however, the relationship between sphingolipid metabolism and insulin resistance during the peripartum remains largely unknown. Our objectives were to characterize temporal responses in plasma and tissue sphingolipids in lean and overweight peripartal cows and to establish the relationships between sphingolipid supply and lipolysis, hepatic lipid deposition, and systemic insulin action. Twenty-one multiparous lean and overweight Holstein cows were enrolled in a longitudinal study spanning the transition from gestation to lactation (d -21 to 21, relative to parturition. Plasma, liver, and skeletal muscle samples were obtained, and sphingolipids were profiled using LC/MS/MS. Insulin sensitivity was assessed utilizing intravenous insulin and glucose challenges. Our results demonstrated the following: first, insulin resistance develops postpartum concurrently with increased lipolysis and hepatic lipid accumulation; second, ceramides and glycosylated ceramides accumulate during the transition from gestation to lactation and are further elevated in overweight cows; third, ceramide accrual is associated with lipolysis and liver lipid accumulation, and C16:0- and C24:0-ceramide are inversely associated with systemic insulin sensitivity postpartum; fourth, plasma sphingomyelin, a potential source of ceramides reaches a nadir at parturition and is closely associated with feed intake; fifth, select sphingomyelins are lower in the plasma of overweight cows during the peripartal period. Our results demonstrate that dynamic changes occur in

  20. Paradoxical effect of troglitazone in normal animals: enhancement of adipocyte but reduction of liver insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dea, M K; Van Citters, G W; Ader, M; Mittelman, S D; Sunehag, A L; Bergman, R N

    2000-12-01

    Troglitazone is an antidiabetic agent that improves the ability of adipocytes to store triglycerides by enhancing their insulin sensitivity. Although potent in insulin-resistant states, the effect of troglitazone on lipid and glucose turnover in normal animals has not been assessed. Euglycemic clamps were performed as an insulin dose response in normal mongrel dogs (n = 6). Somatostatin was infused without hormone replacement (zero insulin) for 90 min. Insulin was then either portally replaced (1.8 pmol x min(-1) x kg(-1), overreplaced (5.4 pmol x min(-1) x kg(-1)), or overreplaced peripherally to match the systemic levels of the portal overreplacement dose (2.3 pmol x min(-1) x kg(-1)) for 180 min. A total of 600 mg troglitazone was then given orally each day for 3 weeks and continued throughout a second experimental phase, at which point the euglycemic clamps were repeated. In concordance with previous studies, endogenous glucose production (EGP) was similar whether insulin was delivered portally or peripherally, both before and during troglitazone treatment. Although free fatty acids (FFAs) at zero insulin were not affected, there was a leftward shift of the insulin-FFA dose response curve secondary to a suppression of FFA release into plasma. EGP was paradoxically elevated by troglitazone treatment because of an elevation of both gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis. In conclusion, troglitazone reduced hepatic sensitivity to FFAs. Because EGP is a primary determinant of fasting blood glucose, we hypothesize that a protective mechanism exists in normal animals, preventing hypoglycemia during insulin sensitization with troglitazone.

  1. Effects of Chronic Consumption of Sugar-Enriched Diets on Brain Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity in Adult Yucatan Minipigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Ochoa

    Full Text Available Excessive sugar intake might increase the risk to develop eating disorders via an altered reward circuitry, but it remains unknown whether different sugar sources induce different neural effects and whether these effects are dependent from body weight. Therefore, we compared the effects of three high-fat and isocaloric diets varying only in their carbohydrate sources on brain activity of reward-related regions, and assessed whether brain activity is dependent on insulin sensitivity. Twenty-four minipigs underwent 18FDG PET brain imaging following 7-month intake of high-fat diets of which 20% in dry matter weight (36.3% of metabolisable energy was provided by starch, glucose or fructose (n = 8 per diet. Animals were then subjected to a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp to determine peripheral insulin sensitivity. After a 7-month diet treatment, all groups had substantial increases in body weight (from 36.02±0.85 to 63.33±0.81 kg; P<0.0001, regardless of the diet. All groups presented similar insulin sensitivity index (ISI = 1.39±0.10 mL·min-1·μUI·kg. Compared to starch, chronic exposure to fructose and glucose induced bilateral brain activations, i.e. increased basal cerebral glucose metabolism, in several reward-related brain regions including the anterior and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, the orbitofrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate cortex, the caudate and putamen. The lack of differences in insulin sensitivity index and body weight suggests that the observed differences in basal brain glucose metabolism are not related to differences in peripheral insulin sensitivity and weight gain. The differences in basal brain metabolism in reward-related brain areas suggest the onset of cerebral functional alterations induced by chronic consumption of dietary sugars. Further studies should explore the underlying mechanisms, such as the availability of intestinal and brain sugar transporter, or the appearance of addictive-like behavioral

  2. Human skeletal muscle ceramide content is not a major factor in muscle insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbro, M; Baranowski, M; Skov-Jensen, C

    2008-01-01

    : The middle-aged male participants (n=33) were matched for lean body mass and divided into four groups: type 2 diabetes (T2D, n=8), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, n=9), healthy controls (CON, n=8) and endurance-trained (TR, n=8). A two step (28 and 80 mU m(-2) min(-1)) sequential euglycaemic......AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: In skeletal muscle, ceramides may be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance through an attenuation of insulin signalling. This study investigated total skeletal muscle ceramide fatty acid content in participants exhibiting a wide range of insulin sensitivities. METHODS...

  3. Circulating free testosterone in obese men after bariatric surgery increases in parallel with insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella-Carretero, J I; Balsa, J A; Gómez-Martin, J M; Peromingo, R; Huerta, L; Carrasco, M; Arrieta, F; Zamarron, I; Martin-Hidalgo, A; Vazquez, C

    2013-04-01

    Male hypogonadism has been linked to obesity and diabetes. We aimed to study the association of changes in insulin sensitivity and testosterone levels in severe obese patients submitted to bariatric surgery. Prospective intervention study with twenty consecutive patients who underwent bariatric surgery studied before and after significant weight loss. Serum testosterone, SHBG, fasting glucose, and insulin were measured among others. Free testosterone was calculated with the Vermeulen formula and insulin sensitivity with the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA). At baseline, thirteen patients had low total testosterone levels, whereas eight of these patients also had free testosterone levels below the reference range obtained from the control group. After bariatric surgery total testosterone, SHBG, and free testosterone significantly increased and achieved normal values in all evaluated patients. Insulin sensitivity improved in all of them. Multivariate linear regression showed that changes in fasting glucose (β=-1.868, p=0.001), insulin (β=-3.782, p=0.001), weight (β=-0.622, p=0.002), and SHBG (β=-0.635, p=0.022) were associated with changes in free testosterone (adjusted R2=0.936, F=26.613, p=0.001). When insulin resistance calculated by HOMA was in the model instead of insulin and glucose, it also was associated (β=-3.488, p=0.008) with free testosterone (adjusted R2=0.821, F=11.111, p=0.005). Circulating tes tos terone in obese men increases after bariatric surgery in parallel with an improvement in insulin sensitivity.

  4. Effect of exercise on insulin sensitivity in healthy postmenopausal women: the SHAPE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gemert, Willemijn A; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; May, Anne M; Peeters, Petra H; Schuit, Albertine J

    2015-01-01

    An inactive lifestyle is a risk factor for several types of cancer. A proposed pathway through which exercise influences cancer risk is via insulin. We aim to investigate the effect of a one-year exercise intervention on insulin sensitivity, and the role of body fat in this association, in healthy, normal to overweight/obese, postmenopausal women. In the Sex Hormones And Physical Exercise (SHAPE) study, 189 healthy, inactive and postmenopausal women [ages, 50-69 years; body mass index (BMI), 22-40 kg/m(2)] were randomly assigned to a one-year aerobic and strength exercise intervention (150 min/wk), or a control group. Between-group differences in fasting insulin, glucose, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA2) over time were estimated using linear mixed models. Follow-up measurements of insulin sensitivity were available for 181 (95.8%) and 182 (96.3%) women at 4 and 12 months, respectively. The intention-to-treat analysis showed no significant differences between the two study groups [treatment effect ratio of the exercise group vs. control (β; 95% confidence interval): insulin, β, 1.07 (0.96-1.19); glucose, β, 1.01 (0.99-1.02); and HOMA2, β, 1.07 (0.96-1.20)]. Similar results were found in a per protocol analysis in compliant women, and in a subgroup of women who lost >2% body fat [measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA)]. Participation in a one-year aerobic and strength exercise intervention program did not result in changes in insulin sensitivity in healthy postmenopausal and inactive women. Our findings suggest that 150 min/wk of exercise, as recommended by current guidelines, is not enough to achieve improvements in insulin sensitivity and subsequent cancer risk, in healthy postmenopausal women. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Impact of sensor and measurement timing errors on model-based insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, Christopher G; Signal, Matthew; Fisk, Liam; Penning, Sophie; Le Compte, Aaron; Shaw, Geoffrey M; Desaive, Thomas; Chase, J Geoffrey

    2014-05-01

    A model-based insulin sensitivity parameter (SI) is often used in glucose-insulin system models to define the glycaemic response to insulin. As a parameter identified from clinical data, insulin sensitivity can be affected by blood glucose (BG) sensor error and measurement timing error, which can subsequently impact analyses or glycaemic variability during control. This study assessed the impact of both measurement timing and BG sensor errors on identified values of SI and its hour-to-hour variability within a common type of glucose-insulin system model. Retrospective clinical data were used from 270 patients admitted to the Christchurch Hospital ICU between 2005 and 2007 to identify insulin sensitivity profiles. We developed error models for the Abbott Optium Xceed glucometer and measurement timing from clinical data. The effect of these errors on the re-identified insulin sensitivity was investigated by Monte-Carlo analysis. The results of the study show that timing errors in isolation have little clinically significant impact on identified SI level or variability. The clinical impact of changes to SI level induced by combined sensor and timing errors is likely to be significant during glycaemic control. Identified values of SI were mostly (90th percentile) within 29% of the true value when influenced by both sources of error. However, these effects may be overshadowed by physiological factors arising from the critical condition of the patients or other under-modelled or un-modelled dynamics. Thus, glycaemic control protocols that are designed to work with data from glucometers need to be robust to these errors and not be too aggressive in dosing insulin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and insulin release in European non-diabetic carriers of a polymorphism upstream of CDKN2A and CDKN2B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hribal, M L; Presta, I; Procopio, T

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the rs10811661 polymorphism near the CDKN2B/CDKN2A genes with glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and insulin release in three samples of white people with European ancestry.......The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the rs10811661 polymorphism near the CDKN2B/CDKN2A genes with glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and insulin release in three samples of white people with European ancestry....

  7. Differential sensitivity of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis to insulin infusions in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiasson, J L; Liljenquist, J E; Finger, F E; Lacy, W W

    1976-04-01

    The suppressive effect of insulin on hepatic glucose production is generally recognized. Though it is well established that this effect is at least partially due to inhibition of glycogenolysis, controversy still exists about insulin's effect on gluconeogenesis. The present study was undertaken to determine whether insulin could affect gluconeogenesis from alanine in the intact dog and to compare the effect of insulin on glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis. In anesthetized dogs fasted overnight, blood samples were drawn simultaneously from a femoral artery and hepatic vein. Alanine-U-14C, 10 mu Ci./kg., was infused over 110 minutes. A constant insulin infusion at either 1 or 5 mU./kg./min. was begun at 50 minutes, and blood glucose concentration was maintained by a variable glucose infusion. When insulin was infused at 1 mU./kg./min., resulting in plasma immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels of 73 +/- 10 muU./ml., the net splanchnic glucose production (NSGP) was suppressed from 2.7 +/- 2 mg./kg./min. to virtually zero. In constrast, this small increment in insulin concentration had no demonstrable effect on the net splanchnic uptake of alanine or on the conversion of plasma alanine to glucose (7.9 +/- 0.3 mu mol/min.). Insulin infused at 5 mU./kg./min. resulted in IRI levels of 240 +/- 25 muU./ml. This higher insulin concentration was associated with a marked suppression of both the NSGP (100 per cent) and the conversion of plasma alanine to glucose (90 per cent) but did not affect the extraction of alanine by the splanchnic bed. Doses of both 1 and 5 mU./kg./min. were associated with a 35 per cent fall in immunoreactive glucagon levels. These data demonstrate that (1) glycogenolysis is more sensitive than gluconeogenesis to the inhibitory effect of small increments in insulin concentrations, (2) gluconeogenesis could be suppressed by insulin but only at higher insulin concentrations, (3) this suppression of gluconeogenesis from alanine by insulin was due to an

  8. MiR-155 Enhances Insulin Sensitivity by Coordinated Regulation of Multiple Genes in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available miR-155 plays critical roles in numerous physiological and pathological processes, however, its function in the regulation of blood glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity and underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we reveal that miR-155 levels are downregulated in serum from type 2 diabetes (T2D patients, suggesting that miR-155 might be involved in blood glucose control and diabetes. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies in mice demonstrate that miR-155 has no effects on the pancreatic β-cell proliferation and function. Global transgenic overexpression of miR-155 in mice leads to hypoglycaemia, improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Conversely, miR-155 deficiency in mice causes hyperglycemia, impaired glucose tolerance and insulin resistance. In addition, consistent with a positive regulatory role of miR-155 in glucose metabolism, miR-155 positively modulates glucose uptake in all cell types examined, while mice overexpressing miR-155 transgene show enhanced glycolysis, and insulin-stimulated AKT and IRS-1 phosphorylation in liver, adipose tissue or skeletal muscle. Furthermore, we reveal these aforementioned phenomena occur, at least partially, through miR-155-mediated repression of important negative regulators (i.e. C/EBPβ, HDAC4 and SOCS1 of insulin signaling. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that miR-155 is a positive regulator of insulin sensitivity with potential applications for diabetes treatment.

  9. A Small Insulinomimetic Molecule Also Improves Insulin Sensitivity in Diabetic Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Mukherjee

    Full Text Available Dramatic increase of diabetes over the globe is in tandem with the increase in insulin requirement. This is because destruction and dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells are of common occurrence in both Type1 diabetes and Type2 diabetes, and insulin injection becomes a compulsion. Because of several problems associated with insulin injection, orally active insulin mimetic compounds would be ideal substitute. Here we report a small molecule, a peroxyvanadate compound i.e. DmpzH[VO(O22(dmpz], henceforth referred as dmp, which specifically binds to insulin receptor with considerable affinity (KD-1.17μM thus activating insulin receptor tyrosine kinase and its downstream signaling molecules resulting increased uptake of [14C] 2 Deoxy-glucose. Oral administration of dmp to streptozotocin treated BALB/c mice lowers blood glucose level and markedly stimulates glucose and fatty acid uptake by skeletal muscle and adipose tissue respectively. In db/db mice, it greatly improves insulin sensitivity through excess expression of PPARγ and its target genes i.e. adiponectin, CD36 and aP2. Study on the underlying mechanism demonstrated that excess expression of Wnt3a decreased PPARγ whereas dmp suppression of Wnt3a gene increased PPARγ expression which subsequently augmented adiponectin. Increased production of adiponectin in db/db mice due to dmp effected lowering of circulatory TG and FFA levels, activates AMPK in skeletal muscle and this stimulates mitochondrial biogenesis and bioenergetics. Decrease of lipid load along with increased mitochondrial activity greatly improves energy homeostasis which has been found to be correlated with the increased insulin sensitivity. The results obtained with dmp, therefore, strongly indicate that dmp could be a potential candidate for insulin replacement therapy.

  10. Effect of weight reduction on insulin sensitivity, sex hormone-binding globulin, sex hormones and gonadotrophins in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkebaek, N H; Lange, Aksel; Holland-Fischer, P

    2010-01-01

    Obesity in men is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and hypoandrogenism, while obesity in women is associated with reduced insulin sensitivity and hyperandrogenism. In children, the effect of obesity and weight reduction on the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis is rarely investigated....... The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of weight reduction in obese Caucasian children on insulin sensitivity, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), DHEAS and the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis....

  11. High intensity interval training improves liver and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinko, Katarina; Sikkema, Sarah R.; Samaan, M. Constantine; Kemp, Bruce E.; Fullerton, Morgan D.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endurance exercise training reduces insulin resistance, adipose tissue inflammation and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), an effect often associated with modest weight loss. Recent studies have indicated that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) lowers blood glucose in individuals with type 2 diabetes independently of weight loss; however, the organs affected and mechanisms mediating the glucose lowering effects are not known. Intense exercise increases phosphorylation and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in muscle, adipose tissue and liver. AMPK and ACC are key enzymes regulating fatty acid metabolism, liver fat content, adipose tissue inflammation and insulin sensitivity but the importance of this pathway in regulating insulin sensitivity with HIIT is unknown. Methods In the current study, the effects of 6 weeks of HIIT were examined using obese mice with serine–alanine knock-in mutations on the AMPK phosphorylation sites of ACC1 and ACC2 (AccDKI) or wild-type (WT) controls. Results HIIT lowered blood glucose and increased exercise capacity, food intake, basal activity levels, carbohydrate oxidation and liver and adipose tissue insulin sensitivity in HFD-fed WT and AccDKI mice. These changes occurred independently of weight loss or reductions in adiposity, inflammation and liver lipid content. Conclusions These data indicate that HIIT lowers blood glucose levels by improving adipose and liver insulin sensitivity independently of changes in adiposity, adipose tissue inflammation, liver lipid content or AMPK phosphorylation of ACC. PMID:26909307

  12. Long-term treatment with losartan versus atenolol improves insulin sensitivity in hypertension: ICARUS, a LIFE substudy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael H; Fossum, Eigil; Høieggen, Aud

    2005-01-01

    Hypertension and insulin resistance might be associated through peripheral vascular hypertrophy/rarefaction which compromises skeletal muscle blood flow and decreases glucose uptake, inducing insulin resistance. We hypothesized that treatment with losartan as compared to atenolol would improve...... insulin sensitivity through regression of peripheral vascular hypertrophy/rarefaction....

  13. Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths Is Associated with Increased Insulin Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiria, Aprilianto E; Hamid, Firdaus; Wammes, Linda J; Prasetyani, Margaretta A; Dekkers, Olaf M; May, Linda; Kaisar, Maria M M; Verweij, Jaco J; Guigas, Bruno; Partono, Felix; Sartono, Erliyani; Supali, Taniawati; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Smit, Johannes W A

    2015-01-01

    Given that helminth infections have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in animal studies, which may be explained by beneficial effects on energy balance or by a shift in the immune system to an anti-inflammatory profile, we investigated whether soil-transmitted helminth (STH)-infected subjects are more insulin sensitive than STH-uninfected subjects. We performed a cross-sectional study on Flores island, Indonesia, an area with high prevalence of STH infections. From 646 adults, stool samples were screened for Trichuris trichiura by microscopy and for Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis by qPCR. No other helminth was found. We collected data on body mass index (BMI, kg/m2), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), fasting blood glucose (FBG, mmol/L), insulin (pmol/L), high sensitive C-reactive protein (ng/ml) and Immunoglobulin E (IU/ml). The homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMAIR) was calculated and regression models were used to assess the association between STH infection status and insulin resistance. 424 (66%) participants had at least one STH infection. STH infected participants had lower BMI (23.2 vs 22.5 kg/m2, p value = 0.03) and lower HOMAIR (0.97 vs 0.81, p value = 0.05). In an age-, sex- and BMI-adjusted model a significant association was seen between the number of infections and HOMAIR: for every additional infection with STH species, the HOMAIR decreased by 0.10 (p for linear trend 0.01). This effect was mainly accounted for by a decrease in insulin of 4.9 pmol/L for every infection (p for trend = 0.07). STH infections are associated with a modest improvement of insulin sensitivity, which is not accounted for by STH effects on BMI alone.

  14. PDE 5 inhibitor improves insulin sensitivity by enhancing mitochondrial function in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hea Min; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Kim, Koon Soon; Lee, Jae Min; Hong, Jun Hwa; Park, Kang Seo

    2017-11-04

    Adipocytes are involved in many metabolic disorders. It was recently reported that phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) is expressed in human adipose tissue. In addition, PDE5 inhibitors have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in humans. However, the mechanism underlying the role of PDE5 inhibitors as an insulin sensitizer remains largely unknown. The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the PDE5 inhibitor udenafil in insulin signaling in adipocytes and whether this is mediated through the regulation of mitochondrial function. To study the mechanism underlying the insulin sensitizing action of PDE5 inhibitors, we evaluated quantitative changes in protein or mRNA levels of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) complex, oxygen consumption rate (OCR), and fatty acid oxidation with varying udenafil concentrations in 3T3-L1 cells. Our cell study suggested that udenafil enhanced the insulin signaling pathway in 3T3-L1 cells. Following udenafil treatment, basal mitochondrial OCR, maximal OxPhos capacity, and OxPhos gene expression significantly increased. Finally, we examined whether udenafil can affect the fatty acid oxidation process. Treatment of 3T3-L1 cells with udenafil (10 and 20 μM) significantly increased fatty acid oxidation rate in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) significantly increased. We demonstrated that the PDE5 inhibitor udenafil enhances insulin sensitivity by improving mitochondrial function in 3T3-L1 cells. This might be the mechanism underlying the PDE5 inhibitor-enhanced insulin signaling in adipocytes. This also suggests that udenafil may provide benefit in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other related cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths Is Associated with Increased Insulin Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprilianto E Wiria

    Full Text Available Given that helminth infections have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in animal studies, which may be explained by beneficial effects on energy balance or by a shift in the immune system to an anti-inflammatory profile, we investigated whether soil-transmitted helminth (STH-infected subjects are more insulin sensitive than STH-uninfected subjects.We performed a cross-sectional study on Flores island, Indonesia, an area with high prevalence of STH infections.From 646 adults, stool samples were screened for Trichuris trichiura by microscopy and for Ascaris lumbricoides, Necator americanus, Ancylostoma duodenale, and Strongyloides stercoralis by qPCR. No other helminth was found. We collected data on body mass index (BMI, kg/m2, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, fasting blood glucose (FBG, mmol/L, insulin (pmol/L, high sensitive C-reactive protein (ng/ml and Immunoglobulin E (IU/ml. The homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMAIR was calculated and regression models were used to assess the association between STH infection status and insulin resistance.424 (66% participants had at least one STH infection. STH infected participants had lower BMI (23.2 vs 22.5 kg/m2, p value = 0.03 and lower HOMAIR (0.97 vs 0.81, p value = 0.05. In an age-, sex- and BMI-adjusted model a significant association was seen between the number of infections and HOMAIR: for every additional infection with STH species, the HOMAIR decreased by 0.10 (p for linear trend 0.01. This effect was mainly accounted for by a decrease in insulin of 4.9 pmol/L for every infection (p for trend = 0.07.STH infections are associated with a modest improvement of insulin sensitivity, which is not accounted for by STH effects on BMI alone.

  16. Control of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity by the Let-7 family of microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Robert J A; Olson, Eric N

    2011-12-27

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder worldwide and a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression that have been implicated in many biological processes, including metabolism. Here we show that the Let-7 family of microRNAs regulates glucose metabolism in multiple organs. Global and pancreas-specific overexpression of Let-7 in mice resulted in impaired glucose tolerance and reduced glucose-induced pancreatic insulin secretion. Mice overexpressing Let-7 also had decreased fat mass and body weight, as well as reduced body size. Global knockdown of the Let-7 family with an antimiR was sufficient to prevent and treat impaired glucose tolerance in mice with diet-induced obesity, at least in part by improving insulin sensitivity in liver and muscle. AntimiR treatment of mice on a high-fat diet also resulted in increased lean and muscle mass, but not increased fat mass, and prevented ectopic fat deposition in the liver. These findings demonstrate that Let-7 regulates multiple aspects of glucose metabolism and suggest antimiR-induced Let-7 knockdown as a potential treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, our Cre-inducible Let-7-transgenic mice provide a unique model for studying tissue-specific aspects of body growth and type 2 diabetes.

  17. Control of glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity by the Let-7 family of microRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Robert J. A.; Olson, Eric N.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common metabolic disorder worldwide and a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. MicroRNAs are negative regulators of gene expression that have been implicated in many biological processes, including metabolism. Here we show that the Let-7 family of microRNAs regulates glucose metabolism in multiple organs. Global and pancreas-specific overexpression of Let-7 in mice resulted in impaired glucose tolerance and reduced glucose-induced pancreatic insulin secretion. Mice overexpressing Let-7 also had decreased fat mass and body weight, as well as reduced body size. Global knockdown of the Let-7 family with an antimiR was sufficient to prevent and treat impaired glucose tolerance in mice with diet-induced obesity, at least in part by improving insulin sensitivity in liver and muscle. AntimiR treatment of mice on a high-fat diet also resulted in increased lean and muscle mass, but not increased fat mass, and prevented ectopic fat deposition in the liver. These findings demonstrate that Let-7 regulates multiple aspects of glucose metabolism and suggest antimiR-induced Let-7 knockdown as a potential treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, our Cre-inducible Let-7-transgenic mice provide a unique model for studying tissue-specific aspects of body growth and type 2 diabetes. PMID:22160727

  18. Effect of intensity of aerobic training on insulin sensitivity/resistance in recreationally active adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Carmine R; Swain, David P; Colberg, Sheri R; Dowling, Elizabeth A; Baskette, Kim; Zarrabi, Lida; Gandrakota, Ramya; Kotipalli, Ushasri; Sechrist, Scott R; Somma, C Thomas

    2013-08-01

    Previous research demonstrates that moderate-intensity aerobic exercise improves insulin effectiveness. Whether higher exercise intensities improve insulin action more so is unclear. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various levels of aerobic intensity on insulin action in young adult men and women. Forty-five healthy subjects (22.2 ± 3.9 years; 169 ± 9 cm; 74.5 ± 17.8 kg) were matched for age, gender, and VO2max and randomly assigned to moderate-intensity (50% heart rate reserve [HRR]), vigorous-intensity (75% HRR), maximal-intensity intervals (95/50% HRR) or a non-exercising control group. Subjects completed a 6-week training protocol on a stationary bicycle ergometer. Weekly duration and frequency of training varied to ensure equivalent energy expenditure across groups. The homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) and quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) were used to assess insulin effectiveness. Significant increases occurred after training in VO2max in the vigorous-intensity(15.4%) and maximal-intensity(14.2%) groups (p < 0.01) but not the moderate-intensity or control group. There were no significant changes in insulin effectiveness in any exercise group. Training intensity did not significantly affect insulin effectiveness in a young adult population as assessed by HOMA or QUICKI; it did, however, significantly affect VO2max.

  19. Substrate Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity During Fasting in Obese Human Subjects: Impact of GH Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Morten Høgild; Svart, Mads Vandsted; Lebeck, Janne; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Møller, Niels; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2017-04-01

    Insulin resistance and metabolic inflexibility are features of obesity and are amplified by fasting. Growth hormone (GH) secretion increases during fasting and GH causes insulin resistance. To study the metabolic effects of GH blockade during fasting in obese subjects. Nine obese males were studied thrice in a randomized design: (1) after an overnight fast (control), (2) after 72 hour fasting (fasting), and (3) after 72 hour fasting with GH blockade (pegvisomant) [fasting plus GH antagonist (GHA)]. Each study day consisted of a 4-hour basal period followed by a 2-hour hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp combined with indirect calorimetry, assessment of glucose and palmitate turnover, and muscle and fat biopsies. GH levels increased with fasting (P fasting-induced reduction of serum insulin-like growth factor I was enhanced by GHA (P Fasting increased lipolysis and lipid oxidation independent of GHA, but fasting plus GHA caused a more pronounced suppression of lipid intermediates in response to hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic clamp. Fasting-induced insulin resistance was abrogated by GHA (P Fasting plus GHA also caused elevated glycerol levels and reduced levels of counterregulatory hormones. Fasting significantly reduced the expression of antilipolytic signals in adipose tissue independent of GHA. Suppression of GH activity during fasting in obese subjects reverses insulin resistance and amplifies insulin-stimulated suppression of lipid intermediates, indicating that GH is an important regulator of substrate metabolism, insulin sensitivity, and metabolic flexibility also in obese subjects. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  20. Anti-hyperglycemic and insulin sensitizer effects of turmeric and its principle constituent curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Zeinab; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Mirmiran, Parvin

    2014-10-01

    Turmeric is obtained from the plant Curcuma longa L; its major constituent, curcumin, is a polyphenol with multiple effects which can modulate some signaling pathways. Insulin resistance is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. In addition, Insulin resistance in peripheral tissue is one of the most important reasons of hyperglycemia which can cause global or systemic effects. The present study reviewed studies published in PubMed from 1998 to 2013, indicating the role of curcumin in attenuation of many pathophysiological processes involved in development and progression of hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Curcumin can reduce blood glucose level by reducing the hepatic glucose production, suppression of hyperglycemia-induced inflammatory state, stimulation of glucose uptake by up-regulation of GLUT4, GLUT2 and GLUT3 genes expressions, activation of AMP kinase, promoting the PPAR ligand-binding activity, stimulation of insulin secretion from pancreatic tissues, improvement in pancreatic cell function, and reduction of insulin resistance. Curcumin has antihyperglycemic and insulin sensitizer effects. Thereby, more studies evaluating the effects of curcumin on hyperglycemic state and insulin resistance in related disorders such as diabetes are recommended.

  1. Differentiation of the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, S.C.; Baly, D.L.; Cushman, S.W.; Lane, M.D.; Simpson, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    3T3-L1 fibroblasts differentiate in culture to resemble adipocytes both morphologically and biochemically. Insulin-sensitive glucose transport, as measured by 2-deoxy-[1- 14 C]- glucose uptake in the undifferentiated cell is small (2X). In contrast, the rate of glucose transport in fully differentiated cells is elevated 15-fold over basal in the presence of insulin. To determine if this is due to an increase in the number of transporters/cell or accessibility to the transporters, the number of transporters was measured in subcellular fractions over differentiation using a 3 H-cytochalasin B binding assay. The increase in the rate of insulin-sensitive glucose transport directly parallels an increase in the number of transporters which reside in an insulin-responsive intracellular compartment. This observation was confirmed by identifying the transporters by immunoblotting using an antibody generated against the human erythrocyte transporter. The molecular weight of this transporter increases over differentiation from a single band of 40kDa to a heterogeneous triplet of 40, 44 and 48kDa. These data suggest that the transporter undergoes differential processing and that the functional, insulin-responsive transporter may be different from the insulin-insensitive (basal) transporter

  2. Plasma adiponectin concentration is associated with skeletal muscle insulin receptor tyrosine phosphorylation, and low plasma concentration precedes a decrease in whole-body insulin sensitivity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefan, Norbert; Vozarova, Barbora; Funahashi, Tohru

    2002-01-01

    concentration and skeletal muscle IR tyrosine phosphorylation and 2) the prospective effect of plasma adiponectin concentration at baseline on change in insulin sensitivity. Fasting plasma adiponectin concentration, body composition (hydrodensitometry or dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), insulin sensitivity.......02, respectively). Longitudinally, after adjustment for age, sex, and percent body fat, low plasma adiponectin concentration at baseline was associated with a decrease in insulin sensitivity (P = 0.04). In conclusion, our cross-sectional data suggest a role of physiological concentration of fasting plasma...

  3. Insulin sensitivity is reduced in children with high body-fat regardless of BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fairchild, Timothy J; Klakk, Heidi; Heidemann, Malene

    2018-01-01

    BF% was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured and the homoeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) used to assess insulin sensitivity. RESULTS: Approximately 8% of children classified as normal weight...... by BMI had high BF% (NW + Adipose). Children with high BF% had significantly higher insulin (NW + adipose: 32.3%; OW/OB + Adipose: 52.2%) and HOMA-IR scores (NW + Adipose: 32.3%; OW/OB + Adipose: 55.3%) than children classified as NW without high BF% (reference group; NW + NonAdipose). Adjusting for CRF...

  4. mTORC2 Regulation of Muscle Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a pandemic that continues to grow at alarming rates. In healthy individuals, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled. After eating a meal blood glucose levels rise. This triggers insulin release from the pancreas, which in turn signals organs like the liver, fat...... insulin sensitivity in mouse skeletal muscle, as insulin stimulated glucose uptake into muscle was reduced. These effects were likely due to the loss of mTORC2 activity, because specific pharmacological mTORC1 inhibition did not impair insulin stimulated glucose uptake. Furthermore, the reduction...... that mTORC2 controls skeletal muscle glycolysis and lipid storage. In agreement, Ric mKO mice exhibited reduced muscle glycolytic flux, greater reliance on fat as an energy substrate, re-partitioning of lean to fat mass and higher intramyocellular triacylglycerol (IMTG) levels compared to Ric WT mice...

  5. Sensitive double-antibody method for simultaneous determination of insulin and growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koparanova, O.; Sotirov, G.; Tyrkolev, N.

    1982-01-01

    A method is described for simultaneous determination of insulin and growth hormone in one sample, using double-antibody technique. The method is characterized by appreciable sensitivity (2.5 μE/ml for insulin and a.2 ng/ml for growth hormone), exactness (variation quotient 6-16 per cent) and reproducibility (96.9-117 per cent). There was no statistically significant difference in the insulin and growth hormone values of the same sera, determined by the here suggested and the standard methods. The necessary test material for examination of either hormone is minimal (0.2 ml). One may thus extend the possibilities for radioimmunologic determination of insulin and growth hormone, when only minor amounts of serum or other biological fluid are available. The method is also less time consuming. Results are reported of statistical processing of an experimental model and different sera determined by the standard method and the one described by the authors. (author)

  6. Gender differences in serum leptin in obese people: relationships with testosterone, body fat distribution and insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettor, R; De Pergola, G; Pagano, C; Englaro, P; Laudadio, E; Giorgino, F; Blum, W F; Giorgino, R; Federspil, G

    1997-12-01

    Testosterone levels are decreased in obese men but increased in obese women. The interplay between gonadal steroids and leptin is, at present, far from being elucidated. This study was carried out to investigate the relationship between serum leptin, plasma insulin, insulin sensitivity and free testosterone in 46 men (29 obese and 17 lean) and 65 premenopausal women (42 obese and 23 lean). In all subjects, anthropometric parameters and serum levels of insulin, leptin, free testosterone (T), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate and sex hormone-binding globulin were measured. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and an insulin tolerance test were also performed to determine the insulin sensitivity index. Our results show a significant difference in serum leptin between lean and obese men (3.19 +/- 0.71 vs. 20.28 +/- 0.26 ng mL-1; P < 0.0005) as well as between lean and obese women (10.78 +/- 2.14 vs. 34.79 +/- 2.26 ng mL-1; P < 0.00001). Basal T concentration in the obese men was significantly lower than in the control group (18.6 +/- 1.3 vs. 23.3 +/- 1.4 ng L-1; P < 0.01), whereas in the obese women it was significantly higher than in the control group (2.0 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.3 +/- 0.1 ng L-1; P < 0.05). When multiple linear regression was performed without body mass index (BMI) in the statistical model, leptin was correlated with basal insulin (P < 0.0001), insulin sensitivity (P < 0.0001) and T (P < 0.0001) in both men and women. When BMI was included in the model as an independent variable, leptin was significantly correlated only with BMI (P < 0.0001), the degree of insulin resistance (P < 0.05) and T (only in men, P < 0.05). This study confirms that serum leptin is strongly correlated with the degree of obesity and female sex. The negative correlation between leptin and T in men, independent of BMI, is consistent with the hypothesis that T may possess an inhibitory effect on adipocyte ob gene transcription.

  7. Fibrinolysis and insulin sensitivity in imidapril and candesartan (FISIC study) recipients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogari, Roberto; Zoppi, Annalisa; Salvadeo, Sibilla A T; Mugellini, Amedeo; Lazzari, Pierangelo; Santoro, Tara; Derosa, Giuseppe

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of imidapril and candesartan on fibrinolysis and insulin sensitivity in normoweight hypertensive patients. After a 2-week wash-out period, 61 patients with mild-to-moderate hypertension were randomized to imidapril or candesartan for 12 weeks. Blood pressure (BP), plasma tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) antigen activities were evaluated at baseline and during treatment. The patients underwent a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (insulin sensitivity was evaluated as glucose infusion rate during the last 30 min) and a desmopressin test (with desmopressin infusion in the brachial artery) to evaluate endothelial ability to release t-PA. Imidapril and candesartan induced similar systolic/diastolic BP reductions (-16/12.6 and -16.1/12.2 mm Hg, respectively, P<0.001 vs. baseline). Imidapril increased glucose infusion rate (+1.1 mg min(-1) per kg, P<0.02), whereas candesartan did not change it. Both drugs decreased PAI-1 antigen activity after 4 weeks of treatment; subsequently, only the decreasing effect of imidapril was sustained throughout the 12 weeks, whereas candesartan increased PAI-1 activity at week 12 (P<0.05 vs. baseline, P<0.01 vs. imidapril). Activity of t-PA decreased with candesartan (from 0.48±0.16 to 0.43±0.14 IU ml(-1), P<0.05) but not with imidapril. Activity of t-PA in response to desmopressin was increased more by imidapril (+4.45 IU ml(-1)) than by candesartan (+2.73 IU ml(-1), P<0.01 vs. imidapril). These results indicate that in normoweight hypertensive patients, despite similar BP reduction, imidapril but not candesartan improved the fibrinolytic balance, suggesting that mechanisms other than Ang II inhibition, possibly including bradykinin-mediated effects on insulin sensitivity and endothelial function, may be responsible for these different effects.

  8. Evidence That the Sympathetic Nervous System Elicits Rapid, Coordinated, and Reciprocal Adjustments of Insulin Secretion and Insulin Sensitivity During Cold Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Gregory J; Muta, Kenjiro; Kaiyala, Karl J; Rojas, Jennifer M; Scarlett, Jarrad M; Matsen, Miles E; Nelson, Jarrell T; Acharya, Nikhil K; Piccinini, Francesca; Stefanovski, Darko; Bergman, Richard N; Taborsky, Gerald J; Kahn, Steven E; Schwartz, Michael W

    2017-04-01

    Dynamic adjustment of insulin secretion to compensate for changes of insulin sensitivity that result from alteration of nutritional or metabolic status is a fundamental aspect of glucose homeostasis. To investigate the role of the brain in this coupling process, we used cold exposure as an experimental paradigm because the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) helps to coordinate the major shifts of tissue glucose utilization needed to ensure that increased thermogenic needs are met. We found that glucose-induced insulin secretion declined by 50% in rats housed at 5°C for 28 h, and yet, glucose tolerance did not change, owing to a doubling of insulin sensitivity. These potent effects on insulin secretion and sensitivity were fully reversed by returning animals to room temperature (22°C) for 4 h or by intravenous infusion of the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist phentolamine for only 30 min. By comparison, insulin clearance was not affected by cold exposure or phentolamine infusion. These findings offer direct evidence of a key role for the brain, acting via the SNS, in the rapid, highly coordinated, and reciprocal changes of insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity that preserve glucose homeostasis in the setting of cold exposure. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  9. Glucose effectiveness and insulin sensitivity measurements derived from the non-insulin-assisted minimal model and the clamp techniques are concordant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jan Erik; Alford, Frank; Ward, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the concordance between glucose effectiveness (SG) and insulin sensitivity (SI), derived from the unmodified dynamic non-insulin-assisted intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) implemented by SG(MM) and SI(MM); simulation analysis and modelling/conversational interaction (SAAM....../CONSAM) versus the eu/hyperglycaemic basal insulinaemic and the euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp (SG(CLAMP) and SI(CLAMP))....

  10. Circulating cytokines as determinants of weight loss-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Edward P; Reeds, Dominic N; Ezekiel, Uthayashanker R; Albert, Stewart G; Villareal, Dennis T

    2017-01-01

    Dietary calorie restriction and exercise promote weight loss and may have additive effects for improving insulin sensitivity, independent of weight loss. It is not known if these effects are attributable to changes in circulating cytokines. We evaluated the hypothesis that modest, matched weight loss induced by calorie restriction and exercise have additive effects on circulating cytokines and these changes correlate with improvements in insulin sensitivity. Overweight and sedentary women and men (n = 52, 45-65 years) were randomized to undergo 7 % weight loss by using 3-6 months of calorie restriction, exercise, or a combination of both calorie restriction and exercise. Concentrations of cytokines and hormones were measured in fasting and oral glucose tolerance test blood samples. Insulin sensitivity was estimated based on oral glucose tolerance test for glucose and insulin. With all groups combined, fasting leptin (p weight adiponectin (p = 0.04) decreased and pentraxin-3 increased (p calorie restriction had additive effects on leptin, with a similar trend for high molecular weight adiponectin. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and C-reactive protein concentrations did not change. Calorie restriction and exercise had opposite effects on soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1. Modest weight loss in overweight adults decreases serum leptin and high molecular weight adiponectin, and increases pentraxin-3 concentrations in a manner that correlates with increased insulin sensitivity. Exercise has additive effects to those induced by calorie restriction for reductions in leptin and possibly adiponectin. These changes may contribute to the additive effects of calorie restriction and exercise for improving insulin sensitivity.

  11. Transient hypoxia reprograms differentiating adipocytes for enhanced insulin sensitivity and triglyceride accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hongyun; Gao, Zhanguo; Zhao, Zhiyun; Weng, Jianping; Ye, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of transient (2-4 h) hypoxia on metabolic reprogramming of adipocytes. Methods The impact of transient hypoxia on metabolic reprogramming was investigated in 3T3-L1 cells before and after differentiation. Glucose uptake, fatty acid oxidation, lipolysis, and mitochondria were examined to determine the hypoxia effects. Preadipocytes were exposed to transient hypoxia (4h/day) in the course of differentiation. Insulin sensitivity and TG accumulation was examined in the cells at the end of differentiation to determine the reprogramming effects. AMPK activity and gene expression were determined by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blotting in search for mechanism of the reprogramming. Results In acute response to hypoxia, adipocytes exhibited an increase in insulin-dependent and -independent glucose uptake. Fatty acid β-oxidation and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity were decreased. Multiple exposures of differentiating adipocytes to transient hypoxia enhanced insulin signaling, TG accumulation, expression of antioxidant genes in differentiated adipocytes in the absence of hypoxia. The metabolic memory was associated with elevated AMPK activity and gene expression (GLUT1, PGC-1α, PPARγ, SREBP, NRF-1, ESRRα, LPL). The enhanced insulin sensitivity was blocked by an AMPK inhibitor. Conclusions Repeated exposure of differentiating adipocytes to transient hypoxia is able to reprogram the cells for increased TG accumulation and enhanced insulin sensitivity. The metabolic alterations were observed in post-differentiated cells under normoxia. The reprogramming involves AMPK activation and gene expression in the metabolic pathways in cytosol and mitochondria. PMID:26219415

  12. Insulin sensitivity and its relation to hormones in adolescent boys and girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldhoon-Hainerová, Irena; Zamrazilová, Hana; Hill, Martin; Hainer, Vojtěch

    2017-02-01

    A subset of obese individuals lacks cardiometabolic impairment. We aimed to analyze hormonal profiles of insulin-sensitive obese (ISO) and insulin-resistant obese (IRO) adolescents and determine hormonal predictors of homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). A threshold of 3.16 of HOMA-IR was used to classify ISO (HOMA-IR thyroid function tests, adiponectin, ghrelin and leptin concentrations played an important role in both genders. Prolactin, testosterone and glucagon contributed to the model only in boys, while progesterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels only in girls. After Bonferroni correction levels of leptin, adiponectin, leptin/adiponectin ratio, SHBG and fT4/TSH ratio in both genders, testosterone and glucagon levels in boys and levels of TSH and fT3 in girls were related to insulin sensitivity. Metabolic health defined by HOMA-IR is partly predicted by various hormones. Some of them are gender specific. Free T4/TSH and leptin/adiponectin ratios are related to insulin sensitivity in both genders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Muscle Arnt/Hif1β Is Dispensable in Myofiber Type Determination, Vascularization and Insulin Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marie Badin

    Full Text Available Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Nuclear Translocator/ hypoxia-inducible factor 1 beta (ARNT/ HIF1β, a member of bHLH-PAS family of transcriptional factors, plays a critical role in metabolic homeostasis, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. The contributions of ARNT in pancreas, liver and adipose tissue to energy balance through gene regulation have been described. Surprisingly, the impact of ARNT signaling in the skeletal muscles, one of the major organs involved in glucose disposal, has not been investigated, especially in type II diabetes. Here we report that ARNT is expressed in the skeletal muscles, particularly in the energy-efficient oxidative slow-twitch myofibers, which are characterized by increased oxidative capacity, mitochondrial content, vascular supply and insulin sensitivity. However, muscle-specific deletion of ARNT did not change myofiber type distribution, oxidative capacity, mitochondrial content, capillarity, or the expression of genes associated with these features. Consequently, the lack of ARNT in the skeletal muscle did not affect weight gain, lean/fat mass, insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance in lean mice, nor did it impact insulin resistance and glucose intolerance in high fat diet-induced obesity. Therefore, skeletal muscle ARNT is dispensable for controlling muscle fiber type and metabolic regulation, as well as diet-induced weight control, insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance.

  14. Increased inflammation and decreased insulin sensitivity indicate metabolic disturbances in zoo-managed compared to free-ranging black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schook, Mandi W; Wildt, David E; Raghanti, Mary Ann; Wolfe, Barbara A; Dennis, Patricia M

    2015-01-01

    Black rhinoceros (rhinos) living in zoos express a host of unusual disease syndromes that are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, including hemolytic anemia, rhabdomyolysis, hepatopathy and ulcerative skin disease, hypophosphatemia and iron overload. We hypothesized that iron overload is a consequence and indicator of disturbances related to inflammation and insulin/glucose metabolism. The objectives of this study were to: (1) generate the first baseline information on biomarkers of inflammation (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], serum amyloid A [SAA]), insulin sensitivity (insulin, glucose and proxy calculations of insulin sensitivity), phosphate and iron stores (ferritin) using banked serum from free-ranging black rhinos; and (2) then compare serum biomarkers between zoo-managed (n=86 individuals) and free-ranging (n=120) animals. Enzyme immunoassays were validated for serum and then biomarker levels analyzed using mixed models while controlling for sex, age and year of sample collection. Concentrations of TNFα, SAA, insulin and insulin-to glucose ratio were higher (Prhinos managed in ex situ conditions compared to free-living counterparts. Findings indicate that the captive environment is contributing to increased inflammation and decreased insulin sensitivity in this endangered species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gender differences in skeletal muscle substrate metabolism - molecular mechanisms and insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard, Annemarie; Kiens, Bente

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that substrate metabolism is subject to gender-specific regulation, and the aim of this review is to outline the available evidence of molecular gender differences in glucose and lipid metabolism of skeletal muscle. Female sex has been suggested to have...... a favorable effect on glucose homeostasis, and the available evidence from hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies is summarized to delineate whether there is a gender difference in whole-body insulin sensitivity and in particular insulin-stimulated glucose uptake of skeletal muscle. Whether an eventual...... higher insulin sensitivity of female skeletal muscle can be related to gender-specific regulation of molecular metabolism will be topic for discussion. Gender differences in muscle fiber type distribution and substrate availability to and in skeletal muscle are highly relevant for substrate metabolism...

  16. Effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rajesh; Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan

    2014-12-01

    Accumulating evidence shows an increase in insulin resistance on salt restriction. We compared the effect of low salt diet on insulin resistance in salt-sensitive versus salt-resistant hypertensive subjects. We also evaluated the relationship between salt sensitivity of blood pressure and salt sensitivity of insulin resistance in a multivariate regression model. Studies were conducted after 1 week of high salt (200 mmol per day sodium) and 1 week of low salt (10 mmol per day sodium) diet. Salt sensitivity was defined as the fall in systolic blood pressure>15 mm Hg on low salt diet. The study includes 389 subjects (44% women; 16% blacks; body mass index, 28.5±4.2 kg/m2). As expected, blood pressure was lower on low salt (129±16/78±9 mm Hg) as compared with high salt diet (145±18/86±10 mm Hg). Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment were higher on low salt diet (95.4±19.4 mg/dL; 10.8±7.3 mIU/L; 2.6±1.9) as compared with high salt diet (90.6±10.8 mg/dL; 9.4±5.8 mIU/L; 2.1±1.4; Psalt-sensitive (n=193) versus salt-resistant (n=196) subjects on either diet. Increase in homeostasis model assessment on low salt diet was 0.5±1.4 in salt-sensitive and 0.4±1.5 in salt-resistant subjects (P=NS). On multivariate regression analysis, change in systolic blood pressure was not associated with change in homeostasis model assessment after including age, body mass index, sex, change in serum and urine aldosterone, and cortisol into the model. We conclude that the increase in insulin resistance on low salt diet is not affected by salt sensitivity of blood pressure. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Early endotoxemia increases peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity in healthy humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Crabben, Saskia N.; Blümer, Regje M. E.; Stegenga, Michiel E.; Ackermans, Mariëtte T.; Endert, Erik; Tanck, Michael W. T.; Serlie, Mireille J.; van der Poll, Tom; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Sepsis-induced hypoglycemia is a well known, but rare, event of unknown origin. Objective: To obtain insight into the mechanism of sepsis-induced hypoglycemia, focusing on glucose kinetics and insulin sensitivity measured with stable isotopes by using the model of human endotoxemia. Design:

  18. Enhanced insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and liver by physiological overexpression of SIRT6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason G. Anderson

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: Our data indicate that moderate, physiological overexpression of SIRT6 enhances insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and liver, engendering protective actions against diet-induced T2DM. Hence, the present study provides support for the anti-T2DM effect of SIRT6 and suggests SIRT6 as a putative molecular target for anti-T2DM treatment.

  19. Strength Exercise Improves Muscle Mass and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Der Heijden, Gert-Jan; Wang, Zhiyue J.; Chu, Zili; Toffolo, Gianna; Manesso, Erica; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Sunehag, Agneta L.

    2010-01-01

    VAN DER HEIJDEN, G.-J., Z. J. WANG, Z. CHU, G. TOFFOLO, E. MANESSO, P. J. J. SAUER, and A. L. SUNEHAG. Strength Exercise Improves Muscle Mass and Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Youth. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 42, No. 11, pp. 1973-1980, 2010. Introduction: Data on the metabolic effects of

  20. Moderate alcohol consumption increases insulin sensitivity and ADIPOQ expression in postmenopausal women: A randomised, crossover trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, M.M.; Beulens, J.W.J.; Kersten, S.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis: To determine whether 6 weeks of daily, moderate alcohol consumption increases expression of the gene encoding adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and plasma levels of the protein, and improves insulin sensitivity in postmenopausal women. Methods: In a randomised, open-label, crossover trial

  1. Aerobic exercise increases peripheral and hepatic insulin sensitivity in sedentary adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The increasing prevalence of obesity and its consequences is a serious public health concern. The present study was undertaken to determine whether a controlled aerobic exercise program (without weight loss) improves insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in sedentary adolescents. Twenty nine p...

  2. GLP-1 does not not acutely affect insulin sensitivity in healthy man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orskov, L; Holst, J J; Møller, J

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) (7-36 amide) may have the direct effect of increasing insulin sensitivity in healthy man. To evaluate this hypothesis we infused GLP-1 in seven lean healthy men during a hyper insulinaemic (0.8 mU.kg-1.min-1), euglycaemic (5 mmol...

  3. Moderate alcohol consumption increases insulin sensitivity and ADIPOQ expression in postmenopausal women: a randomised, crossover trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, M.M.; Beulens, J.W.J.; Kersten, A.H.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis To determine whether 6 weeks of daily, moderate alcohol consumption increases expression of the gene encoding adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and plasma levels of the protein, and improves insulin sensitivity in postmenopausal women. Methods In a randomised, open-label, crossover trial

  4. Infection with Soil-Transmitted Helminths Is Associated with Increased Insulin Sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiria, A.E.; Hamid, F.; Wammes, L.J.; Prasetyani, M.A.; Dekkers, O.M.; May, L.; Kaisar, M.M.; Verweij, J.J.; Guigas, B.; Partono, F.; Sartono, E.; Supali, T.; Yazdanbakhsh, M.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Given that helminth infections have been shown to improve insulin sensitivity in animal studies, which may be explained by beneficial effects on energy balance or by a shift in the immune system to an anti-inflammatory profile, we investigated whether soil-transmitted helminth

  5. Short-term cold acclimation improves insulin sensitivity in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanssen, M.J.W.; Hoeks, J.; Brans, B.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Kersten, A.H.

    2015-01-01

    Cold exposure may be a potential therapy for diabetes by increasing brown adipose tissue (BAT) mass and activity. Here we report that 10 d of cold acclimation (14–15 °C) increased peripheral insulin sensitivity by ~43% in eight type 2 diabetes subjects. Basal skeletal muscle GLUT4 translocation

  6. Brain pericyte-derived soluble factors enhance insulin sensitivity in GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Fuyuko; Matsumoto, Junichi; Machida, Takashi; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Dohgu, Shinya; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2015-02-20

    Insulin signaling in the hypothalamus plays an important role in food intake and glucose homeostasis. Hypothalamic neuronal functions are modulated by glial cells; these form an extensive network connecting the neurons and cerebral vasculature, known as the neurovascular unit (NVU). Brain pericytes are periendothelial accessory structures of the blood-brain barrier and integral members of the NVU. However, the interaction between pericytes and neurons is largely unexplored. Here, we investigate whether brain pericytes could affect hypothalamic neuronal insulin signaling. Our immunohistochemical observations demonstrated the existence of pericytes in the mouse hypothalamus, exhibiting immunoreactivity of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (a pericyte marker), and laminin, a basal lamina marker. We then exposed a murine hypothalamic neuronal cell line, GT1-7, to conditioned medium obtained from primary cultures of rat brain pericytes. Pericyte-conditioned medium (PCM), but not astrocyte- or aortic smooth muscle cell-conditioned medium, increased the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt in GT1-7 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. PCM also enhanced insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor β without changing its expression or localization in cytosolic or plasma membrane fractions. These results suggest that pericytes, rather than astrocytes, increase insulin sensitivity in hypothalamic neurons by releasing soluble factors under physiological conditions in the NVU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Effects of different degrees of insulin sensitivity on endothelial function in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Roberto; Plavnik, Frida Liane; Ribeiro, Fernando Flexa; Ajzen, Sérgio Aron; Christofalo, Dejaldo M de J; Kohlmann, Osvaldo

    2012-01-01

    Obesity derived from intra-abdominal fat deposition tends to increase hormonal and cytokine production, thus worsening insulin sensitivity and leading to endothelial dysfunction. Hyperinsulinemia is considered an independent risk factor for ischemic heart disease and cause of endothelial dysfunction in healthy individuals. To assess the impact of different degrees of insulin resistance, measured by HOMA-IR (Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance), on endothelial function in obese, non-diabetic patients without prior history of cardiovascular events and different metabolic syndrome components. Forty obese individuals were submitted to anthropometric measurements, BP measurements at office and ABPM and laboratory tests, in addition to non-invasive ultrasound assessment of endothelial function. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the level of insulin resistance: patients with HOMA-IR values from 0.590 to 1.082 were assigned to Group 1 (n=13), from 1.083 to 1.410 to Group 2 (n=14) and from 1.610 to 2.510 to Group 3 (n=13). We found a significant difference in flow-mediated dilation in group 3 compared to group 1 (9.2 ± 7.0 vs 18.0 ± 7.5 %, p=0.006). There was a negative correlation between endothelial function and insulin, HOMA-IR and triglycerides. Our data suggest that mild changes in insulin resistance levels assessed by HOMA-IR may have an impact on vasodilatatory endothelial function in uncomplicated obese individuals with different cardiovascular risk factors.

  8. DNA methylation and histone deacetylation regulating insulin sensitivity due to chronic cold exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Lai; Sun, Yizheng; Li, Ruiping; Deng, Jinbo; Deng, Jiexin

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the causal relationship between chronic cold exposure and insulin resistance and the mechanisms of how DNA methylation and histone deacetylation regulate cold-reduced insulin resistance. 46 adult male mice from postnatal day 90-180 were randomly assigned to control group and cold-exposure group. Mice in cold-exposure group were placed at temperature from -1 to 4 °C for 30 days to mimic chronic cold environment. Then, fasting blood glucose, blood insulin level and insulin resistance index were measured with enzymatic methods. Immunofluorescent labeling was carried out to visualize the insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2), Obese receptor (Ob-R, a leptin receptor), voltage-dependent anion channel protein 1 (VDAC1), cytochrome C (cytC), 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) positive cells in hippocampal CA1 area. Furthermore, the expressions of some proteins mentioned above were detected with Western blot. The results showed: ① Chronic cold exposure could reduce the insulin resistance index (P cold-exposure group than in control group with both immunohistochemical staining and Western blot (P cold exposure increased DNA methylation and histone deacetylation in the pyramidal cells of CA1 area and led to an increase in the expression of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) and DNA methylation relative enzymes (P cold exposure can improve insulin sensitivity, with the involvement of DNA methylation, histone deacetylation and the regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. These epigenetic modifications probably form the basic mechanism of cold-reduced insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of insulin infusion on the metabolites in cerebral tissues assessed with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in young healthy subjects with high and low insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczewska-Kupczewska, Monika; Tarasów, Eugeniusz; Nikolajuk, Agnieszka; Stefanowicz, Magdalena; Matulewicz, Natalia; Otziomek, Elzbieta; Górska, Maria; Straczkowski, Marek; Kowalska, Irina

    2013-09-01

    Insulin may play important roles in brain metabolism. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) of the central nervous system gives information on neuronal viability, cellular energy, and membrane status. To elucidate the specific role of insulin action in the brain, we estimated neurometabolites with (1)H-MRS and assessed their regulation by insulin infusion and their relationship with insulin sensitivity. We studied 16 healthy young men. (1)H-MRS was performed at baseline and after 240 min of euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Voxels were positioned in the left frontal lobe, left temporal lobe, and left thalamus. The ratios of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho), myo-inositol, and glutamate/glutamine/γ-aminobutyric acid complex (Glx) to creatine (Cr) and nonsuppressed water signal were determined. The participants were divided into subgroups of high (high IS) and low (low IS) insulin sensitivity. Baseline neurometabolic substrates were not different between the groups. Insulin infusion resulted in an increase in frontal NAA/Cr and NAA/H2O and frontal and temporal Glx/Cr and Glx/H2O and a decrease in frontal Cho/Cr and temporal Cho/H2O and myo-inositol/H2O (all P < 0.05, except temporal Glx/H2O, P = 0.054, NS) in the high-IS, but not in the low-IS, group. Insulin sensitivity correlated positively with frontal NAA/Cr and NAA/H2O and temporal Glx/H2O and negatively with temporal myo-inositol/Cr and myo-inositol/H2O assessed during the second (1)H-MRS (all P < 0.05). Insulin might influence cerebral metabolites, and this action is impaired in subjects with low whole-body insulin sensitivity. Thus, our results provide a potential link between insulin resistance and altered metabolism of the central nervous system.

  10. Effects of protein intake on blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and blood lipids in children: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voortman, Trudy; Vitezova, Anna; Bramer, Wichor M; Ars, Charlotte L; Bautista, Paula K; Buitrago-Lopez, Adriana; Felix, Janine F; Leermakers, Elisabeth T M; Sajjad, Ayesha; Sedaghat, Sanaz; Tharner, Anne; Franco, Oscar H; van den Hooven, Edith H

    2015-02-14

    High protein intake in early childhood is associated with obesity, suggesting possible adverse effects on other cardiometabolic outcomes. However, studies in adults have suggested beneficial effects of protein intake on blood pressure (BP) and lipid profile. Whether dietary protein intake is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic health in children is unclear. Therefore, we aimed to systematically review the evidence on the associations of protein intake with BP, insulin sensitivity and blood lipids in children. We searched the databases Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central and PubMed for interventional and observational studies in healthy children up to the age of 18 years, in which associations of total, animal and/or vegetable protein intake with one or more of the following outcomes were reported: BP; measures of insulin sensitivity; cholesterol levels; or TAG levels. In the search, we identified 6636 abstracts, of which fifty-six studies met all selection criteria. In general, the quality of the included studies was low. Most studies were cross-sectional, and many did not control for potential confounders. No overall associations were observed between protein intake and insulin sensitivity or blood lipids. A few studies suggested an inverse association between dietary protein intake and BP, but evidence was inconclusive. Only four studies examined the effects of vegetable or animal protein intake, but with inconsistent results. In conclusion, the literature, to date provides insufficient evidence for effects of protein intake on BP, insulin sensitivity or blood lipids in children. Future studies could be improved by adequately adjusting for key confounders such as energy intake and obesity.

  11. Genetic Markers of Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Secretion Are Associated With Spontaneous Postnatal Growth and Response to Growth Hormone Treatment in Short SGA Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; Day, Felix

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The wide heterogeneity in the early growth and metabolism of children born small for gestational age (SGA), both before and during GH therapy, may reflect common genetic variations related to insulin secretion or sensitivity. METHOD: Combined multiallele single nucleotide polymorphism...... scores with known associations with insulin sensitivity or insulin secretion were analyzed for their relationships with spontaneous postnatal growth and first-year responses to GH therapy in 96 short SGA children. RESULTS: The insulin sensitivity allele score (GS-InSens) was positively associated...... with spontaneous postnatal weight gain (regression coefficient [B]: 0.12 SD scores per allele; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.01-0.23; P = .03) and also in response to GH therapy with first-year height velocity (B: 0.18 cm/y per allele; 95% CI, 0.02-0.35; P = .03) and change in IGF-1 (B: 0.17 SD scores per allele...

  12. Effects of exercise training on adiposity, insulin sensitivity, and plasma hormone and lipid concentrations in overweight or obese, insulin-resistant horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Rebecca A; McCutcheon, L Jill; Valle, Emanuela; Meilahn, Elaine N; Geor, Raymond J

    2010-03-01

    To determine effects of exercise training without dietary restriction on adiposity, basal hormone and lipid concentrations and glucose and insulin dynamics in overweight or obese, insulin-resistant horses. 12 overweight or obese (body condition score > or = 7), insulin-resistant (insulin sensitivity training period, frequently sampled IV glucose tolerance tests with minimal model analysis were performed and baseline plasma insulin, glucose, triglycerides, non-esterified fatty acids, and leptin concentrations were analyzed. Adiposity was assessed by use of morphometrics, ultrasonic subcutaneous fat thickness, and estimation of fat mass from total body water (deuterium dilution method). Body weight and fat mass decreased by 4% (mean +/- SD, 20 +/- 8 kg) and 34% (32 +/- 9 kg), respectively, compared with pre-exercise values, with similar losses during low- and higher-intensity training. There was no effect of exercise training on subcutaneous fat thickness, plasma hormone and lipid concentrations, or minimal model parameters of glucose and insulin dynamics. Results suggested that moderate exercise training without concurrent dietary restriction does not mitigate insulin resistance in overweight or obese horses. A more pronounced reduction in adiposity or higher volume or intensity of exercise may be necessary for improvement in insulin sensitivity in such horses.

  13. Cereal fiber improves whole-body insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weickert, Martin O; Möhlig, Matthias; Schöfl, Christof; Arafat, Ayman M; Otto, Bärbel; Viehoff, Hannah; Koebnick, Corinna; Kohl, Angela; Spranger, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2006-04-01

    Cereal fiber intake is linked to reduced risk of type 2 diabetes in epidemiological observations. The pathogenic background of this phenomenon is unknown. Based on recent findings, we hypothesized that intake of purified insoluble oat fiber may improve whole-body insulin sensitivity. A randomized, controlled, single-blind, cross-over study was performed, and 17 overweight or obese subjects with normal glucose metabolism were analyzed. After consumption of nine macronutrient-matched portions of fiber-enriched bread (white bread enriched with 31.2 g insoluble fiber/day) or control (white bread) over a time period of 72 h, whole-body insulin sensitivity was assessed by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Energy intake was individually adjusted by providing standardized liquid meals. Hydrogen breath tests were performed to control for dietary adherence. When analyzing the entire cohort, whole-body glucose disposal was improved after fiber consumption (M value 6.56 +/- 0.32 vs. 6.07 +/- 0.27 mg . min(-1) . kg(-1); P = 0.043). Thirteen subjects had increased hydrogen breath test concentrations after fiber consumption, indicating probable dietary adherence. Restricting analysis to these subjects, improvements in M value (6.85 +/- 0.34 vs. 6.06 +/- 0.32 mg . min(-1) . kg(-1); P = 0.003) and insulin sensitivity, expressed as M/I ratio (M value divided by mean serum insulin at steady state: 3.73 +/- 0.23 vs. 3.21 +/- 0.27; P = 0.02), after fiber consumption were more pronounced. Plasma lipids, serum magnesium, ghrelin, and adiponectin concentrations, as well as substrate utilization and body weight, were not significantly changed by fiber intake (P > 0.15). Increased insoluble dietary fiber intake for 3 days significantly improved whole-body insulin sensitivity. These data suggest a potential mechanism linking cereal fiber intake and reduced risk of type 2 diabetes.

  14. Insulin sensitivity predictions in individuals with obesity and type II diabetes mellitus using mathematical model of the insulin signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Clark K; Sriram, Ganesh; Dipple, Katrina M

    2016-11-01

    Mathematical modeling approaches have been commonly used in complex signaling pathway studies such as the insulin signal transduction pathway. Our expanded mathematical model of the insulin signal transduction pathway was previously shown to effectively predict glucose clearance rates using mRNA levels of key components of the pathway in a mouse model. In this study, we re-optimized and applied our expanded model to study insulin sensitivity in other species and tissues (human skeletal muscle) with altered protein activities of insulin signal transduction pathway components. The model has now been optimized to predict the effect of short term exercise on insulin sensitivity for human test subjects with obesity or type II diabetes mellitus. A comparison between our extended model and the original model showed that our model better simulates the GLUT4 translocation events of the insulin signal transduction pathway and glucose uptake as a clinically relevant model output. Results from our extended model correlate with O'Gorman's published in-vivo results. This study demonstrates the ability to adapt this model to study insulin sensitivity to many biological systems (human skeletal muscle and mouse liver) with minimal changes in the model parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reversal of diet-induced obesity increases insulin transport into cerebrospinal fluid and restores sensitivity to the anorexic action of central insulin in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Denovan P; Mul, Joram D; Liu, Min; Reedy, Brianne M; D'Alessio, David A; Seeley, Randy J; Woods, Stephen C

    2013-03-01

    Diet-induced obesity (DIO) reduces the ability of centrally administered insulin to reduce feeding behavior and also reduces the transport of insulin from the periphery to the central nervous system (CNS). The current study was designed to determine whether reversal of high-fat DIO restores the anorexic efficacy of central insulin and whether this is accompanied by restoration of the compromised insulin transport. Adult male Long-Evans rats were initially maintained on either a low-fat chow diet (LFD) or a high-fat diet (HFD). After 22 weeks, half of the animals on the HFD were changed to the LFD, whereas the other half continued on the HFD for an additional 8 weeks, such that there were 3 groups: 1) a LFD control group (Con; n = 18), 2) a HFD-fed, DIO group (n = 17), and 3) a HFD to LFD, DIO-reversal group (DIO-rev; n = 18). The DIO reversal resulted in a significant reduction of body weight and epididymal fat weight relative to the DIO group. Acute central insulin administration (8 mU) reduced food intake and caused weight loss in Con and DIO-rev but not DIO rats. Fasting cerebrospinal fluid insulin was higher in DIO than Con animals. However, after a peripheral bolus injection of insulin, cerebrospinal fluid insulin increased in Con and DIO-rev rats but not in the DIO group. These data provide support for previous reports that DIO inhibits both the central effects of insulin and insulin's transport to the CNS. Importantly, DIO-rev restored sensitivity to the effects of central insulin on food intake and insulin transport into the CNS.

  16. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  17. The macrophage A2B adenosine receptor regulates tissue insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillary Johnston-Cox

    Full Text Available High fat diet (HFD-induced type 2 diabetes continues to be an epidemic with significant risk for various pathologies. Previously, we identified the A2b adenosine receptor (A2bAR, an established regulator of inflammation, as a regulator of HFD-induced insulin resistance. In particular, HFD was associated with vast upregulation of liver A2bAR in control mice, and while mice lacking this receptor showed augmented liver inflammation and tissue insulin resistance. As the A2bAR is expressed in different tissues, here, we provide the first lead to cellular mechanism by demonstrating that the receptor's influence on tissue insulin sensitivity is mediated via its expression in macrophages. This was shown using a newly generated transgenic mouse model expressing the A2bAR gene in the macrophage lineage on an otherwise A2bAR null background. Reinstatement of macrophage A2bAR expression in A2bAR null mice fed HFD restored insulin tolerance and tissue insulin signaling to the level of control mice. The molecular mechanism for this effect involves A2bAR-mediated changes in cyclic adenosine monophosphate in macrophages, reducing the expression and release of inflammatory cytokines, which downregulate insulin receptor-2. Thus, our results illustrate that macrophage A2bAR signaling is needed and sufficient for relaying the protective effect of the A2bAR against HFD-induced tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in mice.

  18. Assessment and mathematical modeling of glucose turnover and insulin sensitivity in lean and obese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenig, M; Thomaseth, K; Brandao, J; Waldron, M; Ferguson, D C

    2006-11-01

    Insulin sensitivity (SI) of glucose disposal can be quantified with the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC) with tracer glucose infusion. True steady state is, however, difficult to achieve, and non-steady state analysis of EHC data is preferred. This analysis requires information on glucose kinetics that can be obtained from bolus injection of cold and tracer glucose. The aim of this study was to assess glucose kinetics in cats. Mathematical modeling and non-steady state analysis was applied to assess effects of obesity on glucose turnover, glycolysis/glycogen synthesis, SI, and inhibition of endogenous glucose production (EGP) in lean cats (L) and obese cats (O). D-[3-(3)H]-glucose kinetics and 3H-H2O production were analyzed in 4 L and 4 O with three-compartment modeling. Frequently sampled insulin-modified intravenous glucose tolerance tests (FSIGT) with minimal model analysis were performed in 5L and 3 O to assess glucose kinetics and SI. EHC was performed in 10 L and 10 O with primed-constant infusion of 3H-glucose. Data were analyzed with a modified minimal model segregating suppression of EGP by insulin using a non-linear mixed-effects population approach. FSIGT provided estimates of SI, glucose effectiveness SG, and distribution volume. EHC provided estimates of SI, SG, glycolysis, and suprabasal insulin concentration for 50% EGP inhibition. Obesity appears to affect glucose distribution but not utilization at basal insulin, and reduces SI estimated by FSIGT and EHC. Differences in SI between FSIGT and EHC depend on different descriptions of EGP inhibition by insulin. Finally, glucose disposal at basal insulin appears to occur entirely through glycolysis, whereas significant amounts of glucose are sequestrated from oxidation during EHC.

  19. Sibutramine improves insulin sensitivity without alteration of serum adiponectin in obese subjects with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Y-J; Chen, Y-C; Pei, D; Kuo, S-W; Hsieh, C-H; Wu, L-Y; He, C-T; Lee, C H; Fan, S C; Sheu, W H-H

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of sibutramine on weight loss, insulin sensitivity and serum adiponectin levels in obese patients with Type 2 diabetes. This study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel comparison study of sibutramine 15 mg/day and placebo. Forty-eight eligible obese patients with Type 2 diabetes (age between 30 and 75 years with body mass index > or = 27 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive either placebo (n = 24) or sibutramine (15 mg/day) (n = 24) for 6 months. Fifteen subjects in each group underwent meal tests and modified insulin suppression tests before and after 6 months' treatment. After 6 months of sibutramine treatment statistically significant changes from baseline were observed for body weight (85.4 +/- 2.5 vs. 82.9 +/- 2.4 kg, P alteration of waist-hip ratio (W/H), blood pressure, heart rate, glycaemic parameters or lipid profiles. The steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) level during the modified insulin suppression test was significantly reduced in the sibutramine group (17.33 +/- 2.92 vs. 14.29 +/- 4.19 mmol/l, P insulin (SSPI) concentrations. In addition, serum adiponectin and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels remained unchanged, although modest weight reduction was achieved after sibutramine treatment. There were also no significant correlations between changes in serum adiponectin and reduction of SSPG or body weight. Daily ambient plasma insulin and glucose concentrations in response to a test meal were not significantly different in subjects receiving sibutramine treatment. We conclude that treatment with sibutramine 15 mg once daily effectively reduces weight and enhances insulin sensitivity without alteration of serum adiponectin levels in obese patients with Type 2 diabetes.

  20. Leptin-induced basal Akt phosphorylation and its implication in exercise-mediated improvement of insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xianjie; Niu, Sen

    2018-01-29

    Physical exercise is an efficient therapeutical tool in the management of insulin resistance (IR) and related metabolic diseases. Leptin, the well-known obesity hormone and the absence of which leads to IR, showed controversial effects on IR as research continues. Thus, in this study, a detailed investigation of the effect of leptin on exercise-mediated improvement of insulin sensitivity and its underlying mechanism was carried out. Using a rat model of chronic or acute swimming exercise training, we found that serum leptin increased 1 h after either acute exercise or the last session of chronic exercise, when impaired insulin action was observed in previous reports. However, chronic exercise reducd basal serum leptin levels and promoted insulin sensitivity compared with sedentary controls or rats subjected to one bout of aerobic exercise. Our animal results indicated the potential linkage between leptin and insulin sensitivity, which is further investigated in the skeletal muscle L6 cells. Leptin treatment in L6 cells promoted the basal levels of insulin signaling as well as glucose uptake, while blocking JAK2 signaling with either pharmacological intervention (JAK2 inhibitor AG490) or genetic manipulation (siRNA knockdown) decreased the basal levels of insulin signaling. Furthermore, leptin treatment inhibited insulin-stimulated insulin signaling and glucose uptake, while blocking JAK2 signaling restored leptin-attenuated insulin sensitivity. Taken together, our results demonstrated that reduced serum leptin, at least in part, contributes to exercise-mediated improvement of insulin sensitivity, indicating JAK2 as a potent therapeutical target of insulin resistance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. FENOFIBRATE ADMINISTRATION DOES NOT AFFECT MUSCLE TRIGLYCERIDE CONCENTRATION OR INSULIN SENSITIVITY IN HUMANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Leigh; Bergman, Bryan C.; Hunerdosse, Devon M.; Howard, David J.; Eckel, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Animal data suggest that males, in particular, rely on PPAR-α activity to maintain normal muscle triglyceride metabolism. We sought to examine whether this was also true in men vs. women and its relationship to insulin sensitivity. Materials/Methods Normolipidemic obese men (n=9) and women (n=9) underwent an assessment of insulin sensitivity (IVGTT) and intramuscular triglyceride metabolism (GC/MS and GC/C/IRMS from plasma and muscle biopsies taken after infusion of [U-13C]palmitate) before and after 12 weeks of fenofibrate treatment. Results Women were more insulin sensitive (Si; 5.2(0.7 vs. 2.4(0.4 ×10−4/uU/ml, W vs. M, ptriglyceride (IMTG) concentration (41.9(15.5 vs. 30.8(5.1 ug/mg dry weight, W vs. M, p=0.43), and IMTG fractional synthesis rate (FSR; 0.27(0.07 vs. 0.35(0.06/hr, W vs. M, p=0.41) as men. Fenofibrate enhanced FSR in men (0.35(0.06 to 0.54(0.06, p=0.05), with no such change seen in women (0.27(0.07 to 0.32(0.13, p=0.73), and no change in IMTG concentration in either group (23.0(3.9 in M, p=0.26 vs. baseline; 36.3(12.0 in W, p=0.79 vs. baseline). Insulin sensitivity was unaffected by fenofibrate (p>0.68). Lower percent saturation of IMTG in women vs. men before (29.1(2.3 vs. 35.2(1.7%, p=0.06) and after (27.3(2.8 vs. 35.1(1.9%, p=0.04) fenofibrate most closely related to their greater insulin sensitivity (R2=0.34, p=0.10), and was largely unchanged by the drug. Conclusions PPAR-α agonist therapy had little effect on IMTG metabolism in men or women. IMTG saturation, rather than IMTG concentration or FSR, most closely (but not significantly) related to insulin sensitivity and was unchanged by fenofibrate administration. PMID:21306746

  2. A Synergistic, Balanced Antioxidant Cocktail, Protects Aging Rats from Insulin Resistance and Absence of Meal-Induced Insulin Sensitization (AMIS Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Helen Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of in vivo and in vitro studies using animal and human models in the past 15 years have demonstrated that approximately 55% (~66% in humans of the glucose disposal effect of an i.v. injection of insulin in the fed state is dependent on the action of a second hormone, hepatic insulin sensitizing substance (HISS, which is released from the liver and stimulates glucose uptake in muscle, heart and kidneys. Sensitization of the insulin response by a meal through release of HISS is called meal-induced insulin sensitization (MIS. Absence of HISS action results in postprandial hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, adiposity, increased free radical stress and a cluster of progressive metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunctions referred to as the AMIS (absence of meal-induced insulin sensitization syndrome. Reduced HISS release accounts for the insulin resistance that occurs with aging and is made worse by physical inactivity and diets high in sucrose or fat. This brief review provides an update of major metabolic disturbances associated with aging due to reduction of HISS release, and the protection against these pathological changes in aging animals using a balanced synergistic antioxidant cocktail SAMEC (S-adenosylmethionine, vitamins E and C. The synergy amongst the components is consistent with the known benefits of antioxidants supplied by a mixed diet and acting through diverse mechanisms. Using only three constituents, SAMEC appears suitable as an antioxidant specifically targeting the AMIS syndrome.

  3. Insulin sensitivity is normalized in the third generation (F3 offspring of developmentally programmed insulin resistant (F2 rats fed an energy-restricted diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin John F

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims The offspring and grandoffspring of female rats fed low protein diets during pregnancy and lactation, but fed nutritionally adequate diets thereafter, have been shown to exhibit altered insulin sensitivity in adulthood. The current study investigates the insulin sensitivity of the offspring and grandoffspring of female rats fed low protein diets during pregnancy, and then maintained on energy-restricted diets post weaning over three generations. Methods Female Sprague Dawley rats (F0 were mated with control males and protein malnourished during pregnancy/lactation. F1 offspring were then weaned to adequate but energy-restricted diets into adulthood. F1 dams were fed energy-restricted diets throughout pregnancy/lactation. F2 offspring were also fed energy-restricted diets post weaning. F2 pregnant dams were maintained as described above. Their F3 offspring were split into two groups; one was maintained on the energy-restricted diet, the other was maintained on an adequate diet consumed ad libitum post weaning. Results F2 animals fed energy-restricted diets were insulin resistant (p ad libitum postweaning diets (p Conclusion Maternal energy-restriction did not consistently program reduced insulin sensitivity in offspring over three consecutive generations. The reasons for this remain unclear. It is possible that the intergenerational transmission of developmentally programmed insulin resistance is determined in part by the relative insulin sensitivity of the mother during pregnancy/lactation.

  4. Chronic exposure to nicotine enhances insulin sensitivity through α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-STAT3 pathway.

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    Tian-Ying Xu

    Full Text Available This study was to investigate the effect of nicotine on insulin sensitivity and explore the underlying mechanisms. Treatment of Sprague-Dawley rats with nicotine (3 mg/kg/day for 6 weeks reduced 43% body weight gain and 65% blood insulin level, but had no effect on blood glucose level. Both insulin tolerance test and glucose tolerance test demonstrated that nicotine treatment enhanced insulin sensitivity. Pretreatment of rats with hexamethonium (20 mg/kg/day to antagonize peripheral nicotinic receptors except for α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR had no effect on the insulin sensitizing effect of nicotine. However, the insulin sensitizing effect but not the bodyweight reducing effect of nicotine was abrogated in α7-nAChR knockout mice. Further, chronic treatment with PNU-282987 (0.53 mg/kg/day, a selective α7-nAChR agonist, significantly enhanced insulin sensitivity without apparently modifying bodyweight not only in normal mice but also in AMP-activated kinase-α2 knockout mice, an animal model of insulin resistance with no sign of inflammation. Moreover, PNU-282987 treatment enhanced phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue and liver in normal mice. PNU-282987 treatment also increased glucose uptake by 25% in C2C12 myotubes and this effect was total abrogated by STAT3 inhibitor, S3I-201. All together, these findings demonstrated that nicotine enhanced insulin sensitivity in animals with or without insulin resistance, at least in part via stimulating α7-nAChR-STAT3 pathway independent of inflammation. Our results contribute not only to the understanding of the pharmacological effects of nicotine, but also to the identifying of new therapeutic targets against insulin resistance.

  5. The transcription factor Prep1 controls hepatic insulin sensitivity and gluconeogenesis by targeting nuclear localization of FOXO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulebyakin, Konstantin; Penkov, Dmitry; Blasi, Francesco; Akopyan, Zhanna; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2016-12-02

    Liver plays a key role in controlling body carbohydrate homeostasis by switching between accumulation and production of glucose and this way maintaining constant level of glucose in blood. Increased blood glucose level triggers release of insulin from pancreatic β-cells. Insulin represses hepatic glucose production and increases glucose accumulation. Insulin resistance is the main cause of type 2 diabetes and hyperglycemia. Currently thiazolidinediones (TZDs) targeting transcriptional factor PPARγ are used as insulin sensitizers for treating patients with type 2 diabetes. However, TZDs are reported to be associated with cardiovascular and liver problems and stimulate obesity. Thus, it is necessary to search new approaches to improve insulin sensitivity. A promising candidate is transcriptional factor Prep1, as it was shown earlier it could affect insulin sensitivity in variety of insulin-sensitive tissues. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible involvement of transcriptional factor Prep1 in control of hepatic glucose accumulation and production. We created mice with liver-specific Prep1 knockout and discovered that hepatocytes derived from these mice are much more sensitive to insulin, comparing to their WT littermates. Incubation of these cells with 100 nM insulin results in almost complete inhibition of gluconeogenesis, while in WT cells this repression is only partial. However, Prep1 doesn't affect gluconeogenesis in the absence of insulin. Also, we observed that nuclear content of gluconeogenic transcription factor FOXO1 was greatly reduced in Prep1 knockout hepatocytes. These findings suggest that Prep1 may control hepatic insulin sensitivity by targeting FOXO1 nuclear stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Myostatin inhibition in muscle, but not adipose tissue, decreases fat mass and improves insulin sensitivity.

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    Tingqing Guo

    Full Text Available Myostatin (Mstn is a secreted growth factor expressed in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that negatively regulates skeletal muscle mass. Mstn(-/- mice have a dramatic increase in muscle mass, reduction in fat mass, and resistance to diet-induced and genetic obesity. To determine how Mstn deletion causes reduced adiposity and resistance to obesity, we analyzed substrate utilization and insulin sensitivity in Mstn(-/- mice fed a standard chow. Despite reduced lipid oxidation in skeletal muscle, Mstn(-/- mice had no change in the rate of whole body lipid oxidation. In contrast, Mstn(-/- mice had increased glucose utilization and insulin sensitivity as measured by indirect calorimetry, glucose and insulin tolerance tests, and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. To determine whether these metabolic effects were due primarily to the loss of myostatin signaling in muscle or adipose tissue, we compared two transgenic mouse lines carrying a dominant negative activin IIB receptor expressed specifically in adipocytes or skeletal muscle. We found that inhibition of myostatin signaling in adipose tissue had no effect on body composition, weight gain, or glucose and insulin tolerance in mice fed a standard diet or a high-fat diet. In contrast, inhibition of myostatin signaling in skeletal muscle, like Mstn deletion, resulted in increased lean mass, decreased fat mass, improved glucose metabolism on standard and high-fat diets, and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Our results demonstrate that Mstn(-/- mice have an increase in insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake, and that the reduction in adipose tissue mass in Mstn(-/- mice is an indirect result of metabolic changes in skeletal muscle. These data suggest that increasing muscle mass by administration of myostatin antagonists may be a promising therapeutic target for treating patients with obesity or diabetes.

  7. Effects of pioglitazone on insulin sensitivity and serum lipids in obese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M; Thomaseth, K; Dirikolu, L; Ferguson, D C; Hoenig, M

    2014-01-01

    Pioglitazone is a thiazolidinedione (TZD) insulin sensitizer approved for use in human type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therapeutic options for diabetes in cats are limited. To evaluate the effects of pioglitazone in obese cats, which are predisposed to insulin resistance, to assess its potential for future use in feline diabetes mellitus. A total of 12 obese purpose-bred research cats (6 neutered males and 6 spayed females, 5-7 years of age, weighing 5.4-9.8 kg). Randomized, placebo-controlled 3-way crossover study. Oral placebo or pioglitazone (Actos™; 1 or 3 mg/kg) was administered daily for 7-week periods, with IV glucose tolerance testing before and after each period. Three mg/kg pioglitazone significantly improved insulin sensitivity (geometric mean [95% CI] 0.90 [0.64-1.28] to 2.03 [1.49-2.78] min⁻¹pmol⁻¹L; P = .0014 versus change with placebo), reduced insulin area under the curve during IVGTT (geometric mean [range] 27 [9-64] to 18 [6-54] min∙nmol/L; P = .0031 versus change with placebo), and lowered serum triglyceride (geometric mean [range] 71 [29-271] to 48 [27-75] mg/dL; P = .047 versus change with placebo) and cholesterol (geometric mean [range] 187 [133-294] to 162 [107-249] mg/dL; P = .0042 versus change with placebo) concentrations in the obese cats. No adverse effects attributable to pioglitazone were evident in the otherwise healthy obese cats at this dosage and duration. Results of this study support a positive effect of pioglitazone on insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism in obese cats, and suggest that further evaluation of the drug in cats with diabetes mellitus or other metabolic disorders might be warranted.

  8. Stevioside from Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni Increases Insulin Sensitivity in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

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    Nabilatul Hani Mohd-Radzman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stevioside from Stevia rebaudiana has been reported to exert antihyperglycemic effects in both rat and human subjects. There have been few studies on these effects in vitro. In this paper, radioactive glucose uptake assay was implemented in order to assess improvements in insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 cells by elevation of glucose uptake following treatment with stevioside. Oil Red-O staining and MTT assay were utilized to confirm adipocyte differentiation and cell viability, respectively. Findings from this research showed a significant increase in absorbance values in mature adipocytes following Oil Red-O staining, confirming the differentiation process. Stevioside was noncytotoxic to 3T3-L1 cells as cell viability was reduced by a maximum of 17%, making it impossible to determine its IC50. Stevioside increased glucose uptake activities by 2.1 times (p<0.001 in normal conditions and up to 4.4 times (p<0.001 in insulin-resistant states. At times, this increase was higher than that seen in positive control group treated with rosiglitazone maleate, an antidiabetic agent. Expressions of pY20 and p-IRS1 which were measured via Western blot were improved by stevioside treatment. In conclusion, stevioside has direct effects on 3T3-L1 insulin sensitivity via increase in glucose uptake and enhanced expression of proteins involved in insulin-signalling pathway.

  9. Rosiglitazone Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Baroreflex Gain in Rats with Diet-Induced Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ding; McCully, Belinda H.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity decreases baroreflex gain (BRG); however, the mechanisms are unknown. We tested the hypothesis that impaired BRG is related to the concurrent insulin resistance, and, therefore, BRG would be improved after treatment with the insulin-sensitizing drug rosiglitazone. Male rats fed a high-fat diet diverged into obesity-prone (OP) and obesity-resistant (OR) groups after 2 weeks. Then, OP and OR rats, as well as control (CON) rats fed a standard diet, were treated daily for 2 to 3 weeks with rosiglitazone (3 or 6 mg/kg) or its vehicle by gavage. Compared with OR and CON rats, conscious OP rats exhibited reductions in BRG (OP, 2.9 ± 0.1 bpm/mm Hg; OR, 4.0 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; CON, 3.9 ± 0.2 bpm/mm Hg; P baroreflex pathways, elicited markedly reduced decreases in heart rate and arterial pressure, but these responses were not improved by rosiglitazone. In conclusion, diet-induced obesity impairs BRG via a central mechanism that is related to the concurrent insulin resistance. Rosiglitazone normalizes BRG, but not by improving brain baroreflex processing or insulin sensitivity. PMID:22815534

  10. The Effects of Carbohydrate, Unsaturated Fat, and Protein Intake on Measures of Insulin Sensitivity: Results from the OmniHeart Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gadgil, Meghana D.; Appel, Lawrence J.; Yeung, Edwina; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.; Sacks, Frank M.; Miller, Edgar R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Impaired insulin sensitivity increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Although calorie restriction and weight loss increase insulin sensitivity, the effects of modifying macronutrient composition on insulin sensitivity are uncertain. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects on insulin sensitivity of a carbohydrate-rich diet (CARB; similar to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH] diet), a protein-rich diet (PROT; protein predominantly from plant sources...

  11. Standardized Mori ramulus extract improves insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity in C57BLKS/J db/db mice and INS-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Yeon; Jin, Bora; Shin, Jae-Ho; Adisakwattana, Sirichai; Kwon, Oran

    2017-08-01

    Abnormalities in the hyperbolic relationship between insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion may cause oxidative stress and non-enzymatic glycation, resulting in an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Here, we performed a 14-week study to investigate the effects of ethanolic extract of Mori ramulus (MRE; 0, 800, and 1600mg/kg body weight) and its signature component oxyresveratrol (OXY; 800mg/kg body weight) on β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance in C57BLKS/J db/db mice fed with a high-fat diet. Compared with the diabetic control group, the high-dose MRE group showed a significant decrease in fasting blood glucose (p=0.0024); a significant increase in insulin secretion as measured by insulin (p=0.0012) and C-peptide (p=0.0103) levels in plasma and insulin content (p=0.0440) and homeobox factor-1 protein expression (p=0.0148) in the pancreas; and a significant increase in insulin sensitivity as measured by insulin receptor mRNA expression in the liver (p=0.0179) and adipose tissue (p=0.0491). In addition, improvements in the reactive oxygen species level and inflammatory pancreatic and hepatic tissue damage were also observed in the MRE group as assessed by histological findings. A similar but weaker effect was found in the OXY group. Furthermore, we observed a potentiating effect of MRE and OXY on insulin secretion in INS-1 cells in the presence of 27mM glucose, together with an anti-glycation effect as indicated by methylglyoxal-trapping capacity and inhibition of advanced glycation end-product formation. Taken together, these data suggest that MRE could ameliorate β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance by reducing oxidative damage and advanced glycation end-product (Wagenknecht et al., 2003) formation and that these effects are due, at least in part, to OXY. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The influence of reduced insulin sensitivity via short-term reductions in physical activity on cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during acute hyperglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holwerda, S W; Reynolds, L J; Restaino, R M; Credeur, D P; Leidy, H J; Thyfault, J P; Fadel, P J

    2015-12-15

    Reduced insulin sensitivity and impaired glycemic control are among the consequences of physical inactivity and have been associated with reduced cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). However, the effect of reduced insulin sensitivity and acute hyperglycemia following glucose consumption on cardiac BRS in young, healthy subjects has not been well characterized. We hypothesized that a reduction in insulin sensitivity via reductions in physical activity would reduce cardiac BRS at rest and following an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Nine recreationally active men (23 ± 1 yr; >10,000 steps/day) underwent 5 days of reduced daily physical activity (RA5) by refraining from planned exercise and reducing daily steps (insulin alone on cardiac BRS using a 120-min hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index) was significantly reduced following RA5 (BL 9.2 ± 1.3 vs. RA5 6.4 ± 1.1, P insulin can impair spontaneous cardiac BRS in young, healthy subjects, and that reductions in cardiac BRS following acute hyperglycemia are unaffected by reduced insulin sensitivity via short-term reductions in physical activity. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. The relationship between heat shock protein 72 expression in skeletal muscle and insulin sensitivity is dependent on adiposity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henstridge, Darren C; Forbes, Josephine M; Penfold, Sally A

    2010-01-01

    Decreased gene expression of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) in skeletal muscle is associated with insulin resistance in humans. We aimed to determine whether HSP72 protein expression in insulin-sensitive tissues is related to criterion standard measures of adiposity and insulin resistance in a you...... with rodent data suggesting that HSP72 stimulates fat oxidation with consequent reduction in fat storage and adiposity....

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor 21 Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Synergizes with Insulin in Human Adipose Stem Cell-Derived (hASC) Adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Darwin V.; Li, Dongmei; Yan, Qingyun; Zhu, Yimin; Goodwin, Bryan; Calle, Roberto; Brenner, Martin B.; Talukdar, Saswata

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) has evolved as a major metabolic regulator, the pharmacological administration of which causes weight loss, insulin sensitivity and glucose control in rodents and humans. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which FGF21 exerts its metabolic effects, we developed a human in vitro model of adipocytes to examine crosstalk between FGF21 and insulin signaling. Human adipose stem cell-derived (hASC) adipocytes were acutely treated with FGF21 alone, insulin alone, or in combination. Insulin signaling under these conditions was assessed by measuring tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (InsR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), and serine 473 phosphorylation of Akt, followed by a functional assay using 14C-2-deoxyglucose [14C]-2DG to measure glucose uptake in these cells. FGF21 alone caused a modest increase of glucose uptake, but treatment with FGF21 in combination with insulin had a synergistic effect on glucose uptake in these cells. The presence of FGF21 also effectively lowered the insulin concentration required to achieve the same level of glucose uptake compared to the absence of FGF21 by 10-fold. This acute effect of FGF21 on insulin signaling was not due to IR, IGF-1R, or IRS-1 activation. Moreover, we observed a substantial increase in basal S473-Akt phosphorylation by FGF21 alone, in contrast to the minimal shift in basal glucose uptake. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acute co-treatment of hASC-adipocytes with FGF21 and insulin can result in a synergistic improvement in glucose uptake. These effects were shown to occur at or downstream of Akt, or separate from the canonical insulin signaling pathway. PMID:25365322

  15. Fibroblast growth factor 21 improves insulin sensitivity and synergizes with insulin in human adipose stem cell-derived (hASC adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwin V Lee

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 has evolved as a major metabolic regulator, the pharmacological administration of which causes weight loss, insulin sensitivity and glucose control in rodents and humans. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which FGF21 exerts its metabolic effects, we developed a human in vitro model of adipocytes to examine crosstalk between FGF21 and insulin signaling. Human adipose stem cell-derived (hASC adipocytes were acutely treated with FGF21 alone, insulin alone, or in combination. Insulin signaling under these conditions was assessed by measuring tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor (InsR, insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1, and serine 473 phosphorylation of Akt, followed by a functional assay using 14C-2-deoxyglucose [14C]-2DG to measure glucose uptake in these cells. FGF21 alone caused a modest increase of glucose uptake, but treatment with FGF21 in combination with insulin had a synergistic effect on glucose uptake in these cells. The presence of FGF21 also effectively lowered the insulin concentration required to achieve the same level of glucose uptake compared to the absence of FGF21 by 10-fold. This acute effect of FGF21 on insulin signaling was not due to IR, IGF-1R, or IRS-1 activation. Moreover, we observed a substantial increase in basal S473-Akt phosphorylation by FGF21 alone, in contrast to the minimal shift in basal glucose uptake. Taken together, our data demonstrate that acute co-treatment of hASC-adipocytes with FGF21 and insulin can result in a synergistic improvement in glucose uptake. These effects were shown to occur at or downstream of Akt, or separate from the canonical insulin signaling pathway.

  16. Estrogen restores brain insulin sensitivity in ovariectomized non-obese rats, but not in ovariectomized obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2014-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that obesity caused the reduction of peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity and that estrogen therapy improved these defects. However, the beneficial effect of estrogen on brain insulin sensitivity and oxidative stress in either ovariectomy alone or ovariectomy with obesity models has not been determined. We hypothesized that ovariectomy alone or ovariectomy with obesity reduces brain insulin sensitivity and increases brain oxidative stress, which are reversed by estrogen treatment. Thirty female rats were assigned as either sham-operated or ovariectomized. After the surgery, each group was fed either a normal diet or high-fat diet for 12 weeks. At week 13, rats in each group received either the vehicle or estradiol for 30 days. At week 16, blood and brain were collected for determining the peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity as well as brain oxidative stress. We found that ovariectomized rats and high-fat diet fed rats incurred obesity, reduced peripheral and brain insulin sensitivity, and increased brain oxidative stress. Estrogen ameliorated peripheral insulin sensitivity in these rats. However, the beneficial effect of estrogen on brain insulin sensitivity and brain oxidative stress was observed only in ovariectomized normal diet-fed rats, but not in ovariectomized high fat diet-fed rats. Our results suggested that reduced brain insulin sensitivity and increased brain oxidative stress occurred after either ovariectomy or obesity. However, the reduced brain insulin sensitivity and the increased brain oxidative stress in ovariectomy with obesity could not be ameliorated by estrogen treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Researching Effective Strategies to Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Children and Teenagers - RESIST. A randomised control trial investigating the effects of two different diets on insulin sensitivity in young people with insulin resistance and/or pre-diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Sukanya

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Concomitant with the rise in childhood obesity there has been a significant increase in the number of adolescents with clinical features of insulin resistance and prediabetes. Clinical insulin resistance and prediabetes are likely to progress to type 2 diabetes and early atherosclerosis if not targeted for early intervention. There are no efficacy trials of lifestyle intervention in this group to inform clinical practice. The primary aim of this randomised control trial (RCT is to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of two different structured lifestyle interventions differing in diet composition on insulin sensitivity, in adolescents with clinical insulin resistance and/or prediabetes treated with metformin. Methods/design This study protocol describes the design of an ongoing RCT. We are recruiting 108 (54 each treatment arm 10 to 17 year olds with clinical features of insulin resistance and/or prediabetes, through physician referral, into a multi-centred RCT. All participants are prescribed metformin and participate in a diet and exercise program. The lifestyle program is the same for all participants except for diet composition. The diets are a high carbohydrate, low fat diet and a moderate carbohydrate, increased protein diet. The program commences with an intensive 3 month dietary intervention, implemented by trained dietitians, followed by a 3 month intensive gym and home based exercise program, supervised by certified physical trainers. To measure the longer term effectiveness, after the intensive intervention trial participants are managed by either their usual physician or study physician and followed up by the study dietitians for an additional 6 months. The primary outcome measure, change in insulin sensitivity, is measured at 3, 6 and 12 months. Discussion Clinical insulin resistance and prediabetes in the paediatric population are rapidly emerging clinical problems with serious health outcomes. With

  18. Researching Effective Strategies to Improve Insulin Sensitivity in Children and Teenagers - RESIST. A randomised control trial investigating the effects of two different diets on insulin sensitivity in young people with insulin resistance and/or pre-diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Sarah P; Baur, Louise A; Noakes, Manny; Steinbeck, Katharine; Woodhead, Helen J; Burrell, Susie; Chisholm, Kerryn; Broderick, Carolyn R; Parker, Robert; De, Sukanya; Shrinivasan, Shubha; Hopley, Lori; Hendrie, Gilly; Ambler, Geoffrey R; Kohn, Michael R; Cowell, Chris T

    2010-09-25

    Concomitant with the rise in childhood obesity there has been a significant increase in the number of adolescents with clinical features of insulin resistance and prediabetes. Clinical insulin resistance and prediabetes are likely to progress to type 2 diabetes and early atherosclerosis if not targeted for early intervention. There are no efficacy trials of lifestyle intervention in this group to inform clinical practice. The primary aim of this randomised control trial (RCT) is to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of two different structured lifestyle interventions differing in diet composition on insulin sensitivity, in adolescents with clinical insulin resistance and/or prediabetes treated with metformin. This study protocol describes the design of an ongoing RCT. We are recruiting 108 (54 each treatment arm) 10 to 17 year olds with clinical features of insulin resistance and/or prediabetes, through physician referral, into a multi-centred RCT. All participants are prescribed metformin and participate in a diet and exercise program. The lifestyle program is the same for all participants except for diet composition. The diets are a high carbohydrate, low fat diet and a moderate carbohydrate, increased protein diet.The program commences with an intensive 3 month dietary intervention, implemented by trained dietitians, followed by a 3 month intensive gym and home based exercise program, supervised by certified physical trainers. To measure the longer term effectiveness, after the intensive intervention trial participants are managed by either their usual physician or study physician and followed up by the study dietitians for an additional 6 months. The primary outcome measure, change in insulin sensitivity, is measured at 3, 6 and 12 months. Clinical insulin resistance and prediabetes in the paediatric population are rapidly emerging clinical problems with serious health outcomes. With appropriate management these conditions are potentially reversible or at

  19. Cinnamon extract improves insulin sensitivity in the brain and lowers liver fat in mouse models of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tina; Peter, Andreas; Schulz, Nadja; Drescher, Andrea; Bergheim, Ina; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Siegel-Axel, Dorothea; Schürmann, Annette; Weigert, Cora; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Hennige, Anita M

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of diabetic subjects with cinnamon demonstrated an improvement in blood glucose concentrations and insulin sensitivity but the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. This work intends to elucidate the impact of cinnamon effects on the brain by using isolated astrocytes, and an obese and diabetic mouse model. Cinnamon components (eugenol, cinnamaldehyde) were added to astrocytes and liver cells to measure insulin signaling and glycogen synthesis. Ob/ob mice were supplemented with extract from cinnamomum zeylanicum for 6 weeks and cortical brain activity, locomotion and energy expenditure were evaluated. Insulin action was determined in brain and liver tissues. Treatment of primary astrocytes with eugenol promoted glycogen synthesis, whereas the effect of cinnamaldehyde was attenuated. In terms of brain function in vivo, cinnamon extract improved insulin sensitivity and brain activity in ob/ob mice, and the insulin-stimulated locomotor activity was improved. In addition, fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance were greatly improved in ob/ob mice due to cinnamon extracts, while insulin secretion was unaltered. This corresponded with lower triglyceride and increased liver glycogen content and improved insulin action in liver tissues. In vitro, Fao cells exposed to cinnamon exhibited no change in insulin action. Together, cinnamon extract improved insulin action in the brain as well as brain activity and locomotion. This specific effect may represent an important central feature of cinnamon in improving insulin action in the brain, and mediates metabolic alterations in the periphery to decrease liver fat and improve glucose homeostasis.

  20. Cinnamon extract improves insulin sensitivity in the brain and lowers liver fat in mouse models of obesity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Sartorius

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Treatment of diabetic subjects with cinnamon demonstrated an improvement in blood glucose concentrations and insulin sensitivity but the underlying mechanisms remained unclear. This work intends to elucidate the impact of cinnamon effects on the brain by using isolated astrocytes, and an obese and diabetic mouse model. METHODS: Cinnamon components (eugenol, cinnamaldehyde were added to astrocytes and liver cells to measure insulin signaling and glycogen synthesis. Ob/ob mice were supplemented with extract from cinnamomum zeylanicum for 6 weeks and cortical brain activity, locomotion and energy expenditure were evaluated. Insulin action was determined in brain and liver tissues. RESULTS: Treatment of primary astrocytes with eugenol promoted glycogen synthesis, whereas the effect of cinnamaldehyde was attenuated. In terms of brain function in vivo, cinnamon extract improved insulin sensitivity and brain activity in ob/ob mice, and the insulin-stimulated locomotor activity was improved. In addition, fasting blood glucose levels and glucose tolerance were greatly improved in ob/ob mice due to cinnamon extracts, while insulin secretion was unaltered. This corresponded with lower triglyceride and increased liver glycogen content and improved insulin action in liver tissues. In vitro, Fao cells exposed to cinnamon exhibited no change in insulin action. CONCLUSIONS: Together, cinnamon extract improved insulin action in the brain as well as brain activity and locomotion. This specific effect may represent an important central feature of cinnamon in improving insulin action in the brain, and mediates metabolic alterations in the periphery to decrease liver fat and improve glucose homeostasis.

  1. pH sensitive thiolated cationic hydrogel for oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonia, T A; Sharma, Chandra P

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the efficacy of pH sensitive thiolated Polydimethylaminoethylmethacrylate for oral delivery of insulin. Synthesis of pH sensitive thiolated Polydimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDCPA) was carried out by crosslinking Polymethacrylic acid with thiolated Polydimethylaminoethylmethacrylate (PDCys) via carbodiimide chemistry. Prior to in vivo experiment, various physicochemical and biological characterisation were carried out to evaluate the efficacy of PDCPA. Modification was confirmed by IR and NMR spectroscopy. The particle size was found to be 284 nm with a zeta potential of 37.3+/-1.58 mV. Texture analyser measurements showed that PDCPA is more mucoadhesive than the parent polymer. Transepithelial electrical measurements showed a reduction of greater than 50% on incubation with PDCPA particles. Permeation studies showed that PDCPA is more permeable than the parent polymer. On in vivo evaluation on male diabetic rats, insulin loaded PDCPA exhibited a blood glucose reduction of 19%.

  2. Association of Sleep Deprivation With Reduction in Insulin Sensitivity as Assessed by the Hyperglycemic Clamp Technique in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bernardi Rodrigues, Ana Maria; da Silva, Cleliani de Cassia; Vasques, Ana Carolina Junqueira; Camilo, Daniella Fernandes; Barreiro, Francieli; Cassani, Roberta Soares Lara; Zambon, Mariana Porto; Antonio, Maria Ângela Reis de Góes Monteiro; Geloneze, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The association between short sleep duration and decreased insulin sensitivity in adolescents has been described. However, to our knowledge, no studies have investigated this association measuring insulin sensitivity by the hyperglycemic clamp technique. To compare the distributions of parameters of insulin resistance in adolescents with sleep deprivation vs adequate sleep, and to investigate the association between sleep deprivation and insulin sensitivity. Cross-sectional multicenter study using data from the Brazilian Metabolic Syndrome Study conducted from June 29, 2011, to December 3, 2014, at an obesity outpatient clinic at the University of Campinas and public schools, with a convenience sample of 615 adolescents aged 10 to 19.9 years with a body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) for age and sex at the fifth percentile or higher. A subsample of 81 adolescents underwent the hyperglycemic clamp technique. The self-reported sleep duration was used to classify the population into 2 groups: adolescents with sleep deprivation (Insulin sensitivity was assessed using the hyperglycemic clamp technique. Among the 615 adolescents (56.3% female; median age, 15.9 years [interquartile range, 12.9-17.8 years]) included in the sample, the mean (SD) sleep duration was 7.9 (1.7) hours/night. The adolescents with sleep deprivation (n = 257) compared with those with adequate sleep (n = 358) had a higher median (interquartile range) age (17.0 [15.4-18.3] vs 14.1 [11.8-16.9] years), BMI (25.0 [21.2-29.3] vs 23.1 [19.5-27.6]), waist circumference (83.0 [73.5-95.4] vs 79.0 [68.5-91.0] cm), sagittal abdominal diameter (17.9 [15.8-20.8] vs 17.0 [15.0-19.8] cm), neck circumference (35.2 [33.0-38.0] vs 33.0 [30.0-35.5] cm), uric acid level (4.9 [4.0-5.8] vs 4.5 [3.7-5.5] mg/dL), and white blood cell count (7000 [5900-8200] vs 6600 [5600-7800] cells/μL) (all P insulin sensitivity index compared with those with adequate

  3. The AMPK activator R419 improves exercise capacity and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Marcinko

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Treatment of obese mice with R419 improved skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity through a mechanism that is independent of skeletal muscle AMPK. R419 also increases exercise capacity and improves mitochondrial function in obese WT mice; effects that are diminished in the absence of skeletal muscle AMPK. These findings suggest that R419 may be a promising therapy for improving whole-body glucose homeostasis and exercise capacity.

  4. Identification of adipokine clusters related to parameters of fat mass, insulin sensitivity and inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesine Flehmig

    Full Text Available In obesity, elevated fat mass and ectopic fat accumulation are associated with changes in adipokine secretion, which may link obesity to inflammation and the development of insulin resistance. However, relationships among individual adipokines and between adipokines and parameters of obesity, glucose metabolism or inflammation are largely unknown. Serum concentrations of 20 adipokines were measured in 141 Caucasian obese men (n = 67 and women (n = 74 with a wide range of body weight, glycemia and insulin sensitivity. Unbiased, distance-based hierarchical cluster analyses were performed to recognize patterns among adipokines and their relationship with parameters of obesity, glucose metabolism, insulin sensitivity and inflammation. We identified two major adipokine clusters related to either (1 body fat mass and inflammation (leptin, ANGPTL3, DLL1, chemerin, Nampt, resistin or insulin sensitivity/hyperglycemia, and lipid metabolism (vaspin, clusterin, glypican 4, progranulin, ANGPTL6, GPX3, RBP4, DLK1, SFRP5, BMP7, adiponectin, CTRP3 and 5, omentin. In addition, we found distinct adipokine clusters in subgroups of patients with or without type 2 diabetes (T2D. Logistic regression analyses revealed ANGPTL6, DLK1, Nampt and progranulin as strongest adipokine correlates of T2D in obese individuals. The panel of 20 adipokines predicted T2D compared to a combination of HbA1c, HOMA-IR and fasting plasma glucose with lower sensitivity (78% versus 91% and specificity (76% versus 94%. Therefore, adipokine patterns may currently not be clinically useful for the diagnosis of metabolic diseases. Whether adipokine patterns are relevant for the predictive assessment of intervention outcomes needs to be further investigated.

  5. Glucose-Responsive Insulin Delivery by Microneedle-Array Patches Loaded with Hypoxia-Sensitive Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jicheng; Zhang, Yuqi; Gu, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe the preparation of glucose-responsive vesicles (GRVs) and the fabrication of GRV-loaded microneedle-array patches for insulin delivery. The GRVs were formed of hypoxia-sensitive hyaluronic acid (HS-HA), the synthesis of which is presented in detail. We also describe the procedure to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of this smart patch in a mouse model of chemically induced type 1 diabetes through transcutaneous administration.

  6. Effect of Ursolic Acid on Metabolic Syndrome, Insulin Sensitivity, and Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Rodríguez, Alejandra M; González-Ortiz, Manuel; Martínez-Abundis, Esperanza; Acuña Ortega, Natalhie

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of ursolic acid on metabolic syndrome, insulin sensitivity, and inflammation, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out in 24 patients (30-60 years) with a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome without treatment. They were randomly assigned to two groups of 12 patients, each to receive orally 150 mg of ursolic acid or homologated placebo once a day for 12 weeks. Before and after the intervention, the components of metabolic syndrome, insulin sensitivity (Matsuda index), and inflammation profile (interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein) were evaluated. After ursolic acid administration, the remission of metabolic syndrome occurred in 50% of patients (P = .005) with significant differences in body weight (75.7 ± 11.5 vs. 71 ± 11 kg, P = .002), body mass index (BMI) (29.9 + 3.6 vs. 24.9 ± 1.2 kg/m 2 , P = .049), waist circumference (93 ± 8.9 vs. 83 + 8.6 cm, P = .008), fasting glucose (6.0 ± 0.5 vs. 4.7 ± 0.4 mmol/L, P = .002), and insulin sensitivity (3.1 ± 1.1 vs. 4.2 ± 1.2, P = .003). Ursolic acid administration leads to transient remission of metabolic syndrome, reducing body weight, BMI, waist circumference and fasting glucose, as well as increasing insulin sensitivity.

  7. Constitutive insulin sensitivity and obesity my be caused by PTEN mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E A Pigarova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по статье: Pal A, Barber TM, Van de Bunt M, Rudge SA, Zhang Q, Lachlan KL, Cooper NS, Linden H, Levy JC, Wakelam MJ, Walker L, Karpe F, Gloyn AL. PTEN mutations as a cause of constitutive insulin sensitivity and obesity. N Engl J Med. 2012 Sep 13;367(11:1002-11.

  8. Short-Term Exercise Training Improves Insulin Sensitivity but Does Not Inhibit Inflammatory Pathways in Immune Cells from Insulin-Resistant Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Reyna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Exercise has an anti-inflammatory effect against, and immune cells play critical roles in the development, of insulin resistance and atherosclerotic vascular disease (AVD. Thus, the goal of this study was to determine whether exercise improves insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant subjects by downregulating proinflammatory signaling in immune cells. Methods. Seventeen lean, 8 obese nondiabetic, and 11 obese type 2 diabetic individuals underwent an aerobic exercise program for 15 days and an insulin clamp before and after exercise. Peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNC were obtained for determination of Toll-like receptor (TLR 2 and 4 protein content and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Results. Compared with that in lean individuals, TLR4 protein content was increased by 4.2-fold in diabetic subjects. This increase in TLR4 content was accompanied by a 3.0-fold increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation. Exercise improved insulin sensitivity in the lean, obese, and type 2 diabetes groups. However, exercise did not affect TLR content or ERK phosphorylation. Conclusions. TLR4 content and ERK phosphorylation are increased in PMNC of type 2 diabetic individuals. While exercise improves insulin sensitivity, this effect is not related to changes in TLR2/TLR4 content or ERK phosphorylation in PMNC of type 2 diabetic individuals.

  9. Trigonella foenum-graecum water extract improves insulin sensitivity and stimulates PPAR and γ gene expression in high fructose-fed insulin-resistant rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrates the beneficial effects of trigonella foenum-graecum extract on insulin resistance in rats fed on a high-fructose diet. At least three mechanisms are involved, including direct insulin-like effect, increase in adiponectin levels, and PPARγ protein expression.

  10. Plasma lipid fatty acid composition, desaturase activities and insulin sensitivity in Amerindian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessby, B; Ahrén, B; Warensjö, E; Lindgärde, F

    2012-03-01

    Two Amerindian populations--Shuar women living in the Amazonian rain forest under traditional conditions and urbanized women in a suburb of Lima were studied. The fatty acid composition in plasma lipids and the relationships between fatty acid composition and metabolic variables were studied, as well as in a reference group of Swedish women. Fasting plasma was used for analyses of glucose, insulin, leptin and fatty acid composition. Women in Lima had more body fat, higher fasting insulin and leptin and lower insulin sensitivity than the Shuar women, who had insulin sensitivity similar to Swedish women. Shuar women had very high proportions (mean; SD) of palmitoleic (13.2; 3.9%) and oleic (33.9; 3.7%) acids in the plasma cholesteryl esters with very low levels of linoleic acid (29.1; 6.1 3%), as expected on a low fat, high carbohydrate diet. The estimated activity of delta 9 (SCD-1) desaturase was about twice as high in the Shuar compared with Lima women, suggesting neo lipogenesis, while the delta 5 desaturase activity did not differ. The Lima women, as well as the Swedish, showed strong positive correlations between SCD-1 activity on the one hand and fasting insulin and HOMA index on the other. These associations were absent in the Shuar women. The high SCD-1 activity in the Shuar women may reflect increased lipogenesis in adipose tissue. It also illustrates how a low fat diet rich in non-refined carbohydrates can be linked to a good metabolic situation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Insulin sensitivity across the lifespan from obese adolescents to obese adults with impaired glucose tolerance: Who is worse off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youth type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) occurs decades earlier than adult T2DM and is characterized by high therapeutic failure rates and decreased response to insulin sensitizers suggesting a more severe disease process than in adults. To explain these observations, we hypothesized that insulin resis...

  12. Training Does Not Alter Muscle Ceramide and Diacylglycerol in Offsprings of Type 2 Diabetic Patients Despite Improved Insulin Sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sogaard, Ditte; Ostergard, Torben; Blachnio-Zabielska, Agnieszka U.

    2016-01-01

    Ceramide and diacylglycerol (DAG) may be involved in the early phase of insulin resistance but data are inconsistent in man. We evaluated if an increase in insulin sensitivity after endurance training was accompanied by changes in these lipids in skeletal muscle. Nineteen first-degree type 2 diab...

  13. The relationship between thyrotropin and low density lipoprotein cholesterol is modified by insulin sensitivity in healthy euthyroid subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, SJL; ter Maaten, JC; Popp-Snijders, C; Slaets, JPJ; Heine, RJ; Gans, ROB

    High levels of TSH are associated with an increased cardiovascular risk. Many cardiovascular risk factors cluster within the insulin resistance syndrome. It is not known whether levels of TSH cluster as well. We conducted this research to test the hypothesis that TSH, insulin sensitivity, and levels

  14. Maternal age at childbirth is associated with offspring insulin sensitivity: a cross-sectional study in adult male siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verroken, Charlotte; Zmierczak, Hans-Georg; Goemaere, Stefan; Kaufman, Jean-Marc; Lapauw, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Maternal age at childbirth is increasing worldwide, but studies investigating the consequences of this trend on offspring metabolic health are scarce. We investigated the associations of maternal age at childbirth with metabolic outcomes in adult male siblings. We used data from 586 men aged 25-45 participating in a cross-sectional, population-based sibling-pair study, including maternal age at childbirth and offspring birthweight, adult weight, height, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)-derived body composition, blood pressure, and total cholesterol, glucose and insulin levels from fasting serum samples. Insulin sensitivity was evaluated using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Maternal age at childbirth was 27·1 ± 4·7 years and was inversely associated with glucose levels (β = -0·10, P = 0·022) and HOMA-IR (β = -0·06, P = 0·065) in age- and body composition-adjusted analyses. Moreover, sons of younger (aged HOMA-IR values than sons of mothers aged 30-34 (1·39, 1·35 and 1·42 vs 1·19, P = 0·028). Additional adjustment for birthweight did not substantially alter these results. Maternal age was inversely associated with cholesterol levels in unadjusted (β = -0·09, P = 0·032), but not in age- and body composition-adjusted analyses. No associations of maternal age were observed with blood pressure, leptin, or adiponectin levels or with any of the body composition measurements. Increasing maternal age at childbirth is associated with lower fasting glucose levels and higher insulin sensitivity in adult male offspring. However, this association might not hold true in offspring of women aged ≥35 years at childbirth. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Diuretics prevent thiazolidinedione-induced cardiac hypertrophy without compromising insulin-sensitizing effects in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cherng-Shyang; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Sung, Junne-Ming; Chen, Ju-Yi; Ho, Li-Chun; Pandya, Kumar; Maeda, Nobuyo; Tsai, Yau-Sheng

    2014-02-01

    Much concern has arisen regarding critical adverse effects of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), including rosiglitazone and pioglitazone, on cardiac tissue. Although TZD-induced cardiac hypertrophy (CH) has been attributed to an increase in plasma volume or a change in cardiac nutrient preference, causative roles have not been established. To test the hypothesis that volume expansion directly mediates rosiglitazone-induced CH, mice were fed a high-fat diet with rosiglitazone, and cardiac and metabolic consequences were examined. Rosiglitazone treatment induced volume expansion and CH in wild-type and PPARγ heterozygous knockout (Pparg(+/-)) mice, but not in mice defective for ligand binding (Pparg(P465L/+)). Cotreatment with the diuretic furosemide in wild-type mice attenuated rosiglitazone-induced CH, hypertrophic gene reprogramming, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, hypertrophy-related signal activation, and left ventricular dysfunction. Similar changes were observed in mice treated with pioglitazone. The diuretics spironolactone and trichlormethiazide, but not amiloride, attenuated rosiglitazone effects on volume expansion and CH. Interestingly, expression of glucose and lipid metabolism genes in the heart was altered by rosiglitazone, but these changes were not attenuated by furosemide cotreatment. Importantly, rosiglitazone-mediated whole-body metabolic improvements were not affected by furosemide cotreatment. We conclude that releasing plasma volume reduces adverse effects of TZD-induced volume expansion and cardiac events without compromising TZD actions in metabolic switch in the heart and whole-body insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Associations of objective physical activity with insulin sensitivity and circulating adipokine profile: the Framingham Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spartano, N L; Stevenson, M D; Xanthakis, V; Larson, M G; Andersson, C; Murabito, J M; Vasan, R S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relation of physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (SED) to insulin sensitivity and adipokines. We assessed PA and SED using Actical accelerometers and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in 2109 participants (free of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus) from Framingham Generation 3 and Omni 2 cohorts (mean age 46 years, 54% women). Systemic inflammation (C-reactive protein [CRP]) and circulating adipokines were measured 6 years earlier. Steps per day, moderate-to-vigorous PA (MVPA) and SED per wear time (%SED) were predictor variables in multivariable regression analyses, with HOMA-IR, CRP and circulating adipokines as outcome measures. We reported that higher MVPA and more steps per day were associated with lower HOMA-IR, adjusting for %SED (β = -0.036, P = 0.002; β = -0.041, P = 0.005). Steps were inversely associated with CRP, but were directly associated with insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 levels (β = -0.111, P = 0.002; β = 3.293, P = 0.007). %SED was positively associated with HOMA-IR (β = 0.033, P insulin resistance and inflammation, whereas SED influences FABPs. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  17. Effect of losartan and atenolol on insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic hypertensive patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Sandesh Madhukar; Singh, Nishith

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of losartan and atenolol on glucometabolic parameters in nondiabetic hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: In a prospective, open-label, parallel group study, nondiabetic patients with mild to moderate hypertension were randomized to either losartan (titrated from 50 to 100 mg/day, n = 20) or atenolol (titrated from 25 mg to 100 mg/day, n = 20) for period of 24 weeks. At baseline, 12 and 24 weeks fasting plasma glucose (FPG), fasting plasma insulin (FPI), homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) apart from lipid parameters, mean systolic, and diastolic blood pressures levels were determined. Results: At the end of study, losartan significantly (P < 0.05) reduced FPG, FPI, and HOMA-IR compared to atenolol and baseline. While atenolol increased the HOMA-IR levels significantly compared to the baseline. Conclusions: Losartan improved the insulin sensitivity while atenolol worsened it. Losartan is better than atenolol for its effects on the glucose-insulin metabolism. PMID:27440952

  18. The impact of pegvisomant treatment on substrate metabolism and insulin sensitivity in patients with acromegaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg-Larsen, Rune; Møller, Niels; Schmitz, Ole

    2007-01-01

    CONTEXT: Pegvisomant is a specific GH receptor antagonist that is able to normalize serum IGF-I concentrations in most patients with acromegaly. The impact of pegvisomant on insulin sensitivity and substrate metabolism is less well described. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We assessed basal and insulin......-stimulated (euglycemic clamp) substrate metabolism in seven patients with active acromegaly before and after 4-wk pegvisomant treatment (15 mg/d) in an open design. RESULTS: After pegvisomant, IGF-I decreased, whereas GH increased (IGF-I, 621 +/- 82 vs. 247 +/- 33 microg/liter, P = 0.02; GH, 5.3 +/- 1.5 vs. 10.8 +/- 3.......3 microg/liter, P = 0.02). Basal serum insulin and plasma glucose levels decreased after treatment (insulin, 54 +/- 5.9 vs. 42 +/- 5.3 pmol/liter, P = 0.001; glucose, 5.7 +/- 0.1 vs. 5.3 +/- 0.0 mmol/liter, not significant), whereas palmitate kinetics were unaltered. During the clamp, the glucose infusion...

  19. Differential effects of age and sex on insulin sensitivity and body composition in adolescent offspring of women with type 1 diabetes: results from the EPICOM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Zuzana; Knorr, Sine; Bytoft, Birgitte

    2018-01-01

    in fasting OGTT-derived indices for insulin sensitivity (BIGTT-SI0-30-120, Matsuda index, HOMA-IR) and insulin secretion (acute insulin response [BIGTT-AIR0-0-30-120], insulinogenic index, HOMA of insulin secretory function [HOMA-β], disposition index) and physical activity (International Physical Activity...

  20. Exercise Improves Insulin Sensitivity in the Absence of Changes in Cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheggen, Rebecca J H M; Poelkens, Fleur; Roerink, Sean H P P; Ramakers, Rob E F S; Catoire, Milène; Hermus, Ad R M M; Thijssen, Dick H J; Hopman, Maria T E

    2016-12-01

    The benefits of aerobic exercise training on insulin sensitivity in subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) are, at least in part, associated with changes in cytokines. Recent studies identified novel cytokines (e.g., fractalkine, omentin, and osteopontin) that are strongly involved in glucose homeostasis and therefore potentially contribute in the exercise-induced changes in insulin sensitivity. Therefore, we aim to examine changes in skeletal muscle RNA expression and plasma levels of novel cytokines after exercise training and correlate these changes to the exercise-induced changes in insulin sensitivity. Women with metabolic syndrome (MetS, n = 11) and healthy women (n = 10) participated in a 6-month aerobic exercise training intervention (three times a week, 45 min per session at 65%-85% of individual heart rate reserve). Before and after training, we examined insulin sensitivity (M value during hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp) and circulating blood levels of cytokines (venous blood sample; leptin, adiponectin, omentin, fraktalkin, and osteopontin). The skeletal muscle RNA expression of these cytokines (muscle biopsy) was examined in two subgroups (MetS, n = 6; healthy women, n = 6). At baseline, plasma levels of omentin (85.8 ± 26.2 ng·mL) and adiponectin (5.0 ± 1.7 μg·mL) levels were significantly higher in controls compared with MetS (51.1 ± 27.1; 3.6 ± 1.1 respectively), and leptin levels were lower in controls (18.7 ± 11.5 vs 53.0 ± 23.5 ng·mL). M value was significantly higher in controls (8.1 ± 1.9 mg·kg·min) than in MetS (4.0 ± 1.7). Exercise training significantly improved M values in both groups (P cytokines, but no correlation was observed between changes in cytokine level/RNA expression and M values (P > 0.05). Although exercise training successfully improves insulin sensitivity in MetS and healthy women, we found no change in plasma and mRNA expression levels of novel cytokines.

  1. Serum Is Not Necessary for Prior Pharmacological Activation of AMPK to Increase Insulin Sensitivity of Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas O. Jørgensen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Exercise, contraction, and pharmacological activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR have all been shown to increase muscle insulin sensitivity for glucose uptake. Intriguingly, improvements in insulin sensitivity following contraction of isolated rat and mouse skeletal muscle and prior AICAR stimulation of isolated rat skeletal muscle seem to depend on an unknown factor present in serum. One study recently questioned this requirement of a serum factor by showing serum-independency with muscle from old rats. Whether a serum factor is necessary for prior AICAR stimulation to increase insulin sensitivity of mouse skeletal muscle is not known. Therefore, we investigated the necessity of serum for this effect of AICAR in mouse skeletal muscle. We found that the ability of prior AICAR stimulation to improve insulin sensitivity of mouse skeletal muscle did not depend on the presence of serum during AICAR stimulation. Although prior AICAR stimulation did not enhance proximal insulin signaling, insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Tre-2/BUB2/CDC16- domain family member 4 (TBC1D4 Ser711 was greater in prior AICAR-stimulated muscle compared to all other groups. These results imply that the presence of a serum factor is not necessary for prior AMPK activation by AICAR to enhance insulin sensitivity of mouse skeletal muscle.

  2. Enhanced insulin sensitivity of gene-targeted mice lacking functional KCNQ1

    OpenAIRE

    Boini, Krishna M.; Graf, Dirk; Hennige, Anita M.; Koka, Saisudha; Kempe, Daniela S.; Wang, Kan; Ackermann, Teresa F.; Föller, Michael; Vallon, Volker; Pfeifer, Karl; Schleicher, Erwin; Ullrich, Susanne; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian

    2009-01-01

    The pore-forming K+-channel α-subunit KCNQ1 is expressed in a wide variety of tissues including heart, skeletal muscle, liver, and epithelia. Most recent evidence revealed an association of the KCNQ1 gene with the susceptibility to type 2 diabetes. KCNQ1 participates in the regulation of cell volume, which is, in turn, critically important for the regulation of metabolism by insulin. The present study explored the influence of KCNQ1 on insulin-induced cellular K+ uptake and glucose metabolism...

  3. Adipocyte-specific blockade of gamma-secretase, but not inhibition of Notch activity, reduces adipose insulin sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Sparling

    2016-02-01

    Conclusions: Notch signaling is dispensable for normal adipocyte function, but adipocyte-specific γ-secretase blockade reduces adipose insulin sensitivity, suggesting that specific Notch inhibitors would be preferable to GSIs for application in T2D.

  4. The neuronal insulin sensitizer dicholine succinate reduces stress-induced depressive traits and memory deficit: possible role of insulin-like growth factor 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cline Brandon H

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of epidemiological studies have established a link between insulin resistance and the prevalence of depression. The occurrence of depression was found to precede the onset of diabetes and was hypothesized to be associated with inherited inter-related insufficiency of the peripheral and central insulin receptors. Recently, dicholine succinate, a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor, was shown to stimulate insulin-dependent H2O2 production of the mitochondrial respiratory chain leading to an enhancement of insulin receptor autophosphorylation in neurons. As such, this mechanism can be a novel target for the elevation of insulin signaling. Results Administration of DS (25 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal in CD1 mice for 7 days prior to the onset of stress procedure, diminished manifestations of anhedonia defined in a sucrose test and behavioral despair in the forced swim test. Treatment with dicholine succinate reduced the anxiety scores of stressed mice in the dark/light box paradigm, precluded stress-induced decreases of long-term contextual memory in the step-down avoidance test and hippocampal gene expression of IGF2. Conclusions Our data suggest that dicholine succinate has an antidepressant-like effect, which might be mediated via the up-regulation of hippocampal expression of IGF2, and implicate the neuronal insulin receptor in the pathogenesis of stress-induced depressive syndrome.

  5. Glycine Increases Insulin Sensitivity and Glutathione Biosynthesis and Protects against Oxidative Stress in a Model of Sucrose-Induced Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El-Hafidi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress and redox status play a central role in the link between insulin resistance (IR and lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome. This mechanistic link may involve alterations in the glutathione redox state. We examined the effect of glycine supplementation to diet on glutathione biosynthesis, oxidative stress, IR, and insulin cell signaling in liver from sucrose-fed (SF rats characterized by IR and oxidative stress. Our hypothesis is that the correction of glutathione levels by glycine treatment leads to reduced oxidative stress, a mechanism associated with improved insulin signaling and IR. Glycine treatment decreases the levels of oxidative stress markers in liver from SF rats and increases the concentrations of glutathione (GSH and γ-glutamylcysteine and the amount of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS, a key enzyme of GSH biosynthesis in liver from SF rats. In liver from SF rats, glycine also decreases the insulin-induced phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (ISR-1 in serine residue and increases the phosphorylation of insulin receptor β-subunit (IR-β in tyrosine residue. Thus, supplementing diets with glycine to correct GSH deficiency and to reduce oxidative stress provides significant metabolic benefits to SF rats by improving insulin sensitivity.

  6. Effects of supplemented isoenergetic diets differing in cereal fiber and protein content on insulin sensitivity in overweight humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weickert, Martin O; Roden, Michael; Isken, Frank; Hoffmann, Daniela; Nowotny, Peter; Osterhoff, Martin; Blaut, Michael; Alpert, Carl; Gögebakan, Ozlem; Bumke-Vogt, Christiane; Mueller, Friederike; Machann, Jürgen; Barber, Tom M; Petzke, Klaus J; Hierholzer, Johannes; Hornemann, Silke; Kruse, Michael; Illner, Anne-Kathrin; Kohl, Angela; Loeffelholz, Christian V; Arafat, Ayman M; Möhlig, Matthias; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H

    2011-08-01

    Despite their beneficial effects on weight loss and blood lipids, high-protein (HP) diets have been shown to increase insulin resistance and diabetes risk, whereas high-cereal-fiber (HCF) diets have shown the opposite effects on these outcomes. We compared the effects of isoenergetic HP and HCF diets and a diet with moderate increases in both cereal fibers and dietary protein (Mix diet) on insulin sensitivity, as measured by using euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps with infusion of [6,6-(2)H(2)]glucose. We randomly assigned 111 overweight adults with features of the metabolic syndrome to 1 of 4 two-phased, 18-wk isoenergetic diets by group-matching. Per 3-d food protocols, the percentages of energy derived from protein and carbohydrates and the intake of cereal fiber per day, respectively, were as follows-after 6 wk: 17%, 52%, and 14 g (control); 17%, 52%, and 43 g (HCF); 28%, 43%, and 13 g (HP); 23%, 44%, and 26 g (Mix); after 18 wk: 17%, 51%, and 15 g (control); 17%, 51%, and 41 g (HCF); 26%, 45%, and 14 g (HP); and 22%, 46%, and 26 g (Mix). Eighty-four participants completed the study successfully and were included in the final analyses. Adherence was supported by the provision of tailored dietary supplements twice daily in all groups. Insulin sensitivity expressed as an M value was 25% higher after 6 wk of the HCF diet than after 6 wk of the HP diet (subgroup analysis: 4.61 ± 0.38 compared with 3.71 ± 0.36 mg · kg(-1) · min(-1), P = 0.008; treatment × time interaction: P = 0.005). Effects were attenuated after 18 wk (treatment × time interaction: P = 0.054), which was likely explained by lower adherence to the HP diet. HP intake was associated with a tendency to increased protein expression in adipose tissue of the translation initiation factor serine-kinase-6-1, which is known to mediate amino acid-induced insulin resistance. Biomarkers of protein intake indicated interference of cereal fibers with dietary protein absorption. Greater changes in insulin

  7. Synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (SCO1) inhibits insulin sensitivity by decreasing copper levels in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiang-Bo; Guo, Liang; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Shui-Rong; Liu, Yuan; Dou, Xin; Du, Shao-Yue; Ding, Meng; Peng, Wan-Qiu; Qian, Shu-Wen; Huang, Hai-Yan; Tang, Qi-Qun

    2017-09-23

    Dysregulation of insulin signaling leads to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and other metabolic disorders. Obesity is an important contributor to insulin resistance, and although the understanding of this relationship has improved in recent years, the mechanism of obesity-induced insulin resistance is not completely understood. Disorders of copper metabolism tend to accompany the development of obesity, which increases the risk of insulin resistance. Synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (SCO1) functions in the assembly of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) and cellular copper homeostasis. However, the role of SCO1 in the regulation of metabolism remains unknown. Here, we found that obese mice had higher expression of SCO1 and lower levels of copper in white adipose tissue (WAT) than did the control mice. Overexpression of SCO1 in adipocytes was associated with copper deficiency. Copper increased insulin sensitivity by decreasing the level of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) protein. Ectopic expression of SCO1 led to insulin resistance and was accompanied by a decrease in intracellular copper level, and addition of copper abolished the inhibitory effect of SCO1 on insulin sensitivity. Our results demonstrated a novel role of SCO1 in modulating insulin sensitivity via the regulation of copper concentration in WAT and suggested a potential therapeutic target for T2DM. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Over-expression of Follistatin-like 3 attenuates fat accumulation and improves insulin sensitivity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Claus; Hansen, Rasmus Hvass; Hansen, Jakob Bondo

    2015-01-01

    -fat feeding. Body weight, food intake, fat accumulation by MR scanning, and glucose, insulin and glucagon tolerance were evaluated, as was the response in body weight and metabolic parameters to 24h fasting. Effects of fstl3 on pancreatic insulin and glucagon content, and pancreatic islet morphology were...... through systemic fstl3 over-expression protects against diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. METHODS: Fstl3 was over-expressed by DNA electrotransfer in tibialis anterior, quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscles in female C57BL/C mice, and the mice were subsequently randomized to chow or high....../glucagon ratio. Accordingly, fstl3 transfection improved counter-regulation to 24h fasting. CONCLUSION: Fstl3 over-expression regulates insulin and glucagon sensitivities through increased muscular insulin action, as well as increased hepatic glucagon sensitivity and pancreatic glucagon content....

  9. UP780, a chromone-enriched aloe composition improves insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimam, Mesfin; Zhao, Jifu; Corneliusen, Brandon; Pantier, Mandee; Brownell, Lidia Alfaro; Jia, Qi

    2013-08-01

    Diabetic individuals experience elevated fasting glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and plasma insulin and impaired glucose tolerance. Adiponectin is a hormone inversely correlated with insulin resistance. Here we describe the activity of aloesin, an aloe chromone that increases adiponectin production and, when formulated with an aloe polysaccharide composition, improves the insulin sensitivity in db/db and diet-induced obese-diabetic mice. Two aloe chromones, aloesin and aloesinol, were tested in vitro for adiponectin production. Following confirmation of glucose-lowering activity in a high-fat diet (HFD)-induced mouse model, aloesin was formulated with an Aloe vera inner leaf gel powder polysaccharide preparation to yield a composition designated UP780. Efficacy of UP780 was evaluated in HDF-induced and db/db mouse models. GW1929, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonist, was used as a positive control. After 3 weeks of treatment of HDF-induced mice, plasma insulin levels were decreased 37.9% and 46.7% by aloesin and aloesinol, respectively. In db/db mice, the chromone- (2% chromone:98% aloe polysaccharide) enriched UP780 aloe composition showed a 33.7% and 46.0% decrease in fasting triglyceride and plasma glucose levels after 10 weeks of oral treatment, respectively. Diabetic mice gavaged with 200 mg/kg of UP780 for 10 weeks showed a 30.3% decrease in fasting blood glucose levels and a 32.2% reduction in plasma insulin. In both animal models, UP780 showed a statistically significant improvement in blood glucose clearance. These findings indicate that UP780, a chromone-standardized, aloe-based composition, could potentially be used as a natural product option to facilitate the maintenance of healthy blood glucose levels.

  10. Proteasome Dysfunction Associated to Oxidative Stress and Proteotoxicity in Adipocytes Compromises Insulin Sensitivity in Human Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Ruiz, Alberto; Guzmán-Ruiz, Rocío; Moreno, Natalia R.; García-Rios, Antonio; Delgado-Casado, Nieves; Membrives, Antonio; Túnez, Isaac; El Bekay, Rajaa; Fernández-Real, José M.; Tovar, Sulay; Diéguez, Carlos; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Vázquez-Martínez, Rafael; López-Miranda, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Obesity is characterized by a low-grade systemic inflammatory state and adipose tissue (AT) dysfunction, which predispose individuals to the development of insulin resistance (IR) and metabolic disease. However, a subset of obese individuals, referred to as metabolically healthy obese (MHO) individuals, are protected from obesity-associated metabolic abnormalities. Here, we aim at identifying molecular factors and pathways in adipocytes that are responsible for the progression from the insulin-sensitive to the insulin-resistant, metabolically unhealthy obese (MUHO) phenotype. Results: Proteomic analysis of paired samples of adipocytes from subcutaneous (SC) and omental (OM) human AT revealed that both types of cells are altered in the MUHO state. Specifically, the glutathione redox cycle and other antioxidant defense systems as well as the protein-folding machinery were dysregulated and endoplasmic reticulum stress was increased in adipocytes from IR subjects. Moreover, proteasome activity was also compromised in adipocytes of MUHO individuals, which was associated with enhanced accumulation of oxidized and ubiquitinated proteins in these cells. Proteasome activity was also impaired in adipocytes of diet-induced obese mice and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes exposed to palmitate. In line with these data, proteasome inhibition significantly impaired insulin signaling in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Innovation: This study provides the first evidence of the occurrence of protein homeostasis deregulation in adipocytes in human obesity, which, together with oxidative damage, interferes with insulin signaling in these cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that proteasomal dysfunction and impaired proteostasis in adipocytes, resulting from protein oxidation and/or misfolding, constitute major pathogenic mechanisms in the development of IR in obesity. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 597–612. PMID:25714483

  11. Opposite regulation of insulin sensitivity by dietary lipid versus carbohydrate excess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundsgaard, Annemarie; Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Høeg, Louise Dalgas

    2017-01-01

    ; CHO) as well as a eucaloric control diet (CON). Compared to CON, UNSAT reduced whole body and leg glucose disposal during a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, while decreasing hepatic glucose production. In muscle, DAG and IMTG were increased. The accumulated DAG was sn-1,3 DAG, which is known...... not to activate PKC, and insulin signaling was intact. UNSAT decreased PDH-E1α protein content, and increased inhibitory PDH-E1α Ser(300) phosphorylation and FA oxidation. CHO increased whole body and leg insulin sensitivity, while increasing hepatic glucose production. After CHO, muscle PDH-E1α Ser(300......) phosphorylation was decreased, and glucose oxidation increased. After UNSAT, but not CHO, muscle G6P content was 103 % higher compared to CON during the clamp. Thus, PDH-E1α expression and covalent regulation, and hence the TCA influx of pyruvate-derived acetyl-CoA relative to beta-oxidation-derived acetyl...

  12. Targeted disruption of the CREB coactivator Crtc2 increases insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiguo; Inoue, Hiroshi; Ravnskjaer, Kim; Viste, Kristin; Miller, Nina; Liu, Yi; Hedrick, Susan; Vera, Liliana; Montminy, Marc

    2010-02-16

    Under fasting conditions, increases in circulating concentrations of pancreatic glucagon maintain glucose homeostasis through induction of gluconeogenic genes by the CREB coactivator CRTC2. Hepatic CRTC2 activity is elevated in obesity, although the extent to which this cofactor contributes to attendant increases in insulin resistance is unclear. Here we show that mice with a knockout of the CRTC2 gene have decreased circulating glucose concentrations during fasting, due to attenuation of the gluconeogenic program. CRTC2 was found to stimulate hepatic gene expression in part through an N-terminal CREB binding domain that enhanced CREB occupancy over relevant promoters in response to glucagon. Deletion of sequences encoding the CREB binding domain in CRTC2 (-/-) mice lowered circulating blood glucose concentrations and improved insulin sensitivity in the context of diet-induced obesity. Our results suggest that small molecules that attenuate the CREB-CRTC2 pathway may provide therapeutic benefit to individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Moderate diet-induced weight loss is associated with improved insulin sensitivity in middle-aged healthy obese Korean women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye-Ok; Yim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Young-Seol; Choue, Ryowon

    2014-08-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of moderate caloric restriction on β-cell function and insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese Korean women. Fifty-seven obese pre-menopausal Korean women participated in a 12-week calorie restriction program. Data on total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and fasting serum levels of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, blood pressure, leptin and anthropometrics were collected. A dietary intake assessment was based on three days of food recording. Additionally, β-cell function [homeostasis model assessment of β-cell (HOMA-β), insulinogenic index (ISI), C-peptide:glucose ratio, and area under curve insulin/glucose (AUCins/glu)] and insulin sensitivity [homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), Quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI) and Matsuda index (MI)] were recorded. When calories were reduced by an average of 422 kcal/day for 12 weeks, BMI (-2.7%), body fat mass (-10.2%), and waist circumference (-5%) all decreased significantly (P calorie restriction, weight, body fat percentage, hip circumference, BP, TC, HDL-C, LDL-C, plasma glucose at fasting, insulin at fasting and 120 min, AUCglu and the insulin area under the curve all decreased significantly (all P weight loss due to caloric restriction with reduction in insulin resistance improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese women and thereby may help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  14. Insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in healthy cats: assessment with the use of the hyperglycemic glucose clamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slingerland, L I; Robben, J H; van Haeften, T W; Kooistra, H S; Rijnberk, A

    2007-05-01

    A hyperglycemic clamp (HGC) was developed for use in conscious cats. In 21 healthy, normal glucose tolerant cats glucose disposal rate (M), insulin sensitivity (ISI (HGC)), and beta-cell response (I) at arterial plasma glucose of 9 mmol.l (-1) were measured. The HGC was tolerated well and steady state glucose infusion was achieved. Compared to values reported for humans, M values for the cats were low, which appeared to relate to both a low ISI (HGC) and a low I. HGC measures correlated with fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations as well as with their HOMA (homeostasis model assessment) and QUICKI (quantitative insulin sensitivity check index) counterparts. Also, I and ISI (HGC) correlated with their counterparts derived from intravenous glucose tolerance tests. In conclusion, this is the first report of hyperglycemic glucose clamping in cats. The procedure (HGC) allows for measurements of glucose disposal, beta-cell response and insulin sensitivity. Compared to human data, both insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion appeared to be low in cats. This is compatible with the carnivorous nature of this species, for which insulin resistance would be advantageous during periods of restricted food availability.

  15. Adipose tissue (P)RR regulates insulin sensitivity, fat mass and body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamansurova, Zulaykho; Tan, Paul; Ahmed, Basma; Pepin, Emilie; Seda, Ondrej; Lavoie, Julie L

    2016-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that the handle-region peptide, a prorenin/renin receptor [(P)RR] blocker, reduces body weight and fat mass and may improve insulin sensitivity in high-fat fed mice. We hypothesized that knocking out the adipose tissue (P)RR gene would prevent weight gain and insulin resistance. An adipose tissue-specific (P)RR knockout (KO) mouse was created by Cre-loxP technology using AP2-Cre recombinase mice. Because the (P)RR gene is located on the X chromosome, hemizygous males were complete KO and had a more pronounced phenotype on a normal diet (ND) diet compared to heterozygous KO females. Therefore, we challenged the female mice with a high-fat diet (HFD) to uncover certain phenotypes. Mice were maintained on either diet for 9 weeks. KO mice had lower body weights compared to wild-types (WT). Only hemizygous male KO mice presented with lower total fat mass, higher total lean mass as well as smaller adipocytes compared to WT mice. Although food intake was similar between genotypes, locomotor activity during the active period was increased in both male and female KO mice. Interestingly, only male KO mice had increased O2 consumption and CO2 production during the entire 24-hour period, suggesting an increased basal metabolic rate. Although glycemia during a glucose tolerance test was similar, KO males as well as HFD-fed females had lower plasma insulin and C-peptide levels compared to WT mice, suggesting improved insulin sensitivity. Remarkably, all KO animals exhibited higher circulating adiponectin levels, suggesting that this phenotype can occur even in the absence of a significant reduction in adipose tissue weight, as observed in females and, thus, may be a specific effect related to the (P)RR. (P)RR may be an important therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and its associated complications such as type 2 diabetes.

  16. Early effects of gastric banding (LGB) and of biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) on insulin sensitivity and on glucose and insulin response after OGTT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontiroli, Antonio E; Gniuli, Donatella; Mingrone, Geltrude

    2010-04-01

    Bariatric surgery improves glucose metabolism. To assess the direct role of surgery (i.e., independently of significant weight loss) on insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) insulin resistance (IR) and oral glucose insulin sensitivity (OGIS)), on glucose and insulin response (area under the curve (AUC) blood glucose (BG) and AUC insulin (Ins)) to oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), and on glucose tolerance, 11 subjects underwent OGTT (75 g, p.o.) before and 5 days after laparoscopic gastric banding (LGB; no change of initial body mass index (BMI), 46.7 +/- 2.21 kg/m(2)), and ten subjects underwent OGTT before and 7 days after biliopancreatic diversion (BPD; BMI decreased from 54.5 +/- 3.75 to 52.1 +/- 4.03 kg/m(2)). As controls, we considered OGTT performed twice over a 30-45-day period in two groups of subjects [BMI 43.0 +/- 0.41 (n = 13, matched with LGB subjects for BMI) and 48.2 +/- 0.49 kg/m(2) (n = 14, matched with BPD subjects for BMI), respectively] with stable weight (+/-1.5 kg); a further control group was made of 11 subjects with a spontaneous weight loss similar to BPD subjects (BMI from 55.5 +/- 1.27 to 52.2 +/- 1.35 kg/m(2)). Fasting BG and OGIS improved in BPD subjects and in subjects with spontaneous weight loss, not in LGB subjects or in weight-stable controls; HOMA-IR, AUC BG, and AUC Ins only decreased in BPD subjects. Glucose tolerance was not affected in a different way in the various groups of subjects. These data indicate an early effect of BPD different from LGB on insulin sensitivity and on glucose and on insulin response to OGTT, mostly independent of weight loss.

  17. A simple method for measuring glucose utilization of insulin-sensitive tissues by using the brain as a reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namba, Hiroki; Nakagawa, Keiichi; Iyo, Masaomi; Fukushi, Kiyoshi; Irie, Toshiaki

    1994-01-01

    A simple method, without measurement of the plasma input function, to obtain semiquantitative values of glucose utilization in tissues other than the brain with radioactive deoxyglucose is reported. The brain, in which glucose utilization is essentially insensitive to plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, was used as an internal reference. The effects of graded doses of oral glucose loading (0.5, 1 and 2 mg/g body weight) on insulin-sensitive tissues (heart, muscle and fat tissue) were studied in the rat. By using the brain-reference method, dose-dependent increases in glucose utilization were clearly shown in all the insulin-sensitive tissues examined. The method seems to be of value for measurement of glucose utilization using radioactive deoxyglucose and positron emission tomography in the heart or other insulin-sensitive tissues, especially during glucose loading. (orig.)

  18. High alanine aminotransferase is associated with decreased hepatic insulin sensitivity and predicts the development of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vozarova, Barbora; Stefan, Norbert; Lindsay, Robert S

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that liver dysfunction may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to examine whether elevated hepatic enzymes (alanine aminotransferase [ALT], aspartate aminotransferase [AST], or gamma -glutamyltranspeptidase [GGT]) are associated...... with prospective changes in liver or whole-body insulin sensitivity and/or insulin secretion and whether these elevated enzymes predict the development of type 2 diabetes in Pima Indians. We measured ALT, AST, and GGT in 451 nondiabetic (75-g oral glucose tolerance test) Pima Indians (aged 30 +/- 6 years, body fat...... 33 +/- 8%, ALT 45 +/- 29 units/l, AST 34 +/- 18 units/l, and GGT 56 +/- 40 units/l [mean +/- SD]) who were characterized for body composition (hydrodensitometry or dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), whole-body insulin sensitivity (M), and hepatic insulin sensitivity (hepatic glucose output [HGO...

  19. Are the beneficial cardiovascular effects of simvastatin and metformin also associated with a hormone-dependent mechanism improving insulin sensitivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bulcão

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to lipid-lowering and cardiovascular protective actions, statins may have beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of simvastatin therapy on insulin resistance and on leptin, adiponectin, and C-reactive protein (CRP levels, as compared to metformin, in overweight pre-diabetic subjects. Forty-one subjects with BMI >25 kg/m² and impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance were randomized to take simvastatin, 20 mg/day (N = 20 or metformin, 1.7 g/day (N = 21 for 16 weeks. Blood samples for the determination of metabolic, hormonal, and inflammatory parameters were obtained at baseline and after each treatment. After metformin therapy, significant reductions in mean BMI and waist circumference were observed, and after simvastatin treatment LDL and triglyceride levels were significantly reduced. Insulin resistance determined by the homeostasis model assessment decreased only with metformin. Independently of the type of medication, a significant decrease in CRP levels was detected from baseline to the end of the study. CRP showed a mean reduction of 0.12 ± 0.04 mg/dL (P = 0.002 over time. No change in leptin or adiponectin levels was induced by any therapy. The data suggest that a low dose of simvastatin does not affect insulin resistance in overweight pre-diabetic subjects and has no effect on leptin or adiponectin levels. Further studies including a larger sample size, higher doses of statins, and a placebo control group are necessary to confirm the present data.

  20. Are the beneficial cardiovascular effects of simvastatin and metformin also associated with a hormone-dependent mechanism improving insulin sensitivity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bulcão

    Full Text Available In addition to lipid-lowering and cardiovascular protective actions, statins may have beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of simvastatin therapy on insulin resistance and on leptin, adiponectin, and C-reactive protein (CRP levels, as compared to metformin, in overweight pre-diabetic subjects. Forty-one subjects with BMI >25 kg/m² and impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance were randomized to take simvastatin, 20 mg/day (N = 20 or metformin, 1.7 g/day (N = 21 for 16 weeks. Blood samples for the determination of metabolic, hormonal, and inflammatory parameters were obtained at baseline and after each treatment. After metformin therapy, significant reductions in mean BMI and waist circumference were observed, and after simvastatin treatment LDL and triglyceride levels were significantly reduced. Insulin resistance determined by the homeostasis model assessment decreased only with metformin. Independently of the type of medication, a significant decrease in CRP levels was detected from baseline to the end of the study. CRP showed a mean reduction of 0.12 ± 0.04 mg/dL (P = 0.002 over time. No change in leptin or adiponectin levels was induced by any therapy. The data suggest that a low dose of simvastatin does not affect insulin resistance in overweight pre-diabetic subjects and has no effect on leptin or adiponectin levels. Further studies including a larger sample size, higher doses of statins, and a placebo control group are necessary to confirm the present data.

  1. How does acupuncture affect insulin sensitivity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and insulin resistance? Study protocol of a prospective pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanhua; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Ng, Ernest H Y; Li, Juan; Wu, Xiaoke; Ma, Hongxia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance (IR) are key features of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and metabolic syndrome. The effect of 5 weeks of acupuncture treatment has been investigated in a completed prospective pilot trial (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01457209), and acupuncture with electrical stimulation applied to insulin-resistant rats with dihydrotestosterone-induced PCOS was shown to improve insulin sensitivity. Therefore, we now aim to conduct a prospective pilot study to evaluate whether using the same acupuncture treatment protocol given over a longer period of time (6 months) than in the previous pilot trial will improve insulin sensitivity in women with PCOS and IR. Our hypothesis is that acupuncture with combined manual and low-frequency electrical stimulation of the needles will improve insulin sensitivity in women with PCOS and IR. Methods/analysis This is a prospective pilot trial. A total of 112 women with PCOS and IR will be recruited and categorised according to their body mass index (BMI) as normal weight (BMI=18.5−23 kg/m2) or as overweight/obese (BMI>23 kg/m2). Acupuncture will be applied three times per week for 6 months at 30 min per treatment. The primary outcome will be the change in insulin sensitivity before and after 6 months of acupuncture treatment, as measured by an oral glucose tolerance test. Ethics/dissemination Ethical approval of this study has been granted from the ethics committee of the First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University (No. 2013039). Written and informed consent will be obtained from each patient before any study procedure is performed, according to good clinical practice. The results of this trial will be disseminated in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at international congresses. Trial registration numbers NCT02026323 and ChiCTR-OCH-13003921. PMID:25941189

  2. Interaction of growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene disruption and caloric restriction for insulin sensitivity and attenuated aging [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5a7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oge Arum

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The correlation of physiological sensitivity to insulin (vis-à-vis glycemic regulation and longevity is extensively established, creating a justifiable gerontological interest on whether insulin sensitivity is causative, or even predictive, of some or all phenotypes of slowed senescence (including longevity. The growth hormone receptor/ binding protein gene-disrupted (GHR-KO mouse is the most extensively investigated insulin-sensitive, attenuated aging model. It was reported that, in a manner divergent from similar mutants, GHR-KO mice fail to respond to caloric restriction (CR by altering their insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that maximized insulin responsiveness is what causes GHR-KO mice to exhibit a suppressed survivorship response to dietary (including caloric restriction; and attempted to refute this hypothesis by assessing the effects of CR on GHR-KO mice for varied slow-aging-associated phenotypes. In contrast to previous reports, we found GHR-KO mice on CR to be less responsive than their ad libitum (A.L. counterparts to the hypoglycemia-inducing effects of insulin. Further, CR had negligible effects on the metabolism or cognition of GHR-KO mice. Therefore, our data suggest that the effects of CR on the insulin sensitivity of GHR-KO mice do not concur with the effects of CR on the aging of GHR-KO mice.

  3. Interaction of growth hormone receptor/binding protein gene disruption and caloric restriction for insulin sensitivity and attenuated aging [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4fk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oge Arum

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The correlation of physiological sensitivity to insulin (vis-à-vis glycemic regulation and longevity is extensively established, creating a justifiable gerontological interest on whether insulin sensitivity is causative, or even predictive, of some or all phenotypes of slowed senescence (including longevity. The growth hormone receptor/ binding protein gene-disrupted (GHR-KO mouse is the most extensively investigated insulin-sensitive, attenuated aging model. It was reported that, in a manner divergent from similar mutants, GHR-KO mice fail to respond to caloric restriction (CR by altering their insulin sensitivity. We hypothesized that maximized insulin responsiveness is what causes GHR-KO mice to exhibit a suppressed survivorship response to dietary (including caloric restriction; and attempted to refute this hypothesis by assessing the effects of CR on GHR-KO mice for varied slow-aging-associated phenotypes. In contrast to previous reports, we found GHR-KO mice on CR to be less responsive than their ad libitum (A.L. counterparts to the hypoglycemia-inducing effects of insulin. Further, CR had negligible effects on the metabolism or cognition of GHR-KO mice. Therefore, our data suggest that the effects of CR on the insulin sensitivity of GHR-KO mice do not concur with the effects of CR on the aging of GHR-KO mice.

  4. Minor long-term changes in weight have beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in obese subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenfalck, A M; Hendel, Helle Westergren; Rasmussen, M H

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term effect of changes in body composition induced by weight loss on insulin sensitivity (SI), non-insulin mediated glucose disposal, glucose effectiveness (SG)and beta-cell function....

  5. Early enhancements of hepatic and later of peripheral insulin sensitivity combined with increased postprandial insulin secretion contribute to improved glycemic control after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Jørgensen, Nils Bruun

    2014-01-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) improves glycemic control within days after surgery, and changes in insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function are likely to be involved. We studied 10 obese patients with type 2 diabetes and 10 obese glucose tolerant subjects before, 1 week, 3 months and 1 year...

  6. Effects of insulin sensitizers on plaque vulnerability associated with elevated lipid content in atheroma in ApoE-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefalu, W T; Wang, Z Q; Schneider, D J; Absher, P M; Baldor, L C; Taatjes, D J; Sobel, B E

    2004-03-01

    Acute coronary syndromes are generally precipitated by rupture of lipid-laden, relatively acellular, vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques with thin fibrous caps. We investigated whether a high-fat diet alters insulin sensitivity and whether insulin sensitizers (troglitazone and rosiglitazone) alter the composition of otherwise lipidladen atherosclerotic plaques in mice deficient in apolipoprotein E (ApoE). ApoE-knockout mice were fed a high-fat (n=30) or standard chow (n=10) diet for two weeks. Thereafter, those fed the high-fat diet were treated with troglitazone (n=10), rosiglitazone (n=10) or no drug (n=10) for 16 weeks beginning at 8 weeks of age. Carbohydrate metabolism was assessed with intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests and insulin tolerance tests. Plaque composition was characterised with confocal laser scanning microscopy. The high-fat diet induced insulin resistance in the absence of weight gain. Compared with control animals on the high-fat diet, animals given troglitazone (400 mg/kg/day) or rosiglitazone (4 mg/kg/day) had significantly less area under the curve (AUC) for insulin ( p<0.05) and glucose disposal ( p<0.05). Despite significant increases in insulin sensitivity with drug treatment, no change in HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels, nor reduction in atheroma size or lipid content was noted. Thus, improvement in insulin resistance induced by a high-fat diet in this animal model of vasculopathy did not alter plaque composition.

  7. Effect of dietary nitrate on blood pressure, endothelial function, and insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Mark; Winyard, Paul G; Aizawa, Kunihiko; Anning, Christine; Shore, Angela; Benjamin, Nigel

    2013-07-01

    Diets rich in green, leafy vegetables have been shown to lower blood pressure (BP) and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Green, leafy vegetables and beetroot are particularly rich in inorganic nitrate. Dietary nitrate supplementation, via sequential reduction to nitrite and NO, has previously been shown to lower BP and improve endothelial function in healthy humans. We sought to determine if supplementing dietary nitrate with beetroot juice, a rich source of nitrate, will lower BP and improve endothelial function and insulin sensitivity in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Twenty-seven patients, age 67.2±4.9 years (18 male), were recruited for a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover trial. Participants were randomized to begin, in either order, a 2-week period of supplementation with 250ml beetroot juice daily (active) or 250ml nitrate-depleted beetroot juice (placebo). At the conclusion of each intervention period 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, tests of macro- and microvascular endothelial function, and a hyperinsulinemic isoglycemic clamp were performed. After 2 weeks administration of beetroot juice mean ambulatory systolic BP was unchanged: 134.6±8.4mmHg versus 135.1±7.8mmHg (mean±SD), placebo vs active-mean difference of -0.5mmHg (placebo-active), p=0.737 (95% CI -3.9 to 2.8). There were no changes in macrovascular or microvascular endothelial function or insulin sensitivity. Supplementation of the diet with 7.5mmol of nitrate per day for 2 weeks caused an increase in plasma nitrite and nitrate concentration, but did not lower BP, improve endothelial function, or improve insulin sensitivity in individuals with T2DM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of Penalized Regression Techniques in Modelling Insulin Sensitivity by Correlated Metabolic Parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian S Göbl

    Full Text Available This paper aims to introduce penalized estimation techniques in clinical investigations of diabetes, as well as to assess their possible advantages and limitations. Data from a previous study was used to carry out the simulations to assess: a which procedure results in the lowest prediction error of the final model in the setting of a large number of predictor variables with high multicollinearity (of importance if insulin sensitivity should be predicted and b which procedure achieves the most accurate estimate of regression coefficients in the setting of fewer predictors with small unidirectional effects and moderate correlation between explanatory variables (of importance if the specific relation between an independent variable and insulin sensitivity should be examined. Moreover a special focus is on the correct direction of estimated parameter effects, a non-negligible source of error and misinterpretation of study results. The simulations were performed for varying sample size to evaluate the performance of LASSO, Ridge as well as different algorithms for Elastic Net. These methods were also compared with automatic variable selection procedures (i.e. optimizing AIC or BIC.We were not able to identify one method achieving superior performance in all situations. However, the improved accuracy of estimated effects underlines the importance of using penalized regression techniques in our example (e.g. if a researcher aims to compare relations of several correlated parameters with insulin sensitivity. However, the decision which procedure should be used depends on the specific context of a study (accuracy versus complexity and moreover should involve clinical prior knowledge.

  9. Effect of a β-Hydroxyphosphonate Analogue of ʟ-Carnitine on Insulin-Sensitive and Insulin-Resistant 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos-Soriano, Anaguiven; De la Cruz-Cordero, Ricardo; López-Martínez, Francisco Josue; Rosado, Jorge L; Duarte-Vázquez, Miguel Ángel; Garcia-Gasca, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of a β-x200B;hydroxyphosphonate analog of ʟ-carnitine (L-CA) (CAS number: 1220955-x200B;20-3, Component: 1221068-91-2, C12H29NO4PI), (3-Hexanaminium, 1-(dimethoxyphosphinyl)-2-hydroxy-N,N,N,5-x200B;tetramethy-iodide (1:1), (2R, 3S)) on parameters related with type-2 diabetes in an in vitro model. Nontoxic concentrations of L-CA were assayed and compared to commercial ʟ-carnitine effects. L-CA did not affect adipogenesis in normal cells, but an increment of TG accumulation was observed on insulin-resistant adipocytes (80%) when compared with resistant control. L-CA also stimulated glucose analog 2-NBDG uptakes on insulin-resistant adipocytes in a similar way as insulin when compared to insulin-resistant cells. Our results show that the L-CA promoted insulin-like responses on insulin-resistant adipocytes without appreciable pro-adipogenic effect in sensitive adipocytes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. Associations of objective physical activity with insulin sensitivity and circulating adipokine profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spartano, N L; Stevenson, M D; Xanthakis, V

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relation of physical activity (PA) and sedentary time (SED) to insulin sensitivity and adipokines. We assessed PA and SED using Actical accelerometers and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in 2109 participants (free of type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus) from...... analyses, with HOMA-IR, CRP and circulating adipokines as outcome measures. We reported that higher MVPA and more steps per day were associated with lower HOMA-IR, adjusting for %SED (β = -0.036, P = 0.002; β = -0.041, P = 0.005). Steps were inversely associated with CRP, but were directly associated...... with insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 levels (β = -0.111, P = 0.002; β = 3.293, P = 0.007). %SED was positively associated with HOMA-IR (β = 0.033, P 

  11. Moderate Alcoholic Beer Consumption: The Effects on the Lipid Profile and Insulin Sensitivity of Adult Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Luciana C; do Rio, Rafaela F; Lollo, Pablo C B; Ferreira, Isabel M P L V O

    2017-07-01

    Beer is the most consumed alcoholic beverage in the world. The purpose was to compare the effects of consuming alcoholic beer (AB) and nonalcoholic beer (NAB) on the biochemical blood parameters. Two beers were produced under known and controlled conditions from the same raw material, NAB (0.6%, v/v) and AB with the addition of 6% grain alcohol. Fifteen healthy adult men (aged 20 to 57 y) underwent 3 treatments (30 d per treatment). In Treatment 1 (Baseline), they followed their usual diet without drinking any alcoholic beverage; in Treatment 2, they added the daily consumption of 330 mL NAB; and in Treatment 3, they added the daily consumption of 330 mL AB. It was found that the use of AB for 30 d (16 g alcohol/d) reduced the blood insulin and fasting glucose, reducing insulin resistance. These data suggest that the daily intake of 330 mL AB could statistically change the lipid profile and insulin sensitivity of adult men. The volunteers were healthy before and remained so after the intervention, with no change in their clinical status. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  12. Modification and Validation of the Triglyceride-to-HDL Cholesterol Ratio as a Surrogate of Insulin Sensitivity in White Juveniles and Adults without Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulmichl, Katharina; Hatunic, Mensud; Højlund, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio was introduced as a tool to estimate insulin resistance, because circulating lipid measurements are available in routine settings. Insulin, C-peptide, and free fatty acids are components of other insulin-sensitivity indices but thei......BACKGROUND: The triglyceride-to-HDL cholesterol (TG/HDL-C) ratio was introduced as a tool to estimate insulin resistance, because circulating lipid measurements are available in routine settings. Insulin, C-peptide, and free fatty acids are components of other insulin-sensitivity indices...

  13. High-intensity interval training improves insulin sensitivity in older individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, D; Lund, M T; Scheuer, C M

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Metabolic health may deteriorate with age as a result of altered body composition and decreased physical activity. Endurance exercise is known to counter these changes delaying or even preventing onset of metabolic diseases. High-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time efficient...... HIIT session consisted of five 1-minute intervals interspersed with 1½-minute rest. Prior to the first and after the last HIIT session whole-body insulin sensitivity, measured by a hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp, plasma lipid levels, HbA1c, glycaemic parameters, body composition and maximal oxygen......-density lipoprotein (P body fat (P

  14. The effect of a very low calorie diet on insulin sensitivity, beta cell function, insulin clearance, incretin hormone secretion, androgen levels and body composition in obese young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svendsen, Pernille F; Jensen, Frank K; Holst, Jens J; Haugaard, Steen B; Nilas, Lisbeth; Madsbad, Sten

    2012-09-01

    Evaluation of the effect of an 8-week very low calorie diet (VLCD, 500-600 kcal daily) on weight, body fat distribution, glucose, insulin and lipid metabolism, androgen levels and incretin secretion in obese women. Seventeen overweight women (BMI > 28) were recruited to the study. Glucose, insulin and lipid metabolism were evaluated by euglycemic clamp technique, indirect calorimetry and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Insulin sensitivity was calculated as glucose disposal rate (GDR) and insulin sensitivity index (ISI), and also by HOMA-IR. Insulin secretion rate (ISR) was calculated from plasma C-peptide measurements. Secretion of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was measured during an oral glucose tolerance test. Abdominal fat distribution was assessed by dual x-ray absorptiometry scan and computed tomography. Ten women completed the intervention. The subjects lost an average 11% of their baseline weight. There was a significant loss of subcutaneous abdominal fatty tissue (p testosterone. A VLCD is an effective weight loss treatment, which results in an immediate improvement in several metabolic parameters.

  15. Trajectories of glycaemia, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion before diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: an analysis from the Whitehall II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabák, A.G.; Jokela, M.; Akbaraly, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    assessed retrospective trajectories of fasting and 2-h postload glucose, homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA) insulin sensitivity, and HOMA beta-cell function from up to 13 years before diabetes diagnosis (diabetic group) or at the end of follow-up (non-diabetics). FINDINGS: Multilevel models adjusted...... by a steep quadratic increase (from 5.79 mmol/L to 7.40 mmol/L) starting 3 years before diagnosis of diabetes. 2-h postload glucose showed a rapid increase starting 3 years before diagnosis (from 7.60 mmol/L to 11.90 mmol/L), and HOMA insulin sensitivity decreased steeply during the 5 years before diagnosis...... (to 86.7%). HOMA beta-cell function increased between years 4 and 3 before diagnosis (from 85.0% to 92.6%) and then decreased until diagnosis (to 62.4%). INTERPRETATION: In this study, we show changes in glucose concentrations, insulin sensitivity, and insulin secretion as much as 3-6 years before...

  16. Gender differences in skeletal muscle substrate metabolism - molecular mechanisms and insulin sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie eLundsgaard

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It has become increasingly apparent that substrate metabolism is subject to gender specific regulation, and the aim of this review is to outline the available evidence of molecular gender differences in glucose and lipid metabolism of skeletal muscle. Female sex has been suggested to have a favorable effect on glucose homeostasis, and the available evidence from hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies is summarized to delineate whether there is a gender difference in whole body insulin sensitivity and in particular insulin-stimulated glucose uptake of skeletal muscle. Whether an eventual higher insulin sensitivity of female skeletal muscle can be related to gender specific regulation of molecular metabolism will be topic for discussion. Gender differences in muscle fiber type distribution and substrate availability to and in skeletal muscle are highly relevant for substrate metabolism in men and women. In particular, the molecular machinery for glucose and fatty acid oxidative and storage capacities in skeletal muscle and its implications for substrate utilization during metabolic situations of daily living are discussed, emphasizing their relevance for substrate choice in the fed and fasted state, and during periods of physical activity and recovery. Together, handling of carbohydrate and lipids and regulation of their utilization in skeletal muscle have implications for whole body glucose homeostasis in men and women. 17-β estradiol is the most important female sex hormone, and the identification of estradiol receptors in skeletal muscle has opened for a role in regulation of substrate metabolism. Also, higher levels of circulating adipokines as adiponectin and leptin in women and their implications for muscle metabolism will be considered.

  17. Systemic insulin sensitivity is regulated by GPS2 inhibition of AKT ubiquitination and activation in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederquist, Carly T; Lentucci, Claudia; Martinez-Calejman, Camila; Hayashi, Vanessa; Orofino, Joseph; Guertin, David; Fried, Susan K; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Cardamone, M Dafne; Perissi, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Insulin signaling plays a unique role in the regulation of energy homeostasis and the impairment of insulin action is associated with altered lipid metabolism, obesity, and Type 2 Diabetes. The main aim of this study was to provide further insight into the regulatory mechanisms governing the insulin signaling pathway by investigating the role of non-proteolytic ubiquitination in insulin-mediated activation of AKT. The molecular mechanism of AKT regulation through ubiquitination is first dissected in vitro in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and then validated in vivo using mice with adipo-specific deletion of GPS2, an endogenous inhibitor of Ubc13 activity (GPS2-AKO mice). Our results indicate that K63 ubiquitination is a critical component of AKT activation in the insulin signaling pathway and that counter-regulation of this step is provided by GPS2 preventing AKT ubiquitination through inhibition of Ubc13 enzymatic activity. Removal of this negative checkpoint, through GPS2 downregulation or genetic deletion, results in sustained activation of insulin signaling both in vitro and in vivo . As a result, the balance between lipid accumulation and utilization is shifted toward storage in the adipose tissue and GPS2-AKO mice become obese under normal laboratory chow diet. However, the adipose tissue of GPS2-AKO mice is not inflamed, the levels of circulating adiponectin are elevated, and systemic insulin sensitivity is overall improved. Our findings characterize a novel layer of regulation of the insulin signaling pathway based on non-proteolytic ubiquitination of AKT and define GPS2 as a previously unrecognized component of the insulin signaling cascade. In accordance with this role, we have shown that GPS2 presence in adipocytes modulates systemic metabolism by restricting the activation of insulin signaling during the fasted state, whereas in absence of GPS2, the adipose tissue is more efficient at lipid storage, and obesity becomes uncoupled from inflammation and insulin

  18. Pioglitazone improves cognitive function via increasing insulin sensitivity and strengthening antioxidant defense system in fructose-drinking insulin resistance rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Qing Yin

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance (IR links Alzheimer's disease (AD with oxidative damage, cholinergic deficit, and cognitive impairment. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ agonist pioglitazone previously used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM has also been demonstrated to be effective in anti-inflammatory reaction and anti-oxidative stress in the animal models of AD and other neuroinflammatory diseases. Here, we investigated the effect of pioglitazone on learning and memory impairment and the molecular events that may cause it in fructose-drinking insulin resistance rats. We found that long-term fructose-drinking causes insulin resistance, oxidative stress, down-regulated activity of cholinergic system, and cognitive deficit, which could be ameliorated by pioglitazone administration. The results from the present study provide experimental evidence for using pioglitazone in the treatment of brain damage caused by insulin resistance.

  19. Day-to-day variation of insulin sensitivity in patients with type 1 diabetes: role of gender and menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, E; Kollind, M; Lins, P E; Adamson, U

    1995-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the day-to-day variations of the insulin sensitivity in male and female Type 1 diabetic patients and to assess the insulin sensitivity in the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Ten male and 20 female Type 1 diabetic patients participated in the study. The insulin sensitivity was assessed by the insulin (0.4 mU kg-1 min-1)-glucose/(4.5 mg kg-1 min-1)-infusion test (IGIT). In 5 of the female patients, a simultaneous i.v. influsion of somatostatin (100 micrograms h-1) was given (SIGIT). Each patient was studied twice, with 2 weeks separating the two tests. The day-to-day variations of the insulin sensitivity were almost identical in the male and female patients, the coefficients of variation being 13% in both groups. In 15 of the female patients, ovulation occurred. In these women, the mean blood-glucose levels between 120 and 240 min after the onset of the IGIT/SIGIT were 9.8 +/- 1.1 mmol l-1 in the follicular phase and 10.3 +/- 1.0 mmol l-1 in the luteal phase, n.s. (95% confidence interval for the difference (luteal-follicular) -0.8-1.9 mmol l-1). Although the present study cannot exclude minor changes of insulin sensitivity during the menstrual cycle, our results suggest that the changes of the metabolic control during the menstrual cycle, experienced by many women with Type 1 diabetes, are largely attributable to mechanisms other than variations of insulin sensitivity.

  20. NASH Therapy: omega 3 supplementation, vitamin E, insulin sensitizers and statin drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Caldwell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is the more aggressive form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD. NASH can progress to hepatic fibrosis, cirrhosis, portal hypertension and primary liver cancer. Therapy is evolving with a substantial number of trials of promising new agents now in progress. In this article however, we will examine data for several older forms of therapy which have been fairly extensively studied over the years: Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA supplements, vitamin E, insulin sensitizing agents with a focus on pioglitazone and statin agents. Early interest in PUFA derived from their potential benefit in cardio-metabolic disease and the close association of NAFLD/NASH with Metabolic Syndrome. Results have been variable although most studies show reduction of liver fat without other major effects and their effects are influenced by concomitant weight loss and underlying genetic factors. Vitamin E has had some efficacy in pediatric NASH but questionable efficacy in even mild NASH among adults. Pioglitazone has shown significant histological benefit in a number of trials but concern over side-effects (especially weight gain have dampened enthusiasm. A newer insulin sensitizer, liraglutide, has also shown promise in a small randomized, controlled trial. Very limited data exists regarding the histological effects of the statins in NASH and these agents appear to be fairly neutral with neither clear cut benefit nor detriment. Their use is best guided by cardiovascular risks rather than liver histology.

  1. pH-sensitive chitosan/alginate core-shell nanoparticles for efficient and safe oral insulin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Piyasi; Chakraborty, Souma; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Mishra, Roshnara; Kundu, P P

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-alginate (CS/ALG) nanoparticles were prepared by formation of an ionotropic pre-gelation of an alginate (ALG) core entrapping insulin, followed by chitosan (CS) polyelectrolyte complexation, for successful oral insulin administration. Mild preparation process without harsh chemicals is aimed at improving insulin bio-efficiency in in vivo model. The nanoparticles showed an average particle size of 100-200 nm in dynamic light scattering (DLS), with almost spherical or sub-spherical shape and ∼ 85% of insulin encapsulation. Again, retention of almost entire amount of encapsulated insulin in simulated gastric buffer followed by its sustained release in simulated intestinal condition proved its pH sensitivity in in vitro release studies. Significant hypoglycemic effects with improved insulin-relative bioavailability (∼ 8.11%) in in vivo model revealed the efficacy of these core-shell nanoparticles of CS/ALG as an oral insulin carrier. No systemic toxicity was found after its peroral treatment, suggesting these core-shell nanoparticles as a promising device for potential oral insulin delivery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Moderate diet-induced weight loss is associated with improved insulin sensitivity in middle-aged healthy obese Korean women

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hye-Ok; Yim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Young-Seol; Choue, Ryowon

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of moderate caloric restriction on β-cell function and insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese Korean women. SUBJECTS/METHODS Fifty-seven obese pre-menopausal Korean women participated in a 12-week calorie restriction program. Data on total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides (TG), and fasting serum levels of glucose, insulin...

  3. Greater body mass index is a better predictor of subclinical cardiac damage at long-term follow-up in men than is insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Lundgren; Pareek, Manan; Gerke, Oke

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine whether lower insulin sensitivity as determined by homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-%S) was associated with increased left ventricular mass (LVM) and presence of LV diastolic dysfunction at long-term follow-up, independently of body mass index (BMI), in middle-aged, other......BACKGROUND: To examine whether lower insulin sensitivity as determined by homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-%S) was associated with increased left ventricular mass (LVM) and presence of LV diastolic dysfunction at long-term follow-up, independently of body mass index (BMI), in middle......-aged, otherwise healthy males. METHODS: Prospective population-based cohort study with a median (IQR) follow-up time of 28 (27-28) years, in which traditional cardiovascular risk factors, including HOMA-%S and BMI, were assessed at baseline, and echocardiographic determination of LVM and LV diastolic function...... (IQR) HOMA-%S was 113.0 (68.3-284.6). Subjects with low insulin sensitivity (lowest HOMA-%S quartile (Q1)) had significantly greater BMI, fasting plasma insulin, and higher fasting blood glucose (FBG) (p HOMA-%S were significantly correlated (r = -0.383, p

  4. Discovery of p1736, a novel antidiabetic compound that improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in mice models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessy Anthony

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Currently used thiazolidinedione (TZD insulin sensitizers although effective, have adverse side effects of weight gain, fluid retention and heart failure. Using fat cell-based phenotypic drug discovery approach we identified P1736, a novel antidiabetic molecule that has completed Phase II clinical trials. The present study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of P1736. P1736 is a non-TZD and it did not activate human PPAR(Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma receptors. P1736 caused dose dependent increase in glucose uptake (EC50-400 nM in the insulin resistant 3T3 adipocytes. The compound (10 µM induced translocation of GLUT-4 (Glucose Transporter type 4 transporters in these adipocytes while metformin (1.0mM was inactive. In diabetic db/db mice, P1736 (150 mg/kg was more efficacious than metformin in lowering plasma glucose (35% vs 25% and triglyceride levels (38% vs 31%. P1736 tested at 5mg/kg, twice daily doses, reduced glucose by 41% and triglycerides by 32%, in db/db mice. These effects were not associated with adverse effects on body weight or liver function. Rosiglitazone (5mg/kg, twice daily caused 60% and 40 % decreases in glucose and triglyceride levels, respectively. However, rosiglitazone induced 13% weight gain (p<0.05 in db/db mice. P1736 was also efficacious in ob/ob mice wherein 30-35% decrease in glucose and significant improvement in hyperinsulinemia were observed. Administration of P1736 to ob/ob mice resulted in 70% increase in glucose uptake in soleus muscles while metformin caused 38% increase. P1736 exhibited excellent safety profile and was weight neutral in all preclinical models of diabetes. Thus, P1736 with its unique pharmacology coupled with PPAR- independent mode of action could represent an alternative option in the

  5. Discovery of p1736, a novel antidiabetic compound that improves peripheral insulin sensitivity in mice models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Jessy; Kelkar, Aditya; Wilankar, Chandan; Ranjith, Vijayalakshmi; Bhumra, Sujit Kaur; Mutt, Shivaprakash Jagalur; Mutt, Shivaprakash; Deka, Nabajyoti; Sivaramakrishnan, Hariharan; Sharma, Somesh; Marita, Adaikalasamy Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a characteristic feature of Type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Currently used thiazolidinedione (TZD) insulin sensitizers although effective, have adverse side effects of weight gain, fluid retention and heart failure. Using fat cell-based phenotypic drug discovery approach we identified P1736, a novel antidiabetic molecule that has completed Phase II clinical trials. The present study evaluated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties of P1736. P1736 is a non-TZD and it did not activate human PPAR(Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptor Gamma )receptors. P1736 caused dose dependent increase in glucose uptake (EC50-400 nM) in the insulin resistant 3T3 adipocytes. The compound (10 µM) induced translocation of GLUT-4 (Glucose Transporter type 4) transporters in these adipocytes while metformin (1.0mM) was inactive. In diabetic db/db mice, P1736 (150 mg/kg) was more efficacious than metformin in lowering plasma glucose (35% vs 25%) and triglyceride levels (38% vs 31%). P1736 tested at 5mg/kg, twice daily doses, reduced glucose by 41% and triglycerides by 32%, in db/db mice. These effects were not associated with adverse effects on body weight or liver function. Rosiglitazone (5mg/kg, twice daily) caused 60% and 40 % decreases in glucose and triglyceride levels, respectively. However, rosiglitazone induced 13% weight gain (p<0.05) in db/db mice. P1736 was also efficacious in ob/ob mice wherein 30-35% decrease in glucose and significant improvement in hyperinsulinemia were observed. Administration of P1736 to ob/ob mice resulted in 70% increase in glucose uptake in soleus muscles while metformin caused 38% increase. P1736 exhibited excellent safety profile and was weight neutral in all preclinical models of diabetes. Thus, P1736 with its unique pharmacology coupled with PPAR- independent mode of action could represent an alternative option in the management of

  6. Knock-Down of IL-1Ra in Obese Mice Decreases Liver Inflammation and Improves Insulin Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Niclas; Maris, Michael; Nalbandian, Sarah; Talukdar, Saswata; Schenk, Simon; Hofmann, Hans-Peter; Bullough, David; Osborn, Olivia

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 1 Receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is highly elevated in obesity and is widely recognized as an anti-inflammatory cytokine. While the anti-inflammatory role of IL-1Ra in the pancreas is well established, the role of IL-1Ra in other insulin target tissues and the contribution of systemic IL-1Ra levels to the development of insulin resistance remains to be defined. Using antisense knock down of IL-1Ra in vivo, we show that normalization of IL-1Ra improved insulin sensitivity due to decreased inflammation in the liver and improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and these effects were independent of changes in body weight. A similar effect was observed in IL1-R1 KO mice, suggesting that at high concentrations of IL-1Ra typically observed in obesity, IL-1Ra can contribute to the development of insulin resistance in a mechanism independent of IL-1Ra binding to IL-1R1. These results demonstrate that normalization of plasma IL-1Ra concentration improves insulin sensitivity in diet- induced obese mice. PMID:25244011

  7. Knock-down of IL-1Ra in obese mice decreases liver inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niclas Franck

    Full Text Available Interleukin 1 Receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra is highly elevated in obesity and is widely recognized as an anti-inflammatory cytokine. While the anti-inflammatory role of IL-1Ra in the pancreas is well established, the role of IL-1Ra in other insulin target tissues and the contribution of systemic IL-1Ra levels to the development of insulin resistance remains to be defined. Using antisense knock down of IL-1Ra in vivo, we show that normalization of IL-1Ra improved insulin sensitivity due to decreased inflammation in the liver and improved hepatic insulin sensitivity and these effects were independent of changes in body weight. A similar effect was observed in IL1-R1 KO mice, suggesting that at high concentrations of IL-1Ra typically observed in obesity, IL-1Ra can contribute to the development of insulin resistance in a mechanism independent of IL-1Ra binding to IL-1R1. These results demonstrate that normalization of plasma IL-1Ra concentration improves insulin sensitivity in diet- induced obese mice.

  8. Altered glucose disposition and insulin sensitivity in peri-pubertal first-degree relatives of women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raissouni Nouhad

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background First-degree relatives (FDRs of women with PCOS are at increased risk for impaired insulin sensitivity and diabetes mellitus. Glucose tolerant FDR have evidence of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia prior to emergence of frank PCOS. Aim To study insulin dynamics parameters in the early adolescent FDR of women with PCOS. Methods This is a cross-sectional study involving 18 adolescents whose mothers or sisters had been diagnosed with PCOS and 21 healthy, age-matched control adolescents without FDR. Subjects underwent anthropometric measurements, steroid profiling and frequently sampled Intravenous Glucose Tolerance Test (IVGTT, Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA index, Glucose Disposal Index (GDI, Acute Insulin Response (AIR and Quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI were derived from IVGTT results. Results FDRs showed significantly higher mean HOMA and lower GDI. There were no differences in mean age or BMI Z-score between the cohorts. No differences in sex steroids or AIR were identified between groups. Conclusion Female adolescent FDR of women with PCOS have higher HOMA index and lower QUICKI, reflecting altered insulin sensitivity and lower GDI reflecting poorer beta-cell function. The presence of multiple risk factors for type 2 diabetes suggests that aggressive screening of the early adolescent FDR of women with PCOS is indicated.

  9. Cinnamon improves insulin sensitivity, prevents mesenteric fat accumulation, and increases glycogen synthesis in an animal model of the metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Western countries, over consumption of fat and/or refined carbohydrates are leading causes of insulin resistance, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome. Some nutritional factors, including many polyphenols, may be beneficial in counteracting insulin resistance associated with the metabolic syndrom...

  10. Assessment of insulin sensitivity (S I) and glucose effectiveness (S G) from a standardized hyperglucidic breakfast test in type 2 diabetics exhibiting various levels of insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Jean-Frédéric; Ghanassia, Edouard; Fédou, Christine; Bordenave, Sylvain; Raynaud de Mauverger, Eric; Mercier, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the measurement of insulin sensitivity (S I) with a standardized hyperglucidic breakfast (SHB) compared to minimal model analysis of an intravenous glucose tolerance test (S I-IVGTT) in 17 patients clinically referred as type 2 diabetics, not yet treated by insulin, and representing a wide range of body mass index and S I. To classify the patients, ten meal-tolerance test-based calculations of S I (MTT-S I) were compared to S I-IVGTT, and their reference values and distribution were measured on a separate sample of 200 control SHBs and 209 control IVGTTs. Eight MTT-SI indices exhibit significant correlations with S I-IVGTT: Mari's OGIS index, BIGTT-SI|0-30-120, BIGTT-SI|0-60-120, 1/G b I m, Caumo's oral minimal model (OMM), Sluiter's index "A" = 10(4)/(I p·G p), Matsuda's composite index given by the formula ISIcomp = 10(4)/(I b G b I m G m)(0.5), S I = 1/I b G b I m G m with r (2) ranging between 0,53 and 0,28. S I-IVGTT and S I-MTT exhibited in the lower range a very different (non-normal) pattern of distribution and thus the cutoff value for defining insulin resistance varied among indices. With such cutoffs, S I-MTT resistance defined as S I-IVGTT < 2 min(-1)/(μU/ml) 10(-4). Other indices, including OGIS and BIGTT, resulted in more misclassifications of patients. HOMA-IR and QUICKI were poor predictors. The formula [Formula: see text] satisfactorily predicts IVGTT-derived glucose effectiveness in type 2 diabetics. Thus, SHB appears suitable for the measurement of S I and S G in type 2 diabetics, and the OMM seems to provide the most accurate SHB-derived index in this population.

  11. The Mediterranean diet improves hepatic steatosis and insulin sensitivity in individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Marno C; Itsiopoulos, Catherine; Thodis, Tania; Ward, Glenn; Trost, Nicholas; Hofferberth, Sophie; O'Dea, Kerin; Desmond, Paul V; Johnson, Nathan A; Wilson, Andrew M

    2013-07-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects up to 30% of the population and signifies increased risk of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Therapies are limited. Weight loss is of benefit but is difficult to maintain. We aimed at examining the effect of the Mediterranean diet (MD), a diet high in monounsaturated fatty acids, on steatosis and insulin sensitivity, using gold standard techniques. Twelve non-diabetic subjects (6 Females/6 Males) with biopsy-proven NAFLD were recruited for a randomised, cross-over 6-week dietary intervention study. All subjects undertook both the MD and a control diet, a low fat-high carbohydrate diet (LF/HCD), in random order with a 6-week wash-out period in- between. Insulin sensitivity was determined with a 3-h hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp study and hepatic steatosis was assessed with localized magnetic resonance (1)H spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS). At baseline, subjects were abdominally obese with elevated fasting concentrations of glucose, insulin, triglycerides, ALT, and GGT. Insulin sensitivity at baseline was low (M=2.7 ± 1.0 mg/kg/min(-1)). Mean weight loss was not different between the two diets (p=0.22). There was a significant relative reduction in hepatic steatosis after the MD compared with the LF/HCD: 39 ± 4% versus 7 ± 3%, as measured by (1)H-MRS (p=0.012). Insulin sensitivity improved with the MD, whereas after the LF/HCD there was no change (p=0.03 between diets). Even without weight loss, MD reduces liver steatosis and improves insulin sensitivity in an insulin-resistant population with NAFLD, compared to current dietary advice. This diet should be further investigated in subjects with NAFLD. Copyright © 2013 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Of the milk sugars, galactose, but not prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharide, improves insulin sensitivity in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priska Stahel

    Full Text Available Consumption of dairy products reduces risk of type 2 diabetes. Milk proteins and fats exhibit anti-diabetic properties but milk sugars have been studied little in this context. Galactose from milk lactose is readily converted to glycogen in the liver but its effects on insulin sensitivity have not been assessed. Prebiotic oligosaccharides from milk alter gut microbiota and can thereby influence host metabolism. Our objective was to assess the effect on insulin sensitivity of dietary galactose compared to glucose and fructose, and fermentable galacto-oligosaccharides compared to non-fermentable methylcellulose.Diets containing 15% of dry matter from glucose, fructose, galactose, galacto-oligosaccharides, or methylcellulose were fed to 36 rats per diet for 9 weeks. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps with [3-3H]glucose infusion and a steady-state 2-[1-14C]deoxyglucose bolus injection were used to assess insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake indices. Tissue was collected in fed, fasted and fasted, insulin-stimulated states.Galactose increased glucose infusion rate during the clamp by 53% and decreased endogenous glucose production by 57% compared to glucose and fructose. Fed-state hepatic glycogen content was greater with galactose compared to glucose and fructose, consistent with a potentiation of the insulin effect on glycogen synthase by dephosphorylation. Galactose decreased the fecal Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio while galacto-oligosaccharides increased abundance of fecal Bifidobacterium spp. 481-fold compared to methylcellulose, and also increased abundance of Lactobacillus spp. and Bacteroidetes. Galacto-oligosaccharides did not affect glucose infusion rate or endogenous glucose production during basal or clamp periods compared to methylcellulose.Galactose at 15% of daily intake improved hepatic insulin sensitivity in rats compared to glucose and fructose. Galactose caused an increase in fed-state hepatic glycogen content and a favourable

  13. 10-day hyperlipidemic clamp in cats: effects on insulin sensitivity, inflammation, and glucose metabolism-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, E; Osto, M; Konrad, D; Franchini, M; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N S; Kaufmann, K; Guscetti, F; Ackermann, M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E

    2010-05-01

    Obesity and hyperlipidemia are associated with impaired insulin sensitivity in human type 2 diabetes mellitus, possibly due to activation of a mild inflammatory response. Because obesity-induced insulin resistance predisposes cats to diabetes and because hyperlipidemia is a frequent concurrent finding, excess lipids may also impair insulin sensitivity in cats. Healthy cats (n=6) were infused with lipids (Lipovenoes 10%) for 10 days to clamp blood triglycerides at the approximate concentration of untreated feline diabetes (3-7 mmol/l). Controls received saline (n=5). On day 10, plasma adiponectin and proinflammatory markers were measured. Whole-body insulin sensitivity was calculated following an intravenous glucose tolerance test. Tissue mRNAs of glucose metabolism-related genes were quantified in subcutaneous and visceral fat, liver, and skeletal muscles. Accumulation of lipids was assessed in liver. At the termination of infusion, whole-body insulin sensitivity did not differ between groups. Compared to saline, cats infused with lipids had 50% higher plasma adiponectin and 2-3 times higher alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. Unexpectedly, lipid-infused cats had increased glucose transporter-4 (GLUT4) mRNA in the visceral fat, and increased peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-gamma2 (PPARgamma2) in subcutaneous fat; adiponectin expression was not affected in any tissue. Lipid-infused cats developed hepatic steatosis. Although hyperlipidemia induced systemic inflammation, whole-body insulin sensitivity was not impaired after 10 day infusion. Increased circulating adiponectin may have contributed to prevent insulin resistance, possibly by increasing GLUT4 and PPARgamma2 transcripts in fat depots. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart-New York.

  14. Of the milk sugars, galactose, but not prebiotic galacto-oligosaccharide, improves insulin sensitivity in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahel, Priska; Kim, Julie J; Xiao, Changting; Cant, John P

    2017-01-01

    Consumption of dairy products reduces risk of type 2 diabetes. Milk proteins and fats exhibit anti-diabetic properties but milk sugars have been studied little in this context. Galactose from milk lactose is readily converted to glycogen in the liver but its effects on insulin sensitivity have not been assessed. Prebiotic oligosaccharides from milk alter gut microbiota and can thereby influence host metabolism. Our objective was to assess the effect on insulin sensitivity of dietary galactose compared to glucose and fructose, and fermentable galacto-oligosaccharides compared to non-fermentable methylcellulose. Diets containing 15% of dry matter from glucose, fructose, galactose, galacto-oligosaccharides, or methylcellulose were fed to 36 rats per diet for 9 weeks. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamps with [3-3H]glucose infusion and a steady-state 2-[1-14C]deoxyglucose bolus injection were used to assess insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake indices. Tissue was collected in fed, fasted and fasted, insulin-stimulated states. Galactose increased glucose infusion rate during the clamp by 53% and decreased endogenous glucose production by 57% compared to glucose and fructose. Fed-state hepatic glycogen content was greater with galactose compared to glucose and fructose, consistent with a potentiation of the insulin effect on glycogen synthase by dephosphorylation. Galactose decreased the fecal Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio while galacto-oligosaccharides increased abundance of fecal Bifidobacterium spp. 481-fold compared to methylcellulose, and also increased abundance of Lactobacillus spp. and Bacteroidetes. Galacto-oligosaccharides did not affect glucose infusion rate or endogenous glucose production during basal or clamp periods compared to methylcellulose. Galactose at 15% of daily intake improved hepatic insulin sensitivity in rats compared to glucose and fructose. Galactose caused an increase in fed-state hepatic glycogen content and a favourable shift in gut

  15. Effect of pioglitazone on various parameters of insulin resistance including lipoprotein subclass according to particle size by a gel-permeation high-performance liquid chromatography in newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Koji; Hasegawa, Goji; Fukui, Michiaki; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Ishihara, Kiyoshi; Takashima, Tooru; Kitagawa, Yoshihiro; Fujinami, Aya; Ohta, Mitsuhiro; Hara, Hirokazu; Adachi, Tetsuo; Ogata, Masakazu; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Naoto

    2010-01-01

    Pioglitazone is an insulin-sensitizing agent that has been reported to have anti-arteriosclerotic effects. The aim of this study was to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism involved in the insulin sensitizing effect of pioglitazone. A total of 50 newly diagnosed patients with type 2 diabetes were enrolled in this study and divided into two groups, 25 of who were treated with 15 mg/day pioglitazone and 25 with 500 mg/day metformin for 12 weeks. Changes in various parameters of insulin resistance including lipoprotein subclass according to particle size determined by high performance liquid chromatography, as well as glucose metabolism, were monitored to determine the relationship between lipoprotein subclass and other insulin resistance parameters. Both pioglitazone and metformin treatment were associated with significant reductions in hyperglycemia, HOMA-IR and HbA1c levels. Pioglitazone treatment, but not metformin treatment resulted in significant reductions in serum large very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL: 44.5-64.0 nm) and increases in serum adiponectin levels (both net electronegative charged modified-LDL (r=0.412, P=0.0399), and inversely with changes in adiponectin level (r=-0.526, P=0.0061). The results in this study suggest that the hypoglycemic effect of pioglitazone is achieved mainly through improvement of hepatic insulin resistance, and that pioglitazone may have an antiatherosclerotic effect by decreasing serum atherogenic modified-LDL and by increasing adiponectin.

  16. Involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme in insulin- and atrial natriuretic peptide-sensitive internalization of amyloid-β peptide in mouse brain capillary endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Murata, Sho; Katsukura, Yuki; Suzuki, Hiroya; Funaki, Miho; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which is implicated in Alzheimer's disease, involves elimination across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and we previously showed that an insulin-sensitive process is involved in the case of Aβ1-40. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanism of the insulin-sensitive Aβ1-40 elimination across mouse BBB. An in vivo cerebral microinjection study demonstrated that [125I]hAβ1-40 elimination from mouse brain was inhibited by human natriuretic peptide (hANP), and [125I]hANP elimination was inhibited by hAβ1-40, suggesting that hAβ1-40 and hANP share a common elimination process. Internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 into cultured mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (TM-BBB4) was significantly inhibited by either insulin, hANP, other natriuretic peptides or insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors, but was not inhibited by phosphoramidon or thiorphan. Although we have reported the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptor C (Npr-C) in hANP internalization, cells stably expressing Npr-C internalized [125I]hANP but not [125I]hAβ1-40, suggesting that there is no direct interaction between Npr-C and hAβ1-40. IDE was detected in plasma membrane of TM-BBB4 cells, and internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 by TM-BBB4 cells was reduced by IDE-targeted siRNAs. We conclude that elimination of hAβ1-40 from mouse brain across the BBB involves an insulin- and ANP-sensitive process, mediated by IDE expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells.

  17. Salt and insulin sensitivity after short and prolonged high salt intake in elderly subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.K.C. Lima

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Salt sensitivity and insulin resistance are correlated with higher cardiovascular risk. There is no information about changes in salt sensitivity (SS and insulin sensitivity (IS after a chronic salt overload in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate these parameters in the elderly. Seventeen volunteers aged 70.5 ± 5.9 years followed a low-salt diet (LSD for 1 week and a high-salt diet (HSD for 13 weeks. We evaluated SS after one week (HSD1 and after 13 weeks (HSD13, and subjects’ IS and lipids on their usual diet (UD at HSD1, and at HSD13. Blood pressure (BP was measured at each visit and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM was performed twice. SS was the same at HSD1 and HSD13. Systolic BP was lower on LSD than on UD (P = 0.01, HSD1 (P < 0.01 and HSD13 (P < 0.01. When systolic and diastolic BP were evaluated by ABPM, they were higher at HSD13 during the 24-h period (P = 0.03 and P < 0.01 and during the wakefulness period (P = 0.02 and P < 0.01 compared to the UD. Total cholesterol was higher (P = 0.04 at HSD13 than at HSD1. Glucose and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA were lower at HSD1 (P = 0.02 and P = 0.01 than at HSD13. Concluding, the extension of HSD did not change the SS in an elderly group. The higher IS found at HSD1 did not persist after a longer HSD. A chronic HSD increased BP as assessed by ABPM.

  18. The Relationship between Adiposity and Insulin Sensitivity in African Women Living with the Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: A Clamp Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuella Doh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We aimed to assess the variation of insulin sensitivity in relation to obesity in women living with PCOS in a sub-Sahara African setting. Methods. We studied body composition, insulin sensitivity, and resting energy expenditure in 14 PCOS patients (6 obese and 8 nonobese compared to 10 matched nonobese non-PCOS subjects. Insulin sensitivity was assessed using the gold standard 80 mU/m2/min euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and resting energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry. Results. Insulin sensitivity adjusted to lean mass was lowest in obese PCOS subjects and highest in healthy subjects (11.2 [10.1–12.4] versus 12.9 [12.1–13.8] versus 16.6 [13.8–17.9], p=0.012; there was a tendency for resting energy expenditure adjusted for total body mass to decrease across the groups highest in obese PCOS subjects (1411 [1368–1613] versus 1274 [1174–1355] versus 1239 [1195–1454], p=0.306. Conclusion. In this sub-Saharan population, insulin resistance is associated with PCOS per se but is further aggravated by obesity. Obesity did not seem to be explained by low resting energy expenditure suggesting that dietary intake may be a determinant of the obesity in this context.

  19. Insulin Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Benjamin Anderschou Holbech

    Insulin resistance (IR) is escalating with alarming pace and is no longer restricted to westernized countries. As a forerunner for some of the most serious threats to human health including metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases, and type 2-diabetes, the need for new treatment modalities...... interventions. We further show that improving the inflammatory toning, using fish oil as fat source, protects mice against diet induced obesity and -inflammation while preserving insulin sensitivity, even in the absence of free fatty acid receptor 4. Conversely, HFD-induced intestinal dysbiosis is associated...

  20. Early insulin sensitivity after restrictive bariatric surgery, inconsistency between HOMA-IR and steady-state plasma glucose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dielen, Francois M H; Nijhuis, Jeroen; Rensen, Sander S M; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Wiebolt, Janneke; Koks, Afra; Prakken, Fred J; Buurman, Wim A; Greve, Jan Willem M

    2010-01-01

    The low-grade inflammatory condition present in morbid obesity is thought to play a causative role in the pathophysiology of insulin resistance (IR). Bariatric surgery fails to improve this inflammatory condition during the first months after surgery. Considering the close relation between inflammation and IR, we conducted a study in which insulin sensitivity was measured during the first months after bariatric surgery. Different methods to measure IR shortly after bariatric surgery have given inconsistent data. For example, the Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) levels have been reported to decrease rapidly after bariatric surgery, although clamp techniques have shown sustained insulin resistance. In the present study, we evaluated the use of steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) levels to assess insulin sensitivity 2 months after bariatric surgery. Insulin sensitivity was measured using HOMA-IR and SSPG levels in 11 subjects before surgery and at 26% excess weight loss (approximately 2 months after restrictive bariatric surgery). The SSPG levels after 26% excess weight loss did not differ from the SSPG levels before surgery (14.3 +/- 5.4 versus 14.4 +/- 2.7 mmol/L). In contrast, the HOMA-IR values had decreased significantly (3.59 +/- 1.99 versus 2.09 +/- 1.02). During the first months after restrictive bariatric surgery, we observed a discrepancy between the HOMA-IR and SSPG levels. In contrast to the HOMA-IR values, the SSPG levels had not improved, which could be explained by the ongoing inflammatory state after bariatric surgery. These results suggest that during the first months after restrictive bariatric surgery, HOMA-IR might not be an adequate marker of insulin sensitivity. Copyright 2010 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. State of the Art Review: Emerging Therapies: The Use of Insulin Sensitizers in the Treatment of Adolescents with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Catherine M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract PCOS, a heterogeneous disorder characterized by cystic ovarian morphology, androgen excess, and/or irregular periods, emerges during or shortly after puberty. Peri- and post-pubertal obesity, insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinemia are highly prevalent co-morbidities of PCOS and promote an ongoing state of excess androgen. Given the relationship of insulin to androgen excess, reduction of insulin secretion and/or improvement of its action at target tissues offer the possibility of improving the physical stigmata of androgen excess by correction of the reproductive dysfunction and preventing metabolic derangements from becoming entrenched. While lifestyle changes that concentrate on behavioral, dietary and exercise regimens should be considered as first line therapy for weight reduction and normalization of insulin levels in adolescents with PCOS, several therapeutic options are available and in wide use, including oral contraceptives, metformin, thiazolidenediones and spironolactone. Overwhelmingly, the data on the safety and efficacy of these medications derive from the adult PCOS literature. Despite the paucity of randomized control trials to adequately evaluate these modalities in adolescents, their use, particularly that of metformin, has gained popularity in the pediatric endocrine community. In this article, we present an overview of the use of insulin sensitizing medications in PCOS and review both the adult and (where available adolescent literature, focusing specifically on the use of metformin in both mono- and combination therapy.

  2. State of the Art Review: Emerging Therapies: The Use of Insulin Sensitizers in the Treatment of Adolescents with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    PCOS, a heterogeneous disorder characterized by cystic ovarian morphology, androgen excess, and/or irregular periods, emerges during or shortly after puberty. Peri- and post-pubertal obesity, insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinemia are highly prevalent co-morbidities of PCOS and promote an ongoing state of excess androgen. Given the relationship of insulin to androgen excess, reduction of insulin secretion and/or improvement of its action at target tissues offer the possibility of improving the physical stigmata of androgen excess by correction of the reproductive dysfunction and preventing metabolic derangements from becoming entrenched. While lifestyle changes that concentrate on behavioral, dietary and exercise regimens should be considered as first line therapy for weight reduction and normalization of insulin levels in adolescents with PCOS, several therapeutic options are available and in wide use, including oral contraceptives, metformin, thiazolidenediones and spironolactone. Overwhelmingly, the data on the safety and efficacy of these medications derive from the adult PCOS literature. Despite the paucity of randomized control trials to adequately evaluate these modalities in adolescents, their use, particularly that of metformin, has gained popularity in the pediatric endocrine community. In this article, we present an overview of the use of insulin sensitizing medications in PCOS and review both the adult and (where available) adolescent literature, focusing specifically on the use of metformin in both mono- and combination therapy. PMID:21899727

  3. Expression and Regulation of Facilitative Glucose Transporters in Equine Insulin-Sensitive Tissue: From Physiology to Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacombe, Véronique A.

    2014-01-01

    Glucose uptake is the rate-limiting step in glucose utilization in mammalians and is tightly regulated by a family of specialized proteins, called the facilitated glucose transporters (GLUTs/SLC2). GLUT4, the major isoform in insulin-responsive tissue, translocates from an intracellular pool to the cell surface and as such determines insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. However, despite intensive research over 50 years, the insulin-dependent and -independent pathways that mediate GLUT4 translocation are not fully elucidated in any species. Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the hallmarks of equine metabolic syndrome and is the most common metabolic predisposition for laminitis in horses. IR is characterized by the impaired ability of insulin to stimulate glucose disposal into insulin-sensitive tissues. Similar to other species, the functional capability of the insulin-responsive GLUTs is impaired in muscle and adipose tissue during IR in horses. However, the molecular mechanisms of altered glucose transport remain elusive in all species, and there is still much to learn about the physiological and pathophysiological functions of the GLUT family members, especially in regard to class III. Since GLUTs are key regulators of whole-body glucose homeostasis, they have received considerable attention as potential therapeutic targets to treat metabolic disorders in human and equine patients. PMID:24977043

  4. Effect of resveratrol on visceral white adipose tissue inflammation and insulin sensitivity in a mouse model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, A; Zhang, S X; Peris, E; Qiao, Z; Wang, Y; Almendros, I; Gozal, D

    2015-03-01

    Sleep fragmentation (SF) increases food intake and the risk of obesity, and recruits macrophages to visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) promoting tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. Administration of resveratrol (Resv) has been associated with significant improvements in high-fat diet-induced obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance. Male mice were subjected to SF or sleep control conditions for 8 weeks, and treated with either Resv or vehicle (Veh). Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin and leptin were obtained and VWAT insulin sensitivity tests were performed (phosphorylated AKT/total AKT), along with flow-cytometric assessments for VWAT macrophages (M1 and M2) and T-cell lymphocytes (CD4+, CD8+ and T regulatory cell (Treg)). SF-Veh and SF-Resv mice showed increased food consumption and weight gain. However, although SF-Veh mice exhibited increased fasting insulin and leptin levels, and reduced VWAT p-AKT/AKT responses to insulin, such alterations were abrogated in SF-Resv-treated mice. Increases in M1, reduced M2 counts and increased tumor necrosis factor-α release emerged in SF-Veh macrophages compared with all other three groups. Similarly, increased CD8+ and reduced Treg lymphocyte counts were apparent in SF-Veh. Resveratrol does not reverse the SF-induced increases in food intake and weight gain, but markedly attenuates VWAT inflammation and insulin resistance, thereby providing a potentially useful adjunctive therapy in the context of sleep disorders manifesting metabolic morbidity.

  5. Metformin and salicylate synergistically activate liver AMPK, inhibit lipogenesis and improve insulin sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Rebecca J.; Fullerton, Morgan D.; Pinkosky, Stephen L.; Day, Emily A.; Scott, John W.; Oakhill, Jonathan S.; Bujak, Adam L.; Smith, Brennan K.; Crane, Justin D.; Blumer, Regje M.; Marcinko, Katarina; Kemp, Bruce E.; Gerstein, Hertzel C.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2017-01-01

    Metformin is the mainstay therapy for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and many patients also take salicylate-based drugs [i.e., aspirin (ASA)] for cardioprotection. Metformin and salicylate both increase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity but by distinct mechanisms, with metformin altering cellular adenylate charge (increasing AMP) and salicylate interacting directly at the AMPK β1 drug-binding site. AMPK activation by both drugs results in phosphorylation of ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase; P-ACC) and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), the rate limiting enzyme controlling fatty acid synthesis (lipogenesis). We find doses of metformin and salicylate used clinically synergistically activate AMPK in vitro and in vivo, resulting in reduced liver lipogenesis, lower liver lipid levels and improved insulin sensitivity in mice. Synergism occurs in cell-free assays and is specific for the AMPK β1 subunit. These effects are also observed in primary human hepatocytes and patients with dysglycaemia exhibit additional improvements in a marker of insulin resistance (proinsulin) when treated with ASA and metformin compared with either drug alone. These data indicate that metformin–salicylate combination therapy may be efficacious for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and T2D. PMID:25742316

  6. Physical activity and weight loss are independent predictors of improved insulin sensitivity following energy restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, Stefan G J A; Verhoef, Sanne P M; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2016-02-01

    The role of physical activity and the joint effect with sleep duration on insulin sensitivity (IS) during energy restriction followed by weight maintenance were determined. One hundred and two subjects (28 males) (mean ± SD age: 40 ± 9 years; BMI: 31.9 ± 3.0 kg/m(2) ) followed a very-low-energy diet for 8 weeks, followed by a 44-week period of weight maintenance. Body composition (three-compartment model based on body weight, total body water, and body volume), physical activity (accelerometry), sleep (questionnaire, Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and fasting plasma insulin and glucose concentrations were assessed before the diet and at 8, 20, and 52 weeks after the start. Compared to baseline, IS was improved significantly after 8 weeks (P weight loss percentage and change in physical activity counts. Maintaining daily physical activity during energy restriction is as important as weight loss itself in the improvement of IS; there was no additional effect of change in sleep duration. During weight maintenance, improved IS is maintained better if physical activity returns to baseline or higher. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  7. The assembly of lipid droplets and its relation to cellular insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, Pontus; Andersson, Linda; Li, Lu

    2009-01-01

    The assembly of lipid droplets is dependent on PtdIns(4,5)P(2) that activates PLD(1) (phospholipase D(1)), which is important for the assembly process. ERK2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 2) phosphorylates the motor protein dynein and sorts it to lipid droplets, allowing them to be transp......The assembly of lipid droplets is dependent on PtdIns(4,5)P(2) that activates PLD(1) (phospholipase D(1)), which is important for the assembly process. ERK2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 2) phosphorylates the motor protein dynein and sorts it to lipid droplets, allowing them...... to be transported on microtubules. Lipid droplets grow in size by fusion, which is dependent on dynein and the transfer on microtubules, and is catalysed by the SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor) proteins SNAP-23 (23 kDa synaptosome-associated protein), syntaxin-5...... and VAMP-4 (vesicle-associated protein 4). SNAP-23 is also involved in the insulin-dependent translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the plasma membrane. Fatty acids induce a missorting of SNAP-23, from the plasma membrane to the interior of the cell, resulting in cellular insulin resistance...

  8. THE EFFECTS OF THE DASH DIET ALONE AND IN COMBINATION WITH EXERCISE AND CALORIC RESTRICTION ON INSULIN SENSITIVITY AND LIPIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Blumenthal, James A.; Babyak, Michael A.; Sherwood, Andrew; Craighead, Linda; Lin, Pao-Hwa; Johnson, Julie; Watkins, Lana L.; Wang, Jenny T.; Kuhn, Cynthia; Feinglos, Mark; Hinderliter, Alan

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on insulin sensitivity and lipids. In a randomized control trial, 144 overweight (body mass index 25–40) men (N= 47) and women (N= 97) with high blood pressure (130–159/85–99 mm Hg) were randomly assigned to either: (1) DASH diet alone (DASH-A); (2) DASH diet with aerobic exercise and caloric restriction (DASH-WM); or usual diet controls (UC). Body composition, fitness, insulin sensitivity, and fasting ...

  9. Effect of trans-fatty acid intake on insulin sensitivity and intramuscular lipids - a randomized trial in overweight postmenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendsen, Nathalie Tommerup; Haugaard, Steen; Larsen, Thomas Meinert

    2011-01-01

    lipid deposition in abdominally obese women. In a double-blind, parallel dietary intervention study, 52 healthy but overweight postmenopausal women were randomized to receive either partially hydrogenated soybean oil (15 g/d TFA) or a control oil (mainly oleic and palmitic acid) for 16 weeks. Three......-nine women completed the study. Insulin sensitivity (assessed by ISI(composite)), β-cell function (the disposition index), and the metabolic clearance rate of insulin were not significantly affected by the dietary intervention. Neither was the ability of insulin to suppress plasma nonesterified fatty acid...... and glycerol during oral glucose ingestion nor the intramuscular lipid deposition. In conclusion, high TFA intake did not affect glucose metabolism over 16 weeks in postmenopausal overweight women. A study population with a stronger predisposition to insulin resistance and/or a longer duration of exposure may...

  10. [Repeatability of insulin sensitivity estimation using the Minimal Model and comparison with a modified short low-dose insulin tolerance test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, R H; Masnatta, L D; Pirola, D; Cuniberti, L A; Maceira, C; Werba, J P

    1996-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemia and insulin-resistance are metabolic disturbances associated with obesity, essential hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, glucose intolerance, overt non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, polymetabolic syndrome and atherosclerotic disease. The assessment of in vivo insulin sensitivity (SAI in vivo) changes achieved by life style modifications or drug interventions require a reproducible technique. To evaluate the day-to-day intra-individual repeatability of SAI-in vivo, we determined the variation in the SI index (calculated from the Minimal Model of Bergman modified by insulin or MMins) in 11 subjects with a wide range of insulin-resistance. SI (first study) varied from 0.82 to 8.48 x 10(-4) min-1/microU.mL (4.43 +/- 2.85 x 10(-4) min-1/microU.mL mean +/- SD) and highly correlated with SI (second study) (r = 0.89; p = 0.0002). The average interday coefficient of variation was 20.9 +/- 13.9% and was similar in subjects with low or high SI values. We also measured SAI in vivo by assessing the rate of serum glucose decline induced by human cristalline insulin 0.025 U/kg IV dose after a 12-14 hours fasting period (a modified Bonora's method or BBD) in 11 subjects. No subject presented biochemical or symptomatic hypoglycemia. SAI in vivo values determined by BBD varied from 21 a 234 mumol/ml/min (134 +/- 64.8 mumol/ml/min, mean +/- SD). We found a highly significant correlation between SI values obtained from MMins and SAI in vivo assessed by the BBD (r = 0.89, p = 0.0002). Our results suggest that the Mmins is a fairly reproducible procedure and that a BBD is an acceptable option to quantify SAI in vivo, mainly when a fast-execution practice is necessary or cost restrictions are required.

  11. Insulin and Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    As obesity and diabetes reach epidemic proportions in the developed world, the role of insulin resistance and its consequences are gaining prominence. Understanding the role of insulin in wide-ranging physiological processes and the influences on its synthesis and secretion, alongside its actions from the molecular to the whole body level, has significant implications for much chronic disease seen in Westernised populations today. This review provides an overview of insulin, its history, structure, synthesis, secretion, actions and interactions followed by a discussion of insulin resistance and its associated clinical manifestations. Specific areas of focus include the actions of insulin and manifestations of insulin resistance in specific organs and tissues, physiological, environmental and pharmacological influences on insulin action and insulin resistance as well as clinical syndromes associated with insulin resistance. Clinical and functional measures of insulin resistance are also covered. Despite our incomplete understanding of the complex biological mechanisms of insulin action and insulin resistance, we need to consider the dramatic social changes of the past century with respect to physical activity, diet, work, socialisation and sleep patterns. Rapid globalisation, urbanisation and industrialisation have spawned epidemics of obesity, diabetes and their attendant co-morbidities, as physical inactivity and dietary imbalance unmask latent predisposing genetic traits. PMID:16278749

  12. Variable reliability of surrogate measures of insulin sensitivity after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen-Møller, Kirstine N; Dirksen, Carsten; Svane, Maria Saur

    2017-01-01

    ) are frequently used, but have not been validated after RYGB. Our aim was to evaluate whether surrogate indices reliably estimate changes in insulin sensitivity after RYGB. Four fasting (inverse-HOMA-IR, HOMA2-%S, QUICKI, revised-QUICKI) and three OGTT-derived surrogates (Matsuda, Gutt, OGIS) were compared...... postoperatively. Post-RYGB changes in inverse-HOMA-IR and HOMA2-%S did not correlate with changes in Rd at any visit, but were comparable to changes in HISI at 1 week. Changes in QUICKI and revised-QUICKI correlated with Rd/I after surgery. Changes in Matsuda and Gutt did not correlate with changes in Rd/I and Rd...

  13. Effects of testosterone administration on fat distribution, insulin sensitivity, and atherosclerosis progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Shalender

    2003-01-01

    In spite of the widespread belief that testosterone supplementation increases the risk of atherosclerotic heart disease, evidence to support this premise is lacking. Although supraphysiological doses of testosterone, such as those used by athletes and recreational body builders, decrease plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations, replacement doses of testosterone have had only a modest or no effect on plasma HDL in placebo-controlled trials. In epidemiological studies, serum total and free testosterone concentrations have been inversely correlated with intra-abdominal fat mass, risk of coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Testosterone administration to middle-aged men is associated with decreased visceral fat and glucose concentrations and increased insulin sensitivity. Testosterone infusion increases coronary blood flow. Similarly, testosterone replacement retards atherogenesis in experimental models of atherosclerosis. However, the long-term risks and benefits of testosterone administration in human immunodeficiency virus-infected men with fat redistribution syndrome have not been studied in randomized clinical trials.

  14. The effect of menopause on carotid artery remodeling, insulin sensitivity, and plasma adiponectin in healthy women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscelli, Elza; Kozàkovà, Michaela; Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mechanisms by which menopause may influence the systemic subclinical atherosclerosis are unexplained. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the associations between early menopause, established cardiovascular (c-v) risk factors, metabolic parameters (insulin...... secretion and sensitivity, plasma adiponectin), and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in healthy women. METHODS: In 74 menopausal women (mean age = 51 +/- 3 years, mean duration of menopause = 2.9 +/- 1.2 years) and in 74 nonmenopausal women comparable for age and body mass index (BMI), common carotid...... by mathematical modeling. RESULTS: CCA diameter (5.55 +/- 0.46 vs. 5.21+/- 0.51 mm, P menopausal women, whereas CCA IMT/diameter ratio and IMT in other carotid...

  15. IGF-I bioactivity in an elderly population: Relation to insulin sensitivity, insulin levels, and the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P. Brugts (Michael); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); L.J. Hofland (Leo); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven); J.A.M.J.L. Janssen (Joseph)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - There is a complex relationship between IGF-I, IGF binding proteins, growth hormone, and insulin. The IGF-I kinase receptor activation assay (KIRA) is a novel method for measuring IGF-I bioactivity in human serum. We speculated that determination of IGF-I bioactivity might

  16. Maximal fat oxidation during exercise is positively associated with 24-hour fat oxidation and insulin sensitivity in young, healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Scott L; Hattersley, John; Frost, Gary S; Chambers, Edward S; Wallis, Gareth A

    2015-06-01

    Disturbances in fat oxidation have been associated with an increased risk of obesity and metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance. There is large intersubject variability in the capacity to oxidize fat when a person is physically active, although the significance of this for metabolic health is unclear. We investigated whether the maximal capacity to oxidize fat during exercise is related to 24-h fat oxidation and insulin sensitivity. Maximal fat oxidation (MFO; indirect calorimetry during incremental exercise) and insulin sensitivity (Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index) were measured in 53 young, healthy men (age 24 ± 7 yr, V̇o2max 52 ± 6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)). Fat oxidation over 24 h (24-h FO; indirect calorimetry) was assessed in 16 young, healthy men (age 26 ± 8 yr, V̇o2max 52 ± 6 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) during a 36-h stay in a whole-room respiration chamber. MFO (g/min) was positively correlated with 24-h FO (g/day) (R = 0.65, P = 0.003; R = 0.46, P = 0.041 when controlled for V̇o2max [l/min]), 24-h percent energy from FO (R = 0.58, P = 0.009), and insulin sensitivity (R = 0.33, P = 0.007). MFO (g/min) was negatively correlated with 24-h fat balance (g/day) (R = -0.51, P = 0.021) but not significantly correlated with 24-h respiratory quotient (R = -0.29, P = 0.142). Although additional investigations are needed, our data showing positive associations between MFO and 24-h FO, and between MFO and insulin sensitivity in healthy young men suggests that a high capacity to oxidize fat while one is physically active could be advantageous for the maintenance of metabolic health. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Resistance training associated with the administration of anabolic-androgenic steroids improves insulin sensitivity in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urtado CB

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Christiano Bertoldo Urtado1,2, Guilherme Borges Pereira3, Marilia Bertoldo Urtado4, Érica Blascovi de Carvalho2, Gerson dos Santos Leite1, Felipe Fedrizzi Donatto1, Claudio de Oliveira Assumpção1, Richard Diego Leite3, Carlos Alberto da Silva1, Marcelo Magalhães de Sales5, Ramires Alsamir Tibana5, Silvia Cristina Crepaldi Alves1, Jonato Prestes51Health Sciences, Methodist University of Piracicaba, Piracicaba, SP, 2Center for Investigation in Pediatrics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, State University of Campinas, Campinas, SP, 3Department of Physiological Sciences, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, 4Laboratory of Orofacial Pain, Division of Oral Physiology, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, Campinas, SP, 5Graduation Program in Physical Education, Catholic University of Brasilia, Brasilia, DF, BrazilAbstract: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids and resistance training (RT on insulin sensitivity in ovariectomized rats. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into ten experimental groups (n = 5 animals per group: (1 sedentary (Sed-Intact; (2 sedentary ovariectomized (Sed-Ovx; (3 sedentary nandrolone (Sed-Intact-ND; (4 sedentary ovariectomized plus nandrolone (Sed-Ovx-ND; (5 trained (TR-Intact; (6 trained nandrolone (TR-Intact-ND; (7 trained ovariectomized (TR-Ovx; (8 trained ovariectomized plus nandrolone; (9 trained sham; and (10 trained ovariectomized plus sham. Four sessions of RT were used, during which the animals climbed a 1.1 m vertical ladder with weights attached to their tails. The sessions were performed once every 3 days, with between four and nine climbs and with eight to twelve dynamic movements per climb. To test the sensitivity of insulin in the pancreas, glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed. For insulin sensitivity, there was a statistically significant interaction for the TR-Ovx group, which presented higher sensitivity

  18. Resistin, an adipokine, may affect the improvement of insulin sensitivity in the metabolic syndrome patient treated with metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hong; Weng, Chunyan; Yang, Youbo; Huang, Lihua; Xing, Xiaowei

    2013-12-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is a cluster of metabolic disorders arising from insulin resistance, characterized by the presence of central obesity, impaired fasting glucose level, dyslipidemia and hypertension. As the first-line medication, metformin is commonly used for MS to reduce insulin resistance. Comparing with rosiglitazone, metformin does not increase cardiovascular mortality risk in patients with MS. However, metformin is not good enough in improving insulin sensitivity. Its molecular mechanism is still not clear. Recent studies have demonstrated that resistin, an adipokine, could induce IR by both AMPK-dependent and AMPK-independent pathways. Though there were conflicting findings of resistin in metabolic syndrome or type 2 diabetes mellitus in different studies, resistin was significant decreased in the rosiglitazone treated patients than in the metformin-treated patients in most of studies. Here, we hypothesized that resistin, an adipokine, may affect the improvement of insulin sensitivity in the metabolic syndrome patient treated with metformin. This hypothesis could explain why rosiglitazone is superior to metformin in enhancement of insulin sensitivity. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Partial inhibition of adipose tissue lipolysis improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity without alteration of fat mass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Girousse

    Full Text Available When energy is needed, white adipose tissue (WAT provides fatty acids (FAs for use in peripheral tissues via stimulation of fat cell lipolysis. FAs have been postulated to play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how chronic inhibition of fat mobilization from WAT modulates insulin sensitivity remains elusive. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL participates in the breakdown of WAT triacylglycerol into FAs. HSL haploinsufficiency and treatment with a HSL inhibitor resulted in improvement of insulin tolerance without impact on body weight, fat mass, and WAT inflammation in high-fat-diet-fed mice. In vivo palmitate turnover analysis revealed that blunted lipolytic capacity is associated with diminution in FA uptake and storage in peripheral tissues of obese HSL haploinsufficient mice. The reduction in FA turnover was accompanied by an improvement of glucose metabolism with a shift in respiratory quotient, increase of glucose uptake in WAT and skeletal muscle, and enhancement of de novo lipogenesis and insulin signalling in liver. In human adipocytes, HSL gene silencing led to improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, resulting in increased de novo lipogenesis and activation of cognate gene expression. In clinical studies, WAT lipolytic rate was positively and negatively correlated with indexes of insulin resistance and WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression, respectively. In obese individuals, chronic inhibition of lipolysis resulted in induction of WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression. Thus, reduction in WAT lipolysis reshapes FA fluxes without increase of fat mass and improves glucose metabolism through cell-autonomous induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis, which contributes to improved insulin sensitivity.

  20. Partial inhibition of adipose tissue lipolysis improves glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity without alteration of fat mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girousse, Amandine; Tavernier, Geneviève; Valle, Carine; Moro, Cedric; Mejhert, Niklas; Dinel, Anne-Laure; Houssier, Marianne; Roussel, Balbine; Besse-Patin, Aurèle; Combes, Marion; Mir, Lucile; Monbrun, Laurent; Bézaire, Véronic; Prunet-Marcassus, Bénédicte; Waget, Aurélie; Vila, Isabelle; Caspar-Bauguil, Sylvie; Louche, Katie; Marques, Marie-Adeline; Mairal, Aline; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Galitzky, Jean; Holm, Cecilia; Mouisel, Etienne; Thalamas, Claire; Viguerie, Nathalie; Sulpice, Thierry; Burcelin, Rémy; Arner, Peter; Langin, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    When energy is needed, white adipose tissue (WAT) provides fatty acids (FAs) for use in peripheral tissues via stimulation of fat cell lipolysis. FAs have been postulated to play a critical role in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, a major risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, whether and how chronic inhibition of fat mobilization from WAT modulates insulin sensitivity remains elusive. Hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) participates in the breakdown of WAT triacylglycerol into FAs. HSL haploinsufficiency and treatment with a HSL inhibitor resulted in improvement of insulin tolerance without impact on body weight, fat mass, and WAT inflammation in high-fat-diet-fed mice. In vivo palmitate turnover analysis revealed that blunted lipolytic capacity is associated with diminution in FA uptake and storage in peripheral tissues of obese HSL haploinsufficient mice. The reduction in FA turnover was accompanied by an improvement of glucose metabolism with a shift in respiratory quotient, increase of glucose uptake in WAT and skeletal muscle, and enhancement of de novo lipogenesis and insulin signalling in liver. In human adipocytes, HSL gene silencing led to improved insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, resulting in increased de novo lipogenesis and activation of cognate gene expression. In clinical studies, WAT lipolytic rate was positively and negatively correlated with indexes of insulin resistance and WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression, respectively. In obese individuals, chronic inhibition of lipolysis resulted in induction of WAT de novo lipogenesis gene expression. Thus, reduction in WAT lipolysis reshapes FA fluxes without increase of fat mass and improves glucose metabolism through cell-autonomous induction of fat cell de novo lipogenesis, which contributes to improved insulin sensitivity.

  1. Distal gastrectomy in pancreaticoduodenectomy is associated with accelerated gastric emptying, enhanced postprandial release of GLP-1, and improved insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmuth, Stefan; Wewalka, Marlene; Holst, Jens Juul

    2014-01-01

    resistance (HOMA-IR) and oral glucose insulin sensitivity were calculated from glucose and insulin concentrations. RESULTS: Patients with Whipple procedure as compared to PPPD had accelerated gastric emptying (p = 0.01) which correlated with early (0-30 min) integrated GLP-1 (AUC30; r (2) = 0.61; p = 0......OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate the relationship between gastric emptying, postprandial GLP-1 and insulin sensitivity after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). BACKGROUND: Abnormal glucose regulation is highly prevalent in patients with pancreatic neoplasm and resolves in some after PD......, the cause of which is unclear. The procedure is carried out with pylorus preservation (PPPD) or with distal gastrectomy (Whipple procedure). Accelerated gastric emptying and ensuing enhanced release of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) conceivably play a role in glucose metabolism after PD. It was the purpose...

  2. Fasting serum levels of ferritin are associated with impaired pancreatic beta cell function and decreased insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonfils, L.; Ellervik, C.; Friedrich, N.

    2014-01-01

    diabetes due to its association with impaired beta cell function and decreased insulin sensitivity. Methods: We investigated 6,392 individuals from the Danish general population. Surrogate measures of beta cell function and insulin sensitivity were calculated for approximately 6,100 individuals based...... on OGTT examinations. Results: The ORs for type 2 diabetes were 4.2 (95% CI 2.4, 7.2) for the highest vs the lowest quintile of serum ferritin, and 17 (95% CI 8.9, 33) for serum ferritin levels ≥97.5th percentile vs ... glucose levels at 0, 30 and 120 min (p beta cell function estimated as the insulinogenic index and corrected insulin response (p 

  3. Improvement of Insulin Sensitivity after Lean Donor Feces in Metabolic Syndrome Is Driven by Baseline Intestinal Microbiota Composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kootte, Ruud S.; Levin, Evgeni; Salojärvi, Jarkko

    2017-01-01

    be predicted based on baseline fecal microbiota composition. Kootte et al. show that fecal microbiota transplantation from lean donors to obese patients with metabolic syndrome improves insulin sensitivity, a transient effect associated with changes in microbiota composition and fasting plasma metabolites......The intestinal microbiota has been implicated in insulin resistance, although evidence regarding causality in humans is scarce. We therefore studied the effect of lean donor (allogenic) versus own (autologous) fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) to male recipients with the metabolic syndrome...... allogenic FMT (defined as improved insulin sensitivity 6 weeks after FMT) is dependent on decreased fecal microbial diversity at baseline. In conclusion, the beneficial effects of lean donor FMT on glucose metabolism are associated with changes in intestinal microbiota and plasma metabolites and can...

  4. Intrauterine growth-restricted sheep fetuses exhibit smaller hindlimb muscle fibers and lower proportions of insulin-sensitive Type I fibers near term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Dustin T; Cadaret, Caitlin N; Beede, Kristin A; Riley, Hannah E; Macko, Antoni R; Anderson, Miranda J; Camacho, Leticia E; Limesand, Sean W

    2016-06-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) reduces muscle mass and insulin sensitivity in offspring. Insulin sensitivity varies among muscle fiber types, with Type I fibers being most sensitive. Differences in fiber-type ratios are associated with insulin resistance in adults, and thus we hypothesized that near-term IUGR sheep fetuses exhibit reduced size and proportions of Type I fibers. Placental insufficiency-induced IUGR fetuses were ∼54% smaller (P fetal muscles develop smaller fibers and have proportionally fewer Type I fibers, which is indicative of developmental adaptations that may help explain the link between IUGR and adulthood insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Adipose tissue inflammation and reduced insulin sensitivity in ovariectomized mice occurs in the absence of increased adiposity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Potter, Victoria J; Strissel, Katherine J; Xie, Chen; Chang, Eugene; Bennett, Grace; Defuria, Jason; Obin, Martin S; Greenberg, Andrew S

    2012-09-01

    Menopause promotes central obesity, adipose tissue (AT) inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR). Both obesity and the loss of estrogen can activate innate and adaptive immune cells (macrophages, T cells). The respective impacts of weight gain and loss of ovarian hormones on AT inflammation and IR are poorly understood. Here we determined the temporal kinetics of fat accretion, AT inflammation, and IR over a 26-wk time course in ovariectomized (OVX) mice, a model of menopause. OVX and sham-operated (SHM) C57BL6 mice were fed a normal chow diet. Weight, body composition (magnetic resonance imaging), total and regional adiposity, activity, food intake, AT crown-like structures, biohumoral measures, and insulin sensitivity (insulin tolerance testing and homeostatic model assessment) were determined at wk 12, 20, and 26. Macrophages and T cells from perigonadal AT were immunophenotyped by fluorescence-associated cell sorting, and perigonadal adipose tissue (PGAT) gene expression was quantified by quantitative PCR. OVX mice (≈ 31 g) became fatter than SHM mice (≈ 26 g) by wk 12, but mice were equally insulin sensitive. PGAT of OVX mice contained more T cells but expressed higher levels of M2-MΦ (arginase-1) and T cell-regulatory (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4) genes. At wk 20, both OVX and SHM mice weighed approximately 35 g and were equally insulin sensitive with comparable amounts of PGAT and total body fat. OVX mice became less insulin sensitive than SHM mice by wk 26, coincident with the down-regulation of PGAT arginase-1 (-20-fold) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (2-fold) and up-regulation of M1/Th1 genes CD11c (+2-fold), IL12p40 (+2-fold), and interferon-γ (+78-fold). Ovarian hormone loss in mice induces PGAT inflammation and IR by mechanisms that can be uncoupled from OVX-induced obesity.

  6. Lactose in milk replacer can partly be replaced by glucose, fructose, or glycerol without affecting insulin sensitivity in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantophlet, A. J.; Gilbert, M. S.; van den Borne, J. J. G. C.; Gerrits, W. J. J.; Roelofsen, H.; Priebe, M. G.; Vonk, R. J.

    Calf milk replacer (MR) contains 40 to 50% lactose. Lactose strongly fluctuates in price and alternatives are desired. Also, problems with glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity (i.e., high incidence of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia) have been described for heavy veal calves (body weight

  7. Lactose in milk replacer can partly be replaced by glucose, fructose, or glycerol without affecting insulin sensitivity in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantophlet, A.J.; Gilbert, M.S.; Borne, van den J.J.G.C.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Roelofsen, H.; Priebe, M.G.; Vonk, R.J.

    2016-01-01

    Calf milk replacer (MR) contains 40 to 50% lactose. Lactose strongly fluctuates in price and alternatives are desired. Also, problems with glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity (i.e., high incidence of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia) have been described for heavy veal calves (body

  8. GQ-16, a Novel Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) Ligand, Promotes Insulin Sensitization without Weight Gain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amato, Angelica A.; Rajagopalan, Senapathy; Lin, Jean Z.; Carvalho, Bruno M.; Figueira, Ana C. M.; Lu, Jenny; Ayers, Stephen D.; Mottin, Melina; Silveira, Rodrigo L.; Telles de Souza, Paulo; Mourao, Rosa H. V.; Saad, Mario J. A.; Togashi, Marie; Simeoni, Luiz A.; Abdalla, Dulcineia S. P.; Skaf, Munir S.; Polikparpov, Igor; Lima, Maria C. A.; Galdino, Suely L.; Brennan, Richard G.; Baxter, John D.; Pitta, Ivan R.; Webb, Paul; Phillips, Kevin J.; Neves, Francisco A. R.

    2012-01-01

    The recent discovery that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma) targeted anti-diabetic drugs function by inhibiting Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of the receptor has provided a new viewpoint to evaluate and perhaps develop improved insulin-sensitizing agents. Herein we report

  9. The effect of dietary phytosphingosine on cholesterol levels and insulin sensitivity in subjects with the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, M.; Sleddering, M.A.; Pijl, H.; Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Frölich, M.; Havekes, L.M.; Romijn, J.A.; Jazet, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Sphingolipids, like phytosphingosine (PS) are part of cellular membranes of yeasts, vegetables and fruits. Addition of PS to the diet decreases serum cholesterol and free fatty acid (FFA) levels in rodents and improves insulin sensitivity.Objective:To study the effect of dietary

  10. The dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor vildagliptin improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in subjects with impaired fasting glucose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utzschneider, Kristina M; Tong, Jenny; Montgomery, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of treatment with the dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor vildagliptin on insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function in subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 22 subjects with IFG (11 female and 11 male, mean +/- SD...

  11. Bezafibrate ameliorates diabetes via reduced steatosis and improved hepatic insulin sensitivity in diabetic TallyHo mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Franko

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: Our data showed that BEZ ameliorates diabetes probably via reduced steatosis, enhanced hepatic mitochondrial mass, improved metabolic flexibility and elevated hepatic insulin sensitivity in TallyHo mice, suggesting that BEZ treatment could be beneficial for patients with NAFLD and impaired glucose metabolism.

  12. Deletion of hepatic carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP impairs glucose homeostasis and hepatic insulin sensitivity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Jois

    2017-11-01

    Conclusions: Overall, hepatic ChREBP is protective in regards to hepatic insulin sensitivity and whole body glucose homeostasis. Hepatic ChREBP action can influence other peripheral tissues and is likely essential in coordinating the body's response to different feeding states.

  13. Age-dependent nongenetic influences of birth weight and adult body fat on insulin sensitivity in twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Rikke Nygaard; Grunnet, Louise Groth; Rasmussen, Eva Lind

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesized a nongenetic influence of birth weight (BW) and twin and zygosity status on dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry determined adult total and regional body composition and a quantitative equal, although independent, importance of adult body composition and BW for insulin sensitivity....

  14. A 12 week aerobic exercise program improves fitness, hepatic insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism in obese Hispanic adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rise in obesity related morbidity in children and adolescents requires urgent prevention and treatment strategies. Strictly controlled exercise programs might be useful tools to improve insulin sensitivity and glucose kinetics. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that a 12-wk aerobic exerci...

  15. Effect of training intensity on physical capacity, lipid profile and insulin sensitivity in early rehabilitation of spinal cord injured individuals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, P.C.E. de; Hjeltnes, N.; Heijboer, A.C.; Stal, W.; Birkeland, K.

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Pre-post training intervention. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of training intensity on physical capacity, lipid profile and insulin sensitivity in early rehabilitation of spinal cord injured (SCI) patients, and to assess the correlation between peak aerobic capacity (VO(2Peak))

  16. Egg white hydrolysate shows insulin mimetic and sensitizing effects in 3T3-F442A pre-adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forough Jahandideh

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance and inflammation in adipose tissue is a key mechanism underlying metabolic syndrome, a growing health problem characterized by diabetes, obesity and hypertension. Previous work from our research group has demonstrated the potential of egg white ovotransferrin derived bioactive peptides against hypertension, oxidative stress and inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Egg white hydrolysate (EWH has also shown anti-hypertensive effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Given the interplay among hypertension, inflammation, oxidative stress and metabolic syndrome, the objective of the study was to test the EWH on differentiation, insulin signaling and inflammatory responses in 3T3-F442A pre-adipocytes. Our study suggested that EWH could promote adipocyte differentiation as shown by increased lipid accumulation, increased release of adiponectin and upregulation of peroxisome proliferator associated receptor gamma (PPARγ and CCAAT/ enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP-α. In addition to enhanced insulin effects on the upregulation of protein kinase B/Akt phosphorylation, EWH treatment increased extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 phosphorylation to a level similar to that of insulin, indicating insulin sensitizing and mimetic properties of the EWH. EWH further attenuated cytokine induced inflammatory marker; cyclooxygenase -2 (COX-2 by 48.78%, possibly through the AP-1 pathway by down regulating c-Jun phosphorylation in adipocytes. Given the critical role of adipose in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome, EWH may have potential applications in the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome and its complications.

  17. Central infusion of ketone bodies modulates body weight and hepatic insulin sensitivity by modifying hypothalamic leptin and insulin signaling pathways in type 2 diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sunmin; Kim, Da Sol; Daily, James W

    2011-07-15

    Although the effects of ketogenic diets on energy and glucose homeostasis have been controversial, elevation of serum ketone levels by subcutaneous injection of β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) can improve glucose homeostasis. Ketones may work through the brain; therefore, we evaluated whether the intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of β-hydroxybutyrates would also modulate peripheral energy and glucose homeostasis, and through what mechanisms, in diabetic rats fed a high fat diet in short- and long-term studies. Short-term (3h) central injection of BHB (50 μg/h) improved serum glucose levels and peripheral insulin sensitivity compared to the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) group among 90% pancreatectomized (Px) diabetic rats, but not in non-diabetic Sham rats. In addition to short-term infusion, long-term (28 days) central infusion of BHB (12 μg/h) elevated serum BHB levels. Long-term infusion of BHB potentiated leptin and insulin signaling in the hypothalamus to slightly decrease body weight in Px rats. Central BHB infusion had a greater effect on peripheral glucose metabolism than overall energy metabolism. Hepatic insulin signaling (tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS2→serine phosphorylation of Akt→reduced expression of PEPCK) was potentiated and hepatic glucose production in the hyperinsulinemic state was suppressed in the diabetic rats. In addition, glucose tolerance was improved by central BHB infusion through enhanced whole body glucose disposal rates, but insulin secretion was not affected in the diabetic rats. In conclusion, mild ketosis by central infusion of ketones improves energy and glucose metabolism through the potentiation of leptin and insulin signaling in the hypothalamus of diabetic rats. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Comparable sensitivity of postmenopausal and young women to the effects of intranasal insulin on food intake and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, Rosemarie; Benedict, Christian; Born, Jan; Hallschmid, Manfred

    2010-12-01

    We have previously shown that enhancing brain insulin signaling by intranasal administration of a single dose of the hormone acutely reduces food intake in young men but not women, whereas its improving effects on spatial and working memory are restricted to young women. Against the background of animal studies suggesting that low estrogen concentrations are a prerequisite for the anorexigenic impact of central nervous insulin, we extended our foregoing study by assessing intranasal insulin effects in postmenopausal women with comparatively low estrogen concentrations, expecting them to be more sensitive than young women to the anorexigenic effects of the hormone. In a within-subject, double-blind comparison performed at the University of Lübeck, 14 healthy postmenopausal women (body mass index, 23.71±0.6 kg/m2; age, 57.61±1.14 yr) were intranasally administered 160 IU regular human insulin or vehicle. Subjects performed a working memory task (digit span) and a hippocampus-dependent visuospatial memory task. Subsequently, free-choice food intake from an ad libitum breakfast buffet was measured. Contrary to expectations, results in postmenopausal women mirrored those found in young women (22.44±0.63 yr), i.e. insulin administration did not affect food intake (P>0.46), but did enhance performance in the prefrontal cortex-dependent working memory task (P<0.05). Low estrogen levels as present in postmenopausal women do not modulate the effects of intranasal insulin in females, suggesting that in humans as opposed to rats, estrogen signaling does not critically alter central nervous system sensitivity to the effects of insulin on energy homeostasis and cognition.

  19. Thrombospondin1 deficiency reduces obesity-associated inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity in a diet-induced obese mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanzhang Li

    Full Text Available Obesity is prevalent worldwide and is associated with insulin resistance. Advanced studies suggest that obesity-associated low-grade chronic inflammation contributes to the development of insulin resistance and other metabolic complications. Thrombospondin 1 (TSP1 is a multifunctional extracellular matrix protein that is up-regulated in inflamed adipose tissue. A recent study suggests a positive correlation of TSP1 with obesity, adipose inflammation, and insulin resistance. However, the direct effect of TSP1 on obesity and insulin resistance is not known. Therefore, we investigated the role of TSP1 in mediating obesity-associated inflammation and insulin resistance by using TSP1 knockout mice.Male TSP1-/- mice and wild type littermate controls were fed a low-fat (LF or a high-fat (HF diet for 16 weeks. Throughout the study, body weight and fat mass increased similarly between the TSP1-/- mice and WT mice under HF feeding conditions, suggesting that TSP1 deficiency does not affect the development of obesity. However, obese TSP1-/- mice had improved glucose tolerance and increased insulin sensitivity compared to the obese wild type mice. Macrophage accumulation and inflammatory cytokine expression in adipose tissue were reduced in obese TSP1-/- mice. Consistent with the local decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, systemic inflammation was also decreased in the obese TSP1-/- mice. Furthermore, in vitro data demonstrated that TSP1 deficient macrophages had decreased mobility and a reduced inflammatory phenotype.TSP1 deficiency did not affect the development of high-fat diet induced obesity. However, TSP1 deficiency reduced macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue and protected against obesity related inflammation and insulin resistance. Our data demonstrate that TSP1 may play an important role in regulating macrophage function and mediating obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. These data suggest that TSP1 may serve as a

  20. Baseline IGF-I Levels Determine Insulin Secretion and Insulin Sensitivity during the First Year on Growth Hormone Therapy in Children Born Small for Gestational Age. Results from a North European Multicentre Study (NESGAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; O'Connell, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Developmental programming alters growth and metabolic outcome in children born small for gestational age (SGA). We explored insulin and glucose metabolism in SGA children treated with a fixed GH dose over 1 year. Methods: In the North European Small for Gestational Age Study (NESGAS......), 110 short SGA children received GH at 67 µg/kg/day for 1 year. Insulin secretion was assessed by acute insulin response (AIR), insulin sensitivity (IS) by HOMA and disposition index (DI) by insulin secretion adjusted for IS. Results: First-year GH therapy led to increases in height and IGF-I standard...... deviation score (SDS), and reductions in IS (p insulin sensitive at baseline (p = 0.024) and 1 year (p = 0.006). IGF-I responses...

  1. Gender dimorphism in aspartame-induced impairment of spatial cognition and insulin sensitivity.

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    Kate S Collison

    Full Text Available Previous studies have linked aspartame consumption to impaired retention of learned behavior in rodents. Prenatal exposure to aspartame has also been shown to impair odor-associative learning in guinea pigs; and recently, aspartame-fed hyperlipidemic zebrafish exhibited weight gain, hyperglycemia and acute swimming defects. We therefore investigated the effects of chronic lifetime exposure to aspartame, commencing in utero, on changes in blood glucose parameters, spatial learning and memory in C57BL/6J mice. Morris Water Maze (MWM testing was used to assess learning and memory, and a random-fed insulin tolerance test was performed to assess glucose homeostasis. Pearson correlation analysis was used to investigate the associations between body characteristics and MWM performance outcome variables. At 17 weeks of age, male aspartame-fed mice exhibited weight gain, elevated fasting glucose levels and decreased insulin sensitivity compared to controls (P<0.05. Females were less affected, but had significantly raised fasting glucose levels. During spatial learning trials in the MWM (acquisition training, the escape latencies of male aspartame-fed mice were consistently higher than controls, indicative of learning impairment. Thigmotactic behavior and time spent floating directionless was increased in aspartame mice, who also spent less time searching in the target quadrant of the maze (P<0.05. Spatial learning of female aspartame-fed mice was not significantly different from controls. Reference memory during a probe test was affected in both genders, with the aspartame-fed mice spending significantly less time searching for the former location of the platform. Interestingly, the extent of visceral fat deposition correlated positively with non-spatial search strategies such as floating and thigmotaxis, and negatively with time spent in the target quadrant and swimming across the location of the escape platform. These data suggest that lifetime

  2. Antidiabetic property of Symplocos cochinchinensis is mediated by inhibition of alpha glucosidase and enhanced insulin sensitivity.

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    Kalathookunnel Antony Antu

    Full Text Available The study is designed to find out the biochemical basis of antidiabetic property of Symplocos cochinchinensis (SC, the main ingredient of 'Nisakathakadi' an Ayurvedic decoction for diabetes. Since diabetes is a multifactorial disease, ethanolic extract of the bark (SCE and its fractions (hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and 90% ethanol were evaluated by in vitro methods against multiple targets relevant to diabetes such as the alpha glucosidase inhibition, glucose uptake, adipogenic potential, oxidative stress, pancreatic beta cell proliferation, inhibition of protein glycation, protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP-1B and dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV. Among the extracts, SCE exhibited comparatively better activity like alpha glucosidase inhibition (IC50 value-82.07 ± 2.10 µg/mL, insulin dependent glucose uptake (3 fold increase in L6 myotubes, pancreatic beta cell regeneration in RIN-m5F (3.5 fold increase and reduced triglyceride accumulation (22% decrease in 3T3L1 cells, protection from hyperglycemia induced generation of reactive oxygen species in HepG2 cells (59.57% decrease with moderate antiglycation and PTP-1B inhibition. Chemical characterization by HPLC revealed the superiority of SCE over other extracts due to presence and quantity of bioactives (beta-sitosterol, phloretin 2'glucoside, oleanolic acid in addition to minerals like magnesium, calcium, potassium, sodium, zinc and manganese. So SCE has been subjected to oral sucrose tolerance test to evaluate its antihyperglycemic property in mild diabetic and diabetic animal models. SCE showed significant antihyperglycemic activity in in vivo diabetic models. We conclude that SC mediates the antidiabetic activity mainly via alpha glucosidase inhibition, improved insulin sensitivity, with moderate antiglycation and antioxidant activity.

  3. Six-month exenatide improves HOMA hyperbolic product in type 2 diabetic patients mostly by enhancing beta-cell function rather than insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preumont, V; Hermans, M-P; Brichard, S; Buysschaert, M

    2010-09-01

    This study aimed to determine whether or not the improvement of glycaemic control with 6-month exenatide therapy in type 2 diabetic patients with secondary failure to combined oral therapy is related to amelioration of β-cell function and/or insulin sensitivity and their combined product. Thirty-three patients with type 2 diabetes were investigated. Their β-cell function and insulin sensitivity were measured using Homoeostasis Model Assessment [HOMA-B, HOMA-S and HOMA hyperbolic product (BxS)]. Additional endpoints included changes in weight, HbA(1c) and plasma adiponectin, as well as baseline clinical and biological characteristics, as potential predictors of HbA(1c) response. After 6 months, unadjusted HOMA-B increased from 33 ± 24% to 43 ± 23% (P=0.0210), whereas there was no significant change in HOMA-S (from 58 ± 35% to 61 ± 40%). The hyperbolic product increased by a relative 70% (from 15 ± 7% to 22 ± 15%; P=0.0055). Body mass index decreased from 32.2 ± 5.1 kg/m(2) to 31.0 ± 4.8 kg/m(2) (PHOMA-B and hyperbolic product over a 6-month treatment period with no overall change in insulin sensitivity, despite weight loss. Thus, improved β-cell function rather than increased insulin sensitivity accounts for the bulk of HbA(1c) reduction following 6 months of exenatide treatment. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Postprandial lipaemia induces an acute decrease of insulin sensitivity in healthy men independently of plasma NEFA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrini, M T; Niederwanger, A; Kranebitter, M; Tautermann, C; Ciardi, C; Tatarczyk, T; Patsch, J R

    2006-07-01

    Typical Western diets cause postprandial lipaemia for 18 h per day. We tested the hypothesis that postprandial lipaemia decreases insulin sensitivity. Employing a randomised crossover design, we administered two types of virtually isocaloric meals to ten healthy volunteers on two separate occasions. The meals (Meals 1 and 2) were both designed to produce a rise in triglycerides, but only Meal 1 generated a rise in NEFA, too. Insulin sensitivity, as quantified by an IVGTT with minimal model analysis, was calculated postabsorptively at 08.00 h and postprandially at 13.00 h, i.e. 3 h after meal ingestion. Triglycerides rose from 0.91+/-0.31 mmol/l postabsorptively to 2.08+/-0.70 mmol/l postprandially with Meal 1 (p=0.005) and from 0.92+/-0.41 to 1.71+/-0.79 mmol/l with Meal 2 (p=0.005). Neither the triglyceride levels at 13.00 h, nor the post-meal AUCs for triglycerides were statistically different between Meal 1 and Meal 2. NEFA rose from 0.44+/-0.17 mmol/l postabsorptively to 0.69+/-0.16 mmol/l postprandially with Meal 1 (p=0.005) and showed no significant change with Meal 2 (0.46+/-0.31 mmol/l postabsorptively vs 0.36+/-0.32 mmol/l postprandially, p=0.09). Both the NEFA level at 13.00 h and the post-meal AUC for NEFA were significantly higher after Meal 1 than Meal 2. Compared with the postabsorptive state, insulin sensitivity decreased postprandially after each of the two meals to a comparable degree (Meal 1: -53%, p=0.02; Meal 2: -45%, p=0.005). Our study reveals a drop in insulin sensitivity during postprandial lipaemia and strongly suggests that decreased insulin sensitivity is brought about by elevated plasma levels of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins independently of plasma NEFA levels.

  5. Mediterranean diet and insulin sensitivity, lipid profile and blood pressure levels, in overweight and obese people; The Attica study

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    Zampelas Antonis

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We aimed to investigate if overweight and obese adults "close" to Mediterranean diet present better insulin, lipids profile and better pressure levels, compared to individuals close to a more Westernized diet. Methods The ATTICA study is a population-based cohort that has randomly enrolled 3042 adult men and women, stratified by age – gender, from the greater area of Athens, during 2001–2002. Of them, in this work were have studied 1762 participants with excess body weight, meaning overweight (BMI: 25–29.9 kg/m2 and obese (BMI>30 kg/m2. 1064 were men and 698 women (20–89 years old. Adherence to Mediterranean diet was assessed through a diet-score that was based on a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Blood pressure was measured and also fasting glucose, insulin and blood lipids. Insulin sensitivity was also assessed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA approach (glucose × insulin/22.5. Results Individuals with excess bodyweight in the highest tertile of diet score, were more insulin sensitive than those in the lowest tertile (11.4% lower HOMA, p = 0.06, had 13% lower levels of total cholesterol (p = 0.001 and 3 mmHg decrease of systolic blood pressure levels (p Conclusion Adherence to Mediterranean diet is modeslty associated with a better insulin sensitivity, lower levels of total cholesterol and lower levels of systolic blood pressure in overweight and obese subjects. This may suggest that compared to general population, the beneficial effect of this diet in cardiovascular system of excess body weight people is limited.

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF THYROID FUNCTION AND BONE TURNOVER ON LIPOPROTEIN PROFILE IN YOUNG PHYSICALLY ACTIVE MEN WITH DIFFERENT INSULIN SENSITIVITY

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    A. Kęska

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity induces changes in the endocrine system. Previous data indicated that changes in insulin secretion and the tissue response to this hormone are very important for energy metabolism. It is believed that they are accompanied by changes in lipid metabolism, but factors contributing to this process are still disputed. The aim of this study was to assess interactions among insulin sensitivity, thyroid function, a bone turnover marker and serum lipid profile in young physically active men. Eighty-seven physical education students, aged 18-23 years, participated in the study. We measured serum levels of glucose, lipids, insulin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH, osteocalcin and anthropometric parameters. Insulin sensitivity was determined using homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR. The median value of HOMA-IR (1.344 was used to divide the study population into Group A (above the median and Group B (below the median. Men from both groups did not differ in anthropometric parameters or in daily physical activity. Triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol (TC and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C levels were higher in Group A (P<0.05. TSH and osteocalcin levels were similar in males with different HOMA-IR. Multiple regression analysis for TSH and osteocalcin showed that in Group A these hormones had no effect on plasma lipoproteins. However, in Group B they significantly determined the variation of plasma TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels (in about 28% and 29%, respectively. We concluded that TSH and osteocalcin are involved in determination of a more healthy lipid profile at a certain level of insulin sensitivity.

  7. Endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in prostate cancer patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvid, Thine; Winding, Kamilla; Rinnov, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance and changes in body composition are side effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) given to prostate cancer patients. The present study investigated whether endurance training improves insulin sensitivity and body composition in ADT-treated prostate cancer patients. Nine men...... and magnetic resonance imaging). The secondary endpoint was systemic inflammation. Statistical analysis was carried out using two-way ANOVA. Endurance training increased VO2max (ml(O2)/min per kg) by 11 and 13% in the patients and controls respectively (P...

  8. Total adiponectin and adiponectin multimeric complexes in relation to weight loss-induced improvements in insulin sensitivity in obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polak, J.; Kovacova, Z.; Holst, C.

    2008-01-01

    diet induced changes in insulin sensitivity (responders and non-responders respectively), matched for weight loss (body mass index (BMI)=34.5 (s.d. 2.9) resp. 36.5 kg/m(2) (s.d. 4.0) for responders and non-responders), were selected from 292 women who underwent a 10-week low-caloric diet (LCD; 600 kcal......, and LMW were negatively associated with fasting insulin levels at baseline. CONCLUSION: No differences in total plasma adiponectin, HMW, MMW, and LMW forms were observed between responders and non-responders following 10-week LCD, suggesting that adiponectin is not a major determinant of weight loss...

  9. Effects of Native Banana Starch Supplementation on Body Weight and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Type 2 Diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C. Díaz-Zagoya

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Few fiber supplements have been studied for physiological effectiveness. The effects of native banana starch (NBS and soy milk (control on body weight and insulin sensitivity in obese type 2 diabetics were compared using a blind within-subject crossover design. Subjects undertook two phases of 4-week supplementation either with NBS or soy milk. Patients on NBS lost more body weight than when they were on control treatment. Plasma insulin and HOMA-I were reduced after NBS consumption, compared with baseline levels, but not significantly when compared to the control treatment. Results support the use of NBS as part of dietary fiber supplementation.

  10. Effects of resveratrol on glucose control and insulin sensitivity in subjects with type 2 diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiangyun; Wu, Chunhua; Qiu, Shanhu; Yuan, Xuelu; Li, Ling

    2017-01-01

    Although the regular consumption of resveratrol has been known to improve glucose homeostasis and reverse insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the reported results are inconsistent. Thus, we aimed to assess the effects of resveratrol on glycemic control and insulin sensitivity among patients with T2DM. We searched for relevant articles published until June 2017 on PubMed-Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science. Randomized controlled trials in T2DM patients administered with resveratrol as intervention were included. After study selection, quality assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two authors, and STATA and RevMan software were used for statistical analysis. Nine randomized controlled trials involving 283 participants were included. Meta-analysis showed that resveratrol significantly improved the fasting plasma glucose ( -0.29 mmol/l, 95% CI: -0.51, -0.06, p resveratrol supplementation doses of resveratrol may benefit management of T2DM.

  11. Short-term weight loss attenuates local tissue inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity without affecting adipose inflammation in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Lichtman, Eben I; Lee, Eunjung; Lawton, Elizabeth; Ong, Helena; Yu, Kristine; Azuma, Yoshihiro; Friedline, Randall H; Lee, Ki Won; Kim, Jason K

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is a major cause of insulin resistance, and weight loss is shown to improve glucose homeostasis. But the underlying mechanism and the role of inflammation remain unclear. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 wk. After HFD, weight loss was induced by changing to a low-fat diet (LFD) or exercise with continuous HFD. The weight loss effects on energy balance and insulin sensitivity were determined using metabolic cages and hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps in awake mice. Diet and exercise intervention for 3 wk caused a modest weight loss and improved glucose homeostasis. Weight loss dramatically reduced local inflammation in skeletal muscle, liver, and heart but not in adipose tissue. Exercise-mediated weight loss increased muscle glucose metabolism without affecting Akt phosphorylation or lipid levels. LFD-mediated weight loss reduced lipid levels and improved insulin sensitivity selectively in liver. Both weight loss interventions improved cardiac glucose metabolism. These results demonstrate that a short-term weight loss with exercise or diet intervention attenuates obesity-induced local inflammation and selectively improves insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle and liver. Our findings suggest that local factors, not adipose tissue inflammation, are involved in the beneficial effects of weight loss on glucose homeostasis.

  12. Changes in mineral status are associated with improvements in insulin sensitivity in obese patients following L-arginine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suliburska, Joanna; Bogdanski, Paweł; Szulinska, Monika; Pupek-Musialik, Danuta; Jablecka, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term influence of L-arginine intake on mineral concentration in patients with obesity and to assess the changes in lipid serum levels, fat content, and insulin resistance that result. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study was conducted. 88 obese patients were randomly assigned to receive either 9 g of L-arginine or placebo daily, for 6 months. At baseline and after 6 months, selected anthropometrical measurements and blood biochemical analyses were performed and mineral levels were assessed. To assess insulin sensitivity, the gold-standard euglycemic clamp methodology was used. We found that 6 months of L-arginine supplementation resulted in significant increases in insulin sensitivity (Δ1.1 mg/kg/min, P L-arginine, a negative correlation between the change in zinc concentration in serum and the change in body fat content was noted (R = -0.38, P L-Arginine supplementation affects zinc status in obese patients. One beneficial influence is related to the improvements in insulin sensitivity.

  13. Photoelectrochemical sensitive detection of insulin based on CdS/polydopamine co-sensitized WO3 nanorod and signal amplification of carbon nanotubes@polydopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongyu; Ma, Hongmin; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Qi; Yang, Zhongping; Du, Bin; Wu, Dan; Wei, Qin

    2017-10-15

    An ultrasensitive photoelectrochemical sandwich immunosensor was designed for detection of insulin based on WO 3 /CdS/polydopamine (WO 3 /CdS/PDA) co-sensitized and PDA@carbon nanotubes (PDA@CNT) conjugates for signal amplification. The CdS nanoparticles were first deposited on the WO 3 nanorods via sequential chemical bath deposition to form the WO 3 /CdS structure to enhance photocurrent. Then equipped with PDA to form the WO 3 /CdS/PDA photosensitive structure. The PDA was used not only to reduce the toxicity of CdS but also adsorb insulin primary antibodies (Ab 1 ). Meanwhile, insulin secondary antibodies (Ab 2 ) were decorated by PDA@CNT conjugates for signal amplification and further enhance photocurrent. Different photocurrent intensities were obtained by the photoelectrochemical workstation at applied bias of 0V due to the different amount of the PDA@CNT conjugates introduced by the different concentrations of insulin. A good linear relationship was obtained between the increased photocurrent and insulin concentrations range from 0.01ngmL -1 to 50ngmL -1 . And a detection limit of 2.8pgmL -1 was obtained. The proposed sensor was applied to the determination of the insulin in human serum sample, and satisfactory results were obtained. The sensor presented good specificity, reproducibility and stability, thus it might find application in the clinical diagnosis of insulin or other biomarkers in the near future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of febuxostat on insulin resistance and expression of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with primary gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Juan; Li, Yanchun; Yuan, Xiaoxu; Lu, Yuewu

    2017-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of febuxostat on IR and the expression of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with primary gout. Forty-two cases of primary gout patients without uric acid-lowering therapy were included in this study. After a physical examination, 20 age- and sex-matched patients were included as normal controls. The levels of fasting insulin (INS), fasting blood glucose (FBG), and hs-CRP were determined. IR was assessed using the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). Gout patients had higher levels of UA, INS, HOMA-IR, and hs-CRP than normal controls (P HOMA-IR (r = 0.353, P = 0.018) and INS (r = 0.426, P = 0.034). Our findings confirm that IR exists in gout patients and implicate that febuxostat can effectively control the level of serum UA and increase insulin sensitivity in primary gout patients.

  15. Lack of relationship between 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase setpoint and insulin sensitivity in the basal state and after 24h of insulin infusion in healthy subjects and type 2 diabetic patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerstens, MN; Riemens, SC; Sluiter, WJ; Pratt, JJ; Wolthers, BG; Dullaart, RPF

    OBJECTIVES To test whether insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with an altered overall setpoint of the 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11 beta HSD) mediated cortisol to cortisone interconversion towards cortisol, and to evaluate whether changes in insulin sensitivity

  16. Krüppel-like factor 14 increases insulin sensitivity through activation of PI3K/Akt signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Ren, Yan; Lin, Zhimin; Tang, Chenchen; Jia, Yanjun; Lai, Yerui; Zhou, Tingting; Wu, Shaobo; Liu, Hua; Yang, Gangyi; Li, Ling

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown that Krüppel-like factor 14 (KLF14) is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, no report has demonstrated a relationship between KLF14 and glucose metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine whether KLF14 is associated with glucose metabolism and insulin signaling in vitro. The mRNA and protein expressions of KLF14 were determined by Real-time PCR and Western blotting. Glucose uptake was assessed by 2-[(3)H]-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake. Western blotting was used to identify the activation of insulin signaling proteins. KLF14 mRNA and protein in fat and muscle were significantly decreased in HFD-fed mice, db/db mice and T2DM patients. Overexpression of KLF14 enhanced insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and the activation of Akt kinase in Hepa1-6 cells. The phosphorylation of insulin receptor (InsR), insulin receptor substrate-1(IRS-1), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and Akt also elevated significantly by up-regulation of KLF14. KLF14 overexpression in Hepa1-6 cells prevented the inhibition of glucose uptake and Akt phosphorylation induced by high glucose and/or high insulin, or T2DM serum. However, KLF14's ability to increase glucose uptake and Akt activation was significantly attenuated by LY294002, a PI3-kinase inhibitor. These data suggested that KLF14 could increase insulin sensitivity probably through the PI3K/Akt pathway. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Nicotinic acid effects on insulin sensitivity and hepatic lipid metabolism: an in vivo to in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blond, E; Rieusset, J; Alligier, M; Lambert-Porcheron, S; Bendridi, N; Gabert, L; Chetiveaux, M; Debard, C; Chauvin, M-A; Normand, S; Roth, H; de Gouville, A-C; Krempf, M; Vidal, H; Goudable, J; Laville, M

    2014-06-01

    Our aim was to characterize the effects and the underlying mechanisms of the lipid-regulating agent Niaspan(®) on both insulin action and triglyceride decrease in 20 nondiabetic, dyslipidemic men with metabolic syndrome receiving Niaspan(®) (2 g/day) or placebo for 8 weeks in a randomized, cross-over study. The effects on plasma lipid profile were characterized at the beginning and the end of each treatment period; insulin sensitivity was assessed using the 2-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp and VLDL-triglyceride turnover by measuring plasma glycerol enrichment, both at the end of each treatment period. The mechanism of action of nicotinic acid was studied in HuH7 and mouse primary hepatocytes. Lipid profile was improved after Niaspan(®) treatment with a significant-28% decrease in triglyceride levels, a+17% increase in HDL-C concentration and unchanged levels of fasting nonesterified fatty acid. VLDL-tri-glyceride production rate was markedly reduced after Niaspan(®) (-68%). However, the treatment induced hepatic insulin resistance, as assessed by reduced inhibition of endogenous glucose production by insulin (0.7±0.4 vs. 1.0±0.5 mg/kg · min, pinsulin sensitivity index (4.8±1.8 vs. 3.2±1.6, pinsulin action in HuH7 and primary hepatocytes, independently of the activation of hepatic PKCε. This effect was associated with an increase in diacylglycerol and a decrease in tri-glyceride contents that occurred in the absence of modification of DGAT2 expression and activity. Eight weeks of Niaspan(®) treatment in dyslipidemic patients with metabolic syndrome induce hepatic insulin resistance. The mechanism could involve an accumulation of diacylglycerol and an alteration of insulin signaling in hepatocytes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Plasma Taurine, Diabetes Genetic Predisposition, and Changes of Insulin Sensitivity in Response to Weight-Loss Diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Ceglarek, Uta; Huang, Tao; Wang, Tiange; Heianza, Yoriko; Ma, Wenjie; Bray, George A; Thiery, Joachim; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu

    2016-10-01

    Taurine metabolism disturbance is closely linked to obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Previous evidence suggested that the preventative effects of taurine on diabetes might be through regulating the expression levels of diabetes-related genes. We estimated whether blood taurine levels modified the overall genetic susceptibility to diabetes on improvement of insulin sensitivity in a randomized dietary trial. We genotyped 31 diabetes-associated variants to calculate a genetic risk score (GRS) and measured plasma taurine levels and glycemic traits among participants from the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS Lost) trial. Seven-hundred eleven overweight or obese participants (age 30-70 y; 60% females) had genetic variants genotyped and blood taurine levels measured. Participants went on 2-year weight-loss diets, which were different in macronutrient composition. Improvements in glycemic traits were measured. We found that baseline taurine levels significantly modified the effects of diabetes GRS on changes in fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during the 2-year diet intervention (P-interaction = .04, .01, .002, respectively), regardless of weight loss. High baseline taurine levels were associated with a less reduction in both glucose and HOMA-IR among the participants with the lowest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .02), and with a greater reduction in both insulin and HOMA-IR among those with the highest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .04). Our data suggest that blood taurine levels might differentially modulate the effects of diabetes-related genes on improvement of insulin sensitivity among overweight/obese patients on weight-loss diets.

  19. Plasma Taurine, Diabetes Genetic Predisposition, and Changes of Insulin Sensitivity in Response to Weight-Loss Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yan; Ceglarek, Uta; Huang, Tao; Wang, Tiange; Heianza, Yoriko; Ma, Wenjie; Bray, George A.; Thiery, Joachim; Sacks, Frank M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Taurine metabolism disturbance is closely linked to obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes. Previous evidence suggested that the preventative effects of taurine on diabetes might be through regulating the expression levels of diabetes-related genes. Objective: We estimated whether blood taurine levels modified the overall genetic susceptibility to diabetes on improvement of insulin sensitivity in a randomized dietary trial. Design and Setting: We genotyped 31 diabetes-associated variants to calculate a genetic risk score (GRS) and measured plasma taurine levels and glycemic traits among participants from the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies (POUNDS Lost) trial. Participants: Seven-hundred eleven overweight or obese participants (age 30–70 y; 60% females) had genetic variants genotyped and blood taurine levels measured. Intervention: Participants went on 2-year weight-loss diets, which were different in macronutrient composition. Main Outcome Measure: Improvements in glycemic traits were measured. Results: We found that baseline taurine levels significantly modified the effects of diabetes GRS on changes in fasting glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) during the 2-year diet intervention (P-interaction = .04, .01, .002, respectively), regardless of weight loss. High baseline taurine levels were associated with a less reduction in both glucose and HOMA-IR among the participants with the lowest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .02), and with a greater reduction in both insulin and HOMA-IR among those with the highest tertile of diabetes GRS (both P = .04). Conclusions: Our data suggest that blood taurine levels might differentially modulate the effects of diabetes-related genes on improvement of insulin sensitivity among overweight/obese patients on weight-loss diets. PMID:27466884

  20. Common genetic variation in the human FNDC5 locus, encoding the novel muscle-derived 'browning' factor irisin, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Staiger

    Full Text Available AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Recently, the novel myokine irisin was described to drive adipose tissue 'browning', to increase energy expenditure, and to improve obesity and insulin resistance in high fat-fed mice. Here, we assessed whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the FNDC5 locus, encoding the irisin precursor, contribute to human prediabetic phenotypes (overweight, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired insulin release. METHODS: A population of 1,976 individuals was characterized by oral glucose tolerance tests and genotyped for FNDC5 tagging SNPs. Subgroups underwent hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps, magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy, and intravenous glucose tolerance tests. From 37 young and 14 elderly participants recruited in two different centres, muscle biopsies were obtained for the preparation of human myotube cultures. RESULTS: After appropriate adjustment and Bonferroni correction for the number of tested variants, SNPs rs16835198 and rs726344 were associated with in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. Via interrogation of publicly available data from the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium, rs726344's effect on insulin sensitivity was replicated. Moreover, novel data from human myotubes revealed a negative association between FNDC5 expression and appropriately adjusted in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity in young donors. This finding was replicated in myotubes from elderly men. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: This study provides evidence that the FNDC5 gene, encoding the novel myokine irisin, determines insulin sensitivity in humans. Our gene expression data point to an unexpected insulin-desensitizing effect of irisin.

  1. Common genetic variation in the human FNDC5 locus, encoding the novel muscle-derived 'browning' factor irisin, determines insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Harald; Böhm, Anja; Scheler, Mika; Berti, Lucia; Machann, Jürgen; Schick, Fritz; Machicao, Fausto; Fritsche, Andreas; Stefan, Norbert; Weigert, Cora; Krook, Anna; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the novel myokine irisin was described to drive adipose tissue 'browning', to increase energy expenditure, and to improve obesity and insulin resistance in high fat-fed mice. Here, we assessed whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the FNDC5 locus, encoding the irisin precursor, contribute to human prediabetic phenotypes (overweight, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, impaired insulin release). A population of 1,976 individuals was characterized by oral glucose tolerance tests and genotyped for FNDC5 tagging SNPs. Subgroups underwent hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamps, magnetic resonance imaging/spectroscopy, and intravenous glucose tolerance tests. From 37 young and 14 elderly participants recruited in two different centres, muscle biopsies were obtained for the preparation of human myotube cultures. After appropriate adjustment and Bonferroni correction for the number of tested variants, SNPs rs16835198 and rs726344 were associated with in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity. Via interrogation of publicly available data from the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium, rs726344's effect on insulin sensitivity was replicated. Moreover, novel data from human myotubes revealed a negative association between FNDC5 expression and appropriately adjusted in vivo measures of insulin sensitivity in young donors. This finding was replicated in myotubes from elderly men. This study provides evidence that the FNDC5 gene, encoding the novel myokine irisin, determines insulin sensitivity in humans. Our gene expression data point to an unexpected insulin-desensitizing effect of irisin.

  2. Estimates of insulin sensitivity from the intravenous-glucose-modified-clamp test depend on suppression of lipolysis in type 2 diabetes: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Sabine; Nowotny, Bettina; Piepel, Simon; Nowotny, Peter J; Strassburger, Klaus; Herder, Christian; Pacini, Giovanni; Roden, Michael

    2014-10-01

    The combined IVGTT-hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp (Botnia clamp) allows the assessment of insulin secretion and sensitivity in one experiment. It remains unclear whether this clamp yields results comparable with those of the standard hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp (SHEC) in diabetes patients. We hypothesised that the IVGTT induces responses affecting insulin sensitivity assessment. Of 22 randomised diet- or metformin-treated patients with well-controlled type 2 diabetes, 19 randomly underwent a Botnia clamp and an SHEC, spaced by 2 weeks, in one clinical research centre in a crossover study. The main outcomes were whole-body and hepatic insulin sensitivity as measured by the clamp and [6,6-(2)H2]glucose. Substrate utilisation was assessed from indirect calorimetry and beta cell function from insulin dynamics during IVGTT. The values of whole-body insulin sensitivity obtained from Botnia clamp and SHEC were correlated (r = 0.87, p clamp, but differed after IVGTT. The contribution of glucose oxidation to glucose disposal increased by 2.2 ± 0.3 and 1.2 ± 0.4 mg kg fat-free mass (FFM)(-1) min(-1) (Botnia and SHEC, p clamps correlated with individual variations of insulin sensitivity. The Botnia clamp provides similar estimates of insulin sensitivity as SHEC in patients with type 2 diabetes, but changes in NEFA during IVGTT may affect insulin sensitivity and thereby the discrimination between insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant individuals. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01397279 FUNDING: The study was funded by the Ministry of Science and Research of the State of North Rhine-Westphalia and the German Federal Ministry of Health, and supported in part by grants from the Federal Ministry for Research to the Centers for Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Alliance Imaging and Curing Environmental Metabolic Diseases and the Schmutzler-Stiftung.

  3. Developmental Programming: Insulin Sensitizer Prevents the GnRH-Stimulated LH Hypersecretion in a Sheep Model of PCOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Rodolfo C.; Burns, Ashleigh; Moeller, Jacob; Skinner, Donal C.

    2016-01-01

    Prenatal testosterone (T) treatment recapitulates the reproductive and metabolic phenotypes of polycystic ovary syndrome in female sheep. At the neuroendocrine level, prenatal T treatment results in disrupted steroid feedback on gonadotropin release, increased pituitary sensitivity to GnRH, and subsequent LH hypersecretion. Because prenatal T-treated sheep manifest functional hyperandrogenism and hyperinsulinemia, gonadal steroids and/or insulin may play a role in programming and/or maintaining these neuroendocrine defects. Here, we investigated the effects of prenatal and postnatal treatments with an androgen antagonist (flutamide [F]) or an insulin sensitizer (rosiglitazone [R]) on GnRH-stimulated LH secretion in prenatal T-treated sheep. As expected, prenatal T treatment increased the pituitary responsiveness to GnRH leading to LH hypersecretion. Neither prenatal interventions nor postnatal F treatment normalized the GnRH-stimulated LH secretion. Conversely, postnatal R treatment completely normalized the GnRH-stimulated LH secretion. At the tissue level, gestational T increased pituitary LHβ, androgen receptor, and insulin receptor-β, whereas it reduced estrogen receptor (ER)α protein levels. Although postnatal F normalized pituitary androgen receptor and insulin receptor-β, it failed to prevent an increase in LHβ expression. Contrarily, postnatal R treatment restored ERα and partially normalized LHβ pituitary levels. Immunohistochemical findings confirmed changes in pituitary ERα expression to be specific to gonadotropes. In conclusion, these findings indicate that increased pituitary responsiveness to GnRH in prenatal T-treated sheep is likely a function of reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity. Moreover, results suggest that restoration of ERα levels in the pituitary may be one mechanism by which R prevents GnRH-stimulated LH hypersecretion in this sheep model of polycystic ovary syndrome-like phenotype. PMID:27792406

  4. Selective Tissue Distribution Mediates Tissue-Dependent PPARγ Activation and Insulin Sensitization by INT131, a Selective PPARγ Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xinni; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Ning; Yuan, Mei; Xu, Cheng; Zheng, Zhibing; Li, Hua; Wang, Lili

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the enhancement of insulin sensitivity by selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ modulators (sPPARγMs) are still not completely known. Here, the representative sPPARγM, INT131, was used as a probe to investigate the insulin-sensitizing mechanisms of sPPARγM in the context of tissue selective compound distribution and PPARγ regulation. First, 30 mg kg−1 INT131 was observed to produce an insulin-sensitizing effect comparable to that of 10 mg kg−1 rosiglitazone (RSG) in both db/db and DIO mice using the oral glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Similar to RSG, INT131 significantly increased brown adipose tissue (BAT) mass and adipocyte size and up-regulated the expression of BAT-specific genes. Compared with RSG, INT131 exhibited greater potency in inducing white adipose tissue (WAT) browning, decreasing adipocyte size, and increasing BAT-specific and function-related gene expression in subcutaneous WAT (sWAT). However, it did not induce hepatomegaly or hepatic steatosis, which is associated with lower levels of lipogenic genes expression. Pharmacokinetic analysis reveals that in contrast with RSG, INT131 shows higher Cmax, and much longer residency time (AUC0−12h), as well relatively lower elimination rate in adipose tissues and skeletal muscle, this demonstrated INT131 distributed predominantly in adipose tissue. Whereas, INT131 was less abundant in the liver. These results thus suggest that the tissue-selective distribution underlies INT131's selective PPARγ modulation. Compounds favoring adipose tissue may aid in development of better, safer sPPARγM to address the insulin resistance of diabetes. PMID:28611668

  5. Selective Tissue Distribution Mediates Tissue-Dependent PPARγ Activation and Insulin Sensitization by INT131, a Selective PPARγ Modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinni Xie

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the enhancement of insulin sensitivity by selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ modulators (sPPARγMs are still not completely known. Here, the representative sPPARγM, INT131, was used as a probe to investigate the insulin-sensitizing mechanisms of sPPARγM in the context of tissue selective compound distribution and PPARγ regulation. First, 30 mg kg−1 INT131 was observed to produce an insulin-sensitizing effect comparable to that of 10 mg kg−1 rosiglitazone (RSG in both db/db and DIO mice using the oral glucose and insulin tolerance tests. Similar to RSG, INT131 significantly increased brown adipose tissue (BAT mass and adipocyte size and up-regulated the expression of BAT-specific genes. Compared with RSG, INT131 exhibited greater potency in inducing white adipose tissue (WAT browning, decreasing adipocyte size, and increasing BAT-specific and function-related gene expression in subcutaneous WAT (sWAT. However, it did not induce hepatomegaly or hepatic steatosis, which is associated with lower levels of lipogenic genes expression. Pharmacokinetic analysis reveals that in contrast with RSG, INT131 shows higher Cmax, and much longer residency time (AUC0−12h, as well relatively lower elimination rate in adipose tissues and skeletal muscle, this demonstrated INT131 distributed predominantly in adipose tissue. Whereas, INT131 was less abundant in the liver. These results thus suggest that the tissue-selective distribution underlies INT131's selective PPARγ modulation. Compounds favoring adipose tissue may aid in development of better, safer sPPARγM to address the insulin resistance of diabetes.

  6. High-fat feeding and Staphylococcus intermedius infection impair beta cell function and insulin sensitivity in mongrel dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavov, Evgeni; Georgiev, Ivan Penchev; Dzhelebov, Petko; Kanelov, Ivan; Andonova, Maria; Mircheva Georgieva, Teodora; Dimitrova, Silviya

    2010-03-01

    As obesity is a state of low-grade inflammation, we aimed to investigate the combined effect of high-fat diet and bacterial infection on beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in dogs. We used 20 healthy, male, mongrel dogs randomly divided into four groups: control group-healthy, non-obese dogs; infected group-non-obese dogs with experimentally induced infection (Staphylococcus intermedius); obese group-obese dogs (after 90 day high-fat diet) and obese-infected group-obese dogs with experimentally induced infection (Staphylococcus intermedius). To evaluate insulin sensitivity and beta-cell function an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT) was performed. Plasma insulin increased in all group after glucose infusion. The lowest values were found in obese-infected group. Blood glucose also increased on 3 min after glucose infusion and then gradually decreased. In obese-infected group glucose concentration on 30 min was still significantly higher than initial levels, while in other groups glucose concentration returned to the initial values. The lowest rate of glucose elimination was found in infected group. In dogs of obese group and obese-infected group AUC(ins 0-60 min) was lower compared to controls. AUC(glucose 0-60 min) values were lowest in infected group, while in obese-infected group values were the highest. Levels of I/G in dogs of obese-infected group were significantly lower compared to controls and infected group. In conclusion, these results reveal that infection in obese dogs leads to impaired glucose tolerance, which is result of impairment in both insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity.

  7. Long-term exposure to abnormal glucose levels alters drug metabolism pathways and insulin sensitivity in primary human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Matthew D.; Ballinger, Kimberly R.; Khetani, Salman R.

    2016-06-01

    Hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes mellitus has been linked to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, which can progress to inflammation, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding how chronic hyperglycemia affects primary human hepatocytes (PHHs) can facilitate the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Conversely, elucidating the effects of hypoglycemia on PHHs may provide insights into how the liver adapts to fasting, adverse diabetes drug reactions, and cancer. In contrast to declining PHH monocultures, micropatterned co-cultures (MPCCs) of PHHs and 3T3-J2 murine embryonic fibroblasts maintain insulin-sensitive glucose metabolism for several weeks. Here, we exposed MPCCs to hypo-, normo- and hyperglycemic culture media for ~3 weeks. While albumin and urea secretion were not affected by glucose level, hypoglycemic MPCCs upregulated CYP3A4 enzyme activity as compared to other glycemic states. In contrast, hyperglycemic MPCCs displayed significant hepatic lipid accumulation in the presence of insulin, while also showing decreased sensitivity to insulin-mediated inhibition of glucose output relative to a normoglycemic control. In conclusion, we show for the first time that PHHs exposed to hypo- and hyperglycemia can remain highly functional, but display increased CYP3A4 activity and selective insulin resistance, respectively. In the future, MPCCs under glycemic states can aid in novel drug discovery and mechanistic investigations.

  8. Spirulina vesicolor Improves Insulin Sensitivity and Attenuates Hyperglycemia-Mediated Oxidative Stress in Fructose-Fed Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walaa Hozayen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The current study aimed to investigate the anti-hyperglycemic, anti-hyperlipidemic and insulin sensitizing effects of the cyanobacterium Spirulina vesicolor extract in fructose-fed rats. Materials and Methods: Rats were fed 30% fructose solution in drinking water for 4 weeks. Animals exhibited hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia were selected for further investigations. Diabetic and control rats were orally supplemented with 50 mg/kg body weight S. vesicolor extract for 4 weeks. Results: At the end of 8 weeks, fructose-fed rats showed significant increase in serum glucose, insulin, cholesterol, triglycerides, cardiovascular risk indices and insulin resistance. Treatment of the fructose-fed rats with S. vesicolor extract improved this metabolic profile. Fructose feeding produced a significant increase in serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and a decrease in adiponectin levels. In addition, fructose-fed rats exhibited a significant increase in liver, kidney and heart lipid peroxidation levels, and declined antioxidant defenses. Supplementation of the fructose-fed rats with S. vesicolor extract reversed these alterations. Conclusion: S. vesicolor attenuates hyperglycemia-mediated oxidative stress and inflammation, and is thus effective in improving insulin sensitivity in fructose-fed rats. [J Complement Med Res 2016; 5(1.000: 57-64

  9. Specific plasma lipid classes and phospholipid fatty acids indicative of dairy food consumption associate with insulin sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Paul John; Straznicky, Nora; Mellett, Natalie Ann; Wong, Gerard; De Souza, David Peter; Tull, Dedreia Lorraine; Barlow, Christopher Kenneth; Grima, Mariee Teresa; Meikle, Peter John

    2014-01-01

    Reports have suggested that the consumption of dairy foods may reduce risk of type 2 diabetes on the basis of evidence of raised circulating ruminant fatty acids. We determined whether certain phospholipid species and fatty acids that are associated with full-fat dairy consumption may also be linked to diminished insulin resistance. Four variables of insulin resistance and sensitivity were defined from oral-glucose-tolerance tests in 86 overweight and obese subjects with metabolic syndrome. Plasma phospholipids, sphingolipids, and fatty acids were determined by using a lipidomic analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to provide objective markers of dairy consumption. Food records provided information on dairy products. Associations were determined by using linear regression analyses adjusted for potential confounders age, sex, systolic blood pressure, waist:hip ratio, or body mass index (BMI) and corrected for multiple comparisons. Lysophosphatidylcholine, lyso-platelet-activating factor, and several phospholipid fatty acids correlated directly with the number of servings of full-fat dairy foods. Lysophosphatidylcholine and lyso-platelet-activating factor were also associated directly with insulin sensitivity when accounting for the waist:hip ratio (Matsuda index unadjusted, P fasting insulin unadjusted, P consumption. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00163943.

  10. Small Molecule Kaempferol Promotes Insulin Sensitivity and Preserved Pancreatic β-Cell Mass in Middle-Aged Obese Diabetic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhalidy, Hana; Moore, William; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Aihua; Ali, Mostafa; Suh, Kyung-Shin; Zhen, Wei; Cheng, Zhiyong; Jia, Zhenquan; Hulver, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Insulin resistance and a progressive decline in functional β-cell mass are hallmarks of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). Thus, searching for natural, low-cost compounds to target these two defects could be a promising strategy to prevent the pathogenesis of T2D. Here, we show that dietary intake of flavonol kaempferol (0.05% in the diet) significantly ameliorated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and circulating lipid profile, which were associated with the improved peripheral insulin sensitivity in middle-aged obese mice fed a high-fat (HF) diet. Kaempferol treatment reversed HF diet impaired glucose transport-4 (Glut4) and AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK) expression in both muscle and adipose tissues from obese mice. In vitro, kaempferol increased lipolysis and prevented high fatty acid-impaired glucose uptake, glycogen synthesis, AMPK activity, and Glut4 expression in skeletal muscle cells. Using another mouse model of T2D generated by HF diet feeding and low doses of streptozotocin injection, we found that kaempferol treatment significantly improved hyperglycemia, glucose tolerance, and blood insulin levels in obese diabetic mice, which are associated with the improved islet β-cell mass. These results demonstrate that kaempferol may be a naturally occurring anti-diabetic agent by improving peripheral insulin sensitivity and protecting against pancreatic β-cell dysfunction. PMID:26064984

  11. Surrogate measures of insulin sensitivity when compared to euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies in Asian Indian men without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Padmanaban; Tiwari, Akankasha; Dasgupta, Riddhi; Carey, Michelle; Kehlenbrink, Sylvia; Wickramanayake, Anneka; Jambugulam, Mohan; Jeyaseelan, Lakshmanan; Ramanathan, Kavitha; Hawkins, Meredith; Thomas, Nihal

    2016-03-01

    Fasting surrogate measures of insulin sensitivity are increasingly used in research and clinical practice. To assess the reliability of these measures, we aimed to evaluate multiple fasting surrogate measures simultaneously in non-diabetic subjects in comparison with the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study. Sixteen normoglycemic male South Indian subjects were studied. After an overnight fast, blood samples were collected for glucose, insulin and lipid profile measurements, and stepped euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp studies were performed on all subjects. Steady state glucose infusion rates (M value) during low and high insulin phases of the clamp were calculated. Correlation of M value with surrogate markers of insulin sensitivity was performed. Predictive accuracy of surrogate indices was measured in terms of Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE) and leave-one-out cross-validation-type RMSE of prediction using a calibration model. M values showed a strong and significant correlation (pHOMA-IR and QUICKI. Among the surrogate measures, FGIR had the strongest correlation with M values. FGIR was also the most accurate surrogate measure, as assessed by the calibration model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Phytic acid and myo-inositol support adipocyte differentiation and improve insulin sensitivity in 3T3-L1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Nam; Han, Sung Nim; Kim, Hye-Kyeong

    2014-08-01

    Phytic acid, also known as myo-inositol hexaphosphate, has been shown to lower blood glucose levels and to improve insulin sensitivity in rodents. We investigated the effects of phytic acid and myo-inositol on differentiation, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, and lipolysis of adipocytes to test the hypothesis that the antidiabetic properties of phytic acid and myo-inositol are mediated directly through adipocytes. 3T3-L1 cells were treated with 10, 50, or 200 μmol/L of phytic acid or myo-inositol. Oil Red O staining and an intracellular triacylglycerol assay were used to determine lipid accumulation during adipocyte differentiation. Immunoblotting and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were performed to evaluate expression of transcription factors, a target protein, and insulin signaling molecules. Phytic acid and myo-inositol exposures increased lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner (P inositol (P inositol treatments (P inositol treatments. In fully differentiated adipocytes, phytic acid and myo-inositol reduced basal lipolysis dose dependently (P inositol increase insulin sensitivity in adipocytes by increasing lipid storage capacity, improving glucose uptake, and inhibiting lipolysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Correlations between insulin sensitivity and bone mineral density in non-diabetic men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B.; Rohold, A.; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2000-01-01

    stimulates osteoblast differentiation and collagen synthesis, with no clear evidence if this response in impaired in insulin resistance. METHODS: Femur and whole body (WB) BMD was measured in 55 male patients with ischaemic heart disease and 40 healthy men, using a Hologic QDR-2000 densitometer. Insulin...

  14. Muscle insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism are controlled by the intrinsic muscle clock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyar, Kenneth A.; Ciciliot, Stefano; Wright, Lauren E.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms control metabolism and energy homeostasis, but the role of the skeletal muscle clock has never been explored. We generated conditional and inducible mouse lines with muscle-specific ablation of the core clock gene Bmal1. Skeletal muscles from these mice showed impaired insulin-s...

  15. Ghrelin receptor null mice have reduced visceral fat and improved insulin sensitivity during aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aging is associated with a higher incidence of Type 2 diabetes; one in five Americans over age 65 has diabetes. Loss of lean mass and accumulation of fat, particularly visceral fat, during aging result in increased insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a major pathogenic factor for Type 2 diabet...

  16. Insulin sensitivity and mortality risk estimation in patients with type 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is at present the dearth of information on the possible contribution of insulin resistance to scores obtained from mortality risk estimation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Aim: This study determined the mortality risk scores in patients with T2DM and its relationship with insulin resistance.

  17. Sustained Brown Fat Stimulation and Insulin Sensitization by a Humanized Bispecific Antibody Agonist for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1/βKlotho Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh Kolumam

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dissipating excess calories as heat through therapeutic stimulation of brown adipose tissues (BAT has been proposed as a potential treatment for obesity-linked disorders. Here, we describe the generation of a humanized effector-less bispecific antibody that activates fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR 1/βKlotho complex, a common receptor for FGF21 and FGF19. Using this molecule, we show that antibody-mediated activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex in mice induces sustained energy expenditure in BAT, browning of white adipose tissue, weight loss, and improvements in obesity-associated metabolic derangements including insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia and hepatosteatosis. In mice and cynomolgus monkeys, FGFR1/βKlotho activation increased serum high-molecular-weight adiponectin, which appears to contribute over time by enhancing the amplitude of the metabolic benefits. At the same time, insulin sensitization by FGFR1/βKlotho activation occurs even before the onset of weight loss in a manner that is independent of adiponectin. Together, selective activation of FGFR1/βKlotho complex with a long acting therapeutic antibody represents an attractive approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and other obesity-linked disorders through enhanced energy expenditure, insulin sensitization and induction of high-molecular-weight adiponectin.

  18. Higher insulin sensitivity in vegans is not associated with higher mitochondrial density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojda, J; Patková, J; Jaček, M; Potočková, J; Trnka, J; Kraml, P; Anděl, M

    2013-12-01

    Vegans have a lower incidence of insulin resistance (IR)-associated diseases and a higher insulin sensitivity (IS) compared with omnivores. The aim of this study was to examine whether the higher IS in vegans relates to markers of mitochondrial biogenesis and to intramyocellular lipid (IMCL) content. Eleven vegans and 10 matched (race, age, sex, body mass index, physical activity and energy intake) omnivorous controls were enrolled in a case-control study. Anthropometry, bioimpedance (BIA), ultrasound measurement of visceral and subcutaneous fat layer, parameters of glucose and lipid homeostasis, hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp and muscle biopsies were performed. Citrate synthase (CS) activity, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and IMCL content were assessed in skeletal muscle samples. Both groups were comparable in anthropometric and BIA parameters, physical activity and protein-energy intake. Vegans had significantly higher glucose disposal (M-value, vegans 8.11±1.51 vs controls 6.31±1.57 mg/kg/min, 95% confidence interval: 0.402 to 3.212, P=0.014), slightly lower IMCL content (vegans 13.91 (7.8 to 44.0) vs controls 17.36 (12.4 to 78.5) mg/g of muscle, 95% confidence interval: -7.594 to 24.550, P=0.193) and slightly higher relative muscle mtDNA amount (vegans 1.36±0.31 vs controls 1.13±0.36, 95% confidence interval:-0.078 to 0.537, P=0.135). No significant differences were found in CS activity (vegans 18.43±5.05 vs controls 18.16±5.41 μmol/g/min, 95% confidence interval: -4.503 to 5.050, P=0.906). Vegans have a higher IS, but comparable mitochondrial density and IMCL content with omnivores. This suggests that a decrease in whole-body glucose disposal may precede muscle lipid accumulation and mitochondrial dysfunction in IR development.

  19. The effect of prostaglandins E1, E2 and F2 alpha and indomethacin on the sensitivity of glycolysis and glycogen synthesis to insulin in stripped soleus muscles of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leighton, B; Budohoski, L; Lozeman, F J; Challiss, R A; Newsholme, E A

    1985-01-01

    Prostaglandins E1 and E2 increased the sensitivity of glycolysis to insulin in the isolated stripped soleus muscle of the rat, but prostaglandin F2 alpha had no effect. Indomethacin, which inhibits prostaglandin formation, markedly decreased the sensitivity of glycolysis to insulin. These findings suggest that prostaglandins of the E series increase the sensitivity of muscle glycolysis to insulin in vivo. PMID:3888199

  20. The importance of moral sensitivity when including persons with dementia in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggestad, Anne Kari T; Nortvedt, Per; Slettebø, Åshild

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this article is to show the importance of moral sensitivity when including persons with dementia in research. The article presents and discusses ethical challenges encountered when a total of 15 persons with dementia from two nursing homes and seven proxies were included in a qualitative study. The examples show that the ethical challenges may be unpredictable. As researchers, you participate with the informants in their daily life and in the interviews, and it is not possible to plan all that may happen during the research. A procedural proposal to an ethical committee at the beginning of a research project based on traditional research ethical principles may serve as a guideline, but it cannot solve all the ethical problems one faces during the research process. Our main argument in this article is, therefore, that moral sensitivity is required in addition to the traditional research ethical principles throughout the whole process of observing and interviewing the respondents.

  1. Transcriptional Regulation by Nuclear Corepressors and PGC-1α: Implications for Mitochondrial Quality Control and Insulin Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengtang Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs and estrogen-related receptor (ERRα are ligand-activated nuclear receptors that coordinately regulate gene expression. Recent evidence suggests that nuclear corepressors, NCoR, RIP140, and SMRT, repress nuclear receptors-mediated transcriptional activity on specific promoters, and thus regulate insulin sensitivity, adipogenesis, mitochondrial number, and activity in vivo. Moreover, the coactivator PGC-1α that increases mitochondrial biogenesis during exercise and calorie restriction directly regulates autophagy in skeletal muscle and mitophagy in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In this paper, we discuss the PGC-1α’s novel role in mitochondrial quality control and the role of nuclear corepressors in regulating insulin sensitivity and interacting with PGC-1α.

  2. Macrophages and Adipocytes in Human Obesity Adipose Tissue Gene Expression and Insulin Sensitivity During Calorie Restriction and Weight Stabilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capel, F.; Klimcakova, E.; Viguerie, N.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-We investigated the regulation of adipose tissue gene expression during different phases of a dietary weight loss program and its relation with insulin sensitivity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS-Twenty-two obese women followed a dietary intervention program composed of an energy restriction...... macrophages and adipocytes show distinct patterns of gene regulation and association with insulin sensitivity during the various phases of a dietary weight loss program. Diabetes 58:1558-1567, 2009...... phase with a 4-week very-low-calorie diet and a weight stabilization period composed of a 2-month low-calorie diet followed by 3-4 months of a weight maintenance diet. At each time point, a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were performed. Adipose tissue gene...

  3. Insulin sensitivity is independent of lipid binding protein trafficking at the plasma membrane in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jordy, Andreas Børsting; Serup, Annette Karen; Karstoft, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate lipid-induced regulation of lipid binding proteins in human skeletal muscle and the impact hereof on insulin sensitivity. Eleven healthy male subjects underwent a 3-day hyper-caloric and high-fat diet regime. Muscle biopsies were taken before......-regulated by increased fatty acid availability. This suggests a time dependency in the up-regulation of FAT/CD36 and FABPpm protein during high availability of plasma fatty acids. Furthermore, we did not detect FATP1 and FATP4 protein in giant sarcolemmal vesicles obtained from human skeletal muscle. In conclusion......, this study shows that a short-term lipid-load increases mRNA content of key lipid handling proteins in human muscle. However, decreased insulin sensitivity after high-fat diet is not accompanied with relocation of FAT/CD36 or FABPpm protein to the sarcolemma. Finally, FATP1 and FATP4 protein could...

  4. Improvement in insulin sensitivity followed by ovulation and pregnancy in a woman with polycystic ovary syndrome who was treated with rosiglitazone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, N A; Abbasi, F; McLaughlin, T L; Lamendola, C; Reaven, G M

    2001-11-01

    To determine the metabolic and reproductive effectiveness of rosiglitazone in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Case report. Academic clinical practice and General Clinical Research Center. A 25-year-old woman with PCOS. Rosiglitazone maleate, 4 mg daily for 5 months until conception. Insulin sensitivity by steady-state plasma glucose technique; serum androgens, progesterone, and hCG; and pelvic ultrasound images. Rosiglitazone treatment for 5 months improved insulin sensitivity, lowered serum free testosterone, and resulted in spontaneous ovulation and conception. Rosiglitazone is a promising insulin sensitizer for treatment of PCOS. Clinical trials are warranted.

  5. Validation of surrogate indexes of insulin sensitivity in acute phase of myocardial infarction based on euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp

    OpenAIRE

    Moura, FA; Carvalho, LSF; Cintra, RMR; Martins, NV; Figueiredo, VN; Silva, JCQE; Almeida, OLR; Coelho, OR; Sposito, AC

    2014-01-01

    The decrease in insulin sensitivity (IS) during myocardial infarction (MI) is recognized as a possible contributor to poor patient outcomes. Despite its potential relevance, a standardized and convenient IS assessment tool has yet to be established for said clinical scenarios. This study aimed to validate the accuracy of surrogate indexes in determining IS in acute MI patients by comparison with the gold standard reference method for measuring IS, the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp (EHC). ...

  6. Diabetes Alters the Expression and Translocation of the Insulin-Sensitive Glucose Transporters 4 and 8 in the Atria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, Zahra; Campolo, Allison R.; Lacombe, Veronique A.

    2015-01-01

    Although diabetes has been identified as a major risk factor for atrial fibrillation, little is known about glucose metabolism in the healthy and diabetic atria. Glucose transport into the cell, the rate-limiting step of glucose utilization, is regulated by the Glucose Transporters (GLUTs). Although GLUT4 is the major isoform in the hear