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Sample records for included inpatient services

  1. Patient and program costs, and outcomes, of including gender-sensitive services in intensive inpatient programs for substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornack, Sarah E; Yates, Brian T

    2017-12-01

    Gender-sensitive services (GSS) attempt to make substance use treatment better for women, but at what cost and with what results? We sought answers to these questions in a federally-funded study by measuring separately the patient and provider costs of adding GSS, outcomes, and cost-outcome relationships for 12 mixed-gender intensive inpatient programs (IIP) that varied in amounts and types of GSS. GSS costs to female inpatients included time devoted to GSS and expenses for care of dependents while in the IIP. GSS costs to providers included time spent with patients, indirect services, treatment facilities, equipment, and materials. Offering more GSS was expected to consume more patient and provider resources. Offering more GSS also was expected to enhance outcomes and cost-outcome relationships. We found that average GSS costs to patients at the IIPs were $585 ($515-$656) per patient. Average GSS costs to providers at the IIPs were $344 ($42-$544) per patient. GSS costs to patients significantly exceeded GSS costs to providers. Contrary to previous research, offering more GSS services to patients did not result in significantly higher costs to patients or providers. IIPs offering more GSS may have delivered fewer traditional services, but this did not significantly affect outcomes, i.e., days until returning to another substance use treatment. In fact, median cost-outcome for these IIPs was a promising 35 treatment-free days, i.e., over a month, per $100 of GSS resources used by patients and providers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The logistics of an inpatient dermatology service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbach, Misha

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology represents a unique challenge as caring for hospitalized patients with skin conditions is different from most dermatologists' daily outpatient practice. Declining rates of inpatient dermatology participation are often attributed to a number of factors, including challenges navigating the administrative burdens of hospital credentialing, acclimating to different hospital systems involving potential alternate electronic medical records systems, medical-legal concerns, and reimbursement concerns. This article aims to provide basic guidelines to help dermatologists establish a presence as a consulting physician in the inpatient hospital-based setting. The emphasis is on identifying potential pitfalls, problematic areas, and laying out strategies for tackling some of the challenges of inpatient dermatology including balancing financial concerns and optimizing reimbursements, tracking data and developing a plan for academic productivity, optimizing workflow, and identifying metrics to document the impact of an inpatient dermatology consult service. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  3. 42 CFR 440.140 - Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.140 Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital services, nursing facility services, and intermediate care facility services for individuals age 65 or older in institutions for...

  4. Revenue Potential for Inpatient IR Consultation Services: A Financial Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misono, Alexander S; Mueller, Peter R; Hirsch, Joshua A; Sheridan, Robert M; Siddiqi, Assad U; Liu, Raymond W

    2016-05-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) has historically failed to fully capture the value of evaluation and management services in the inpatient setting. Understanding financial benefits of a formally incorporated billing discipline may yield meaningful insights for interventional practices. A revenue modeling tool was created deploying standard financial modeling techniques, including sensitivity and scenario analyses. Sensitivity analysis calculates revenue fluctuation related to dynamic adjustment of discrete variables. In scenario analysis, possible future scenarios as well as revenue potential of different-size clinical practices are modeled. Assuming a hypothetical inpatient IR consultation service with a daily patient census of 35 patients and two new consults per day, the model estimates annual charges of $2.3 million and collected revenue of $390,000. Revenues are most sensitive to provider billing documentation rates and patient volume. A range of realistic scenarios-from cautious to optimistic-results in a range of annual charges of $1.8 million to $2.7 million and a collected revenue range of $241,000 to $601,000. Even a small practice with a daily patient census of 5 and 0.20 new consults per day may expect annual charges of $320,000 and collected revenue of $55,000. A financial revenue modeling tool is a powerful adjunct in understanding economics of an inpatient IR consultation service. Sensitivity and scenario analyses demonstrate a wide range of revenue potential and uncover levers for financial optimization. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Consumer perspectives on quality of inpatient mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Patricia B; El-Mallakh, Peggy; Kay Rayens, Mary; Clark, James J

    2003-10-01

    This study, conducted at two public-sector psychiatric hospitals in a south-eastern state, investigated satisfaction with inpatient services and treatment outcomes among 204 hospitalized mental health consumers. A simple survey design with nonrandom sampling technique was used; instruments included the KY-CSI, the 21-item MHSIP Consumer Survey, and the CSQ-8. Respondents reported satisfaction with time available to be with other patients, staff availability, and their degree of comfort talking to staff. Areas of dissatisfaction included lack of client input into treatment planning, lack of family involvement, and lack of medication education. Providers are encouraged to include clients in all phases of treatment planning and to continue to evaluate consumer perspectives of quality services.

  6. Audit of an inpatient liaison psychiatry consultation service.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lyne, John

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to examine an audit that was performed of all patients referred to a liaison psychiatry inpatient consultation service which sought to establish a baseline for demographics, type of referral, and management of referrals, with a view to introducing improved evidence-based treatments. It also aims to examine timeliness of response to referrals benchmarked against published standards. DESIGN\\/METHODOLOGY\\/APPROACH: All inpatient referrals to a liaison psychiatry service were recorded over a six-month period, including demographics, diagnosis, management and timeliness of response to referrals. The data were retrospectively analysed and compared against international standards. FINDINGS: A total of 172 referrals were received in the six months. Commonest referral reasons included assessments regarding depressive disorders (23.8 per cent), delirium\\/other cognitive disorders (19.2 per cent), alcohol-related disorders (18.6 per cent), anxiety disorders (14.5 per cent), and risk management (12.2 per cent). Evidence-based practices were not utilised effectively for a number of different types of presentations. A total of 40.1 per cent of referrals were seen on the same day, 75.4 per cent by the end of the next day, and 93.4 per cent by the end of the following day. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Use of a hospital protocol for management of delirium may improve outcomes for these patients. Evidence-based techniques, such as brief intervention therapies, may be beneficial for referrals involving alcohol dependence. Referrals were seen reasonably quickly, but there is room for improvement when compared with published standards. ORIGINALITY\\/VALUE: This paper provides valuable information for those involved in management of liaison psychiatry consultation services, providing ideas for development and implementation of evidence based practices.

  7. Audit of an inpatient liaison psychiatry consultation service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, John; Hill, Michelle; Burke, Patricia; Ryan, Martina

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine an audit that was performed of all patients referred to a liaison psychiatry inpatient consultation service which sought to establish a baseline for demographics, type of referral, and management of referrals, with a view to introducing improved evidence-based treatments. It also aims to examine timeliness of response to referrals benchmarked against published standards. All inpatient referrals to a liaison psychiatry service were recorded over a six-month period, including demographics, diagnosis, management and timeliness of response to referrals. The data were retrospectively analysed and compared against international standards. A total of 172 referrals were received in the six months. Commonest referral reasons included assessments regarding depressive disorders (23.8 per cent), delirium/other cognitive disorders (19.2 per cent), alcohol-related disorders (18.6 per cent), anxiety disorders (14.5 per cent), and risk management (12.2 per cent). Evidence-based practices were not utilised effectively for a number of different types of presentations. A total of 40.1 per cent of referrals were seen on the same day, 75.4 per cent by the end of the next day, and 93.4 per cent by the end of the following day. Use of a hospital protocol for management of delirium may improve outcomes for these patients. Evidence-based techniques, such as brief intervention therapies, may be beneficial for referrals involving alcohol dependence. Referrals were seen reasonably quickly, but there is room for improvement when compared with published standards. This paper provides valuable information for those involved in management of liaison psychiatry consultation services, providing ideas for development and implementation of evidence based practices.

  8. Communication strategies for a successful inpatient dermatology consultative service: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ladan; Shinkai, Kanade

    2017-03-01

    Inpatient dermatology consultative services care for hospitalized patients with skin disease in collaboration with the primary inpatient team. Effective, efficient communication is important. A consultation service must develop strong relationships with primary inpatient teams requesting consults in order to provide optimal patient care. Prior studies have identified effective communication practices for inpatient consultative services. This narrative review provides a summary of effective communication practices for an inpatient dermatology consultation service organized into 5 domains: (1) features of the initial consult request; (2) best practices in responding to the initial consult; (3) effective communication of recommendations; (4) interventions to improve consultations; and (5) handling curbside consultations. Recommendations include identifying the specific reason for consult; establishing urgency; secure sharing of sensitive clinical information such as photographs; ensuring timely responses; providing clear yet brief documentation of the differential diagnosis, problem list, final diagnosis and recommendations; and limiting curbside consultations. Future studies are needed to validate effective strategies to enhance communication practices within an inpatient dermatology consultative service. ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  9. Utilization of In-Patient Physiotherapy Services in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this retrospective study was to examine the trend and pattern of utilization of in-patient physiotherapy services in the management and care of patients by various medical specialties at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin City, Nigeria within a period of 4 years. Medical records of all patients admitted ...

  10. Beyond satisfaction, what service users expect of inpatient mental health care: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, J E; Loeb, S J; Fick, D M

    2009-12-01

    To provide efficient and effective inpatient mental health services, it is imperative to not only ascertain if service users are satisfied with the care received from nurses, but also the degree to which initial expectations are being met. Ten reports of primary research on service users' experiences, perceptions and expectations of inpatient mental health care were examined to understand what service users' expect of inpatient mental health care and the implications for nursing practice. The World Health Organization's description of responsiveness to service users' non-medical expectations of care was used as a framework for retrieving literature and organizing the research outcomes. Responsiveness includes seven categories of healthcare performance ranging from respect for the dignity of the person, to adequacy of amenities, and choice of provider. Service users expect to form interpersonal relationships with nurses; however, non-clinical responsibilities serve as barriers which consume considerable available nursing time that otherwise could be spent developing therapeutic relationships. In addition, inpatient programming ideas are identified for the provision of better services. Hospitals' expectations of mental health nurses will need to be reconsidered if these nurses are to provide the time and resources necessary to meet current service users' expectations.

  11. Client evaluation of a specialist inpatient parent-infant psychiatric service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Revi; Bilszta, Justin; Salam, Nilam; Shafira, Nadia; Buist, Anne

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this paper was to collect feedback on a specialist parent-infant psychiatric service in terms of client satisfaction with inpatient treatment, and the impact on health outcomes of providing written information about available support options in the community following discharge. Women (n = 37) from consecutive admissions between January 2006 and December 2007 were contacted by telephone and administered a service quality evaluation questionnaire. Women were happy with the quality of inpatient care provided but suggested areas of improvement included continuity of staff during the inpatient stay and better communication between inpatient and outpatient services post-discharge. At discharge, women were not confident with their ability in coping with motherhood but confidence with parenting skills increased post-discharge. Use of recommended post-discharge community support and/or health services was poor. As adherence with discharge recommendations was less than ideal, greater involvement of primary/community health care professionals, and active participation of clients and carers, in discharge planning is required. Increased emphasis on the practical skills of motherhood as well as opportunities to develop the mother-infant relationship may assist mothers in gaining confidence to interact with their baby and pick up infant cues.

  12. A chief of service rotation as an alternative approach to pediatric otolaryngology inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Eelam; Xiao, Roy; McGill, Trevor; Rahbar, Reza; Cunningham, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Maintaining an outpatient practice and providing high-quality inpatient care pose significant challenges to the traditional call team approach. To introduce a unique rotating hospitalist inpatient program and assess its clinical, educational, and financial impact. The chief of service (COS) program requires 1 attending physician to rotate weekly as chief of the inpatient service with no conflicting elective duties. This was a retrospective internal billing data review performed at a tertiary pediatric hospital. A total of 1241 patients were evaluated by the COS from October 2012 through October 2013. All patients were treated by the inpatient service under the supervision of the COS. A retrospective analysis of patient encounters and procedures, including International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) and Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes, locations of service, clinicians, service dates, and average weekly relative value units (RVUs). Over the study period, the COS was involved in the care of 1241 patients, generating 2786 billable patient encounters. The COS averaged 11.2 patient encounters per day. The most common reasons for consultation were respiratory distress, dysphagia, and stridor. Of patient encounters, 63.0% resulted in a procedure; 82.8% of those procedures were performed in the operating room with the most common being lower airway endoscopy (340 [19.4%]). The average weekly RVUs for the COS (232) were comparable with those of the average weekly outpatient clinic and procedural RVUs of the other otolaryngology faculty in the group (240). The COS program was created to meet the clinical, educational, and organizational demands of a high-volume and high-acuity inpatient service. It is a financially sustainable model with unique advantages, particularly for the staff who maintain their outpatient practices without disruption and for the trainees who have the opportunity to work closely with the entire faculty. Patients are

  13. Monitoring the Diagnostic Process on an Inpatient Neurology Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar; Bucelli, Robert; Varadhachary, Arun; Tsiaklides, Michael; de Bruin, Gabriela; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet

    2017-07-01

    The Institute of Medicine report Improving Diagnosis in Health Care called for tools to monitor physicians' diagnostic process. We addressed this need by developing a tool for clinicians to record and analyze their diagnostic process. The tool was a secure web application in which clinicians used a structured grading system to assess the relative impact of clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging data for every new diagnosis. Four neurohospitalists used the tool for 6.5 months on a general neurology ward service at a single tertiary-level teaching hospital. Process measures of tool use included number of diagnoses entered, time spent on each data entry, and concordance of diagnoses compared to the medical record. We also aggregated the data across clinicians to examine the average process scores across common inpatient disorders. The 4 clinicians entered 254 new diagnoses that took approximately 3 minutes per patient. In 50 randomly chosen cases, the neurohospitalists' diagnoses entered into the tool agreed with 92% of diagnoses in the medical record, which was better than the agreement between billing code and medical record diagnoses (74%). The diagnostic process varied across disease categories, showing a spectrum of clinical-dominant (eg, headache), laboratory-dominant (eg, encephalitis), and neuroimaging-dominant (eg, stroke) disorders. This study demonstrated the feasibility of a clinician-driven diagnostic process monitoring system, along with preliminary characterization of the process for common disorders. The tracking of diagnostic process has the potential to promote reflection on clinical practice, deconstruct neurologists' clinical decision-making, and improve health-care safety.

  14. Consensus-based perspectives of pediatric inpatient eating disorder services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Amy; McCormack, Julie; Hoiles, Kimberley J; Watson, Hunna J; Anderson, Rebecca A; Hay, Phillipa; Egan, Sarah J

    2018-03-14

    There are few evidence-based guidelines for inpatient pediatric eating disorders. The aim was to gain perspectives from those providing and receiving inpatient pediatric eating disorder care on the essential components treatment. A modified Delphi technique was used to develop consensus-based opinions. Participants (N = 74) were recruited for three panels: clinicians (n = 24), carers (n = 31), and patients (n = 19), who endorsed three rounds of statements online. A total of 167 statements were rated, 79 were accepted and reached a consensus level of at least 75% across all panels, and 87 were rejected. All agreed that families should be involved in treatment, and thatpsychological therapy be offered in specialist inpatient units. Areas of disagreement included that patients expressed a desire for autonomy in sessions being available without carers, and that weight gain should be gradual and admissions longer, in contrast to carers and clinicians. Carers endorsed that legal frameworks should be used to retain patients if required, and that inpatients are supervised at all times, in contrast to patients and clinicians. Clinicians endorsed that food access should be restricted outside meal times, in contrast to patients and carers. The findings indicate areas of consensus in admission criteria, and that families should be involved in treatment, family involvement in treatment, while there was disagreement across groups on topics including weight goals and nutrition management. Perspectives from patients, carers, and clinicians may be useful to consider during future revisions of best practice guidelines. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Perceived Safety and Value of Inpatient "Very Important Person" Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen-Dicker, Joshua; Auerbach, Andrew; Herzig, Shoshana J

    2017-03-01

    Providing care to "very important person" (VIP) patients can pose unique moral and value-based challenges for providers. No studies have examined VIP services in the inpatient setting. Through a multi-institutional survey of hospitalists, we assessed physician viewpoints and behavior surrounding the care of VIP patients. A significant proportion of respondents reported feeling pressured by patients, family members, and hospital representatives to provide unnecessary care to VIP patients. Based on self-reported perceptions, as well as case-based questions, we also found that the VIP status of a patient may impact physician clinical decision-making related to unnecessary medical care. Additional studies to quantify the use of VIP services and its effect on cost, resource availability, and patient-specific outcomes are needed. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:177-179. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  16. Vitamin D deficiency in an inpatient forensic intellectual disability service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Verity; Simmons, Hayley; Henriksen, Marie; Alexander, Regi T

    2017-06-01

    No research has examined vitamin D deficiency among inpatients within forensic intellectual disability services, despite their potentially increased risk. Tests of serum 25(OHD) concentration in blood are routinely offered to patients within the service as part of the admission and annual physical health check. Results were classified as deficient 75. Deficient or insufficient patients were offered supplement treatment and retested within 6 months. Levels were compared between groups: level of security and gender. At baseline, 87% of patients were deficient or insufficient, whilst 13% were sufficient or optimal. At follow-up, 53% had sufficient or optimal levels. However, some patients remained deficient (13%) or insufficient (34%) due to non-compliance with treatment. Women appeared more likely to be deficient. High levels of vitamin D deficiency were found among this population. Vitamin D screening and treatment is a simple and effective way of improving the physical health of this population.

  17. [Mental health service utilization among borderline personality disorder patients inpatient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailhol, L; Thalamas, C; Garrido, C; Birmes, P; Lapeyre-Mestre, M

    2015-04-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by a pervasive pattern of instability and impulsivity. Several North American prospective studies support the high level of mental health care utilization in this population. There is little data in other systems of health organization, such as France. Furthermore, little is known on the variables associated with the mental health service utilization among BPD patients. The main objective was to compare the utilization of mental health care among BPD patients, to the general population and patients with another personality disorder (PD) and to describe the demographic and clinical factors associated with the group of patients who use the most health care. A multi-center (5 public and private centers), epidemiological study. Data were collected prospectively (database of an insurance fund covering 80% of the population) and viewed, retrospectively. We used the data collected during the five years previously to the inclusion. Inclusion criteria were age (18-60 years) and membership in the health insurance fund targeted. Patients on legal protection, forced hospitalization, with a chronic psychotic disorder, manic, mental retardation, or not reading French were excluded. First, four groups were composed: BPD, other PD, control groups for PD and other PD. The first two groups were recruited from a screening of inpatients including a self-administered questionnaire (Personality Disorder Questionnaire 4+). Assessment by a psychologist including the Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders (SIDP-IV) was given straight to those who had a score above 28. This questionnaire allowed us to distinguish one group of subjects with BPD and a group with other PD (without BPD). Clinical evaluation included Axis I (MINI), Axis II (SIDP-IV), psychopathological features (YSQ-I, DSQ-40), demographic variables and therapeutic alliance (Haq-II). Matched controls (age, sex) composed the 3rd and 4th group (BPD control and

  18. Development and Implementation of an Inpatient Otolaryngology Consultation Service at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, Matthew G; London, Nyall R; Stewart, C Matthew

    2018-02-01

    To design and implement a formal otolaryngology inpatient consultation service that improves satisfaction of consulting services, increases educational opportunities, improves the quality of patient care, and ensures sustainability after implementation. This was a retrospective cohort study in a large academic medical center encompassing all inpatient otolaryngology service consultations from July 2005 to June 2014. Staged interventions included adding fellow coverage (July 2007 onward), intermittent hospitalist coverage (July 2010 onward), and a physician assistant (October 2011 onward). Billing data were collected for incidences of new patient and subsequent consultation charges. The 2-year preimplementation period (July 2005-June 2007) was compared with the postimplementation periods, divided into 2-year blocks (July 2007-June 2013). Outcome measures of patient encounters and work relative value units were compared between pre- and postimplementation blocks. Total encounters increased from 321 preimplementation to 1211, 1347, and 1073 in postimplementation groups ( P service was designed with supervisory oversight by non-Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education fellows and then expanded to include intermittent hospitalist management, followed by the addition of a dedicated physician assistant. These additions have led to the formation of a sustainable consultation service that supports the mission of high-quality care and service to consulting teams.

  19. Optimizing education on the inpatient dermatology consultative service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Ladan; Shinkai, Kanade

    2017-03-01

    A consultative dermatology service plays an important role in patient care and education in the hospital setting. Optimizing education in balance with high-quality dermatology consultative services is both a challenge and an opportunity for dermatology consultation teams. There is an emergence of new information about how dermatology can best be taught in the hospital, much of which relies on principles of workplace learning as well as the science of how learning and teaching best happen in work settings. These best practices are summarized in this narrative review with integrated discussion of concepts from outpatient dermatology education and lessons learned from other inpatient teaching models. In addition, consultative dermatology curricula should utilize a blended curriculum model comprised of patient care and active learning and self-study modalities. Specific educational methods will discuss 2 strategies: (1) direct patient-care activities (ie, bedside teaching rounds) and (2) nonpatient care activities (ie, case presentations, didactic sessions, online modules, and reading lists). ©2017 Frontline Medical Communications.

  20. Inpatient Utilization and Costs for Medicare Fee-for-Service Beneficiaries with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, Kathryn; Pelizzari, Pamela M; Pyenson, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    Although the medical and economic burden of heart failure in the United States is already substantial, it will likely grow as the population ages and life expectancy increases. Not surprisingly, most of the heart failure burden is borne by individuals aged ≥65 years, many of whom are in the Medicare population. The population-based utilization and costs of inpatient care for Medicare beneficiaries with heart failure are not well understood by payers and providers. To create a real-world view of utilization and costs associated with inpatient admissions, readmissions, and admissions to skilled nursing facilities among Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) beneficiaries with heart failure. The study used the 2011 and 2012 Medicare 5% sample limited data set to perform a retrospective analysis of claims data. The look-back year that was used to identify certain patient characteristics was 2011, and 2012 was the analysis period for the study. Beneficiaries with heart failure were defined as those who had ≥1 acute inpatient, emergency department, nonacute inpatient, or outpatient claims in 2012 containing an International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code for heart failure. To be included in the study, beneficiaries with heart failure had to have eligibility for ≥1 months in 2012 and in all 2011 months, with Part A and Part B eligibility in all the study months, and no enrollment in an HMO (Medicare Advantage plan). Utilization of inpatient admissions, inpatient readmissions, and skilled nursing facility admissions in 2012 were reported for Medicare FFS beneficiaries with heart failure and for all Medicare FFS beneficiaries. The costs for key metrics included all allowed Medicare payments in 2012 US dollars. The 2012 Medicare FFS population for this study consisted of 1,461,935 patients (1,301,545 without heart failure; 160,390 with heart failure); the heart failure prevalence was 11%. The Medicare-allowed cost per member per month (PMPM) was $3395 for a

  1. Homeless and Housed Inpatients with Schizophrenia: Disparities in Service Access upon Discharge from Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burra, Tara A.; Hwang, Stephen W.; Rourke, Sean B.; Stergiopoulos, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examines differences in services available at the time of discharge for homeless and housed psychiatric inpatients. Participants diagnosed with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder were recruited from a general hospital psychiatric inpatient unit. Thirty homeless individuals and 21 housed controls (matched for diagnosis, gender,…

  2. Inpatient service providers' perspectives on service user involvement in Norwegian community mental health centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Marianne; Hausken, Kjell; Knudsen, Knud

    2011-11-01

    For two decades, mental health services in Norway have focused on service user involvement. Despite this, there is little knowledge about how inpatient mental health services have promoted user involvement. To examine service providers' reports of service user involvement at the individual and departmental levels in Norwegian community mental health centres (CMHCs). One hundred and eighty six (186) inpatient service providers in five CMHCs filled out a questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that service provider perceptions and awareness of service user involvement can be measured by three subscales: organizational user involvement; patient collaboration; and assisted patient involvement. Little user involvement was reported at the departmental level. Providers more often reported user involvement at the individual level. Providers in two of the CMHCs reported a somewhat higher degree of departmental-level user involvement. There were no significant differences across gender, age, leader position, profession and job tenure, though evening/night shift workers reported a lesser degree of user involvement. The results suggest that user involvement at the departmental level needs to be addressed in future efforts to promote user involvement in CMHCs.

  3. Inpatient consultations to an orthopaedic service: the hidden workload.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Malley, N T

    2011-12-01

    While the quality and efficiency of out-patient orthopaedic referrals are well documented in the literature, there is little on the standard and appropriateness of inpatient orthopaedic consultations.

  4. Improving inpatient postnatal services: midwives views and perspectives of engagement in a quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wray Julie

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite major policy initiatives in the United Kingdom to enhance women's experiences of maternity care, improving in-patient postnatal care remains a low priority, although it is an aspect of care consistently rated as poor by women. As part of a systems and process approach to improving care at one maternity unit in the South of England, the views and perspectives of midwives responsible for implementing change were sought. Methods A Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI approach was adopted to support a systems and process change to in-patient care and care on transfer home in a large district general hospital with around 6000 births a year. The CQI approach included an initial assessment to identify where revisions to routine systems and processes were required, developing, implementing and evaluating revisions to the content and documentation of care in hospital and on transfer home, and training workshops for midwives and other maternity staff responsible for implementing changes. To assess midwifery views of the quality improvement process and their engagement with this, questionnaires were sent to those who had participated at the outset. Results Questionnaires were received from 68 (46% of the estimated 149 midwives eligible to complete the questionnaire. All midwives were aware of the revisions introduced, and two-thirds felt these were more appropriate to meet the women's physical and emotional health, information and support needs. Some midwives considered that the introduction of new maternal postnatal records increased their workload, mainly as a consequence of colleagues not completing documentation as required. Conclusions This was the first UK study to undertake a review of in-patient postnatal services. Involvement of midwives at the outset was essential to the success of the initiative. Midwives play a lead role in the planning and organisation of in-patient postnatal care and it was important to obtain their

  5. Needs and services at an in-patient psychotherapy unit | Joska ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    social needs. These needs may exacerbate psychiatric problems and should be managed more actively before, during and after an in-patient stay. Keywords: Mental health services; Camberwell assessment of Need; Unmet need. African Journal ...

  6. A pragmatic implementation of a 6-day physiotherapy service in a mixed inpatient rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, Erin L; Kuys, Suzanne S; Clarke, Jane; Bauer, Sandra G

    2017-08-01

    This study determined the impact of a pragmatic 6-day physiotherapy service on length of stay, functional independence, gait and balance in people undergoing inpatient rehabilitation, compared to a 5-day service. A prospective cohort study with historical comparison was undertaken in a mixed inpatient rehabilitation unit. Intervention period participants (2011) meeting inclusion criteria were eligible for a 6-day physiotherapy service. All other participants, including the historical cohort (2010) received usual care (5-day physiotherapy). Length of stay, functional independence, gait and balance performance were measured. A total of 536 individuals participated in this study; 270 in 2011 (60% received 6-day physiotherapy) and 266 in 2010. Participants in 2011 showed a trend for reduced length of stay (1.7 days, 95%CI -0.53 to 3.92) compared to 2010. Other measures showed no significant differences between cohorts. In 2011, those receiving 6-day physiotherapy were more dependent, but showed significantly improved functional independence and balance compared to those receiving 5-day physiotherapy (p physiotherapy service in a "real-world" rehabilitation setting demonstrated a trend towards reduced length of stay, and improved functional gains. This service could lead to cost-savings for hospitals and improved patient flow. Implications for Rehabilitation "Real-world" implementation of a 6-day physiotherapy service in rehabilitation shows a trend for reducing length of stay. This reduction in length of stay may lead to cost-savings for the hospital system, and improve patient flow into rehabilitation. Patients receiving 6-day physiotherapy made significant gains in balance and functional independence compared to patients receiving 5-day physiotherapy services in the rehabilitation setting.

  7. Clinical impact of a pharmacist-led inpatient anticoagulation service: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee T

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tiffany Lee, Erin Davis, Jason Kielly School of Pharmacy, Memorial University, St John's, NL, Canada Background: Anticoagulant therapies provide management options for potentially life-threatening thromboembolic conditions. They also carry significant safety risks, requiring careful consideration of medication dose, close monitoring, and follow-up. Inpatients are particularly at risk, considering the widespread use of anticoagulants in hospitals. This has prompted the introduction of safety goals for anticoagulants in Canada and the USA, which recommend increased pharmacist involvement to reduce patient harm. The goal of this review is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pharmacist-led inpatient anticoagulation services compared to usual or physician-managed care. Methods: This narrative review includes articles identified through a literature search of PubMed, Embase, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases, as well as hand searches of the references of relevant articles. Full publications of pharmacist-managed inpatient anticoagulation services were eligible if they were published in English and assessed clinical outcomes. Results: Twenty-six studies were included and further divided into two categories: 1 autonomous pharmacist-managed anticoagulation programs (PMAPs and 2 pharmacist recommendation. Pharmacist management of heparin and warfarin appears to result in improvements in some surrogate outcomes (international normalized ratio [INR] stability and time in INR goal range, while results for others are mixed (time to therapeutic INR, length of stay, and activated partial thromboplastin time [aPTT] measures. There is also some indication that PMAPs may be associated with reduced patient mortality. When direct thrombin inhibitors are managed by pharmacists, there seems to be a shorter time to therapeutic aPTT and a greater percentage of time in the therapeutic range, as well as a decrease in the frequency of medication

  8. Individual psychological therapy in an acute inpatient setting: Service user and psychologist perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small, Catherine; Pistrang, Nancy; Huddy, Vyv; Williams, Claire

    2018-01-18

    The acute inpatient setting poses potential challenges to delivering one-to-one psychological therapy; however, there is little research on the experiences of both receiving and delivering therapies in this environment. This qualitative study aimed to explore service users' and psychologists' experiences of undertaking individual therapy in acute inpatient units. It focused on the relationship between service users and psychologists, what service users found helpful or unhelpful, and how psychologists attempted to overcome any challenges in delivering therapy. The study used a qualitative, interview-based design. Eight service users and the six psychologists they worked with were recruited from four acute inpatient wards. They participated in individual semi-structured interviews eliciting their perspectives on the therapy. Service users' and psychologists' transcripts were analysed together using Braun and Clarke's (2006, Qualitative Research in Psychology, 3, 77) method of thematic analysis. The accounts highlighted the importance of forming a 'human' relationship - particularly within the context of the inpatient environment - as a basis for therapeutic work. Psychological therapy provided valued opportunities for meaning-making. To overcome the challenges of acute mental health crisis and environmental constraints, psychologists needed to work flexibly and creatively; the therapeutic work also extended to the wider context of the inpatient unit, in efforts to promote a shared understanding of service users' difficulties. Therapeutic relationships between service users and clinicians need to be promoted more broadly within acute inpatient care. Psychological formulation can help both service users and ward staff in understanding crisis and working collaboratively. Practice-based evidence is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of adapted psychological therapy models. Developing 'human' relationships at all levels of acute inpatient care continues to be an

  9. 42 CFR 410.100 - Included services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...-language pathology services and respiratory therapy services. (i) Nursing care services. Nursing care... the rehabilitation goals of the physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, or... subpart B. (b) Physical therapy services. (1) These services include— (i) Testing and measurement of the...

  10. 42 CFR 440.10 - Inpatient hospital services, other than services in an institution for mental diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... an institution for mental diseases. 440.10 Section 440.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... for mental diseases. (a) Inpatient hospital services means services that— (1) Are ordinarily furnished... and treatment of patients with disorders other than mental diseases; (ii) Is licensed or formally...

  11. Epidemiology of burns in Taiwan: a nationwide report including inpatients and outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Han; Chen, Yi-Chun; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Ma, Hsu

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study is to understand the incidence of burns among outpatients and inpatients of Taiwan in 2010. Characteristics of the burned patients were also studied in terms of gender, age, burn sites, burn degree, reconstructive surgical treatment, as well as which specialty and medical facility they are treated in. Burned patients were identified from the 1,000,000-person cohort dataset sampled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance database. Ones who had been hospitalized with discharge diagnoses related to burns were categorized as inpatients and others who had only ambulatory visits and emergency room visits were classified as outpatients. 7630 burn-injury patients were found, presenting an annual incidence of burns as 670.8/10(5) in males (n=3303) and 852.5/10(5) in females (n=4327). Only 3.4% (156 males and 107 females) of them were hospitalized. Higher incidence of burns were found in females and young children, while males and the elderly tended to have more severe burns, based on high-degree burns, admission rate, and incidence of hospitalizations for burns. This is a population-based study demonstrating the epidemiology of burns among outpatients and inpatients in Taiwan, leading us closer to the reality of burns treated in different settings of medical facilities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Transfers to civil psychiatric inpatient services from a maximum security forensic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, Bruce B; Smith, Hal; Sawyer, Don

    2004-01-01

    To examine inpatients discharged from a forensic psychiatric hospital to a civil hospital at the completion of their correctional sentence. Extract information from a patient database. About 20% of the discharges from the New York State forensic hospital that serves mentally ill state prison inmates, Central New York Psychiatric Center (CNYPC), are transferred to a civil psychiatric hospital; the remainder are returned to a correctional setting. Although their diagnoses, Global Assessment of Functioning scores, and number of prior inpatient admissions are similar, CNYPC transfers stay 1(1/2) times as long in their civil hospital admission as other civil hospital admissions. If total inpatient hospitalization before release to the community at large is considered (CNYPC plus the subsequent civil hospital), the stay is about 2(1/2) times as long. Fifty-two percent of the CNYPC transfers had been incarcerated for violent offenses and 28% are re-hospitalized within 12 months after release from the civil hospital. Longer lengths of stay in the civil hospital for these CNYPC transfers do not seem to be related to psychiatric functioning. Instead, it may be related to being harder to place in a community setting. All these CNYPC transfers have prison histories, many have a violent offense history, and all have been geographically remote from their home communities for a long time periods. As a result, the social support networks of CNYPC transfers may be weaker than those of other civil inpatients. The families and neighborhood agencies of CNYPC transfers are probably less willing to accept them on their return than those of other civil patients.Enhanced discharge planning and support services targeted specially for correctional transfers to a civil psychiatric inpatient environment should be considered. These type of service may reduce inpatient length of stay and thereby allow the inpatient resources to be used by other patients. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Novel Survey Tool Assessing Inpatient Consult Service Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavsky, Eli M; Chang, Yuchiao

    2017-12-01

    Subspecialty consultation in inpatient medicine is increasing, and enhancing performance of consultation services may have a broad-reaching impact. Multisource feedback is an important tool in assessing competence and improving performance. A mechanism for primary team resident feedback on performance of consult services has not been described. We developed and evaluated an instrument designed to assess internal medicine (IM) subspecialty inpatient consult service performance. We hypothesized that the instrument would be feasible to administer and provide important information to fellowship directors. The instrument was administered in 2015 and 2016 at a single academic center. All IM residents were invited to evaluate 10 IM subspecialty consult services on 4 items and an overall satisfaction rating. The instrument allowed for free-text feedback to fellows. Program directors completed another survey assessing the impact of the consult service evaluation. A total of 113 residents responded (47 in 2015 and 66 in 2016, for a combined response rate of 35%). Each of the 4 items measured (communication, professionalism, teaching, and pushback) correlated significantly with the overall satisfaction rating in univariate and multivariate analyses. There were no differences in ratings across postgraduate year or year of administration. There was considerable variation in ratings among the services evaluated. The 7 program directors who provided feedback found the survey useful and made programmatic changes following evaluation implementation. A primary team resident evaluation of inpatient medicine subspecialty consult services is feasible, provides valuable information, and is associated with changes in consult service structure and curricula.

  14. Dialectical Behaviour Therapy in an Inpatient Unit for Women with a Learning Disability: Service Users' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Paula; Petalas, Michael; Hastings, Richard; Thomas, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    There is a general lack of self-report data from service users with an intellectual disability (ID) about their views of psychological interventions. This research explored the views and experiences of female inpatients, with a diagnosis of a personality disorder and an ID, about dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT). Semi-structured interviews were…

  15. Social Health Insurance Difference in Inpatient Expenditure and Service Category in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Shen, Jay; Rice, Jennifer; Frakes, Kaitlyn

    2018-01-01

    China successfully achieved universal health insurance coverage in 2011. Previous work on the effects of social health insurance in China has overlooked the association between health insurance and inpatient service category as well as the mechanisms of institutional characteristics. This study seeks to estimate the social health insurance difference in inpatient expenditure and service category. The role of institutional characteristics was also studied. The logistic model was applied to estimate the association of social health insurance and service category. In addition, Heckman Selected Model and generalized linear model were used to examine the association of health insurance and inpatient expenditure. Estimations were done for 4076 individuals older than 45 years using pooled cross-sectional survey data from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study conducted in 2011 and 2013. Patients with health insurance were more likely to spend more and receive more types of inpatient service. This relationship was partially explained by the institutional characteristics. Therefore, this study highlights the importance of enforcing the regulation of referral mechanisms, the tiered copayment requirement to guide people's care-seeking behavior, and reforming the allocation of limited health resources between different levels of facilities and also between private and public hospitals.

  16. Development and evaluation of an inpatient [correction of impatient] holistic nursing care services department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newshan, Gayle

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of a holistic nursing department at a 261-bed conventional, community hospital. Through the holistic nursing department, a nurse visits hospitalized inpatients. The visit might include complementary and alternative modalities (CAM) therapies, such as relaxation techniques, therapeutic touch, aromatherapy, and therapeutic suggestion. Evaluation of visits occurred through a retrospective chart review and patient satisfaction surveys. Main outcome measures were patient satisfaction, physiological changes, and pre- and post-distress scores. Discomfort and distress was decreased and patient satisfaction high when CAM therapies were used in conjunction with traditional inpatient medical and nursing care.

  17. 20 CFR 404.1312 - World War II service included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false World War II service included. 404.1312... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services World War II Veterans § 404.1312 World War II service included. Your service was in the active service of the United...

  18. Relationship of psychology inpatient rehabilitation services and patient characteristics to outcomes following spinal cord injury: the SCIRehab project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Allen W; Wilson, Catherine S; Huston, Toby; Koval, Jill; Gordon, Samuel; Gassaway, Julie; Kreider, Scott E D; Whiteneck, Gale

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the effects of psychological interventions on rehabilitation outcomes, including residence and functional status at discharge, and residence, school attendance, or employment, and physical, social, occupational, and mobility aspects of participation 1 year after spinal cord injury (SCI). Prospective observational cohort study. Six inpatient rehabilitation facilities in the United States. Inpatients with SCI 12 years of age and older. Usual rehabilitation care. Functional Independence Measure at rehabilitation discharge and 1-year injury anniversary; discharge destination and residence at 1-year anniversary; Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique, Diener Satisfaction with Life Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire, employment or school attendance, rehospitalization, and occurrence of a pressure ulcer at 1-year anniversary. More time in psycho-educational interventions was associated with better function, discharge to home, home residence at 1 year, and the absence of pressure ulcers at 1 year. More psychotherapeutic sessions focusing on processing emotions and/or locus of control were associated with poorer function at discharge and 1 year, less physical independence and community mobility, lower satisfaction with life, and the presence of pressure sores at 1 year. Psychological services are an important component of comprehensive medical rehabilitation and tailored to patient needs and readiness to benefit from rehabilitation. Services focused on remediating deficits tend to be associated with negative outcomes, while services intended to foster adjustment and growth tend to be associated with favorable outcomes. Further research is needed to determine the optimal type and timing of psychological services during inpatient rehabilitation based on individuals' strengths and vulnerabilities. Note: This is the sixth in this third series of SCIRehab articles.

  19. Substance Use Disorders in Elderly Admissions to an Academic Psychiatric Inpatient Service over a 10-Year Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Dombrowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There is a paucity of research on substance use disorders (SUDs in the elderly psychiatric population. This study examines SUDs in a geriatric psychiatry inpatient service over a 10-year period. Methods. Data from 1788 elderly psychiatric inpatients from a ten-year period was collected. Variables collected included psychiatric diagnoses, SUD, number of psychiatric admissions, and length of stay. Those with and without a SUD were compared using Chi-Square or Student’s t-test as appropriate using SPSS. Results. 11.7% (N=210 of patients had a SUD, and the most common substance was alcohol at 73.3% (N=154 or 8.6% of all admissions. Other SUDs were sedative-hypnotics (11%, opiate (2.9%, cannabis (1%, tobacco (1.4%, and unspecified SUD (38.6%. SUD patients were significantly younger, divorced, male, and less frequently readmitted and had shorter lengths of stay. The most common comorbid diagnoses were major depression (26.1%, bipolar disorder (10.5%, and dementia (17.1%. Conclusions. Over 10% of psychogeriatric admissions were associated with a SUD, with alcohol being the most common. Considering the difficulties in diagnosing SUD in this population and the retrospective study design, the true prevalence in elderly psychiatric inpatients is likely higher. This study adds to sparse literature on SUD in elderly psychiatric patients.

  20. A Systematic Review of the Effect of Early Interventions for Psychosis on the Usage of Inpatient Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Jason R; Vokey, Sherri; Loewen, Hal; Martens, Patricia J; Brownell, Marni; Katz, Alan; Nickel, Nathan C; Burland, Elaine; Chateau, Dan

    2015-11-01

    To review and synthesize the currently available research on whether early intervention for psychosis programs reduce the use of inpatient services. A systematic review was conducted using keywords searches on PubMed, Embase (Ovid), PsycINFO (ProQuest), Scopus, CINAHL (EBSCO), Social Work Abstracts (EBSCO), Social Science Citations Index (Web of Science), Sociological Abstracts (ProQuest), and Child Development & Adolescent Studies (EBSCO). To be included, studies had to be peer-reviewed publications in English, examining early intervention programs using a variant of assertive community treatment, with a control/comparison group, and reporting inpatient service use outcomes. The primary outcome extracted number hospitalized and total N. Secondary outcome extracted means and standard deviations. Data were pooled using random effects models. Primary outcome was the occurrence of any hospitalization during treatment. A secondary outcome was the average bed-days used during treatment period. Fifteen projects were identified and included in the study. Results of meta-analysis supported the occurrence of a positive effect for intervention for both outcome measures (any hospitalization OR: 0.33; 95% CI 0.18-0.63, bed-days usage SMD: -0.38, 95% CI -0.53 to -0.24). There was significant heterogeneity of effect across the studies. This heterogeneity is due to a handful of studies with unusually positive responses. These results suggest that early intervention programs are superior to standard of care, with respect to reducing inpatient service usage. Wider use of these programs may prevent the occurrence of admission for patients experiencing the onset of psychotic symptoms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  1. Comparing Self-Concept Among Youth Currently Receiving Inpatient Versus Outpatient Mental Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chris; Ferro, Mark A

    2018-01-01

    This study compared levels of self-concept among youth who were currently receiving inpatient versus outpatient mental health services. Forty-seven youth were recruited from the Child & Youth Mental Health Program at McMaster Children's Hospital. Self-concept was measured using the Self-Perception Profile for Children and Adolescents. The mean age was 14.5 years and most participants were female (70.2%). ANOVAs comparing self-concept with population norms showed large significant effects (d = 0.77 to 1.93) indicating compromised self-concept among youth receiving mental health services. Regression analyses controlling for patient age, sex, family income, and diagnoses of major depressive disorder, generalized social phobia, and generalized anxiety showed that the inpatient setting was a significant predictor of lower global self-worth (β=-.26; p=.035). Compared to outpatients, inpatients generally reported lower self-concept, but differences were significant only for global self-worth. Future research replicating this finding and assessing its clinical significance is encouraged.

  2. Dialectical behaviour therapy in an inpatient unit for women with a learning disability: Service users' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscoe, Paula; Petalas, Michael; Hastings, Richard; Thomas, Cathy

    2016-09-01

    There is a general lack of self-report data from service users with an intellectual disability (ID) about their views of psychological interventions. This research explored the views and experiences of female inpatients, with a diagnosis of a personality disorder and an ID, about dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT). Semi-structured interviews were used with 10 women, recruited from two independent mental health hospitals. The interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants showed varying levels of understanding of DBT. Findings highlight the need for a standardized approach with a suitably adapted structure and curriculum to meet the needs of inpatients with an ID. Factors such as the therapeutic relationship were identified as playing a role in participants' motivation, engagement and participation in DBT. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Hospital Organization and Importance of an Interventional Radiology Inpatient Admitting Service: Italian Single-Center 3-Year Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel; Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p < 0.05). The results of the 3-year activity show that the activation of a COUIR with an inpatient admitting service, and the better organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of Euro 1,009,095.35. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  4. Emergency department and inpatient health care utilization among patients who require interpreter services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeru, Jane W; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Jacobson, Debra J; Ebbert, Jon O; Takahashi, Paul Y; Fan, Chun; Wieland, Mark L

    2015-05-29

    Limited English proficiency is associated with health disparities and suboptimal health outcomes. Although Limited English proficiency is a barrier to effective health care, its association with inpatient health care utilization is unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the association between patients with limited English proficiency, and emergency department visits and hospital admissions. We compared emergency department visits and hospitalizations in 2012 between patients requiring interpreter services and age-matched English-proficient patients (who did not require interpreters), in a retrospective cohort study of adult patients actively empanelled to a large primary health care network in a medium-sized United States city (n = 3,784). Patients who required interpreter services had significantly more Emergency Department visits (841 vs 620; P ≤ .001) and hospitalizations (408 vs 343; P ≤ .001) than patients who did not require interpreter services. On regression analysis the risk of a first Emergency Department visit was 60% higher for patients requiring interpreter services than those who did not (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.4-1.9; P interpreter services had higher rates of inpatient health care utilization compared with patients who did not require an interpreter. Further research is required to understand factors associated with this utilization and to develop sociolinguistically tailored interventions to facilitate appropriate health care provision for this population.

  5. Facilitators and Barriers to Effective Smoking Cessation: Counselling Services for Inpatients from Nurse-Counsellors’ Perspectives — A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chuan Li

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco use has reached epidemic levels around the World, resulting in a world-wide increase in tobacco-related deaths and disabilities. Hospitalization presents an opportunity for nurses to encourage inpatients to quit smoking. This qualitative descriptive study was aimed to explore nurse-counsellors’ perspectives of facilitators and barriers in the implementation of effective smoking cessation counselling services for inpatients. In-depth interviews were conducted with 16 nurses who were qualified smoking cessation counsellors and who were recruited from eleven health promotion hospitals that were smoke-free and located in the Greater Taipei City Area.  Data were collected from May 2012 to October 2012, and then analysed using content analysis based on the grounded theory approach. From nurse-counsellors’ perspectives, an effective smoking cessation program should be patient-centred and provide a supportive environment. Another finding is that effective smoking cessation counselling involves encouraging patients to modify their lifestyles. Time constraints and inadequate resources are barriers that inhibit the effectiveness of smoking cessation counselling programs in acute-care hospitals. We suggest that hospitals should set up a smoking counselling follow-up program, including funds, facilities, and trained personnel to deliver counselling services by telephone, and build a network with community smoking cessation resources.

  6. The "Surgeon on Service" Model for Timely, Economically Viable Inpatient Care of Tracheostomy Patients in Academic Pediatric Otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Jennifer M; Schroeder, James W; Thompson, Dana M

    2017-10-01

    The traditional practice model for pediatric otolaryngologists at high-volume academic centers is to simultaneously balance outpatient care responsibilities with those of the inpatient service, emergency department, and ambulatory care clinics. This model leads to challenges with care coordination, timeliness of nonemergency operative care, and consistent participation in care and consultation at the attending surgeon level. The "surgeon on service" (SOS) model-where faculty members rotate to manage the inpatient service in lieu of outpatient responsibilities-has been described as one method to address this conundrum. The operational and economic feasibility of the SOS model has been demonstrated; however, its impact on care coordination, time from consultation to surgical care, and length of stay (LOS) have not been evaluated. To determine the impact of the SOS model on the quality principles of timeliness and efficiency of tracheostomy tube placement and to determine if the SOS model is fiscally feasible in an academic pediatric otolaryngology practice. Medical record review of patients undergoing tracheostomy in a pediatric academic medical center and survey of their treating physician trainees, comparing the 6-month SOS pilot phase (postimplementation, January-June 2016) with the 6-month preimplementation period (January-June 2015). Implementation of the SOS model. Time to tracheostomy, frequency of successful coordination of tracheostomy with gastrostomy tube placement, total LOS, productivity measured in work relative value units, and responses to trainee surveys. Of the 41 patients included in the study (24 boys and 17 girls; mean age, 3 years; range, 3 months to 17 years), 15 were treated before SOS implementation, and 26 after. Also included were 21 trainees. Before SOS implementation, median time to tracheostomy was 7 days (range, 2-20 days); after SOS implementation, it was 4 days (range, 1-10 days) (difference between the medians, before to after, -3

  7. Identifying Human Trafficking Victims on a Psychiatry Inpatient Service: a Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong T; Lamkin, Joanna; Coverdale, John H; Scott, Samuel; Li, Karen; Gordon, Mollie R

    2017-10-02

    Human trafficking is a serious and prevalent human rights violation that closely intersects with mental health. Limited empirical attention has been paid to the presentations and identification of trafficking victims in psychiatric settings. The primary goal of this paper is to describe the varied presentations of trafficking victims on an urban inpatient psychiatric unit. A literature review was conducted to identify relevant empirical articles to inform our examination of cases. Adult inpatient cases meeting criteria for known or possible human trafficking were systematically identified and illustrative cases were described. Six cases were identified including one male and five females. Two had been labor trafficked and four were suspected or confirmed to have been sex trafficked. The cases demonstrated a tremendous diversity of demographic and psychiatric identifying factors. These cases indicate the importance of routinely screening for trafficking victims in inpatient psychiatry settings. Identification of cases is a requisite step in providing informed and evidence-based treatments and enabling the secondary prevention of re-exploitation. Additional research is warranted given the limited current empirical research on this topic area.

  8. In-Patient Treatment of Fibromyalgia: A Controlled Nonrandomized Comparison of Conventional Medicine versus Integrative Medicine including Fasting Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Michalsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia poses a challenge for therapy. Recent guidelines suggest that fibromyalgia should be treated within a multidisciplinary therapy approach. No data are available that evaluated multimodal treatment strategies of Integrative Medicine (IM. We conducted a controlled, nonrandomized pilot study that compared two inpatient treatment strategies, an IM approach that included fasting therapy and a conventional rheumatology (CM approach. IM used fasting cure and Mind-Body-Medicine as specific methods. Of 48 included consecutive patients, 28 were treated with IM, 20 with CM. Primary outcome was change in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ score after the 2-week hospital stay. Secondary outcomes included scores of pain, depression, anxiety, and well being. Assessments were repeated after 12 weeks. At 2 weeks, there were significant improvements in the FIQ (P<0.014 and for most of secondary outcomes for the IM group compared to the CM group. The beneficial effects for the IM approach were reduced after 12 weeks and no longer statistically significant with the exception of anxiety. Findings indicate that a multimodal IM treatment with fasting therapy might be superior to CM in the short term and not inferior in the mid term. Longer-term studies are warranted to assess the clinical impact of integrative multimodal treatment in fibromyalgia.

  9. Supporting management of medical equipment for inpatient service in public hospitals: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Rosa L; Vallejos, Guido E

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a study of medical equipment availability in the short and long term. The work is divided in two parts. The first part is an analysis of the medical equipment inventory for the institution of study. We consider the replacement, maintenance, and reinforcement of the available medical equipment by considering local guidelines and surveying clinical personnel appreciation. The resulting recommendation is to upgrade the current equipment inventory if necessary. The second part considered a demand analysis in the short and medium term. We predicted the future demand with a 5-year horizon using Holt-Winters models. Inventory analysis showed that 27% of the medical equipment in stock was not functional. Due to this poor performance result we suggested that the hospital gradually addresses this situation by replacing 29 non-functional equipment items, reinforcing stock with 40 new items, and adding 11 items not available in the inventory but suggested by the national guidelines. The results suggest that general medicine inpatient demand has a tendency to increase within the time e.g. for general medicine inpatient service the highest increment is obtained by respiratory (12%, RMSE=8%) and genitourinary diseases (20%, RMSE=9%). This increment did not involve any further upgrading of the proposed inventory.

  10. Continuity of care in hospital rehabilitation services: a qualitative insight from inpatients' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Mirapeix, Francesc; Oliveira-Sousa, Silvana L; Escolar-Reina, Pilar; Sobral-Ferreira, Marta; Lillo-Navarro, M Carmen; Collins, Sean M

    Few empirical studies have been conducted on the continuity of rehabilitation services, despite the fact that it may affect clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction, the perception of quality, and safety. The aim of this study was to explore experiences and perceptions of inpatients receiving physical rehabilitation in an acute care hospital and how these experiences may have led to perceived gaps in the continuity of rehabilitation care. Using qualitative research methods, fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients who received physical rehabilitation during hospital stay in an acute care hospital in Murcia, Spain. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, analyzed, and grouped into predetermined and emergent codes. Patients described three main themes in continuity of care: informational, management, and relational continuity. Several factors were described as influencing the perceived gaps in these three types of continuity. Informational continuity was influenced by the transfer of information among care providers. Relational continuity was influenced by patient-therapist relations and consistency on the part of the provider. Management continuity was influenced by consistency of care between providers and the involvement of patients in their own care. The participants in this study identified several gaps in three types of continuity of care (informational, management, and relational). Inpatients often perceive their experiences of rehabilitation as being disconnected or incoherent over time. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Fisioterapia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. patient perceptions of integrated care and their relationship to utilization of emergency, inpatient and outpatient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Ashley-Kay; Friedberg, Mark W; Thompson, Ryan W; Singer, Sara J

    2017-12-01

    Patients with multiple chronic conditions have garnered particular attention from policymakers and health service researchers because these patients utilize more services and contribute disproportionally to rising health care expenses. The growing prevalence of patients with multiple chronic conditions has increased the importance of achieving better health care integration for this patient population. Patients may be well positioned to assess integration of their care, but the relationship between patients' perceptions of care integration and use of health services has not been studied. We sought to understand how patient-perceived integrated care relates to utilization of health services. We fielded the Patient Perceptions of Integrated Care survey among a random sample of 3000 (information flow to other providers in your doctor's office and responsiveness independent of visits, pinformation flow to your specialist, pinformation flow to the patient, psystem, patient perceptions of integrated care were associated with ED and outpatient utilization but not inpatient utilization. With further development, patient reports of integration could be useful guides to improving health system efficiency. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. 25 CFR 20.403 - What do protective services include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....403 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE... services, which may include, but are not limited to, the following: (i) Investigating and reporting on... for assistance in solving the social problems of individuals, families, and children. (5) Coordinating...

  13. Utility of Daily Mobile Tablet Use for Residents on an Otolaryngology Head & Neck Surgery Inpatient Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowson, Matthew G; Kahmke, Russel; Ryan, Marisa; Scher, Richard

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the utility of electronic tablets and their capacity to increase hospital floor productivity, efficiency, improve patient care information safety, and to enhance resident education and resource utilization on a busy Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery inpatient service. This was a prospective cohort study with a 2-week pre-implementation period with standard paper census lists without mobile tablet use, and a 2-week post-implementation period followed with electronic tablets used to place orders, look up pertinent clinical data, educate patients as appropriate, and to record daily to-dos that would previously be recorded on paper. The setting for the study was Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, with 13 Otolaryngology residents comprising the study population. The time for inpatient rounding was shorter with the use tablets (p = 0.037). There was a non-significant trend in the number of times a resident had to leave rounds to look up a clinical query on a computer, with less instances occurring in the post-implementation study period. The residents felt that having a tablet facilitated more detailed and faster transfer of information, and improved ease of documentation in the medical record. Seventy percent felt tablets helped them spend more time with patients, 70 % could spend more time directly involved in rounds because they could use the tablet to query information at point-of-care, and 80 % felt tablets improved morale. The utility of a mobile tablet device coupled with the electronic health record appeared to have both quantitative and qualitative improvements in efficiency, increased time with patients and attendance at academic conferences. Tablets should be encouraged but not mandated for clinical and educational use.

  14. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data - Inpatient

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The data provided here include hospital-specific charges for the more than 3,000 U.S. hospitals that receive Medicare Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS)...

  15. Parameters of consultee satisfaction with inpatient academic psychiatric consultation services: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavakumar, Mallika; Gastelum, Emily D; Choo, Tse-Hwei; Gerkin, Jonathan S; Kahn, Debra; Lee, Seonjoo; Nicolson, Stephen E; Rosenthal, Lisa J; Schwartz, Ann C; Tobin, Marie B; Wharton, Ralph N; Shapiro, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Consultation-liaison psychiatrists commonly perceive consultee satisfaction as a useful global measure of consultation-liaison service performance. No tool exists to measure consultee satisfaction. A single-site study at Columbia University Medical Center elicited ratings of parameters importantly contributing to consultee satisfaction within consultation-liaison services. The purpose of this study was to assess the generalizability of the rating of importance of these parameters in a larger, multicenter sample. From October 2013 to January 2014, a confidential and voluntary Web-based survey was distributed to 133 physicians at 7 academic centers in the United States asking them to rate the importance of 16 performance parameters (identified in the previous single-site study) in determining consultee satisfaction. Overall, 87 recipients (65%) responded to the survey. Among all the 16 items, there was no significant difference between sites in ratings of item importance. Of the 16 parameters, 9 received a mean rating in the "important" to "very important" range. Three items, "completion of consultation within 24 hours of request," "understanding the core questions being asked," and "practical and helpful management suggestions for medical staff" were rated as the most important. Quickly managing behavioral problems, management suggestions for nursing staff, verbal communication of recommendations, providing diagnostic clarification, facilitating transfer to inpatient psychiatry, and providing follow-up consultation were other parameters that were highly valued by consultees. We found good generalizability across academic medical centers for ratings of parameters important for consultee satisfaction with consultation-liaison services, which can provide the basis for a consultee satisfaction measurement tool. Copyright © 2015 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Econometric estimation of WHO-CHOICE country-specific costs for inpatient and outpatient health service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Karin; Lauer, Jeremy A; Gkountouras, Georgios; Fitzpatrick, Christopher; Stanciole, Anderson

    2018-01-01

    Policy makers require information on costs related to inpatient and outpatient health services to inform resource allocation decisions. Country data sets were gathered in 2008-2010 through literature reviews, website searches and a public call for cost data. Multivariate regression analysis was used to explore the determinants of variability in unit costs using data from 30 countries. Two models were designed, with the inpatient and outpatient models drawing upon 3407 and 9028 observations respectively. Cost estimates are produced at country and regional level, with 95% confidence intervals. Inpatient costs across 30 countries are significantly associated with the type of hospital, ownership, as well as bed occupancy rate, average length of stay, and total number of inpatient admissions. Changes in outpatient costs are significantly associated with location, facility ownership and the level of care, as well as to the number of outpatient visits and visits per provider per day. These updated WHO-CHOICE service delivery unit costs are statistically robust and may be used by analysts as inputs for economic analysis. The models can predict country-specific unit costs at different capacity levels and in different settings.

  17. 76 FR 4726 - Avaya Global Services, AOS Service Delivery, Worldwide Services Group, Including Workers Whose...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... workers are related to the supply of service desk/help desk services providing the first level of... Employment and Training Administration Avaya Global Services, AOS Service Delivery, Worldwide Services Group... Assistance on October 20, 2010, applicable to workers of Avaya Global Services, AOS Service Delivery...

  18. Positive behavioral support planning in the inpatient treatment of severe disruptive behaviors: A description of service features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlett, Nakia M; Carr, Erika R; Hillbrand, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Positive behavior support (PBS) plans are increasingly used on inpatient units to assess and treat serious and dangerous behaviors displayed by patients with serious psychiatric impairment. A contemporary extension of traditional applied behavior analytic procedures, PBS plans integrate theories from several domains with perspectives on community psychology, positive psychology, and recovery-oriented care. Because there is little evidence to suggest that more invasive, punitive disciplinary strategies lead to long-term positive behavioral change (Parkes, 1996), PBS plans have emerged as an alternative to the use of seclusion and restraint or other forms of restrictive measures typically used on inpatient psychiatric units (Hammer et al., 2011). Moreover, PBS plans are a preferred method of intervention because more invasive interventions often cause more harm than good to all involved (Elliott et al., 2005). This article seeks to provide an integrated framework for the development of positive behavior support plans in inpatient psychiatric settings. In addition to explicating the philosophy and core elements of PBS plans, this work includes discussion of the didactic and pragmatic aspects of training clinical staff in inpatient mental health settings. A case vignette is included for illustration and to highlight the use of PBS plans as a mechanism for helping patients transition to less restrictive settings. This work will add to the scant literature examining the use of positive behavioral support plans in inpatient psychiatric settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Payment Services for Global Online Systems Including Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seebeck, Bill; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A panel of four conference presenters address issues related to paying for services provided through online systems. Discussion includes the following topics: metering devices; electronic/digital cash; working within existing banking/credit card structures; provision of payment mechanisms in countries without extensive credit card usage; and…

  20. Exclusive queueing model including the choice of service windows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masahiro; Yanagisawa, Daichi; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2018-01-01

    In a queueing system involving multiple service windows, choice behavior is a significant concern. This paper incorporates the choice of service windows into a queueing model with a floor represented by discrete cells. We contrived a logit-based choice algorithm for agents considering the numbers of agents and the distances to all service windows. Simulations were conducted with various parameters of agent choice preference for these two elements and for different floor configurations, including the floor length and the number of service windows. We investigated the model from the viewpoint of transit times and entrance block rates. The influences of the parameters on these factors were surveyed in detail and we determined that there are optimum floor lengths that minimize the transit times. In addition, we observed that the transit times were determined almost entirely by the entrance block rates. The results of the presented model are relevant to understanding queueing systems including the choice of service windows and can be employed to optimize facility design and floor management.

  1. 78 FR 59427 - Reasonable Charges for Inpatient MS-DRGs and SNF Medical Services; V3.13, Fiscal Year 2014 Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... amounts for the following types of charges: Acute inpatient facility charges; skilled nursing facility/sub... this notice. These changes are effective October 1, 2013. When charges for medical care or services... section of this notice, only the acute inpatient facility charges and skilled nursing facility/sub-acute...

  2. 76 FR 60136 - Reasonable Charges for Inpatient MS-DRGs and SNF Medical Services; V3.8, 2012 Fiscal Year Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... amounts for the following types of charges: acute inpatient facility charges; skilled nursing facility/sub... this notice. These changes are effective October 1, 2011. When charges for medical care or services... in the Summary section of this notice, only the acute inpatient facility charges and skilled nursing...

  3. 77 FR 55269 - Reasonable Charges for Inpatient MS-DRGs and SNF Medical Services; V3.11, 2013; Fiscal Year Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-07

    ... amounts for the following types of charges: Acute inpatient facility charges; skilled nursing facility/sub... this notice. These changes are effective October 1, 2012. When charges for medical care or services... section of this notice, only the acute inpatient facility charges and skilled nursing facility/sub-acute...

  4. Outcomes of social work and case management services during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation: the SCIRehab project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M; Gassaway, Julie; Abeyta, Nichola; Freeman, Erma S; Primack, Donna; Kreider, Scott E D; Whiteneck, Gale

    2012-11-01

    To investigate associations of social work/case management (SW/CM) services during inpatient rehabilitation following spinal cord injury (SCI) and patient characteristics with outcomes. Prospective observational cohort of individuals with SCI receiving inpatient rehabilitation. Six inpatient rehabilitation centers. 1032 individuals with traumatic SCI. Not applicable. Type of residence at the time of rehabilitation discharge. Employment/school status, presence of a pressure ulcer, Patient History Questionnaire, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART) subscales, and rehospitalization at 1-year post-injury. The intensity of specific SW/CM services is associated with multiple outcomes examined. More sessions dedicated to discharge planning for a home discharge and financial planning were associated positively with more discharge to home, while more sessions focused on planning for discharge to a location other than home, e.g. nursing home or long-term acute care facilities, have negative associations with societal participation outcomes (CHART Social Integration, Occupation, and Mobility scores) as well as with residing at home at the time of the 1-year injury anniversary. The intensity and type of SW/CM services are associated with outcomes at rehabilitation discharge and at 1-year post-injury. Discharge to home may require assistance from SW/CM in the area of discharge planning and financial planning, while discharge to non-home residence demands directed SW/CM services for such placement. Note: This is the eighth of nine articles of this SCIRehab series.

  5. Relocation consequences on an ophthalmology consultation service from an inpatient to outpatient facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh JS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jorawer S Singh,1 Vincent M Imbrogno,2 Mary K Howard,3 Amandip S Cheema,3 Ausra D Selvadurai,4 Surbhi Bansal5 1Department of Ophthalmology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, 2Contemporary Ophthalmology of Erie, Erie, PA, 3Department of Ophthalmology, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 4OcuSight Eye Care Center, Rochester, NY, 5Department of Ophthalmology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA Importance: This study shows that relocation of an academic ophthalmology residency program from an inpatient to an outpatient setting in western New York does not affect the consult volume but affects management patterns and follow-up rates.Objective: To investigate the effects on the ophthalmology consultation service of an academic program with relocation from a Regional Level-1 Trauma center to an outpatient facility.Design: Consultation notes from 3 years before and 3 years after the University at Buffalo’s (UB Department of Ophthalmology relocation from a Regional Level-1 Trauma center (Erie County Medical Center to an outpatient facility (Ross Eye Institute were obtained from hospital electronic medical records and analyzed.Setting: Hospitalized care and institutional practice.Participants: All inpatient or Emergency Room Ophthalmology consultation patients from the Department of Ophthalmology at UB from 2004 to 2010 (1,379 patients.Exposures: None, this was a retrospective chart review.Main outcome measures: Patient demographics, reason for consult, diagnoses, and ophthalmic procedures performed by the UB Department of Ophthalmology before and after its relocation.Results: Relocation to the outpatient facility did not affect consult volume (P=0.15. The number of consults focusing on ophthalmic conditions, as a percentage of the yearly total, rose 460% (P=0.0001, while systemic condition consults with ocular manifestations fell 83% (P=0.0001. Consults for ocular trauma decreased 65% (P=0.0034. Consults ending with a

  6. Redesigning an inpatient pediatric service using Lean to improve throughput efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Michael J; Gosik, Kirk

    2015-04-01

    Data suggest that delays in discharges from inpatient units affect hospital throughput and contribute to emergency department crowding. Lean/Six Sigma (LSS) has been shown to improve inefficiencies in other industries. There are no published data on what impact LSS can have on advancing and sustaining earlier patient discharges. Determine the impact LSS has on advancing times of placement of discharge order and patient discharge compared to control. Secondary outcomes were length of stay (LOS) and readmission rates. Prospective quality study with concurrent controls. Academic medical center. Hospitalized pediatric patients compared to remainder of the children's hospital services. Staff reallocation, creation of standard workflow, multidisciplinary predischarge planning, and creation of a discharge checklist. Median time of discharge order entry and median time of actual patient discharge, proportion of patients discharged before noon and 2 pm, and LOS and readmission rates. The median time of order entry was 10:45 compared to 14:05, and the median time of discharge was 14:15 compared to 15:48. The LOS and the readmission rates remained the same in both cohorts. The control group had faster baseline discharge order entry and patient discharge, but discharge performance did not improve, despite a significantly lower average daily census. We determined that Lean approaches can have an immediate and sustained impact on advancing patient discharges, with no negative affect on LOS or readmission rates. Our intervention generated consistent results independent of personnel during the busiest months of the year at a tertiary care children's hospital. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  7. An evaluation of the level of satisfaction with a dedicated inpatient venepuncture service at a rehabilitation centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oatey, Anthea; Stiller, Kathy

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this prospective observational study was to determine the levels of satisfaction of the three main 'customers' of a dedicated inpatient venepuncture service at a rehabilitation centre, namely the patients, medical staff and nursing staff. The venepuncture service was delivered by two part-time nurses. One hundred and six patients, 14 medical staff and 35 nurses participated in the study. Three purpose-designed surveys were administered to investigate levels of satisfaction. High degrees of satisfaction were reported by all three 'customer' groups. Patients were highly satisfied with the interpersonal skills of the venepuncture nurses and their ability to obtain blood on the first pass, medical staff agreed that a dedicated venepuncture service gave them more time to spend in patient care, and nursing staff believed that a dedicated venepuncture service caused less disruption to patients' daily schedule.

  8. Use of Inpatient Mental Health Services by Members of Ethnic Minority Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Lonnie R.; Cheung, Freda K.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the ethnic-related differences in mental hospitalization admittance rates, diagnoses, and length of treatment. Explores reasons other than ethnic origin that may account for these differences, including socioeconomic standing, access to alternative services, bias in practitioners' assignment of diagnostic labels, and differential stigma…

  9. A comparison of two psychological screening methods currently used for inpatients in a UK burns service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Laura; Tew, Victoria; Rai, Lovedeep

    2017-12-01

    Various types of psychological screening are currently used in the UK to identify burn patients who are experiencing psychological distress and may need additional support and intervention during their hospital admission. This audit compared two types of psychological screening in 40 burn inpatients. One screening method was an unpublished questionnaire designed to explore multiple areas of potential distress for those who have experienced burns. The other method was an indirect psychological screen via discussions within multi-disciplinary team (MDT) meetings where a Clinical Psychologist was present to guide and prompt psychological discussions. Data was collected between November 2012 and September 2016. Results suggested that both screening methods were similar in identifying patients who benefit from more formal psychological assessment. Indeed, statistical analysis reported no difference between the two screening methods (N=40, p=.424, two-tailed). In conclusion, measuring distress in burns inpatients using a burns-specific questionnaire and psychological discussions within MDT meetings are similar in their ability to identify patients in need of more thorough psychological assessment. However, both screening methods identified patients who were in need of psychological input when the other did not. This suggests that psychological screening of burns inpatients, and the psychological difficulties that they can present with, is complex. The advantages and disadvantages of both methods of screening are discussed. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Poor Self-Rated Health Influences Hospital Service Use in Hospitalized Inpatients With Chronic Conditions in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Vivian; McLachlan, Craig S; Baune, Bernhard T; Huang, Chun-Ta; Wu, Chia-Yi

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to investigate the association between self-rated health (SRH) and use of hospital services (ie, medical outpatient department, emergency department, and general ward. admissions). Cross-sectional study data were collected from 230 consecutive patients admitted to medical departments of a 2000-bed academic medical center in Taiwan using standardized operating procedures for data collection of SRH (ie, a single-item question inquiring overall perceived health status), medical disorders, depressive symptoms, and combined service utilization over a 1-year period (ie, number of visits to outpatient department, number of visits to emergency department, and number of hospitalizations). Electronic medical records were retrieved, with self-reported external medical visits added to in-hospital frequencies of service use to provide better estimation of health service utilization. Fifty-two percent of study patients rated their health as poor or very poor. Poor SRH was associated with more visits to medical outpatient department, emergency department, and hospital admission. Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated an independent association between poor SRH and services utilization after adjustment for age, gender, hypertension, diabetes, metastatic cancer, number of chronic illness, life-threatening event, life-time suicidal ideation, and depression. SRH may be a useful research tool to model medical service use for inpatients with chronic conditions.

  11. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Since October 1, 1983, most hospitals have been paid under the hospital inpatient prospective payment system (PPS). However, certain types of specialty hospitals and...

  12. 75 FR 59329 - Reasonable Charges for Inpatient MS-DRGs and SNF Medical Services; 2011 Fiscal Year Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... the following types of charges: Acute inpatient facility charges; skilled nursing facility/sub-acute... are hereby updated as described in the Supplementary Information section of this notice. These changes..., only the acute inpatient facility charges and skilled nursing facility/sub-acute inpatient facility...

  13. 78 FR 70584 - ATOS IT Solutions & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, Including Workers Whose...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ... & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI... Solutions & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, Mason, Ohio. The workers are engaged in... of ATOS IT Solutions & Services, Inc., Billing and Collections Department, including workers whose...

  14. Compliance with Australian stroke guideline recommendations for outdoor mobility and transport training by post-inpatient rehabilitation services: An observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Annie; Ada, Louise; Kelly, Patrick J; Middleton, Sandy; Goodall, Stephen; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Logan, Pip; Longworth, Mark; Karageorge, Aspasia

    2015-07-29

    Community participation is often restricted after stroke, due to reduced confidence and outdoor mobility. Australian clinical guidelines recommend that specific evidence-based interventions be delivered to target these restrictions, such as multiple escorted outdoor journeys. The aim of this study was to describe post-inpatient outdoor mobility and transport training delivered to stroke survivors in New South Wales, Australia and whether therapy differed according to type, sector or location of service provider. Using an observational retrospective cohort study design, 24 rehabilitation service providers were audited. Provider types included outpatient (n = 8), day therapy (n = 9), home-based rehabilitation (n = 5) and transitional aged care services (TAC, n = 2). Records of 15 stroke survivors who had received post-hospital rehabilitation were audited per service, for wait time, duration, amount of therapy and outdoor-related therapy. A total of 311 records were audited. Median wait time for post-hospital therapy was 13 days (IQR, 5-35). Median duration of therapy was 68 days (IQR, 35-109), consisting of 11 sessions (IQR 4-19). Overall, a median of one session (IQR 0-3) was conducted outdoors per person. Outdoor-related therapy was similar across service providers, except that TAC delivered an average of 5.4 more outdoor-related sessions (95% CI 4.4 to 6.4), and 3.5 more outings into public streets (95% CI 2.8 to 4.3) per person, compared to outpatient services. The majority of service providers in the sample delivered little evidence-based outdoor mobility and travel training per stroke participant, as recommended in national stroke guidelines. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12611000554965.

  15. Evaluation of a motivational interview for substance use within psychiatric in-patient services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Amanda; Lewin, Terry; Reichler, Heidi; Clancy, Richard; Carr, Vaughan; Garrett, Rachel; Sly, Ketrina; Devir, Holly; Terry, Margarett

    2002-10-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a motivational interview among hospitalized psychiatric patients with comorbid substance use disorder in reducing alcohol and other drug (AOD) use. Subjects were assigned randomly to receive an individual motivational interview (n=79) or a self-help booklet (control condition; n=81). Subjects were volunteers recruited from a major public psychiatric hospital. Subjects met abuse or dependence criteria on the structured clinical interview for diagnosis (SCID) for alcohol, cannabis or amphetamine or they reported hazardous use during the last month of one or more of these drug types on the opiate treatment index (OTI). Either one 30-45-minute motivational interview or brief advice. The SCID and OTI were the main measures. There was a modest short-term effect of the motivational interview on an aggregate index of alcohol and other drug use (polydrug use on the OTI). Cannabis use remained high among the sample over the 12-month follow-up period. Although motivational interviewing appears feasible among in-patients in psychiatric hospital with comorbid substance use disorders, more extensive interventions are recommended, continuing on an out-patient basis, particularly for cannabis use.

  16. 25 CFR 20.401 - What is included under Services to Children, Elderly, and Families?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What is included under Services to Children, Elderly, and... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Services to Children, Elderly, and Families § 20.401 What is included under Services to Children, Elderly, and Families? Services to Children, Elderly, and...

  17. 20 CFR 404.1322 - Post-World War II service included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Post-World War II service included. 404.1322... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Wage Credits for Veterans and Members of the Uniformed Services Post-World War II Veterans § 404.1322 Post-World War II service included. Your service was in the active service of...

  18. 75 FR 7218 - Payment for Inpatient and Outpatient Health Care Professional Services at Non-Departmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    .... General Medical & Surgical Hospitals/Freestanding Ambulatory Surgical & Emergency Centers (NAICS 622110... authorize payment for emergency care in a non-VA facility in limited situations primarily where the care is... services if such care or services were provided in a medical emergency and VA or other Federal facilities...

  19. Microbiologic evaluation of skin wounds: alarming trend toward antibiotic resistance in an inpatient dermatology service during a 10-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Isabel C; Kirsner, Robert S; Kerdel, Francisco A

    2004-06-01

    Increasing resistance to commonly used antibiotics has been seen for patients with superficial skin wounds and leg ulcers. We sought to evaluate bacterial isolates from leg ulcers and superficial wounds for resistance to commonly used antibiotics and to compare current data with previous data. We performed a chart review for patients admitted to a tertiary care dermatology inpatient unit from January to December 2001. Comparison was made with 2 previous surveys of the same inpatient service from 1992 and 1996. Bacterial isolates were cultured from 148 patients, 84% (72 of 86) with leg ulcers and 38% (76 of 202) with superficial wounds. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most common bacterial isolates in both groups. For patients with leg ulcers, S aureus grew in 67% of isolates (48/72) of which 75% (36/48) were methicillin-resistant (MRSA). Of leg ulcers, 35% (25/72) grew P aeruginosa, which was resistant to quinolones in 56% of cultures (14/25). For patients with superficial wounds, S aureus was isolated in 75% (57/76) and 44% were MRSA (25/57). P aeruginosa grew in 17% of isolates (13/76) and was resistant to quinolones in 18%. We found a marked increase in antibiotic resistance for both leg ulcers and superficial wounds. Over time, MRSA increased in leg ulcers from 26% in 1992 to 75% in 2001. For superficial wounds, MRSA increased from 7% in 1992 to 44% in 2001. P aeruginosa resistance to quinolones in leg ulcers increased from 19% in 1992 to 56% in 2001, whereas for superficial wounds there was no resistance in 1992 and 18% resistance in 2001. Rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria continues and is a problem of increasing significance in dermatology. Common pathogenic bacteria, S aureus and P aeruginosa, showed increased resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Selection of antibiotics should be on the basis of local surveillance programs.

  20. The Effectiveness and Efficiency of Inpatient Rehabilitation Services in Thailand: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilai Kuptniratsaikul

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effectiveness and efficiency of inpatient rehabilitation. Methods A total of 2,081 patients across 14 hospitals were recruited in this prospective, multicenter cohort study. Data on the diagnoses, types of admission, length of stay (LOS, and functional ability score based on a modified Barthel index (BI at admission (BIa and at discharge (BId were collected. Effectiveness was defined as the difference of BI (ΔBI and efficiency as ΔBI divided by LOS. Results The majority of patients were diagnosed with spinal cord injury and stroke (41.8% and 37.5%, respectively. The mean age was 52.4 ± 18.6 years with a mean LOS of 23.9 ± 19.9 days, BIa of 9.4 ± 6.1, and BId of 12.3 ± 5.7. The overall effectiveness and efficiency were 2.9 ± 3.4 and 0.16 ± 0.30 scores/day, respectively; stroke rehabilitation provided the most effective and efficient BI improvement compared with rehabilitation for other diseases. Most patients (54.5% received intensive functional rehabilitation, which was the most effective and efficient program (4.4 ± 3.6 and 0.23 ± 0.32 scores/day, respectively; the efficiency of the intensive program was not different among various diseases (P = 0.726. Conclusion Stroke rehabilitation had the highest efficiency compared with rehabilitation for other neurological diseases. The most efficient type of admission was intensive rehabilitation, regardless of the disease being treated.

  1. 76 FR 4725 - Hewlett Packard Company Application Services Division Including Workers Whose Unemployment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard Company Application Services Division Including..., applicable to workers of Hewlett Packard Company, Applications Services Division, Fishers, Indiana. The... provide consulting and application development services for Hewlett Packard Company and its customers. New...

  2. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Inpatient Claims PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Inpatient Public Use Files (PUF) named CMS 2008 BSA Inpatient Claims PUF with information from 2008 Medicare...

  3. 42 CFR 413.217 - Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... payment system. 413.217 Section 413.217 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT....217 Items and services included in the ESRD prospective payment system. The following items and services are included in the ESRD prospective payment system effective January 1, 2011: (a) Renal dialysis...

  4. Inpatient treatment of major depression in Austria between 1989 and 2009: impact of downsizing of psychiatric hospitals on admissions, suicide rates and outpatient psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssoki, B; Willeit, M; Blüml, V; Höfer, P; Erfurth, A; Psota, G; Lesch, O M; Kapusta, N D

    2011-09-01

    During the last 20 years Austrian psychiatric services underwent fundamental changes, as a focus was set on downsizing psychiatric hospitals. Little is known about how restructuring of mental health services affected patients with major depression and suicide rates. Monthly hospital discharges from all hospitals in Austria with the diagnosis of unipolar major depression as primary reason for inpatient treatment were obtained for the time period between 1989 and 2008. These data were correlated with relevant parameters from the general health system, such as number of hospital beds, suicide rate, density of psychotherapists and sales of antidepressants. While the number of psychiatric beds was reduced by almost 30%, the total annual numbers of inpatient treatment episodes for depression increased by 360%. This increase was stronger for men than for women. Further on this development was accompanied by a decrease in the suicide rate and an improvement in the availability of professional outpatient mental health service providers. Only aggregated patient data and no single case histories were available for this study. The validity of the correct diagnosis of unipolar major depression must be doubted, as most likely not all patients were seen by a clinical expert. Our data show that although inpatient treatment for unipolar major depression dramatically increased, reduction of psychiatric beds did not lead to an increase of suicide rates. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Inpatient satisfaction and usage patterns of personalized smart bedside station system for patient-centered service at a tertiary university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Borim; Kim, Seok; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Hwang, Hee; Yoo, Sooyoung

    2016-11-01

    Bedside stations, also known as bedside terminals, are in place to enhance the quality and experience of a hospital's healthcare service delivery. The purpose of this study was to identify information needs and overall satisfaction with the personalized patient bedside system, called Smart Bedside Station (SBS) system, embedded in a tertiary general university hospital. End-user responses on the satisfaction survey and system usage logs of the SBS system were collected and analyzed. For the user opinion survey, 156 nurses and 1914 patients, their family members, or caregivers participated during the evaluation period of 2013 to 2014 in this study. All working nurses in the SBS-installed ward were answered the paper-based evaluation, for complete enumeration survey. Inpatients were voluntary participated to deliver the online questionnaire on the SBS menu. We also explored system log data including page calls and usage time from December 2013 to 2015. Regarding the relationship of overall satisfaction of the SBS with patient's characteristics, patient's education status and degree of familiarity with the smart device were statistically significant. From the analysis of system logs, Personalized My Menu(28.0%) was the most frequently used menu item (except for TV and Internet entertainment service use of 62.7%),it provides individual health information, such as laboratory test results, hospital fee check, message logs, daily medication information, and meal information. Next frequently used menus were information support(4.9%) which deliver hospital guide and health information and convenience service ordering(4.4%) such as meal order, bed sheet change. Satisfaction survey results and log data results show that the personalized service enhances the user satisfaction during hospital admission. Our post-implementation experience and subsequent assessment of SBS system is capable of providing insights into improving the hospital information system and service contents

  6. Timing of palliative care team referrals for inpatients receiving rapid response services: A retrospective pilot study in a US hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, M; Cardona-Morrell, M; Stevens, P; Bey, J; Smith Glasgow, M E

    2017-10-01

    Research indicates up to one-third of rapid response team calls relate to end-of-life symptoms. The CriSTAL criteria were developed as a screening tool to identify high risk of death within three months. The primary purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the timing of palliative care referrals in patients receiving rapid response team services, and patients' CriSTAL criteria score on admission. The potential feasibility of using the CriSTAL tool to stimulate earlier Palliative Care Team (PCT) referral served as an underlying goal, and investigation of a relationship between specific CriSTAL criteria and the prediction of in-hospital death was a secondary objective. A retrospective chart review of rapid response calls made in 2015 was used to identify patient risk of death on admission based on the CriSTAL criteria. The presence and timing of PCT referral as well as patient survival status to hospital discharge were documented for comparison. A sample of 183 charts from 584 inpatients involved in over 600 RRT events recorded in 2015. The study was undertaken in a 676-bed teaching hospital in the Midwestern U.S. Ninety-one patients died during the hospital stay while 92 patients from the 493 individuals who survived were randomly selected for full analysis. Applying CriSTAL criteria to the 141 individuals aged 50 years or older indicated that frailty (OR=1.43, 95%CI 1.08-1.89, p=0.012), being a male (OR=3.14; 95%CI 1.40-7.05, p=0.006), and the presence of two or more comorbidities (OR=3.71, 95%CI 1.67-8.24, p=0.001) were the most significant predictors of in-hospital death after adjusting for age. A CriSTAL score of 6 was the optimal cut-off for high-risk of in-hospital death. Palliative care consultations within the high-risk population occurred for 45.2% of the deceased and 40.4% of the survivors. Consultation often occurred within two days of the RRT event and many patients (46.8%) died within one day of the consultation. A positive relationship was found

  7. 78 FR 12358 - UBS Financial Services, Inc., Wealth Management Americas Operations, Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ..., Inc., Wealth Management Americas Operations, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Leafstone... Services, Inc., Wealth Management Americas Operations (UBS), Weehawken, New Jersey. The workers are engaged... to include all leased workers on-site at UBS Financial Services, Inc., Wealth Management Americas...

  8. 75 FR 76040 - Weyerhaeuser Company Corporate Headquarters Including On-Site Leased Workers From Volt Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... Employment and Training Administration Weyerhaeuser Company Corporate Headquarters Including On-Site Leased... Weyerhaeuser Company, Corporate Headquarters, including on-site leased workers from Volt Services, Adecco, and... subject firm. The workers supply corporate and administrative services for the firm. The company reports...

  9. 75 FR 39045 - Hewlett-Packard Company Division of Corporate Administration and Shared Services Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... Employment and Training Administration Hewlett-Packard Company Division of Corporate Administration and... Division of Corporate Administration and Shared Services Including On- Site Leased Workers From Manpower... Company, Division of Corporate Administration and Shared Services, including on- site leased workers from...

  10. 76 FR 19467 - Weyerhaeuser Company, Corporate Headquarters Including On-Site Leased Workers From Volt Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... Employment and Training Administration Weyerhaeuser Company, Corporate Headquarters Including On-Site Leased... to workers of Weyerhaeuser Company, Corporate Headquarters, including on-site leased workers from Volt Services, Adecco, and Manpower, Federal Way, Washington. The workers supply corporate and...

  11. Inpatient preanalytic process improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagar, Elizabeth A; Phipps, Ron; Del Guidice, Robert; Middleton, Lavinia P; Bingham, John; Prejean, Cheryl; Johnson-Hamilton, Martha; Philip, Pheba; Le, Ngoc Han; Muses, Waheed

    2013-12-01

    Phlebotomy services are a common target for preanalytic improvements. Many new, quality engineering tools have recently been applied in clinical laboratories. However, data on relatively few projects have been published. This example describes a complete application of current, quality engineering tools to improve preanalytic phlebotomy services. To decrease the response time in the preanalytic inpatient laboratory by 25%, to reduce the number of incident reports related to preanalytic phlebotomy, and to make systematic process changes that satisfied the stakeholders. The Department of Laboratory Medicine, General Services Section, at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston) is responsible for inpatient phlebotomy in a 24-hour operation, which serves 689 inpatient beds. The study director was project director of the Division of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine's Quality Improvement Section and was assisted by 2 quality technologists and an industrial engineer from MD Anderson Office of Performance Improvement. After implementing each solution, using well-recognized, quality tools and metrics, the response time for blood collection decreased by 23%, which was close to meeting the original responsiveness goal of 25%. The response time between collection and arrival in the laboratory decreased by 8%. Applicable laboratory-related incident reports were reduced by 43%. Comprehensive application of quality tools, such as statistical control charts, Pareto diagrams, value-stream maps, process failure modes and effects analyses, fishbone diagrams, solution prioritization matrices, and customer satisfaction surveys can significantly improve preset goals for inpatient phlebotomy.

  12. Inpatient Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Kayla

    2016-12-01

    Inpatient violence constitutes a major concern for staff, patients, and administrators. Violence can cause physical injury and psychological trauma. Although violence presents a challenge to inpatient clinicians, it should not be viewed as inevitable. By looking at history of violence, in addition to clinical and other historical factors, clinicians can identify which patients present the most risk of exhibiting violent behavior and whether the violence would most likely flow from psychosis, impulsivity, or predatory characteristics. With that information, clinicians can provide environmental and treatment modifications to lessen the likelihood of violence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Hispanic Inpatient Pain Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Deborah Dillon; Ambrose, Margaret; Morey, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Hispanic adults experience significant pain, but little is known about their pain during hospitalization. The purpose of this research was to describe Hispanic inpatients' pain intensity and compare their pain intensity with that of non-Hispanic patients. A post hoc descriptive design was used to examine 1,466 Hispanic inpatients' medical records (63.2% English speakers) and 12,977 non-Hispanic inpatients' medical records from one hospital for 2012. Mean documented pain intensity was mild for both Hispanic and non-Hispanic inpatients. Pain intensity was greater for English-speaking Hispanic patients than Spanish speakers. The odds of being documented with moderate or greater pain intensity decreased 30% for Spanish-speaking patients. Greater pain intensity documented for English-speaking Hispanic inpatients suggests underreporting of pain intensity by Spanish-speaking patients. Practitioners should use interpreter services when assessing and treating pain with patients who speak languages different from the practitioners' language(s). © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Medicare Program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system changes and FY2011 rates; provider agreements and supplier approvals; and hospital conditions of participation for rehabilitation and respiratory care services; Medicaid program: accreditation for providers of inpatient psychiatric services. Final rules and interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-16

    : We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems and to implement certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act and other legislation. In addition, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the rates for Medicare acute care hospital inpatient services for operating costs and capital-related costs. We also are setting forth the update to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. We are updating the payment policy and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and setting forth the changes to the payment rates, factors, and other payment rate policies under the LTCH PPS. In addition, we are finalizing the provisions of the August 27, 2009 interim final rule that implemented statutory provisions relating to payments to LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities and increases in beds in existing LTCHs and LTCH satellite facilities under the LTCH PPS. We are making changes affecting the: Medicare conditions of participation for hospitals relating to the types of practitioners who may provide rehabilitation services and respiratory care services; and determination of the effective date of provider agreements and supplier approvals under Medicare. We are also setting forth provisions that offer psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs increased flexibility in obtaining accreditation to participate in the Medicaid program. Psychiatric hospitals and hospitals with inpatient psychiatric programs will have the choice of undergoing a State survey or of obtaining accreditation from a national accrediting organization whose hospital accreditation

  15. 76 FR 24914 - Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River, Inc., Including Workers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-03

    ... Digital River Education Services acquired Journey Education Marketing (JEM) in August 2010. Some workers... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,975] Digital River Education Services, Inc., a Division of Digital River, Inc., Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI...

  16. Revisions to the 2009 American Society of Clinical Oncology/Oncology Nursing Society chemotherapy administration safety standards: expanding the scope to include inpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Joseph O; Polovich, Martha; Gilmore, Terry R; Schulmeister, Lisa; Esper, Peg; Lefebvre, Kristine B; Neuss, Michael N

    2012-01-01

    In November 2009, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) jointly published a set of 31 voluntary chemotherapy safety standards for adult patients with cancer, as the end result of a highly structured, multistakeholder process. The standards were explicitly created to address patient safety in the administration of parenteral and oral chemotherapeutic agents in outpatient oncology settings. In January 2011, a workgroup consisting of ASCO and ONS members was convened to review feedback received since publication of the standards, to address interim changes in practice, and to modify the standards as needed. The most significant change to the standards is to extend their scope to the inpatient setting. This change reflects the conviction that the same standards for chemotherapy administration safety should apply in all settings. The proposed set of standards has been approved by the Board of Directors for both ASCO and ONS and has been posted for public comment. Comments were used as the basis for final editing of the revised standards. The workgroup recognizes that the safety of oral chemotherapy usage, nononcology medication reconciliation, and home chemotherapy administration are not adequately addressed in the original or revised standards. A separate process, cosponsored by ASCO and ONS, will address the development of safety standards for these areas.

  17. The effect of an occupational therapy mental health day treatment centre on the use of inpatient services in the Western Cape, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelbrecht, Riekie; Plastow, Nicola; Botha, Ulla; Niehaus, Djh; Koen, Liezl

    2018-04-27

    The aim of this study was to determine whether attendance at an occupational therapy-led day treatment centre for mental health care users affects the use of inpatient services in South Africa. A retrospective pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental study design was used to compare admissions and days spent in hospital during the 24 months before and after attendance at the centre, using the hospital's electronic records. Total population sampling yielded data for 44 mental health care users who made first contact with the service between July 2009 and June 2010. Data were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test, Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test and Mann-Whitney U test. There was a significant decrease in the number of admissions (z = -4.093, p = 0.00) and the number of days spent in hospital (z = -4.730, p = 0.00). Participants were admitted to psychiatric care 33 times less in the 24 months' post-intervention, indicating a medium effect (r = 0.436). They also spend 2569 days less in hospital, indicating a large effect (r = 0.504). The findings suggest that an occupational therapy-led day treatment centre could be effective in reducing the use of inpatient mental health services in South Africa. Implications for Rehabilitation Attendance at an occupational therapy-led community day treatment centre decreases the number of admissions and number of days spent in hospital and is therefore beneficial to mental health care users and service providers. The study indicates that the successful implementation of a community day treatment centre for mental health care users on the grounds of a tertiary hospital by utilising existing resources is possible.

  18. A nonresident cardiovascular inpatient service improves residents' experiences in an academic medical center: a new model to meet the challenges of the new millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Rick A; Linderbaum, Jane A; Naessens, James M; Spurrier, Barbara; Koch, Mark B; Gaines, Kim A

    2004-05-01

    Hospital practices in academic medical centers have fewer medical residents available to provide hospital care, necessitating alternative models for patient care. This article reports a new model for care of inpatients with cardiovascular diseases. In 1998, a new nonresident cardiovascular patient care (Cardiology IV) service was implemented that used a team approach of staff attending cardiologists, cardiovascular fellows, midlevel practitioners (nurse practitioners and physician's assistants), and nurses to evaluate and treat patients. Standard dismissal information was collected for all patients dismissed in 1998 to compare diagnosis-related group, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, and 30-day readmission rates for Cardiology IV. These characteristics were compared with those for the remaining resident teaching services. Patients' satisfaction surveys from 1997 and 1998 were compared. Attending physicians' and internal medicine residents' satisfaction before and after the implementation of the new service was also compared. Staff and resident physicians were more satisfied with their hospital rotations after this intervention was introduced. Optimal patient care was maintained, and efficiency enhanced. Patients on Cardiology IV had a shorter length of stay compared with patients on the resident teaching service. This new hospital model has provided an alternative to patient care without the need for residents and protects education on the conventional teaching services. This model maintains optimal patient care and has resulted in enhanced satisfaction of attending staff and residents.

  19. How forest management affects ecosystem services, including timber production and economic return

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duncker, Philipp S.; Raulund-Rasmussen, Karsten; Gundersen, Per

    2012-01-01

    Forest ecosystems deliver multiple goods and services and, traditionally, forest owners tend to have a high interest in goods in the form of merchantable wood. As a consequence, forest management often aims to increase timber production and economic returns through intervention into natural...... processes. However, forests provide further services, including carbon sequestration, water quantity and quality, and preservation of biodiversity. In order to develop and implement strategies for sustainable forest management, it is important to anticipate the long-term effects of different forest...... management alternatives on the ability of the forest to provide ecosystem goods and services. Management objectives might emphasize economic interests at the expense of other services. Very few attempts have been made to illustrate and evaluate quantitatively the relationship between forest goods...

  20. Hospital billing for blood processing and transfusion for inpatient stays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Michael J; Nayar, Preethy

    2009-07-01

    Medicare, an important payer for hospitals, reimburses hospitals for inpatient stays using Diagnosis Related Groups (DRGs). Many private insurers also use the DRG methodology to reimburse hospitals for their services. Therefore, those blood service organizations that bill Medicare directly require an understanding of the DRG system of payment to enable them to bill Medicare correctly, and in order to be certain they are adequately reimbursed. Blood centers that do not bill Medicare directly need to understand how hospitals are reimbursed for blood and blood components as this affects a hospital's ability to pay service fees related to these products. This review presents a detailed explanation of how hospitals are reimbursed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for Medicare inpatient services, including blood services.

  1. Inpatient Dialysis Unit Project Development: Redesigning Acute Hemodialysis Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Executive leaders of an acute care hospital performed a market and financial analysis, and created a business plan to establish an inpatient hemodialysis unit operated by the hospital to provide safe, high-quality, evidence-based care to the population of individuals experiencing end stage renal disease (ESRD) within the community. The business plan included a SWOT (Strengths - Weaknesses - Opportunities - Threats) analysis to assess advantages of the hospital providing inpatient hemodialysis services versus outsourcing the services with a contracted agency. The results of the project were a newly constructed tandem hemodialysis room and an operational plan with clearly defined key performance indicators, process improvement initiatives, and financial goals. This article provides an overview of essential components of a business plan to guide the establishment of an inpatient hemodialysis unit. Copyright© by the American Nephrology Nurses Association.

  2. Regional Correlates of Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taina Ala-Nikkola

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Current reforms of mental health and substance abuse services (MHS emphasize community-based care and the downsizing of psychiatric hospitals. Reductions in acute and semi-acute hospital beds are achieved through shortened stays or by avoiding hospitalization. Understanding the factors that drive the current inpatient treatment provision is essential. We investigated how the MHS service structure (diversity of services and balance of personnel resources and indicators of service need (mental health index, education, single household, and alcohol sales correlated with acute and semi-acute inpatient treatment provision. The European Service Mapping Schedule-Revised (ESMS-R tool was used to classify the adult MHS structure in southern Finland (population 1.8 million, 18+ years. The diversity of MHS in terms of range of outpatient and day care services or the overall personnel resourcing in inpatient or outpatient services was not associated with the inpatient treatment provision. In the univariate analyses, sold alcohol was associated with the inpatient treatment provision, while in the multivariate modeling, only a general index for mental health needs was associated with greater hospitalization. In the dehospitalization process, direct resource re-allocation and substituting of inpatient treatment with outpatient care per se is likely insufficient, since inpatient treatment is linked to contextual factors in the population and the health care system. Mental health services reforms require both strategic planning of service system as a whole and detailed understanding of effects of societal components.

  3. Inpatients' Preferences, Beliefs, and Stated Willingness to Pay for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montross-Thomas, Lori P; Meier, Emily A; Reynolds-Norolahi, Kimberly; Raskin, Erin E; Slater, Daniel; Mills, Paul J; MacElhern, Lauray; Kallenberg, Gene

    2017-04-01

    Research demonstrates the benefits of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in myriad environments. Yet, the majority of CAM services are offered in outpatient settings. Incorporating CAM into hospital settings may lead to increased patient comfort, well-being, and overall satisfaction with hospital admissions. Few studies have examined CAM services among inpatients. Therefore, this study assessed inpatients' preferences and beliefs regarding CAM, as well as their stated willingness to pay for these services. Adult patients (n = 100), ranging in age from 19-95 years (M = 53 years; SD = 19.2 years), were recruited during their hospitalization in the University of California, San Diego, Healthcare System. The inpatients completed a brief individual interview to gather their perspectives on common CAM services, including acupuncture, aromatherapy, art therapy, guided imagery, healthy food, humor therapy, massage therapy, music therapy, pet therapy, Reiki, and stress management. Inpatients were asked which CAM therapies they perceived as being potentially the most helpful, their willingness to pay for those therapies, and their perceived beliefs regarding the use of those therapies. Inpatients most commonly perceived healthy food (85%), massage therapy (82%), and humor therapy (70%) to be the most helpful, and were most willing to pay for healthy food (71%), massage therapy (70%), and stress management (48%). Inpatients most commonly believed CAM treatments would provide relaxation (88%), increase well-being (86%), and increase their overall satisfaction with the hospitalization (85%). This study suggests that CAM services may be a beneficial addition to hospitals, as demonstrated by inpatients' interest and stated willingness to pay for these services. These findings may help organizational leaders when making choices regarding the development of CAM services within hospitals, particularly since a significant percentage of inpatients reported that

  4. HCUP State Inpatient Databases (SID) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The State Inpatient Databases (SID) contain the universe of hospital inpatient discharge abstracts in States participating in HCUP that release their data through...

  5. Service use, charge, and access to mental healthcare in a private Kenyan inpatient setting: the effects of insurance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Pattison de Menil

    Full Text Available The gap in Kenya between need and treatment for mental disorders is wide, and private providers are increasingly offering services, funded in part by private health insurance (PHI. Chiromo, a 30-bed psychiatric hospital in Nairobi, forms part of one of the largest private psychiatric providers in East Africa. The study evaluated the effects of insurance on service use and charge, questioning implications on access to care. Data derive from invoices for 455 sequential patients, including 12-month follow-up. Multi-linear and binary logistic regressions explored the effect of PHI on readmission, cumulative length of stay, and treatment charge. Patients were 66.4% male with a mean age of 36.8 years. Half were employed in the formal sector. 70% were admitted involuntarily. Diagnoses were: substance use disorder 31.6%; serious mental disorder 49.5%; common mental disorder 7%; comorbid 7%; other 4.9%. In addition to daily psychiatric consultations, two-thirds received individual counselling or group therapy; half received lab tests or scans; and 16.2% received ECT. Most took a psychiatric medicine. Half of those on antipsychotics were given only brands. Insurance paid in full for 28.8% of patients. Mean length of stay was 11.8 days and, in 12 months, 16.7 days (median 10.6. 22.2% were readmitted within 12 months. Patients with PHI stayed 36% longer than those paying out-of-pocket and had 2.5 times higher odds of readmission. Mean annual charge per patient was Int$ 4,262 (median Int$ 2,821. Insurers were charged 71% more than those paying out-of-pocket--driven by higher fees and longer stays. Chiromo delivers acute psychiatric care each year to approximately 450 people, to quality and human rights standards higher than its public counterpart, but at considerably higher cost. With more efficient delivery and wider insurance coverage, Chiromo might expand from its occupancy of 56.6% to reach a larger population in need.

  6. Inadequate recording of alcohol-drinking, tobacco-smoking and discharge diagnosis in medical in-patients: failure to recognize risks including drug interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairstow, B M; Burke, V; Beilin, L J; Deutscher, C

    1993-11-01

    The records of 62 men and 43 women, 14-88 years old, admitted to general medical wards in a public teaching hospital during 1991 were examined for discharge medications and for the recording of alcohol-drinking, tobacco-smoking and discharge diagnosis. Drinking and smoking status was unrecorded in 22.9% and 21.9% of patients respectively. Twenty-four patients had 31 potential drug interactions which were related to the number of drugs prescribed and to drinking alcohol; 10.5% of the patients had interactions involving alcohol and 2.9% tobacco. Six patients received relatively or absolutely contraindicated drugs, including one asthmatic given two beta-blockers. The drugs prescribed indicated that some patients had conditions such as gastro-oesophageal disorders, diabetes and obstructive airways disease which had not been recorded. Inadequate recording of diagnoses, alcohol and smoking status creates risks to patients and may cause opportunities for preventive care to be missed. This study provides the basis for the development of undergraduate and postgraduate education programmes to address these issues and so decrease risks to patients which arise from inadequate recording practices. Incomplete diagnoses also adversely affect hospital funding where this depends on case-mix diagnostic groups. Quality assurance programmes and other strategies are being implemented to improve medical recording and prescribing habits.

  7. [Pain therapy in in-patients with cancer. Effects of a manual-based approach as guideline for pain-consulting service at a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkers, M; Pfau, Gernot; Lux, A; Pfau, Giselher; Schneemilch, C; Meyer, F; Grond, S

    2016-03-01

    Appropriate medication is an important and substantial part in the therapy of tumor-induced pain. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of anaesthesiology-based consultant service characterizing the quality of this type of treatment in daily clinical practice of a university hospital, i. e., in the patient profile of a tertiary center (study design: systematic clinical, unicenter observational study reflecting clinical practice and study-based control of therapeutic care quality). In the course of consulting function with regard to pain care on the single wards a considerable portion of cancer patients are recieving drugs. For most patients such care comprises several consultations and subsequently initiated treatment modifications. The consulting function ends if the patients feel free of pain or report a substantial improvement. From 1/1/2010 to 12/31/2012 detailed information on the drug therapy applied prior to, during and after the consultation was prospectively documented.This data was retrospectively evaluated as "pre-vs.-post" comparison (Chi-squared test, Fisher's exact test and McNemar's test), in particular, focussing on the quality of pain medication using the WHO index as well as pain intensity obtained by means of the visual analogue scale (VAS). In total, 375 in-patients were treated. The modified pain medication by the anesthesiological consultant service led to a significant increase (p therapy for cancer-related pain. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Psychometric properties and relations with coping and family strain of the Health Services and Caregiver Experience questionnaire (HSCE): an outcome measure of informal caregivers' experience for inpatient care in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccia, Anna; Ferretti, Fabio; Fagiolini, Andrea; Pozza, Andrea

    2017-07-17

    In the last decade, the number of patients supported by informal caregivers has substantially increased. In the Italian healthcare context, informal caregivers' experience of care is a new under-recognized construct, and no assessment tool is available. Measuring caregivers' experience is important since in Italy the relationship between doctors and patients/relatives is still considered asymmetrical. The current study presented development and initial psychometric properties of the Health Services and Caregiver Experience questionnaire (HSCE), a self-report tool of caregivers' global experience for inpatient clinical care, including factor structure, reliability and its relations with measures of coping strategies and family strain. The HSCE was administered to a total of 503 informal caregivers of inpatients admitted at an Italian University Hospital (mean age = 48.08 years, SD = 14.82, females = 61.40%). Family Strain Questionnaire-Short Form (FSQ-SF) and Coping Orientations to Problems Experience-New Italian Version (COPE-NVI) were administered to a subgroup of participants. First-grade relatives were 73.10%, whereas 13.20% were second-grade relatives and 13.70% were home-watch caregivers. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses showed a structure with a single factor, which explained 64.80% of the total variance. All the items had salient loadings. In the two subsamples, HSCE had excellent internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.95-0.97). Positive moderate correlations were found between HSCE and FSQ-SF scores (r = 0.45, p caregivers' experience correlated with stronger family strain but also with better problem solving and social support. The study expanded knowledge on caregiver's experience in Italy and indicated that HSCE is a valid and reliable tool to measure this under-recognized construct in Italy.

  9. The National Adult Inpatient Survey conducted in the English National Health Service from 2002 to 2009: how have the data been used and what do we know as a result?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeCourcy Anna

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When it was initiated in 2001, England's national patient survey programme was one of the first in the world and has now been widely emulated in other healthcare systems. The aim of the survey programme was to make the National Health Service (NHS more "patient centred" and more responsive to patient feedback. The national inpatient survey has now been running in England annually since 2002 gathering data from over 600,000 patients. The aim of this study is to investigate how the data have been used and to summarise what has been learned about patients' evaluation of care as a result. Methods Two independent researchers systematically gathered all research that included analyses of the English national adult inpatient survey data. Journals, databases and relevant websites were searched. Publications prior to 2002 were excluded. Articles were also identified following consultation with experts. All documents were then critically appraised by two co-authors both of whom have a background in statistical analysis. Results We found that the majority of the studies identified were reports produced by organisations contracted to gather the data or co-ordinate the data collection and used mainly descriptive statistics. A few articles used the survey data for evidence based reporting or linked the survey to other healthcare data. The patient's socio-demographic characteristics appeared to influence their evaluation of their care but characteristics of the workforce and the. At a national level, the results of the survey have been remarkably stable over time. Only in those areas where there have been co-ordinated government-led campaigns, targets and incentives, have improvements been shown. The main findings of the review are that while the survey data have been used for different purposes they seem to have incited little academic interest. Conclusions The national inpatient survey has been a useful resource for many authors and

  10. Piping failure analysis for the Korean nuclear piping including the effect of in-service inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, S.Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.(KAERI), Daejeon (Korea); Choi, Y.H. [Korea Inst. of Nuclear Safety(KINS), Daejeon (Korea)

    2004-07-01

    The purposes of this paper are to perform piping failure analysis for the failed safety class piping in Korean nuclear power plants(NPPs) and evaluate the effect of an in-service inspection(ISI) on the piping failure probability. For data collection, a database for piping failure events was constructed with 135 data fields including population data, event data, and service history data. A total of 6 kinds of events with 25 failure cases up to June 30, 2003 were identified from Korean NPPs. The failed systems were main feedwater system, CVCS, primary sampling system, essential service water system, and CANDU purification system. Piping failure analyses such as evaluation of the impact on nuclear safety and piping integrity and the root cause analysis were performed and the piping failure frequencies for the failed piping were calculated by using population data. The result showed that although the integrity was not maintained in the failed piping, the safety of the plants was maintained for all the events. And the root causes of the events were analyzed as FAC, vibration, thermal fatigue, corrosion, and/or an improper weld joint. The piping failure frequencies ranged from 6.08E-5/Cr-Yr to 1.15E-3/Cr-Yr for the events. According to the ASME Code sec. XI requirements, the small bore piping less than the nominal diameter of 4 inch is exempt from ISI. There, however, were many piping failures reported in the small bore piping. The effect of ISI considering the pipe size on the piping failure probability was investigated by using the Win-PRAISE program based on probabilistic fracture mechanics. The results showed that there is no significant difference between the small and large bore piping from the viewpoint of the ISI effect on the piping failure probability. It means that ISI for a small bore piping is recommended as well as the large bore piping. (orig.)

  11. Inpatient Psychiatric Prospective Payment System (IPF PPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This file contains case level data for inpatient psychiatric stays and is derived from 2011 MEDPAR data file and the latest available provider specific file. The...

  12. Implications of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 for general hospital psychiatry inpatient units providing medical and psychiatric services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, R J; Kathol, R

    2000-01-01

    Since 1983, the Tax Equity and Fiscal Responsibility Act (TEFRA) of 1982 has determined payment for services in most psychiatry units located in general hospitals. This system provided reimbursement on a cost-per-discharge basis. In 1997, a Balanced Budget Act (BBA) was passed by Congress which has replaced the TEFRA system of 1982 (H.R 2015). As a result of this law, many general hospital psychiatry units, particularly those that address the needs of elderly patients with high levels of medical comorbidity, will experience a reduction in their reimbursement when compared with the old TEFRA system. This reduction will average 7.8% and affect up to 84% of health care organizations. Those with higher TEFRA target amounts, such as is found with most general hospital programs, will have proportionately greater reductions. This article summarizes legislation affecting Medicare reimbursement and suggests a service reorganization approach that would allow billing to both medical and psychiatric payers. Finally, it encourages active participation in psychiatric access and quality standards development and with legislation, such as The Medicare Psychiatric Hospital Prospective Payment System Act of 1999.

  13. 76 FR 2144 - Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Information Technology Help Desk Services Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Quest Diagnostics, Inc. Information Technology Help Desk Services...., Information Technology Help Desk Services, West Norriton, Pennsylvania. The workers are engaged in activities... Technology Help Desk ] Services. The Department has determined that these workers were sufficiently under the...

  14. 75 FR 77665 - Frank Russell Company, Administrative Service Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Volt...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Frank Russell Company, Administrative Service Center, Including On..., Administrative Service Center, Tacoma, Washington. The notice was published in the Federal Register on August 13..., Washington location of Frank Russell Company, Administrative Service Center. The Department has determined...

  15. 75 FR 20390 - Robert Bosch LLC, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Bosch Management Services North America...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-19

    ...-site leased workers of Bosch Management Services North America, South Haven Community Hospital... leased workers of Bosch Management Services North America, South Haven Community Hospital, Huffmaster Inc..., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Bosch Management Services North America, South Haven Community...

  16. 75 FR 22629 - Kenco Logistic Services, LLC, Electrolux Webster City, Including On-Site Leased Workers From...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-72,778] Kenco Logistic Services... January 8, 2010, applicable to workers of Kenco Logistic Services, LLC, Electrolux Webster City, including... logistic services for the Electrolux, Webster City, Iowa. The company reports that workers leased from...

  17. 75 FR 55614 - Dell Products LP-Parmer North One Including On-Site Leased Workers From Belcan Services Group...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... North One Including On-Site Leased Workers From Belcan Services Group, Hawkins Associates, Inc... Belcan Services Group, Hawkins Associates, Inc., Integrated Human Capital, MagRabbit, Manpower, and... reports that workers leased from Belcan Services Group, Hawkins Associates, Inc., Integrated Human Capital...

  18. [Extended medical services to the inpatient sector--"medical services on individual demand" in the hospital. General legal conditions, 10 basic rules, and practical examples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersting, Thomas; Pillokat, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Today, extended medical services--previously known in the context of ambulant healthcare provision or plastic surgery only--are increasingly being offered by hospitals. Hospitals have started to offer these services with good reason: in times of budgetary restraints they want to exploit this emerging new market due to economic necessities and they try to meet rising demands from patients. It is not easy to draw the line between special (extended) medical services and general hospital services. These different categories need to be kept apart, though. Special contracts for these specific extended medical services have to be entered into by hospital and patient in any case where the hospital wants to charge him later on. Different preconditions are to be considered with patients insured by statutory health insurance companies and privately insured patients. The price of extended medical services must be carefully calculated and, in particular, has to be related to the price charged from patients insured via statutory health insurance. Attention should also be paid to other aspects such as taxes, liability law, and hospital subsidisation. The present article presents some basic rules for offering extra medical services in a hospital.

  19. Variation in Inpatient Croup Management and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Amy; McLeod, Lisa; Beaty, Brenda; Juarez-Colunga, Elizabeth; Birkholz, Meghan; Hyman, Daniel; Kempe, Allison; Todd, James; Dempsey, Amanda F

    2017-04-01

    Croup is a clinical diagnosis, and the available evidence suggests that, except in rare cases, ancillary testing, such as radiologic imaging, is not helpful. Given the paucity of inpatient-specific evidence for croup care, we hypothesized that there would be marked variability in the use of not routinely indicated resources (NRIRs). Our primary study objective was to describe the variation and predictors of variation in the use of NRIRs. This was a retrospective cohort study that used the Pediatric Health Information System database of generally healthy inpatients with croup aged 6 months to 15 years who were admitted between January 1, 2012 and September 30, 2014. We measured variability in the use of NRIRs: chest and lateral neck radiographs, viral testing, parenteral steroids, and antibiotics. Risk-adjusted analysis was used to compare resource utilization adjusted for hospital-specific effects and average case mix. The cohort included 26 hospitals and 6236 patients with a median age of 18 months. Nine percent of patients required intensive care services, and 3% had a 30-day readmission for croup. We found marked variability in adjusted and unadjusted utilization across hospitals for all resources. In the risk-adjusted analysis, hospital-specific effects rather than patient characteristics were the main predictor of variability in the use of NRIRs. We observed an up to fivefold difference in NRIR utilization attributable to hospital-level practice variability in inpatient croup care. This study highlights a need for inpatient-specific evidence and quality-improvement interventions to reduce unnecessary utilization and to improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. Inpatient Consultative Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesbroeck, Lauren K; Shinohara, Michi M

    2015-11-01

    Dermatology consultation can improve diagnostic accuracy in the hospitalized patient with cutaneous disease. Dermatology consultation can streamline and improve treatment plans, and potentially lead to cost savings. Dermatology consultants can be a valuable resource for education for trainees, patients, and families. Inpatient consultative dermatology spans a breadth of conditions, including inflammatory dermatoses,infectious processes, adverse medication reactions, and neoplastic disorders, many of which can be diagnosed based on dermatologic examination alone, but when necessary, bedside skin biopsies can contribute important diagnostic information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Use of dialectical behavior therapy in inpatient treatment of borderline personality disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloom, Jill Myerow; Woodward, Eva N; Susmaras, Teresa; Pantalone, David W

    2012-09-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an empirically supported treatment for outpatients with borderline personality disorder. However, the utility of DBT strategies for inpatients with the disorder is unclear. This review summarizes and synthesizes findings from trials of DBT in inpatient settings. Multiple research databases were searched for articles published through June 2011 that reported on any implementation of DBT in an inpatient setting to address symptoms related to borderline personality disorder, including suicidal and self-injurious behavior. Eleven studies that reported pre- and posttreatment symptoms related to borderline personality disorder were evaluated. Studies indicated that many variations of standard DBT have been used in inpatient settings, including approaches that do not include phone consultation, that include group therapy only, and that vary in treatment duration (from two weeks to three months). Most studies reported reductions in suicidal ideation, self-injurious behaviors, and symptoms of depression and anxiety, whereas results for reducing anger and violent behaviors were mixed. Follow-up data indicated that symptom reduction was often maintained between one and 21 months posttreatment. On the basis of the evidence, the authors identify essential components of an inpatient DBT package and discuss its potential function as an "intensive orientation" to outpatient DBT services. There is considerable variation in the configuration and duration of DBT implementation for inpatients with borderline personality disorder. However, findings suggest that DBT may be effective in reducing symptoms related to borderline personality disorder in inpatient settings. Future research should standardize and systematically test inpatient DBT. (Psychiatric Services 63:881-888, 2012; doi: 10.1176/appi.ps.201100311).

  2. Netchain coordinator services in pork supply chains including inspections according to the AMOR principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Juliane; Ellebrecht, Susanne; Petersen, Brigitte

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents a mutual inspection concept between livestock production and processing, coordinated by a netchain coordinator acting as the service provider. The concept is based on an analysis of demand and offer with respect to the coordination of livestock health status certificates. Surveys have been conducted amongst piglet producers and pig fatteners (nfarmers=206) to reflect the demand for coordination services. Another survey amongst service providers (nproviders=21) determines the availability of these services. The results show a clear demand amongst farmers for the netchain coordinator services of livestock health status certificates. It has also been found that some service providers offer audit and monitoring procedures to enable certification with highly varying degrees of service quality. Based on the surveys, the joint organisation of livestock health status certificates between producer, fattener and service provider will be presented. It will be shown that for greater efficiency, coordination should be based on the principles of Alliances for the Mutual Organisation of Risk oriented inspection strategies (AMOR). To enable the mutual organisation of inspections, four key steps have been identified to develop and test AMOR as an innovative form of cooperation: (i) inspection design, (ii) responsibilities and tasks, (iii) information and communication structures, and (iv) shared cost and benefit model. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Change In Length of Stay and Readmissions among Hospitalized Medical Patients after Inpatient Medicine Service Adoption of Mobile Secure Text Messaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mitesh S; Patel, Neha; Small, Dylan S; Rosin, Roy; Rohrbach, Jeffrey I; Stromberg, Nathaniel; Hanson, C William; Asch, David A

    2016-08-01

    Changes in the medium of communication from paging to mobile secure text messaging may change clinical care, but the effects of these changes on patient outcomes have not been well examined. To evaluate the association between inpatient medicine service adoption of mobile secure text messaging and patient length of stay and readmissions. Observational study. Patients admitted to medicine services at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (intervention site; n = 8995 admissions of 6484 patients) and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center (control site; n = 6799 admissions of 4977 patients) between May 1, 2012, and April 30, 2014. Mobile secure text messaging. Change in length of stay and 30-day readmissions, comparing patients at the intervention site to the control site before (May 1, 2012 to April 30, 2013) and after (May 1, 2013 to April 30, 2014) the intervention, adjusting for time trends and patient demographics, comorbidities, insurance, and disposition. During the pre-intervention period, the mean length of stay ranged from 4.0 to 5.0 days at the control site and from 5.2 to 6.7 days at the intervention site, but trends were similar. In the first month after the intervention, the mean length of stay was unchanged at the control site (4.7 to 4.7 days) but declined at the intervention site (6.0 to 5.4 days). Trends were mostly similar during the rest of the post-intervention period, ranging from 4.4 to 5.6 days at the control site and from 5.4 to 6.5 days at the intervention site. Readmission rates varied significantly within sites before and after the intervention, but overall trends were similar. In adjusted analyses, there was a significant decrease in length of stay for the intervention site relative to the control site during the post-intervention period compared to the pre-intervention period (-0.77 days ; 95 % CI, -1.14, -0.40; P services whose care providers and staff were offered mobile secure text messaging showed a relative decrease in

  4. Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES): using GIS to include social values information in ecosystem services assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrouse, B.C.; Semmens, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Ecosystem services can be defined in various ways; simply put, they are the benefits provided by nature, which contribute to human well-being. These benefits can range from tangible products such as food and fresh water to cultural services such as recreation and esthetics. As the use of these benefits continues to increase, additional pressures are placed on the natural ecosystems providing them. This makes it all the more important when assessing possible tradeoffs among ecosystem services to consider the human attitudes and preferences that express underlying social values associated with their benefits. While some of these values can be accounted for through economic markets, other values can be more difficult to quantify, and attaching dollar amounts to them may not be very useful in all cases. Regardless of the processes or units used for quantifying such values, the ability to map them across the landscape and relate them to the ecosystem services to which they are attributed is necessary for effective assessments. To address some of the needs associated with quantifying and mapping social values for inclusion in ecosystem services assessments, scientists at the Rocky Mountain Geographic Science Center (RMGSC), in collaboration with Colorado State University, have developed a public domain tool, Social Values for Ecosystem Services (SolVES). SolVES is a geographic information system (GIS) application designed to use data from public attitude and preference surveys to assess, map, and quantify social values for ecosystem services. SolVES calculates and maps a 10-point Value Index representing the relative perceived social values of ecosystem services such as recreation and biodiversity for various groups of ecosystem stakeholders. SolVES output can also be used to identify and model relationships between social values and physical characteristics of the underlying landscape. These relationships can then be used to generate predicted Value Index maps for areas

  5. Equity of access to adult hospice inpatient care within north-west England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D J; Clark, D; Gatrell, A C

    2004-09-01

    There is a growing debate about the question of equity of access to hospice and palliative care services. Even countries with relatively well developed palliative care systems are considered to have problems of access and inequity of provision. Despite these concerns, we still lack a relevant evidence base to serve as a guide to action. We present an analysis of access to adult hospice inpatient provision in the north-west region of England that employs Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Measures of the possible demand for, and supply of, hospice inpatient services are used to determine the potential accessibility of cancer patients, assessed at the level of small areas (electoral wards). Further, the use of deprivation scores permits an analysis of the equity of access to adult inpatient hospice care, leading to the identification of areas where additional service provision may be warranted. Our research is subject to a number of caveats--it is limited to inpatient hospice provision and does not include other kinds of inpatient and community-based palliative care services. Likewise, we recognise that not everyone with cancer will require palliative care and also that palliative care needs exist among those with nonmalignant conditions. Nevertheless, our methodology is one that can also be applied more generally.

  6. 26 CFR 31.3121(c)-1 - Included and excluded services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... is a local college club within the meaning of section 3121(b)(2), employs D, a student who is... employment, and his services as the club's bookkeeper constitute employment. D receives a payment at the end... which a payment of remuneration is ordinarily made to the employee by the employer. Thus, if the periods...

  7. 75 FR 60141 - International Business Machines (IBM), Global Technology Services Delivery Division, Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,164] International Business... 25, 2010, applicable to workers of International Business Machines (IBM), Global Technology Services... hereby issued as follows: All workers of International Business Machines (IBM), Global Technology...

  8. [Effects of self-adapting G-DRG system 2004 to 2006 on in-patient services payment in pediatric hematology and oncology patients of a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christaras, A; Schaper, J; Strelow, H; Laws, H-J; Göbel, U

    2006-01-01

    Reimbursement of inpatient treatment by daily constant charges is replaced by diagnosis- and procedure-related group system (G-DRG) in German acute care hospitals excerpt for psychiatry since 2004. Re-designs of G-DRG system were undertaken in 2005 and 2006. Parallel to implementation requirement- and resource-based self-adjustment of this new reimbursement system has been established by law. Adjustments performed in 2005 and 2006 are examined with respect to their effect on reimbursements in treatments of children with oncological, hematological, and immunological diseases. An unchanged population of 349 patients associated with 1,731 inpatient stays of a Clinic of Pediatric Oncology, Hematology, and Immunology in 2004 was analyzed by methods and means of G-DRG systems 2004, 2005, and 2006. DRGs and additional payments for drugs and procedures eligible for all and/or individual hospitals were calculated. G-DRG system 2005 resulted in overall reimbursement loss of 3.77 % compared to G-DRG 2004. G-DRG 2006 leads to slightly improved overall reimbursements compared to G-DRG 2005 by increasing DRG-based revenues. G-DRG 2006 effects 2.40 % reduction in overall reimbursement compared to G-DRG 2004. This loss includes ameliorating effects of additional payments for drugs and blood products already. Despite introduction of additional payments especially designed for children and teenagers in 2006, additional payment volume is decreased by 21.71 % from 2005 to 2006. G-DRG 2006 yields over-all reimbursement losses of 1.45 % in comparison to G-DRG 2004. Overall reimbursements include introduced additional payments for drugs and blood products. (Reimbursements resulting out of DRG payment alone drop by 14.73 % from 2004 to 2005, and increase by 3.26 % from 2005 to 2006 (2004 vs. 2006 11.95 %). Introduction of additional payments for drugs and blood products on a Germany-wide basis introduced in 2005 dampens DRG-based reimbursement losses. Despite introduction of dosage

  9. [Effectivity of Inpatient Psychosomatic Treatment - Results of a Naturalistic Two-Year Survey in a Psychosomatic Service at a General Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Stauber, Juan; Fuchs, Alexander; Reiner, Sören; Bachthaler, Susanne

    2017-08-14

    Background Hospital psychosomatic treatment matches care expectations of a modern society. Evidence of its effectiveness through investigation in different settings is of importance because of prominent role of psychotherapy in German Healthcare System. Objective First, to explore whether clinical as well as personal resources could improve significantly due to a hospital psychosomatic treatment. Second, to assess possible associations between outcome variables and other variables from the multidimensional profile of the sample. Method The sample consists of all 2014 - 2015 admitted patients who agree with investigation (N=283). Pre-post comparisons of results from validated questionnaires were performed by means of t-tests, including effect sizes. Associations between outcome variables (pre-post differences of clinical and resources related variables) and variables from the multidimensional profile were performed by means of bivariate and multivariate regression tests. Outcome differences were assessed by means of logistic regression models. Results Drop-out-rate due to refusal of participation amounts 11.8%; from remaining participants uncompleted datasets additional 6.9%; due to declining further participation during hospitalisation additional 4.1% (total drop-out rate amounted 22.8%). Functionality, self-efficacy, disease severity, psychological as well as physical symptom burden, depressiveness, interpersonal concerns, and embitterment improved significantly (pPsychosomatic hospital treatment is effective according to clinical improvement as well as to perceived quality of treatment. Clinical and resources related variables are positively bidirectional associated notwithstanding the kind of working causality. Robust prognostic factors are hard to identify. Conclusions Inpatient psychosomatic treatment is effective when the admission is indicated and the unit accomplishes mandatory quality criteria. The outcome occurs individually and is hard to be predicted

  10. Weight management in a cohort of Irish inpatients with serious mental illness (SMI) using a modular behavioural programme. A preliminary service evaluation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bushe, Chris J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Weight gain is commonly observed during psychotropic treatments for chronic forms of severe mental illness and is most rapid during the early treatment phases. All formats of behavioural weight intervention programmes have suggested that weight gain can be prevented or reversed in some patients. There is no data on these programmes in acutely unwell inpatients whom may be the major beneficiaries. METHODS: A modular behavioural intervention programme (Solutions for Wellness) used in SMI outpatients since 2002 in Ireland has been adapted for inpatient use. Preliminary data is reported from 5 centres in Ireland. RESULTS: In 47 inpatients the mean weight change was +0.26 kg (SD 2.02) with a median change of 0 kg. Mean follow-up was 23.7 (SD 21.6) days, and median 14 days (range 6-98 days). There was no difference in mean weight change in those patients involved for > 35 days compared with < 35 days (+0.26 kg; 0.25 kg; p = 0.5). Weight loss or maintenance was seen in 70% of patients. CONCLUSION: These preliminary data are supportive of the concept that acutely unwell inpatients with SMI may engage with a behavioural weight programme. Weight change observed contrasts with the significant weight gain often seen in most subjects. Further clinical trials are warranted.

  11. 26 CFR 1.61-2 - Compensation for services, including fees, commissions, and similar items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (including Christmas bonuses), termination or severance pay, rewards, jury fees, marriage fees and other...). For the special rules relating to the includibility in an employee's gross income of an amount equal...

  12. Masters of convenience: competition, including a rising star from Quebec, improves the service station breed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverty Wilson, K.

    2002-06-03

    After a decade of extensive dismantling and reconstruction, changes in the downstream refining and marketing side of the petroleum industry have progressed to the point where downstream assets are once again considered to be among the strongest and most vital parts of the industry. Merchandising has become a way of life in gasoline service stations to the point where the service station of the 21. century will likely carry mass-consumption items from panty hose to sandwiches in addition to gasoline. Petro-Canada is in the forefront of rolling out the new-image service stations, while high traffic Esso locations are adding cafes serving doughnuts, muffins, bagels, soup and sandwiches in partnership with the Tim Horton's chain. In Canada, Quebec is way ahead of the other provinces in setting the high tone in the business of catering to consumers on wheels as demonstrated by the 1,932 retail sites of 'Couche-Tard', a name synonymous with gas pumps, fresh coffee and the myriad items offered in traditional convenience stores. With a total of 1,693 stores in Canada, 239 in the United States, 13,000 plus employees and more than 800 gas pumps (80 of them branded to in-house gasoline) Couche-Tard is the ninth largest convenience retailer in North America. The article describes the rise to prominence of the Couche-Tard empire, explains why circumstances in Quebec were ripe for this type of development, and offers a glimpse into the future of the likely further development of the retail gasoline market in the rest of Canada.

  13. The inpatient management of syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Laura C; Reed, Matthew J

    2010-11-01

    The management and risk stratification of patients with syncope in the Emergency Department (ED) has been the emphasis of much recent research, however little is known about inpatient management especially in the UK. The aim of this study was to examine the inpatient management of patients with syncope admitted to hospital from a UK ED. This was a single centre prospective observational cohort study, recruiting patients with syncope admitted to hospital from a UK ED. Inpatient management was examined focusing on length of stay and investigations undertaken. Between 3 March 2007 and 22 July 2008, 540 patients presenting with syncope to the ED of the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, UK were admitted and enrolled. Median and mean length of stay was 1 day (IQR 1-4) and 6.3 days (SD 15.5). In all, 392 (73%) patients were admitted to General/Acute Medicine, 39 (7%) to Cardiology, 35 (7%) to Medicine of the Elderly, 33 (6%) to surgical specialities and the rest to other specialities. A diagnosis was finally made in 342 (63%) patients including 33 (85%) of the 39 admitted to Cardiology and 239 (61%) of the 392 patients admitted to General/Acute Medicine. The use of diagnostic tests varied between specialities with more intensive investigation undertaken in patients admitted to Cardiology. The current approach to the inpatient management of syncope is speciality dependent. Standardised diagnostic pathways may improve diagnostic yield and cost effectiveness.

  14. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Seheult

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia. The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose.

  15. Addressing Inpatient Glycaemic Control with an Inpatient Glucometry Alert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seheult, J N; Pazderska, A; Gaffney, P; Fogarty, J; Sherlock, M; Gibney, J; Boran, G

    2015-01-01

    Background. Poor inpatient glycaemic control has a prevalence exceeding 30% and results in increased length of stay and higher rates of hospital complications and inpatient mortality. The aim of this study was to improve inpatient glycaemic control by developing an alert system to process point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) results. Methods. Microsoft Excel Macros were developed for the processing of daily glucometry data downloaded from the Cobas IT database. Alerts were generated according to ward location for any value less than 4 mmol/L (hypoglycaemia) or greater than 15 mmol/L (moderate-severe hyperglycaemia). The Diabetes Team provided a weekday consult service for patients flagged on the daily reports. This system was implemented for a 60-day period. Results. There was a statistically significant 20% reduction in the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted values >15 mmol/L compared to the preimplementation period without a significant change in the percentage of hypoglycaemic values. The time-to-next-reading after a dysglycaemic POC-BG result was reduced by 14% and the time-to-normalization of a dysglycaemic result was reduced from 10.2 hours to 8.4 hours. Conclusion. The alert system reduced the percentage of hyperglycaemic patient-day weighted glucose values and the time-to-normalization of blood glucose.

  16. Impact of Including Authentic Inquiry Experiences in Methods Courses for Pre-Service Secondary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, T. F.; Elfring, L.; Novodvorsky, I.; Talanquer, V.; Quintenz, J.

    2007-12-01

    Science education reform documents universally call for students to have authentic and meaningful experiences using real data in the context of their science education. The underlying philosophical position is that students analyzing data can have experiences that mimic actual research. In short, research experiences that reflect the scientific spirit of inquiry potentially can: prepare students to address real world complex problems; develop students' ability to use scientific methods; prepare students to critically evaluate the validity of data or evidence and of the consequent interpretations or conclusions; teach quantitative skills, technical methods, and scientific concepts; increase verbal, written, and graphical communication skills; and train students in the values and ethics of working with scientific data. However, it is unclear what the broader pre-service teacher preparation community is doing in preparing future teachers to promote, manage, and successful facilitate their own students in conducting authentic scientific inquiry. Surveys of undergraduates in secondary science education programs suggests that students have had almost no experiences themselves in conducting open scientific inquiry where they develop researchable questions, design strategies to pursue evidence, and communicate data-based conclusions. In response, the College of Science Teacher Preparation Program at the University of Arizona requires all students enrolled in its various science teaching methods courses to complete an open inquiry research project and defend their findings at a specially designed inquiry science mini-conference at the end of the term. End-of-term surveys show that students enjoy their research experience and believe that this experience enhances their ability to facilitate their own future students in conducting open inquiry.

  17. 77 FR 5009 - Power Supply Services LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Power Supply Services LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket Section 204 Authorization This is a supplemental notice in the above-referenced proceeding of Power Suppl...

  18. 75 FR 28296 - Clark Engineering Co., Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services and Qualified...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-72,773] Clark Engineering Co... of Clark Engineering Co., Inc., including on-site leased workers of Kelly Services, Owosso, Michigan... from Qualified Staffing were employed on-site at the Owosso, Michigan location of Clark Engineering Co...

  19. 77 FR 61028 - Hasbro, Inc.; Hasbro Managerial Services, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers of Entegee East...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hasbro, Inc.; Hasbro Managerial Services, Inc., Including On-Site... activities related to the production of board games, card games, puzzles, and toys. At the request of the...

  20. 76 FR 66328 - Callaway Golf Ball Operations, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Reliable Temp Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Operations, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Reliable Temp Services, Inc., Johnson & Hill Staffing... Johnson and Hill Staffing, Chicopee, Massachusetts. The workers are engaged in activities related to the... subject firm adversely affected by increased company imports. Based on these findings, the Department is...

  1. 76 FR 32227 - DST Systems, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Comsys Information Technology Services...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,649; TA-W-74,649a] DST Systems... Kelly Services Kansas City, MO; DST Technologies, a Wholly Owned Subsidiary of DST Systems, Inc., Boston... November 5, 2010, applicable to workers of DST Systems, Inc., including on-site leased workers from Comsys...

  2. Inpatient suicide in a Chinese psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Ran, Mao-Sheng; Hao, Yuantao; Zhao, Zhenhuan; Guo, Yangbo; Su, Jinghua; Lu, Huixian

    2008-08-01

    Little is known about the risk factors for suicide among psychiatric inpatients in China. In this study we identified the risk factors of suicide among psychiatric inpatients at Guangzhou Psychiatric Hospital. All psychiatric inpatients who died by suicide during the 1956-2005 period were included in this study. Using a case-control design, 64 inpatients with schizophrenia who died by suicide were compared with a matched 64 controls. The results indicate that the rate of suicide was 133.1/100,000 admissions (95%CI 103.4-162.9). There were no significant differences in the method, location, or time of suicide between male and female inpatients. The number of hospitalizations was significantly larger in the suicide group than that in the control group. In logistic regression analyses, guilty thought, depressive mood, and suicidal ideation and suicide attempt 1 month before hospital admission were identified as independent predictors of suicide among inpatients with schizophrenia. The findings of risk factors for schizophrenic inpatient suicide should be taken into account when developing interventions to prevent suicide among these patients.

  3. Service use and costs for people with long-term neurological conditions in the first year following discharge from in-patient neuro-rehabilitation: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Jackson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Knowledge of the configuration and costs of community rehabilitation and support for people with long-term neurological conditions (LTNCs is needed to inform future service development and resource allocation. In a multicentre prospective cohort study evaluating community service delivery during the year post-discharge from in-patient neuro-rehabilitation, a key objective was to determine service use, costs, and predictors of these costs. METHODS: Patients consecutively admitted over one year to all nine London specialised (Level 1 in-patient neuro-rehabilitation units were recruited on discharge. They or their carers completed postal/web-based questionnaires at discharge and six and twelve months later, providing demographic data and measures of impairment, disability, service needs and provision. This paper describes health and social care service use, informal care and associated costs. Regression models using non-parametric boot-strapping identified predictors of costs over time. RESULTS: Overall, 152 patients provided consistent data. Mean formal service costs fell significantly from £13,290 (sd £19,369 during the first six months to £9,335 (sd £19,036 from six-twelve months, (t = 2.35, P<0.05, mainly due to declining health service use. At six months, informal care was received on average for 8.2 hours/day, mean cost £14,615 (sd 23,305, comprising 52% of overall care costs. By twelve months, it had increased to 8.8 hours per day, mean cost £15,468 (sd £25,534, accounting for 62% of overall care costs. Being younger and more disabled predicted higher formal care costs, explaining 32% and 30% of the variation in costs respectively at six and twelve months. CONCLUSION: Community services for people with LTNCs carry substantial costs that shift from health to social care over time, increasing the burden on families. Prioritising rehabilitation services towards those in greatest need could limit access to others needing on

  4. Utilization of the National Inpatient Sample for abdominal aortic aneurysm research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dua, Anahita; Ali, Fadwa; Traudt, Elizabeth; Desai, Sapan S

    2017-10-01

    Large administrative databases, including the Medicare database by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the National Surgical Quality Improvement Project database sponsored by the American College of Surgeons, and the National Inpatient Sample, have been used by major public health agencies for years. More recently, medical researchers have turned to database research to power studies on diseases that are noted to be relatively scarce. This study aimed to review and discuss the utilization of the National Inpatient Sample for abdominal aortic aneurysm research, inclusive of its advantages, disadvantages, and best practices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) , Medicare Claims data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2003 forward. CMS compiles claims data for Medicare and Medicaid patients across a variety of categories and years. This includes Inpatient and Outpatient claims,...

  6. 76 FR 14691 - Delphi Steering, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Acro Service Corporation, Aerotek, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ... Contract Services, Integrated Partners Group LLC, Kelly Services, Manpower, Inc., Rapid Global Business Solutions, Inc., TAC Worldwide, Trialon Corp., Trison Business Solutions, Wright K. Technologies, Interim... Services, Integrated Partners Group LLC, Kelly Services, Manpower, Inc., Rapid Global Business Solutions...

  7. Suicide amongst psychiatric in-patients who abscond from the ward: a national clinical survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Appleby Louis

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Suicide prevention by mental health services requires an awareness of the antecedents of suicide amongst high risk groups such as psychiatric in-patients. The goal of this study was to describe the social and clinical characteristics of people who had absconded from an in-patient psychiatric ward prior to suicide, including aspects of the clinical care they received. Methods We carried out a national clinical survey based on a 10-year (1997-2006 sample of people in England and Wales who had died by suicide. Detailed data were collected on those who had been in contact with mental health services in the year before death. Results There were 1,851 cases of suicide by current psychiatric in-patients, 14% of all patient suicides. 1,292 (70% occurred off the ward. Four hundred and sixty-nine of these patients died after absconding from the ward, representing 25% of all in-patient suicides and 38% of those that occurred off the ward. Absconding suicides were characterised by being young, unemployed and homeless compared to those who were off the ward with staff agreement. Schizophrenia was the most common diagnosis, and rates of previous violence and substance misuse were high. Absconders were proportionally more likely than in-patients on agreed leave to have been legally detained for treatment, non-compliant with medication, and to have died in the first week of admission. Whilst absconding patients were significantly more likely to have been under a high level of observation, clinicians reported more problems in observation due to either the ward design or other patients on the ward. Conclusion Measures that may prevent absconding and subsequent suicide amongst in-patients might include tighter control of ward exits, and more intensive observation of patients, particularly in the early days of admission. Improving the ward environment to provide a supportive and less intimidating experience may contribute to reduced risk.

  8. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Measure Data – by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  9. Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) - National Inpatient Sample

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2001 forward. The National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) is part of a family of databases and software tools developed for the Healthcare Cost and Utilization...

  10. HCUP National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample (NIS) - Restricted Access File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIS is the largest publicly available all-payer inpatient care database in the United States. It contains data from approximately 8 million hospital stays each...

  11. 78 FR 40511 - Homeward Residential, Inc., a Subsidiary of Ocwen Loan Servicing, LLC, Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... insurance (UI) tax account under the name American Home Mortgage Servicing, Inc. Accordingly, the Department... mortgage servicing customer services from India. The amended notice applicable to TA-W-82,568, TA-W-82,568A...

  12. 71. Depression an adverse prognostic factor in geriatric cardiac inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mekdad; F. Sakr; Y. Asiri

    2016-01-01

    Depression is very common among ill geriatric inpatients and could be a major factor responsible for delayed recovery, hospitalization and increased health care utilization. Study the prevalence of depression in geriatric cardiac inpatients. Determine the relationships between depression and hospitalization. A cross sectional study included 200 geriatrics (⩾65 years) inpatients in cardiac wards at King Fahad Medical City from 20th of March 2015 to 29th of April 2015. We employed the modified ...

  13. Inpatients hypospadias care: trends and outcomes from the American nationwide inpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Christian; Sukumar, Shyam; Sood, Akshay; Hanske, Julian; Vetterlein, Malte; Elder, Jack S; Fisch, Margit; Trinh, Quoc-Dien; Friedman, Ariella A

    2015-08-01

    Hypospadias is the most common congenital penile anomaly. Information about current utilization patterns of inpatient hypospadias repair as well as complication rates remain poorly evaluated. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was used to identify all patients undergoing inpatient hypospadias repair between 1998 and 2010. Patient and hospital characteristics were attained and outcomes of interest included intra- and immediate postoperative complications. Utilization was evaluated temporally and also according to patient and hospital characteristics. Predictors of complications and excess length of stay were evaluated by logistic regression models. A weighted 10,201 patients underwent inpatient hypospadias repair between 1998 and 2010. Half were infants (52.2%), and were operated in urban and teaching hospitals. Trend analyses demonstrated a decline in incidence of inpatient hypospadias repair (estimated annual percentage change, -6.80%; range, -0.51% to -12.69%; p=0.037). Postoperative complication rate was 4.9% and most commonly wound-related. Hospital volume was inversely related to complication rates. Specifically, higher hospital volume (>31 cases annually) was the only variable associated with decreased postoperative complications. Inpatient hypospadias repair have substantially decreased since the late 1990's. Older age groups and presumably more complex procedures constitute most of the inpatient procedures nowadays.

  14. Cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) in a specialist inpatient eating disorder service for children and adolescents: CAN-CRT study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giombini, Lucia; Nesbitt, Sophie; Cox, Hannah; Foxall, Anna; Sharia, Teo; Easter, Abigail; Tchanturia, Kate

    2018-03-26

    Research on treatments for young people (YP) with anorexia nervosa (AN) is scarce. Evidence supports the use of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) to improve central coherence and set-shifting, inefficiencies that can negatively impact on prognosis. The study aims to evaluate the feasibility of individual CRT in an inpatient setting for YP aged 10-18 years with AN and to qualitatively examine YP's and their parents experiences. In a single-centre, pilot, randomised controlled trial, 80 patients aged 10-18 years with AN will be randomly allocated to the immediate or delayed CRT group, in addition to standard treatment. A repeated measures design will be conducted across 3 time points. The data will provide evidence regarding the feasibility of individual CRT in YP with AN, informing directions of further development of CRT. The study is in preparation for a definitive randomised controlled trial. The aim of this manuscript is to describe the study protocol. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  15. Prescribing patterns for inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders in a psychiatric hospital in Slovenia: Results of 16-month prospective, non-interventional clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bole, Cvetka Bačar; Pišlar, Mitja; Mrhar, Aleš; Tavčar, Rok

    2017-06-01

    In Slovenia, there has been no evidence about the prescribing patterns for inpatients with psychotic disorders. The research aims to analyze drug utilization patterns for inpatients with psychotic disorder that are coded as F20-F29 according to International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 10 th revision (schizophrenia spectrum disorders). Prospective research was conducted at the Psychiatric Hospital Idrija. The medical records of the inpatients admitted over a 12-month period were collected from the beginning to the end of their hospitalization. A total of 311 inpatients with 446 hospitalizations were included, producing a total of 3954 medication prescriptions. Medications prescribed pro re nata (the use of as needed) were also taken into account. Antipsychotics (N=1149, 43% of prescriptions) were the most often prescribed medications, followed by anxiolytics, antiparkinsonians, antidepressants, mood stabilizers and cardiovascular drugs. A total of 256 (82%) inpatients received at least one pro re nata medication. It was observed that the studied population was treated with one antipsychotic on 27 percent of prescriptions. Inpatients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders were exposed to a large number of different drugs. They were not received only psychotropic drugs but also other medications. With the knowledge about medications the implementation of clinical pharmacy services to the psychiatrists would significantly improve medication of inpatients with psychotic disorders and polypharmacotherapy.

  16. Boarding admitted children in the emergency department impacts inpatient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekmezian, Arpi; Chung, Paul J

    2012-03-01

    This study aimed to assess the relationship between boarding of admitted children in the emergency department (ED) and cost, inpatient length of stay (LOS), mortality, and readmission. This was a retrospective study of 1,792 pediatric inpatients admitted through the ED and discharged from the hospital between February 20, 2007 and June 30, 2008 at a major teaching hospital with an annual ED volume of 40,000 adult and pediatric patients.The main predictor variable was boarding time (time from admission decision to departure for an inpatient bed, in hours). Covariates were patient age, payer group, times of ED and inpatient bed arrival, ED triage acuity, type of inpatient service, intensive care unit admission, surgery, and severity of inpatient illness. The main outcome measures, cost (dollars) and inpatient LOS (hours), were log-transformed and analyzed using linear regressions. Secondary outcomes, mortality and readmission to the hospital within 72 hours of discharge, were analyzed using logistic regression. Mean ED LOS for admitted patients was 9.0 hours. Mean boarding time was 5.1 hours. Mean cost and inpatient LOS were $9893 and 147 hours, respectively. In general, boarding time was associated with cost (P boarding times were associated with greater inpatient LOS especially among patients triaged as low acuity (P = 0.008). In addition, longer boarding times were associated with greater probability of being readmitted among patients on surgical services (P = 0.01). Among low-acuity and surgical patients, longer boarding times were associated with longer inpatient LOS and more readmissions, respectively.

  17. Oiling the gate: a mobile application to improve the admissions process from the emergency department to an academic community hospital inpatient medicine service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Russell; Hyde, Jensen Hart; Davis, Mike

    2018-01-01

    The process of admitting patients from the emergency department (ED) to an academic internal medicine (AIM) service in a community teaching hospital is one fraught with variability and disorder. This results in an inconsistent volume of patients admitted to academic versus private hospitalist services and results in frustration of both ED and AIM clinicians. We postulated that implementation of a mobile application (app) would improve provider satisfaction and increase admissions to the academic service. The app was designed and implemented to be easily accessible to ED physicians, regularly updated by academic residents on call, and a real-time source of the number of open AIM admission spots. We found a significant improvement in ED and AIM provider satisfaction with the admission process. There was also a significant increase in admissions to the AIM service after implementation of the app. We submit that the implementation of a mobile app is a viable, cost-efficient, and effective method to streamline the admission process from the ED to AIM services at community-based hospitals.

  18. 75 FR 41522 - Novell, Inc., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Affiliated Computer Services, Inc., (ACS...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... related to research, design and technical support for the production of computer software. The company reports that workers leased from Affiliated Computer Services, Inc., (ACS) were employed on-site at the... Computer Services, Inc., (ACS), Provo, UT; Amended Certification Regarding Eligibility To Apply for Worker...

  19. 78 FR 22909 - Mondelez Global LLC, Business Services Center, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Abacus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... group at Mondelez Global LLC, Business Services Center, San Antonio, Texas. The leasing agencies are... agencies worked on-site at Mondelez Global LLC, Business Services Center, San Antonio, Texas. The intent of... applicable to TA-W-82,339 is hereby issued as follows: ``All workers of Mondelez Global LLC, Business...

  20. 42 CFR 412.432 - Method of payment under the inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR... inpatient psychiatric facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating cost and capital... without undue risk of resulting in an overpayment to the provider. (2) Frequency of payment. For...

  1. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2016 Rates; Revisions of Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers, Including Changes Related to the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; Extensions of the Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospital Program and the Low-Volume Payment Adjustment for Hospitals. Final rule; interim final rule with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-17

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2016. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform(SGR) Act of 2013, the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are addressing the update of the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2016.As an interim final rule with comment period, we are implementing the statutory extensions of the Medicare dependent,small rural hospital (MDH)Program and changes to the payment adjustment for low-volume hospitals under the IPPS.We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2016 and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014.In addition, we are establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals,PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that are participating in Medicare, including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals participating in the Medicare Electronic Health Record (EHR)Incentive Program. We also are updating policies relating to the

  2. African-American and Latina Women Seeking Public Health Services: Cultural Beliefs regarding Pregnancy, including Medication-taking Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Dalia Sanchez, MD, MCP, MHA, PhD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to describe cultural beliefs and medication-taking-behavior about pregnancy in African-American and Latina women. Design: qualitative study using phenomenological methodology; face-to-face, semi structured interviews and focus group. Thematic analysis was done to obtain themes consistent with the research objective. Setting: Maricopa County, Arizona, Department of Public-health Programs, November 2008 through April 2009.Participants: women seeking public-health services in the greater Phoenix, Arizona.Results: fifteen adult women representing two ethnic groups (seven African-Americans and eight Latinas participated. Themes derived from the interview data included: “The Dilemma: To Become or Not to Become Pregnant;” “The Ideal Stress-free World: Support System;” “Changing Worlds: Wanting Dependency;” and “The Health care System: Disconnection from Pregnancy to Postpartum.”Conclusions: based on the cultural themes: 1. pregnancies were not planned; 2. healthy life-style changes were not likely to occur during pregnancy; 3. basic facts about the biology of sexual intercourse and pregnancy were not understood, and there was no usage of any preconceptional or prenatal medications; and 4. professional health care was not desired or considered necessary (except during delivery. These cultural beliefs can contribute to negative birth outcomes, and need to be considered by pharmacists and other health-care providers. The information gained from this study can guide the implementation of educational programs developed by pharmacists that are more sensitive to the cultural beliefs and points of view of these particular women. Such programs would thus be more likely to be favorably received and utilized.

  3. 42 CFR 412.63 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for Federal fiscal years 1984 through 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... paragraph exclude payments for per case review by a utilization and quality control quality improvement... INPATIENT HOSPITAL SERVICES Basic Methodology for Determining Prospective Payment Federal Rates for... inpatient operating costs for each inpatient hospital discharge in Federal fiscal years 1985 through 2004...

  4. Use of web services for computerized medical decision support, including infection control and antibiotic management, in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steurbaut, Kristof; Van Hoecke, Sofie; Colpaert, Kirsten; Lamont, Kristof; Taveirne, Kristof; Depuydt, Pieter; Benoit, Dominique; Decruyenaere, Johan; De Turck, Filip

    2010-01-01

    The increasing complexity of procedures in the intensive care unit (ICU) requires complex software services, to reduce improper use of antibiotics and inappropriate therapies, and to offer earlier and more accurate detection of infections and antibiotic resistance. We investigated whether web-based software can facilitate the computerization of complex medical processes in the ICU. The COSARA application contains the following modules: Infection overview, Thorax, Microbiology, Antibiotic therapy overview, Admission cause with comorbidity and admission diagnosis, Infection linking and registration, and Feedback. After the implementation and test phase, the COSARA software was installed on a physician's office PC and then on the bedside PCs of the patients. Initial evaluation indicated that the services had been integrated easily into the daily clinical workflow of the medical staff. The use of a service oriented architecture with web service technology for the development of advanced decision support in the ICU offers several advantages over classical software design approaches.

  5. Patients overwhelmingly prefer inpatient boarding to emergency department boarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viccellio, Peter; Zito, Joseph A; Sayage, Valerie; Chohan, Jasmine; Garra, Gregory; Santora, Carolyn; Singer, Adam J

    2013-12-01

    Boarding of admitted patients in the emergency department (ED) is a major cause of crowding. One alternative to boarding in the ED, a full-capacity protocol where boarded patients are redeployed to inpatient units, can reduce crowding and improve overall flow. Our aim was to compare patient satisfaction with boarding in the ED vs. inpatient hallways. We performed a structured telephone survey regarding patient experiences and preferences for boarding among admitted ED patients who experienced boarding in the ED hallway and then were subsequently transferred to inpatient hallways. Demographic and clinical characteristics, as well as patient preferences, including items related to patient comfort and safety using a 5-point scale, were recorded and descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. Of 110 patients contacted, 105 consented to participate. Mean age was 57 ± 16 years and 52% were female. All patients were initially boarded in the ED in a hallway before their transfer to an inpatient hallway bed. The overall preferred location after admission was the inpatient hallway in 85% (95% confidence interval 75-90) of respondents. In comparing ED vs. inpatient hallway boarding, the following percentages of respondents preferred inpatient boarding with regard to the following 8 items: rest, 85%; safety, 83%; confidentiality, 82%; treatment, 78%; comfort, 79%; quiet, 84%; staff availability, 84%; and privacy, 84%. For no item was there a preference for boarding in the ED. Patients overwhelmingly preferred the inpatient hallway rather than the ED hallway when admitted to the hospital. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 42 CFR 417.101 - Health benefits plan: Basic health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... provided in a non-hospital based health care facility or at a hospital; (ii) Inpatient hospital services, which must include but not be limited to, room and board, general nursing care, meals and special diets... hospital services must include short-term rehabilitation services and physical therapy, the provision of...

  7. Pattern of psychiatric inpatient admission in Ibadan: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pattern of psychiatric inpatient admission in Ibadan: implications for service organisation and planning. ... Introduction: Reports from different parts of the world has shown a seasonal pattern in psychiatric admission. Seasonal changes in climatic and social situations have been attributed. Such audit of psychiatric services is ...

  8. Vancouver winters: Environmental influences on inpatient adult orthopaedic trauma demographics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordin, S.; Masri, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the pattern of adult inpatient orthopaedic injuries admitted at three Vancouver hospitals following one of the worst winter snowstorms in the region with the preceding control winter period. Methods: The surveillance study was conducted at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 2007 to 2010. Inpatient adult admissions for orthopaedic injuries at three hospitals were recorded, including age, gender, anatomic location of injury, type of fracture (open or closed), fixation method (internal versus external fixation), and length of acute care hospital stay. Comparisons between admissions during this weather pattern and admission during a previous winter with minimal snow were made. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the 511 patients admitted under Orthopaedic trauma service during the significant winter snowstorms of December 2008 - January 2009, 100 (19.6%) (CI: 16.2%-23.2%) were due to ice and snow, whereas in the preceding mild winter only 18 of 415 (4.3%) (CI: 2.5%-6.8%) cases were related to snow (p<0.05). Ankle and wrist fractures were the most frequent injuries during the index snow storm period (p<0.05). At all the three institutions, 97 (96.5%) fractures were closed during the snowstorm as opposed to 17 (95%) during the control winter period. Internal fixation in 06 (89%) fractures as opposed to external fixation in 12 (11%) patients was the predominant mode of fixation across the board during both time periods. Conclusion: The study demonstrated a significantly higher inpatient orthopaedic trauma volume during the snowstorm more rigorous prospective studies need to be designed to gain further insight to solving these problems from a public health perspective. (author)

  9. Impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Astrid; Rein, Katharina; Kollei, Ines; Jacobi, Andrea; Rotter, Andrea; Schütz, Patricia; Hillemacher, Thomas; de Zwaan, Martina

    2011-08-15

    The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in a European psychiatric inpatient sample. Two hundred thirty four consecutive psychiatric inpatients (62% female) were examined using a module of the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders fourth edition (DSM-IV) that has been developed for ICDs (SCID-ICD). In addition to intermittent explosive disorder, pyromania, kleptomania, pathological gambling, and trichotillomania, the proposed ICDs not otherwise specified were assessed, including compulsive buying, nonparaphilic compulsive sexual behavior, pathological internet use, and pathological skin picking. Based on the SCID-ICD, a lifetime ICD rate of 23.5% and a current ICD rate of 18.8% were found. The most frequent ICDs were pathological skin picking (lifetime 7.3%, current 6.8%), compulsive buying (lifetime 6.8%, current 6.0%), and intermittent explosive disorder (lifetime 5.6%, current 3.4%). In contrast, referring to admission diagnoses taken from patients' charts only 3.8% of the inpatients were diagnosed with any current ICD. Individuals with comorbid ICD were significantly younger and had more admission diagnoses other than ICD. The results suggest high rates of ICDs among psychiatric inpatients that remain to be under-diagnosed in clinical routine. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Predictors of Readmission after Inpatient Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Umang; Salgado, Christopher; Mioton, Lauren; Rambachan, Aksharananda

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding risk factors that increase readmission rates may help enhance patient education and set system-wide expectations. We aimed to provide benchmark data on causes and predictors of readmission following inpatient plastic surgery. Methods The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset was reviewed for patients with both "Plastics" as their recorded surgical specialty and inpatient status. Readmission was tracked through the "Unplanned Readmission" variable. Patient characteristics and outcomes were compared using chi-squared analysis and Student's t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis was used for identifying predictors of readmission. Results A total of 3,671 inpatient plastic surgery patients were included. The unplanned readmission rate was 7.11%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; confidence interval [CI], 1.12-3.60; P=0.020), previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (OR, 2.69; CI, 1.21-5.97; P=0.015), hypertension requiring medication (OR, 1.65; CI, 1.22-2.24; Pplastic surgery has an associated 7.11% unplanned readmission rate. History of COPD, previous PCI, hypertension, ASA class 3 or 4, bleeding disorders, and obesity all proved to be significant risk factors for readmission. These findings will help to benchmark inpatient readmission rates and manage patient and hospital system expectations. PMID:24665418

  11. Including a Service Learning Educational Research Project in a Biology Course-II: Assessing Community Awareness of Legionnaires' Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shakra, Amal

    2012-01-01

    For a university service learning educational research project addressing Legionnaires' disease (LD), a Yes/No questionnaire on community awareness of LD was developed and distributed in an urban community in North Carolina, USA. The 456 questionnaires completed by the participants were sorted into yes and no sets based on responses obtained to…

  12. Converting a major dosimetry service from film to optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters including revision of the 'back-office' software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perks, Christopher A.; Faugoin, Stephane; Serise, Bertrand; Prugnaud, Brice; Million, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In our offices at Fontenay-aux-Roses we provide personal dosimetry for over 100,000 participants. During 2005/6 we transformed our operations from film dosemeters to those using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (InLight (Trade Mark)). The opportunity was taken to fully overhaul our operational procedures and we are currently completely reworking our 'back-office' software support. The change from film to InLight dosimetry has involved: 1) The installation of new readers at our offices in Fontenay-aux Roses; 2) The installation of a physical badge archiving system; 3) Complete revision of the operational flow to optimise the benefits of the new service; 4) Maintenance of our approval to operate a personal dosimetry service in France; 5) Considerable liaison between our office in Fontenay-aux-Roses and our Glenwood, USA, parent company to enable complete integration of the processes; and 6) Maintaining the service throughout the changeover and keeping client satisfaction high. Having changed the physical environment we are now completely renewing the back office software and systems in support of the dosimetry service. This ranges in scope from entering new clients, client support, all aspects of the dosimetry operations and chain of custody of the dosemeters and participants records and reports. This system is being rolled out in sections and it is envisaged that it will be fully implemented at the start of 2008. A key feature is that continuing improvement and the possibility of future developments of our services is in-built into the philosophy of the new back-office system. The nature of the new system, its benefits to our own operations and, in particular, clients will be discussed. (author)

  13. In-patients care surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Wook; Cheung, Hwan

    1986-01-01

    It cannot be denied that in the practice of radiological medicine or technology in Korea, patient care, the most fundamental aspect of medicine, has not received as much emphasis as the technical aspect has. This is also the case with the curriculum of the vocational colleges which train radiological technologists. But this is certainly wrong when we think of the fact that hospital itself exists for the patient, and medicine has developed for his well-being. This situation may be attributed to the health facilities which were grossly inadequate to handle the explosive health demand resulting from the development of the Korean economy, and the health policy of the government preoccupied with facility expansion. But Korea seems to have reached the stage demanding greater attention to improvement of the quality of medical care through, among other things, re-evaluation of the fundamental stance and re-establishment of values of the medical profession. This study, with focus on the attitude of technologists, considered various procedures of patient care involving means of patient transport used and the time required for handing of individual cases, as reflected in the results of independent investigation and in the questionnaire answered by in-patients of the Seoul National University Hospital who used the services of its Diagnostic Radiology Department

  14. Predictors of Readmission after Inpatient Plastic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umang Jain

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Understanding risk factors that increase readmission rates may help enhance patient education and set system-wide expectations. We aimed to provide benchmark data on causes and predictors of readmission following inpatient plastic surgery. Methods The 2011 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program dataset was reviewed for patients with both "Plastics" as their recorded surgical specialty and inpatient status. Readmission was tracked through the "Unplanned Readmission" variable. Patient characteristics and outcomes were compared using chi-squared analysis and Student's t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Multivariate regression analysis was used for identifying predictors of readmission. Results A total of 3,671 inpatient plastic surgery patients were included. The unplanned readmission rate was 7.11%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (odds ratio [OR], 2.01; confidence interval [CI], 1.12-3.60; P=0.020, previous percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI (OR, 2.69; CI, 1.21-5.97; P=0.015, hypertension requiring medication (OR, 1.65; CI, 1.22-2.24; P<0.001, bleeding disorders (OR, 1.70; CI, 1.01-2.87; P=0.046, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA class 3 or 4 (OR, 1.57; CI, 1.15-2.15; P=0.004, and obesity (body mass index ≥30 (OR, 1.43; CI, 1.09-1.88, P=0.011 to be significant predictors of readmission. Conclusions Inpatient plastic surgery has an associated 7.11% unplanned readmission rate. History of COPD, previous PCI, hypertension, ASA class 3 or 4, bleeding disorders, and obesity all proved to be significant risk factors for readmission. These findings will help to benchmark inpatient readmission rates and manage patient and hospital system expectations.

  15. 5 CFR 890.903 - Covered services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Limit on Inpatient Hospital Charges, Physician Charges, and FEHB Benefit... inpatient hospital services apply to inpatient hospital services which are: (1) Covered under both Medicare...

  16. Prevalence and cost of imaging in inpatient falls: the rising cost of falling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fields J

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jessica Fields,1 Tahani Alturkistani,2 Neal Kumar,3 Arjun Kanuri,3 Deeb N Salem,1 Samson Munn,2 Deborah Blazey-Martin1 1Department of Medicine, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Radiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA; 3Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Objective: To quantify the type, prevalence, and cost of imaging following inpatient falls, identify factors associated with post-fall imaging, and determine correlates of positive versus negative imaging. Design: Single-center retrospective cohort study of inpatient falls. Data were collected from the hospital's adverse event reporting system, DrQuality. Age, sex, date, time, and location of fall, clinical service, Morse Fall Scale/fall protocol, admitting diagnosis, and fall-related imaging studies were reviewed. Cost included professional and facilities fees for each study. Setting: Four hundred and fifteen bed urban academic hospital over 3 years (2008–2010. Patients: All adult inpatient falls during the study period were included. Falls experienced by patients aged <18 years, outpatient and emergency patients, visitors to the hospital, and staff were excluded. Measurements and main results: Five hundred and thirty inpatient falls occurred during the study period, average patient age 60.7 years (range 20–98. More than half of falls were men (55% and patients considered at risk of falls (56%. Falls were evenly distributed across morning (33%, evening (34%, and night (33% shifts. Of 530 falls, 178 (34% patients were imaged with 262 studies. Twenty percent of patients imaged had at least one positive imaging study attributed to the fall and 82% of studies were negative. Total cost of imaging was $160,897, 63% ($100,700 from head computed tomography (CT. Conclusion: Inpatient falls affect patients of both sexes, all ages, occur at any time of day and lead to expensive imaging, mainly from head CTs. Further study should be targeted toward

  17. 75 FR 11921 - Heritage Aviation, Ltd., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Global Technical Services and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Employment and Training Administration Heritage Aviation, Ltd., Including On-Site Leased Workers From Global... workers of Heritage Aviation, including on-site leased workers from Heritage Aviation, Ltd, including on... leased from Global Inc., were employed on-site at the Grand Prairie, Texas location of Heritage Aviation...

  18. Adolescent inpatient activity 1999-2010: analysis of English Hospital Episode Statistics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Dougal S; Viner, Russell M

    2014-09-01

    To investigate patterns and trends of adolescent (10-19 years) inpatient activity in England by sex, disease category, and admitting speciality. 9 632 844 Finished Consultant Episodes (FCEs) from English patients aged 1-19 between 1999/2000 and 2010/2011 (Hospital Episode Statistics data). Age trends by sex and major International Classification of Disease 10 (ICD10) chapter; differences in activity rates by age and sex; inpatient activity trends over the past decade, disaggregated by sex, admitting speciality and ICD10 chapter. Adolescent female patients account for more activity than girls aged 1-9 (139.4 vs 107.2 FCEs/1000). Female inpatient activity increases significantly between age 10 (70.9 FCEs/1000) and 19 (281.7 FCES/1000, of which non-obstetric care accounts for 155.9 FCEs/1000). Male activity increases much less during adolescence, with lower overall rates among adolescents than younger children (93.7 vs 142.9 FCEs/1000). Between 1999 and 2010, total adolescent inpatient activity increased faster among adolescents (10-19 years) (+14.2%) than younger children (1-9 years) (+11.0%). Adolescent FCEs/1000 increased by 12.8%, including higher rates admitted under Paediatrics (+47.5%) and Paediatric Surgery (+23.2%). Adolescents were admitted across a range of specialities. These data challenge the belief that adolescents are a healthy group who rarely use inpatient services. In England, use of inpatient services is higher among female patients aged 10-19 years than those aged 1-9 years, while adolescent activity has increased faster than for younger children over the past 11 years. Improving service quality for adolescents will require engagement of the many different teams that care for them. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Inpatient Financial Burden of Atopic Dermatitis in the United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narla, Shanthi; Hsu, Derek Y; Thyssen, Jacob P

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the inpatient burden of atopic dermatitis (AD). We sought to determine the risk factors and financial burden of hospitalizations for AD in the United States. Data were analyzed from the 2002-2012 National Inpatient Sample, including a 20% representative sample of all...... hospitalizations in the United States. Hospitalization rates for AD or eczema were highest in the northeast during the winter and south during the summer. Geometric mean cost of care (95% confidence interval) was lower for a primary diagnosis of AD or eczema versus no AD or eczema in adults ($3,502 [$3......, there is a substantial inpatient financial burden of AD in the United States....

  20. Treatment utilisation and trauma characteristics of child and adolescent inpatients with posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Traut

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Few empirical studies have addressed the impact of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD on treatment utilisation and outcome in South African youth. This study was undertaken to document demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics of child and adolescent inpatients with PTSD. Design. A retrospective chart study of all patients presenting to a child and adolescent inpatient unit was conducted between 1994-1996. For children and adolescents diagnosed with PTSD; demographic, diagnostic and treatment variables, including trauma type, family history, and delays in treatment seeking, were documented. Setting. Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatient Unit, Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town. Subjects. Children and adolescents (2 to 18 years presenting to an inpatient unit (n=737. Results. 10.3% (n=76 met diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Gender differences were clearly evident: PTSD was six times more prevalent in girls (65 with PTSD were female and 11 were male; girls were most likely to have experienced rape or sexual abuse while boys were most likely to have witnessed a killing. Psychotherapy was the most common intervention for PTSD, followed by treatment with a tricyclic antidepressant. 97.4% of children and adolescents who were treated demonstrated significant improvement. Delays in seeking treatment and problems with the primary support group were highly prevalent. Conclusion. PTSD is a common disorder that is responsive to treatment with psychotherapy and/or tricyclic antidepressants in child and adolescent inpatients. These findings underscore the importance of early identification and treatment of childhood PTSD in mental health settings, in particular tertiary service institutions.

  1. Including service learning in the undergraduate communication sciences and disorders curriculum: benefits, challenges, and strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Kimberly A

    2011-12-01

    To describe some of the benefits of service learning (SL), considerations in course development and construction, and implementation and outcomes of an SL course in the undergraduate communication sciences and disorders (CSD) program at a small, public university in northwest Washington. A review of the literature on SL and a description of the author's experience in course development are provided on the basis of a computerized database search, library search, and discussions with the Western Washington University Center for Service Learning. Teaching an SL course can present challenges to both faculty and students; nonetheless, incorporating SL into the undergraduate CSD curriculum is an excellent way of enriching the academic experience and improving critical-thinking skills of young students. SL provides hands-on opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in their CSD classes to real-world contexts, gain a better understanding of course content through engagement in real situations, and integrate information from a variety of courses in and outside of their major.

  2. Alternatives to inpatient mental health care for children and young people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepperd, Sasha; Doll, Helen; Gowers, Simon; James, Anthony; Fazel, Mina; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Pollock, Jon

    2014-01-01

    Background Current policy in the UK and elsewhere places emphasis on the provision of mental health services in the least restrictive setting, whilst also recognising that some children will require inpatient care. As a result, there are a range of mental health services to manage young people with serious mental health problems who are at risk of being admitted to an inpatient unit in community or outpatient settings. Objectives 1. To assess the effectiveness, acceptability and cost of mental health services that provide an alternative to inpatient care for children and young people. 2. To identify the range and prevalence of different models of service that seek to avoid inpatient care for children and young people. Search methods Our search included the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group Specialised Register (2007), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2006, issue 4), MEDLINE (1966 to 2007), EMBASE (1982 to 2006), the British Nursing Index (1994 to 2006), RCN database (1985 to 1996), CINAHL (1982 to 2006) and PsycInfo (1972 to 2007). Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials of mental health services providing specialist care, beyond the scope of generic outpatient provision, as an alternative to inpatient mental health care, for children or adolescents aged from five to 18 years who have a serious mental health condition requiring specialist services beyond the capacity of generic outpatient provision. The control group received mental health services in an inpatient or equivalent setting. Data collection and analysis Two authors independently extracted data and assessed study quality. We grouped studies according to the intervention type but did not pool data because of differences in the interventions and measures of outcome. Where data were available we calculated confidence intervals (CIs) for differences between groups at follow up. We also calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs) and

  3. 12 CFR 303.46 - Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial education programs that include the... Branches and Offices § 303.46 Financial education programs that include the provision of bank products and... participate in one or more financial education programs that involve receiving deposits, paying withdrawals...

  4. 32 CFR Appendix E to Part 37 - What Provisions May a Participant Need To Include When Purchasing Goods or Services Under a TIA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Pt. 37, App. E Appendix E to Part 37—What Provisions May a Participant Need To Include... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What Provisions May a Participant Need To Include When Purchasing Goods or Services Under a TIA? E Appendix E to Part 37 National Defense Department...

  5. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 80 - Procedures for Special Educational Programs (Including Related Services) for Preschool Children...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... frequency, number of times per week/month and intensity, amount of times each day) and the extent to which... school activities, including meals and recess periods, with students who do not have a disability. E...

  6. Inpatient allergy/immunology consultations in a tertiary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Hans F; England, Ronald W; Quinn, James M

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have examined inpatient referral patterns for fellowship training programs and none for allergy/immunology (AI) since 2003. The primary end point was the reason for consultation, and secondary end points included the AI diagnosis made and outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed all inpatient AI consultations from July 1, 2001 through June 30, 2007. These 6 years of data were combined with 14 years of data examining the reason for consult from a previous study. The data were analyzed for trends and changes over the entire 20-year period. A total of 254 AI inpatient consults were reviewed over the 6 years studied. Thirty-six percent (92/254) of inpatient consults were for evaluation of adverse drug reactions (ADRs), 22% (55/254) miscellaneous reasons, 17% (43/254) urticaria/angioedema, 13% (32/254) for possible immunodeficiency, 9% (23/254) for anaphylaxis, and 3% (8/254) for asthma. AI inpatient consults show a significant decline over the recent 6-year period (p = 0.0023) despite stable total hospital admissions since 1998. Over the last 20 years, an 85% decrease (p < 0.00001) in inpatient asthma consults and increases (p < 0.05) in immunodeficiency, rash, and urticaria/angioedema evaluations have been observed. Not following AI recommendations resulted in a 16.6 odds ratio (95% CI, 5.55-49.93) that a patient's clinical status would be worse or unchanged. Inpatient AI consults have declined with associated reduction in asthma inpatient consults. Although ADRs and anaphylaxis consults have been stable, evaluations for immunodeficiency, rash, and urticaria/angioedema have increased. Following inpatient AI recommendations is associated with improved patient outcomes.

  7. 42 CFR 412.62 - Federal rates for inpatient operating costs for fiscal year 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... per case review by a utilization and quality control quality improvement organization, as allowed..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR INPATIENT HOSPITAL... determines national adjusted DRG prospective payment rates for operating costs, for each inpatient hospital...

  8. 77 FR 53257 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ..., Hospital Inpatient Quality Reporting and Hospital Value-Based Purchasing--Program Administration... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 412, 413, 424, et al. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective...

  9. Medical Inpatient Journey Modeling and Clustering: A Bayesian Hidden Markov Model Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhengxing; Dong, Wei; Wang, Fei; Duan, Huilong

    2015-01-01

    Modeling and clustering medical inpatient journeys is useful to healthcare organizations for a number of reasons including inpatient journey reorganization in a more convenient way for understanding and browsing, etc. In this study, we present a probabilistic model-based approach to model and cluster medical inpatient journeys. Specifically, we exploit a Bayesian Hidden Markov Model based approach to transform medical inpatient journeys into a probabilistic space, which can be seen as a richer representation of inpatient journeys to be clustered. Then, using hierarchical clustering on the matrix of similarities, inpatient journeys can be clustered into different categories w.r.t their clinical and temporal characteristics. We evaluated the proposed approach on a real clinical data set pertaining to the unstable angina treatment process. The experimental results reveal that our method can identify and model latent treatment topics underlying in personalized inpatient journeys, and yield impressive clustering quality.

  10. 76 FR 13227 - Continental Structural Plastics, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Kelly Services and Doepker...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-10

    ... body structural components for automobiles. The notice was published in the Federal Register on January... State agency, the Department reviewed the certification for workers of the subject firm. New information.... The intent of the Department's certification is to include all workers of the subject firm who were...

  11. Suicidal ideation in inpatients with acute schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxakis, Vassilis; Havaki-Kontaxaki, Beata; Margariti, Maria; Stamouli, Sophia; Kollias, Costas; Christodoulou, George

    2004-07-01

    Schizophrenia has been associated with a high rate of suicide. This study investigates the prevalence of suicidal ideation in a population of inpatients with acute schizophrenia, together with the clinical parameters associated with suicidal thoughts. We assessed 93 schizophrenia patients. We matched subjects for age and sex and compared subjects with and without suicidal thoughts. We performed stepwise multiple regression analysis to assess the association between specific clinical symptoms and suicidal ideation. Of the patients, 20.4% reported suicidal thoughts during the last 15 days. Severity of depressive symptoms, motor retardation, guilt feelings, pathological guilt, and self-depreciation predicted the patients' suicidal ideation. Suicidal thoughts are frequent among inpatients with acute schizophrenia. Prevention of suicidal behaviour should include helping patients improve their self-esteem and reducing depression and guilt feelings.

  12. Perceptions of the Inpatient Training Experience: A Nationwide Survey of Gastroenterology Program Directors and Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navin L; Perencevich, Molly L; Trier, Jerry S

    2017-10-01

    Inpatient training is a key component of gastroenterology (GI) fellowship programs nationwide, yet little is known about perceptions of the inpatient training experience. To compare the content, objectives and quality of the inpatient training experience as perceived by program directors (PD) and fellows in US ACGME-accredited GI fellowship programs. We conducted a nationwide, online-based survey of GI PDs and fellows at the conclusion of the 2016 academic year. We queried participants about (1) the current models of inpatient training, (2) the content, objectives, and quality of the inpatient training experience, and (3) the frequency and quality of educational activities on the inpatient service. We analyzed five-point Likert items and rank assessments as continuous variables by an independent t test and compared proportions using the Chi-square test. Survey response rate was 48.4% (75/155) for PDs and a total of 194 fellows completed the survey, with both groups reporting the general GI consult team (>90%) as the primary model of inpatient training. PDs and fellows agreed on the ranking of all queried responsibilities of the inpatient fellow to develop during the inpatient service. However, fellows indicated that attendings spent less time teaching and provided less formal feedback than that perceived by PDs (p training experience (p training experience.

  13. Medicaid lapses and low-income young adults' receipt of outpatient mental health care after an inpatient stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Eric P; Wissow, Lawrence S; Davis, Maryann; Abrams, Michael T; Dixon, Lisa B

    2014-04-01

    This study examined low-income young adults' use of outpatient mental health services after an inpatient mental health stay, with a focus on Medicaid enrollment lapses and public mental health safety-net coverage. The sample included 1,174 young adults ages 18 to 26 who had been discharged from inpatient psychiatric care in a mid-Atlantic state. All were enrolled in Medicaid at the time of discharge, and all were eligible for continued outpatient public mental health services regardless of Medicaid enrollment. Administrative claims data were used to examine outpatient mental health clinic use, psychotropic medication possession, inpatient readmission, and emergency department admission during the 365-day period after the index discharge. The main independent variable was a lapse in Medicaid enrollment. An instrumental-variables regression model was used to minimize estimation bias resulting from unmeasured confounding between lapses and service use. Nearly a third (30%) of the young adults had an enrollment lapse. In instrumental-variables analysis, those whose coverage lapsed were less likely than those who had continuous Medicaid coverage to have at least two clinic visits (38% versus 80%); they also had a lower average psychotropic medication possession ratio (25% versus 55%). Age-related Medicaid enrollment lapses were common in this sample of young adults and were associated with receipt of less clinical care postdischarge despite continued eligibility for public services. States should examine opportunities to assist young adults with serious mental health problems who are aging out of Medicaid enrollment categories for children.

  14. Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility PPS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 4421 of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (Public Law 105-33), as amended by section 125 of the Medicare, Medicaid, and SCHIP Balanced Budget Refinement Act of...

  15. Inpatient dermatology: Characteristics of patients and admissions in a tertiary level hospital in Eastern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpita Sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermatology is primarily a non-acute, outpatient-centered clinical specialty, but substantial number of patients need indoor admission for adequate management. Over the years, the need for inpatient facilities in Dermatology has grown manifold; however, these facilities are available only in some tertiary centers. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the characteristics of the diseases and outcomes of patients admitted in the dermatology inpatient Department of a tertiary care facility in eastern India. Materials and Methods: We undertook a retrospective analysis of the admission and discharge records of all patients, collected from the medical records department, admitted to our indoor facility from 2011 to 2014. The data thus obtained was statistically analyzed with special emphasis on the patient's demographic profile, clinical diagnosis, final outcome, and duration of stay. Results and Analysis: A total of 375 patients were admitted to our indoor facility during the period. Males outnumbered females, with the median age in the 5th decade. Immunobullous disorders (91 patients, 24.27% were the most frequent reason for admissions, followed by various causes of erythroderma (80 patients, 21.33% and infective disorders (73 patients, 19.47%. Other notable causes included cutaneous adverse drug reactions, psoriasis, vasculitis, and connective tissue diseases. The mean duration of hospital stay was 22.2±15.7 days; ranging from 1 to 164 days. Majority of patients (312, 83.2% improved after hospitalization; while 29 (7.73% patients died from their illness. About 133 patients (35.64% required referral services during their stay, while 8 patients (2.13% were transferred to other departments for suitable management. Conclusion: Many dermatoses require inpatient care for their optimum management. Dermatology inpatient services should be expanded in India to cater for the large number of cases with potentially highly severe dermatoses.

  16. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Susan R; Casely, Emma M; Kuehler, Bianca M; Ward, Stephen; Halmshaw, Charlotte L; Thomas, Sarah E; Goodall, Ian D; Bantel, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients' pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize communication and to resolve a difficult and potentially risk-laden situation. This small case series discusses the benefits derived from the involvement of a clinical psychologist in the management of inpatient pain, and therefore illustrates the need for novel initiatives for inpatient pain services. However, future research is warranted to validate this approach.

  17. Accounting for Inpatient Wards when developing Master Surgical Schedules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanberkel, P.T.; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Hans, Elias W.; Hurink, Johann L.; van Lent, W.A.M.; van Harten, Willem H.; van Harten, Wim H.

    BACKGROUND: As the demand for health care services increases, the need to improve patient flow between departments has likewise increased. Understanding how the master surgical schedule (MSS) affects the inpatient wards and exploiting this relationship can lead to a decrease in surgery

  18. Characteristics of inpatient anterior cruciate ligament reconstructions and concomitant injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Nathaniel A; McPherson, April L; Rao, Marepalli B; Myer, Gregory D; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this epidemiologic study was to quantify the incidence, expense, and concomitant injuries for anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) procedures in the USA from 2003 to 2011 that required an inpatient stay. It was hypothesized that the relative reported rates of concomitant knee injuries would be greater with the MCL and menisci compared to all other concomitant knee injuries. The National Inpatient Sample from 2003 to 2011 was retrospectively sampled using ICD-9-CM codes to identify ACLR patients and to extrapolate national averages. Between the years of 2003-2011, an average of 9,037 ± 1,728 inpatient hospitalization included ACLRs, of which 4,252 ± 1,824 were primarily due to the ACLR. Inpatient visits primarily due to ACLR involved an average hospitalization of 1.7 ± 0.2 days and cost $30,118 ± 9,066 per patient. Knee injuries that were commonly reported along with inpatient ACLRs included medial meniscus damage (18.1 %), lateral meniscus damage (16.8 %), collateral ligament repairs (12.3 %), and medial collateral ligament strains (6.9 %). Prevalence of meniscus injuries was consistent across years, but MCL-related injuries increased over time. ACLR-related inpatient hospitalizations account for approximately 7.1 % of the total ACLRs performed annually in the USA. Inpatient ACLR procedures continue to decrease in frequency; however, the mean cost per patient increased. Meniscus and collateral ligament injuries were the most commonly reported concomitant knee injuries. The clinical relevance of this investigation is that it informs, on a large clinical cohort of patients, the current state of incidence and expense for ACLR surgeries in an inpatient setting. Prognostic, retrospective study, Level II.

  19. Child & Adolescent Mental Health Services - first annual report 2008

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-10-01

    This Annual Report provides the first comprehensive survey carried out on community CAMHS teams and includes preliminary data collected by The Health Research Board on the admission of young people under the age of 18 years to inpatient mental health facilities. As many measures in this report do not have historic comparators it provides a baseline foundation that will be built upon in subsequent years providing an indication of trends that cannot yet be drawn on the basis of this report. The next report will include day hospital, liaison and inpatient services. Subsequent reports will further extend the mapping of mental health services for young people.

  20. Suicide Behaviors in Adult Inpatients with Mental Disorders in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Gao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examined the tendency and suicidal behavior rates of Chinese adult inpatients with different types of mental disorders from 2010 to 2015. The aim was to provide some interesting clues for further studies. Methods: Adult patients with mental disorders who were hospitalized in Beijing Anding hospital from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2015 were included. Chi-square tests were used to compare the difference among inpatients with mental disorders by gender and year. Frequency, trend and suicidal behavior rates of inpatients with mental disorders were graphed. Results: A total of 17,244 psychiatric adult inpatients were included in our study. About 53.2% of the inpatients had mood disorders, followed by schizophrenia, which accounted for 34.6%. The proportion of female inpatients with mental disorders was larger than that of males (52.6% to 47.4%. Of the total, 3296 psychiatric inpatients were recognized as having suicidal behaviors. The rate of suicidal behavior among all inpatients was 19.1%, and it varied over the years. The suicidal behavior rate of female inpatients with mood disorders was much higher than that of the corresponding male inpatients. Conclusions: The presence of suicidal behavior varied among people with different types of mental disorders. For each type of mental illness, identifying the risk of specific suicide behavior would help tailor-make preventive efforts accordingly.

  1. Quality Metrics in Inpatient Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhand, Amar

    2015-12-01

    Quality of care in the context of inpatient neurology is the standard of performance by neurologists and the hospital system as measured against ideal models of care. There are growing regulatory pressures to define health care value through concrete quantifiable metrics linked to reimbursement. Theoretical models of quality acknowledge its multimodal character with quantitative and qualitative dimensions. For example, the Donabedian model distils quality as a phenomenon of three interconnected domains, structure-process-outcome, with each domain mutually influential. The actual measurement of quality may be implicit, as in peer review in morbidity and mortality rounds, or explicit, in which criteria are prespecified and systemized before assessment. As a practical contribution, in this article a set of candidate quality indicators for inpatient neurology based on an updated review of treatment guidelines is proposed. These quality indicators may serve as an initial blueprint for explicit quality metrics long overdue for inpatient neurology. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Atividades da farmácia hospitalar brasileira para com pacientes hospitalizados: uma revisão da literatura Pharmaceutical services for inpatients provided by hospital pharmacies in Brazil: a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Magarinos-Torres

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo discute a produção científica relacionada à farmácia hospitalar brasileira direcionada à internação, na tentativa de ampliar a visão sobre características e prioridades. Foram localizados dezessete artigos nas bases de dados Medline e Lilacs condizentes com os critérios de inclusão e exclusão definidos a priori. A maioria ateve-se aos componentes ensino/pesquisa, logística e farmacotécnica, a partir da observação de hospitais públicos localizados no Sudeste. Percebe-se a escassez de textos relacionados a atividades estruturais como gerenciamento e seleção. Estima-se que à formação acadêmica dos farmacêuticos atrele-se a percepção da manipulação como atividade preponderante nos serviços embora, atualmente, esta seja necessária apenas em um número restrito de hospitais. Soma-se a isto a baixa adequação das atividades realizadas a normas legais e padrões estabelecidos e a inexistência de revista brasileira dedicada ao tema e indexada pela BVS. Tendo em vista a maior freqüência de trabalhos oriundos do setor público, há, aparentemente, ou maior liberdade de atuação do farmacêutico neste setor ou menor produção científica, quantificada por publicações, no setor privado.This paper discusses the literature on hospital pharmacy services for in-patients in Brazil, seeking a broader view of its characteristics and priorities. Seventeen papers were located in the Medline and Lilacs databases that complied with the pre-defined inclusion/exclusion criteria. Most of them were related to teaching and research, logistics and compounding, based on observations in public hospitals in Southeast Brazil. Few studies focused on core activities such as management and selection. The academic syllabus through which pharmacy students are trained may underlie the perception that compounding is the preponderant aspect of hospital pharmacy services, although this is required in only a few institutions. Added to

  3. Characteristics of Inpatient Care and Rehabilitation for Acute First-Ever Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Shin, Yong-Il; Lee, Sam-Gyu; Oh, Gyung-Jae; Lim, Young Shil

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to analyze the status of inpatient care for acute first-ever stroke at three general hospitals in Korea to provide basic data and useful information on the development of comprehensive and systematic rehabilitation care for stroke patients. Materials and Methods This study conducted a retrospective complete enumeration survey of all acute first-ever stroke patients admitted to three distinct general hospitals for 2 years by reviewing medical records. Both ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes were included. Survey items included demographic data, risk factors, stroke type, state of rehabilitation treatment, discharge destination, and functional status at discharge. Results A total of 2159 patients were reviewed. The mean age was 61.5±14.4 years and the ratio of males to females was 1.23:1. Proportion of ischemic stroke comprised 54.9% and hemorrhagic stroke 45.1%. Early hospital mortality rate was 8.1%. Among these patients, 27.9% received rehabilitation consultation and 22.9% underwent inpatient rehabilitation treatment. The mean period from admission to rehabilitation consultation was 14.5 days. Only 12.9% of patients were transferred to a rehabilitation department and the mean period from onset to transfer was 23.4 days. Improvements in functional status were observed in the patients who had received inpatient rehabilitation treatment after acute stroke management. Conclusion Our analysis revealed that a relatively small portion of patients who suffered from an acute first-ever stroke received rehabilitation consultation and inpatient rehabilitation treatment. Thus, applying standardized clinical practice guidelines for post-acute rehabilitation care is needed to provide more effective and efficient rehabilitation services to patients with stroke. PMID:25510773

  4. Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) Provider Summary for the Top 100 Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A provider level summary of Inpatient Prospective Payment System (IPPS) discharges, average charges and average Medicare payments for the Top 100 Diagnosis-Related...

  5. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Measure Data – National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  6. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Measure Data – by Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  7. Inpatient versus outpatient vincristine, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide for pediatric cancers: Quality and cost implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaty, Rachel S; Bernhardt, M Brooke; Berger, Amanda H; Hesselgrave, Joy E; Russell, Heidi V; Okcu, M Fatih

    2015-11-01

    Approximately 18% of the United States' gross domestic product is attributed to healthcare expenditures. Several studies have illustrated that shifting healthcare from the inpatient to the outpatient setting is more cost effective, in addition to improving patient satisfaction. Vincristine, dactinomycin, and cyclophosphamide (VAC) are used together to treat children with solid tumors. Our traditional treatment approach included a two day inpatient admission. The purpose of this project was to establish a process for the administration of VAC in the outpatient setting to improve satisfaction, and reduce costs. We aimed to benchmark practice standards with other institutions, revised our treatment approach to permit outpatient administration, and implemented the new protocol in a stepwise manner. We collected caregiver satisfaction metrics through the use of surveys. Costs of encounters were obtained from administrative data. Total costs and costs by service type were compared using descriptive and mean comparisons. Seven patients received a total of 31 cycles of VAC in the outpatient setting. The time to achieve an appropriate pre-chemotherapy specific gravity was reduced by a median of 120 min. In addition, time spent in the hospital setting was reduced by a mean of 27.2 hr. Adverse effects were minimal and all caregivers reported greater satisfaction with the outpatient regimen. Outpatient administration of VAC was $3,300 less on average compared to the inpatient administration. Outpatient VAC provides a safe alternative for administration that reduces healthcare costs, reduces healthcare utilization, and improves patient satisfaction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. 29 CFR 825.114 - Inpatient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LEAVE ACT OF 1993 Coverage Under the Family and Medical Leave Act § 825.114 Inpatient care. Inpatient... any period of incapacity as defined in § 825.113(b), or any subsequent treatment in connection with...

  9. Patterns of psychotropic medication use in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alosaimi FD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fahad D Alosaimi,1 Abdulhadi Alhabbad,2 Mohammed F Abalhassan,3 Ebtihaj O Fallata,4 Nasser M Alzain,5 Mohammad Zayed Alassiry,6 Bander Abdullah Haddad71Department of Psychiatry, King Saud University, Riyadh, 2Department of Psychiatry, Prince Mohammed Medical City, Aljouf, 3Department of Medicine, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, 4Department of Psychiatry, Mental Health Hospital, Jeddah, 5Department of Psychiatry, Al-Amal Complex for Mental Health, Dammam, 6Medical Services Department, Abha Psychiatric Hospital, Abha, 7Department of Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To study the pattern of psychotropic medication use and compare this pattern between inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia.Method: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted between July 2012 and June 2014 on patients seeking psychiatric advice at major hospitals in five main regions of Saudi Arabia. Male (n=651 and female (n=594 patients who signed the informed consent form and were currently or had been previously using psychotropic medications, irrespective of the patient’s type of psychiatric diagnosis and duration of the disease, were included. A total of 1,246 patients were found to be suitable in the inclusion criteria of whom 464 were inpatients while 782 were outpatients.Results: Several studied demographic factors have shown that compared with outpatients, inpatients were more likely to be male (P=0.004, unmarried (P<0.001, have less number of children (1–3; P=0.002, unemployed (P=0.001, have a lower family income (<3,000 SR; P<0.001, live in rural communities (P<0.001, have a lower body mass index (P=0.001, and are smokers (P<0.001; however, there were no differences with regard to age or educational levels. The current frequency of use of psychotropic medications in overall patients was antipsychotics (76.6%, antidepressants (41.4%, mood stabilizers

  10. Overcrowding as a possible risk factor for inpatient suicide in a South African psychiatric hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffel Grobler

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available About 4% of all suicides are estimated to occur while being an inpatient in a psychiatric facility. Staff generally assume that an inpatient suicide reflects a failure on their part to recognise the patient’s suicidal intent and whether it could have been prevented in any way. Inpatients who commit suicide do not seem to be a homogenous group, but some risk factors have been identified, including being young, single, male, unemployed, abusing substances, schizophrenia and personality- and affective disorders. Number of admissions in the previous month also appears to be a risk factor. When the numbers of inpatients are high, more violent incidents occu. Although literature presently do not suggest an association, overcrowding in psychiatric inpatient wards should be considered a risk factor for inpatient suicide.

  11. Gearing service quality into public and private hospitals in small islands: empirical evidence from Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasli, Huseyin; Ekiz, Erdogan Haktan; Katircioglu, Salih Turan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop and compare some determinants of service quality in both the public and private hospitals of Northern Cyprus. There is considerable lack of literature with respect to service quality in public and private hospitals. Randomly, 454 respondents, who have recently benefited from hospital services in Famagusta, were selected to answer a modified version of the SERVQUAL Instrument. The instrument contained both service expectations and perceptions questions. This study identifies six factors regarding the service quality as perceived in both public and private Northern Cyprus hospitals. These are: empathy, giving priority to the inpatients needs, relationships between staff and patients, professionalism of staff, food and the physical environment. Research results revealed that the various expectations of inpatients have not been met in either the public or the private hospitals At the micro level, the lack of management commitment to service quality in both hospital settings leads doctors and nurses to expend less effort increasing or improving inpatient satisfaction. Hospital managers should also satisfy their employees, since job satisfaction leads to customer satisfaction and loyalty. Additionally, hospital administrations need to gather systematic feedback from their inpatients, establish visible and transparent complaint procedures so that inpatients' complaints can be addressed effectively and efficiently. The hospitals need to organize training sessions based on the critical importance of service quality and the crucial role of inpatient satisfaction in the health care industry. Future studies should include the remaining regions in Cyprus in order to increase research findings' generalizability. Additionally, including other dimensions such as hospital processes and discharge management and co-ordination may provide further insights into understanding inpatients' perceptions and intentions.

  12. The experiences of clients and healthcare providers regarding the provision of reproductive health services including the prevention of HIV and AIDS in an informal settlement in Tshwane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L.S. Mataboge

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Globally challenges regarding healthcare provision are sometimes related to a failure to estimate client numbers in peri-urban areas due to rapid population growth. About one-sixth of the world's population live in informal settlements which are mostly characterised by poor healthcare service provision. Poor access to primary healthcare may expose residents of informal settlement more to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS than their rural and urban counterparts due to a lack of access to information on prevention, early diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of both the reproductive health services' clients and the healthcare providers with regard to the provision of reproductive health services including the prevention of HIV and AIDS in a primary healthcare setting in Tshwane. A qualitative, exploratory and contextual design using a phenomenological approach to enquire about the participants' experiences was implemented. Purposive sampling resulted in the selection of 23 clients who used the reproductive healthcare services and ten healthcare providers who were interviewed during individual and focus group interviews respectively. Tesch's method for qualitative data analysis was used. Ethical principles guided the study, and certain strategies were followed to ensure trustworthiness. The findings revealed that females who lived in informal settlements were aware of the inability of the PHC setting to provide adequate reproductive healthcare to meet their needs. The HCPs acknowledged that healthcare provision was negatively affected by policies. It was found that the community members could be taught how to coach teenagers and support each other in order to bridge staff shortages and increase health outcomes including HIV/AIDS prevention.

  13. The experiences of clients and healthcare providers regarding the provision of reproductive health services including the prevention of HIV and AIDS in an informal settlement in Tshwane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.L.S. Mataboge

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Globally challenges regarding healthcare provision are sometimes related to a failure to estimate client numbers in peri-urban areas due to rapid population growth. About one-sixth of the world's population live in informal settlements which are mostly characterised by poor healthcare service provision. Poor access to primary healthcare may expose residents of informal settlement more to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS than their rural and urban counterparts due to a lack of access to information on prevention, early diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of both the reproductive health services' clients and the healthcare providers with regard to the provision of reproductive health services including the prevention of HIV and AIDS in a primary healthcare setting in Tshwane. A qualitative, exploratory and contextual design using a phenomenological approach to enquire about the participants' experiences was implemented. Purposive sampling resulted in the selection of 23 clients who used the reproductive healthcare services and ten healthcare providers who were interviewed during individual and focus group interviews respectively. Tesch's method for qualitative data analysis was used. Ethical principles guided the study, and certain strategies were followed to ensure trustworthiness. The findings revealed that females who lived in informal settlements were aware of the inability of the PHC setting to provide adequate reproductive healthcare to meet their needs. The HCPs acknowledged that healthcare provision was negatively affected by policies. It was found that the community members could be taught how to coach teenagers and support each other in order to bridge staff shortages and increase health outcomes including HIV/AIDS prevention.

  14. Inpatient Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Severe Eating Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E for eating disorders has been developed and evaluated only in outpatient setting. Aim of the paper is to describe a novel model of inpatient treatment, termed inpatient CBT-E, indicated for patients with an eating disorder of clinical severity not manageable in an outpatient setting or that failed outpatient treatment. Inpatient CBT-E is derived by the outpatients CBT-E with some adaptations to rend the treatments suitable for an inpatient setting. The principal adaptations include: 1 multidisciplinary and non-eclectic team composed of physicians, psychologists, dieticians and nurses all trained in CBT; 2 assisted eating; 3 group sessions; and a CBT family module for patients younger than 18 years. The treatment lasts 20 weeks (13 for inpatients followed by seven weeks of residential day treatment and, as CBT-E, is divided in four stages and can be administered in a focused form (CBT-F or in a broad form (CBT-B. A randomized control trial is evaluating the effectiveness of the treatment.

  15. The validity of the MSI-BPD among inpatient adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblin, J Leigh; Venta, Amanda; Sharp, Carla

    2014-04-01

    Although the McLean Screening Instrument for Borderline Personality Disorder (MSI-BPD) has shown validity in adult samples, only one study has explored its validity in adolescents and, to our knowledge, the measure has not been validated with inpatient adolescents. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the reliability, and convergent and criterion validity, of the MSI-BPD in an effort to establish the clinical utility of the MSI-PBD as a screening measure for BPD in inpatient adolescents. A total of 121 adolescents from an acute care inpatient unit were recruited for the study. Convergent validity was examined with established measures of BPD in adolescents, including the use of receiver operating characteristics analyses to establish a clinical cutoff score for the MSI-BPD in predicting a diagnosis of BPD. Criterion validity was examined by using this clinical cutoff to investigate group differences in suicidal ideation and Axis I symptoms, known correlates of BPD. Findings demonstrated support for validity of the MSI-BPD when used among inpatient adolescents, and established a clinical cutoff of 5.5. Taken together, this study demonstrates adequate validity for the MSI-BPD, and suggests it is a valuable screening measure for BPD in adolescent inpatients. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. [Inpatients days in patients with respiratory diseases and periodontal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Plata, Rosario; Olmedo-Torres, Daniel; Martínez-Briseño, David; González-Cruz, Herminia; Casa-Medina, Guillermo; García-Sancho, Cecilia

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory gingival process that has been associated with the severity of respiratory diseases. In Mexico a prevalence of 78% was found in population with social security and > 60 years old. The aim of this study is to establish the association between periodontal disease and respiratory diseases according to the inpatient days. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to December 2011. We included hospitalized patients, ≥ 18 years of age, without sedation or intubated. A dentist classified patients into two groups according to the severity of the periodontal disease: mild-to-moderate and severe. We estimated medians of inpatient days by disease and severity. Negative binomial models were adjusted to estimate incidence rate ratios and predicted inpatient days. 3,059 patients were enrolled. The median of observed and predicted inpatient days was higher in the group of severe periodontal disease (p disease, tuberculosis, and influenza had the highest incidence rates ratios of periodontal disease (p periodontal disease is positively -associated with inpatient days of patients with respiratory diseases.

  17. Hypovitaminosis D in psychogeriatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapid, M I; Drake, M T; Geske, J R; Mundis, C B; Hegard, T L; Kung, S; Frye, M A

    2013-03-01

    This study investigated the rate of hypovitaminosis D in psychogeriatric inpatients and explored whether any associations exist between vitamin D levels, cognitive function, and psychiatric diagnoses. Retrospective medical record review from November 2000 through November 2010. Geriatric psychiatric ward of an academic tertiary care hospital. Psychiatric inpatients aged 65 years or older. MEASUREMENTS AND ANALYSIS METHODS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels were measured at admission. Associations between 25(OH)D levels, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were analyzed using Spearman correlations, and psychiatric diagnoses were analyzed using logistic regression models and Fisher's exact tests. In 141 subjects (mean age, 77.8 years; 86 [61%] female; 135 [96%] white), the most frequent diagnoses were major depressive disorder in 81 patients (57%), dementia in 38 (27%), delirium in 13 (9%), anxiety in 12 (8.5%), and bipolar disorder in 11 (8%). Mean MMSE score was 24±6.4 (range, 3-30). Forty-three subjects (30.4%) had mild to moderate vitamin D deficiency [25(OH)D, 10-24 ng/mL], and 6 (4.2%) had severe deficiency [25(OH)D D was common in elderly psychiatric inpatients. No associations were found between vitamin D levels and global cognitive function or psychiatric diagnoses.

  18. Paraphilias in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Patrick J; Odlaug, Brian L; Thomarios, Nick; Davis, Andrew A; Buchanan, Stephanie N; Meyer, Craig S; Grant, Jon E

    2010-05-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine the prevalence of paraphilias in an adult inpatient psychiatric population. One hundred twelve consecutive, voluntarily admitted, adult male psychiatric inpatients were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, Sexual Disorders Module, Male Version, to assess the rates of DSM-IV paraphilias. Fifteen patients (13.4%) reported symptoms consistent with at least one lifetime DSM-IV paraphilia. The most common paraphilias were voyeurism (n = 9 [8.0%]), exhibitionism (n = 6 [5.4%]), and sexual masochism (n = 3 [2.7%]). Patients who screened positive for a paraphilia had significantly more psychiatric hospitalizations (P = .006) and, on a trend level, were more likely to have attempted suicide. In addition, patients with paraphilias were significantly more likely to report having been sexually abused than patients without a paraphilia (P = paraphilia. Paraphilias appear to be more common in adult male psychiatric inpatients than previously estimated. The study also demonstrated that these disorders were not screened for by the treating physician and thus may go untreated. Further, larger-scale studies are necessary in order to further examine the rates of these disorders in the general population.

  19. Risk factors for delayed inpatient functional recovery after total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, T.J.; Meeteren, N.L. van; Schank, K.; Kim, R.H.; Miner, T.; Stevens-Lapsley, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the predictive value of surgery-related variables for delayed inpatient functional recovery (i.e., >/=3 days to reach functional independence) after TKA. Method. 193 consecutive people undergoing TKA were included in this prospective cohort study. Inpatient functional recovery

  20. Risk factors for delayed inpatient functional recovery after total knee arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, T.J.; Meeteren, N.L.U. van; Schank, K.; Kim, R.H.; Miner, T.; Stevens-Lapsley, J.E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the predictive value of surgery-related variables for delayed inpatient functional recovery (i.e., ≥3 days to reach functional independence) after TKA. Method. 193 consecutive people undergoing TKA were included in this prospective cohort study. Inpatient functional recovery

  1. The Boston HAPPENS Program: Needs and Use of Services by HIV-Positive Compared to At-Risk Youth, Including Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Elizabeth R.; Samples, Cathryn L.; Melchiono, Maurice W.; Keenan, Peter M.; Fox, Durrell J.; Chase, Louise H.; Burns, Michelle A.; Price, Virginia A.; Paradise, Jan; O'Brien, Rebecca; Claytor, Richard A., Jr.; Brooke, Robyn; Goodman, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    Studied the needs and use of services by HIV-positive youth of the services provided by the Boston HIV Adolescent Provider and Peer Education Network for Services (HAPPENS) program. Results for 1,044 youth shows that HIV-positive young people are accessing coordinated care. Also highlights gender differences in services needed. (SLD)

  2. Implementing WHO Feeding Guidelines for Inpatient Management of Malnourished Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, S.; Ejaz, K.; Mehnaz, A.; Adil, F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of adopting WHO feeding guidelines on weight gain and case fatality rate in malnourished children. Study Design: Cross-sectional, observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pediatrics, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from 2009 to 2010. Methodology: Patients above 6 months and less than 5 years of age with severe malnutrition were included during the study period, acute complications were treated and nutritional rehabilitation by WHO feeding formulae was done. Demographic details, clinical features, reasons for weight gain and risk factors of mortality were analyzed. Results: A total of 131 children were included. Mean age of children was 22 +- 18 months. There were 78% marasmic, 4% kwashiorkor and marasmic kwashiorkor 18% children. Resolution of edema took 8 +- 4 days, dermatosis cleared in 11 +- 3 days. Mean hospital stay was 10 +- 8 days. Case fatality rate was 13%. Mean weight gain was 5.25 +- 4.57 g/kg/day. Weight gain of > 5 gm/kg/day was associated with hospital stay of more than 7 days, acceptability and palatability of feed by the children and mothers and early clearance of infections. Conclusion: Implementation of WHO feeding guidelines resulted in adequate weight gain of inpatient malnourished children, however, adequate healthcare services are available at the therapeutic feeding centers. (author)

  3. Implementing WHO feeding guidelines for inpatient management of malnourished children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Saba; Ejaz, Kiran; Mehnaz, Aisha; Adil, Faraz

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of adopting WHO feeding guidelines on weight gain and case fatality rate in malnourished children. Cross-sectional, observational study. Department of Pediatrics, Dow University of Health Sciences, Karachi, from 2009 to 2010. Patients above 6 months and less than 5 years of age with severe malnutrition were included during the study period, acute complications were treated and nutritional rehabilitation by WHO feeding formulae was done. Demographic details, clinical features, reasons for weight gain and risk factors of mortality were analyzed. A total of 131 children were included. Mean age of children was 22 ± 18 months. There were 78% marasmic, 4% kwashiorkor and marasmic kwashiorkor 18% children. Resolution of edema took 8 ± 4 days, dermatosis cleared in 11 ± 3 days. Mean hospital stay was 10 ± 8 days. Case fatality rate was 13%. Mean weight gain was 5.25 ± 4.57 g/kg/day. Weight gain of > 5 gm/kg/day was associated with hospital stay of more than 7 days, acceptability and palatability of feed by the children and mothers and early clearance of infections. Implementation of WHO feeding guidelines resulted in adequate weight gain of inpatient malnourished children, however, adequate healthcare services are available at the therapeutic feeding centers.

  4. Practice patterns and organizational commitment of inpatient nurse practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Janet; Brennan, Mary; Musil, Carol M; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2016-07-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) deliver a wide array of healthcare services in a variety of settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the practice patterns and organizational commitment of inpatient NPs. A quantitative design was used with a convenience sample (n = 183) of NPs who attended the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP) national conference. The NPs were asked to complete a demographic questionnaire, the Practice Patterns of Acute Nurse Practitioners tool and the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire. Over 85% of inpatient practice time consists of direct and indirect patient care activities. The remaining nonclinical activities of education, research, and administration were less evident in the NP's workweek. This indicates that the major role of inpatient NPs continues to be management of acutely ill patients. Moderate commitment was noted in the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire. Supportive hospital/nursing leadership should acknowledge the value of the clinical and nonclinical roles of inpatient NPs as they can contribute to the operational effectiveness of their organization. By fostering the organizational commitment behaviors of identification, loyalty, and involvement, management can reap the benefits of these professionally dedicated providers. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  5. Child and Adolescent Inpatient Unit in General Hospital “Tzaneio”

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    E. Tseva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Inpatient Service offers comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and treatment of children and adolescents (typical age ranges from 3-16 years old with a variety of emotional and behavioral problems including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic disorders, severe disruptive behavior, and suicide attempts. Treatment Team. The inpatient treatment team includes psychiatrists, psychologists, registered nurses, special education teacher, social worker, speech and occupational therapists. In addition, pediatricians from a full range of medical subspecialties are available for consultations. The multi-disciplinary staff emphasizes a family-oriented approach and parents and care-givers are encouraged to be active participants in the treatment team throughout a child’s stay. Treatment Program. The program offers developmentally appropriate therapeutic activities in a closely supervised environment. Extensive opportunities for observation, assessment, and intervention are possible in this intensive setting. Specialized assessments including neuropsychological testing, speech and language testing, and occupational therapy assessments are all available. Treatment plans typically include a combination of individual psychotherapy, behavior management, family counseling and medications. Staff members develop an individualized treatment plan emphasizing safety for each patient during the hospital stay. The plan is closely coordinated with families, outpatient providers, and resource programs to coordinate aftercare plans and facilitate a smooth transition to home.

  6. Psychogeriatric inpatient unit design: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrohotoff, John T; Llewellyn-Jones, Robert H

    2011-03-01

    In many parts of the world the provision of psychogeriatric inpatient units (PGUs) remains limited. More units will be required over coming decades given rapid population aging. Medline (1950-2010), psycINFO (1806-2009), EMBASE (1980-2009) and CINAHL (1982-2009) were searched for papers about PGU design. Selected non-peer reviewed literature such as government reports and unpublished academic dissertations were also reviewed. Data were also obtained from the literature related to general adult psychiatry inpatient units where there was limited information from studies of units designed for older people. Over 200 papers were reviewed and 130 were included. There are few good quality studies to guide the design of acute PGUs and much of the existing literature is based on opinion and anecdote or, at best, based on observational studies. Randomized controlled studies comparing different designs and assessing outcomes are virtually non-existent. Several studies have identified violence and trauma resulting from hospitalization as significant problems with current acute PGU care. Despite its limitations the available literature provides useful guidance on how PGU design can optimize patient and staff safety and improve clinical outcomes. There are significant problems with current acute PGUs, and patient mix on existing units is an important issue. Future research should examine patient and staff perceptions of different PGU ward environments, the relationship between ward design and clinical outcomes, the effects of segregating patients with challenging behaviors in dementia and the benefits or otherwise of gender segregation.

  7. Impact of the health insurance scheme for stateless people on inpatient utilization in Kraburi Hospital, Thailand

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    Suphanchaimat R

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapeepong Suphanchaimat,1,2 Phusit Prakongsai,1 Supon Limwattananon,1,3 Anne Mills2 1International Health Policy Program (IHPP, Ministry of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health and Policy, Nonthaburi, Thailand; 2London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; 3Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, Thailand Objectives: This study sought to investigate the impact of the Thai “Health Insurance for People with Citizenship Problems” (HI-PCP on access to care for stateless patients, compared to Universal Coverage Scheme patients and the uninsured, using inpatient utilization as a proxy for impact.Methods: Secondary data analysis of inpatient records of Kraburi Hospital, Ranong province, between 2009 (pre-policy and 2012 (post-policy was employed. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis by difference-in-difference model were performed.Results: The volume of inpatient service utilization by stateless patients expanded after the introduction of the HI-PCP. However, this increase did not appear to stem from the HI-PCP per se. After controlling for key covariates, including patients’ characteristics, disease condition, and domicile, there was only a weak positive association between the HI-PCP and utilization. Critical factors contributing significantly to increased utilization were older age, proximity to the hospital, and presence of catastrophic illness.Conclusion: A potential explanation for the insignificant impact of the HI-PCP on access to inpatient care of stateless patients is likely to be a lack of awareness of the existence of the scheme among the stateless population and local health staff. This problem is likely to have been accentuated by operational constraints in policy implementation, including the poor performance of local offices in registering stateless people. A key limitation of this study is a lack of data on patients who did not visit the health facility at the first opportunity. Further study of health

  8. 42 CFR 441.11 - Continuation of FFP for institutional services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... age 65 or older in an institution for mental diseases. (5) Inpatient psychiatric services for...) Inpatient hospital services for individuals age 65 or older in an institution for mental diseases. (3...

  9. Update of Inpatient Treatment for Refractory Chronic Daily Headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Tzu-Hsien; Wang, Shuu-Jiun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is a group of headache disorders, in which headaches occur daily or near-daily (>15 days per month) and last for more than 3 months. Important CDH subtypes include chronic migraine, chronic tension-type headache, hemicrania continua, and new daily persistent headache. Other headaches with shorter durations (CDH. Common comorbidities of CDH are medication overuse headache and various psychiatric disorders, such as depression and anxiety. Indications of inpatient treatment for CDH patients include poor responses to outpatient management, need for detoxification for overuse of specific medications (particularly opioids and barbiturates), and severe psychiatric comorbidities. Inpatient treatment usually involves stopping acute pain, preventing future attacks, and detoxifying medication overuse if present. Multidisciplinary integrated care that includes medical staff from different disciplines (e.g., psychiatry, clinical psychology, and physical therapy) has been recommended. The outcomes of inpatient treatment are satisfactory in terms of decreasing headache intensity or frequency, withdrawal from medication overuse, reducing disability, and improving life quality, although long-term relapse is not uncommon. In conclusion, inpatient treatment may be useful for select patients with refractory CDH and should be incorporated in a holistic headache care program.

  10. Mental Health Needs and Services for Severely Troubled and Troubling Young People Including Young Offenders in an N.H.S. Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, Rory; Stretch, David; Whitney, Irene; Jones, Karin; Garfield, Paul; Turner, Keith; Stanion, Bryan

    2000-01-01

    Screens penal, social services, and special education agencies in one region to determine the need for mental health services among adolescents. Determines that the need for mental health care greatly outstrips the supply. Discusses the effectiveness of treatment for the problems of these youth and a possible structure for service delivery.…

  11. Observational study of drug-drug interactions in oncological inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Sacramento Díaz-Carrasco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of potential clinically relevant drug- drug interactions in adult oncological inpatients, as well as to describe the most frequent interactions. A standard database was used. Method: An observational, transversal, and descriptive study including patients admitted to the Oncology Service of a reference hospital. All prescriptions were collected twice a week during a month. They were analysed using Lexicomp® database, recording all interactions classified with a level of risk: C, D or X. Results: A total of 1 850 drug-drug interactions were detected in 218 treatments. The prevalence of treatments with at least one clinically relevant interaction was 95%, being 94.5% for those at level C and 26.1% for levels D and X. The drugs most commonly involved in the interactions detected were opioid analgesics, antipsychotics (butyrophenones, benzodiazepines, pyrazolones, glucocorticoids and heparins, whereas interactions with antineoplastics were minimal, highlighting those related to paclitaxel and between metamizole and various antineoplastics. Conclusions: The prevalence of clinically relevant drug-drug interactions rate was very high, highlighting the high risk percentage of them related to level of risk X. Due to the frequency of onset and potential severity, highlighted the concomitant use of central nervous system depressants drugs with risk of respiratory depression, the risk of onset of anticholinergic symptoms when combining morphine or haloperidol with butylscopolamine, ipratropium bromide or dexchlorpheniramine and the multiple interactions involving metamizole.

  12. Using patient reported outcome measures in health services: A qualitative study on including people with low literacy skills and learning disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jahagirdar Deepa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient reported outcome measures (PROMs are self-report measures of health status increasingly promoted for use in healthcare quality improvement. However people with low literacy skills or learning disabilities may find PROMs hard to complete. Our study investigated stakeholder views on the accessibility and use of PROMs to develop suggestions for more inclusive practice. Methods Taking PROMs recommended for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD as an example, we conducted 8 interviews with people with low literacy skills and/or learning disabilities, and 4 focus groups with 20 health professionals and people with COPD. Discussions covered the format and delivery of PROMs using the EQ-5D and St George Respiratory Questionnaire as prompts. Thematic framework analysis focused on three main themes: Accessibility, Ease of Use, and Contextual factors. Results Accessibility included issues concerning the questionnaire format, and suggestions for improvement included larger font sizes and more white space. Ease of Use included discussion about PROMs’ administration. While health professionals suggested PROMs could be completed in waiting rooms, patients preferred settings with more privacy and where they could access help from people they know. Contextual Factors included other challenges and wider issues associated with completing PROMs. While health professionals highlighted difficulties created by the system in managing patients with low literacy/learning disabilities, patient participants stressed that understanding the purpose of PROMs was important to reduce intimidation. Conclusions Adjusting PROMs’ format, giving an explicit choice of where patients can complete them, and clearly conveying PROMs’ purpose and benefit to patients may help to prevent inequality when using PROMs in health services.

  13. Same agency, different teams: perspectives from home and inpatient hospice care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysaght Hurley, Susan; Barg, Frances K; Strumpf, Neville; Ersek, Mary

    2015-07-01

    Tremendous growth in hospice over the past 30 years in the United States has increased the number of terminally ill patients dying at home. Recently, however, more hospice patients are dying at inpatient facilities. To understand the varying perceptions about care in the home and inpatient hospice, we conducted semistructured interviews with 24 interdisciplinary team (IDT) members and analyzed the data using the constant comparative method. Core interdisciplinary tasks, including identifying the focus of energy, tailoring family caregiver involvement, acknowledging who is in charge, and knowing both sides differed in the home and inpatient settings. Despite the overarching umbrella of hospice care, home and inpatient hospice settings create different foci for IDT members, burdens and privileges for family caregivers, and control of the care plan. Key differences between home and inpatient hospice processes of care highlight the complexity of patient-centered end-of-life care in the United States. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Post-discharge survival outcomes of patients with advanced cancer from UT MD Anderson Cancer Center Investigational Cancer Therapeutics (phase I trials) Inpatient unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, Holly; Maiti, Abhishek; Hess, Kenneth; Dempsey, Jennifer; Beatty, Laura; Baldwin, Sarah; Hong, David S.; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Janku, Filip; Karp, Daniel; Reddy, Suresh; Yennu, Sriram; Epner, Daniel; Bruera, Eduardo; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Falchook, Gerald; Subbiah, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with advanced cancer who progress on standard therapy are potential candidates for phase I clinical trials. Due to their aggressive disease and complex co-morbid conditions, these patients often need inpatient admission. This study assessed the outcomes of such patients after they were discharged to hospice care. Patients and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with solid tumor malignancies who were discharged to hospice care from the inpatient service. Results One hundred thirty-three patients were included in the study cohort. All patients had metastatic disease and an ECOG PS ≥3. The median survival after discharge to hospice from an inpatient setting was 16 days, with a survival rate of 5% at 3 months after discharge. The median survival after the last cancer treatment was 46 days, with survival of 17% at 3 months, and 5% at 6 months. Patients with LDH >618 IU/L had a median post-discharge survival of 11 days versus 20 days for patients with LDH ≤618 IU/L. Conclusions Patients with metastatic cancer participating in phase I trials who have poor performance status and require inpatient admission have a very short survival after discharge to hospice. A high LDH level predicts an even shorter survival. PMID:27802448

  15. Antibiotic prescriptions for inpatients having non-bacterial diagnosis at medicine departments of two private sector hospitals in Madhya Pradesh, India: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstedt, Kristoffer; Sharma, Ashish; Johansson, Fredrik; Stålsby Lundborg, Cecilia; Sharma, Megha

    2017-04-08

    To present and compare antibiotic prescribing for inpatients among the most common non-bacterial diagnoses groups at medicine departments of a teaching (TH) and a non-teaching hospital (NTH) in central India. An observational cross-sectional study was conducted at two tertiary care settings in Ujjain district, Madhya Pradesh, India. The data were collected manually, using a customised form. Complete records of all inpatients, who were >15 years of age and had stayed for at least one night in either of the hospitals during 2008-2011, were analysed. Inpatients were grouped according to the presence or absence of a bacterial infectious diagnosis, viral/malaria fever or cardiovascular disease. Classes of antibiotics prescribed to these groups and adherence to the available prescribing guidelines were compared between the hospitals using the notes from the patient files and the diagnoses. Of 20 303 inpatients included in the study, 66% were prescribed antibiotics. Trade name prescribing and use of broad-spectrum antibiotics were more frequent at the NTH than at the TH (poverprescribing of antibiotics, the main recommendations are development and implementation of local prescription guidelines, encouragement to use laboratory facilities and prescription analysis, with antibiotic stewardship programmes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long-Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2017 Rates; Quality Reporting Requirements for Specific Providers; Graduate Medical Education; Hospital Notification Procedures Applicable to Beneficiaries Receiving Observation Services; Technical Changes Relating to Costs to Organizations and Medicare Cost Reports; Finalization of Interim Final Rules With Comment Period on LTCH PPS Payments for Severe Wounds, Modifications of Limitations on Redesignation by the Medicare Geographic Classification Review Board, and Extensions of Payments to MDHs and Low-Volume Hospitals. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems for FY 2017. Some of these changes will implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Reform Act of 2013, the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014, the Notice of Observation Treatment and Implications for Care Eligibility Act of 2015, and other legislation. We also are providing the estimated market basket update to apply to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits for FY 2017. We are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) for FY 2017. In addition, we are making changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education payments; establishing new requirements or revising existing requirements for quality reporting by specific Medicare providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, LTCHs, and inpatient psychiatric facilities), including related provisions for eligible hospitals and critical access hospitals (CAHs) participating in the Electronic Health Record Incentive Program; updating policies relating to the Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Program, the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program, and the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program; implementing statutory provisions that require hospitals and CAHs to furnish notification to Medicare beneficiaries, including Medicare Advantage enrollees, when the beneficiaries receive outpatient observation services for more than 24 hours; announcing the implementation of the Frontier Community Health Integration Project Demonstration; and

  17. How people who self-harm negotiate the inpatient environment: the mental healthcare workers perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J B; Haslam, C O

    2017-09-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ABOUT THE SUBJECT?: Self-harm plays a function, commonly in the form of distress management. There has been little focussed exploration of how individuals who use self-harm to manage distress cope when prevented from self-harm in an inpatient environment and how staff respond to this issue. This paper uses the experiences of mental health staff to add to the existing knowledge that self-harm has a functional role and supports the notion that interventions for self-harm should focus on the origins of distress. It describes the potential consequences that focussing on prevention of self-harm as opposed to actually managing distress may have on service-users, how staff attempt to manage these consequences and factors that may impact on staff interventions to prevent further distress/harm. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The findings suggest that mental healthcare staff should aim to understand the function of self-harm, use this understanding to develop an individualized care plan with the aim of managing distress and identify barriers to the effectiveness of the interventions so they can be worked around. Introduction Literature describes self-harm as functional and meaningful. This creates difficulties for service-users detained in an inpatient environment where self-harm is prevented. Aim Mental healthcare staff were interviewed to build on existing evidence of issues with the prevention approach and explore, from a staff perspective, how self-harm prevention impacts on service-users, how they manage distress and how this impacts on staff and their approach to care. Methods Qualitative methods were used to allow unexpected themes to arise. Ten semi-structured interviews were carried out with mental healthcare staff and thematically analysed. Findings and discussion The findings provide new evidence on the benefits and limitations of the inpatient environment for individuals who self-harm. Findings indicate that being unable to self-harm can

  18. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness (FUH) Quality Measure Data – by Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  19. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness (FUH) Quality Measure Data – National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  20. Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Follow-Up After Hospitalization for Mental Illness (FUH) Quality Measure Data – by State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Psychiatric facilities that are eligible for the Inpatient Psychiatric Facility Quality Reporting (IPFQR) program are required to meet all program requirements,...

  1. The clinical psychologist and the management of inpatient pain: a small case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Childs SR

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Susan R Childs,1,* Emma M Casely,2,* Bianca M Kuehler,1 Stephen Ward,1 Charlotte L Halmshaw,1 Sarah E Thomas,1 Ian D Goodall,1 Carsten Bantel1,3 1Pain Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, 2Anaesthetic Department, Hillingdon Hospital, Uxbridge, 3Section of Anaesthetics, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital Campus, London, UK *These authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: Recent research has confirmed that between 25% and 33% of all hospitalized patients experience unacceptable levels of pain. Studies further indicate that this reduces patient satisfaction levels, lengthens hospital stays, and increases cost. Hospitals are aiming to discharge patients earlier, and this can interfere with adequate pain management. Therefore, the pain service at Chelsea and Westminster Hospital has adapted to this changing model of care. An increasing body of evidence demonstrates that psychological factors are key components of patients’ pain experiences in both acute and chronic pain. Therefore, it is reasonable to suggest a clinical psychologist should be involved in inpatient pain management. This small study discusses three cases that highlight how patient care could be improved by including a clinical psychologist as part of the inpatient pain team. Two cases particularly highlight the active role of the psychologist in the diagnosis and management of common conditions such as fear and anxiety, along with other psychiatric comorbidities. The management therefore employed an eclectic approach adapted from chronic pain and comprising of behavioral, cognitive behavioral, and dialectical behavioral therapeutic techniques blended with brief counseling. The third case exemplifies the importance of nurse-patient interactions and the quality of nurse-patient relationships on patient outcomes. Here, the psychologist helped to optimize

  2. 42 CFR 412.632 - Method of payment under the inpatient rehabilitation facility prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEMS FOR... rehabilitation facility receives payment under this subpart for inpatient operating costs and capital-related... under the PIP method without undue risk of its resulting in an overpayment to the provider. (2...

  3. Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral therapy modified for inpatients with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Andrew C; Hooke, Geoff R

    2012-01-01

    The effectiveness among inpatients with depression of a modified cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program was examined. A group of 300 inpatient admissions with a primary diagnosis of depression attending a private psychiatric clinic were assessed at the beginning and end of a two-week CBT program. The effectiveness of the treatment was demonstrated by improvements on the Beck depression inventory (BDI), the health of the nation outcome scales, locus of control of behaviour scale, and the global assessment of function. The changes on the BDI for patients with depression were benchmarked against estimates generated from published studies. The degree of change in a two-week period for inpatients with depression was similar to that observed in efficacy studies of CBT that typically run over a more extended time. Implications for integrating CBT with inpatient services are discussed.

  4. Needs and expectations of adolescent in-patients: the experience of Gaslini Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimo, Luisa; Rossoni, Nicoletta; Mattei, Francesca; Bonassi, Stefano; Caprino, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents affected by a severe disease who undergo high-risk treatment may experience stress, pain, extreme frustration, depression, and anger. In this large spectrum of emotions, several situations must be considered carefully. To improve coping and quality of services offered to adolescents in paediatric hospitals, we elaborated a semi-structured interview and a short questionnaire (Quality of life-adolescent-Istituto Giannina Gaslini, QoL-adol-IGG scale) to investigate the quality of life, the needs and expectations of adolescent in-patients. The study sample includes 117 in-patients aged between 10 and 20 years coming from several Italian regions who were admitted to the G. Gaslini Research Children's Hospital for a period of 10 days or more, regardless of the disease. The QoL-adol-IGG scale was administered - after obtaining informed consent from the children and their parents - in one single encounter by trained psychologist. The distribution of the answers was evaluated after stratification by patient's age, gender, area of residence, and clinical diagnosis. Continuous data were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis, while the χ2-test was used for categorical data. Seventy-two percent had difficulty practicing normal daily activities during their stay in the hospital, not only because of the disease (40%), but also because of the poor organization within the hospital, the lack of proposals/activities and space for spare time, and the limited access to technologies. Adolescents ≥15 years were more frequently dissatisfied than youngsters concerning the access to Internet and other technologies, the possibility to make new friends and to take part in social activities. The results of this study, which evaluated the hospital's organization, but also psychological functioning in a representative sample of patients, may contribute to optimize internal procedures of clinical departments where adolescent in-patients are present, on the basis of their requests and

  5. Use of Security Officers on Inpatient Psychiatry Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Ryan E; Perez-Coste, Maria M; Arkow, Stan D; Appelbaum, Paul S; Dixon, Lisa B

    2018-04-02

    Violent and aggressive behaviors are common among psychiatric inpatients. Hospital security officers are sometimes used to address such behaviors. Research on the role of security in inpatient units is scant. This study examined when security is utilized and what happens when officers arrive. The authors reviewed the security logbook and the medical records for all patients discharged from an inpatient psychiatry unit over a six-month period. Authors recorded when security calls happened, what behaviors triggered security calls, what outcomes occurred, and whether any patient characteristics were associated with security calls. A total of 272 unique patients were included. A total of 49 patients (18%) generated security calls (N=157 calls). Security calls were most common in the first week of hospitalization (N=45 calls), and roughly half of the patients (N=25 patients) had only one call. The most common inciting behavior was "threats to persons" (N=34 calls), and the most common intervention was intramuscular antipsychotic injection (N=49 calls). The patient variables associated with security calls were having more than one prior hospitalization (odds ratio [OR]=4.56, p=.001, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.80-11.57), involuntary hospitalization (OR=5.09, pSecurity officers were often called for threats of violence and occasionally called for actual violence. Patient variables associated with security calls are common among inpatients, and thus clinicians should stay attuned to patients' moment-to-moment care needs.

  6. Pilot Trial of Inpatient Cognitive Therapy for the Prevention of Suicide in Military Personnel with Acute Stress Disorder or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    LTC Geoffrey Grammer , M.D., Chief of Inpatient Psychiatry at WRNMMC. Dr. Holloway remains the overall study PI. We received initial approval to...WRNMMC inpatient psychiatry for availability for site PI, Dr. Grammer . On March 9, 2013, the clinical coordinator attended the WRNMMC IRB Research...Dr. Geoffrey Grammer (Chief of Inpatient Psychiatry) and Major Robert Duprey (Acting Chief of Psychiatric Nursing Service). During these meetings, we

  7. A Preliminary Review of U.S. Forest Service Business Practices To Authorize Special Uses, Including Energy Infrastructure Projects, on National Forest System Lands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wescott, K. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); May, J. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moore, H. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunner, D. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The U.S. Forest Service (USFS) Special Uses-Lands Program is in jeopardy. Although this program, authorized in Title 36, Part 251, of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (36 CFR Part 251), ranks among the top four revenue-generating programs for use of National Forest System (NFS) lands, along with the Timber, Minerals, and Special Uses-Recreation Programs, the Special Uses-Lands Program is in a state of neglect. Repeated cuts in funding (a decrease of 26% from fiscal years 2010 to 2014) are adversely affecting staffing and training, which in turn is affecting timely permit processing and ultimately the public’s ability to use and benefit from NFS lands. In addition, highly experienced staff with valuable institutional knowledge of the program have begun to retire. The ability of the program to function under these dire circumstances can be attributed to the dedication of Special Uses staff to the program and their commitment to the public. The initial focus of this report was to identify opportunities for improving performance of permitting and review for large energy infrastructure-related projects. However, it became clear during this analysis that these projects are generally adequately staffed and managed. This is due in large part to the availability of cost-recovery dollars and the high-profile nature of these projects. However, it also became apparent that larger issues affecting the bulk of the work of the Special Uses-Lands Program need to be addressed immediately. This report is a preliminary examination of the state of the Special Uses-Lands Program and focuses on a few key items requiring immediate attention. Further investigation through case studies is recommended to dig deeper into the Special Uses-Lands Program business process to determine the most costeffective strategies for streamlining the overall process and the metrics by which performance can be evaluated, including for the permitting and tracking of energy infrastructure projects.

  8. Age structure at diagnosis affects aggression in a psychiatric inpatient population: age structure affecting inpatient aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Un Jung; Lee, JooYoung; Kim, Hyo-Won; Lee, Jung Sun; Joo, Yeon-Ho; Kim, Seong-Yoon; Kim, Chang Yoon; Shin, Yong-Wook

    2014-12-30

    Study of inpatient aggression in psychiatric inpatient units (PIUs), where vulnerable patients interact intensely in small groups, is hampered by a lack of systematic monitoring of aggressive events in the context of group dynamics. Our current study examines the relationship between aggression and group structure in the PIU of a general tertiary-care hospital over a 9-month period. The severity of aggression was monitored daily using the Overt Aggression Scale (OAS). Clinical data including the daily number and mean age of subpopulations with different diagnoses were acquired. Cross-correlation function and autoregressive integrated moving average modeling were used to assess the effects of various group structure parameters on the incidence of aggressive events in the PIU. The daily total OAS score correlated positively with the daily mean age of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. By contrast, the OAS total score demonstrated a negative correlation with the daily mean age of patients with major depression. The age of the patients at diagnosis is an important group structure that affects the incidence of aggression in a PIU.

  9. Inpatient care of mentally ill people in prison: results of a year's programme of semistructured inspections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, John L; Lyne, Maggi

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the facilities for inpatient care of mentally disordered people in prison. Design Semistructured inspections conducted by doctor and nurse. Expected standards were based on healthcare quality standards published by the Prison Service or the NHS. Setting 13 prisons with inpatient beds in England and Wales subject to the prison inspectorate's routine inspection programme during 1997-8. Main outcomes measures Appraisals of quality of care against published standards. Results The 13 prisons had 348 beds, 20% of all beds in prisons. Inpatient units had between 3 and 75 beds. No doctor in charge of inpatients had completed specialist psychiatric training. 24% of nursing staff had mental health training; 32% were non-nursing trained healthcare officers. Only one prison had occupational therapy input; two had input from a clinical psychologist. Most patients were unlocked for about 3.5 hours a day and none for more than nine hours a day. Four prisons provided statistics on the use of seclusion. The average length of an episode of seclusion was 50 hours. Conclusion The quality of services for mentally ill prisoners fell far below the standards in the NHS. Patients' lives were unacceptably restricted and therapy limited. The present policy dividing inpatient care of mentally disordered prisoners between the prison service and the NHS needs reconsideration. PMID:10764360

  10. 42 CFR 409.12 - Nursing and related services, medical social services; use of hospital or CAH facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nursing and related services, medical social... Inpatient Hospital Services and Inpatient Critical Access Hospital Services § 409.12 Nursing and related... (b) of this section, Medicare pays for nursing and related services, use of hospital or CAH...

  11. Emergency department overcrowding and inpatient boarding: a statewide glimpse in time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felton, Brent M; Reisdorff, Earl J; Krone, Christopher N; Laskaris, Gus A

    2011-12-01

    This was a point-prevalence study designed to quantify the magnitude of emergency department (ED) overcrowding and inpatient boarding. Every ED in Michigan was surveyed at a single point in time on a Monday evening. Given the high patient volumes on Monday evenings, the effect on inpatient boarding the next morning was also reviewed. All 134 EDs within the state of Michigan were contacted and surveyed on Monday evening, March 16, 2009, over a single hour and again the following morning. Questions included data on annual census, bed number, number of admitted patients within the ED, ambulance diversion, and ED length of stay. Data were obtained from 109 of the 134 (81%) hospitals on Monday evening and 99 (74%) on Tuesday morning. There was no difference in annual visits or ED size between participating and nonparticipating EDs. Forty-seven percent of EDs were boarding inpatients on Monday evening, compared with 30% on Tuesday morning. The mean estimated boarding times were 3.7 hours (Monday evening) and 7.2 hours (Tuesday morning). Twenty-four percent of respondents met the definition of overcrowded during sampling times. There was a significant relationship between inpatient boarding and ED overcrowding (p boarding inpatients, while 24% were operating beyond capacity. On the following morning (Tuesday), EDs had fewer boarded inpatients than on Monday evening. However, these boarded inpatients remained in the ED for a significantly longer duration. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  12. Including 10-Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Network under End-to-End Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching Provisioned Quality of Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewka, Lukasz; Gavler, Anders; Wessing, Henrik; Dittmann, Lars

    2012-04-01

    End-to-end quality of service provisioning is still a challenging task despite many years of research and development in this area. Considering a generalized multi-protocol label switching based core/metro network and resource reservation protocol capable home gateways, it is the access part of the network where quality of service signaling is bridged. This article proposes strategies for generalized multi-protocol label switching control over next emerging passive optical network standard, i.e., the 10-gigabit-capable passive optical network. Node management and resource allocation approaches are discussed, and possible issues are raised. The analysis shows that consideration of a 10-gigabit-capable passive optical network as a generalized multi-protocol label switching controlled domain is valid and may advance end-to-end quality of service provisioning for passive optical network based customers.

  13. Including 10-Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Network under End-to-End Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching Provisioned Quality of Service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewka, Lukasz Jerzy; Gavler, Anders; Wessing, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    of the network where quality of service signaling is bridged. This article proposes strategies for generalized multi-protocol label switching control over next emerging passive optical network standard, i.e., the 10-gigabit-capable passive optical network. Node management and resource allocation approaches...... are discussed, and possible issues are raised. The analysis shows that consideration of a 10-gigabit-capable passive optical network as a generalized multi-protocol label switching controlled domain is valid and may advance end-to-end quality of service provisioning for passive optical network based customers.......End-to-end quality of service provisioning is still a challenging task despite many years of research and development in this area. Considering a generalized multi-protocol label switching based core/metro network and resource reservation protocol capable home gateways, it is the access part...

  14. Psychosomatic inpatient rehabilitation: the German model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The term 'psychosomatic' has many connotations, be it in the sense of a general biopsychosocial concept in medicine as outlined in the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) of the World Health Organization, a holistic and person-centered view of the patient beyond the illness, the treatment of somatoform or somatic disorders, or special psychotherapeutic approaches. In Germany, there are also about 25,000 inpatient beds in 'psychosomatic rehabilitation hospitals', which treat approximately 5/1,000 inhabitants in the working age population per year. These institutions give an example of how to translate the theoretical concepts of psychosomatic medicine and of the ICF into clinical practice. 'Psychosomatic rehabilitation' aims at the prevention, treatment and compensation of chronic illness by a biopsychosocial approach. This includes a multilevel psychosomatic assessment and a multidimensional treatment focus including the reduction of symptoms, the training of capacities, the coping with chronic illness and impairment, the restoration of well-being and normal life, and the occupational reintegration including the search for a workplace, which allows work in spite of impairment. Scientific studies have shown that the psychological status, the motivation to work, the number of days on sickness leave and occupational reintegration can be improved, and that the system pays for the patients themselves, but also pension and health insurance companies. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Effects of Public Hospital Reform on Inpatient Expenditures in Rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuting; Ma, Qianheng; Chen, Yingchun; Gao, Hongxia

    2017-04-01

    Public hospital reform is one priority area in the healthcare system reform that China launched in 2009. The Chinese government invested over $10bn for pilot projects in public hospital reform in rural China. However, little evidence exists on their effects. Using a quasi-natural experiment design, we evaluated the effects of a public hospital pilot project in Hubei province on inpatient spending. We obtained inpatient claims data from 1/1/2011 through 6/30/2013 for enrollees in the New Cooperative Medical Scheme in two counties: Danjiangkou, one of the pilot counties selected for reform in September 2012, and Laohekou, a similar, adjacent county serving as the control group. Using a difference-in-differences approach with propensity score weighting, we found that total inpatient spending increased ¥1160 (95% CI 1155-1166), out-of-pocket spending increased ¥385 (95% CI 382-389), length of stay increased 0.51 days (95% CI 0.50-0.52), but inpatient medication spending decreased ¥147 (95% CI 145-150), post-policy in Danjiangkou, relative to the control group. The overall reimbursement rate increased by 5.7 percentage points. One of the goals of the recent public hospital reform is to make inpatient services affordable to patients. We found that although patients spent less on inpatient medications, total out-of-pocket spending increased considerably after reform. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Care transitions service: a pharmacy-driven program for medication reconciliation through the continuum of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, Jessica R; Togami, John C; Burnett, Allison; Dodd, Melanie A; Ray, Gretchen M

    2014-05-15

    A quality-improvement program at University of New Mexico Hospital (UNMH) encompassing admission, discharge, and postdischarge medication reconciliation activities is described, with a report on initial assessments of the program's impact on rates of medication-related problems (MRPs). Pharmacists conducted a five-month evaluation of the UNMH Care Transitions Service (CTS), which serves inpatients admitted to the hospital's family medicine service, providing medication reconciliation and targeted MRP interventions. Selected patients who received CTS services from November 2012 through March 2013 (n = 191) were included in the analysis. The study endpoints were the rates and types of MRPs identified, the most commonly implicated medication classes, and predictors of MRPs. Postdischarge MRP rates during a two-month trial of CTS services at a UNMH outpatient clinic were also evaluated. During the five-month evaluation of inpatient CTS services, a total of 1140 MRPs were identified (an average of 6 per patient), about 70% of which were resolved independently of provider review using pharmacy-driven protocols. During the two-month pilot test of CTS outpatient services (n = 16), a total of 28 MRPs were identified; in over 80% of cases, there was a decline in the number of MRPs from the admission to the postdischarge medication reconciliation. MRPs were identified through the continuum of care. The majority of MRPs identified in both the inpatient and outpatient settings involved patient variables and patient nonadherence. Seventy percent of inpatient MRPs were resolved independently by the CTS team under pharmacy-driven protocols.

  17. A work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Philip; Gilding, Moorene; Seewooruttun, Khooseal; Walsh, Hannah

    2016-09-14

    Background With a rise in the number of unqualified staff providing health and social care, and reports raising concerns about the quality of care provided, there is a need to address the learning needs of clinical support workers. This article describes a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project that involved a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers on mental health inpatient wards. Aim To investigate and identify insights in relation to the content and process of learning using a work-based learning approach for clinical support workers. Method This was a qualitative evaluation of a service improvement project involving 25 clinical support workers at the seven mental health inpatient units in South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust. Three clinical skills tutors were appointed to develop, implement and evaluate the work-based learning approach. Four sources of data were used to evaluate this approach, including reflective journals, qualitative responses to questionnaires, three focus groups involving the clinical support workers and a group interview involving the clinical skills tutors. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings The work-based learning approach was highly valued by the clinical support workers and enhanced learning in practice. Face-to-face learning in practice helped the clinical support workers to develop practice skills and reflective learning skills. Insights relating to the role of clinical support workers were also identified, including the benefits of face-to-face supervision in practice, particularly in relation to the interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusion A work-based learning approach has the potential to enhance care delivery by meeting the learning needs of clinical support workers and enabling them to apply learning to practice. Care providers should consider how the work-based learning approach can be used on a systematic, organisation-wide basis in the context of budgetary

  18. Local Area Unemployment and the Demand for Inpatient Care Among Veterans Affairs Enrollees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Edwin S; Hebert, Paul L; Nelson, Karin M; Hernandez, Susan E; Sylling, Philip W; Fihn, Stephan D; Liu, Chuan-Fen

    2015-08-01

    Prior research examining the relationship between economic conditions and health service demand has focused primarily on outpatient use. This study examines whether local area unemployment, as an indicator of economic conditions, was associated with use of inpatient care, which is theoretically less subject to discretionary use. Using a random sample of 131,603 patients dually enrolled in the Veterans Affairs (VA) Health System and fee-for-service Medicare, we measured VA, Medicare, and total (VA and Medicare) hospitalizations. Overall, local unemployment was not associated with VA, Medicare, or total hospitalization probability. Among low-income veterans exempt from VA copayments, higher local unemployment was moderately associated with a lower probability of hospitalization through Medicare. For veterans subject to VA copayments, higher local unemployment was moderately associated with a higher likelihood of VA hospitalization. These results suggest inpatient use is less sensitive to the economy, although worse economic conditions slightly affected inpatient demand for select veterans. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Including a Client Sexual Health Pathway in a National Youth Mental Health Early Intervention Service--Project Rationale and Implementation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, C. A.; Britton, M. L.; Jenkins, L.; Rickwood, D. J.; Gillham, K. E.

    2014-01-01

    Young people have higher rates of sexually transmissible infections (STIs) than the general population. Research has shown that there is a clear link between emotional distress, depression, substance abuse and sexual risk taking behaviours in young people. "headspace" is a youth mental health early intervention service operating in more…

  20. 75 FR 62424 - EDS, an HP Company (Re-Branded as HP-Enterprise Services) Including On-Site Workers From: Abel...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... Floyd and Company, Trinity Government SYS a Private Co, Verizon Network Integration Corp, Vision... technology (IT) services. New information shows that worker separations have occurred involving virtual employees across the United States under the control of the Plano, Texas location of EDS, an HP Company (Re...

  1. Risk Factors for Readmission on an Adult Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, Melanie; Colon-Sanchez, Dayan; Keniston, Angela; Hamalian, Gareen; Lozano, Abby; Nussbaum, Abraham M

    2016-01-01

    Readmission rates have been proposed as a possible quality metric for inpatient psychiatry. Little is known about predicting readmissions and identifying modifiable factors that may reduce early readmissions in these settings. We reviewed 693 medical records from our adult inpatient psychiatric unit to identify factors associated with patients' readmission within 90 days of discharge. After adjusting for all variables, and including interactions between identified factors, we found several demographic features predicting readmission, including male gender with suicidal ideation on admission (odds ratio [OR] = 13.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4-51.9), a diagnosis of a psychotic disorder with a prior medical admission (OR = 5.7; 95% CI, 1.7-20.6), and suicidal ideation with comorbid personality disorder (OR = 5.3; 95% CI, 1.4-20.6). Demographic features decreasing the odds of readmission included being non-white with homeless living situation (OR = 0.18; 95% CI, 0.04-0.82), medication changes made within 48 hours of discharge (OR = 0.44; 95% CI, 0.23-0.84), and the number of medications dispensed without documented follow-up plan or appointment (OR = 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96). Future prospective studies utilizing qualitative and quantitative methods are required to more precisely define a wider array of metrics. Improved identification of demographic features associated with early readmissions may suggest areas to target as we seek to the quality of inpatient psychiatric care.

  2. [Sleep disturbances: frequent diagnosis in inpatients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamasco, Ellen Cristina; da Cruz, Diná de Almeida Lopes Monteiro

    2006-09-01

    Sleep disturbances and deprivation are common stressors in inpatients. Nurses must be able to notice undesirable effects of sleep disturbances on the patient's responses to health problems, and to implement interventions to help them achieve the best possible quality of sleep. This article discusses the relevance of sleep-related nursing diagnoses for inpatients of medical-surgical wards, and presents a synthesis of the tools available in literature to assess sleep.

  3. A Systematic Review of the Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Nurse Specialists and Nurse Practitioners in Inpatient Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Kelley; Reid, Kim; Carter, Nancy; Donald, Faith; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Harbman, Patricia; Marshall, Deborah; Charbonneau-Smith, Renee; DiCenso, Alba

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the evidence of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) working in alternative or complementary roles in inpatient settings. Those in alternative roles substitute for another provider and deliver similar services. Those in complementary roles deliver additional services to meet patient health needs. We searched 10 electronic databases, reference lists, pertinent journals and websites from 1980 to July 2012 with no language, publication or geographical restrictions. Study identification and assessment were completed independently by two-member teams. Internal validity was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool. The quality of the economic analysis was evaluated using the Quality of Health Economic Studies (QHES) instrument. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system was used to assess outcome-specific quality of evidence. Three dated trials evaluated CNS and NP inpatient roles; they were conducted in North America and included 488 adults and 821 neonates. In one study, CNSs in complementary provider roles, when compared with usual care, were equally effective with equal resource use (very low-quality evidence). In two studies, NPs in alternative roles, when compared with physicians, were equally effective with equal-to-more resource use and equal costs (low- to moderate-quality evidence). The quality of the economic analyses was poor. Only three dated studies were identified. More research is needed to determine cost-effectiveness and inform policies and decisions related to the implementation of CNSs and NPs working exclusively in inpatient roles. Copyright © 2015 Longwoods Publishing.

  4. Video ambulatory EEG: A good alternative to inpatient video telemetry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandler, Rosalind; Ponnusamy, Athi; Wragg, Claire

    2017-04-01

    Video ambulatory EEG (V-AEEG) is a new technique which could add increased capacity for long term EEG monitoring to overstretched inpatient video telemetry (IPVT) services. We compare V-AEEG and IPVT for diagnostic efficacy, recording quality, patient acceptability and technologist time required. Forty-one V-AEEG and 64 IPVT adult patients were included. Patients were investigated to diagnose attacks or to obtain polysomnography (PSG) prior to multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Number of attacks recorded, whether the diagnostic question was answered, quality of video and EEG recording and patients' preference for investigation at home or in hospital were noted. For V-AEEG patients, ease of procedure and extra technologist time required were recorded. Of patients investigated for diagnosis of attacks, 74% V-AEEG patients and 62% IPVT had typical attacks during the investigation. All PSGs were useful in interpreting the MSLTs. Diagnostic questions were answered by 73% V-AEEGs and 73% IPVTs. Quality of EEG and video recording was similar using V-AEEG and IPVT. Four patients had difficulty using V-AEEG equipment but diagnostic information was lost in only one. 5% of V-AEEG patients would have preferred hospital investigation but 45% of IPVT patients would have preferred home investigation. Extra technologist time for home visits (mean 2h) was required only for the first 7 patients. Video EEG recording quality and diagnostic efficacy from V-AEEG are similar to IPVT. V-AEEG is acceptable to most patients and does not require additional technical time. Hence, V-AEEG offers a convenient, economical alternative to IPVT. Copyright © 2017 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Health-Related Quality of Life: Expanding a Conceptual Framework to Include Older Adults Who Receive Long-Term Services and Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubritsky, Cynthia; Abbott, Katherine M.; Hirschman, Karen B.; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Foust, Janice B.; Naylor, Mary D.

    2013-01-01

    For older adults receiving long-term services and supports (LTSS), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) has emerged as a critical construct to examine because of its focus on components of well-being, which are affected by progressive changes in health status, health care, and social support. HRQoL is a health-focused quality of life (QOL)…

  6. "Just be a light": Experiences of peers working on acute inpatient psychiatric units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Thomas E; Abraham, Maria; Bivona, Michael; Brakman, Myles J; Brown, Isaac S; Enders, Gita; Goodman, Sara; McNabb, Liam; Swinford, Joseph W

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to clarify the potential role and impact of behavioral health peer support providers on community hospital acute inpatient psychiatric units. Qualitative interviews were conducted to examine perspectives of peer support providers (peers) and individuals who initially received peer services (recipients) during an inpatient stay on a community hospital psychiatric unit. Interviews elicited perspectives on interactions between peers and recipients, the role of peers vis-à-vis the clinical treatment team, and involvement of peers in discharge planning and transitions to community-based care. Fourteen interviews were completed (6 peers and 8 recipients of peer services); all were recorded, transcribed, and coded using a thematic analysis approach. Emergent themes were grouped into 3 domains: (a) initial impressions and client engagement, (b) peer interventions to support discharge planning, and (c) shared or sharing experiences in an inpatient setting. Recipients described inpatient experiences as disempowering and humiliating and reported powerful positive initial reactions to peers who had had similar experiences but who also displayed competence and professionalism. Peers and recipients described strong emotional connections that differed from traditional attitudes and relationships with clinical staff. Peers described challenges and obstacles related to interactions with the clinical treatment team, and both peers and recipients strongly endorsed the role of peers in facilitating successful care transitions. Behavioral health peers can play important roles in acute inpatient psychiatric care, supplementing clinical treatment team activities and filling important gaps related to engagement, discharge planning, and care transitions. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Inpatients with Acute Urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Serap

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: To determine the clinical and etiological features of inpatients with acute urticaria and angioedema and to assess the need for laboratory tests. Material and Methods: We recruited 105 patients with acute urticaria and angioedema who were admitted to our inpatient unit. The lesions and the characteristics of the patients were analyzed. Routine diagnostic tests including complete blood count, thyroid function tests, hepatitis panel, stool parasite, total IgE levels, cultures, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, anti-nuclear antibody, and posterior anterior lung X-ray were ordered. A psychiatric consultation was obtained, when needed. The results were analyzed with SPSS 15.0 statistical software.Results: Among 105 patients, 28 (26.7% had urticaria, 7 (6.7% had angioedema, and 70 (66.7% suffered from both urticaria and angioedema. The most common accompanying symptoms were itching (91.4% and burning (34.3%. The most common systemic symptoms were fatigue (15.2% and headache (12.4%. The lesions usually appeared in the evening hours (24.8%. Twenty-five patients were waking up due to itching during the night. Some lesions were associated with physical activities. Systemic diseases accompanied the lesions in 12 patients (11%. In terms of etiological factors, 33 patients (22.5% had infections. Food- related lesions were encountered in 14 (13% patients. Thirty patients (28.5% had history of medication use. Stress was detected in 37.1% of the patients; anxiety was diagnosed in 3% of patients. The stool was positive for parasites in 10 (9% patients. Conclusion: Acute urticaria is a benign disorder. Although the underlying cause of urticaria can not always be identified, infections and medications are the most common causes. A comprehensive and detailed history is very important to discover the underlying cause. The diagnostic tests should be ordered according to the patient’s history. Conducting diagnostic tests

  8. Overcoming practical challenges to conducting clinical research in the inpatient stroke rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Grace B; Skidmore, Elizabeth R; Whyte, Ellen M; Matthews, Judith T

    2015-10-01

    There is a shortage of published empirical studies conducted in acute inpatient stroke rehabilitation, though such studies are greatly needed in order to shed light on the most efficacious inpatient stroke rehabilitation interventions. The inherent challenges of inpatient research may dissuade researchers from undertaking this important work. This paper describes our institution's experience devising practical solutions to research barriers in this setting. Through concentrated efforts to overcome research barriers, such as by cultivating collaborative relationships and capitalizing on unanticipated benefits, we successfully facilitated conduct of five simultaneous inpatient stroke studies. Tangible benefits realized include increased effectiveness of research participant identification and enrollment, novel collaborative projects, innovative clinical care initiatives, and enhanced emotional and practical support for patients and their families. We provide recommendations based on lessons learned during our experience, and discuss benefits of this collaboration for our research participants, clinical staff, and the research team.

  9. 76 FR 26489 - Medicare Program; Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-06

    ... Purchasing Program; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 76, No. 88 / Friday, May 6, 2011 / Rules and...-Based Purchasing Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule implements a Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing program (Hospital VBP...

  10. Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatric Admission Rates and Subsequent One-Year Mortality in England: 1998-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Anthony; Clacey, Joe; Seagroatt, Valerie; Goldacre, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adolescence is a time of very rapid change not only in physical but also psychological development. During the teenage years there is a reported rise in the prevalence of psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate age- and sex-specific National Health Service (NHS) hospital inpatient admission rates for psychiatric…

  11. 42 CFR 405.1206 - Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... hospital care. 405.1206 Section 405.1206 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... Hospital Discharges § 405.1206 Expedited determination procedures for inpatient hospital care. (a... expedited determination by the QIO when a hospital (acting directly or through its utilization review...

  12. Factors affecting time of access of in-patient care at Webuye District hospital, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell M. Lodenyo

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: Ten-year increment in age, perception of a supernatural cause of illness(predisposing factors, having an illness that is considered bearable and belief in the effectiveness of treatment offered in-hospital (need factors affect time of access of in-patient healthcare services in the community served by Webuye District hospital and should inform interventions geared towards improving access.

  13. Gender Differences in Psychiatric Diagnoses among Inpatients with and without Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunsky, Yona; Bradley, Elspeth A.; Gracey, Carolyn D.; Durbin, Janet; Koegl, Chris

    2009-01-01

    There are few published studies on the relationship between gender and psychiatric disorders in individuals with intellectual disabilities. Adults (N = 1,971) with and without intellectual disabilities who received inpatient services for psychiatric diagnosis and clinical issues were examined. Among individuals with intellectual disabilities,…

  14. Uterine artery embolization - inpatient and outpatient therapy: a comparison of cost, safety, and patient satisfaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baerlocher, M.O.; Asch, M.R.; Hayeems, E.Z.; Rajan, D.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Radiology Residency Training Program, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: mark.baerlocher@utoronto.ca

    2006-04-15

    To determine whether uterine artery embolization (UAE) can be safely performed as an outpatient procedure without increased complications and readmission rates or decreased patient satisfaction rates and to determine the Canadian cost difference between performing UAE as an outpatient, compared with inpatient, procedure. We performed a retrospective chart review and patient survey of 2 groups of patients, 132 patients who underwent inpatient UAE and 20 patients who underwent outpatient UAE. Of these, 82 and 18, respectively, were successfully surveyed by telephone. Variables examined included presenting complaints, postprocedural symptoms, patient satisfaction, and readmission or complication rates. We also performed a detailed Canadian cost analysis comparing inpatient with outpatient UAE. We did not find any statistically significant difference between inpatient and outpatient UAE on any of the patient variables measured, including presenting complaints, postprocedural symptoms, patient satisfaction, and readmission or complication rates. We also found that outpatient UAE costs significantly less than inpatient UAE, primarily owing to decreased hospital overhead costs for overnight admission. In Ontario, inpatient UAE costs per patient totalled $3216.22, whereas outpatient costs totalled $2194.53 - a saving of $1021.69, which represents a 31.8% cost reduction. Given these results, we recommend that centres consider performing UAE as an outpatient procedure. A key enabling factor is the ability to have several hours of close nursing supervision of the patient postprocedure, prior to discharge. (author)

  15. Uterine artery embolization - inpatient and outpatient therapy: a comparison of cost, safety, and patient satisfaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baerlocher, M.O.; Asch, M.R.; Hayeems, E.Z.; Rajan, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether uterine artery embolization (UAE) can be safely performed as an outpatient procedure without increased complications and readmission rates or decreased patient satisfaction rates and to determine the Canadian cost difference between performing UAE as an outpatient, compared with inpatient, procedure. We performed a retrospective chart review and patient survey of 2 groups of patients, 132 patients who underwent inpatient UAE and 20 patients who underwent outpatient UAE. Of these, 82 and 18, respectively, were successfully surveyed by telephone. Variables examined included presenting complaints, postprocedural symptoms, patient satisfaction, and readmission or complication rates. We also performed a detailed Canadian cost analysis comparing inpatient with outpatient UAE. We did not find any statistically significant difference between inpatient and outpatient UAE on any of the patient variables measured, including presenting complaints, postprocedural symptoms, patient satisfaction, and readmission or complication rates. We also found that outpatient UAE costs significantly less than inpatient UAE, primarily owing to decreased hospital overhead costs for overnight admission. In Ontario, inpatient UAE costs per patient totalled $3216.22, whereas outpatient costs totalled $2194.53 - a saving of $1021.69, which represents a 31.8% cost reduction. Given these results, we recommend that centres consider performing UAE as an outpatient procedure. A key enabling factor is the ability to have several hours of close nursing supervision of the patient postprocedure, prior to discharge. (author)

  16. 'Our Care through Our Eyes': a mixed-methods, evaluative study of a service-user, co-produced education programme to improve inpatient care of children and young people admitted following self-harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Joseph C; Latif, Asam; Carter, Tim; Cooper, Joanne; Horsley, Angela; Armstrong, Marie; Wharrad, Heather

    2015-12-29

    Within Europe, the UK has one of the highest rates of self-harm, with a particularly high prevalence in children and young people (CYP). CYP who are admitted to paediatric hospital wards with self-harm are cared for by registered children's nurses who have been identified to lack specific training in caring for this patient group. This may impede the delivery of high quality care. Therefore, this study aims to co-produce, implement and evaluate an education programme for registered children's nurses to improve their knowledge, attitudes and confidence when caring for CYP admitted with self-harm. This mixed-methods evaluative study will involve a three-stage design. Stage 1: A priority-setting workshop will be conducted with 19 registered children's nurses. A Delphi technique will be used to establish consensus of information needs. Stage 2: An online educational intervention will be co-produced with 25 CYP and 19 registered children's nurses based on the priorities identified in Stage 1. Stage 3: The intervention will be implemented and evaluated with 250 registered children's nurses at a single hospital. Online Likert scale questionnaires will be administered at baseline and postintervention to assess levels of knowledge, attitudes and confidence in caring for CYP who self-harm. Descriptive and inferential statistics will be used to analyse the data. Statistical significance will be assessed at the 5% (two-sided) level. One-to-one qualitative interviews will also be undertaken with approximately 25 participants to explore any perceived impact on clinical practice. An interpretive descriptive approach will guide qualitative data collection and analysis. This study aims to develop, trial and evaluative a service-user, co-produced education programme for acute hospital registered children's nurses to improve the care of CYP admitted due to self-harm. The study has ethical approval from the National Health Services Research Ethics Committee and full governance

  17. VT - Vermont Hospital Service Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — Hospital service areas (HSAs) are organized by towns and are based on inpatient discharges where the diagnosis indicated the need for immediate care. Plurality...

  18. Dissociative disorders in acute psychiatric inpatients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chui-De; Meg Tseng, Mei-Chih; Chien, Yi-Ling; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Liu, Chih-Min; Yeh, Yei-Yu; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Ross, Colin A

    2017-04-01

    Dissociative disorders have been documented to be common psychiatric disorders which can be detected reliably with standardized diagnostic instruments in North American and European psychiatric inpatients and outpatients (20.6% and 18.4%, respectively). However, there are concerns about their cross-cultural manifestations as an apparently low prevalence rate has been reported in East Asian inpatients and outpatients (1.7% and 4.9%, respectively). It is unknown whether the clinical profile of dissociative disorders in terms of their core symptomatic clusters, associated comorbid disorders, and environmental risk factors that has emerged in western clinical populations can also be found in non-western clinical populations. A standardized structured interview for DSM-IV dissociative disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder, and a history of interpersonal victimization was administered in a sample of Taiwanese acute psychiatric inpatients. Our results showed that 19.5% of our participants met criteria for a DSM-IV dissociative disorder, mostly dissociative disorder not otherwise specified. More importantly, the western clinical profile of dissociative disorders also characterized our patients, including a poly-symptomatic presentation and a history of interpersonal trauma in both childhood and adulthood. Our results lend support to the conclusion that cross-cultural manifestations of dissociative pathology in East Asia are similar to those in North America and Europe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Prevalence of sleep disorders and associated factors in inpatient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico-Romero, Judit; Cabré-Roure, Mateu; Monteis-Cahis, Rosa; Palomera-Faneges, Elisabet; Serra-Prat, Mateu

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of insomnia in inpatient in an Internal Medicine Department and to identify risk factors of sleep disorders. A cross-sectional observational study was designed. Inpatients over eighteen years old hospitalized for acute medical conditions were recruited. Insomnia was assessed by the Athens insomnia scale. A nurse administered a questionnaire on risk factors including socio-demographic factors, reason for admission, comorbidities, current medications, functional status, nocturnal symptoms, and environmental factors. A total of 299 patients were recruited with a mean age of 73.7 years (SD 14.2). Overall prevalence of insomnia was 42.1%, slightly higher in women (48.2%) than in men (37.0%) (P=.052). In those less than 65 years the prevalence was 33.8%, and in patients aged 65 or over it was 44.9% (P=.093). The main factors associated with insomnia were a history of anxiety, depression and stroke, heartburn, pain, fear, and poor functional capacity at admission. Environmental factors such as noise, the sensation of cold or heat, and changing habits involved in hospitalization did not reach statistical significance. In patients 65 years or older, the use of beta-blockers was associated with insomnia. The multivariate analysis showed stroke, heartburn, and pain as independent risk factors for insomnia. Insomnia is highly prevalent among inpatient, and is associated with some treatable or modifiable factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Trends in inpatient hospital prices, 2008 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Jeff; Mulligan, Teresa

    2013-03-01

    Our goal was to present detailed descriptive data on transaction prices paid by commercial insurers and their enrollees for inpatient hospital care. To estimate transaction prices for inpatient hospital stays (hospital cost only), we used the MarketScan data set of commercial claims and administrative records for 45 to 50 million covered enrollees under age 65 years with commercial group health insurance. Prices are defined as average allowed charges, including insurer-paid reimbursements plus patient costsharing obligations, and are shown for 350 specific admission categories and for many states and localities. Intensity adjustments to account for increased complexity or resource use in hospital stays were estimated from changes in the numbers of procedures per admission, the complexity of admission codes, and patients' risk scores. Unadjusted inpatient hospital prices per admission grew by 8.2% per year from 2008 to 2010 for the commercially insured population (under age 65 years) in the MarketScan data set. We estimate that approximately 1.3 to 1.9 percentage points of the growth in prices can be attributed to increased intensity per admission. Thus, we estimate that intensity-adjusted price increases ranged from 6.2% to 6.8% annually in the 2008-2010 period. Price levels and trends varied considerably across admission types, states, and localities.

  1. FUNDAMENTALS OF OPTIMIZING INPATIENT CARE FOR CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Baranov

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Inpatient care for children has been considered to play an important role and to be influential in Russian healthcare system. However, a long lasting extensive development of health care system lacking sufficient finance and recourses has created a gap between the healthcare structure and capacity to provide healthcare and the needs of qualitative healthcare in the population. High number of limited ability hospitals without appropriate recourse base has already had its's day as a stage of inpatients care development. These hospitals could not provide a base for modern technology implementation and provision of present day high b quality medical care. Moreover, the current mechanism of financing «the hospital bed» but the patient has hampered medical care intensification and implementation of new technologies through loss of result orientation in medical specialists. Elaboration of efficacious means to optimize inpatient care would allow to control the rates assessing TH children's health in the country's population and to promote medical, social and economic efficacy of the inpatient care system.Key words: inpatient care, healthcare quality.

  2. Impulse control disorders in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Levine, Laura; Kim, Daniel; Potenza, Marc N

    2005-11-01

    The authors' goal was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients. They used the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview, a semistructured clinical interview assessing pathological gambling, trichotillomania, kleptomania, pyromania, intermittent explosive disorder, compulsive buying, and compulsive sexual behavior, to screen 204 consecutively admitted psychiatric inpatients. One hundred twelve of the inpatients were women (54.9%), and the mean age of the 204 inpatients was 40.5 years (SD=13.2, range=18-83). Patients whose screen was positive for an impulse control disorder were evaluated with structured clinical interviews. Sixty-three patients (30.9%) were diagnosed with at least one current impulse control disorder. The most common impulse control disorders were compulsive buying (N=19 [9.3%]), kleptomania (N=16 [7.8%]), and pathological gambling (N=14 [6.9%]). Patients with and without co-occurring impulse control disorders did not differ significantly from each other on demographic measures or number or type of psychiatric diagnoses other than impulse control disorders. Impulse control disorders appear common among psychiatric inpatients. Additional, larger studies are needed to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in the general population and specific psychiatric groups.

  3. Personality Disorders in Offenders with Intellectual Disability: A Comparison of Clinical, Forensic and Outcome Variables and Implications for Service Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, R. T.; Green, F. N.; O'Mahony, B.; Gunaratna, I. J.; Gangadharan, S. K.; Hoare, S.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To establish any differences between patients with and without a diagnosis of personality disorders, being treated in a secure inpatient service for offenders with intellectual disability (ID) in the UK. Method: A cohort study involving a selected population of people with ID and offending behaviours. Results: The study included a total of…

  4. Mock-ups as "interactive laboratories": mixed methods research using inpatient unit room mock-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Nicholas; Myers, Donald; Villasante, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    To establish evidence-based design (EBD) guidelines for inpatient rooms at Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) facilities. Simulation allows clients, designers, and researchers to visualize how users might interact with a proposed design before actual construction of the design. This study used mock-ups as a simulation technique during a study of the VA inpatient room standards. The participants used the inpatient room mock-ups as "interactive laboratory" environments to maximize opportunities for participatory design, qualitative research, and quantitative research of project-specific EBD solutions. The research used questionnaires, scenarios, on-demand modifications, and observations to evaluate and confirm EBD solutions for inpatient room mock-ups. A total of 71 participants responded to a questionnaire administered across five mock-up work sessions. These 71 participants consisted of administrators, nurses, physicians, support staff, environment and maintenance staff, and patient and staff safety representatives from throughout the VA healthcare system. EBD solutions were tested, evaluated, and modified for each inpatient room type and were applicable to two or more of the inpatient room types. The latter included the location of patient beds and standard headwall position, technology and spaces for nurse charting activities, clearances (e.g., equipment, wheelchair, and bariatric patient), universal rooms, and patient and family amenities. Also, EBD solutions were tested, validated, and modified to the needs of each inpatient room. The mock-ups allowed researchers and designers to evaluate and confirm EBD solutions and strategies for the development of VA inpatient room standards. When used as a means for mixed-methods research, mock-ups can successfully integrate research and design during project-related work. EBD research using mock-ups not only addresses project- or organization-specific concerns, but it may contribute to the knowledge base of the

  5. Comparison of insight and clinical variables in homeless and non-homeless psychiatric inpatients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yan-Nan; Cao, Xiao-Lan; Hou, Cai-Lan; Ng, Chee H; Ungvari, Gabor S; Chiu, Helen F K; Lin, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Lihui; Zheng, Xiaocong; Jia, Fu-Jun; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2017-09-01

    There are no published data on insight in homeless patients with psychiatric disorders in China. This study examined insight in homeless and non-homeless Chinese psychiatric inpatients in relation to demographic and clinical variables. A total of 278 homeless and 222 non-homeless inpatients matched in age and gender were included in the study. Demographic and clinical characteristics were collected based on a review of medical charts and a clinical interview with standardized instruments. Insight was evaluated with the Insight and Treatment Attitudes Questionnaire. Altogether 20.5% of homeless inpatients and 43.7% of the non-homeless controls had good insight. Compared with homeless inpatients with impaired insight, homeless inpatients with good insight had higher physical quality of life, longer duration of illness and less severe positive and negative symptoms. Impaired insight appeared more common in homeless psychiatric inpatients in China. Further studies should address the need for effective therapeutic interventions that promote homeless patients' insight. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ideal timing to transfer from an acute care hospital to an interdisciplinary inpatient rehabilitation program following a stroke: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeau Sylvie

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Timely accessibility to organized inpatient stroke rehabilitation services may become compromised since the demand for rehabilitation services following stroke is rapidly growing with no promise of additional resources. This often leads to prolonged lengths of stays in acute care facilities for individuals surviving a stroke. It is believed that this delay spent in acute care facilities may inhibit the crucial motor recovery process taking place shortly after a stroke. It is important to document the ideal timing to initiate intensive inpatient stroke rehabilitation after the neurological event. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the specific influence of short, moderate and long onset-admission intervals (OAI on rehabilitation outcomes across homogeneous subgroups of patients who were admitted to a standardized interdisciplinary inpatient stroke rehabilitation program. Methods A total of 418 patients discharged from the inpatient neurological rehabilitation program at the Montreal Rehabilitation Hospital Network after a first stroke (79% of all cases reviewed were included in this retrospective study. After conducting a matching procedure across these patients based on the degree of disability, gender, and age, a total of 40 homogeneous triads (n = 120 were formed according to the three OAI subgroups: short (less than 20 days, moderate (between 20 and 40 days or long (over 40 days; maximum of 70 days OAI subgroups. The rehabilitation outcomes (admission and discharge Functional Independence Measure scores (FIM, absolute and relative FIM gain scores, rehabilitation length of stay, efficiency scores were evaluated to test for differences between the three OAI subgroups. Results Analysis revealed that the three OAI subgroups were comparable for all rehabilitation outcomes studied. No statistical difference was found for admission (P = 0.305–0.972 and discharge (P = 0.083–0.367 FIM scores, absolute (P = 0

  7. Rising utilization of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Sunitha V; Rodean, Jonathan; Bekmezian, Arpi; Hall, Matt; Shah, Samir S; Mahant, Sanjay; Parikh, Kavita; Morse, Rustin; Puls, Henry; Cabana, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    Clinical pathways are detailed care plans that operationalize evidence-based guidelines into an accessible format for health providers. Their goal is to link evidence to practice to optimize patient outcomes and delivery efficiency. It is unknown to what extent inpatient pediatric asthma pathways are being utilized nationally. (1) Describe inpatient pediatric asthma pathway design and implementation across a large hospital network. (2) Compare characteristics of hospitals with and without pathways. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, survey study of hospitals in the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings Network (75% children's hospitals, 25% community hospitals). Our survey determined if each hospital used a pathway and pathway characteristics (e.g. pathway elements, implementation methods). Hospitals with and without pathways were compared using Chi-square tests (categorical variables) and Student's t-tests (continuous variables). Surveys were distributed to 3-5 potential participants from each hospital and 302 (74%) participants responded, representing 86% (106/123) of surveyed hospitals. From 2005-2015, the proportion of hospitals utilizing inpatient asthma pathways increased from 27% to 86%. We found variation in pathway elements, implementation strategies, electronic medical record integration, and compliance monitoring across hospitals. Hospitals with pathways had larger inpatient pediatric programs [mean 12.1 versus 6.1 full-time equivalents, p = 0.04] and were more commonly free-standing children's hospitals (52% versus 23%, p = 0.05). From 2005-2015, there was a dramatic rise in implementation of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways. We found variation in many aspects of pathway design and implementation. Future studies should determine optimal implementation strategies to better support hospital-level efforts in improving pediatric asthma care and outcomes.

  8. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR) system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients' medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients) are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed. PMID:28280506

  9. An Innovative, Interdisciplinary Model of Care for Inpatient Child Psychiatry: an Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathright, Molly M; Holmes, Khiela J; Morris, Ed M; Gatlin, De Angelo

    2016-10-01

    There are profound effects of childhood psychiatric disorders on families and communities. Given that each year over half a million youth receive mental health services through inpatient psychiatric hospitals, focus on assessment and treatment strategies for this group is paramount The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of an innovative, evidenced-based model of inpatient child psychiatric care that challenges commonly used traditional practices of inpatient child psychiatry. The highlighted model utilizes an interdisciplinary approach to clarify psychiatric diagnoses; create a comprehensive biopsychosocial formulation of the child and family; establish a rational medication regimen; provide individually tailored recommendations; and address the "revolving door" of repeated psychiatric hospitalizations. Descriptive analyses are presented that provide demographic, developmental, and psychiatric characteristics of the children admitted to the unit. The potential benefits of using this innovative model with developmentally and psychiatrically complex children are discussed.

  10. Analysis of inpatient dermatologic referrals: insight into the educational needs of trainee doctors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, K

    2012-01-31

    AIM: To analyse inpatient consultation referrals to the Dermatology Department and to identify the educational needs of junior\\/trainee doctors. METHODS: Consultation data of inpatients referred to the Dermatology Department between 2001 and 2006 was reviewed. RESULTS: There were 703 referrals identified. Patients were referred from all wards in the hospital. There were a total of 113 different dermatological diagnoses in the group. One-fifth (22%) consultations were for skin infections, 12% had atopic dermatitis, 8% had psoriasis and 8% had clear or suspected drug cause for their rash. In 391 cases, the Consultant Dermatologist\\'s diagnosis was different to the inpatient referral diagnosis on the consultation referral form. CONCLUSIONS: Our results emphasise the need for junior dermatology trainees to undertake extra training in both the dermatologic conditions. This data supports the need for expansion of service provision of dermatology in the region.

  11. [The inpatient treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa in German clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föcker, Manuel; Heidemann-Eggert, Elke; Antony, Gisela; Becker, Katja; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Fleischhaker, Christian; Hahn, Freia; Jaite, Charlotte; Kaess, Michael; M E Schulze, Ulrike; Sinzig, Judith; Wagner, Catharina; Legenbauer, Tanja; Renner, Tobias; Wessing, Ida; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Hebebrand, Johannes; Bühren, Katharina

    2017-09-01

    The medium- and long-term effects and side effects of inpatient treatment of patients with anorexia nervosa is still a matter of debate. The German S3-guidelines underline the importance of providing specialized and competent treatment. In this article we focus on the inpatient service structure in German child and adolescent psychiatric clinics with regard to their diagnostic and therapeutic concepts. A self-devised questionnaire was sent to 163 German child and adolescent psychiatric clinics. The questionnaire focused on the characteristics of the respective clinic as well as its diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. All clinics with an inpatient service for patients with anorexia nervosa (N = 84) provide single-therapy, family-based interventions and psychoeducation. A target weight is defined in nearly all clinics, and the mean intended weight gain per week is 486 g (range: 200 g to 700 g/week; SD = 117). Certain diagnostic tests and therapeutic interventions are used heterogeneously. This is the first study investigating the inpatient service structure for patients with anorexia nervosa in German clinics. Despite the provision of guideline-based therapy in all clinics, heterogeneous approaches were apparent with respect to specific diagnostic and therapeutic concepts.

  12. Inpatient management of borderline personality disorder at Helen Joseph Hospital, Johannesburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Paruk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this report was to establish a profile of patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD admitted to the acute inpatient psychiatric assessment unit at the Helen Joseph Hospital, in Johannesburg, over the course of 1 year. Methods: A retrospective record review was conducted to investigate the prevalence, demographics, reasons for admission, treatment, length of stay and follow-up of a group of inpatients during 2010 with a diagnosis of BPD, based on DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria, allocated on discharge. Results: Considering evidence retrospectively, the quality of the BPD diagnosis allocated appeared adequate. Statistical analysis revealed findings mainly in keeping with other reports, for example, that patients with BPD are above-average users of resources who make significantly more use of emergency services and that they generally do not adhere well to their scheduled outpatient follow-up arrangements. The longer average length of inpatient stay of this group with BPD, however, exceeded the typically brief period generally recommended for acute inpatient containment and emergency intervention. Conclusion: Implementation of targeted prevention and early intervention strategies, based on systematised programmes such as dialectical behavioural therapy and mentalisation based therapy, may be useful in addressing these problems experienced with integrating the in- and outpatient management of BPD. Keywords: Borderline personality; inpatient; acute

  13. Reducing Psychiatric Inpatient Readmissions Using an Organizational Change Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Todd; Connor, Tim; Ford, James H; Hyatt, John; Zimmerman, Dan

    2016-06-01

    Thirty-day hospital readmission rates have become a quality indicator for many regulators and payers, but published accounts of reducing these rates across a patient population are lacking. This article describes and evaluates the Wisconsin Mental Health Readmissions Project, which aimed to reduce psychiatric inpatient 30-day readmission rates in Wisconsin. Nineteen county human services boards representing 23 of Wisconsin's 72 counties and 61% of the state's residential admissions participated in a statewide quality improvement collaborative from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Participants applied a standardized organizational change model, called NIATx, in the context of a multicounty quality improvement collaborative to reduce 30-day readmission rates. Readmission rates were tracked through national and state databases, using 2009 as a baseline, and analyzed using a chi-square analysis to test the proportion of means. The study team compared readmission rates of Wisconsin counties that participated in the statewide collaborative with those that did not. Between 2009 and 2013, the 30-day readmission rates in Wisconsin declined significantly for counties that participated in the project when compared to those that did not (2009-2013) [Χ2(4) = 54.503, P < .001], based on a 2.5% decline for participants vs a 0.7% decline for nonparticipants. Reductions to behavioral health inpatient readmission rates beyond individual case examples have been difficult to document. This analysis evaluates a method that Wisconsin behavioral health providers applied as part of a multicounty program addressing readmission rates. The findings highlight quality improvement program design elements and interventions to consider in reducing inpatient behavioral health readmissions, as well as the need for further research on this complex systems issue.

  14. Defense Manpower Commission Staff Studies and Supporting Papers. Volume 2. The Total Force and Its Manpower Requirements Including Overviews of Each Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    III, DMC Filial Report.) E. MANPOWER BUDCETINC WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, by Audrey J. Page. (Related to Chapter III, DMC Final Report.) F...y *i E»V ■ X 1 m -10- Maneuver battalions (counting other non-dlvlslonal combat unlta of Amor and Infantry aa wall at thoaa Included In tht... Amor Schools, wiU continue In those "school troop" roles at Fort Banning and Fort Knox, respectively. Additionally, there are soae very serious

  15. Care Planning for Inpatients Referred for Palliative Care Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Kara; O'Riordan, David L; Marks, Angela K; Sudore, Rebecca; Pantilat, Steven Z

    2018-01-01

    Care planning is a critical function of palliative care teams, but the impact of advance care planning and goals of care discussions by palliative care teams has not been well characterized. To describe the population of patients referred to inpatient palliative care consultation teams for care planning, the needs identified by palliative care clinicians, the care planning activities that occur, and the results of these activities. This was a prospective cohort study conducted between January 1, 2013, and December 31, 2016. Seventy-eight inpatient palliative care teams from diverse US hospitals in the Palliative Care Quality Network, a national quality improvement collaborative. Standardized data were submitted for 73 145 patients. Inpatient palliative care consultation. Overall, 52 571 of 73 145 patients (71.9%) referred to inpatient palliative care were referred for care planning (range among teams, 27.5%-99.4% of patients). Patients referred for care planning were older (73.3 vs 67.9 years; F statistic, 1546.0; P planning needs in 52 825 of 73 145 patients (72.2%) overall, including 42 467 of 49 713 patients (85.4%) referred for care planning and in 10 054 of 17 475 patients (57.5%) referred for other reasons. Through care planning conversations, surrogates were identified for 10 571 of 11 149 patients (94.8%) and 9026 patients (37.4%) elected to change their code status. Substantially more patients indicated that a status of do not resuscitate/do not intubate was consistent with their goals (7006 [32.1%] preconsultation to 13 773 [63.1%] postconsultation). However, an advance directive was completed for just 2160 of 67 955 patients (3.2%) and a Physicians Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment form was completed for 8359 of 67 955 patients (12.3%) seen by palliative care teams. Care planning was the most common reason for inpatient palliative care consultation, and care planning needs were often found even when the consultation was

  16. Predicting institutionalization after traumatic brain injury inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Regina S; Seel, Ronald T; Goldstein, Richard; Brown, Allen W; Watanabe, Thomas K; Zasler, Nathan D; Roth, Elliot J; Zafonte, Ross D; Glenn, Mel B

    2015-02-15

    Risk factors contributing to institutionalization after inpatient rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not been well studied and need to be better understood to guide clinicians during rehabilitation. We aimed to develop a prognostic model that could be used at admission to inpatient rehabilitation facilities to predict discharge disposition. The model could be used to provide the interdisciplinary team with information regarding aspects of patients' functioning and/or their living situation that need particular attention during inpatient rehabilitation if institutionalization is to be avoided. The study population included 7219 patients with moderate-severe TBI in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) National Database enrolled from 2002-2012 who had not been institutionalized prior to injury. Based on institutionalization predictors in other populations, we hypothesized that among people who had lived at a private residence prior to injury, greater dependence in locomotion, bed-chair-wheelchair transfers, bladder and bowel continence, feeding, and comprehension at admission to inpatient rehabilitation programs would predict institutionalization at discharge. Logistic regression was used, with adjustment for demographic factors, proxy measures for TBI severity, and acute-care length-of-stay. C-statistic and predictiveness curves validated a five-variable model. Higher levels of independence in bladder management (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.88; 95% CI 0.83, 0.93), bed-chair-wheelchair transfers (OR, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.83-0.93]), and comprehension (OR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.68, 0.89]) at admission were associated with lower risks of institutionalization on discharge. For every 10-year increment in age was associated with a 1.38 times higher risk for institutionalization (95% CI, 1.29, 1.48) and living alone was associated with a 2.34 times higher risk (95% CI, 1.86, 2.94). The c-statistic was 0.780. We conclude that this simple model

  17. Optimizing the User Experience: Identifying Opportunities to Improve Use of an Inpatient Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Daniel M; Menser, Terri; Yen, Po-Yin; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2018-01-01

    Patient portals specifically designed for the inpatient setting have significant potential to improve patient care. However, little is known about how the users of this technology, the patients, may interact with the inpatient portals. As a result, hospitals have limited ability to design approaches that support patient use of the portal. This study aims to evaluate the user experience associated with an inpatient portal. We used a Think-Aloud protocol to study user interactions with a commercially available inpatient portal-MyChart Bedside (MCB). Study participants included 19 English-speaking adults over the age of 18 years. In one-on-one sessions, participants narrated their experience using the MCB application and completing eight specific tasks. Recordings were transcribed and coded into three dimensions of the user experience: physical, cognitive, and sociobehavioral. Our analysis of the physical experience highlighted the navigational errors and technical challenges associated with the use of MCB. We also found that issues associated with the cognitive experience included comprehension problems that spurred anxiety and uncertainty. Analysis of the sociobehavioral experience suggested that users have different learning styles and preferences for learning including self-guided, handouts, and in-person training. Inpatient portals may be an effective tool to improve the patient experience in the hospital. Moreover, making this technology available to inpatients may help to foster ongoing use of technology across the care continuum. However, deriving the benefits from the technology requires appropriate support. We identified multiple opportunities for hospital management to intervene. In particular, teaching patients to use the application by making a variety of instructional materials available could help to reduce several identified barriers to use. Additionally, hospitals should be prepared to manage patient anxiety and increased questioning arising from the

  18. Quality care for children: inpatient medication use in a mid-Atlantic hospital system 2000-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasky, Tamar; Lawless, Stephen T; Greenspan, Jay

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on a preliminary analysis of an electronic database that includes more than 32 000 pediatric hospitalizations during 2000-2003. They analyzed pediatric inpatient medication use in a defined geographic area, the catchment area for the Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, serving Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The study population included 18 108 female and 14 375 male children. The authors calculated the percentages of children receiving at least 1 administration of each drug. More than 700 drugs were received by children in the study population; 9 were received by at least 10% of all patients. The probability of receiving specific medications varied with patient age, sex, and race, but much further work is needed to quantify the variations. The database has the potential to inform pediatric health services research and pediatric comparative effectiveness research, and it may be the first analysis of hospitalizations for a pediatric population comprising all ages from 0 to 18.

  19. Severe forms of fibromyalgia with acute exacerbation of pain: costs, comorbidities, and length of stay in inpatient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romeyke T

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tobias Romeyke,1,2 Elisabeth Noehammer,1 Hans Christoph Scheuer,2 Harald Stummer1,3 1Institute for Management and Economics in Health Care, University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology (UMIT, Hall in Tirol, Austria; 2Waldhausklinik Deuringen, Acute Hospital for Internal Medicine, Pain Therapy, Complementary, and Individualized Patient-Centered Medicine, Stadtbergen, Germany; 3Institute for Management and Innovation in Healthcare, University Schloss Seeburg, Seekirchen/Wallersee, Austria Background and purpose: As a disease of the musculoskeletal system, fibromyalgia is becoming increasingly important, because of the direct and indirect costs to health systems. The purpose of this study of health economics was to obtain information about staff costs differentiated by service provider, and staff and material costs of the nonmedical infrastructure in inpatient care.Patients and methods: This study looked at 263 patients who received interdisciplinary inpatient treatment for severe forms of fibromyalgia with acute exacerbation of pain between 2011 and 2014. Standardized cost accounting and an analysis of additional diagnoses were performed.Results: The average cost per patient was €3,725.84, with staff and material costs of the nonmedical infrastructure and staff costs of doctors and nurses accounting for the highest proportions of the costs. Each fibromyalgia patient had an average of 6.1 additional diagnoses.Conclusion: Severe forms of fibromyalgia are accompanied by many concomitant diseases and associated with both high clinical staff costs and high medical and nonmedical infrastructure costs. Indication-based cost calculations provide important information for health policy and hospital managers if they include all elements that incur costs in both a differentiated and standardized way. Keywords: fibromyalgia, DRG, cost, length of stay, comorbidities, interdisciplinary care, inpatient care, musculoskeletal, pain

  20. Depression in Geriatric and Adult Medical Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magni, Guido; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Administered two scales for the evaluation of depression to two groups of medical inpatients: adults (N=201) and geriatric subjects (N=178). Results confirmed a high presence of depressive symptoms among patients with medical problems, particularly among geriatric subjects. Factors most predictive of depressive symptoms are identified. (JAC)

  1. Psychiatric nurses' experiences with inpatient aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.; Bowers, L.; Oud, N.; Jansen, G.

    2005-01-01

    Using a survey instrument, the experiences of psychiatric nurses with inpatient aggression were investigated in East London, U.K. On this "Perceptions of Prevalence Of Aggression Scale" (POPAS), annual experiences with 15 types of disruptive and aggressive behavior were rated anonymously. Staff

  2. Perceptions of mental healthcare professionals regarding inpatient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, professionals who are part of a multi-professional team need to be suitably skilled and prepared to meet the needs of the adolescent. Professionals working in therapy programmes for adolescents should have certain personal attributes that make them suitable for working with adolescents. An adolescent inpatient ...

  3. Equidad de género en la adherencia al tratamiento de adicciones: Representaciones y prácticas de profesionales y pacientes en un servicio de internación de un hospital público Gender equity within adherence to treatment of addictions: Social representations and practices of professionals and patients in an inpatient service of a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanesa Jeifetz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo central de este proyecto1 es explorar la equidad de género relativa a la adherencia al tratamiento en un servicio de internación de un hospital público, que atiende pacientes adictos/as a las drogas, así como identificar los modos en los cuales las diferencias entre los géneros se transforman en inequidad en salud. El propósito del proyecto es contribuir en el avance de la equidad de género en el tratamiento de las adicciones a las drogas, visibilizando las inequidades que se presenten, asi como las necesidades en la atención y los modos de enfermar de cada género. Del mismo modo, promoviendo la inclusión de la perspectiva de género en las prácticas de los profesionales, en aras de mejorar los modelos de atención. Se trata de una investigación de carácter exploratorio-descriptivo, en la que se utiliza metodología cualitativa para la recolección y el análisis de la información.The central objective of this project is to explore gender equity in adherence to treatment of an inpatient service of a public hospital, which serves patients addicted to drugs and to identify ways in which gender differences are transformed into health inequities. The project aim's is to contribute to gender equity in the treatment of addictions to drugs, make visible inequities that arise, promote the inclusion of gender in the practices of professionals and manifest the needs and modes of each gender in pursuit of improved models of care. It is an exploratory and descriptive research, which used qualitative methodology to collect and analyze information.

  4. The effect of additional physiotherapy to hospital inpatients outside of regular business hours: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Natasha K; Paratz, Jennifer

    2006-12-01

    Provision of out of regular business hours (OBH) physiotherapy to hospital inpatients is widespread in the hospital setting. This systematic review evaluated the effect of additional OBH physiotherapy services on patient length of stay (LOS), pulmonary complications, discharge destination, discharge mobility status, quality of life, cost saving, adverse events, and mortality compared with physiotherapy only within regular business hours. A literature search was completed on databases with citation tracking using key words. Two reviewers completed data extraction and quality assessment independently by using modified scales for historical cohorts and case control studies as well as the PEDro scale for randomized controlled trials and quasi-randomised controlled trials. This search identified nine articles of low to medium quality. Four reported a significant reduction in LOS associated with additional OBH physiotherapy, with two articles reporting overall significance and two reporting only for specific subgroups. Two studies reported significant reduction in pulmonary complications for two different patient groups in an intensive care unit (ICU) with additional OBH physiotherapy. Three studies accounted for discharge destination and/or discharge mobility status with no significant difference reported. Quality of life, adverse events, and mortality were not reported in any studies. Cost savings were considered in three studies, with two reporting a cost saving. This systematic review was unable to conclude that the provision of additional OBH physiotherapy made significant improvement to patient outcomes for all subgroups of inpatients. One study in critical care reported that overnight physiotherapy decreased LOS and reduced pulmonary complications of patients in the ICU. However, the studies in the area of orthopaedics, neurology, postcardiac surgery, and rheumatology, which all considered additional daytime weekend physiotherapy intervention, did not provide

  5. Risks, Benefits, and Recommendations for Pastoral Care on Inpatient Psychiatric Units: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennybaker, Steven; Hemming, Patrick; Roy, Durga; Anton, Blair; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2016-09-01

    A systematic review was conducted of the biomedical literature regarding pastoral care (PaC) providers on inpatient psychiatric units with the aim of answering 3 questions: (1) What are the risks and benefits of PaC providers' presence on inpatient psychiatric units? (2) What are current recommendations for integration of PaC providers into a psychiatric team? and (3) What gaps exist in the literature? PubMed, PsycInfo, Embase, CINAHL, and Scopus were searched from the start of each database to July 9, 2014 using terms related to PaC providers and inpatient psychiatry. Two independent reviewers performed full-text reviews of each article identified by independent review of all titles/abstracts from the electronic search and by a hand search of articles included in reference lists. Inclusion criteria were: English-language article, published in a peer-reviewed journal, and focus on a PaC provider working in a psychiatric hospital setting. One author performed data extraction. Forty-nine articles were identified by electronic (84%) and hand search (16%), 18 of which were evaluative studies: 5 qualitative and 13 quantitative. Most of the literature viewed integration of PaC providers in inpatient treatment teams as beneficial. Potential harms were noted and mitigation strategies suggested, including providing training to PaC providers concerning psychiatric illness, clearly defining roles, and enhancing team integration. None of the articles reported outcomes data. Psychiatric inpatients often have unmet spiritual needs. Although the literature suggests potential benefits of PaC providers for psychiatric inpatients, more rigorous studies are needed to establish these benefits as efficacious. The authors of this review recommend the cautious integration of PaC providers into the psychiatric inpatient care team.

  6. Improving the efficiency of patient throughput via centralized inpatient scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Mark W

    2010-01-01

    Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center implemented a centralized scheduling system in order to increase efficiency and throughput, improve customer satisfaction, improve communication between departments,and create a single schedule (IP/ED/OP) per modality. Most resistance for the change came from technologists, so a formal design team was established for each modality, which included a core information systems (IS) team member,the lead technologist of the modality, and the technologist most able to influence the other technologists who might be resistant to change. Overall,throughput increased by 3.14% post-implementation of the inpatient scheduling software.

  7. Recovery-Oriented Practice in Mental Health Inpatient Settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldemar, Anna Kristine; Arnfred, Sidse M; Petersen, Lone

    2016-01-01

    such settings. The quality and relevance of the studies were assessed with the Critical Appraisal Skills Program, and a text-driven content analysis identified three organizing themes: definitions and understandings, current practice, and challenges. RESULTS: Eight studies from Canada, the United Kingdom......, the United States, Australia, and Ireland were included. The results highlight the limited number of studies of recovery-oriented practice in mental health inpatient settings and the limited extent to which such an approach is integrated into these settings. Findings raise the question of whether recovery...

  8. Evaluation of hospital inpatient complications: a planning approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westert Gert P

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hospital inpatient complications are one of a number of adverse health care outcomes. Reducing complications has been identified as an approach to improving care and saving resources as part of the health care reform efforts in the United States. An objective of this study was to describe the Potentially Preventable Complications software developed as a tool for evaluating hospital inpatient outcomes. Additional objectives included demonstration of the use of this software to evaluate the connection between health care outcomes and expenses in United States administrative data at the state and local levels and the use of the software to plan and implement interventions to reduce hospital complications in one U.S. metropolitan area. Methods The study described the Potentially Preventable Complications software as a tool for evaluating these inpatient hospital outcomes. Through administrative hospital charge data from California and Maryland and through cost data from three hospitals in Syracuse, New York, expenses for patients with and without complications were compared. These comparisons were based on patients in the same All Patients Refined Diagnosis Related Groups and severity of illness categories. This analysis included tests of statistical significance. In addition, the study included a planning process for use of the Potentially Preventable Complications software in three Syracuse hospitals to plan and implement reductions in hospital inpatient complications. The use of the PPC software in cost comparisons and reduction of complications included tests of statistical significance. Results The study demonstrated that Potentially Preventable Complications were associated with significantly increased cost in administrative data from the United States in California and Maryland and in actual cost data from the hospitals of Syracuse, New York. The implementation of interventions in the Syracuse hospitals was associated with

  9. 42 CFR 441.12 - Inpatient hospital tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inpatient hospital tests. 441.12 Section 441.12... General Provisions § 441.12 Inpatient hospital tests. Except in an emergency situation (see § 440.170(e)(1) of this chapter for definition), FFP is not available in expenditures for inpatient hospital tests...

  10. Health services use associated with emergency department closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Enemark, Ulrika; Foldspang, Anders

    2011-01-01

    , 1997-2003. Data were extracted from administrative registries including information on individual use of emergency services and other hospital care, contact with GPs and socioeconomic background. Health services' use by the Morsø population was measured before reduction in emergency room opening hours...... of substitute health services. By contrast, Morsø women compared to the rest of Viborg county reduced their use of GP services in terms of face-to-face visits (β = -0.08, P = 0.020), telephone consultations (β = -0.11, P = 0.007), home visits (β = -0.48, P = 0.009), and their inpatient hospital utilization (β...... = -0.12, P = 0.022) during the period when emergeny services were only available in the daytime. CONCLUSIONS: Emergency services at neighbouring hospitals (40 kilometres distance) were able to compensate, in part, for the decreased local emergency service provision. Concurrent changes in health care...

  11. Hospice care in the Netherlands: who applies and who is admitted to inpatient care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Emily; Pasman, H Roeline; Galesloot, Cilia; Lokker, Martine Elizabeth; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje

    2016-01-28

    Ten percent of non-sudden deaths in the Netherlands occur in inpatient hospice facilities. To investigate differences between patients who are admitted to inpatient hospice care or not following application, how diagnoses compare to the national population, characteristics of application, and associations with being admitted to inpatient hospice care or not. Data from a database representing over 25% of inpatient hospice facilities in the Netherlands were analysed. The study period spanned the years 2007-2012. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to study associations between demographic and application characteristics, and admittance. Ten thousand two hundred fifty-four patients were included. 84.1% of patients applying for inpatient hospice care had cancer compared to 37.0% of deaths nationally. 52.4% of applicants resided in hospital at the time of admission. Most frequent reasons for application were the wish to die in an inpatient hospice facility (70.5%), needing intensive care or support (52.2 ), relieving caregivers (41.4%) and needing pain/symptom control (39.9%). Living alone (OR 1.68, 95% CI 1.46-1.94), having cancer (OR 1.40, 95% CI 1.11-1.76), relieving caregivers (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01-1.38), needing pain/symptom control (OR1.72, 95% CI 1.46-2.03) wanting inpatient hospice care until death (vs respite care) (OR 3.59, 95% CI 2.11-6.10), wanting to be admitted as soon as possible (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.42-1.88), and being referred by a primary care professional (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.17-1.59) were positively associated with being admitted. Wishing to die in an inpatient hospice facility was negatively associated with being admitted (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.72-1.00). This study suggests that when applying for inpatient hospice care, patients who seem most urgently in need of inpatient hospice care are more frequently admitted. However, non-cancer patients seem to be an under-represented population. Staff should consider application based on need for

  12. An audit of the quality of inpatient care for adults with learning disability in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Rory; Gandesha, Aarti; Hassiotis, Angela; Gallagher, Pamela; Burnell, Matthew; Jones, Glyn; Kerr, Michael; Hall, Ian; Chaplin, Robert; Crawford, Michael J

    2016-04-18

    To audit patient hospital records to evaluate the performance of acute general and mental health services in delivering inpatient care to people with learning disability and explore the influence of organisational factors on the quality of care they deliver. Nine acute general hospital Trusts and six mental health services. Adults with learning disability who received inpatient hospital care between May 2013 and April 2014. Data on seven key indicators of high-quality care were collected from 176 patients. These covered physical health/monitoring, communication and meeting needs, capacity and decision-making, discharge planning and carer involvement. The impact of services having an electronic system for flagging patients with learning disability and employing a learning disability liaison nurse was assessed. Indicators of physical healthcare (body mass index, swallowing assessment, epilepsy risk assessment) were poorly recorded in acute general and mental health inpatient settings. Overall, only 34 (19.3%) patients received any assessment of swallowing and 12 of the 57 with epilepsy (21.1%) had an epilepsy risk assessment. For most quality indicators, there was a non-statistically significant trend for improved performance in services with a learning disability liaison nurse. The presence of an electronic flagging system showed less evidence of benefit. Inpatient care for people with learning disability needs to be improved. The work gives tentative support to the role of a learning disability liaison nurse in acute general and mental health services, but further work is needed to confirm these benefits and to trial other interventions that might improve the quality and safety of care for this high-need group. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  13. Broken bodies, healing spirits: road trauma survivor's perceptions of pastoral care during inpatient orthopaedic rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Andy; Badcoe, Andrew; Harms, Louise

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present findings from an Australian study that explored road trauma survivors' perceptions of spirituality and of a hospital-based pastoral care service throughout their inpatient rehabilitation. All participants had experienced severe orthopaedic injury. A mixed-method research design was used. The survey method elicited demographic, pastoral care contact and hospitalisation data. It included the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI; Tedeschi and Calhoun 1996) and an adapted World Health Organisation Pastoral Intervention (WHO 2002) coding schema (Constitution of the World Health Organisation, basic documents, supplement. 45 ed.). An interview method was used to elicit information about participants' prior and current experiences of faith and spirituality, expectations, and experiences of the pastoral care service, and perceptions of the role of pastoral care in their rehabilitation. A thematic analysis of both quantitative and qualitative data identified nine core themes of supportive pastoral care. Pastoral care was seen as a valued and supportive intervention. Participants who completed the PTGI reported at least some degree of posttraumatic growth. Further research is recommended to examine the role and efficacy of pastoral care that is integral to road trauma recovery support.

  14. "We're Almost Guests in Their Clinical Care": Inpatient Provider Attitudes Toward Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecker, Saul; Meisel, Talia; Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Shelley, Donna; Horwitz, Leora I

    2017-03-01

    Many hospitalized patients have at least 1 chronic disease that is not optimally controlled. The purpose of this study was to explore inpatient provider attitudes about chronic disease management and, in particular, barriers and facilitators of chronic disease management in the hospital. We conducted a qualitative study of semi-structured interviews of 31 inpatient providers from an academic medical center. We interviewed attending physicians, resident physicians, physician assistants, and nurse practitioners from various specialties about attitudes, experiences with, and barriers and facilitators towards chronic disease management in the hospital. Qualitative data were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Providers perceived that hospitalizations offer an opportunity to improve chronic disease management, as patients are evaluated by a new care team and observed in a controlled environment. Providers perceived clinical benefits to in-hospital chronic care, including improvements in readmission and length of stay, but expressed concerns for risks related to adverse events and distraction from the acute problem. Barriers included provider lack of comfort with managing chronic diseases, poor communication between inpatient and outpatient providers, and hospital-system focus on patient discharge. A strong relationship with the outpatient provider and involvement of specialists were facilitators of inpatient chronic disease management. Providers perceived benefits to in-hospital chronic disease management for both processes of care and clinical outcomes. Efforts to increase inpatient chronic disease management will need to overcome barriers in multiple domains. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2017;12:162-167.

  15. Factors influencing inpatients’ satisfaction with hospitalization service in public hospitals in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen H

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Haiping Chen,1 Meina Li,1 Jingrui Wang,1 Chen Xue,1 Tao Ding,1 Xin Nong,2 Yuan Liu,1 Lulu Zhang11Department of Military Health Management, College of Health Service, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 2Department of Medical Research, Rizhao Maternity and Infant Hospital, Shandong, People’s Republic of ChinaObjective: The aim of this study was to observe the current status of inpatient satisfaction and analyze the possible factors influencing patient satisfaction during hospitalization.Methods: A cross-sectional investigation was conducted to obtain basic information about inpatient satisfaction, and statistical methods were used to describe and analyze the data. A total of 878 questionnaires were included in this study. A 5-point Likert scale rating was employed to assess items related to hospitalization care. Nonparametric tests and ordinal logistic analysis were used to explore the relationship between predictors and the patients’ overall satisfaction.Results: Among the respondents, 89.75% were satisfied overall with the service they received during hospitalization, while 0.57% reported dissatisfaction. Inpatient demographic characteristics such as sex of the patients, occupation, age, and residence had significant associations with satisfaction, while monthly income and marital status did not. Additionally, the statistical outcome indicated that doctors’ and nurses’ service attitudes, and expenditure and environment were found to have an impact on the inpatient satisfaction ratings, with odds ratio of 2.43, 3.19, and 2.72, respectively.Conclusion: This study emphasizes the influence of sex of the patients, the service attitudes of the doctors and nurses, and expenditure and environment on inpatient satisfaction. An increase in satisfaction ratings concerning the areas of doctors’ and nurses’ service attitudes, and expenditure and environment can improve the overall satisfaction levels. Responsible health management

  16. Outpatient Foley catheter versus inpatient prostaglandin E2 gel for induction of labour: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Induction of labour (IOL is one of the commonest obstetric interventions, with significant impact on both the individual woman and health service delivery. Outpatient IOL is an attractive option to reduce these impacts. To date there is little data comparing outpatient and inpatient IOL methods, and potential safety concerns (hyperstimulation if prostaglandins, the standard inpatient IOL medications, are used in the outpatient setting. The purpose of this study was to assess feasibility, clinical effectiveness and patient acceptability of outpatient Foley catheter (OPC vs. inpatient vaginal PGE2 (IP for induction of labour (IOL at term. Methods Women with an unfavourable cervix requiring IOL at term (N = 101 were randomised to outpatient care using Foley catheter (OPC, n = 50 or inpatient care using vaginal PGE2 (IP, n = 51. OPC group had Foley catheter inserted and were discharged overnight following a reassuring cardiotocograph. IP group received 2 mg/1 mg vaginal PGE2 if nulliparous or 1 mg/1 mg if multiparous. Main outcome measures were inpatient stay (prior to birth, in Birthing Unit, total, mode of birth, induction to delivery interval, adverse reactions and patient satisfaction. Results OPC group had shorter hospital stay prior to birth (21.3 vs. 32.4 hrs, p  Conclusions OPC was feasible and acceptable for IOL of women with an unfavourable cervix at term compared to IP, however did not show a statistically significant reduction in total inpatient stay and was associated with increased oxytocin IOL. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, ACTRN:12609000420246.

  17. An economic evaluation of outpatient versus inpatient polyp treatment for abnormal uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwakar, L; Roberts, T E; Cooper, N A M; Middleton, L; Jowett, S; Daniels, J; Smith, P; Clark, T J

    2016-03-01

    To undertake a cost-effectiveness analysis of outpatient uterine polypectomy compared with standard inpatient treatment under general anaesthesia. Economic evaluation carried out alongside the multi-centre, pragmatic, non-inferiority, randomised controlled Outpatient Polyp Treatment (OPT) trial. The UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective was used in the estimation of costs and the interpretation of results. Thirty-one secondary care UK NHS hospitals between April 2008 and July 2011. Five hundred and seven women with abnormal uterine bleeding and hysteroscopically diagnosed endometrial polyps. Outpatient uterine polypectomy versus standard inpatient treatment. Clinicians were free to choose the technique for polypectomy within the allocated setting. Patient-reported effectiveness of the procedure determined by the women's self-assessment of bleeding at 6 months, and QALY gains at 6 and 12 months. Inpatient treatment was slightly more effective but more expensive than outpatient treatment, resulting in relatively high incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Intention-to-treat analysis of the base case at 6 months revealed that it cost an additional £9421 per successfully treated patient in the inpatient group and £ 1,099,167 per additional QALY gained, when compared with outpatient treatment. At 12 months, these costs were £22,293 per additional effectively treated patient and £445,867 per additional QALY gained, respectively. Outpatient treatment of uterine polyps associated with abnormal uterine bleeding appears to be more cost-effective than inpatient treatment at willingness-to-pay thresholds acceptable to the NHS. HTA-funded OPT trial concluded that outpatient uterine polypectomy is cost-effective compared with inpatient polypectomy. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  18. Teamwork on inpatient medical units: assessing attitudes and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, K J; Ritter, C D; Wheeler, H; Szekendi, M K; Brinton, T S; Williams, M V

    2010-04-01

    Discrepant attitudes about teamwork among nurses and physicians exist in operating rooms and intensive care units. Little is known about teamwork attitudes on general medical services. To assess ratings of teamwork by providers on inpatient medical units and barriers to collaboration. Nurses, primary hospital physicians and medical subspeciality consultants on four general medical units were surveyed. Providers rated the quality of communication and collaboration experienced with their own and other disciplines. Providers also rated potential barriers to collaboration. Differences between providers in ratings of collaboration and barriers were tested using analysis of variance. Of 230 eligible providers, 159 (69%) completed the survey. Teamwork ratings of nurses were similarly high across provider types. Ratings of physicians differed considerably by provider type (pteamwork. Whereas physicians rated the quality of teamwork with nurses favourably, nurses perceived teamwork as suboptimal.

  19. Delayed discharge from intellectual disability in-patient units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devapriam, John; Gangadharan, Satheesh; Pither, Judith; Critchfield, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method We undertook a cross-sectional service evaluation of the reasons and extent of delay in the discharge process in an intellectual disability hospital over a 12-month period. Delays at each stage of the discharge process are also quantified in this study. Results We found that discharge was delayed for 29% of patients during the study period. The majority (78.5%) was due to awaiting completion of assessment of future care needs and waiting for public funding. Clinical implications Commissioners (health and social), provider trusts, regulators and community providers should consider the reasons for delay in the discharge process and adopt a whole systems approach to discharge planning. This is highly relevant in light of recommendations by the Department of Health following the Winterbourne View scandal, which has raised concern about patients staying in intellectual disability in-patient units too long and for the wrong reasons. PMID:25285218

  20. Levels of inpatient satisfaction with health service provision among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patient satisfaction with the attractiveness of the physical structure of the hospital were 242(57.3%), 224(53.1%) replied the hospital blocks were not sufficient, and 344(81.5%) replied the hospital compound was not neat, clear and planted with sufficient grasses and flowers, 283(67.1%) respondents answered the hospital ...

  1. Medication errors in pediatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishoej, Rikke Mie; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to describe medication errors (MEs) in hospitalized children reported to the national mandatory reporting and learning system, the Danish Patient Safety Database (DPSD). MEs were extracted from DPSD from the 5-year period of 2010–2014. We included reports from public hospitals...... on patients aged 0–17 years and categorized by reporters as medication-related. Reports from psychiatric wards and outpatient clinics were excluded. A ME was defined as any medication-related error occurring in the medication process whether harmful or not. MEs were categorized as harmful if they resulted...... in actual harm or interventions to prevent harm. MEs were further categorized according to occurrence in the medication process, type of error, and the medicines involved. A total of 2071 MEs including 487 harmful MEs were identified. Most MEs occurred during prescribing (40.8%), followed by dispensing (38...

  2. Physician organization care management capabilities associated with effective inpatient utilization management: a fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Thomas J; Thygeson, N Marcus

    2014-12-03

    We studied the relationship between physician organization (PO) care management capabilities and inpatient utilization in order to identify PO characteristics or capabilities associated with low inpatient bed-days per thousand. We used fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) to conduct an exploratory comparative case series study. Data about PO capabilities were collected using structured interviews with medical directors at fourteen California POs that are delegated to provide inpatient utilization management (UM) for HMO members of a California health plan. Health plan acute hospital claims from 2011 were extracted from a reporting data warehouse and used to calculate inpatient utilization statistics. Supplementary analyses were conducted using Fisher's Exact Test and Student's T-test. POs with low inpatient bed-days per thousand minimized length of stay and surgical admissions by actively engaging in concurrent review, discharge planning, and surgical prior authorization, and by contracting directly with hospitalists to provide UM-related services. Disease and case management were associated with lower medical admissions and readmissions, respectively, but not lower bed-days per thousand. Care management methods focused on managing length of stay and elective surgical admissions are associated with low bed-days per thousand in high-risk California POs delegated for inpatient UM. Reducing medical admissions alone is insufficient to achieve low bed-days per thousand. California POs with high bed-days per thousand are not applying care management best practices.

  3. Risk factors of coercion among psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Christoffer; Starkopf, Liis; Hastrup, Lene Halling

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Reducing the use of coercion among patients with mental disorders has long been a political priority. However, risk factors for coercive measures have primarily been investigated in smaller studies. To reduce the use of coercion, it is crucial to identify people at risk which we aim to do...... in this first large-scale study. METHODS: A cohort study was conducted among all psychiatric inpatients in Denmark, following 112,233 individuals during 1999-2014. Data from Danish registers were analysed using logistic regression for repeated measures. RESULTS: 24,594 inpatients were exposed to a coercive...... measure (21.9%). Clinical characteristics were the foremost predictors of coercion and patients with organic mental disorder had the highest increased risk of being subjected to a coercive measure (OR = 5.56; 95% CI = 5.04, 6.14). The risk of coercion was the highest in the first admission and decreased...

  4. The relationship between inpatient discharge timing and emergency department boarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Emilie S; Khare, Rahul K; Venkatesh, Arjun K; Van Roo, Ben D; Adams, James G; Reinhardt, Gilles

    2012-02-01

    Patient crowding and boarding in Emergency Departments (EDs) impair the quality of care as well as patient safety and satisfaction. Improved timing of inpatient discharges could positively affect ED boarding, and this hypothesis can be tested with computer modeling. Modeling enables analysis of the impact of inpatient discharge timing on ED boarding. Three policies were tested: a sensitivity analysis on shifting the timing of current discharge practices earlier; discharging 75% of inpatients by 12:00 noon; and discharging all inpatients between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. A cross-sectional computer modeling analysis was conducted of inpatient admissions and discharges on weekdays in September 2007. A model of patient flow streams into and out of inpatient beds with an output of ED admitted patient boarding hours was created to analyze the three policies. A mean of 38.8 ED patients, 22.7 surgical patients, and 19.5 intensive care unit transfers were admitted to inpatient beds, and 81.1 inpatients were discharged daily on September 2007 weekdays: 70.5%, 85.6%, 82.8%, and 88.0%, respectively, occurred between noon and midnight. In the model base case, total daily admitted patient boarding hours were 77.0 per day; the sensitivity analysis showed that shifting the peak inpatient discharge time 4h earlier eliminated ED boarding, and discharging 75% of inpatients by noon and discharging all inpatients between 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. both decreased boarding hours to 3.0. Timing of inpatient discharges had an impact on the need to board admitted patients. This model demonstrates the potential to reduce or eliminate ED boarding by improving inpatient discharge timing in anticipation of the daily surge in ED demand for inpatient beds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MMPI characteristics of borderline personality inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R W; Ruff, R M; Braff, D L; Ainsworth, T L

    1984-12-01

    MMPI (Form R) profiles of psychiatric inpatients (N = 45) meeting DSM-III criteria for borderline personality disorder were compared with chronic schizophrenic inpatients (N = 48) and with inpatients with acute psychotic illness (N = 20). Profile shape was similar among the three groups, although the borderline sample showed significantly higher elevations on four of the 10 clinical scales--Depression, Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, and Psychasthenia--when compared to the chronic schizophrenic cohorts. The borderline sample showed only one significant deviation on the clinical scales when compared to the acute psychotic sample as evidenced by a higher elevation on the Psychopathic Deviate scale. Clinically, the borderline MMPI responses suggest features of irritability, hostility, and resentfulness. On the validity scales, the borderline sample showed a significantly lower score on the L scale when compared to both comparison groups, although all of the groups' L scale scores were within conventional limits. While significant differences between groups did not emerge on the F scale, the borderline sample attained a clinically elevated score suggestive of weakened ego defenses and unconventional thinking. Analysis was also performed of a composite measure of psychoticism probability (the Goldberg Index) between groups. While the borderline and acute psychotic samples showed Goldberg indices suggestive of increasing likelihood for psychotic illness, the chronic schizophrenic group yielded a Goldberg Index significantly greater than both of the other groups, thus confirming the validity of the hypothesis. Finally, the MMPI borderline profiles were also compared to previously published norms of borderline outpatients and veteran borderline inpatients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. [Relationship experiences and therapeutic outcome in inpatient psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammet, Isa; Staats, Herrmann; Schauenburg, Henning

    2004-01-01

    Inpatient psychotherapy includes the patient's manifold contacts with different therapists, nurses and fellow patients. The present study investigated the association between these multiple relationships and therapy outcome. Pre-post measures of symptom load (Brief Symptom Inventory), interpersonal problems (IIP) and self-efficacy (SEB) were used to define three groups with positive (N=129), unchanged (N=44) or negative (N=40) outcome. These groups were compared 1) by their alliance with an individual therapist, their relationship to the therapeutic team, their experience of cohesion and climate concerning fellow patients in the ward (measured weekly by the "Stationserfahrungsbogen" SEB), and 2) by their differences in mean correlations between the courses of relationship experiences and symptom load. Cohesion and relationship to the therapeutic team were not associated with therapy outcome. Therapeutic alliance with the individual therapist and climate among fellow patients turned out to be moderate indicators of the therapeutic outcome. It is recommended to include these process parameters systematically into the process diagnostics of inpatient psychotherapy.

  7. Use of mobile assessment technologies in inpatient psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimhy, David; Vakhrusheva, Julia; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuanjia

    2014-08-01

    Mobile electronic devices (i.e., PDAs, cellphones) have been used successfully as part of research studies of individuals with severe mental illness living in the community. More recently, efforts have been made to incorporate such technologies into outpatient treatments. However, few attempts have been made to date to employ such mobile devices among hospitalized psychiatric patients. In this article, we evaluate the potential use of such devices in inpatient psychiatric settings using 33 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. Employing an Experience Sampling Method approach, we provide support for the feasibility of using such devices, along with examples of potentially clinically-relevant information that can be obtained using such technologies, including assessment of fluctuations in the severity of psychotic symptoms and negative mood in relation to social context, unit location, and time of day. Following these examples, we discuss issues related to the potential use of mobile electronic devices by patients hospitalized at inpatient psychiatric settings including issues related to patients' compliance, assessment schedules, questionnaire development, confidentiality issues, as well as selection of appropriate software/hardware. Finally, we delineate some issues and areas of inquiry requiring additional research and development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CDBG Public Services Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — CDBG activity related to public services, including senior services, legal services, youth services, employment training, health services, homebuyer counseling, food...

  9. Pregnant Adolescents Admitted to an Inpatient Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Unit: An Eight-Year Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Teresa M; Markley, Laura A; Nelson, Dana; Crane, Stephen S; Fitzgibbon, James J

    2015-12-01

    To assess patient outcomes and describe demographic data of pregnant adolescents admitted to an inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit, as well as to determine if it is safe to continue to admit pregnant adolescents to such a unit. A descriptive retrospective chart review conducted at a free-standing pediatric hospital in northeast Ohio of all pregnant adolescents aged 13 to 17 years admitted to the inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit from July 2005 to April 2013. Data collection included details on demographic, pregnancy status, and psychiatric diagnoses. Eighteen pregnant adolescents were admitted to the psychiatric unit during the time frame. Sixteen of those were in the first trimester of pregnancy. Pregnancy was found to be a contributing factor to the adolescent's suicidal ideation and admission in 11 of the cases. Admission to an inpatient psychiatric facility did not lead to adverse effects in pregnancy. Pregnant adolescents did not have negative pregnancy outcomes related to admission to an inpatient psychiatric unit. Results of this study suggest that it is safe to continue to admit uncomplicated pregnant adolescents in their first trimester to an inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric unit for an acute stay. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Changes to Hospital Inpatient Volume After Newspaper Reporting of Medical Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Haruhisa

    2017-06-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of medical error case reporting by national newspapers on inpatient volume at acute care hospitals. A case-control study was conducted using the article databases of 3 major Japanese newspapers with nationwide circulation between fiscal years 2012 and 2013. Data on inpatient volume at acute care hospitals were obtained from a Japanese government survey between fiscal years 2011 and 2014. Panel data were constructed and analyzed using a difference-in-differences design. Acute care hospitals in Japan. Hospitals named in articles that included the terms "medical error" and "hospital" were designated case hospitals, which were matched with control hospitals using corresponding locations, nurse-to-patient ratios, and bed numbers. Medical error case reporting in newspapers. Changes to hospital inpatient volume after error reports. The sample comprised 40 case hospitals and 40 control hospitals. Difference-in-differences analyses indicated that newspaper reporting of medical errors was not significantly associated (P = 0.122) with overall inpatient volume. Medical error case reporting by newspapers showed no influence on inpatient volume. Hospitals therefore have little incentive to respond adequately and proactively to medical errors. There may be a need for government intervention to improve the posterror response and encourage better health care safety.

  11. Violence among psychiatric inpatients: a victim's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveendranathan, D; Chandra, P S; Chaturvedi, S K

    2012-12-01

    OBJECTIVE. Violence in psychiatric wards results in serious consequences and there is need for research to assess it in various settings to enable improvements in safety within psychiatric facilities. This study aimed to assess the inpatient violence from victims' perspective, in settings where family members accompanied patients during inpatient stay and played a significant role in caregiving. METHODS. A total of 100 consecutive incidents of inpatient violence were examined. Family members present at the time of the incident were interviewed to assess putative causes and behaviour prior to the incident. RESULTS. Bipolar spectrum disorder was the most common diagnosis. Family members were the targets of violence in 70% of the incidents and 81% were provoked episodes. Also, 76% of the patients were identified by family member to be irritable just prior to the episode. As preventive measures, family members suggested a need for more staff, more sedation, and improved communication. CONCLUSIONS. The capability of family members to identify behaviour patterns of patients prior to the episode might help decrease the severity and consequence of violence. It is essential to provide culture-specific interventions to the family, which could enable them in handling violence and give better care for the patient.

  12. Role of Surgical Services in Profitability of Hospitals in California: An Analysis of Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Annual Financial Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzez, Ashkan; de Virgilio, Christian

    2016-10-01

    With constant changes in health-care laws and payment methods, profitability, and financial sustainability of hospitals are of utmost importance. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between surgical services and hospital profitability. The Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development annual financial databases for the years 2009 to 2011 were used for this study. The hospitals' characteristics and income statement elements were extracted for statistical analysis using bivariate and multivariate linear regression. A total of 989 financial records of 339 hospitals were included. On bivariate analysis, the number of inpatient and ambulatory operating rooms (ORs), the number of cases done both as inpatient and outpatient in each OR, and the average minutes used in inpatient ORs were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. On multivariate regression analysis, when controlling for hospitals' payer mix and the study year, only the number of inpatient cases done in the inpatient ORs (β = 832, P = 0.037), and the number of ambulatory ORs (β = 1,485, 466, P = 0.001) were significantly related with the net income of the hospital. These findings suggest that hospitals can maximize their profitability by diverting and allocating outpatient surgeries to ambulatory ORs, to allow for more inpatient surgeries.

  13. Suicide among older psychiatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlangsen, Annette; Zarit, Steven H; Tu, Xin

    2006-01-01

    .1-0.3). In combination with other types of disorder, affective disorders were found to modify an increased risk of suicide. First versus later admission for depression was a better predictor for suicide than age at first hospitalization for depression (before or after age 60 years). More than half of suicides occurred......OBJECTIVE: Older adults have elevated suicide rates, especially in the presence of a psychiatric disorder, yet not much is known about predictors for suicide within this high-risk group. The current study examines the characteristics associated with suicide among older adults who are admitted...... to a psychiatric hospital. METHOD: All persons aged 60 and older living in Denmark who were hospitalized with psychiatric disorders during 1990-2000 were included in the study. Using a case-control design and logistic regression analysis, the authors calculated the suicide risk associated with specific patient...

  14. Inpatient versus other settings for detoxification for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, E; Ison, J; Strang, J

    2005-04-18

    There are a complex range of variables that can influence the course and subjective severity of opioid withdrawal. There is a growing evidence for the effectiveness of a range of medically-supported detoxification strategies, but little attention has been paid to the influence of the setting in which the process takes place. To evaluate the effectiveness of any inpatient opioid detoxification programme when compared with all other time-limited detoxification programmes on the level of completion of detoxification, the intensity and duration of withdrawal symptoms, the nature and incidence of adverse effects, the level of engagement in further treatment post-detoxification, and the rates of relapse post-detoxification. Electronic databases: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL - The Cochrane Library Issue 3, 2004); MEDLINE (January 1966-March 2004); EMBASE (January 1988-March 2004); PsycInfo (January 1967-March 2004); CINAHL (January 1982-March 2004). In addition the Current Contents, Biological Abstracts, Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Index were searched. Randomised controlled clinical trials comparing inpatient opioid detoxification (any drug or psychosocial therapy) with other time-limited detoxification programmes (including residential units that are not staffed 24 hours per day, day-care facilities where the patient is not resident for 24 hours per day, and outpatient or ambulatory programmes, and using any drug or psychosocial therapy). All abstracts were independently inspected by two reviewers (ED & JI) and relevant papers were retrieved and assessed for methodological quality using Cochrane Reviewers' Handbook criteria. Only one study met the inclusion criteria. This did not explicitly report the number of participants in each group that successfully completed the detoxification process, but the published data allowed us to deduce that 7 out of 10 (70%) in the inpatient detoxification group were opioid-free on discharge

  15. Elevated C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia inpatients is associated with aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, R; Lobel, T; Krivoy, A; Shlosberg, D; Weizman, A; Katz, N

    2016-01-01

    An association between inflammation and behavioral domains of mental disorders is of growing interest. Recent studies reported an association between aggression and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the association between aggressive behavior and inflammatory markers in schizophrenia inpatients. Adult schizophrenia inpatients without affective symptoms (n=213) were retrospectively identified and categorized according to their C-reactive protein measurement at admission as either elevated (CRP>1 mg/dL; n=57) or normal (CRPaggression were compared: PANSS excitement component (PANSS-EC), restraints and suicidal behavior during hospitalization. Univariate comparisons between elevated and normal CRP levels were performed and multivariate analysis was conducted to control for relevant covariates. CRP levels significantly correlated with other laboratory markers indicating increased inflammation including leukocyte count and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (r=0.387, Paggressive behavior compared to patients with normal CRP levels (aggression) in schizophrenia inpatients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Length of stay of general psychiatric inpatients in the United States: systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tulloch, Alex D

    2011-05-01

    Psychiatric length of stay (LOS) has reduced but is still longer than for physical disorders. Inpatient costs are 16% of total mental health spending. Regression analyses of the determinants of LOS for US adult psychiatric inpatients were systematically reviewed. Most studies predated recent LOS reductions. Psychosis, female gender and larger hospital size were associated with longer LOS, while discharge against medical advice, prospective payment, being married, being detained and either younger or middle age were associated with shorter LOS. Associations appeared consistent, especially where sample size was above 3,000. Updated studies should be adequately powered and include the variables above.

  17. Factors affecting time of access of in-patient care at Webuye District hospital, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell M. Lodenyo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Among many Kenyan rural communities, access to in-patient healthcare services is seriously constrained. It is important to understand who has ready access to the facilities and services offered and what factors prevent those who do not from doing so.Aim: To identify factors affecting time of access of in-patient healthcare services at a rural district hospital in Kenya.Setting: Webuye District hospital in Western Kenya.Methods: A cross-sectional, comparative, hospital-based survey among 398 in-patients using an interviewer-administered questionnaire. Results were analysed using SPSS V.12.01.Results: The median age of the respondents, majority of whom were female respondents(55%, was 24 years. Median time of presentation to the hospital after onset of illness was 12.5 days. Two hundred and forty seven patients (62% presented to the hospital within 2 weeks of onset of illness, while 151 (38% presented after 2 weeks or more. Ten-year increase in age, perception of a supernatural cause of illness, having an illness that was considered bearable and belief in the effectiveness of treatment offered in-hospital were significant predictors for waiting more than 2 weeks to present at the hospital.Conclusion: Ten-year increment in age, perception of a supernatural cause of illness(predisposing factors, having an illness that is considered bearable and belief in the effectiveness of treatment offered in-hospital (need factors affect time of access of in-patient healthcare services in the community served by Webuye District hospital and should inform interventions geared towards improving access.

  18. Outcomes of inpatients with severe mental illness: a naturalistic descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela L. Nuernberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe and evaluate the response and predictors of remission during inpatient treatment in a psychiatric unit in a general hospital based on symptomatology, functionality, and quality of life (QoL. Methods: Patients were admitted to a psychiatric unit in a tertiary general hospital in Brazil from June 2011 to December 2013 and included in the study if they met two of the severe mental illness (SMI criteria: Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF ≤ 50 and duration of service contact ≥ 2 years. Patients were assessed by the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS, the Clinical Global Impression (CGI Severity Scale , GAF, the World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument – Abbreviated version (WHOQOL-Bref, and specific diagnostic scales. Results: A total of 239 patients were included. BPRS mean scores were 25.54±11.37 at admission and 10.96±8.11 at discharge (p < 0.001. Patients with manic episodes (odds ratio: 4.03; 95% confidence interval: 1.14-14.30; p = 0.03 were more likely to achieve remission (CGI ≤ 2 at discharge than those with depressive episodes. Mean length of stay was 28.95±19.86 days. All QoL domains improved significantly in the whole sample. Conclusion: SMI patients had marked improvements in symptomatic and functional measures during psychiatric hospitalization. Patients with manic episodes had higher chance of remission according to the CGI.

  19. Reasons for premature termination of dialectical behavior therapy for inpatients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Christoph; Roepke, Stefan; Roepke, Stefan; Kliem, Sören

    2014-09-01

    Although one of the main aims of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder (BPD) is to increase the retention rates, premature termination rates for DBT inpatient programs were found to be over 30%. The aim of the study was to identify the reasons for, and to analyze, patient characteristics that are associated with premature termination. We studied 541 inpatients with BPD, who were consecutively admitted for an open-door 3-month DBT inpatient treatment in Berlin, Germany. All participants completed several self-rating measures and participated in clinical interviews. Fourteen percent, who did not complete the full 84 days of assigned treatment, were expelled, mainly due to treatment-disturbing behaviors, or substance abuse or possession. Nearly 19% dropped out of treatment, mostly due to lack of motivation, arguments with others, and poor tolerance of emotional distress. Using non-parametric conditional inference trees, expulsion was associated with anorexia nervosa and alcohol abuse, whereas more than 9 suicide attempts, antisocial personality disorders, and more than 86 weeks in a psychiatric hospital were risk factors for dropout. We discussed measures and interventions that might lead to an adaptation of DBT inpatient programs. Future research should examine the symptom course and utilization of health-care services of non-completers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The july effect: an analysis of never events in the nationwide inpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Timothy; Attenello, Frank J; Wu, Brian; Ng, Alvin; Cen, Steven Y; Mack, William J

    2015-07-01

    Prior studies examining the impact of the "July effect" on in-hospital mortality rates have generated variable results. In 2008, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services published a series of high-cost, high-volume, nonreimbursable hospital-acquired complications (HACs). These events were believed to be preventable and indicate deficiencies in healthcare delivery. The present study aims to investigate the impact of July admissions on patient safety in a national sample using the HACs as a metric. Discharge data were collected from all admissions recorded in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2008 to 2011. HAC incidence was evaluated as a function of admission month, adjusting for demographic and hospital factors in multivariable analysis. The outcome measures were HAC occurrence, prolonged length of stay (LOS), and higher inpatient costs. A total of 143,019,381 inpatient admissions were recorded, with an overall HAC occurrence of 4.7%. July admissions accounted for 7.6% of the total number of inpatient admissions. July admissions experienced a 6% increase in likelihood of HAC occurrence (odds ratio = 1.06, 95% confidence interval: 1.06-1.07, P organization structure distinct from traditional quality measures, requiring novel transition protocols dedicated to improving HACs. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  1. The impact of the 2008 economic crisis on the increasing number of young psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medel-Herrero, Alvaro; Gomez-Beneyto, Manuel

    2017-11-21

    Little is published about the impact of the 2008 economic crisis on mental health services in Spain. An interrupted time series analysis was conducted to investigate a potential short-term association between the 2008 economic crisis and the number of psychiatric hospital admissions. The timing of the intervention (April 2008) was based on observed changes in Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Data on 1,152,880 psychiatric inpatients from the national Hospital Morbidity Survey, 69 months before and after the onset of the economic crisis (April 2008), were analyzed. Age-adjusted psychiatric (ICD9 290-319) hospital discharge rates significantly increased from April 2008, matching the onset of the crisis, especially for inpatients aged 15-24 years old and to a less extend for inpatients aged 25-34 years old. Other age groups were not affected. There was a significant increase in diagnoses for disturbance of conduct and emotions, depression, neurotic and personality disorders and alcohol and drug disorders; however, diagnoses for mental retardation and organic psychosis for 15-34 years old inpatients were unaffected. Psychiatric hospital admissions abruptly increased in April 2008, coinciding with the onset of the economic crisis. We identified age groups and diagnoses affected. Increased hospitalizations were found only at the age-ranges most affected by the rise in unemployment. The diagnoses affected were those most sensitive to environmental changes. Copyright © 2017 SEP y SEPB. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Techniques and Behaviors Associated with Exemplary Inpatient General Medicine Teaching: An Exploratory Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchens, Nathan; Harrod, Molly; Moody, Stephanie; Fowler, Karen; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-07-01

    Clinician educators face numerous obstacles to their joint mission of facilitating high-quality learning while also delivering patient-centered care. Such challenges necessitate increased attention to the work of exemplary clinician educators, their respective teaching approaches, and the experiences of their learners. To describe techniques and behaviors utilized by clinician educators to facilitate excellent teaching during inpatient general medicine rounds. An exploratory qualitative study of inpatient teaching conducted from 2014 to 2015. Inpatient general medicine wards in 11 US hospitals, including university-affiliated hospitals and Veterans Affairs medical centers. Participants included 12 exemplary clinician educators, 57 of their current learners, and 26 of their former learners. In-depth, semi-structured interviews of exemplary clinician educators, focus group discussions with their current and former learners, and direct observations of clinical teaching during inpatient rounds. Interview data, focus group data, and observational field notes were coded and categorized into broad, overlapping themes. Each theme elucidated a series of actions, behaviors, and approaches that exemplary clinician educators consistently demonstrated during inpatient rounds: (1) they fostered positive relationships with all team members by building rapport, which in turn created a safe learning environment; (2) they facilitated patient-centered teaching points, modeled excellent clinical exam and communication techniques, and treated patients as partners in their care; and (3) they engaged in coaching and collaboration through facilitation of discussion, effective questioning strategies, and differentiation of learning among team members with varied experience levels. This study identified consistent techniques and behaviors of excellent teaching during inpatient general medicine rounds. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine

  3. The involvement of older inpatients in medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, T; Thompson, S M; Metcalfe, K H M; Hughes, H; Sinclair, L; Batt, F

    2018-01-01

    To examine older inpatients' experiences with medical student education, their views on future interactions, and to seek their opinion on the most important curricular topics related to geriatric medicine. The study involved 112 non-confused inpatients older than 65 years of age, who completed a uniformed questionnaire on the day of their discharge from a teaching hospital. The mean age was 81 years, with equal number of male and female participants. 57% interacted with the students during their admission, the majority being interviewed and examined. Almost all (92%) of these patients described their experience as positive, some described it as time-consuming (23%), repetitive (19%) and tiresome (9%). 92% of all participants agreed that the older patients should be part of medical students' education. Dementia, cardiac conditions, cancer, arthritis, isolation/loneliness were highlighted as the most important topics to teach medical students related to geriatric medicine, while patience and listening were listed as important skills. They suggested practical, easily implemented advice for the improvement of the interaction between students and older patients; including allowing more time for interactions and for students to speak louder. Older patients felt positively about their interactions with medical students, and believed that older patients should be involved in medical student education. As well as medical conditions such as dementia, cardiac disease and cancer, these patients highlighted isolation and loneliness as important topics for undergraduate geriatric medical education, implying that students should learn about broader aspects of older patients' health and wellbeing.

  4. Inpatient rehabilitation outcomes of patients with apraxia after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Andy J; Burgard, Emily; Radel, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Stroke-induced paresis commands much attention during rehabilitation; other stroke-related consequences receive less consideration. Apraxia is a stroke disorder that may have important implications for rehabilitation and recovery. To investigate association of apraxia with stroke rehabilitation outcomes during inpatient rehabilitation. This cohort study compared patients with and without apraxia after a first left hemispheric stroke. All study patients received standard of care. Clinical measures were the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) and the upper extremity section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) administered upon admission and at discharge. Length of stay was also documented. Florida Apraxia Battery subtests were used to classify patients with apraxia. Fifteen patients were included in this study, 10 of whom had apraxia. Data analysis revealed that patients with apraxia exhibited improvement from admission to discharge in clinical measures; however, admission FIM score was significantly lower compared to patients without apraxia. There was no statistically significant difference between groups on FMA score, length of stay, or amount of change on clinical measures. This study of acute patients found those with apraxia to be significantly less independent upon admission to inpatient rehabilitation compared to patients without apraxia. Although both groups improved a similar amount during rehabilitation, patients with apraxia discharged at a level of independence comparable to patients without apraxia upon admission. Such disparity in independence is of concern, and apraxia as a factor in stroke rehabilitation and recovery deserves further attention.

  5. Inpatient pediatric consultation-liaison: a case-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Bryan D; Kronenberger, William G; Baker, Janet; Grimes, Laurie M; Crabtree, Valerie M; Smith, Courtney; McGraw, Kelly

    2003-09-01

    To conduct a prospective case-controlled study of pediatric inpatients referred for consultation in a tertiary care children's medical center. Referrals (n = 104) were matched with nonreferrals (n = 104) for age (4 to 18 years), gender, and illness type/severity and completed parent- and self-report (dependent on age) behavioral rating scales to assess for adjustment/functioning. Nurses completed in-hospital ratings of behavioral/adjustment difficulties. Goal attainment and satisfaction ratings were obtained from the referring physicians, parents/guardians, and the consultant. Referrals exhibited more behavior/adjustment/coping difficulties than nonreferrals by parent, nurse, and self report. Frequently employed interventions included coping-strategies intervention, cognitive and behavioral therapies, and case management. Referring physician and consultant ratings of goal attainment were high, as were physician ratings of satisfaction and parent/guardian ratings of overall helpfulness. Pediatric inpatients referred by their physicians had significantly more internalizing and externalizing disturbances than their nonreferred hospitalized peers. Many of the behavioral and adjustment problems that lead to in-hospital consultation referral were evident in global behavior difficulties prior to hospitalization. Referring pediatricians, parents/guardians, and consultants rate the outcome as benefiting the patients via assisting in the overall management of their health concerns, coping, and adjustment.

  6. Psychiatric admissions fall following the Christchurch earthquakes: an audit of inpatient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaglehole, Ben; Bell, Caroline; Beveridge, John; Frampton, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Following the devastating earthquake in Christchurch, New Zealand, there was the widespread perception that the demand for inpatient mental health services would increase. However, our clinical observation was to the contrary, with substantial reductions in inpatient utilisation being noted. We therefore examined psychiatric bed occupancy and admission data to improve understanding of the impact of the disaster on mental health services. We audited acute psychiatric bed occupancy and admission rates prior to and following a major earthquake. After the earthquake, total bed occupancy reduced from an average of 93% to 79%. Daily admissions also reduced by 20.2% for the 30 days following the earthquake. All diagnostic groups, with the exception of the 'Schizophrenia, schizotypal and delusional disorders' category, contributed to the reduction. No rebound to increased occupancy or admissions was seen over the study period. The study confirmed our clinical observation that demand for acute inpatient psychiatric services were markedly reduced after the February 2011 earthquake. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2014.

  7. Revisiting the Association of Aggression and Suicidal Behavior in Schizophrenic Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Tanja; Hubner-Liebermann, Bettina; Hausner, Helmut; Hajak, Goran; Wolfersdorf, Manfred; Spiessl, Hermann

    2011-01-01

    Our study investigated the association of aggression and suicidal behavior in schizophrenic inpatients. Eight thousand nine hundred one admissions for schizophrenia (1998-2007) to a psychiatric university hospital were included. Schizophrenic suicides (n = 7)/suicide attempters (n = 40) were compared to suicides (n = 30)/suicide attempters (n =…

  8. Development of an adolescent inpatient sexual abuse group: application of Lewin's model of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddle, C R

    1994-01-01

    The development and implementation of an adolescent sexual abuse group on an inpatient psychiatric unit is described. Steps of Kurt Lewin's model of change are used as a framework for this planned change. Specific issues concerning group procedure and process are detailed. Recommendations for this group and broader use of the Lewin model are included.

  9. Associations between Relational Aggression, Depression, and Suicidal Ideation in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Paula J.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Preddy, Teresa M.

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined relations between relational aggression, depressive symptoms, and suicidal ideation in a child clinical population. Participants included 276 children (M age = 9.55 years; 69% Male) who were admitted to a child psychiatric inpatient facility. Findings suggested that relational aggression was associated with depressive…

  10. Willingness for weight loss intervention among overweight and obese inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachsberg, Kelley N; Feinglass, Joseph; Williams, Mark V; O'Leary, Kevin J

    2011-06-01

    To determine whether overweight and obese inpatients are receptive to weight-loss interventions while hospitalized and whether interest in weight-loss intervention correlates with accurate self-perception of weight. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of overweight and obese patients admitted to the general medicine service at a large urban academic medical center from September 17, 2007 through October 16, 2007. Subjects were identified based on body mass index (BMI) on admission ≥25 and surveyed using a 14-question instrument. The main outcome measure was patient willingness to consider weight-loss intervention. Of 67 eligible patients, 64 (95.5%) agreed to be interviewed. BMI ranged from 25 to 50. Overall, 52.6% (10 of 19) of overweight patients did not believe they were overweight and 46.7% (21 of 45) of those with a BMI over 30 were unaware that they met criteria for obesity. Among all patients surveyed, 56.3% stated they would be interested in weight-loss intervention while hospitalized. In obese patients specifically, 68.9% expressed interest. Interest correlated with BMI (Pearson correlation coefficient (r) = 0.261, P = 0.04), accurate self-perception of weight (P = 0.03), diagnostic delays related to weight (P = 0.01) and a history of past weight-loss attempts (P = 0.04). None of the patients we interviewed received weight-loss intervention of any kind while hospitalized. Inpatients who recognize that they are overweight or obese are interested in pursuing weight-loss initiatives. Despite their interest, most do not receive weight-loss interventions while hospitalized.

  11. What Factors Drive Inpatient Satisfaction After Knee Arthroplasty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Kleeman, Lindsay T; Wellman, Samuel S; Green, Cynthia L; Attarian, David E; Bolognesi, Michael P; Seyler, Thorsten M

    2017-06-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey, developed by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, is directly tied to hospital reimbursement. The purpose of this study is to analyze survey responses from patients who underwent primary knee arthroplasty in order to identify factors that drive patient dissatisfaction in the inpatient setting. HCAHPS responses received from patients undergoing elective total and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty at our institution between January 1, 2013 and January 1, 2016 were obtained and expressed as a percentage of overall satisfaction. Satisfaction scores were correlated to patient demographics. Overall, responses from 580 patients were obtained (554 total knee arthroplasties, 26 unicompartmental knee arthroplasties). There was a statistically significant difference in overall satisfaction when comparing sex (P = .034), race (P = .030), and socioeconomic status (P = .001). Men reported a higher average satisfaction score than women (77.8% vs 74.2%). Patients in the 1st quartile of socioeconomic status reported a higher average satisfaction than those in the 4th quartile (81.3% vs 71.3%). African American patients reported a higher satisfaction than Caucasian and other races (81.6% vs 75.3% vs 66.3%, respectively). There was an inverse relationship between increased length of stay and reported satisfaction (r = -0.113, P = .006). Our data indicate that patients who are likely to report higher levels of inpatient satisfaction after knee arthroplasty are male, African American, of lower socioeconomic status, and with shorter length of stay. To our knowledge, this is the first reported analysis of the HCAHPS survey in relation to total joint arthroplasty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychopathological features of anorectic patients who dropped out of inpatient treatment as assessed by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Keisuke

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anorexia nervosa often requires inpatient treatment that includes psychotherapeutic intervention in addition to physical and nutritional management for severe low body weight. However, such patients sometimes terminate inpatient treatment prematurely because of resistance to treatment, poor motivation for treatment, unstable emotions, and problematic behaviors. In this study, the psychopathological factors related to the personality of anorexic patients that might predict discontinuation of inpatient treatment were investigated using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI. Methods Subjects were 75 consecutive anorectic inpatients who received cognitive behavioral therapy with a behavior protocol governing privileges in a university hospital based general (not psychiatric ward. The MMPI was done on admission for all patients. A comparison was done of patients who completed the process of inpatient treatment, including attainment of target body weight (completers, and patients who dropped out of inpatient treatment (dropouts. Results: No significant differences between completers (n = 51 and dropouts (n = 24 were found in the type of eating disorder, age of onset, duration of illness, age, or BMI at admission. Logistic regression analysis found the MMPI scales schizophrenia (Sc, hypomania (HYP, deviant thinking and experience, and antisocial attitude to be factors predicting completion or dropout. Conclusion Dropouts have difficulty adapting to inpatient treatment protocols such as our behavior protocol governing privileges because they have social and emotional alienation, a lack of ego mastery (Sc, emotional instability (HYP and an antisocial attitude. As a result, they have decreased motivation for treatment, leave the hospital without permission, attempt suicide, or shoplift, which leads them to terminate inpatient treatment prematurely. Treatments based on cognitive behavioral therapy with a behavior

  13. [Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment and Return to Work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernyi, Lena; Hölzle, Patricia; Hamann, Johannes

    2017-05-12

    Objective People with mental diseases have a high risk of unemployment and they have only limited access to the labor market. The return to work is often associated with fears.The present study aims to provide an overview of the number of hospitalized psychiatric patients with permanent employment. Moreover it should give an insight into the process of return to work, the experiences patients gain and the support they receive. Methods In the participating clinics we measured the number of patients with permanent employment. The main inclusion criteria for further survey were the status of permanent employment and age between 18 and 65. The participating patients were interviewed on two occasions, at the time of inclusion and 3 months after the patient was discharged. The questions addressed working conditions, job satisfaction and the process of return-to-work. For statistical analysis, descriptive statistics (frequencies, means, standard deviations) were used. Results Only 21 % of n = 815 inpatients of the participating hospitals were permanently employed. Many patients did not return to work after being discharged. In many cases the interviewed patients saw a connection between their job and their current episode of illness. In this context patients reported unsatisfying workplace conditions such as long working hours, bad work organization and social conflicts. Conclusions For mentally ill patients, the employment rate in the primary labor market is devastating low. After psychiatric inpatient treatment patients are at high risk to lose their jobs. In order to prevent this development, work-related stress factors should be discussed with inpatients at an early stage and support should be provided during the return-to-work-process. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Opportunistic hearing screening in elderly inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan Ramdoo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence of occult hearing loss in elderly inpatients, to evaluate feasibility of opportunistic hearing screening and to determine subsequent provision of hearing aids. Materials and methods: Subjects (>65 years were recruited from five elderly care wards. Hearing loss was detected by a ward-based hearing screen comprising patient-reported assessment of hearing disability and a whisper test. Subjects failing the whisper test or reporting hearing difficulties were offered formal audiological assessment. Results: Screening was performed on 51 patients aged between 70 and 95 years. Of the patients, 21 (41% reported hearing loss and 16 (31% failed the whisper test. A total of 37 patients (73% were referred for audiological assessment with 17 (33% found to have aidable hearing loss and 11 were fitted with hearing aids (22%. Discussion: This study highlights the high prevalence of occult hearing loss in elderly inpatients. Easy two-step screening can accurately identify patients with undiagnosed deafness resulting in significant proportions receiving hearing aids. Key sentences Approximately 14% of the elderly population use hearing aids despite a reported prevalence of deafness in up to 55%. The use of hearing aids is associated with an improvement in physical, emotional, mental and social well-being. An easy screening test for hearing loss consists of patient-reported hearing loss and a whisper test. Opportunistic screening of elderly inpatients resulted in referral of 73% of screened patients for formal audiology. Of the screened patients, 22% were provided with hearing aids.

  15. Prevalence of multimorbidity in medical inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Florian; Kaplan, Vladimir; Rodak, Roksana; Battegay, Edouard; Holzer, Barbara

    2012-03-09

    To validate the estimates of the prevalence of multimorbidity based on administrative hospital discharge data, with medical records and chart reviews as benchmarks. Retrospective cohort study. Medical division of a tertiary care teaching hospital. A total of 170 medical inpatients admitted from the emergency unit in January 2009. The prevalence of multimorbidity for three different definitions (≥2 diagnoses, ≥2 diagnoses from different ICD-10 chapters, and ≥2 medical conditions as defined by Charlson/Deyo) and three different data sources (administrative data, chart reviews, and medical records). The prevalence of multimorbidity in medical inpatients derived from administrative data, chart reviews and medical records was very high and concurred for the different definitions of multimorbidity (≥2 diagnoses: 96.5%, 95.3%, and 92.9% [p = 0.32], ≥2 diagnoses from different ICD-10 chapters: 86.5%, 90.0%, and 85.9% [p = 0.46], and ≥2 medical conditions as defined by Charlson/Deyo: 48.2%, 50.0%, and 46.5% [p = 0.81]). The agreement of rating of multimorbidity for administrative data and chart reviews and administrative data and medical records was 94.1% and 93.0% (kappa statistics 0.47) for ≥2 diagnoses; 86.0% and 86.5% (kappa statistics 0.52) for ≥2 diagnoses from different ICD-10 chapters; and 82.9% and 85.3% (kappa statistics 0.69) for ≥2 medical conditions as defined by Charlson/Deyo. Estimates of the prevalence of multimorbidity in medical inpatients based on administrative data, chart reviews and medical records were very high and congruent for the different definitions of multimorbidity. Agreement for rating multimorbidity based on the different data sources was moderate to good. Administrative hospital discharge data are a valid source for exploring the burden of multimorbidity in hospital settings.

  16. Effectiveness of nursing discharge planning interventions on health-related outcomes in discharged elderly inpatients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabire, Cedric; Dwyer, Andrew; Garnier, Antoine; Pellet, Joanie

    2016-09-01

    Inadequate discharge planning for the growing elderly population poses significant challenges for health services. Effective discharge planning interventions have been examined in several studies, but little information is available on nursing's role or the specific components of these interventions. Despite the research published on the importance of discharge planning, the impact on patient's health outcomes still needs to be proven in practice. To determine the best available evidence on the effectiveness of discharge planning interventions involving at least one nurse on health-related outcomes for elderly inpatients discharged home and to assess the relative impact of individual components of discharge planning interventions. Elderly inpatients aged 65 years or older, discharged from acute care and post-acute care rehabilitation hospitals to home. The review focused on the six keys components of Naylor's Transitional Care Model: early geriatric assessment, discharge preparation, patient or caregiver's participation, continuity of care, day of discharge assessment and post-discharge follow-up. This review considered randomized and non-randomized controlled trials, quasi-experimental studies, before and after studies, prospective and retrospective cohort studies, case-control studies and analytical cross-sectional studies. The outcomes for this review were functional ability, symptoms management, adverse outcomes, unmet needs after discharge, coping with disease, health-related quality of life (QoL), satisfaction with care, readmission rate and healthcare utilization. A systematic search was undertaken across 13 databases to retrieve published and unpublished studies in English between 2000 and 2015. Critical appraisal was undertaken by two independent reviewers using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute Meta-Analysis of Statistics Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-MAStARI). Quantitative data were extracted from

  17. Improving Inpatient Surveys: Web-Based Computer Adaptive Testing Accessed via Mobile Phone QR Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Tsair-Wei; Lin, Weir-Sen

    2016-03-02

    The National Health Service (NHS) 70-item inpatient questionnaire surveys inpatients on their perceptions of their hospitalization experience. However, it imposes more burden on the patient than other similar surveys. The literature shows that computerized adaptive testing (CAT) based on item response theory can help shorten the item length of a questionnaire without compromising its precision. Our aim was to investigate whether CAT can be (1) efficient with item reduction and (2) used with quick response (QR) codes scanned by mobile phones. After downloading the 2008 inpatient survey data from the Picker Institute Europe website and analyzing the difficulties of this 70-item questionnaire, we used an author-made Excel program using the Rasch partial credit model to simulate 1000 patients' true scores followed by a standard normal distribution. The CAT was compared to two other scenarios of answering all items (AAI) and the randomized selection method (RSM), as we investigated item length (efficiency) and measurement accuracy. The author-made Web-based CAT program for gathering patient feedback was effectively accessed from mobile phones by scanning the QR code. We found that the CAT can be more efficient for patients answering questions (ie, fewer items to respond to) than either AAI or RSM without compromising its measurement accuracy. A Web-based CAT inpatient survey accessed by scanning a QR code on a mobile phone was viable for gathering inpatient satisfaction responses. With advances in technology, patients can now be offered alternatives for providing feedback about hospitalization satisfaction. This Web-based CAT is a possible option in health care settings for reducing the number of survey items, as well as offering an innovative QR code access.

  18. Opinions of Nurses About the Evaluation of Risk of Falling Among Inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atay, Selma; Vurur, Sevda; Erdugan, Necla

    Patient falls and fall-related injuries are an important problem for patients, relatives, caregivers, and the health system at large. This study aims to identify opinions of nurses about the risk of falling among patients staying in hospitals. This study uses a qualitative descriptive design and employs a semistructured interview method to identify the opinions and experiences of nurses about patient falls. This study evaluated the opinions of a total of 12 staff nurses. It was found that nurses consider patients in the postoperative period to be most prone to falls. They think that most falls take place during transfers and that the medical diagnosis of the patient plays a crucial role in fall incidents. The most important problem associated with patient falls was symptoms of traumatic brain injury. According to the participating nurses, the risk of fall for every patient should be evaluated upon admission. Measures that the nurses take against patient falls include raising the bed's side rails and securing the bed brakes. The findings of this research suggest that in-service training programs about the evaluation of the risk of falling should be organized for nurses. Guidelines should be developed for patients with different levels of risk of falling. It is suggested that nurses should be in charge of training patients who are conscious, their relatives, and caregiver personnel. The training of nurses and caregivers helps to prevent the falls of inpatients.

  19. Data mining application in customer relationship management for hospital inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Whan

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to discover patients loyal to a hospital and model their medical service usage patterns. Consequently, this study proposes a data mining application in customer relationship management (CRM) for hospital inpatients. A recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) model has been applied toward 14,072 patients discharged from a university hospital. Cluster analysis was conducted to segment customers, and it modeled the patterns of the loyal customers' medical services usage via a decision tree. Patients were divided into two groups according to the variables of the RFM model and the group which had significantly high frequency of medical use and expenses was defined as loyal customers, a target market. As a result of the decision tree, the predictable factors of the loyal clients were; length of stay, certainty of selectable treatment, surgery, number of accompanying treatments, kind of patient room, and department from which they were discharged. Particularly, this research showed that when a patient within the internal medicine department who did not have surgery stayed for more than 13.5 days, their probability of being a classified as a loyal customer was 70.0%. To discover a hospital's loyal patients and model their medical usage patterns, the application of data-mining has been suggested. This paper suggests practical use of combining segmentation, targeting, positioning (STP) strategy and the RFM model with data-mining in CRM.

  20. Lapse and relapse following inpatient treatment of opiate dependence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, B P

    2010-06-01

    We conducted a prospective follow-up study of consecutive opiate dependent patients admitted to a residential addiction treatment service for detoxification. We measured the rate of relapse following discharge, and sought to identify factors that were associated with early relapse (i.e., a return to daily opiate use). Follow-up interviews were conducted with 109 patients, of whom, 99 (91%) reported a relapse. The initial relapse occurred within one week in 64 (59%) cases. Multivariate survival analysis revealed that earlier relapse was significantly predicted by younger age, greater heroin use prior to treatment, history of injecting, and a failure to enter aftercare. Unexpectedly, those who were in a relationship with an opiate user had significantly delayed relapse. Those who completed the entire six-week inpatient treatment programme also had a significantly delayed relapse. In order to reduce relapse and the associated increased risk of fatal overdose, services providing residential opiate detoxification should prepare people for admission, strive to retain them in treatment for the full admission period and actively support their entry into planned aftercare in order to improve outcome.

  1. Data Mining Application in Customer Relationship Management for Hospital Inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study aims to discover patients loyal to a hospital and model their medical service usage patterns. Consequently, this study proposes a data mining application in customer relationship management (CRM) for hospital inpatients. Methods A recency, frequency, monetary (RFM) model has been applied toward 14,072 patients discharged from a university hospital. Cluster analysis was conducted to segment customers, and it modeled the patterns of the loyal customers' medical services usage via a decision tree. Results Patients were divided into two groups according to the variables of the RFM model and the group which had significantly high frequency of medical use and expenses was defined as loyal customers, a target market. As a result of the decision tree, the predictable factors of the loyal clients were; length of stay, certainty of selectable treatment, surgery, number of accompanying treatments, kind of patient room, and department from which they were discharged. Particularly, this research showed that when a patient within the internal medicine department who did not have surgery stayed for more than 13.5 days, their probability of being a classified as a loyal customer was 70.0%. Conclusions To discover a hospital's loyal patients and model their medical usage patterns, the application of data-mining has been suggested. This paper suggests practical use of combining segmentation, targeting, positioning (STP) strategy and the RFM model with data-mining in CRM. PMID:23115740

  2. Agitation in the inpatient psychiatric setting: a review of clinical presentation, burden, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, Cheryl S; Bronstone, Amy; Koran, Lorrin M

    2011-05-01

    Agitation among psychiatric inpatients (particularly those diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder) is common and, unless recognized early and managed effectively, can rapidly escalate to potentially dangerous behaviors, including physical violence. Inpatient aggression and violence have substantial adverse psychological and physical consequences for both patients and providers, and they are costly to the healthcare system. In contrast to the commonly held view that inpatient violence occurs without warning or can be predicted by "static" risk factors, such as patient demographics or clinical characteristics, research indicates that violence is usually preceded by observable behaviors, especially non-violent agitation. When agitation is recognized, staff should employ nonpharmacological de-escalation strategies and, if the behavior continues, offer pharmacological treatment to calm patients rapidly. Given the poor therapeutic efficacy and potential for adverse events associated with physical restraint and seclusion, and the potential adverse sequelae of involuntary drug treatment, these interventions should be considered last resorts. Pharmacological agents used to treat agitation include benzodiazepines and first- and second-generation antipsychotic drugs. Although no currently available agent is ideal, recommendations for selecting among them are provided. There remains an unmet need for a non-invasive and rapidly acting agent that effectively calms without excessively sedating patients, addresses the patient's underlying psychiatric symptoms, and is reasonably safe and tolerable. A treatment with these characteristics could substantially reduce the clinical and economic burden of agitation in the inpatient psychiatric setting.

  3. The association between rehabilitation programs and metabolic syndrome in chronic inpatients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Lai, Chien-Liang; Chan, Hung-Yu

    2017-12-02

    The correlation between different rehabilitation programs and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in people with schizophrenia is unclear. We tested the association in chronic inpatients with schizophrenia of a psychiatric hospital in Taiwan. Patients with schizophrenia and age from 20 to 65 years old were included. The criteria of metabolic syndrome were according to the adapted Adult Treatment Protocol for Asians. According to different types of rehabilitations, patients were divided into work group, occupational therapy group and daily activities group. A total of 359 chronic inpatients with schizophrenia were recruited. Participants had a mean age of 45.9 years and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 37.3%. There was a significantly higher prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the work group than in the daily activity group (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 1.91, 95% CI = 1.019-3.564, p metabolic syndrome included old age, female gender, low psychotic symptoms severity and clozapine user. This study identified a high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in chronic inpatients with schizophrenia especially in patients with good occupational function. Further investigation of the relationship between the occupational function and metabolic syndrome is necessary for chronic inpatients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Orodental status and medical problems of stroke inpatients undergoing rehabilitation at a rehabilitation hospital in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahi, Yoshinao; Omichi, Shiro; Ono, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Many stroke patients may have oral problems and systemic diseases, but clinical information on treatment provided to stroke patients for dental problems during inpatient rehabilitation is rare. The objective of this study was to research stroke inpatients' requirements for dental treatment and the accompanying risks. We included 165 stroke patients undergoing inpatient rehabilitation at Morinomiya Hospital during the year 2010 and researched the causes of stroke and the patients' orodental status, underlying diseases, antithrombotic drugs prescribed and special considerations or difficulties in the treatment. Cerebral infarction was the most common causes of stroke. Many patients had hypertension, heart disease or diabetes mellitus, and 54.5% had been prescribed antithrombotic drugs. Dentists diagnosed 57.0% patients with untreated dental cavities. Approximately 30% did not use dentures despite having a requirement. In total, 142 patients underwent dental treatment including periodontal treatment, prosthetic treatment and tooth extraction under management of circulation and haemostasis such as monitoring vital signs and surgical splints in cases of the difficult extraction. The current study revealed a high requirement for dental treatment among stroke patients and demonstrated the effectiveness of performing dental treatment during inpatient rehabilitation of these patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Neuropediatrics: epidemiological features and etiologies at the Dakar neurology service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, M; Sene-Diouf, F; Diop, A G; Ndao, A K; Ndiaye, M M; Ndiaye, I P

    1999-01-01

    Child neurology is a relatively young speciality of neurosciences which is at the frontier of Neurology and Paediatrics. Its development has been impulsed by the diagnosis techniques such as Neurobiology, Genetics, Neuroimaging and pedo-psychology. We conducted a retrospective survey among the in-patients from January 1980 to December 1997 in the service of Neurology of the University Hospital. Have been included children ranged from 0 to 15 years old without any racial, sexual or origin distinctive. In Neurology Department, children of 0 to 15 years old represent 10.06% of the in-patients received from 1980 to 1997. The mortality rate was 9.23%. The diseases are dominated by epilepsy and infantile encephalopathies with 31.02%, infectious diseases with 19.36% represented by tuberculosis, other bacterial, viral and parasitical etiologies, tumors with 10.36%, vascular pathology and degenerative disorders.

  6. Psychiatric Boarding in the Pediatric Inpatient Medical Setting: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Katherine A S; Bujoreanu, I Simona; Cheung, Priscilla; Choi, Christine; Golden, Sara; Brodziak, Kerry; Andrade, Gabriela; Ibeziako, Patricia

    2017-08-01

    Psychiatric concerns are a common presenting problem for pediatric providers across many settings, particularly on inpatient medical services. The volume of youth requiring intensive psychiatric treatment outnumbers the availability of psychiatric placements, and as a result many youth must board on pediatric medical units while awaiting placement. As the phenomenon of boarding in the inpatient pediatric setting increases, it is important to understand trends in boarding volume and characteristics of pediatric psychiatric boarders (PBs) and understand the supports they receive while boarding. A retrospective chart review of patients admitted as PBs to a medical inpatient unit at a large northeastern US pediatric hospital during 2013. Four hundred thirty-seven PBs were admitted to the medical service from January to December 2013, representing a more than 50% increase from PB admissions in 2011 and 2012. Most PBs were admitted for suicidal attempt and/or ideation. Average length of boarding was 3.11 ± 3.34 days. PBs received a wide range of mental health supports throughout their admissions. PBs demonstrated modest but statistically significant clinical improvements over the course of their stay, with only a small proportion demonstrating clinical deterioration. Psychiatric boarding presents many challenges for families, providers, and the health care system, and PBs have complex psychiatric histories and needs. However, boarding may offer a valuable opportunity for psychiatric intervention and stabilization among psychiatrically vulnerable youth. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Alternative comorbidity adjustors for the Medicare inpatient psychiatric facility PPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozd, Edward M; Maier, Jan; Hales, Jan F; Thomas, Frederick G

    2008-01-01

    The inpatient psychiatric facility prospective payment system (IPF-PPS), provides per diem payments for psychiatric hospitals and units, including 17 comorbid condition payment adjustors that cover 11 percent of patients. This study identifies an alternative set of 16 adjustors identifying three times as many high-cost patients and evaluates the improved predictive power in log per diem cost regression models. A model using the IPF-PPS adjustors achieved 8.8 percent of the feasible improvement from a no-adjustor baseline, while the alternative adjustors achieved 22.1 percent of the feasible improvement. The current adjustors may therefore be too restrictive, resulting in systematic over- or underpayment for many patients.

  8. Teaching Nursing Leadership: Comparison of Simulation versus Traditional Inpatient Clinical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Teresa N; Johnson, Tanya Looney; Wang, Chih-hsuan

    2015-04-30

    Nurse educators claim accountability to ensure their students are prepared to assume leadership responsibilities upon graduation. Although front-line nurse leaders and nurse executives feel new graduates are not adequately prepared to take on basic leadership roles, professional nursing organizations such as the American Nurses Association (ANA) and the Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) deem leadership skills are core competencies of new graduate nurses. This study includes comparison of a leadership-focused multi-patient simulation and the traditional leadership clinical experiences in a baccalaureate nursing leadership course. The results of this research show both environments contribute to student learning. There was no statistical difference in the overall score. Students perceived a statistically significant difference in communication with patients in the traditional inpatient environment. However, the students perceived a statistical significant difference in teaching-learning dyad toward simulation.

  9. WOM Effectiveness in Improving the Purchasing Behavior: Comparative Study on the Private Hospitals Inpatients in Jordan and Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyad A. Al-Nsour

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at determining the effectiveness of WOM in improving the decision to select the suitable hospital for treatment during the stages of purchase, as well as determining the statistical differences of the sample perception of WOM effectiveness according to WOM sources, and the personal factors for inpatients in both Jordan and Saudi Arabia. The study population consisted of all inpatients in private hospitals in Jordan and Saudi Arabia estimated at 137.6 and 554.9 thousand inpatients respectively in 2015. The sample has been selected from the inpatients in Amman and Riyadh cities, which are 387 for each market; 387 were analyzed, and simple random sample was used. The study showed that there is a statistical impact of WOM on improving the purchasing behavior to select the suitable hospital in countries of comparison, and also showed that there are no statistical differences in sample perception for WOM effectiveness according to WOM sources, and the personal factors of inpatients in Jordan and Saudi Arabia. Finally, the study recommended a set of suggestions that enhance the WOM in the marketing communications strategy in the service institutions in general, and private hospitals in particular.

  10. A Way to Understand Inpatients Based on the Electronic Medical Records in the Big Data Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyi Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, information technology in healthcare, such as Electronic Medical Record (EMR system, is potential to improve service quality and cost efficiency of the hospital. The continuous use of EMR systems has generated a great amount of data. However, hospitals tend to use these data to report their operational efficiency rather than to understand their patients. Base on a dataset of inpatients’ medical records from a Chinese general public hospital, this study applies a configuration analysis from a managerial perspective and explains inpatients management in a different way. Four inpatient configurations (valued patients, managed patients, normal patients, and potential patients are identified by the measure of the length of stay and the total hospital cost. The implications of the finding are discussed.

  11. Inpatient migration patterns in persons with spinal cord injury: A registry study with hospital discharge data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Ronca

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated and compared patient migration patterns of persons with spinal cord injury, the general population and persons with morbid obesity, rheumatic conditions and bowel disease, for secondary health conditions, across administrative boundaries in Switzerland. The effects of patient characteristics and health conditions on visiting hospitals outside the residential canton were examined using complete, nationwide, inpatient health records for the years 2010 and 2011. Patients with spinal cord injury were more likely to obtain treatment outside their residential canton as compared to all other conditions. Facilitators of patient migration in persons with spinal cord injury and the general hospital population were private or accidental health insurances covering costs. Barriers of patient migration in persons with spinal cord injury were old age, severe multimorbidity, financial coverage by basic health insurance, and minority language region. Keywords: Spinal cord injury, Patient migration, Health services accessibility, Health care utilization, Inpatient hospital care

  12. Drug administration errors in hospital inpatients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdot, Sarah; Gillaizeau, Florence; Caruba, Thibaut; Prognon, Patrice; Durieux, Pierre; Sabatier, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Drug administration in the hospital setting is the last barrier before a possible error reaches the patient. We aimed to analyze the prevalence and nature of administration error rate detected by the observation method. Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library from 1966 to December 2011 and reference lists of included studies. Observational studies, cross-sectional studies, before-and-after studies, and randomized controlled trials that measured the rate of administration errors in inpatients were included. Two reviewers (senior pharmacists) independently identified studies for inclusion. One reviewer extracted the data; the second reviewer checked the data. The main outcome was the error rate calculated as being the number of errors without wrong time errors divided by the Total Opportunity for Errors (TOE, sum of the total number of doses ordered plus the unordered doses given), and multiplied by 100. For studies that reported it, clinical impact was reclassified into four categories from fatal to minor or no impact. Due to a large heterogeneity, results were expressed as median values (interquartile range, IQR), according to their study design. Among 2088 studies, a total of 52 reported TOE. Most of the studies were cross-sectional studies (N=46). The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was 10.5% [IQR: 7.3%-21.7%]. No fatal error was observed and most errors were classified as minor in the 18 studies in which clinical impact was analyzed. We did not find any evidence of publication bias. Administration errors are frequent among inpatients. The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was about 10%. A standardization of administration error rate using the same denominator (TOE), numerator and types of errors is essential for further publications.

  13. Drug Administration Errors in Hospital Inpatients: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdot, Sarah; Gillaizeau, Florence; Caruba, Thibaut; Prognon, Patrice; Durieux, Pierre; Sabatier, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    Context Drug administration in the hospital setting is the last barrier before a possible error reaches the patient. Objectives We aimed to analyze the prevalence and nature of administration error rate detected by the observation method. Data Sources Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library from 1966 to December 2011 and reference lists of included studies. Study Selection Observational studies, cross-sectional studies, before-and-after studies, and randomized controlled trials that measured the rate of administration errors in inpatients were included. Data Extraction Two reviewers (senior pharmacists) independently identified studies for inclusion. One reviewer extracted the data; the second reviewer checked the data. The main outcome was the error rate calculated as being the number of errors without wrong time errors divided by the Total Opportunity for Errors (TOE, sum of the total number of doses ordered plus the unordered doses given), and multiplied by 100. For studies that reported it, clinical impact was reclassified into four categories from fatal to minor or no impact. Due to a large heterogeneity, results were expressed as median values (interquartile range, IQR), according to their study design. Results Among 2088 studies, a total of 52 reported TOE. Most of the studies were cross-sectional studies (N=46). The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was 10.5% [IQR: 7.3%-21.7%]. No fatal error was observed and most errors were classified as minor in the 18 studies in which clinical impact was analyzed. We did not find any evidence of publication bias. Conclusions Administration errors are frequent among inpatients. The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was about 10%. A standardization of administration error rate using the same denominator (TOE), numerator and types of errors is essential for further publications. PMID:23818992

  14. Drug administration errors in hospital inpatients: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Berdot

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Drug administration in the hospital setting is the last barrier before a possible error reaches the patient. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to analyze the prevalence and nature of administration error rate detected by the observation method. DATA SOURCES: Embase, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library from 1966 to December 2011 and reference lists of included studies. STUDY SELECTION: Observational studies, cross-sectional studies, before-and-after studies, and randomized controlled trials that measured the rate of administration errors in inpatients were included. DATA EXTRACTION: Two reviewers (senior pharmacists independently identified studies for inclusion. One reviewer extracted the data; the second reviewer checked the data. The main outcome was the error rate calculated as being the number of errors without wrong time errors divided by the Total Opportunity for Errors (TOE, sum of the total number of doses ordered plus the unordered doses given, and multiplied by 100. For studies that reported it, clinical impact was reclassified into four categories from fatal to minor or no impact. Due to a large heterogeneity, results were expressed as median values (interquartile range, IQR, according to their study design. RESULTS: Among 2088 studies, a total of 52 reported TOE. Most of the studies were cross-sectional studies (N=46. The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was 10.5% [IQR: 7.3%-21.7%]. No fatal error was observed and most errors were classified as minor in the 18 studies in which clinical impact was analyzed. We did not find any evidence of publication bias. CONCLUSIONS: Administration errors are frequent among inpatients. The median error rate without wrong time errors for the cross-sectional studies using TOE was about 10%. A standardization of administration error rate using the same denominator (TOE, numerator and types of errors is essential for further publications.

  15. The prediction of discharge from in-patient psychiatric rehabilitation: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mountain Debbie A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At any time, about 1% of people with severe and enduring mental illness such as schizophrenia require in-patient psychiatric rehabilitation. In-patient rehabilitation enables individuals with the most challenging difficulties to be discharged to successful and stable community living. However, the length of rehabilitation admission that is required is highly variable and the reasons for this are poorly understood. There are very few case-control studies of predictors of outcome following hospitalisation. None have been carried out for in-patient rehabilitation. We aimed to identify the factors that are associated with achieving discharge from in-patient rehabilitation by carrying out a case-control study. Methods We compared two groups: 34 people who were admitted to the Rehabilitation Service at the Royal Edinburgh Hospital and discharged within a six year study period, and 31 people who were admitted in the same period, but not discharged. We compared the groups on demographic, illness, treatment and risk variables that were present at the point of their admission to rehabilitation. We used independent t tests and Pearson Chi-Square tests to compare the two groups. Results We found that serious self harm and suicide attempts, treatment with high dose antipsychotics, antipsychotic polypharmacy and previous care in forensic psychiatric services were all significantly associated with non-discharge. The non-discharged group were admitted significantly later in the six year study period and had already spent significantly longer in hospital. People who were admitted to rehabilitation within the first ten years of developing psychosis were more likely to have achieved discharge. Conclusions People admitted later in the study period required longer rehabilitation admissions and had higher rates of serious self harm and treatment resistant illness. They were also more likely to have had previous contact with forensic services. This

  16. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and Fiscal Year 2014 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; hospital conditions of participation; payment policies related to patient status. Final rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    administration of vaccines by nursing staff as well as the CoPs for critical access hospitals relating to the provision of acute care inpatient services. We are finalizing proposals issued in two separate proposed rules that included payment policies related to patient status: payment of Medicare Part B inpatient services; and admission and medical review criteria for payment of hospital inpatient services under Medicare Part A.

  17. Outcome of a 4-step treatment algorithm for depressed inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birkenhäger, T.K.; Broek, W.W. van den; Moleman, P.; Bruijn, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the efficacy and the feasibility of a 4-step treatment algorithm for inpatients with major depressive disorder. Method: Depressed inpatients, meeting DSM-IV criteria for major depressive disorder, were enrolled in the algorithm that consisted of

  18. A Policy Analysis: Military Medical Treatment Facility Contingency Inpatient Expansion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalamaras, Jr, Peter

    2005-01-01

    .... Based on size, structure, logistic complexity, and environmental uncertainty, the study concludes that inpatient expansion is not an effective component of the overall sourcing strategy. The study provides AMEDD executives with an evidenced-based assessment to consider revising the graduated response to provide inpatient care for the Nation's returning wounded.

  19. Survey on knowledge and attitudes regarding diabetic in-patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Doctors and nurses taking care of diabetic inpatients were surveyed to assess their knowledge of diabetes inpatient management and their attitudes towards diabetic patients. The survey made use of the diabetes knowledge questionnaire (O'Brien) and the DAS3 scale. Results. The survey group comprised 115 health care ...

  20. The inpatient economic and mortality impact of hepatocellular carcinoma from 2005 to 2009: analysis of the US nationwide inpatient sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Alita; Otgonsuren, Munkhzul; Venkatesan, Chapy; Afendy, Mariam; Erario, Madeline; Younossi, Zobair M

    2013-09-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an important complication of cirrhosis. Our aim was to assess the inpatient economic and mortality of HCC in the USA METHODS: Five cycles of Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) conducted from 2005 to 2009 were used. Demographics, inpatient mortality, severity of illness, payer type, length of stay (LoS) and charges were available. Changes and associated factors related to inpatient HCC were assessed using simple linear regression. Odds ratios and 95% CIs for hospital mortality were analysed using log-linked regression model. To estimate the sampling variances for complex survey data, we used Taylor series approach. SAS(®) v.9.3 was used for statistical analysis. From 2005 to 2009, 32,697,993 inpatient cases were reported to NIS. During these 5 years, primary diagnosis of HCC increased from 4401 (2005), 4170 (2006), 5065 (2007), 6540 (2008) to 6364 (2009). HCC as any diagnosis increased from 68 per 100,000 discharges (2005) to 99 per 100,000 (2009). However, inpatient mortality associated with HCC decreased from 12% (2005) to 10% (2009) (P inflation-adjusted charges at the time of discharge increased from $29,466 per case (2005) to $31,656 per case (2009). Total national HCC charges rose from $1.0 billion (2005) to $2.0 billion (2009). In multivariate analysis, hospital characteristic was independently associated with decreasing in-hospital mortality (all P < 0.05). Liver transplantation for HCC was the main contributor to high inpatient charges. Longer LoS and other procedures also contributed to higher inpatient charges. There is an increase in the number of inpatient cases of HCC. Although inpatient mortality is decreasing and the LoS is stable, the inpatient charges associated with HCC continue to increase. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Does English proficiency impact on health outcomes for inpatients undergoing stroke rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Sarah E; Dodd, Karen J; Tu, April; Zucchi, Emiliano; Zen, Stefania; Hill, Keith D

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether English proficiency and/or the frequency of interpreter use impacts on health outcomes for inpatient stroke rehabilitation. Retrospective case-control study. People admitted for inpatient stroke rehabilitation. A high English proficiency group comprised people with native or near native English proficiency (n = 80), and a low English proficiency group comprised people who preferred a language other than English (n = 80). Length of stay (LOS), discharge destination and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). The low English proficiency group showed a greater improvement in FIM from admission to discharge (p = 0.04). No significant differences were found between groups in LOS, discharge destination and number of encounters with allied health professionals. Increased interpreter usage improved FIM efficiency but did not significantly alter other outcomes. English proficiency does not appear to impact on health outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation with a primarily in-house professional interpreter service. However, there is a need for a larger powered study to confirm these findings. Implications for rehabilitation People with low English proficiency undergoing inpatient stroke rehabilitation in a setting with a primarily in-house professional interpreter service, achieved similar outcomes to those with high English proficiency irrespective of frequency of interpreter usage. A non-significant increase of 4 days length of stay was observed in the low English proficiency group compared to the high English proficiency group. For patients with low English proficiency, greater change in Functional Independence Measure efficiency scores was observed for those with higher levels of interpreter use relative to those with low interpreter use. Clinicians should optimise use of interpreters with patients with low English proficiency when possible.

  2. Inpatient care of the elderly in Brazil and India: Assessing social inequalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, Andrew Amos; Andrade, Monica Viegas; Noronha, Kenya; Leone, Tiziana; Dilip, T.R.

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly growing older adult populations in Brazil and India present major challenges for health systems in these countries, especially with regard to the equitable provision of inpatient care. The objective of this study was to contrast inequalities in both the receipt of inpatient care and the length of time that care was received among adults aged over 60 in two large countries with different modes of health service delivery. Using the Brazilian National Household Survey from 2003 and the Indian National Sample Survey Organisation survey from 2004 inequalities by wealth (measured by income in Brazil and consumption in India) were assessed using concentration curves and indices. Inequalities were also examined through the use of zero-truncated negative binomial models, studying differences in receipt of care and length of stay by region, health insurance, education and reported health status. Results indicated that there was no evidence of inequality in Brazil for both receipt and length of stay by income per capita. However, in India there was a pro-rich bias in the receipt of care, although once care was received there was no difference by consumption per capita for the length of stay. In both countries the higher educated and those with health insurance were more likely to receive care, while the higher educated had longer stays in hospital in Brazil. The health system reforms that have been undertaken in Brazil could be credited as a driver for reducing healthcare inequalities amongst the elderly, while the significant differences by wealth in India shows that reform is still needed to ensure the poor have access to inpatient care. Health reforms that move towards a more public funding model of service delivery in India may reduce inequality in elderly inpatient care in the country. PMID:23041128

  3. Drug and alcohol abuse inpatients' attitudes about smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, L M; Seidner, A L; Burling, T A; Thomas, R G; Brenner, G F

    1994-01-01

    Attitudes about quitting cigarette smoking were assessed at admission to a substance abuse treatment program for homeless veterans. The majority were interested in quitting smoking, believed that inpatient drug/alcohol treatment was the best time to quit, and that quitting would not threaten their sobriety. Using cluster analysis, four subgroups of inpatients with different levels of interest, confidence, and motivation regarding quitting smoking were identified. Our inpatients' positive attitudes about quitting smoking stand in contrast with previously reported attitudes of many health professionals, and suggest that inpatient treatment could be an opportune time to provide stop-smoking interventions. Findings also suggest that different treatment approaches may be needed for subgroups of inpatients with varying attitudes about quitting.

  4. Frequency and risk factors of renal insufficiency in inflammatory bowel disease inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brian; Mukewar, Saurabh; Lopez, Rocio; Brzezinski, Aaron; Hall, Philip; Shen, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Renal involvement in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been well documented. However, there was a paucity of data on the frequency of renal insufficiency and its risk factors in this patient population. The aim of the study was to determine the frequency and factors associated with renal insufficiency within IBD inpatients. This case-control study was conducted on both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis inpatients in our tertiary care center from 2009 to 2010. Patients were identified as having renal insufficiency by the criterion of glomerular filtration rate renal insufficiency were evaluated by univariable and multivariable analyses. A total of 251 eligible patients were included. The frequency of renal insufficiency was 15.9% (95% confidence interval: 11.4-20.5), with 40 patients having a glomerular filtration rate renal insufficiency increased by 30%. Acute or chronic renal sufficiency in IBD inpatients was common, especially in elderly. Acute renal insufficiency can be medically reversed if properly treated. We recommend that renal function be closely monitored in IBD inpatients.

  5. Factors affecting staff morale on inpatient mental health wards in England: a qualitative investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Moli

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Good morale among staff on inpatient psychiatric wards is an important requirement for the maintenance of strong therapeutic alliances and positive patient experiences, and for the successful implementation of initiatives to improve care. More understanding is needed of mechanisms underlying good and poor morale. Method We conducted individual and group interviews with staff of a full range of disciplines and levels of seniority on seven NHS in-patient wards of varying types in England. Results Inpatient staff feel sustained in their potentially stressful roles by mutual loyalty and trust within cohesive ward teams. Clear roles, supportive ward managers and well designed organisational procedures and structures maintain good morale. Perceived threats to good morale include staffing levels that are insufficient for staff to feel safe and able to spend time with patients, the high risk of violence, and lack of voice in the wider organisation. Conclusions Increasing employee voice, designing jobs so as to maximise autonomy within clear and well-structured operational protocols, promoting greater staff-patient contact and improving responses to violence may contribute more to inpatient staff morale than formal support mechanisms.

  6. Caregiver availability for severe stroke results in improved functional ability at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirkowski, Magdalena; Pereira, Shelialah; Janzen, Shannon; Mehta, Swati; Meyer, Matthew; McClure, Andrew; Speechley, Mark; Teasell, Robert

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the predictive capacity of caregiver availability on functional ability at time of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation in individuals with severe first-time stroke. A retrospective chart review was conducted of severe stroke inpatients admitted to a stroke rehabilitation unit between April 2005 and December 2009. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with patients to determine caregiver availability at time of discharge. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was performed to assess the predictive capacity of caregiver availability on functional ability at discharge from an inpatient rehabilitation unit after controlling for covariates. Data from 180 individuals were included in the analysis. Individuals with a caregiver had significantly higher levels of functional ability at discharge compared to those without (85.8 ± 23.6 versus 72.9 ± 20.3; p availability explained 1.3% of additional variance, with the final model explaining 41.3% of total variance for functional ability at discharge (F (5,174) = 26.21, p availability of a caregiver at time of discharge from inpatient rehabilitation is predictive of improved functional ability at discharge in individuals with severe stroke. The presence of an available caregiver positively influences the functional recovery of individuals with severe stroke and may be an important element to successful rehabilitation.

  7. Research of Medical Expenditure among Inpatients with Unstable Angina Pectoris in a Single Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suo-Wei; Pan, Qi; Chen, Tong; Wei, Liang-Yu; Xuan, Yong; Wang, Qin; Li, Chao; Song, Jing-Chen

    2017-07-05

    With the rising incidence as well as the medical expenditure among patients with unstable angina pectoris, the research aimed to investigate the inpatient medical expenditure through the combination of diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) among patients with unstable angina pectoris in a Grade A tertiary hospital to conduct the referential standards of medical costs for the diagnosis. Single-factor analysis and multiple linear stepwise regression method were used to investigate 3933 cases between 2014 and 2016 in Beijing Hospital (China) whose main diagnosis was defined as unstable angina pectoris to determine the main factors influencing the inpatient medical expenditure, and decision tree method was adopted to establish the model of DRGs grouping combinations. The major influential factors of inpatient medical expenditure included age, operative method, therapeutic effects as well as comorbidity and complications (CCs) of the disease, and the 3933 cases were divided into ten DRGs by four factors: age, CCs, therapeutic effects, and the type of surgery with corresponding inpatient medical expenditure standards setup. Data of nonparametric test on medical costs among different groups were all significant (P unstable angina pectoris is conducive in standardizing the diagnosis and treatment behaviors of the hospital and reducing economic burdens among patients.

  8. Differences in aerobic fitness between inpatients and outpatients with severe mental disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Daae-Qvale Holmemo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackgroundPatients with severe mental disorders have increased mortality, and cardiovascular disease (CVD accounts for a large part. Physical inactivity and low aerobic fitness have been recognized as significant risk factors for CVD. In this study, we investigated the differences in aerobic fitness and physical activity between in- and outpatients with severe mental disorders. Method and subjectsFifty in- and outpatients from a regional psychiatric department were included. The patients filled in a questionnaire on physical activity and completed a clinical examination. An estimation of aerobic fitness was calculated for each patient, using gender, age, waist circumference, resting heart rate and physical activity level as variables.ResultsInpatients had lower estimated aerobic fitness than outpatients (VO₂peak 42 vs 50 mL•kg-1•min-1, p<0.001. Compared to population data matched for age and gender, inpatients had lower aerobic fitness, while outpatients were not different from the population average.ConclusionInpatients at a psychiatric department had lower estimated aerobic fitness than outpatients, and a lower aerobic fitness compared to the general population. Our findings suggest that inpatients with severe mental disorders should be considered a high risk group for CVD.

  9. Implementing and evaluating a multicomponent inpatient diabetes management program: putting research into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Miguel; Pronovost, Peter; Dintzis, Joanne; Kemmerer, Theresa; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Chang, Yi-Ting; Efird, Leigh; Berenholtz, Sean M; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2012-05-01

    Strategies for successful implementation of hospitalwide glucose control efforts were addressed in a conceptual model for the development and implementation of an institutional inpatient glucose management program. CONCEPTUAL MODEL COMPONENTS: The Glucose Steering Committee incrementally developed and implemented hospitalwide glucose policies, coupled with targeted education and clinical decision support to facilitate policy acceptance and uptake by staffwhile incorporating process and outcome measures to objectively assess the effectiveness of quality improvement efforts. The model includes four components: (1) engaging staff and hospital executives in the importance of inpatient glycemic management, (2) educating staff involved in the care of patients with diabetes through structured knowledge dissemination, (3) executing evidence-based inpatient glucose management through development of policies and clinical decision aids, and (4) evaluating intervention effectiveness through assessing process measures, intermediary glucometric outcomes, and clinical and economic outcomes. An educational curriculum for nursing, provider, and pharmacist diabetes education programs and current glucometrics were also developed. Overall the average patient-day-weighted mean blood glucose (PDWMBG) was below the currently recommended maximum of 180 mg/dL in patients with diabetes and hyperglycemia, with a significant decrease in PDWMBG of 7.8 mg/dL in patients with hyperglycemia. The program resulted in an 18.8% reduction in hypoglycemia event rates, which was sustained. Inpatient glucose management remains an important area for patient safety, quality improvement, and clinical research, and the implementation model should guide other hospitals in their glucose management initiatives.

  10. Inpatient falls in older adults: a cohort study of antihypertensive prescribing pre- and post-fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, H M R B; Hodson, J; Pontefract, S K; Martin, U

    2018-02-23

    Falls are common during hospital admissions and may occur more frequently in patients who are taking antihypertensive medications, particularly in the context of normal to low blood pressure. The review and adjustment of these medications is an essential aspect of the post-fall assessment and should take place as soon as possible after the fall. Our aim was to investigate whether appropriate post-fall adjustments of antihypertensive medications are routinely made in a large National Health Service (NHS) Trust. Inpatient records over an eight-month period were captured from an electronic prescribing system to identify older adults (≥80 years old) with normal/low blood pressures (fall as these patients were considered to be at high risk of further falls. Prescribed antihypertensive medication on admission was then compared with the post-fall (within 24 h after the fall) and discharge prescriptions. A total of 146 patients were included in the analysis. Of those, 120 patients (82%) were taking the same number of antihypertensive medications in the 24 h after the fall as they were before; only 19 patients (13%) had a reduction in the number of medications and seven patients (5%) had an increase in medications during that period. Only 9% of the antihypertensive classes assessed were either stopped or reduced in dose immediately post-fall. In addition, 11 new antihypertensives were prescribed at this time. At discharge, half of the patients (n = 73) remained on the same number of antihypertensive medication as on admission, 51 patients (35%) were on fewer antihypertensives and 22 (15%) were on more. Additionally, no changes were made to individual antihypertensives in 49% of prescriptions; 34% were stopped or reduced in dose but 38 new agents were started by the time of discharge. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ACEi/ARB) were the class of medications most commonly stopped or reduced (51%). Antihypertensive

  11. An Automated Inpatient Split-dose Bowel Preparation System Improves Colonoscopy Quality and Reduces Repeat Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadlapati, Rena; Johnston, Elyse R; Gluskin, Adam B; Gregory, Dyanna L; Cyrus, Rachel; Werth, Lindsay; Ciolino, Jody D; Grande, David P; Keswani, Rajesh N

    2017-07-19

    Inpatient colonoscopy preparations are often inadequate, compromising patient safety and procedure quality, while resulting in greater hospital costs. The aims of this study were to: (1) design and implement an electronic inpatient split-dose bowel preparation order set; (2) assess the intervention's impact upon preparation adequacy, repeated colonoscopies, hospital days, and costs. We conducted a single center prospective pragmatic quasiexperimental study of hospitalized adults undergoing colonoscopy. The experimental intervention was designed using DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, and control) methodology. Prospective data collected over 12 months were compared with data from a historical preintervention cohort. The primary outcome was bowel preparation quality and secondary outcomes included number of repeated procedures, hospital days, and costs. On the basis of a Delphi method and DMAIC process, we created an electronic inpatient bowel preparation order set inclusive of a split-dose bowel preparation algorithm, automated orders for rescue medications, and nursing bowel preparation checks. The analysis data set included 969 patients, 445 (46%) in the postintervention group. The adequacy of bowel preparation significantly increased following intervention (86% vs. 43%; P2.0% vs. 4.6%; P=0.03). Mean hospital days from bowel preparation initiation to discharge decreased from 8.0 to 6.9 days (P=0.02). The intervention resulted in an estimated 1-year cost-savings of $46,076 based on a reduction in excess hospital days associated with repeated and delayed procedures. Our interdisciplinary initiative targeting inpatient colonoscopy preparations significantly improved quality and reduced repeat procedures, and hospital days. Other institutions should consider utilizing this framework to improve inpatient colonoscopy value.

  12. A randomised controlled trial linking mental health inpatients to community smoking cessation supports: A study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clancy Richard

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental health inpatients smoke at higher rates than the general population and are disproportionately affected by tobacco dependence. Despite the advent of smoke free policies within mental health hospitals, limited systems are in place to support a cessation attempt post hospitalisation, and international evidence suggests that most smokers return to pre-admission smoking levels following discharge. This protocol describes a randomised controlled trial that will test the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of linking inpatient smoking care with ongoing community cessation support for smokers with a mental illness. Methods/Design This study will be conducted as a randomised controlled trial. 200 smokers with an acute mental illness will be recruited from a large inpatient mental health facility. Participants will complete a baseline survey and will be randomised to either a multimodal smoking cessation intervention or provided with hospital smoking care only. Randomisation will be stratified by diagnosis (psychotic, non-psychotic. Intervention participants will be provided with a brief motivational interview in the inpatient setting and options of ongoing smoking cessation support post discharge: nicotine replacement therapy (NRT; referral to Quitline; smoking cessation groups; and fortnightly telephone support. Outcome data, including cigarettes smoked per day, quit attempts, and self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence (validated by exhaled carbon monoxide, will be collected via blind interview at one week, two months, four months and six months post discharge. Process information will also be collected, including the use of cessation supports and cost of the intervention. Discussion This study will provide comprehensive data on the potential of an integrated, multimodal smoking cessation intervention for persons with an acute mental illness, linking inpatient with community cessation support. Trial Registration

  13. Herbal medicine use and linked suspected adverse drug reactions in a prospective cohort of Ugandan inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiguba, Ronald; Ononge, Sam; Karamagi, Charles; Bird, Sheila M

    2016-05-26

    Clinical history-taking can be employed as a standardized approach to elucidate the use of herbal medicines and their linked suspected adverse drug reactions (ADRs) among hospitalized patients. We sought to identify herbal medicines nominated by Ugandan inpatients; compare nomination rates by ward and gender; confirm the herbs' known pharmacological properties from published literature; and identify ADRs linked to pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Prospective cohort of consented adult inpatients designed to assess medication use and ADRs on one gynaecological and three medical wards of 1790-bed Mulago National Referral Hospital. Baseline and follow-up data were obtained on patients' characteristics, including pre-admission use of herbal medicines. Fourteen percent (26/191) of females in Gynaecology nominated at least one specific herbal medicine compared with 20 % (114/571) of inpatients on medical wards [20 % (69/343) of females; 20 % (45/228) of males]. Frequent nominations were Persea americana (30), Mumbwa/multiple-herb clay rods (23), Aloe barbadensis (22), Beta vulgaris (12), Vernonia amygdalina (11), Commelina africana (7), Bidens pilosa (7), Hoslundia opposita (6), Mangifera indica (4), and Dicliptera laxata (4). Four inpatients experienced 10 suspected ADRs linked to pre-admission herbal medicine use including Commelina africana (4), multiple-herb-mumbwa (1), or unspecified local-herbs (5): three ADR-cases were abortion-related and one kidney-related. The named herbal medicines and their nomination rates generally differed by specialized ward, probably guided by local folklore knowledge of their use. Clinical elicitation from inpatients can generate valuable safety data on herbal medicine use. However, larger routine studies might increase the utility of our method to assess herbal medicine use and detect herb-linked ADRs. Future studies should take testable samples of ADR-implicated herbal medicines for further analysis.

  14. Involvement of the multidisciplinary team and outcomes in inpatient rehabilitation among patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, Till; Bjørneboe, Olav; Krøll, Frode; Palm, Øyvind; Olsen, Inge Christoffer; Grotle, Margreth

    2016-01-13

    The last decades have for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases seen a shift towards more physically active rehabilitation programs, often provided as out-patients with less use of inpatient facilities. There is little research on which effect the multidisciplinary team has on health outcomes for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and connective tissue disease. This study examined patient reported outcomes for patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases receiving rehabilitation care as inpatients in departments of rheumatology, and studied how number of consultations with the multidisciplinary team affected these clinical outcomes. Patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases were included in a multi-center prospective observational study if rehabilitation was considered a focus during an inpatient stay at four departments of rheumatology. At admission, discharge, and after 3 and 6 months, 317 patients were assessed with patients reported outcomes (PRO) including health assessment questionnaire (HAQ), short-form 36 (SF-36), pain, fatigue, patient global assessment of disease activity, self-efficacy scales, rheumatoid arthritis disease activity index (RADAI), and SF-6D utility. Patients stated consultations with the multidisciplinary team. Improvements were short-lived, and at 6 months follow-up period only mental health, pain and utility remained improved with small effect sizes. Extensive involvement of health professionals was not associated with improved outcomes. Patients with inflammatory rheumatic disease receiving inpatient multidisciplinary rehabilitation had small and mainly short-term improvements in most PROs. High use of the multidisciplinary team did not enhance or preserve rehabilitation outcomes in inflammatory rheumatic conditions when admitted as inpatients.

  15. Effectiveness of a multimodal inpatient treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa in comparison with adults: an analysis of a specialized inpatient setting : treatment of adolescent and adult anorexics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naab, Silke; Schlegl, Sandra; Korte, Alexander; Heuser, Joerg; Fumi, Markus; Fichter, Manfred; Cuntz, Ulrich; Voderholzer, Ulrich

    2013-06-01

    There is evidence for an increased prevalence and an earlier onset of anorexia nervosa (AN) in adolescents. Early specialized treatment may improve prognosis and decrease the risk of a chronic course. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of a multimodal inpatient treatment for adolescent AN patients treated in a highly specialized eating disorder unit for adults. 177 adolescents and 1,064 adult patients were included. The evaluation focused on eating behavior, depressive symptoms and general psychopathology. All measured variables decreased significantly in both groups during inpatient treatment. No differences were found concerning weight gain, improvement of global eating disorder symptomatology as well as depressive symptoms. However, adults showed a higher psychological distress and in this regard also a greater improvement. Results indicate that treating adolescent AN patients in a highly specialized eating disorder unit for adults can be an effective treatment setting for these patients.

  16. The effect of an active on-ward participation of hospital pharmacists in Internal Medicine teams on preventable Adverse Drug Events in elderly inpatients: protocol of the WINGS study (Ward-oriented pharmacy in newly admitted geriatric seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dijkgraaf Marcel G

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The potential of clinical interventions, aiming at reduction of preventable Adverse Drug Events (preventable ADEs during hospital stay, have been studied extensively. Clinical Pharmacy is a well-established and effective service, usually consisting of full-time on-ward participation of clinical pharmacists in medical teams. Within the current Hospital Pharmacy organisation in the Netherlands, such on-ward service is less feasible and therefore not yet established. However, given the substantial incidence of preventable ADEs in Dutch hospitals found in recent studies, appears warranted. Therefore, "Ward-Oriented Pharmacy", an on-ward service tailored to the Dutch hospital setting, will be developed. This service will consist of multifaceted interventions implemented in the Internal Medicine wards by hospital pharmacists. The effect of this service on preventable ADEs in elderly inpatients will be measured. Elderly patients are at high risk for ADEs due to multi-morbidity, concomitant disabilities and polypharmacy. Most studies on the incidence and preventability of ADEs in elderly patients have been conducted in the outpatient setting or on admission to a hospital, and fewer in the inpatient setting. Moreover, recognition of ADEs by the treating physicians is challenging in elderly patients because their disease presentation is often atypical and complex. Detailed information about the performance of the treating physicians in ADE recognition is scarce. Methods/Design The design is a multi-centre, interrupted time series study. Patients of 65 years or older, consecutively admitted to Internal Medicine wards will be included. After a pre-measurement, a Ward-Oriented Pharmacy service will be introduced and the effect of this service will be assessed during a post-measurement. The primary outcome measures are the ADE prevalence on admission and ADE incidence during hospital stay. These outcomes will be assessed using structured

  17. Forensic mental health services: Current service provision and planning for a prison mental health service in the Eastern Cape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Sukeri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: No research data exists on forensic psychiatric service provision in the Eastern Cape, Republic of South Africa. The objective of this research was to assess current forensic psychiatric service provision and utilisation rates at Fort England Hospital. This is important in improving and strengthening the service. A related objective was to develop a model for a provincial prison mental health service. Methodology: This study is a situational analysis of an existing forensic psychiatric service in the Eastern Cape. The design of the study was cross sectional. An audit questionnaire was utilised to collate quantitative data, which was submitted to Fort England Hospital, Grahamstown. A proposed prison mental health service was developed utilising prevalence rates of mental illness among prisoners to calculate bed and staff requirements for an ambulatory and in-patient service. Results: During the study period a total of 403 remand detainees were admitted to the forensic psychiatry division of Fort England Hospital. The average length of stay was 494 days and the bed utilisation rate was determined at 203.54%. We estimate that to provide a provincial prison mental health service to treat psychotic illnesses and major depression the province requires a 52 bedded facility and a total staff complement of approximately 31. Conclusions: Forensic psychiatric services include the assessment, management and treatment of mentally disordered persons in conflict with the law and prisoners requiring psychiatric assessments. The Eastern Cape Province does not have plans or policies to assess and manage mentally ill offenders, resulting in an increased load on available services. We recommend that an inter-departmental task team, which includes Health, Justice and Constitutional Development and Correctional Services, should be established in the province, to develop a strategy to assist in the development of an effective and efficient forensic

  18. Review of literature on aftercare services among children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Stephanie S; Goldston, David B; Harris, Ashley E; Kelley, Arthur E; Palmes, Guy K

    2004-08-01

    Psychiatric hospital lengths of stay have decreased for children and adolescents, in part because of the presumption that aftercare services in the community are effective and accessible. This review critically examines the literature that pertains to the rates of aftercare service use, the effectiveness of aftercare services, and predictors of aftercare service use. Studies were selected on the basis of MEDLINE and PsychINFO computer searches, covering the period between January 1992 and August 2003. Reports that were selected (N=21) included data on outpatient aftercare service use among youths who were aged 18 years and younger and who were discharged from child and adolescent inpatient facilities. A majority of youths received aftercare services after hospitalization, but many youths and families were not fully compliant with aftercare recommendations. Many youths and families continued to receive services up to three months after hospitalization. The literature documents only a small amount of evidence about the effectiveness of aftercare services, but the evidence suggested that aftercare services for youths with substance use problems may have beneficial effects. Few studies examined predictors of aftercare service use and discontinuation, but previous recent mental health service use and decreased family dysfunction appeared to be related to aftercare service use.

  19. Electronic inpatient whiteboards: improving multidisciplinary communication and coordination of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Hannah J; Caesar, Michael; Bandali, Salim; Agnew, James; Abrams, Howard

    2009-04-01

    Effective and timely communication of information is essential for quality patient care. Information and communication technology tools have the potential to transform and enable health care processes to be more accurate, timely, and integrated. This study describes the development, implementation, and evaluation of an electronic whiteboard in a General Internal Medicine (GIM) inpatient unit of an acute care hospital. The development, implementation, and evaluation of the inpatient whiteboard included scope discussions, workflow analyses, communication and training, and issues and enhancement reporting, all managed through a central project team. Evaluation of the whiteboard was two-fold: a survey given to allied health, nursing and physician disciplines (n=120), and an audit performed on whiteboard usage. The whiteboard displays relevant, real-time patient information, in a single, highly visible, user-friendly display. With a quick glance at the whiteboard, one can get an accurate snapshot view of the current patient activity in the unit. Approximately 71% of survey participants believed that the whiteboard improves and standardizes communication within the care team. Further, approximately 62% of the participants agreed that the whiteboard saves them time when searching for information on a patient and their care plan. In addition, the whiteboard has had an impact on the work practices of many GIM care providers, and it along with its users has acted together as agents for positive change. Whiteboard utilization has significantly increased since its implementation. The success of the whiteboard is in part due to overall change management methodologies through collaborative development throughout the project development lifecycle and subsequent continuous improvement initiatives. The multidisciplinary care team embraced the tool, took ownership of it, and tailored it to meet their needs.

  20. Inpatient Hematology-Oncology Rotation Is Associated With a Decreased Interest in Pursuing an Oncology Career Among Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Daniel C; Holland, Jimmie; Holcombe, Randall F

    2015-07-01

    The demand for hematologists and oncologists is not being met. We hypothesized that an inpatient hematology-oncology ward rotation would increase residents' interest. Potential reasons mitigating interest were explored and included differences in physician distress, empathy, resilience, and patient death experiences. Agreement with the statement "I am interested in pursuing a career/fellowship in hematology and oncology" was rated by residents before and after a hematology-oncology rotation, with 0 = not true at all, 1 = rarely true, 2 = sometimes true, 3 = often true, and 4 = true nearly all the time. House staff rotating on a hematology-oncology service from November 2013 to October 2014 also received questionnaires before and after their rotations containing the Connors-Davidson Resilience Scale, the Impact of Events Scale-Revised, the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, demographic information, and number of dying patients cared for and if a sense of meaning was derived from that experience. Fifty-six residents completed both before- and after-rotation questionnaires (response rate, 58%). The mean interest score was 1.43 initially and decreased to 1.24 after the rotation (P = .301). Female residents' mean score was 1.13 initially and dropped to 0.81 after the rotation (P = .04). Male residents' mean score was 1.71 initially and 1.81 after the rotation (P = .65). Decreased hematology-oncology interest correlated with decreased empathy; male interest decrease correlated with decreased resilience. An inpatient hematology-oncology ward rotation does not lead to increased interest and, for some residents, may lead to decreased interest in the field. Encouraging outpatient hematology-oncology rotations and the cultivation of resilience, empathy, and meaning regarding death experiences may increase resident interest. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  1. Screening for older emergency department inpatients at risk of prolonged hospital stay: the brief geriatric assessment tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille P Launay

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were 1 to confirm that combinations of brief geriatric assessment (BGA items were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS among geriatric patients hospitalized in acute care medical units after their admission to the emergency department (ED; and 2 to determine whether these combinations of BGA items could be used as a prognostic tool of prolonged LHS.Based on a prospective observational cohort design, 1254 inpatients (mean age ± standard deviation, 84.9±5.9 years; 59.3% female recruited upon their admission to ED and discharged in acute care medical units of Angers University Hospital, France, were selected in this study. At baseline assessment, a BGA was performed and included the following 6 items: age ≥85years, male gender, polypharmacy (i.e., ≥5 drugs per day, use of home-help services, history of falls in previous 6 months and temporal disorientation (i.e., inability to give the month and/or year. The LHS in acute care medical units was prospectively calculated in number of days using the hospital registry.Area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves of prolonged LHS of different combinations of BGA items ranged from 0.50 to 0.57. Cox regression models revealed that combinations defining a high risk of prolonged LHS, identified from ROC curves, were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS (hazard ratio >1.16 with P>0.010. Kaplan-Meier distributions of discharge showed that inpatients classified in high-risk group of prolonged LHS were discharged later than those in low-risk group (P<0.003. Prognostic value for prolonged LHS of all combinations was poor with sensitivity under 77%, a high variation of specificity (from 26.6 to 97.4 and a low likelihood ratio of positive test under 5.6.Combinations of 6-item BGA tool were significant risk factors for prolonged LHS but their prognostic value was poor in the studied sample of older inpatients.

  2. Economic burden of inpatient and outpatient antibiotic treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus complicated skin and soft-tissue infections: a comparison of linezolid, vancomycin, and daptomycin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephens JM

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer M Stephens,1 Xin Gao,1 Dipen A Patel,1 Bram G Verheggen,2 Ahmed Shelbaya,3,5 Seema Haider4 1Pharmerit North America, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Pharmerit Europe, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; 3Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA; 4Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, USA; 5Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, NY, USA Background: Previous economic analyses evaluating treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTI failed to include all direct treatment costs such as outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT. Our objective was to develop an economic model from a US payer perspective that includes all direct inpatient and outpatient costs incurred by patients with MRSA cSSTI receiving linezolid, vancomycin, or daptomycin. Methods: A 4-week decision model was developed for this economic analysis. Published literature and database analyses with validation by experts provided clinical, resource use, and cost inputs on data such as efficacy rate, length of stay, adverse events, and OPAT services. Base-case analysis assumed equal efficacy and equal length of stay for treatments. We conducted several sensitivity analyses where assumptions on resource use or efficacy were varied. Costs were reported in year-end 2011 US dollars. Results: Total treatment costs in the base-case were lower for linezolid ($10,571 than vancomycin ($11,096, and daptomycin ($13,612. Inpatient treatment costs were $740 more, but outpatient costs, $1,266 less with linezolid than vancomycin therapy due to a switch to oral linezolid when the patient was discharged. Compared with daptomycin, both inpatient and outpatient treatment costs were lower with linezolid by $87 and $2,954 respectively. In sensitivity analyses, linezolid had lower costs compared with vancomycin and daptomycin when using differential length of stay data from a clinical trial, and using success rates from a meta-analysis. In a scenario without

  3. Validation of the "Security Needs Assessment Profile" for measuring the profiles of security needs of Chinese forensic psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, B W M; Au-Yeung, C C Y; Chan, A W L; Chan, L S Y; Yuen, K K; Leung, H W; Yan, C K; Ng, K K; Lai, A C H; Davies, S; Collins, M

    Mapping forensic psychiatric services with the security needs of patients is a salient step in service planning, audit and review. A valid and reliable instrument for measuring the security needs of Chinese forensic psychiatric inpatients was not yet available. This study aimed to develop and validate the Chinese version of the Security Needs Assessment Profile for measuring the profiles of security needs of Chinese forensic psychiatric inpatients. The Security Needs Assessment Profile by Davis was translated into Chinese. Its face validity, content validity, construct validity and internal consistency reliability were assessed by measuring the security needs of 98 Chinese forensic psychiatric inpatients. Principal factor analysis for construct validity provided a six-factor security needs model explaining 68.7% of the variance. Based on the Cronbach's alpha coefficient, the internal consistency reliability was rated as acceptable for procedural security (0.73), and fair for both physical security (0.62) and relational security (0.58). A significant sex difference (p=0.002) in total security score was found. The Chinese version of the Security Needs Assessment Profile is a valid and reliable instrument for assessing the security needs of Chinese forensic psychiatric inpatients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Brief Distress Screening in Clinical Practice: Does it Help to Effectively Allocate Psycho-Oncological Support to Female Cancer Inpatients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermelink, Kerstin; Höhn, Henrik; Hasmüller, Stephan; Gallwas, Julia; Härtl, Kristin; Würstlein, Rachel; Köhm, Janna

    2014-05-01

    The usefulness of distress screening in cancer inpatient settings has rarely been investigated. This study evaluated a brief distress screening of inpatients in a breast cancer centre and a gynaecological cancer centre. Hospitalised patients with breast or gynaecological cancers were screened with the Distress Thermometer. Patients who scored above the cut-off, were referred by the medical staff, or self-referred were offered bedside psycho-oncological counselling. Of 125 patients, 68 (54.4%) received an offer of counselling, and 62 patients (49.6%) accepted. Most of the counselling was induced by distress screening. Only 4 (3.2%) patients self-referred to the counselling service. Of the counselled patients, 65.8% stated that they had substantially benefited from psycho-oncological support; only 5.6% of the non-counselled patients indicated that they might have benefited from psycho-oncological support. Almost all patients who will accept and benefit from psycho-oncological counselling can be identified if distress screening is used in conjunction with referrals by physicians and nurses. Distress screening is a worthwhile component in a framework of psycho-oncological support in a cancer inpatient setting. It paves the way to counselling for cancer inpatients who need it and are willing to accept it but hesitate to self-refer to psycho-oncological services.

  5. Between difference and belonging: configuring self and others in inpatient treatment for eating disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Eli

    Full Text Available Dedicated inpatient care for eating disorders has profound impact on patients' embodied practices and lived realities. Analyses of inpatients' accounts have shown that participants endorse complex and conflicting attitudes toward their experiences in eating disorders wards, yet the apparent ambivalence that characterizes inpatient experiences has not been subject to critical examination. This paper examines the narrated experiences of 13 participants (12 women and one man; age 18-38 years at first interview with past or present anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or eating disorder not otherwise specified, who had been hospitalized in an inpatient eating disorders ward for adults in central Israel. The interviews, which took place in 2005-2006, and again in 2011, were part of a larger longitudinal study exploring the subjective experiences of eating disorders and recovery among Israeli adults. Employing qualitative analysis, this study finds that the participants' accounts were concerned with dynamics of difference and belonging, as they played out in various aspects of inpatient care, including diagnosis, treatment, relationships with fellow patients and staff, and everyday life in hospital. Notably, participants simultaneously defined themselves as connected to, but also distinct from, the eating disordered others who formed their reference group at the ward. Through negotiating a protectively ambivalent positioning, participants recognized their eating disordered identities and connected with others on the ward, while also asserting their non-disordered individuality and distancing themselves from the potential dangers posed by 'excessive' belonging. The paper suggests that this ambivalent positioning can usefully be understood through the anthropological concept of liminality: being both a part of and apart from one's community.

  6. Recent national trends in the use of adolescent inpatient bariatric surgery: 2000 through 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelleher, Deirdre C; Merrill, Chaya T; Cottrell, Linda T; Nadler, Evan P; Burd, Randall S

    2013-02-01

    To determine the current rate of inpatient bariatric surgical procedures among adolescents and to analyze national trends of use from 2000 to 2009. Retrospective cross-sectional study. Discharge data obtained from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Kids' Inpatient Database, 2000 through 2009. Adolescents (defined herein as individuals aged 10-19 years) undergoing inpatient bariatric procedures. Inpatient bariatric surgery. The primary outcome measure was the national population-based bariatric procedure rate. The secondary outcome measures were trends in procedure rates and type, demographics, complication rate, length of stay, and hospital charges from 2000 through 2009. The inpatient bariatric procedure rate increased from 0.8 per 100 000 in 2000 to 2.3 per 100 000 in 2003 (328 vs 987 procedures) but did not change significantly in 2006 (2.2 per 100 000) or 2009 (2.4 per 100 000), with 925 vs 1009 procedures. The use of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding approached one-third (32.1%) of all procedures by 2009. The cohort was predominantly female and older than 17 years. The prevalence of comorbidities increased from 2003 (49.3%) to 2009 (58.6%) (P = .002), while the complication rate remained low and the in-hospital length of stay decreased by approximately 1 day (P bariatric procedures among adolescents has plateaued since 2003. The predominant procedure type has changed to minimally invasive techniques, including laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Trends show low complication rates and decreasing length of stay, despite increasing comorbid conditions among patients.

  7. The epidemiology of assault-related hospital in-patient admissions and ED attendances.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Farrell, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology and impact of serious assault warranting in-patient care over six years and its impact on ED attendances in a large teaching hospital in Dublin over 2 years. There were 16,079 emergency assault-related inpatient hospital discharges reducing from 60.1 per 100,000 population in 2005 to 50.6 per 100,000 population in 2010. The median length of stay was 1 day (1-466) representing 49,870 bed days. The majority were young males (13,921, 86.6%; median age 26 years). Overall crime figures showed a similar reduction. However, knife crimes did not reduce over this period. Data on ED attendances confirmed the age and gender profile and also showed an increase at weekends. Alcohol misuse was recorded in 2,292\\/16079 (14%) of in-patient cases and 242\\/2484 (10%) in ED attendances. An inter-sectoral preventative approach specifically targeting knife crime is required to reduce this burden on health services.

  8. Which Aged Care inpatients are potentially suitable for community-based acute care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Robyn M; Ogle, Susan J; Finnegan, Terence P; Hilmer, Sarah N

    2012-03-01

    To identify Aged Care inpatients potentially suitable for Acute/Post-Acute Care (APAC)-Aged Care, a new service offering community-based acute care as an alternative to hospital admission for frail older people. Criteria were developed to identify suitable patients for APAC-Aged Care and applied to consecutive Aged Care inpatient admissions at Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia, through retrospective chart review. Only 5/90 reviewed patients were potentially suitable for APAC-Aged Care. All five were from Residential Aged Care Facilities. The median age of the 90 patients was 86 years; 30% lived in Residential Aged Care Facilities; 53% of patients were medically stable on presentation; 70% required investigations beyond a standard baseline set; 27% had either no new functional decline on presentation or adequate community support to manage this; 91% had allied health input and 41% had medical/surgical consultation. APAC-Aged Care is a potentially suitable alternative to acute inpatient hospitalisation in a select minority of Aged Care patients. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2011 ACOTA.

  9. Effects of a Staff Training Intervention on Seclusion Rates on an Adult Inpatient Psychiatric Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Julie; Paun, Olimpia; Fogg, Louis

    2018-02-15

    The current article presents the effects of a 90-minute staff training intervention aimed at reducing inpatient psychiatric seclusion rates through strengthened staff commitment to seclusion alternatives and improved de-escalation skills. The intervention occurred at an 18-bed adult inpatient psychiatric unit whose seclusion rates in 2015 were seven times the national average. Although the project's primary outcome compared patient seclusion rates before and after the intervention, anonymous staff surveys measured several secondary outcomes. Seclusion rates were reduced from a 6-month pre-intervention average of 2.95 seclusion hours per 1,000 patient hours to a 6-month post-intervention average of 0.29 seclusion hours per 1,000 patient hours, a 90.2% reduction. Completed staff surveys showed significant staff knowledge gains, non-significant changes in staff attitudes about seclusion, non-significant changes in staff de-escalation skill confidence, and use of the new resource sheet by only 17% of staff. The key study implication is that time-limited, focused staff training interventions can have a measurable impact on reducing inpatient seclusion rates. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Assessment of inpatient multimodal cardiac imaging appropriateness at large academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remfry, Andrew; Abrams, Howard; Dudzinski, David M; Weiner, Rory B; Bhatia, R Sacha

    2015-11-14

    Responding to concerns regarding the growth of cardiac testing, the American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF) published Appropriate Use Criteria (AUC) for various cardiac imaging modalities. Single modality cardiac imaging appropriateness has been reported but there have been no studies assessing the appropriateness of multiple imaging modalities in an inpatient environment. A retrospective study of the appropriateness of cardiac tests ordered by the inpatient General Internal Medicine (GIM) and Cardiology services at three Canadian academic hospitals was conducted over two one-month periods. Cardiac tests characterized were transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), transesophageal echocardiography (TEE), single-photon emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT), and diagnostic cardiac catheterization. Overall, 553 tests were assessed, of which 99.8% were classifiable by AUC. 91% of all studies were categorized as appropriate, 4% may be appropriate and 5% were rarely appropriate. There were high rates of appropriate use of all modalities by GIM and Cardiology throughout. Significantly more appropriate diagnostic catheterizations were ordered by Cardiology than GIM (93% vs. 82%, p = imaging modalities in this multi-centered study on Cardiology and GIM inpatients in the acute care setting. The rate of appropriate ordering was high across all imaging modalities. We recommend further work towards improving appropriate utilization of cardiac imaging resources focus on the out-patient setting.

  11. Intensive lifestyle treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children with severe obesity: inpatient versus ambulatory treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koot, B G P; van der Baan-Slootweg, O H; Vinke, S; Bohte, A E; Tamminga-Smeulders, C L J; Jansen, P L M; Stoker, J; Benninga, M A

    2016-01-01

    Lifestyle intervention is the only established therapy for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The optimal treatment schedule and predictors of response of this treatment have not been established in children. We aimed to evaluate the 2-year efficacy of an inpatient versus ambulatory intensive lifestyle intervention for treating NAFLD in children with severe obesity. A cohort study of 51 severely obese non-diabetic children (mean age 14.7 (±2.4) years; BMI-z-score 3.5 (±0.5)) with liver steatosis were non-randomly allocated to inpatient treatment (2 or 6 months), ambulatory treatment or usual care. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy determined liver steatosis and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) at 6 months were the primary outcome measures. Baseline variables were evaluated as predictors of treatment response. Liver steatosis had disappeared in 43, 29 and 22% and serum ALT normalized in 41, 33 and 6% at the end of 6 months in the inpatient, ambulatory or usual care treatment groups, respectively. Only the proportions of ALT normalization in inpatient and ambulatory treatment compared with usual care were significantly higher. Treatment effects of inpatient and ambulatory treatment were sustained at 1.5 years follow-up. No baseline characteristic, including PNPLA3 polymorphism or leptin, was consistently predictive for treatment response. A 6-month intensive inpatient and ambulatory lifestyle treatment in children with severe obesity reverses NAFLD in a minority of patients. This study suggests that inpatient compared with ambulatory intensive treatment does not importantly increase treatment success. Further efforts to optimize and individualize lifestyle interventions and additional treatments options are needed particular for children with severe obesity resistant to conventional lifestyle interventions.

  12. Effect of a drug allergy educational program and antibiotic prescribing guideline on inpatient clinical providers' antibiotic prescribing knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Shenoy, Erica S; Hurwitz, Shelley; Varughese, Christy A; Hooper, David C; Banerji, Aleena

    2014-01-01

    Inpatient providers have varying levels of knowledge in managing patients with drug and/or penicillin (PCN) allergy. Our objectives were (1) to survey inpatient providers to ascertain their baseline drug allergy knowledge and preparedness in caring for patients with PCN allergy, and (2) to assess the impact of an educational program paired with the implementation of a hospital-based clinical guideline. We electronically surveyed 521 inpatient providers at a tertiary care medical center at baseline and again 6 weeks after an educational initiative paired with clinical guideline implementation. The guideline informed providers on drug allergy history taking and antibiotic prescribing for inpatients with PCN or cephalosporin allergy. Of 323 unique responders, 42% (95% CI, 37-48%) reported no prior education in drug allergy. When considering those who responded to both surveys (n = 213), we observed a significant increase in knowledge about PCN skin testing (35% vs 54%; P allergy over time (54% vs 80%; P allergy was severe significantly improved (77% vs 92%; P = .03). Other areas, including understanding absolute contraindications to receiving a drug again and PCN cross-reactivity with other antimicrobials, did not improve significantly. Inpatient providers have drug allergy knowledge deficits but are interested in tools to help them care for inpatients with drug allergies. Our educational initiative and hospital guideline implementation were associated with increased PCN allergy knowledge in several crucial areas. To improve care of inpatients with drug allergy, more research is needed to evaluate hospital policies and sustainable educational tools. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of Nightmares in Psychiatric Inpatients With Imagery Rehearsal Therapy: An Open Trial and Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Thomas E; Rufino, Katrina A; Nadorff, Michael R

    2017-03-23

    This study sought to assess the utility of Imagery Rehearsal Therapy (IRT) for nightmares in an inpatient psychiatric setting. Although IRT enjoys a substantial evidence base for efficacy in various populations, data with psychiatric inpatients are lacking. Participants were 20 adult psychiatric inpatients (11 male, 9 female; mean age=43.4), in an extended stay psychiatric inpatient facility. All participants were diagnosed with multiple, treatment resistant, comorbid conditions, including mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, and substance-related disorders. Patients with active psychosis or significant cognitive impairment were excluded. This was an open trial utilizing a case series design. In addition to routine hospital treatment that included psychotherapeutic and pharmacological interventions, participants received IRT over a span of 3 weeks in 4 small group sessions. Included were education about sleep and nightmares, instruction in writing new dream narratives and practicing guided imagery, and support via further consultation and trouble-shooting. Patients were referred by their psychiatrist or were self-referred, with approval from their treatment teams. Results showed significant aggregate reductions in nightmare frequency and intensity, as well as improvement in sleep overall. Patients also improved on a variety of other symptom measures, including suicidal ideation. No adverse reactions were observed. The present report includes a sampling of individual case vignettes to illustrate variability in treatment response. This study provides preliminary evidence that IRT can be used safely and effectively in a hospital environment to benefit patients suffering from serious mental illnesses, often in the midst of significant life crises. It is not possible in this preliminary study to conclude that IRT specifically (as opposed to other aspects of hospital treatment) produced these outcomes. Larger, controlled trials are needed to

  14. Innovative Strength-Based Care in Child and Adolescent Inpatient Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Deanna P; Garrison, David; Bartlett, Joanne

    2016-08-01

    Child and adolescent psychiatric units serve the highest risk, most vulnerable populations in the mental health delivery system. This article describes the integration of a strength-based approach with a traditional, medical model of psychiatric care on an acute inpatient unit. A strength-based framework allows for increased focus on exploring patients' goals, strengths, relationships, skills, and family communication within the hospital setting. The process of integration of strength-based care is described, followed by discussion of the implementation and evaluation of interventions, including mindfulness, family movie, narrative, and animal-assisted therapies. Innovative interventions led to improvement in patient symptoms, unit culture, and patient, family, and staff satisfaction. A strong emphasis on strength-based, multidisciplinary treatment has enhanced patient care, as the goals of acute inpatient admission are broadened to include more than diagnosis and medication management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Performance of freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals before and after the rehabilitation prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jon M; McCue, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Inpatient rehabilitation hospitals provide important services to patients to restore physical and cognitive functioning. Historically, these hospitals have been reimbursed by Medicare under a cost-based system; but in 2002, Medicare implemented a rehabilitation prospective payment system (PPS). Despite the implementation of a PPS for rehabilitation, there is limited published research that addresses the operating and financial performance of these hospitals. We examined operating and financial performance in the pre- and post-PPS periods for for-profit and nonprofit freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals to test for pre- and post-PPS differences within the ownership groups. We identified freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Health Care Cost Report Information System database for the first two fiscal years under PPS. We excluded facilities that had fiscal years less than 270 days, facilities with missing data, and government facilities. We computed average values for performance variables for the facilities in the two consecutive fiscal years post-PPS. For the pre-PPS period, we collected data on these same facilities and, once facilities with missing data and fiscal years less than 270 days were excluded, computed average values for the two consecutive fiscal years pre-PPS. Our final sample of 140 inpatient rehabilitation facilities was composed of 44 nonprofit hospitals and 96 for-profit hospitals both pre- and post-PPS. We utilized a pairwise comparison test (t-test comparison) to measure the significance of differences on each performance variable between pre- and post-PPS periods within each ownership group. Findings show that both nonprofit and for-profit freestanding inpatient rehabilitation hospitals reduced length of stay, increased discharges, and increased profitability. Within the for-profit ownership group, the percentage of Medicare discharges increased and operating expense per

  16. Evaluation of an inpatient fall risk screening tool to identify the most critical fall risk factors in inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Hsuan; Kang, Chun-Mei; Ho, Mu-Hsing; Kuo, Jessie Ming-Chuan; Chen, Hsiao-Lien; Chang, Wen-Yin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of the inpatient fall risk screening tool and to identify the most critical fall risk factors in inpatients. Variations exist in several screening tools applied in acute care hospitals for examining risk factors for falls and identifying high-risk inpatients. Secondary data analysis. A subset of inpatient data for the period from June 2011-June 2014 was extracted from the nursing information system and adverse event reporting system of an 818-bed teaching medical centre in Taipei. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis and logistic regression analysis. During the study period, 205 fallers and 37,232 nonfallers were identified. The results revealed that the inpatient fall risk screening tool (cut-off point of ≥3) had a low sensitivity level (60%), satisfactory specificity (87%), a positive predictive value of 2·0% and a negative predictive value of 99%. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0·805 (sensitivity, 71·8%; specificity, 78%). To increase the sensitivity values, the Youden index suggests at least 1·5 points to be the most suitable cut-off point for the inpatient fall risk screening tool. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a considerably increased fall risk in patients with impaired balance and impaired elimination. The fall risk factor was also significantly associated with days of hospital stay and with admission to surgical wards. The findings can raise awareness about the two most critical risk factors for falls among future clinical nurses and other healthcare professionals and thus facilitate the development of fall prevention interventions. This study highlights the needs for redefining the cut-off points of the inpatient fall risk screening tool to effectively identify inpatients at a high risk of falls. Furthermore, inpatients with impaired balance and impaired elimination should be closely

  17. How Exemplary Inpatient Teaching Physicians Foster Clinical Reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchens, Nathan; Harrod, Molly; Fowler, Karen E; Moody, Stephanie; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-09-01

    Clinical reasoning is a crucial component of training in health professions. These cognitive skills are necessary to provide quality care and avoid diagnostic error. Much previous literature has focused on teaching clinical reasoning in nonclinical environments and does not include learner reflections. The authors sought to explore, through multiple perspectives including learners, techniques used by exemplary inpatient clinician-educators for explicitly cultivating clinical reasoning. The authors conducted (2014-2015) a multisite, exploratory qualitative study examining how excellent clinician-educators foster clinical reasoning during general medicine rounds. This was accomplished through interviews of educators, focus group discussions with learners, and direct observations of clinical teaching. The authors reviewed field notes and transcripts using techniques of thematic analysis. Twelve clinician-educators, 57 current learners, and 26 former learners participated in observations and interviews. The techniques and behaviors of educators were categorized into 4 themes, including 1) emphasizing organization and prioritization, 2) accessing prior knowledge, 3) thinking aloud, and 4) analyzing the literature. The findings of this comprehensive study both confirm strategies found in previous literature and provide novel approaches. This is the first study to incorporate the perspectives of learners. Educators' techniques and behaviors, identified through direct observation and supported by reflections from the entire team, can inform best practices for the teaching of clinical reasoning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Feasibility Study Analyzing the Possibility of Creating an Inpatient Rehabilitation Product Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    Inpatient Rehabilitation 36 injury, Guillain - Barre , and others. These discharges included 129,399 males and 214,727 females. The majority, 296,894 were...of therapy per day. These facilities are reimbursed on a per diem system based on the use of resources such as nursing, physical therapy , occupational...nursing therapy , physical therapy , occupational therapy , and others improve FIMs. However, these measures are not currently routinely shared with payers

  19. Improvement in cognitive and psychosocial functioning and self image among adolescent inpatient suicide attempters

    OpenAIRE

    Hintikka, Ulla; Marttunen, Mauri; Pelkonen, Mirjami; Laukkanen, Eila; Viinamäki, Heimo; Lehtonen, Johannes

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Psychiatric treatment of suicidal youths is often difficult and non-compliance in treatment is a significant problem. This prospective study compared characteristics and changes in cognitive functioning, self image and psychosocial functioning among 13 to 18 year-old adolescent psychiatric inpatients with suicide attempts (n = 16) and with no suicidality (n = 39) Methods The two-group pre-post test prospective study design included assessments by a psychiatrist, a psycholo...

  20. Pediatric Inpatient Headache Therapy: What is Available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbouche, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Status migrainosus is defined by the international classification of headache disorders (ICHD) criteria as a debilitating migraine lasting more then 72 hours. The epidemiology of status migrainosus is still unknown in adult and children, and frequently underdiagnosed. Children and adolescents often end up in the emergency room with an intractable headache that failed outpatient therapy. Six to seven percent of these children do not respond to acute infusion therapy and require hospitalization. It is imperative that more aggressive therapy is considered when patients are affected by a severe intractable headache to prevent further disability and returning the child to baseline activity. Multiple therapies are available for adults and children. Studies for acute therapy in the emergency room are available in adults and pediatric groups. Small studies are available for inpatient therapy in children and, along with available therapies for children and adolescents, are described in this review. A review of the literature shows growing evidence regarding the use of dihydroergotamine intravenously once patients are hospitalized. Effectiveness and safety have been proven in the last decades in adults and small studies in the pediatric populations. © 2015 American Headache Society.

  1. A review and meta-analysis of the patient factors associated with psychiatric in-patient aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dack, C; Ross, J; Papadopoulos, C; Stewart, D; Bowers, L

    2013-04-01

    To combine the results of earlier comparison studies of in-patient aggression to quantitatively assess the strength of the association between patient factors and i) aggressive behaviour,ii) repetitive aggressive behaviour. A systematic review and meta-analysis of empirical articles and reports of comparison studies of aggression and non-aggression within adult psychiatric in-patient settings. Factors that were significantly associated with in-patient aggression included being younger, male, involuntary admissions, not being married, a diagnosis of schizophrenia, a greater number of previous admissions, a history of violence, a history of self-destructive behaviour and a history of substance abuse. The only factors associated with repeated in-patient aggression were not being male, a history of violence and a history of substance abuse. By comparing aggressive with non-aggressive patients, important differences between the two populations may be highlighted. These differences may help staff improve predictions of which patients might become aggressive and enable steps to be taken to reduce an aggressive incident occurring using actuarial judgements. However, the associations found between these actuarial factors and aggression were small. It is therefore important for staff to consider dynamic factors such as a patient's current state and the context to reduce in-patient aggression. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Age-Specific Characteristics of Inpatients with Severe Asthma Exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoshi Sekiya

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The characteristics of inpatients with severe asthma vary depending on age. We need to establish countermeasures for asthma exacerbation according to the characteristics of patients depending on age.

  3. Short term effects of inpatient cognitive behavioral treatment of adolescents with anxious-depressed school absenteeism: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Daniel; Hautmann, Christopher; Rizk, Saada; Petermann, Maike; Minkus, Johannes; Sinzig, Judith; Lehmkuhl, Gerd; Doepfner, Manfred

    2010-11-01

    This observational study examined the changes during inpatient cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) of adolescents with chronic anxious-depressive school absenteeism with or without comorbid disruptive symptoms. 147 adolescents (aged 12-18 years) with a specific phobia or other anxiety disorder or a depressive episode or a mixed disorder of conduct and emotions and who had completely ceased to attend school or showed irregular school attendance underwent an inpatient cognitive-behavioral treatment. A further 16 patients aborted the treatment during the first day and were not included in the analyses. The treatment was manual guided and also included parents. Assessments were made pre-inpatient treatment, immediately post-inpatient treatment and at 2-month follow-up. School attendance was the primary outcome variable and secondary outcomes were composite scores of a range of adolescent- and parent-rated mental health problems. Overall, results show a considerable decline of school absenteeism and mental health problems during treatment and subsequent follow-up. Continuous school attendance was achieved by 87.1% of the sample at the end of inpatient treatment and by 82.3% at 2-month follow-up. Comorbid symptoms of anxiety, depression, disruptive and insufficient learning behavior were significantly reduced from pre to follow-up, with effect sizes for the composite scores ranging from 0.44 to 1.15 (p school absenteeism and a mixture of emotional and disruptive symptoms is the first to show the benefits of inpatient therapy that included cognitive-behavioral therapy and access to a special school with expertise on teaching children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders. The results must be interpreted conservatively because of the lack of a control condition.

  4. Law No.13.192 workers that execute radiological services it state included in the advantage of the laws 9.940 and 9744 to civil or militaries employers belonging to Ministry of National Defense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The civil and military officials that lend services in dependences of the Ministry of National Defense in the tasks of radiological services were applied in the compute to be carried out the legal norms referred to effects of their retirement [es

  5. Two RFID-based solutions for secure inpatient medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Yi-Chung; Lo, Nai-Wei; Wu, Tzong-Chen

    2012-10-01

    Medication error can easily cause serious health damage to inpatients in hospital. Consequently, the whole society has to spend huge amount of extra resources for additional therapies and medication on those affected inpatients. In order to prevent medication errors, secure inpatient medication administration system is required in a hospital. Using RFID technology, such administration system provides automated medication verification for inpatient's medicine doses and generates corresponding medication evidence, which may be audited later for medical dispute. Recently, Peris-Lopez et al. (Int. J. Med. Inform., 2011) proposed an IS-RFID system to enhance inpatient medication safety. Nevertheless, IS-RFID system does not detect the denial of proof attack efficiently and the generated medication evidence cannot defend against counterfeit evidence generated from the hospital. That is, the hospital possesses enough privilege from the design of IS-RFID system to modify generated medication evidence whenever it is necessary. Hence, we design two lightweight RFID-based solutions for secure inpatient medication administration, one for online verification environment and the other for offline validation situation, to achieve system security on evidence generation and provide early detection on denial of proof attack.

  6. 42 CFR 440.250 - Limits on comparability of services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to recipients in institutions for mental diseases (§ 440.140) must be limited to those age 65 or older. (e) If covered under the plan, inpatient psychiatric services (§ 440.160) must be limited to...

  7. Medicare program; hospital inpatient prospective payment systems for acute care hospitals and the long-term care hospital prospective payment system and fiscal year 2015 rates; quality reporting requirements for specific providers; reasonable compensation equivalents for physician services in excluded hospitals and certain teaching hospitals; provider administrative appeals and judicial review; enforcement provisions for organ transplant centers; and electronic health record (EHR) incentive program. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-22

    We are revising the Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for operating and capital-related costs of acute care hospitals to implement changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. Some of these changes implement certain statutory provisions contained in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 (collectively known as the Affordable Care Act), the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014, and other legislation. These changes are applicable to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, unless otherwise specified in this final rule. We also are updating the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis subject to these limits. The updated rate-of-increase limits are effective for cost reporting periods beginning on or after October 1, 2014. We also are updating the payment policies and the annual payment rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital services provided by long-term care hospitals (LTCHs) and implementing certain statutory changes to the LTCH PPS under the Affordable Care Act and the Pathway for Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Reform Act of 2013 and the Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014. In addition, we discuss our proposals on the interruption of stay policy for LTCHs and on retiring the "5 percent" payment adjustment for collocated LTCHs. While many of the statutory mandates of the Pathway for SGR Reform Act apply to discharges occurring on or after October 1, 2014, others will not begin to apply until 2016 and beyond. In addition, we are making a number of changes relating to direct graduate medical education (GME) and indirect medical education (IME) payments. We are establishing new requirements or revising requirements for quality reporting by specific providers (acute care hospitals, PPS-exempt cancer hospitals, and LTCHs) that

  8. Medicare Program: Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment and Ambulatory Surgical Center Payment Systems and Quality Reporting Programs; Short Inpatient Hospital Stays; Transition for Certain Medicare-Dependent, Small Rural Hospitals Under the Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment System; Provider Administrative Appeals and Judicial Review. Final rule with comment period; final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-13

    This final rule with comment period revises the Medicare hospital outpatient prospective payment system (OPPS) and the Medicare ambulatory surgical center (ASC) payment system for CY 2016 to implement applicable statutory requirements and changes arising from our continuing experience with these systems. In this final rule with comment period, we describe the changes to the amounts and factors used to determine the payment rates for Medicare services paid under the OPPS and those paid under the ASC payment system. In addition, this final rule with comment period updates and refines the requirements for the Hospital Outpatient Quality Reporting (OQR) Program and the ASC Quality Reporting (ASCQR) Program. Further, this document includes certain finalized policies relating to the hospital inpatient prospective payment system: Changes to the 2-midnight rule under the short inpatient hospital stay policy; and a payment transition for hospitals that lost their status as a Medicare-dependent, small rural hospital (MDH) because they are no longer in a rural area due to the implementation of the new Office of Management and Budget delineations in FY 2015 and have not reclassified from urban to rural before January 1, 2016. In addition, this document contains a final rule that finalizes certain 2015 proposals, and addresses public comments received, relating to the changes in the Medicare regulations governing provider administrative appeals and judicial review relating to appropriate claims in provider cost reports.

  9. The importance of group cohesion in inpatient treatment of combat-related PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Carilyn C; Peterson, Mary; Bufford, Rodger; Benson, Jon

    2014-04-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the most widespread mental illness resulting from exposure to combat, necessitating an increase in the provision of group therapy. This pilot study examined the efficacy of, and treatment outcome predictors associated with, group inpatient treatment of combat-related PTSD. Participants included 38 active duty military personnel deployed during Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF), diagnosed with PTSD, and consecutive admissions to an inpatient PTSD treatment facility. A paired samples t-test revealed significant change in symptom severity and global functioning between pre- and post-treatment. Multiple regression analyses supported the predictive utility of baseline symptomatology and group cohesion (> 50% of the variance in treatment outcome), highlighting the importance of group cohesion in the efficacy of group treatment for combat-related PTSD.

  10. The effect of inpatient cognitive-behavioral therapy for eating disorders on temperament and character.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Grave, Riccardo; Calugi, Simona; Brambilla, Francesca; Abbate-Daga, Giovanni; Fassino, Secondo; Marchesini, Giulio

    2007-06-01

    Personality traits seem to have an important role in the development, clinical expression, course, and treatment response in eating disorders (EDs). We investigated the effects of an inpatient cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) on the measures of temperament and character (Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI)) in 149 consecutive patients with EDs. Baseline assessment included anthropometry, the Eating Disorder Examination (EDE), the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and the TCI. Treatment was based on the transdiagnostic cognitive behavior theory and treatment of ED, adapted for an inpatient setting. Treatment effects were tested by paired ANOVA, adjusted for covariates. No effects were found on Novelty Seeking, Reward Dependence, and Cooperativeness. Harm Avoidance (F=18.17, pbehavior and of BMI changes. We conclude that in ED, a few scales of both temperament and character are significantly modified by CBT, in relation to changes in psychopathology and depression, independently of nutrition. These results are relevant for future studies based on TCI.

  11. [Effectiveness of an inpatient multimodal psychiatric-psychotherapeutic program for the treatment of job burnout].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzkopf, Kathleen; Conrad, Nathalie; Straus, Doris; Porschke, Hildburg; von Känel, Roland

    2016-03-16

    We studied the clinical course and long-term effects of inpatient treatment in 723 patients with job burnout referred with an ICD-10 F diagnosis and Z73.0 code («overwhelming exhaustion») to a Swiss hospital specialized in the treatment of job stress-related disorders. Patients were characterized in terms of age, gender, socioeconomic status. Self-rated psychological measures related to general and burnout-specific symptoms (i. e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished personal accomplishments) were applied before and after a six-week treatment program, as well as at 15 months after hospital discharge in 232 patients. The results show that the multimodal inpatient psychiatric-psychotherapeutic treatment was successful with a sustainable effect on psychological well-being (>90 %), including improvements regarding emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishments as well as professional reintegration in 71 % of cases.

  12. Feasibility of training nurses in motivational interviewing to improve patient experience in mental health inpatient rehabilitation: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, M; Crowley, J; Smedley, N; Mutti, M-F; Cashen, A; Thompson, T; Foster, J

    2017-05-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Recently, concerns have been raised about how well United Kingdom National Health Service nurses care for their patients and their level of compassion. Motivational interviewing (MI) is an established approach to helping people make positive behaviour changes, through directive, person-centred counselling within a collaborative relationship between clinician and recipient. Based on evidence that MI may influence nursing practice positively, an investigation into the feasibility of training nurses on mental health inpatient rehabilitation wards ('rehabilitation') in MI to improve patient experience was reported. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: This pilot study demonstrates that training rehabilitation nurses in MI is feasible and provides preliminary evidence suggesting that a larger study to examine efficacy is warranted, including a calculation of sample size required to draw robust statistical conclusions. Nurses evaluated the training as highly relevant to their work. Patients responded well to interviews and focus groups with support from experts-by-experience; they were generally fairly satisfied with the rehabilitation ward and slight improvements in their experience were found following MI training for nurses but not at 6-month follow-up. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Rehabilitation nurses may face conflicting demands between ensuring patients with severe difficulties meet their basic needs and working with them to develop greater independence. Qualitative findings question whether nurse-patient interactions are fully valued as nursing interventions in inpatient rehabilitation. Learning MI might be a useful way of helping nurses think in detail about their interactions with patients and how to improve communications with their patients. The principles of MI should be incorporated into pre-registration training. Introduction There is limited research addressing the experiences of patients in inpatient

  13. System-Wide Inpatient Portal
 Implementation: Survey of Health Care Team Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Jennifer L; Sieck, Cynthia J; Walker, Daniel M; Huerta, Timothy R; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2017-09-14

    Inpatient portals, a new type of patient portal tailored specifically to the hospital setting, can allow patients to access up-to-date health information and exchange secure communications with their care team. As such, inpatient portals present an opportunity for patients to increase engagement in their care during a time of acute crisis that emphasizes focus on a patient's health. While there is a large body of research on patient portals in the outpatient setting, questions are being raised specifically about inpatient portals, such as how they will be incorporated into the flow of patient care in hectic, stressed, team-based hospital settings. Our aim is to improve understanding about hospital care team members' perceptions of the value of an interactive patient portal for admitted patients, as well as to ascertain staff orientation toward this new technology. Throughout the course of 2016, an inpatient portal, MyChart Bedside (MCB) was implemented across a five-hospital health system. The portal is a tablet-based app that includes a daily schedule, lab/test results, secure messaging with the care team, a place to take notes, and access to educational materials. Within a month of initial rollout, hospital care team members completed a 5-minute, anonymous online survey to assess attitudes and perceptions about MCB use and staff training for the new technology. Throughout the health system, 686 staff members completed the survey: 193 physicians (23.6%), 439 nurses (53.7%), and 186 support staff (22.7%). Questions about the importance of MCB, self-efficacy in using MCB with patients, and feelings about sufficient training and resources showed that an average of 40-60% of respondents in each group reported a positive orientation toward the MCB technology and training received. This positive orientation was highest among support staff, lower among nurses, and lowest for physicians (all differences by staff role were statistically significant at Pteam members

  14. Specialist inpatient treatment for severe motor conversion disorder: a retrospective comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormack, Ruaidhri; Moriarty, John; Mellers, John D; Shotbolt, Paul; Pastena, Rosa; Landes, Nadine; Goldstein, Laura; Fleminger, Simon; David, Anthony S

    2014-08-01

    Gold standard protocols have yet to be established for the treatment of motor conversion disorder (MCD). There is limited evidence to support inpatient, multidisciplinary intervention in chronic, severe cases. To evaluate the characteristics and outcomes of MCD patients admitted to a specialist neuropsychiatric inpatient unit. All patients admitted to the Lishman Unit (years 2007-2011) with a diagnosis of MCD were included. Data relevant to characteristics and status with regard to mobility, activities of daily living (ADLs) and Modified Rankin Scale (MRS) score at admission and discharge were extracted. Thirty-three cases (78.8% female) were included; the median duration of illness was 48 months. In comparison with brain injury patients admitted to the same unit, more cases had histories of childhood sexual abuse (36.4%, n=12), premorbid non-dissociative mental illness (81.1%, n=27) and employment as a healthcare/social-care worker (45.5%, n=15). Cases showed significant improvements in MRS scores (p<0.001), mobility (p<0.001) and ADL (p=0.002) following inpatient treatment. Patients with severe, long-standing MCD can achieve significant improvements in functioning after admission to a neuropsychiatry unit. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Cost analysis of in-patient cancer chemotherapy at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ashraf Wani

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: After permission from the Ethical Committee, a prospective study of 6 months duration was carried out to study the cost of treatment provided to in-patients in Medical Oncology. Direct costs that include the cost of material, labor and laboratory investigations, along with indirect costs were calculated, and data analyzed to compute unit cost of treatment. Results: The major cost components of in-patient cancer chemotherapy are cost of drugs and materials as 46.88% and labor as 48.45%. The average unit cost per patient per bed day for in-patient chemotherapy is Rs. 5725.12 ($125.96. This includes expenditure incurred both by the hospital and the patient (out of pocket. Conclusion: The economic burden of cancer treatment is quite high both for the patient and the healthcare provider. Modalities in the form of health insurance coverage need to be established and strengthened for pooling of resources for the treatment and transfer of risks of these patients.

  16. Inpatient care of small and sick newborns: a multi-country analysis of health system bottlenecks and potential solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Preterm birth is the leading cause of child death worldwide. Small and sick newborns require timely, high-quality inpatient care to survive. This includes provision of warmth, feeding support, safe oxygen therapy and effective phototherapy with prevention and treatment of infections. Inpatient care for newborns requires dedicated ward space, staffed by health workers with specialist training and skills. Many of the estimated 2.8 million newborns that die every year do not have access to such specialised care. Methods The bottleneck analysis tool was applied in 12 countries in Africa and Asia as part of the Every Newborn Action Plan process. Country workshops involved technical experts to complete the survey tool, which is designed to synthesise and grade health system "bottlenecks" (or factors that hinder the scale up) of maternal-newborn intervention packages. For this paper, we used quantitative and qualitative methods to analyse the bottleneck data, and combined these with literature review, to present priority bottlenecks and actions relevant to different health system building blocks for inpatient care of small and sick newborns. Results Inpatient care of small and sick newborns is an intervention package highlighted by all country workshop participants as having critical health system challenges. Health system building blocks with the highest graded (significant or major) bottlenecks were health workforce (10 out of 12 countries) and health financing (10 out of 12 countries), followed by community ownership and partnership (9 out of 12 countries). Priority actions based on solution themes for these bottlenecks are discussed. Conclusions Whilst major bottlenecks to the scale-up of quality inpatient newborn care are present, effective solutions exist. For all countries included, there is a critical need for a neonatal nursing cadre. Small and sick newborns require increased, sustained funding with specific insurance schemes to cover inpatient care

  17. Cost analysis of in-patient cancer chemotherapy at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Mohammad Ashraf; Tabish, S A; Jan, Farooq A; Khan, Nazir A; Wafai, Z A; Pandita, K K

    2013-01-01

    Cancer remains a major health problem in all communities worldwide. Rising healthcare costs associated with treating advanced cancers present a significant economic challenge. It is a need of the hour that the health sector should devise cost-effective measures to be put in place for better affordability of treatments. To achieve this objective, information generation through indigenous hospital data on unit cost of in-patient cancer chemotherapy in medical oncology became imperative and thus hallmark of this study. The present prospective hospital based study was conducted in Medical Oncology Department of tertiary care teaching hospital. After permission from the Ethical Committee, a prospective study of 6 months duration was carried out to study the cost of treatment provided to in-patients in Medical Oncology. Direct costs that include the cost of material, labor and laboratory investigations, along with indirect costs were calculated, and data analyzed to compute unit cost of treatment. The major cost components of in-patient cancer chemotherapy are cost of drugs and materials as 46.88% and labor as 48.45%. The average unit cost per patient per bed day for in-patient chemotherapy is Rs. 5725.12 ($125.96). This includes expenditure incurred both by the hospital and the patient (out of pocket). The economic burden of cancer treatment is quite high both for the patient and the healthcare provider. Modalities in the form of health insurance coverage need to be established and strengthened for pooling of resources for the treatment and transfer of risks of these patients.

  18. Pastoral care in old age psychiatry: addressing the spiritual needs of inpatients in an acute aged mental health unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Anita M Y; Eagleton, Tamara; Kelleher, Rosemary; Yastrubetskaya, Olga; Taylor, Michael; Chiu, Edmond A M; Hamilton, Bridget; Trauer, Tom; Lautenschlager, Nicola T

    2014-06-01

    Pastoral Care (PC) practitioners respond to the spiritual needs of patients and families of all spiritual orientations. The integrated PC service in an acute psychogeriatric inpatient ward at St Vincent's Aged Mental Health Service, Melbourne, Australia, was examined to investigate how PC was being accessed by inpatients. A retrospective medical record file audit was undertaken of patients admitted over a 16-month period from 1 February 2009 to 30 June 30 2010 (n = 202). Sixty-eight percent were seen by PC practitioners during their admission. Sixty-six percent received PC assessments, 32% received PC ministry, and 10% received PC ritual or worship interventions. Other interventions (counseling/education, crisis situation, grief/ bereavement counseling) occurred infrequently. Seventy-five percent of Roman Catholic patients received PC compared to 57% of those patients with no religious affiliation. However, the overall association between religious grouping and receiving PC was not significant. Gender, religion, marital status, legal status, country of birth, language spoken, living situation, carer needs, or educational level were not related to PC contact. Whether or not an inpatient received PC assessment was unrelated to diagnostic category. Patients seen by PC were significantly more likely to engage in religious practice, have longer length of stay, and have neuropsychological, social work and occupational therapy assessments. Results suggest that PC practitioners can help optimize the clinical care of patients by developing a comprehensive understanding of their spiritual and religious needs and providing a more holistic service. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Patient satisfaction with inpatient care provided by the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Arora

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Vivek Arora, Shannon Philp, Kathryn Nattress, Selvan Pather, Christopher Dalrymple, Kenneth Atkinson, Sofia Smirnova, Stephen Cotterell, Jonathan CarterSydney Gynecological Oncology Group, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, AustraliaPurpose: Patient satisfaction with the provision of hospital oncology services can have a significant impact on their overall treatment experience.Aims: To assess patient satisfaction with the inpatient hospital services in the gynecological oncology setting using the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC.Methods: A modified version of the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire with additional 16 items was administered to 52 adult surgical inpatients admitted with the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group. All participants were provided with an information leaflet regarding the survey and written consent obtained.Results: A high response rate (100% from patients with varied social, ethnic, and educational backgrounds confirmed the acceptability of the survey. Standard of medical care provided, frequency of doctors’ visits, exchange of information with doctors, friendliness of the staff, and state of the room ranked highly (>95% on the patient satisfaction scales. Problems were identified with ease of access to and within the hospital, quality of food, and exchange of information with other hospital staff.Conclusions: Overall the satisfaction with inpatient care was rated very highly in most areas. Deficiencies in certain elements of provision of medical care to the patients were identified and steps have been taken to improve upon these shortcomings.Keywords: patient satisfaction, EORTC, IN-PATSAT32, gynecological oncology, survey

  20. Decreasing Emergency Department Walkout Rate and Boarding Hours by Improving Inpatient Length of Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artenstein, Andrew W; Rathlev, Niels K; Neal, Douglas; Townsend, Vernette; Vemula, Michael; Goldlust, Sheila; Schmidt, Joseph; Visintainer, Paul

    2017-10-01

    Patient progress, the movement of patients through a hospital system from admission to discharge, is a foundational component of operational effectiveness in healthcare institutions. Optimal patient progress is a key to delivering safe, high-quality and high-value clinical care. The Baystate Patient Progress Initiative (BPPI), a cross-disciplinary, multifaceted quality and process improvement project, was launched on March 1, 2014, with the primary goal of optimizing patient progress for adult patients. The BPPI was implemented at our system's tertiary care, academic medical center, a high-volume, high-acuity hospital that serves as a regional referral center for western Massachusetts. The BPPI was structured as a 24-month initiative with an oversight group that ensured collaborative goal alignment and communication of operational teams. It was organized to address critical aspects of a patient's progress through his hospital stay and to create additional inpatient capacity. The specific goal of the BPPI was to decrease length of stay (LOS) on the inpatient adult Hospital Medicine service by optimizing an interdisciplinary plan of care and promoting earlier departure of discharged patients. Concurrently, we measured the effects on emergency department (ED) boarding hours per patient and walkout rates. The BPPI engaged over 300 employed clinicians and non-clinicians in the work. We created increased inpatient capacity by implementing daily interdisciplinary bedside rounds to proactively address patient progress; during the 24 months, this resulted in a sustained rate of discharge orders written before noon of more than 50% and a decrease in inpatient LOS of 0.30 days (coefficient: -0.014, 95% CI [-0.023, -0.005] Pboarding hours per patient decreased by approximately 2.1 hours (coefficient: -0.09; 95% CI [-0.15, -0.02] P = 0.007). Concurrently, ED walkout rates decreased by nearly 32% to a monthly mean of 0.4 patients (coefficient: 0.4; 95% CI [-0.7, -0.1] P= 0

  1. Study of the inpatient admission unit condition in the educational hospitals of Lorestan univercity of medical sciences in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahnaz Samadbeik

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: The condition of the investigated admission departments was evaluated as average. To improve admission process, some solutions should be taken into consideration including: preparing and supplying special strategies of inpatient admission department, employing professional and interested staff, holding postgraduation courses, ideal allotting of resources and space, regular evaluation of the admission department function and implementing process improvement procedures.

  2. Status and determinants of health services utilization among elderly migrants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Yu, Bin; He, Tiantian; Wang, Peigang

    2018-01-01

    The household registration system in China places migrants in a vulnerable status regarding access to local public services, including limited access to health services. Most studies on migrants' health services utilization targeted on working-age migrants, and there has been a paucity of studies conducted among elderly migrants. This study aims to investigate the status of health services utilization and its influential factors among elderly migrants. Data (13,043 participants, 52.4% male, mean age 66.22 ± 6.20) were derived from the 2015 Migrant Dynamics Monitoring Survey. The outcome variable in the study was health services utilization, consisting of doctor visits, hospitalization and local inpatient care. The Behavioral Model of Health Service Use was applied to categorize the influential factors into three components, including predisposing, enabling and need factors. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the influential factors of the three components of health services utilization. Of the total sample, 45.5% would visit a doctor when they were ill, 81.8% would prefer to be hospitalized when recommended by doctors, and 71.6% (those who were hospitalized) would choose to receive local inpatient care rather than going back to their hometown. Age, marital status, household income, years of residence, migration range, reasons for migration, size of friend network, health insurance type, local health insurance status and chronic disease status were significantly associated with health services utilization. A low level of local health services utilization was observed among elderly migrants. Enabling factors played important roles in promoting health services utilization among elderly migrants. Policy and decision makers may consider improving the capability for elderly migrants to access health services, such as increasing income and providing local health insurance.

  3. Comparison of Patient Outcome Measures between a Traditional Teaching Hospitalist Service and a Non-Teaching Hospitalist Service at an Academic Children's Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarchichi, Tony R; Garrison, Jessica; Jeong, Kwonho; Fabio, Anthony

    2017-12-01

    Inpatient pediatric care is increasingly provided by pediatric hospitalists. This, in addition to changes in resident duty hour restrictions, has led to the creation of new models of care for inpatient pediatric patients. The objective of this study was to compare traditional outcome measures between a pediatric hospitalist-only service and a more traditional academic service in which care was provided by pediatric hospitalists, residents, and medical students. Attending physicians on the hospitalist-only service had an average of 1.7 years of post-residency experience compared to an average 16 years of experience for those working on the traditional academic service. This retrospective cohort study (hospitalist-only v. teaching service) used electronic medical records data of patients (n=1,059) admitted to a quaternary care, academic, children's hospital in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania with diagnoses of bronchiolitis, viral syndrome, and gastroenteritis from July 2011 to June 2014. Primary outcome measures included length of stay, hospital costs, and readmission rates. Patients with a diagnosis of bronchiolitis admitted to the hospitalist-only service had a significantly higher severity-of-illness-score than those admitted to the teaching service. A decreased length of stay and lower hospital costs were seen for patients admitted to the hospitalist-only service; however, these differences did not reach a level of statistical significance. There were no statistically significant differences in the outcome measures of patients with common pediatric illnesses admitted to a hospitalist-only versus a teaching hospitalist service. The model of a hospitalist-only service staffed by recent residency graduates may provide an efficient and effective model of care as patients admitted to this service had similar outcome measures to those patients cared for by more-experienced attending physicians.

  4. Eye casualty services in London

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H B; Daniel, C S; Verma, S

    2013-01-01

    The combined pressures of the European Working Time Directive, 4 h waiting time target, and growing rates of unplanned hospital attendances have forced a major consolidation of eye casualty departments across the country, with the remaining units seeing a rapid increase in demand. We examine the effect of these changes on the provision of emergency eye care in Central London, and see what wider lessons can be learned. We surveyed the managers responsible for each of London's 8 out-of-hours eye casualty services, analysed data on attendance numbers, and conducted detailed interviews with lead clinicians. At London's two largest units, Moorfields Eye Hospital and the Western Eye Hospital, annual attendance numbers have been rising at 7.9% per year (to 76 034 patients in 2010/11) and 9.6% per year (to 31 128 patients in 2010/11), respectively. Using Moorfields as a case study, we discuss methods to increase capacity and efficiency in response to this demand, and also examine some of the unintended consequences of service consolidation including patients travelling long distances to geographically inappropriate units, and confusion over responsibility for out-of-hours inpatient cover. We describe a novel ‘referral pathway' developed to minimise unnecessary travelling and delay for patients, and propose a forum for the strategic planning of London's eye casualty services in the future. PMID:23370420

  5. Development of a Risk-adjustment Model for the Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Discharge Self-care Functional Status Quality Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Anne; Pardasaney, Poonam; Iriondo-Perez, Jeniffer; Ingber, Melvin J; Porter, Kristie A; McMullen, Tara

    2017-07-01

    Functional status measures are important patient-centered indicators of inpatient rehabilitation facility (IRF) quality of care. We developed a risk-adjusted self-care functional status measure for the IRF Quality Reporting Program. This paper describes the development and performance of the measure's risk-adjustment model. Our sample included IRF Medicare fee-for-service patients from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' 2008-2010 Post-Acute Care Payment Reform Demonstration. Data sources included the Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation Item Set, IRF-Patient Assessment Instrument, and Medicare claims. Self-care scores were based on 7 Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation items. The model was developed using discharge self-care score as the dependent variable, and generalized linear modeling with generalized estimation equation to account for patient characteristics and clustering within IRFs. Patient demographics, clinical characteristics at IRF admission, and clinical characteristics related to the recent hospitalization were tested as risk adjusters. A total of 4769 patient stays from 38 IRFs were included. Approximately 57% of the sample was female; 38.4%, 75-84 years; and 31.0%, 65-74 years. The final model, containing 77 risk adjusters, explained 53.7% of variance in discharge self-care scores (Pcare function was the strongest predictor, followed by admission cognitive function and IRF primary diagnosis group. The range of expected and observed scores overlapped very well, with little bias across the range of predicted self-care functioning. Our risk-adjustment model demonstrated strong validity for predicting discharge self-care scores. Although the model needs validation with national data, it represents an important first step in evaluation of IRF functional outcomes.

  6. Measuring Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility Quality of Care: Discharge Self-Care Functional Status Quality Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardasaney, Poonam K; Deutsch, Anne; Iriondo-Perez, Jeniffer; Ingber, Melvin J; McMullen, Tara

    2017-03-28

    To describe the calculation and psychometric properties of the discharge self-care functional status quality measure implemented in the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' (CMS) Inpatient Rehabilitation Facility (IRF) Quality Reporting Program on October 1, 2016. Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) patients from 38 IRFs that participated in the CMS Post-Acute Care Payment Reform Demonstration were included in this cohort study. Data came from the Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation Item Set, IRF-Patient Assessment Instrument, and Medicare claims. For each patient, we calculated an expected discharge self-care score, risk-adjusted for demographic and baseline clinical characteristics. The performance score of each IRF equaled the percentage of patient stays where the observed discharge self-care score met or exceeded the expected score. We assessed the measure's discriminatory ability across IRFs and reliability. IRFs. Medicare FFS patients aged ≥21 years (N=4769). Not applicable. Facility-level discharge self-care quality measure performance score. A total of 4769 patient stays were included; 57% of stays were in women, and 12.1% were in patients aged care score in the overall demonstration sample. The quality measure showed strong reliability, with intraclass correlation coefficients of .91. The discharge self-care quality measure showed strong discriminatory ability and reliability, representing an important initial step in evaluation of IRF self-care outcomes. A wide range in performance scores suggested a gap in quality of care across IRFs. Future work should include testing the measure with nationwide data from all IRFs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Establishing an ISO 10001-based promise in inpatients care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Ashiqur Rahman; Karapetrovic, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore ISO 10001:2007 in planning, designing and developing a customer satisfaction promise (CSP) intended for inpatients care. Through meetings and interviews with research participants, who included a program manager, unit managers and registered nurses, information about potential promises and their implementation was obtained and analyzed. A number of promises were drafted and one was finally selected to be developed as a CSP. Applying the standard required adaptation and novel interpretation. Additionally, ISO 10002:2004 (Clause 7) was used to design the feedback handling activities. A promise initially chosen for development turned out to be difficult to implement, experience that helped in selecting and developing the final promise. Research participants found the ISO 10001-based method useful and comprehensible. This paper presents a specific health care example of how to adapt a standard's guideline in establishing customer promises. The authors show how a promise can be used in alleviating an existing issue (i.e. communication between carers and patients). The learning can be beneficial in various health care settings. To the knowledge, this paper shows the first example of applying ISO 10001:2007 in a health care case. A few activities suggested by the standard are further detailed, and a new activity is introduced. The integrated use of ISO 10001:2007 and 10002:2004 is presented and how one can be "augmented" by the other is demonstrated.

  8. Cognitive Assessment of Elderly Inpatients: A Clinical Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Shermon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Comprehensive geriatric assessment including cognitive assessment results in better outcomes and quality of life through facilitating access to support and further care. The National Audit of Dementia Care revealed too few patients were being assessed for cognition and therefore failing to receive adequate care. Methods: This was a retrospective clinical audit in a district general hospital with systematic sampling of the clinical records of 50 inpatients on an elderly care ward. A descriptive analysis of the results was performed. Results: Despite guidance that cognitive assessment should be performed on admission, this was only documented in 22% of the medical notes. However, this rate improved to 56% by discharge. The most commonly used tool was the Abbreviated Mental Test (AMT 10. Assessment completion was independent of gender or social support, but only patients aged over 75 years were assessed. Of those, 75% had some level of cognitive impairment and 36.8% received a new or suspected diagnosis of dementia. Discussion: Cognitive assessment rates continue to be low. Our findings support the need for increased education regarding the importance and benefits of assessment as well as how to complete and document the assessment correctly. Conclusion: Cognitive assessment rates need to be further improved to promote better outcomes for patients with dementia.

  9. [Medication errors in pediatric inpatients: a multicentric prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stheneur, C; Armengaud, J-B; Castro, C; Chéron, G; Chevallier, B

    2006-10-01

    To improve the knowledge of medication errors in paediatrics: rate of occurrence, error characteristics, risk factors. Our prospective study included nine uninformed teaching paediatric wards (general paediatrics, emergency departments, intensive care units) using a describing questionnaire built from medical reports analysis (event description, medical issues, contributing personal and structural factors) during a two-months period. Seventy-five questionnaires were collected and analysed. Medical errors reported concerned prescription: 21 cases and administration: 45 cases. Ten errors led to adverse effects. An attributable factor was noted in 39 cases. Concerning prescription errors, no respect to protocol: 11 cases, lack of knowledge: 3 cases, personal communication failure: 3 cases were noted. Concerning administration errors, human mistakes (lack of experience, miscommunication, calculation error): 8 cases, unclear prescription: 6 cases and system flaws: 6 cases were noted. Several attribuable causes were reported in 8 cases. Medication errors in paediatrics inpatients are common and contributing factors intricated. Paediatricians should help hospitals develop effective programs for safety providing medications, reporting medication errors, errors analysis strategy and creating a safe environment of medication for all hospitalised paediatric patients.

  10. Developing a pediatric palliative care service in a large urban hospital: challenges, lessons, and successes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlynn, Emily S; Derrington, Sabrina; Morgan, Helene; Murray, Jennifer; Ornelas, Beatriz; Cucchiaro, Giovanni

    2013-04-01

    We report the process of creating a new palliative care service at a large, urban children's hospital. Our aim was to provide a detailed guide to developing an inpatient consultation service, along with reporting on the challenges, lessons, and evaluation. We examined the hiring process of personnel and marketing strategies, a clinical database facilitated ongoing quality review and identified trends, and a survey project assessed provider satisfaction and how referring physicians used the palliative care service. The pilot phase of service delivery laid the groundwork for a more effective service by creating documentation templates and identifying relevant data to track growth and outcomes. It also allowed time to establish a clear delineation of team members and distinction of roles. The survey of referring physicians proved a useful evaluation starting point, but conclusions could not be generalized because of the low response rate. It may be necessary to reconsider the survey technique and to expand the sample to include patients and families. Future research is needed to measure the financial benefits of a well-staffed inpatient pediatric palliative care service.

  11. Comparison of Rate of Utilization of Medicare Services in Private Versus Academic Cardiology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanesyan, Arsen; Rubio, Eduardo; Novak, Eric; Budoff, Matthew; Rich, Michael W

    2017-11-15

    Cardiovascular services are the third largest source of Medicare spending. We examined the rate of cardiovascular service utilization in the community of Glendale, CA, compared with the nearest academic medical center, the University of Southern California. Publicly available utilization data released by Medicare for the years 2012 and 2013 were used to identify all inpatient and outpatient cardiology services provided in each practice setting. The analysis included 19 private and 17 academic cardiologists. In unadjusted analysis, academic physicians performed half as many services per Medicare beneficiary per year as those in private practice: 2.3 versus 4.8, p cardiology practice settings in southern California, medical service utilization per Medicare beneficiary was nearly 2-fold higher in private practice than in the academic setting, suggesting that there may be opportunity for substantially reducing costs of cardiology care in the community setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Profile of forensic psychiatric inpatients referred to the Free State Psychiatric Complex, 2004–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Pienaar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An accused found unfit to stand trial and/or not responsible for his/her actions because of mental illness, is declared a state patient by the court. Aim: The aim of the study was to analyse the biographical data and relevant particulars of forensic psychiatric inpatients who were admitted to the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC according to section 42 of the Mental Health Care Act (no. 17 of 2002, from 2004 to 2008. Study design A descriptive, retrospective study was conducted. Method One hundred and twenty forensic psychiatric inpatients admitted to the FSCP in the terms of section 42 of the Mental Health Care Act in the period 2004–2008, were included in the study. Results: The majority (95.8% of the offenders were male, unmarried (83.8% and unemployed (81.5%. The median age was 32.5 years. Most of the offenses against persons were of a sexual nature (45.8%. More than half (55.5% of the forensic inpatients were diagnosed with schizophrenia, followed by mental retardation (10% and bipolar mood disorder. Eighty percent (80% of these patients were found not competent to stand trial and unaccountable. Fifty percent (50% of the participants received treatment for a mental illness prior to the crime, and were also known to have poor compliance and defaulted from treatment in the past. Conclusion: The findings of this study can contribute to implement effective management and training programmes for the benefit of state patients.

  13. An oral hygiene protocol improves oral health for patients in inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Joanne; Scholten, Ingrid

    2018-03-01

    To determine whether a simple oral hygiene protocol improves the oral health of inpatients in stroke rehabilitation. Poor oral health can lead to serious complications, such as pneumonia. The comorbidities associated with stroke, such as dysphagia, hemiparesis and cognitive impairment, can further impede independent oral care. International stroke guidelines recommend routine oral care but stop short of detailing specific regimes. The oral health assessment tool (OHAT) was conducted by speech-language pathologists with 100 patients with and without dysphagia in three metropolitan inpatient stroke rehabilitation facilities. A simple nurse-led oral hygiene regime was then implemented with all participants, which included twice daily tooth brushing and mouth rinsing after lunch, and oral health was measured again one week later. Initially, dysphagia was negatively associated with OHAT scores, and independence for oral hygiene was positively associated with oral health. After one week of a simple oral hygiene regime, the OHAT scores available for 89 participants indicated an improvement on average for all participants. In particular, 59% of participants with dysphagia had an improvement of 1 or more points. None of the participants developed pneumonia. A simple, inexpensive oral hygiene regime resulted in positive outcomes for patients with and without dysphagia in inpatient stroke rehabilitation settings. Oral health assessments and oral hygiene regimes that are simple to implement by the interdisciplinary team can be incorporated into standard stroke care with positive effect. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Association. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Relationship between cancer-related fatigue and physical activity in inpatient cancer rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummer, Franziska; Catuogno, Silvio; Perseus, Josef M; Bloch, Wilhelm; Baumann, Freerk T

    2013-08-01

    Fatigue is a serious problem for the majority of patients with cancer. In this context, several studies have shown benefits of physical activity during and following treatment. However, uncertainties remain regarding the optimal type and duration of physical activity. Therefore, this study examined the relationship between cancer-related fatigue and physical activity in the course of inpatient rehabilitation. Fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory) and physical activity (Freiburg Questionnaire of Physical Activity) were assessed in a consecutive series of 35 patients with cancer attending oncological inpatient rehabilitation during a six-month study period. The three-week rehabilitation program included daily exercise therapy consisting of aerobic endurance training, moderate resistance training, coordination exercises, relaxation training and individual physiotherapy. At discharge, a significant improvement in each dimension of cancer-related fatigue (p=0.001-0.003) and a significant increase of physical activity levels (p=0.001) were observed. A small, but significant negative correlation was found between cancer-related fatigue and the level of physical activity (R=-0.438, p=0.004). The largest effects were associated with a weekly energy expenditure of 3000 kcal through physical activity. The results support a non-linear dose-response relationship between cancer-related fatigue and physical activity. Since this is the first study providing specific exercise recommendations for an effective treatment of cancer-related fatigue in the context of inpatient rehabilitation, further research is required to validate the observed trends.

  15. Criteria of medical care evaluation in daily in-patient department in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grozdova T.U.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to work out criteria for the evaluation of medical care quality. Materials included 386 medical cards of daily in-patients, 216 medical cards of in-patients; 602 cards of analysis of case histories; 4 computer data bases. Methods of mathematical statistics were successfully used in the study. The comparative method of data analysis was applied to the research work. Intensity of medical care in values from 0,1 to 0,5 conditional units corresponded to requirements of criterion of estimation of medical care quality. Parameters of medicinal treatment were close to the standards of treatment in interval from 44,4 to 100%, as criterion of quality of medical care. Specific weight of apparatus and instrumental researches constituted an interval from 7, 4% to 22, 6%, forming corresponding criterion. Interval of effectiveness according to standards of consultations is from 0, 26 to 1, 04 conditional units. In conclusion the article stated that the characteristics for criteria to evaluate medical care in daily in-patient departments were worked out on the basis of indices obtained during the research work

  16. Tablet computers for hospitalized patients: a pilot study to improve inpatient engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greysen, S Ryan; Khanna, Raman R; Jacolbia, Ronald; Lee, Herman M; Auerbach, Andrew D

    2014-06-01

    Inadequate patient engagement in hospital care inhibits high-quality care and successful transitions to home. Tablet computers may provide opportunities to engage patients, particularly during inactive times between provider visits, tests, and treatments, by providing interactive health education modules as well as access to their personal health record (PHR). We conducted a pilot project to explore inpatient satisfaction with bedside tablets and barriers to usability. Additionally, we evaluated use of these devices to deliver 2 specific Web-based programs: (1) an interactive video to improve inpatient education about hospital safety, and (2) PHR access to promote inpatient engagement in discharge planning. We enrolled 30 patients; 17 (60%) were aged 40 years or older, 17 (60%) were women, 17 (60%) owned smartphones, and 6 (22%) owned tablet computers. Twenty-seven (90%) reported high overall satisfaction with the device, and 26 (87%) required ≤ 30 minutes for basic orientation (70% required ≤ 15 minutes). Twenty-five (83%) independently completed an interactive educational module on hospital patient safety. Twenty-one (70%) accessed their personal health record (PHR) to view their medication list, verify scheduled appointments, or send a message to their primary care physician. Next steps include education on high-risk medications, assessment of discharge barriers, and training clinical staff (such as respiratory therapists, registered nurses, or nurse practitioners) to deliver tablet interventions. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  17. Inpatient infliximab is ineffective at preventing colectomy for steroid refractory extensive colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Rachel E; Lauria, Alexis; Puleo, Frances J; Berg, Arthur; Stewart, David B

    2017-11-01

    Despite data suggesting safety and efficacy in ulcerative colitis patients treated with inpatient infliximab, prior studies did not focus on patients with extensive colitis, the group at highest risk for requiring surgery. This was a single center, retrospective study (2008-2015) of consecutive patients who required admission because of severe extensive ulcerative colitis defined by preoperative symptoms and computed tomography scans and postoperative histology. Patients admitted for high-dose steroids were compared with steroid refractory inpatients provided with one or two infusions of infliximab. The primary study outcome was colectomy rates; secondary outcomes included mean length of stay and 60-d complication rates. A total of 174 patients required admission with steroids for extensive ulcerative colitis. Of these, 19 (10%) also received infliximab. Among the subjects treated with infliximab, 15 (78%) required total colectomy during that admission versus 81 (52%) who received steroids alone (P = 0.03). Postoperative readmission rates, surgical-site infections, return to the operating room, and all-complication rates were similar between the cohorts (P > 0.05). For steroid refractory extensive ulcerative colitis, inpatient infliximab did not lower colectomy rates or increase postoperative complications compared with patients treated with steroids alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Investigating the Relationship Between Religiosity and Psychological Distress Among Surgical Inpatients: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Peter; Behzadi, Abdollah

    2018-02-01

    Psychological distress may hinder recovery following surgery. Studies examining the relationship between psychological distress and religiosity in the acute post-operative setting are lacking. The present study investigated this relationship, evaluated protocol design, and explored coping mechanisms. Psychological distress of surgical inpatients was assessed using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Rotterdam Symptom Checklist (RSCL). Religiosity was assessed using the Santa Clara Strength of Religious Faith Questionnaire. Correlations were obtained using Minitab software. Qualitative analysis identified coping mechanisms. Of eligible inpatients, 13/54 were recruited. No significant correlation was found between religiosity and psychological distress. The RSCL had a strong correlation with HADS (R = 0.82, p = 0.001). Assessment of distress was >2 min faster using RSCL compared to HADS. Relationships with pets, friends or family, and God emerged as the most common coping mechanism. Given study limitations, no conclusion was drawn regarding the relationship between religiosity and psychological distress. Weaknesses in study protocol were identified, and recommendations were outlined to facilitate the definitive study. This includes use of RSCL instead of HADS. Further study is warranted to explore how to strengthen relationships for inpatients.

  19. Modafinil and sleep architecture in an inpatient-outpatient treatment study of cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Peter T; Angarita, Gustavo A; Canavan, Sofija; Pittman, Brian; Oberleitner, Lindsay; Malison, Robert T; Mohsenin, Vahid; Hodges, Sarah; Easton, Caroline; McKee, Sherry; Bessette, Andrew; Forselius, Erica

    2016-03-01

    To determine whether the increase in slow-wave sleep associated with modafinil treatment in chronic cocaine users mediates improved clinical outcomes. 57 cocaine dependent participants were randomized to receive modafinil 400mg or placebo daily during a period of inpatient treatment followed by six weeks of outpatient treatment. Participants underwent polysomnographic sleep recording during inpatient treatment prior to and after starting modafinil. Outpatient treatment consisted of weekly cognitive behavioral therapy. Contingency management was used to promote participation in treatment and research demands, including thrice weekly visits during the outpatient phase for urine toxicology screens and other assessments. The primary clinical outcome was the percent of urine toxicology screens that were negative for cocaine. Modafinil treatment was associated with a higher mean percentage (52% vs. 26%) of cocaine-free urine screens (p=0.02) and an increase in N3 sleep time (p=0.002). The change in N3 sleep time mediated the higher rate of cocaine-free urine screens. Modafinil treatment was also associated with more consecutive days abstinent during outpatient treatment, greater survival of abstinence, higher daily rates of abstinence, and less sleep degradation typically associated with abstinence from chronic cocaine use. Morning-dosed modafinil improves slow-wave sleep in abstinent cocaine users in the inpatient setting, and this effect is a statistical mediator of improved clinical outcomes associated with continued modafinil treatment. The high rates of abstinence achieved in this trial suggest that promoting healthy sleep physiology in an inpatient setting may be important in the effective treatment of cocaine dependence. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  1. Estimates of economic burden of providing inpatient care in childhood rotavirus gastroenteritis from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Way Seah; Poo, Muhammad Izzuddin; Nagaraj, Shyamala

    2007-12-01

    To estimate the cost of an episode of inpatient care and the economic burden of hospitalisation for childhood rotavirus gastroenteritis (GE) in Malaysia. A 12-month prospective, hospital-based study on children less than 14 years of age with rotavirus GE, admitted to University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, was conducted in 2002. Data on human resource expenditure, costs of investigations, treatment and consumables were collected. Published estimates on rotavirus disease incidence in Malaysia were searched. Economic burden of hospital care for rotavirus GE in Malaysia was estimated by multiplying the cost of each episode of hospital admission for rotavirus GE with national rotavirus incidence in Malaysia. In 2002, the per capita health expenditure by Malaysian Government was US$71.47. Rotavirus was positive in 85 (22%) of the 393 patients with acute GE admitted during the study period. The median cost of providing inpatient care for an episode of rotavirus GE was US$211.91 (range US$68.50-880.60). The estimated average cases of children hospitalised for rotavirus GE in Malaysia (1999-2000) was 8571 annually. The financial burden of providing inpatient care for rotavirus GE in Malaysian children was estimated to be US$1.8 million (range US$0.6 million-7.5 million) annually. The cost of providing inpatient care for childhood rotavirus GE in Malaysia was estimated to be US$1.8 million annually. The financial burden of rotavirus disease would be higher if cost of outpatient visits, non-medical and societal costs are included.

  2. Critical Transitions: A Mixed Methods Examination of Sleep from Inpatient Alcohol Rehabilitation Treatment to the Community.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Todaro Brooks

    Full Text Available This prospective, repeated measures study utilized a convergent parallel mixed methods approach to assess sleep experiences among individuals who were alcohol-dependent undergoing inpatient detoxification and treatment at a clinical research facility across the transition periods associated with the rehabilitation process: the initial adjustment to becoming an inpatient and the transition from inpatient to outpatient status.This study included individual semi-structured interviews and quantitative measures relating to psychological distress, sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and sleep-related beliefs and behavior (n = 33; 66.7% male. Interviews were conducted and questionnaires were administered within one week of participants' scheduled discharge date and again four to six weeks post-discharge when they returned for a follow-up visit (or via phone.Participants self-reported significant sleep disturbances at both study time points. Of those participants with valid data at both time points (n = 28, there were no significant changes in mean scores from pre- to post-discharge with the exception of self-efficacy for sleep (SE-S being significantly higher post-discharge. Preliminary qualitative findings suggested differences between those with ongoing sleep disturbances, those whose sleep disturbances had resolved, and those with no sleep disturbances at either time point.This analysis highlights individual variation in sleep throughout the process of inpatient treatment and transition to outpatient aftercare in individuals with alcohol dependence. Collecting quantitative and qualitative data concurrently and combining emerging themes from qualitative data with quantitative analyses allowed for a more thorough examination of this relatively novel area of research and provided information that can be utilized to inform future behavioral sleep interventions.

  3. Profile and pattern of crack consumption among inpatients in a Brazilian psychiatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Silvia Mendes; Araujo, Renata Brasil; Bizarro, Lisiane

    2015-01-01

    Crack cocaine use is associated with polydrug abuse, and inpatients dependent on crack exhibit profiles of serious consumption patterns. Use of alcohol and tobacco and other drugs is a risk factor for experimentation of additional drugs, including crack cocaine. The present study describes the characteristics and crack consumption patterns among inpatients in treatment during 2011 and 2012 at the Hospital Psiquiátrico São Pedro (Porto Alegre, Brazil). An additional objective was to identify the sequence of alcohol and tobacco consumption prior to crack use. The participants were 53 male inpatients addicted to crack with a mean age of 27.5±7.3 years. A sociodemographic questionnaire; the Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test and the Mini Mental State Examination were all administered to participants. Inclusion criteria were crack cocaine dependency (based on the 10th edition of the International Classification of Diseases [ICD-10]) and being abstinent for 7 days. Patients with cognitive difficulties who were unable to understand and/or respond to the questionnaires were excluded from the sample. The participants were young male adults with low educational level and low incomes and were polydrug users. The majority had made more than one attempt to quit. Use of legal drugs in early adolescence, prior to crack use, was identified. The profiles of the inpatients addicted to crack treated at this hospital indicate a serious usage pattern among those who seek specialized support. Crack use is frequent and is associated with use of other drugs and with difficulty sustaining abstinence. The pattern of progression from alcohol and tobacco use to crack cocaine dependency demands the attention of those responsible for prevention policies.

  4. Prioritizing strategies for preventing medication errors and adverse drug events in pediatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortescue, Elizabeth B; Kaushal, Rainu; Landrigan, Christopher P; McKenna, Kathryn J; Clapp, Margaret D; Federico, Frank; Goldmann, Donald A; Bates, David W

    2003-04-01

    Medication errors in pediatric inpatients occur at similar rates as in adults but have 3 times the potential to cause harm. Error prevention strategies in this setting remain largely untested. The objective of this study was to classify the major types of medication errors in pediatric inpatients and to determine which strategies might most effectively prevent them. A prospective cohort study was conducted of 1020 patients who were admitted to 2 academic medical centers during a 6-week period in April and May 1999. Medication errors were characterized by subtype. Physician raters evaluated error prevention strategies and identified those that might be most effective in preventing errors. Of 10 778 medication orders reviewed, 616 contained errors. Of these, 120 (19.5%) were classified as potentially harmful, including 115 potential adverse drug events (18.7%) and 5 preventable adverse drug events (0.8%). Most errors occurred at the ordering stage (74%) and involved errors in dosing (28%), route (18%), or frequency (9%). Three interventions might have prevented most potentially harmful errors: 1) computerized physician order entry with clinical decision support systems (76%); 2) ward-based clinical pharmacists (81%); and 3) improved communication among physicians, nurses, and pharmacists (86%). Interrater reliability of error prevention strategy assignment was good (agreement: 0.92; kappa: 0.82). Of the assessed interventions, computerized physician order entry with clinical decision support systems; ward-based clinical pharmacists; and improved communication among physicians, nurses, and pharmacists had the greatest potential to reduce medication errors in pediatric inpatients. Development, implementation, and assessment of such interventions in the pediatric inpatient setting are needed.

  5. The n-by-T Target Discharge Strategy for Inpatient Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Pratik J; Ballester, Nicholas; Ramsey, Kylie; Kong, Nan; Pook, Nancy

    2017-07-01

    Ineffective inpatient discharge planning often causes discharge delays and upstream boarding. While an optimal discharge strategy that works across all units at a hospital is likely difficult to identify and implement, a strategy that provides a reasonable target to the discharge team appears feasible. We used observational and retrospective data from an inpatient trauma unit at a Level 2 trauma center in the Midwest US. Our proposed novel n-by-T strategy-discharge n patients by the Tth hour-was evaluated using a validated simulation model. Outcome measures included 2 measures: time-based (mean discharge completion and upstream boarding times) and capacity-based (increase in annual inpatient and upstream bed hours). Data from the pilot implementation of a 2-by-12 strategy at the unit was obtained and analyzed. The model suggested that the 1-by-T and 2-by-T strategies could advance the mean completion times by over 1.38 and 2.72 h, respectively (for 10 AM ≤ T ≤ noon, occupancy rate = 85%); the corresponding mean boarding time reductions were nearly 11% and 15%. These strategies could increase the availability of annual inpatient and upstream bed hours by at least 2,469 and 500, respectively. At 100% occupancy rate, the hospital-favored 2-by-12 strategy reduced the mean boarding time by 26.1%. A pilot implementation of the 2-by-12 strategy at the unit corroborated with the model findings: a 1.98-h advancement in completion times (Pstrategies, such as the n-by-T, can help substantially reduce discharge lateness and upstream boarding, especially during high unit occupancy. To sustain implementation, necessary commitment from the unit staff and physicians is vital, and may require some training.

  6. [Distribution of Rh blood group in 51 283 cases of inpatients and voluntary blood donors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ting; Yang, Jiangcun; Song, Yaojun; Wang, Wenhua; Xie, Xinxin; Chen, Ping; Yang, Yingqun; Chang, Jingyan; Wang, Miaoni

    2018-01-01

    Objective To investigate the distribution characteristics of Rh blood group in 51 283 cases of inpatients and voluntary blood donors. Methods Micro-column gel test was used to detect RhD, RhE, Rhe, RhC, Rhc antigen in 31 818 cases of hospitalized patients and 19 465 cases of voluntary blood donors. Results There were significant differences in Rh blood type distribution between inpatients and voluntary blood donors. The mainly phenotype of Rh blood group in the inpatients were DCCee (41.64%) and DCcEe (36.58%), and Rh blood type in voluntary blood donors were DCCee (41.11%) and DCcEe (37.11%). There were noticeable differences in Rh blood group and ABO phenotype between inpatients and voluntary blood donors. The mainly phenotype of the RhD positive patients were CcEe (36.58%) and CCee (41.64%). However, the mainly phenotype of RhD negative patients were ccee (54.30%) and Ccee (30.86%). Additionally, obvious difference of Rh blood group was seen between patients in haematology department and all patients. The voluntary blood donors from different areas including Hefei, Guangzhou, Nanning and Xi'an showed significant different Rh blood group distribution. On the contrary, no obvious difference of Rh blood group was found between Xianyang and Xi'an. Conclusion The differences of Rh blood group distribution have been found in different populations, departments and areas, which make it extremely important to detect Rh blood group in clinical transfusion.

  7. The Role of Hospital Inpatients in Supporting Medication Safety: A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Garfield

    Full Text Available Inpatient medication errors are a significant concern. An approach not yet widely studied is to facilitate greater involvement of inpatients with their medication. At the same time, electronic prescribing is becoming increasingly prevalent in the hospital setting. In this study we aimed to explore hospital inpatients' involvement with medication safety-related behaviours, facilitators and barriers to this involvement, and the impact of electronic prescribing.We conducted ethnographic observations and interviews in two UK hospital organisations, one with established electronic prescribing and one that changed from paper to electronic prescribing during our study. Researchers and lay volunteers observed nurses' medication administration rounds, pharmacists' ward rounds, doctor-led ward rounds and drug history taking. We also conducted interviews with healthcare professionals, patients and carers. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Observation notes and transcripts were coded thematically.Paper or electronic medication records were shown to patients in only 4 (2% of 247 cases. However, where they were available during patient-healthcare professional interactions, healthcare professionals often viewed them in order to inform patients about their medicines and answer any questions. Interprofessional discussions about medicines seemed more likely to happen in front of the patient where paper or electronic drug charts were available near the bedside. Patients and carers had more access to paper-based drug charts than electronic equivalents. However, interviews and observations suggest there are potentially more significant factors that affect patient involvement with their inpatient medication. These include patient and healthcare professional beliefs concerning patient involvement, the way in which healthcare professionals operate as a team, and the underlying culture.Patients appear to have more access to paper-based records than

  8. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Carr

    Full Text Available There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported.A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis.98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions.No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to develop specific music therapy models for this

  9. A systematic review of music therapy practice and outcomes with acute adult psychiatric in-patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to develop specific music therapy models for this patient group that

  10. Rapid Inpatient Titration of Intravenous Treprostinil for Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: Safe and Tolerable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kersh, Karim; Ruf, Kathryn M; Smith, J Shaun

    There is no standard protocol for intravenous treprostinil dose escalation. In most cases, slow up-titration is performed in the outpatient setting. However, rapid up-titration in an inpatient setting is an alternative that provides opportunity for aggressive treatment of common side effects experienced during dose escalation. In this study, we describe our experience with inpatient rapid up-titration of intravenous treprostinil. This was a single-center, retrospective study in which we reviewed the data of subjects with pulmonary arterial hypertension treated at our center who underwent inpatient rapid up-titration of intravenous treprostinil. Our treprostinil dose escalation protocol included initiation at 2 ng·kg·min with subsequent up-titration by 1 ng·kg·min every 6 to 8 hours as tolerated by side effects. A total of 16 subjects were identified. Thirteen subjects were treprostinil naive (naive group), and 3 subjects were receiving subcutaneous treprostinil but were hospitalized for further intravenous up-titration of treprostinil dose (nonnaive group). In the naive group, the median maximum dose achieved was 20 ng·kg·min with an interquartile range (IQR) of 20-23 ng·kg·min. The median up-titration interval was 6 days (IQR: 4-9). In the nonnaive group, the median maximum dose achieved was 20 ng·kg·min (range: 17-30). The median up-titration interval was 8.5 days (range: 1.5-11). Overall, the median maximum dose achieved was 20 ng·kg·min (IQR: 20-23.5), and the median up-titration interval was 6 days (IQR: 4.6-9.25), with no reported significant adverse hemodynamic events. In patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, rapid inpatient titration of intravenous treprostinil is safe and tolerable.

  11. Inpatient treatment has no impact on the core thoughts and perceptions in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennig, Silvana; Brunstein Klomek, Anat; Shahar, Ben; Sarel-Michnik, Zohar; Hadas, Arie

    2017-06-01

    Examine changes in core perceptions and thoughts during the weight restoration phase of inpatient treatment for adolescents with anorexia nervosa. Forty-four adolescents with anorexia nervosa consecutively admitted (2009-2012) to an inpatient paediatric-psychiatric unit specializing in eating disorders. The programme consisted of a complete inpatient intervention combining weight restoration by structured supervised meals with individual and group cognitive-behavioural therapy, parental training/family intervention and educational activities, followed by a half-way day-treatment weight-stabilizing phase and progressive reintroduction to the community. The study focused on changes from hospital admission to discharge in patients' responses to self-report questionnaires on eating disorder symptoms, depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation. No significant changes in core anorexic thoughts and perceptions as Body dissatisfaction, Drive for thinness, Weight concern and Shape concern were noted. However, a reduction in the general severity of eating disorder symptoms (including Restraint and Eating concern) was observed, mainly related to the treatment structure. Levels of depression significantly decreased but remained within pathological range. We also found a concerning increase in suicidal ideation not correlated with a concomitant increase in depressive symptomatology. Inpatient treatment of anorexia nervosa in adolescents does not significantly modify core anorexic thoughts and perceptions. This may explain the high relapse rates. Changes in core beliefs may be crucial for recovery and prevention of relapse in anorexia nervosa at this critical age. This study may have clinical implications for the development of better treatment strategies to target the gap between disturbed thoughts and distorted perceptions - the core aspects of anorexia nervosa and physical recovery during and after the weight restoration phase. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  12. A randomised controlled trial of Outpatient versus inpatient Polyp Treatment (OPT) for abnormal uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T Justin; Middleton, Lee J; Cooper, Natalie Am; Diwakar, Lavanya; Denny, Elaine; Smith, Paul; Gennard, Laura; Stobert, Lynda; Roberts, Tracy E; Cheed, Versha; Bingham, Tracey; Jowett, Sue; Brettell, Elizabeth; Connor, Mary; Jones, Sian E; Daniels, Jane P

    2015-07-01

    Uterine polyps cause abnormal bleeding in women and conventional practice is to remove them in hospital under general anaesthetic. Advances in technology make it possible to perform polypectomy in an outpatient setting, yet evidence of effectiveness is limited. To test the hypothesis that in women with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) associated with benign uterine polyp(s), outpatient polyp treatment achieved as good, or no more than 25% worse, alleviation of bleeding symptoms at 6 months compared with standard inpatient treatment. The hypothesis that response to uterine polyp treatment differed according to the pattern of AUB, menopausal status and longer-term follow-up was tested. The cost-effectiveness and acceptability of outpatient polypectomy was examined. A multicentre, non-inferiority, randomised controlled trial, incorporating a cost-effectiveness analysis and supplemented by a parallel patient preference study. Patient acceptability was evaluated by interview in a qualitative study. Outpatient hysteroscopy clinics and inpatient gynaecology departments within UK NHS hospitals. Women with AUB - defined as heavy menstrual bleeding (formerly known as menorrhagia) (HMB), intermenstrual bleeding or postmenopausal bleeding - and hysteroscopically diagnosed uterine polyps. We randomly assigned 507 women, using a minimisation algorithm, to outpatient polypectomy compared with conventional inpatient polypectomy as a day case in hospital under general anaesthesia. The primary outcome was successful treatment at 6 months, determined by the woman's assessment of her bleeding. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, procedure feasibility, acceptability and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. At 6 months, 73% (166/228) of women who underwent outpatient polypectomy were successfully treated compared with 80% (168/211) following inpatient polypectomy [relative risk (RR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.82 to 1.02]. The lower end of the CIs showed

  13. Adapting the balanced scorecard for mental health and addictions: an inpatient example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Elizabeth; Durbin, Janet

    2008-05-01

    The Balanced Scorecard (BSC) is a performance-monitoring framework that originated in the business sector but has more recently been applied to health services. The province of Ontario is using the BSC approach to monitor quality of inpatient care in five service areas. Feasibility of the scorecard framework for each area has been assessed using a standard approach. This paper reports results of the feasibility study for the mental health sector, focusing on three issues: framework relevance, underlying strategic goals and indicator selection. Based on a literature review and extensive stakeholder input, the BSC quadrant structure was recommended with some modifications, and indicators were selected that aligned with provincial mental health reform policy goals. The mental health report has completed two cycles of reporting, and has received good support from the field. Copyright © 2008 Longwoods Publishing.

  14. User-Centered Collaborative Design and Development of an Inpatient Safety Dashboard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlaver, Eli; Schnipper, Jeffrey L; Boxer, Robert B; Breuer, Dominic J; Gershanik, Esteban F; Dykes, Patricia C; Massaro, Anthony F; Benneyan, James; Bates, David W; Lehmann, Lisa S

    2017-12-01

    Patient safety remains a key concern in hospital care. This article summarizes the iterative participatory development, features, functions, and preliminary evaluation of a patient safety dashboard for interdisciplinary rounding teams on inpatient medical services. This electronic health record (EHR)-embedded dashboard collects real-time data covering 13 safety domains through web services and applies logic to generate stratified alerts with an interactive check-box function. The technological infrastructure is adaptable to other EHR environments. Surveyed users perceived the tool as highly usable and useful. Integration of the dashboard into clinical care is intended to promote communication about patient safety and facilitate identification and management of safety concerns. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. All rights reserved.

  15. An Empirical Analysis of Citizens' Acceptance Decisions of Electronic-Government Services: A Modification of the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) Model to Include Trust as a Basis for Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awuah, Lawrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding citizens' adoption of electronic-government (e-government) is an important topic, as the use of e-government has become an integral part of governance. Success of such initiatives depends largely on the efficient use of e-government services. The unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT) model has provided a…

  16. Evaluation of a video-based Internet intervention as preparation for inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Jan; Beutel, Manfred E; Gerzymisch, Katharina; Schulz, Dirk; Siepmann, Martin; Knickenberg, Rudolf J; Schmädeke, Stefan; Ferdinand, Peter; Zwerenz, Rüdiger

    2016-06-13

    Patients' treatment expectations are a key factor in psychotherapy. Several studies have linked higher expectations to better treatment success. Therefore, we want to evaluate the impact of a targeted video-based intervention on patients' expectations and the treatment success of inpatient rehabilitation. All patients who will be referred to inpatient psychosomatic rehabilitation in three clinics will receive a study flyer with information about how to log in to the study platform together with the usual clinic information leaflet. Patients will receive the study information and informed consent upon login and will be randomized into the intervention or the control group. The intervention group (n = 394) will get access to our virtual online clinic, containing several videos about inpatient rehabilitation, until their admission to inpatient rehabilitation. The control group (n = 394) will receive no special treatment preparation. Questionnaires will be given at study inclusion (T0), two weeks before admission to (T1), and at the end of (T2) inpatient rehabilitation. The primary outcome is the outcome expectancy measured with the Credibility Expectancy Questionnaire at T1. Secondary outcomes include treatment motivation, mental health, work ability, depression, anxiety, and satisfaction with and usage of the Internet platform. We expect the intervention group to benefit from the additional preparation concerning their outcome expectancy. If successful, this approach could be used in the future to enhance the efficacy of inpatient rehabilitation. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02532881 . Registered on 25 August 2015.

  17. Efficacy of an adjunctive brief psychodynamic psychotherapy to usual inpatient treatment of depression: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background A few recent studies have found indications of the effectiveness of inpatient psychotherapy for depression, usually of an extended duration. However, there is a lack of controlled studies in this area and to date no study of adequate quality on brief psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression during short inpatient stay exists. The present article describes the protocol of a study that will examine the relative efficacy, the cost-effectiveness and the cost-utility of adding an Inpatient Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapy to pharmacotherapy and treatment-as-usual for inpatients with unipolar depression. Methods/Design The study is a one-month randomized controlled trial with a two parallel group design and a 12-month naturalistic follow-up. A sample of 130 consecutive adult inpatients with unipolar depression and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score over 18 will be recruited. The study is carried out in the university hospital section for mood disorders in Lausanne, Switzerland. Patients are assessed upon admission, and at 1-, 3- and 12- month follow-ups. Inpatient therapy is a manualized brief intervention, combining the virtues of inpatient setting and of time-limited dynamic therapies (focal orientation, fixed duration, resource-oriented interventions). Treatment-as-usual represents the best level of practice for a minimal treatment condition usually proposed to inpatients. Final analyses will follow an intention–to-treat strategy. Depressive symptomatology is the primary outcome and secondary outcome includes measures of psychiatric symptomatology, psychosocial role functioning, and psychodynamic-emotional functioning. The mediating role of the therapeutic alliance is also examined. Allocation to treatment groups uses a stratified block randomization method with permuted block. To guarantee allocation concealment, randomization is done by an independent researcher. Discussion Despite the large number of studies on treatment of depression

  18. Efficacy of an adjunctive brief psychodynamic psychotherapy to usual inpatient treatment of depression: rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambresin Gilles

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A few recent studies have found indications of the effectiveness of inpatient psychotherapy for depression, usually of an extended duration. However, there is a lack of controlled studies in this area and to date no study of adequate quality on brief psychodynamic psychotherapy for depression during short inpatient stay exists. The present article describes the protocol of a study that will examine the relative efficacy, the cost-effectiveness and the cost-utility of adding an Inpatient Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapy to pharmacotherapy and treatment-as-usual for inpatients with unipolar depression. Methods/Design The study is a one-month randomized controlled trial with a two parallel group design and a 12-month naturalistic follow-up. A sample of 130 consecutive adult inpatients with unipolar depression and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score over 18 will be recruited. The study is carried out in the university hospital section for mood disorders in Lausanne, Switzerland. Patients are assessed upon admission, and at 1-, 3- and 12- month follow-ups. Inpatient therapy is a manualized brief intervention, combining the virtues of inpatient setting and of time-limited dynamic therapies (focal orientation, fixed duration, resource-oriented interventions. Treatment-as-usual represents the best level of practice for a minimal treatment condition usually proposed to inpatients. Final analyses will follow an intention–to-treat strategy. Depressive symptomatology is the primary outcome and secondary outcome includes measures of psychiatric symptomatology, psychosocial role functioning, and psychodynamic-emotional functioning. The mediating role of the therapeutic alliance is also examined. Allocation to treatment groups uses a stratified block randomization method with permuted block. To guarantee allocation concealment, randomization is done by an independent researcher. Discussion Despite the large number of studies

  19. Passive therapeutic gardens. A study on an inpatient geriatric ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachana, Nancy A; McWha, J Lindsay; Arathoon, Maureen

    2003-05-01

    A brief history of the link between horticultural activities and care of patients, particularly psychiatric patients, is reviewed in this article. Past research on both passive and active garden activities is examined in terms of physical and psychological benefits to patients. A passive garden intervention on an inpatient geriatric ward is described. Participants in this study were patients on a geriatric inpatient ward in a mid-sized regional hospital in New Zealand. Behavioral observations of patient movement on the ward were used to demonstrate the effects on patient behavior in response to the presence of the conservatory garden. Results showed a positive reaction to the conservatory, which was maintained 6 months after the initial plants were installed. The benefits of such garden installations are discussed, and areas for further research are outlined. Procedures, ethical concerns, and practical considerations of setting up such a conservatory on an inpatient ward are discussed.

  20. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Mpimbaza

    Full Text Available Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP, in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP, set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set. One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set. Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC, both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76 and validation dataset (AUC =0.74. Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%, moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%, and high risk (16.5% vs. 12

  1. Admission Risk Score to Predict Inpatient Pediatric Mortality at Four Public Hospitals in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Sears, David; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Rubahika, Denis; Nadler, Adam; Yeka, Adoke; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Mortality rates among hospitalized children in many government hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa are high. Pediatric emergency services in these hospitals are often sub-optimal. Timely recognition of critically ill children on arrival is key to improving service delivery. We present a simple risk score to predict inpatient mortality among hospitalized children. Between April 2010 and June 2011, the Uganda Malaria Surveillance Project (UMSP), in collaboration with the National Malaria Control Program (NMCP), set up an enhanced sentinel site malaria surveillance program for children hospitalized at four public hospitals in different districts: Tororo, Apac, Jinja and Mubende. Clinical data collected through March 2013, representing 50249 admissions were used to develop a mortality risk score (derivation data set). One year of data collected subsequently from the same hospitals, representing 20406 admissions, were used to prospectively validate the performance of the risk score (validation data set). Using a backward selection approach, 13 out of 25 clinical parameters recognizable on initial presentation, were selected for inclusion in a final logistic regression prediction model. The presence of individual parameters was awarded a score of either 1 or 2 based on regression coefficients. For each individual patient, a composite risk score was generated. The risk score was further categorized into three categories; low, medium, and high. Patient characteristics were comparable in both data sets. Measures of performance for the risk score included the receiver operating characteristics curves and the area under the curve (AUC), both demonstrating good and comparable ability to predict deathusing both the derivation (AUC =0.76) and validation dataset (AUC =0.74). Using the derivation and validation datasets, the mortality rates in each risk category were as follows: low risk (0.8% vs. 0.7%), moderate risk (3.5% vs. 3.2%), and high risk (16.5% vs. 12.6%), respectively. Our

  2. Intermediate Services After Behavioral Health Hospitalization: Effect on Rehospitalization and Emergency Department Visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, Catherine A; Lin, Hollis; O'Brien, Peggy L; Lenhart, Gregory M; Crable, Erika L; Mark, Tami L

    2016-11-01

    This study examined the effect of intermediate service use on behavioral health inpatient readmissions and subsequent emergency department (ED) visits among Medicaid enrollees. Data were from fee-for-service inpatient admissions from the 2008 Medicaid Analytic eXtract files for adults with a primary diagnosis of a mental or substance use disorder. A multivariate survival analysis estimated the association between posthospital services-particularly intermediate services (residential, partial hospital, intensive outpatient, and other rehabilitative services)-and time to readmission or ED visit. A propensity score-matched sample was used to examine the relationship between time to readmission and ED visit in the nondisabled and disabled populations more closely. The sample included 32,037 adults (nondisabled, 27.6%; disabled, 72.4%). Only 2.5% of nondisabled adults and 5.4% of disabled adults used intermediate services within seven days of hospital discharge. In the multivariate analysis, significant associations were found between intermediate service use and readmissions and ED visits in the nondisabled population (hazard ratio [HR]=.71, p=.04, and HR=.68, p<.01, respectively), but not in the disabled population. Significant associations were also found between use of other health care in the seven-day posthospitalization period and decreased time to readmission and ED visits in the nondisabled population and increased time to readmission and ED visits in the disabled population. In the propensity score--matched analysis, use of intermediate services was not significant in either population. The low use of intermediate services may reflect limited availability as well as Medicaid coverage limits. Research is needed to determine the optimal number and type of intermediate services for this population to minimize the need for additional hospital services.

  3. Inpatient care 50 years after the process of deinstitutionalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csipke, Emese; Flach, Clare; McCrone, Paul; Rose, Diana; Tilley, Jacqueline; Wykes, Til; Craig, Tom

    2014-04-01

    Throughout the past 50 years mental health services have aimed to provide and improve high quality inpatient care. It is not clear whether there has been improvement as service users and nursing staff have both expressed frustration at the lack of therapeutic activities. In particular, it may be that the changing levels of symptoms over the past 50 years may affect engagement with ward activities. Eight wards in a health care trust in London serving an inner city and urban populations participated. Data were collected on participation in activities and 116 service users' perceptions of acute care as well as clinical factors. Less time was spent participating in activities today than 50 years ago, while one quarter of service users reported taking part in no activities at all. Uptake of activities was related to more positive service user perceptions of the wards. Symptom severity did not impact the frequency of participation in activities, although those who took part in no activities at all had higher negative symptoms scores. Service users' uptake of activities was not related to the severity of their illness. This belies the belief that the acutely ill cannot take part in meaningful activities. This study supports the view that more therapeutic activities could be taken up by the acutely ill and are in fact appreciated.

  4. Suicide in the homeless within 12 months of contact with mental health services : a national clinical survey in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickley, Harriet; Kapur, Navneet; Hunt, Isabelle M; Robinson, Jo; Meehan, Janet; Parsons, Rebecca; McCann, Kerry; Flynn, Sandra; Burns, James; Amos, Tim; Shaw, Jenny; Appleby, Louis

    2006-09-01

    Suicide prevention is a health service priority. Homeless mental health patients present a challenge to services because of their complex health and social needs. To establish the numbers of homeless patients in contact with services who die by suicide; to describe their suicide methods and their social and clinical characteristics including aspects of clinical care. A national clinical survey based on a 4-year (1996-2000) sample of people in England and Wales who died by suicide. Detailed data were collected on those who had been in contact with mental health services in the year before death. A total of 131 individuals who died by suicide were reported to have been homeless at the time of death--3% of all suicides by psychiatric patients, over 30 per year. Hanging was the most common cause of death. The most frequent diagnosis was schizophrenia. Around half were in-patients at the time of death. Social and clinical risk factors for suicide were common, including drug and alcohol misuse, and recent suicidal ideas and behaviour. Despite this, their clinical care was characterised by disengagement from services as a result of missed contacts, self-discharge, lack of follow-up and lack of key worker. In order to reduce the number of deaths by suicide in those who are homeless and mentally ill, improvements in in-patient safety and engagement in the community are needed. This may be achieved through assertive community treatment, dual diagnosis services, and dedicated community mental health teams.

  5. Predictive Factors for Inpatient Falls among Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemdaroğlu, Ebru; Özbudak, Sibel Demir; Mandiroğlu, Sibel; Biçer, Seda Alakoç; Özgirgin, Neşe; Uçan, Halil

    Inpatient falls are of significant concern. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the predictors of inpatient falls among children with cerebral palsy in a rehabilitation hospital. A total of 93 patients with cerebral palsy were assessed based on history, physical findings, the Selective Motor Control Test, the Gross Motor Functional Classification System, the Berg Balance Scale and the Manual Ability Classification System. Previous history of falls/frequent falls, and any falls which occurred during hospitalization, were recorded. Of all 93 patients, 25 (27%) fell and 68 (73%) did not fall. The mean age of the fallers (6.3±2.0 years) was lower than that of the non-fallers (8.1±3.9 years). Behavioral problems according to the mother's statement (OR 26.454), not being able to maintain a long sitting position (OR 10.807), ability to balance on knees without support (OR 9.810), a history of frequent falls (OR 4.893) and a negative Thomas test (OR 4.192 fold) were found to increase the risk of inpatient falls. In these children with cerebral palsy, behavioral problems according to the mother's statement, a history of frequent falls, not being able to maintain a long sitting position, a negative Thomas test, and able to balance on knees without support were associated with the risk of inpatient falls. Children with cerebral palsy may experience inpatient falls. Further studies are required in order to develop prevention programs. For patients diagnosed with cerebral palsy, these results may help identify possible inpatient fallers on hospital admission. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative effectiveness of pediatric integrative medicine as an adjunct to usual care for pediatric inpatients of a North American tertiary care centre: A study protocol for a pragmatic cluster c