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Sample records for included hiv care

  1. The financial burden of HIV care, including antiretroviral therapy, on patients in three sites in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyarto, Sigit; Hidayat, Budi; Johns, Benjamin; Probandari, Ari; Mahendradhata, Yodi; Utarini, Adi; Trisnantoro, Laksono; Flessenkaemper, Sabine

    2010-07-01

    This paper assesses the extent of the financial burden due to out-of-pocket payments for health care incurred by people living with HIV (PLHIV) and the effect of this burden on their financial capacity. Data were collected in a cross-sectional survey of 353 PLHIV from three cities in Indonesia (Jakarta, Jogjakarta and Merauke). Respondents in Jakarta were sampled from one hospital and one non-governmental organization working with PLHIV. In Jogjakarta and Merauke, all HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) who came to selected hospitals during the interview period were asked to participate in the survey. The survey collected data on the frequency and extent of payments for HIV-related care, with answers cross-checked against medical records. Results show that PLHIV had different burdens of payments in the different geographical areas. On average, respondents in Jogjakarta spent 68%, and PLHIV on ART in Jakarta spent 96%, of monthly expenditure for HIV-related care, indicating a substantial financial burden for many ART patients. These patients depended on several sources of finance to cover the costs of their care, with donations from their immediate family being the most common method, selling assets and payments from personal income being the second most common method in Jakarta and Jogjakarta, respectively. Most PLHIV in these two areas did not have insurance. In Merauke, there were little observed out-of-pocket payments because the government covers medical costs via the local budget and health insurance for the poor. The results of this study confirm previous findings that providing subsidized ART drugs alone does not ensure financial accessibility to HIV care. Thus, the government of Indonesia at central and local levels should consider covering HIV care additional to providing antiretroviral drugs free of charge. Social health insurance should also be encouraged.

  2. Benchmarking HIV health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podlekareva, Daria; Reekie, Joanne; Mocroft, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV-patients based on four key indicators. METHODS: Four indicators of health care were...... assessed: Compliance with current guidelines on initiation of 1) combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), 2) chemoprophylaxis, 3) frequency of laboratory monitoring, and 4) virological response to cART (proportion of patients with HIV-RNA 90% of time on cART). RESULTS: 7097 Euro...... to North, patients from other regions had significantly lower odds of virological response; the difference was most pronounced for East and Argentina (adjusted OR 0.16[95%CI 0.11-0.23, p HIV health care utilization...

  3. Opportunity Knocks: HIV Prevention in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrun, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    Expansions in health care coverage, a comprehensive framework for HIV prevention and care, electronic medical records, and novel HIV prevention modalities create a current opportunity to change the trajectory of the HIV epidemic in the United States. HIV is increasingly disproportionately found in populations historically at higher risk, including gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender women, injection drug users, and persons of color. This underscores the need for providers to identify persons at higher risk for HIV and assure the provision of screening and prevention services. In turn, universal screening for HIV-testing every adolescent and adult at least once in their lifetime-will increasingly be necessary to find the infrequent cases of HIV in lower risk populations. In both these domains, primary care providers will play a unique role in complementing traditional providers of HIV prevention and care services by increasing the proportion of their patients who have been screened for HIV, opening dialogues around sexual health, including asking about sexual orientation and gender identity, and prescribing antivirals as pre- and postexposure prophylaxis for their non-HIV-infected patients. Primary care providers must understand and embrace their importance along the HIV prevention and care continuum.

  4. Sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, in the Netherlands in 2006

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MG van Veen; FDH Koedijk; IVF van der Broek; ELM Op de Coul; IM de Boer; AI van Sighem; MAB van der Sande; soa-centra; Stichting HIV Monitoring; EPI/Cib

    2007-01-01

    The nationally covered low threshold STI centres offering STI care targeted at high risk groups, provide surveillance data to monitor national trends in STI, including HIV. In 2006, chlamydia remained the most commonly diagnosed bacterial STI in the Netherlands in the STI centres, in spite of

  5. Executive summary--nutritional care of HIV-infected adolescents and adults, including pregnant and lactating women: what do we know, what can we do, and where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiten, Daniel J; Mulligan, Kathleen; Papathakis, Peggy; Wanke, Christine

    2011-12-01

    The HIV pandemic continues to place an unbearable burden on the international community, with disease prevalence remaining highest in resource-limited settings in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. HIV is most often imposed on conditions of food insecurity and consequent malnutrition, poor sanitation, and chronic exposure to a myriad of infectious (eg, malaria, tuberculosis, and diarrheal) and noncommunicable (eg, obesity, diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular) diseases. Women and children continue to bear the greatest burden. Two essential tenets underpin our approach to HIV: 1) antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) are essential to prolong lives and to halt the spread of HIV and AIDS and 2) food and sound nutrition are essential to human health. The challenge is to apply sound principles of clinical care and nutrition science to the safe and efficacious implementation of ARVs and for long-term care for people living with HIV and AIDS. The WHO has played a leading role in developing guidelines to support this goal with the generation of general recommendations regarding nutritional needs of people living with HIV and AIDS and specific guidelines for the nutritional care of HIV-infected infants and children (y of age). These proceedings represent a summary of the work accomplished at a workshop sponsored by the NIH to review the existing evidence to support changes in the recommendations regarding nutrient requirements for people living with HIV and AIDS; to support development of new WHO guidelines for adolescents and adults, including for pregnant and lactating women; and to identify a research agenda to address outstanding knowledge gaps.

  6. Late presentation for HIV care across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens; Antinori, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Late presentation (LP) for HIV care across Europe remains a significant issue. We provide a cross-European update from 34 countries on the prevalence and risk factors of LP for 2010-2013. People aged ≥ 16 presenting for HIV care (earliest of HIV-diagnosis, first clinic visit or cohort enrollment......) after 1 January 2010 with available CD4 count within six months of presentation were included. LP was defined as presentation with a CD4 count HIV diagnosis. Logistic regression investigated changes in LP over time. A total.......02-1.32), and a significant decline in LP in northern Europe (aOR/year later 0.89; 95% CI: 0.85-0.94). Further improvements in effective HIV testing strategies, with a focus on vulnerable groups, are required across the European continent....

  7. Envisioning Women-Centered HIV Care: Perspectives from Women Living with HIV in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Nadia; Greene, Saara; Carter, Allison; Lewis, Johanna; Nicholson, Valerie; Kwaramba, Gladys; Ménard, Brigitte; Kaufman, Elaina; Ennabil, Nourane; Andersson, Neil; Loutfy, Mona; de Pokomandy, Alexandra; Kaida, Angela

    Women comprise nearly one-quarter of people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Canada. Compared with men, women living with HIV experience inequities in HIV care and health outcomes, prompting a need for gendered and tailored approaches to HIV care. Peer and academic researchers from the Canadian HIV Women's Sexual and Reproductive Health Cohort Study conducted focus groups to understand women's experience of seeking care, with the purpose of identifying key characteristics that define a women-centered approach to HIV care. Eleven focus groups were conducted with 77 women living with HIV across Quebec, Ontario, and British Columbia, Canada. Women envisioned three central characteristics of women-centered HIV care, including i) coordinated and integrated services that address both HIV and women's health care priorities, and protect against exclusion from care due to HIV-related stigma, ii) care that recognizes and responds to structural barriers that limit women's access to care, such as violence, poverty, motherhood, HIV-related stigma, and challenges to safe disclosure, and iii) care that fosters peer support and peer leadership in its design and delivery to honor the diversity of women's experiences, overcome women's isolation, and prioritize women's ownership over the decisions that affect their lives. Despite advances in HIV treatment and care, the current care landscape is inadequate to meet women's comprehensive care needs. A women-centered approach to HIV care, as envisioned by women living with HIV, is central to guiding policy and practice to improve care and outcomes for women living with HIV in Canada. Copyright © 2017 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Consideration of Including Male Circumcision in the Indonesian HIV Prevention Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IN Sutarsa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction HIV/AIDS is an emerging threat to population health. Globally, 33.4 million people were estimated to be living with HIV in 2008 including 2.1 million children.1,2 The total number of new cases was estimated to be 2.7 million people (including 430,000 children and HIV/AIDS related death was estimated to be 2.0 million in 2008.1 Sustainable prevention measures followed by care, support and treatment program is vital to reduce the incidence and prevalence of HIV/AIDS.

  9. Racial Disparities in HIV Care Extend to Common Comorbidities: Implications for Implementation of Interventions to Reduce Disparities in HIV Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Kelly K; Bokhour, Barbara; McInnes, D Keith; Yakovchenko, Vera; Okwara, Leonore; Midboe, Amanda M; Skolnik, Avy; Vaughan-Sarrazin, Mary; Asch, Steven M; Gifford, Allen L; Ohl, Michael E

    2016-01-01

    Prior studies have described racial disparities in the quality of care for persons with HIV infection, but it is unknown if these disparities extend to common comorbid conditions. To inform implementation of interventions to reduce disparities in HIV care, we examined racial variation in a set of quality measures for common comorbid conditions among Veterans in care for HIV in the United States. The cohort included 23,974 Veterans in care for HIV in 2013 (53.4% black; 46.6% white). Measures extracted from electronic health record and administrative data were receipt of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), HIV viral control (serum RNA racial disparities in HIV care should comprehensively address and monitor processes and outcomes of care for key comorbidities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. HIV Care Nurses' Knowledge of HIV Criminalization: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J Craig; Domingue, Jean-Laurent; Petty, Mary; Coker, Michael A; Howard, Terry; Margolese, Shari

    HIV-related criminal laws in some jurisdictions may hamper population health efforts to manage HIV and bring about an AIDS-free generation. HIV care nurses have an instrumental role to play in ensuring equitable care and health for all in a context of HIV. The purpose of our study was to determine HIV care nurses' knowledge of HIV-related criminal laws. Ecosocial theory and content expert opinion guided development of a questionnaire to assess nurses' knowledge of HIV-related criminal laws. A total of 174 HIV care nurses from Canada (n = 23) and the United States (n = 151) completed the questionnaire. Knowledge gaps were observed in several aspects of HIV-related criminal laws that can influence nursing clinical practices. Nurses should increase their knowledge of HIV-related criminal laws to ensure the success of population health initiatives and to reduce stigma and discrimination experienced by people living with HIV. Copyright © 2016 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. HIV, violence and women: unmet mental health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunner, Brian; Dworkin, Shari L; Neylan, Thomas C; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Oyaro, Patrick; Cohen, Craig R; Abwok, Matilda; Meffert, Susan M

    2015-03-15

    HIV-infected (HIV+) women have high rates of Gender Based Violence (GBV). Studies of GBV find that approximately 50-90% of survivors develop mood and anxiety disorders. Given that women in sub-Saharan African constitute the largest population of HIV+ individuals in the world and the region׳s high GBV prevalence, mental health research with HIV+ women affected by GBV (HIV+GBV+) in this region is urgently needed. Qualitative methods were used to evaluate the mental health care needs of HIV+GBV+ female patients at an HIV clinic in the Kisumu County, Kenya. Thirty in-depth interviews and four focus groups were conducted with patients, healthcare providers and community leaders. Interviews were transcribed, translated and analyzed using qualitative data software. Respondents stated that physical, sexual and emotional violence against HIV+ women was widely prevalent and perpetrated primarily by untested husbands accusing a wife of marital infidelity following her positive HIV test result. Mental health problems among HIV+GBV+ women included depressive, anxiety, traumatic stress symptoms and suicidal thoughts. Participants opined that emotional distress from GBV not only caused HIV treatment default, but also led to poor HIV health even if adherent. Respondents agreed that mental health treatment was needed for HIV+GBV+ women; most agreed that the best treatment modality was individual counseling delivered weekly at the HIV clinic. Emotional distress may be higher and/or more varied among HIV+GBV+ women who are not engaged in HIV care. Mental health care is needed and desired by HIV+GBV+ women in Kisumu County, Kenya. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nursing Care of HIV-Positive Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ben; Martinsen, Bente

    2015-01-01

    to improve quality of life after being diagnosed with HIV, a sharp distinction between HIV and AIDS and a religious and spiritually coping. Identifying the emotional challenges women living with HIV face in their daily lives may help nurses obtain a clearer understanding and greater knowledge of how...... to provide HIV-positive women with effective care that empower and support these women in managing their chronic disease. However to ensure that nurses have the proper tools for effective care for women living with HIV European studies are essentials in relation to what emotional challenges these women...

  13. Collaborative HIV care in primary health care: nurses' views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngunyulu, R N; Peu, M D; Mulaudzi, F M; Mataboge, M L S; Phiri, S S

    2017-12-01

    Collaborative HIV care between the nurses and traditional health practitioners is an important strategy to improve health care of people living with HIV. To explore and describe the views of nurses regarding collaborative HIV care in primary healthcare services in the City of Tshwane, South Africa. A qualitative, descriptive design was used to explore and describe the views of nurses who met the study's inclusion criteria. In-depth individual interviews were conducted to collect data from purposively selected nurses. Content analysis was used to analyse data. Two main categories were developed during the data analysis stage. The views of nurses and health system challenges regarding collaborative HIV care. The study findings revealed that there was inadequate collaborative HIV care between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners. It is evident that there is inadequate policy implementation, monitoring and evaluation regarding collaboration in HIV care. The study findings might influence policymakers to consider the importance of collaborative HIV care, and improve the quality of care by strengthening the referral system and follow-up of people living with HIV and AIDS, as a result the health outcomes as implied in the Sustainable Development Goals 2030 might be improved. Training and involvement of traditional health practitioners in the nursing and health policy should be considered to enhance and build a trustworthy working relationship between the nurses and the traditional health practitioners in HIV care. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  14. Truck Drivers And Risk Of STDs Including HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal R.K

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Research Question: Whether long distance truck drivers are at a higher risk of contracting and transmitting STDs including HIV? Objectives: i To study the degree of knowledge of HIV and AIDS among long- distance truck drivers. ii Assess their sexual behaviour including condom use. iii Explore their prevailing social influences and substance abuse patterns. iv Explore their treatment seeking bahaviour as regards STDs. v Deduce their risk of contracting and transmitting STDs including HIV. Study Design: Cross- sectional interview. Setting: Transport Nagar, Indore (M.P Participants: 210 senior drivers (First drivers and 210 junior drivers (Second drivers. Study Variables: Extra-Marital sexual intercourse, condom usage, past and present history of STDs, treatment and counseling, substance abuse, social â€" cultural milieu. Outcome Variables: Risk of contraction of STDs. Statistical Analysis: Univariate analysis. Results: 94% of the drivers were totally ignorant about AIDS. 82.9% and 43.8 % of the senior and junior drivers had a history of extra- marital sex and of these only 2 regularly used condoms. 13.8% and 3.3 % of the senior and junior drivers had a past or present history suggestive of STD infection. Alcohol and Opium were regularly used by them. Conclusion: The studied drivers are at a high risk of contracting and transmitting STDs including HIV.

  15. Social support and delays seeking care after HIV diagnosis, North Carolina, 2000–2006

    OpenAIRE

    McCoy, Sandra I.; Strauss, Ronald P.; MacDonald, Pia D. M.; Leone, Peter A.; Eron, Joseph J.; Miller, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Many adults in the United States enter primary care late in the course of HIV infection, countering the clinical benefits of timely HIV services and missing opportunities for risk reduction. Our objective was to determine if perceived social support was associated with delay entering care after an HIV diagnosis. Two hundred sixteen patients receiving primary care at a large, university-based HIV outpatient clinic in North Carolina were included in the study. Dimensions of functional social su...

  16. Non-communicable diseases and HIV care and treatment: models of integrated service delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Malia; Ojikutu, Bisola; Andrian, Soa; Sohng, Elaine; Minior, Thomas; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2017-08-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are a growing cause of morbidity in low-income countries including in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Integration of NCD and HIV services can build upon experience with chronic care models from HIV programmes. We describe models of NCD and HIV integration, challenges and lessons learned. A literature review of published articles on integrated NCD and HIV programs in low-income countries and key informant interviews were conducted with leaders of identified integrated NCD and HIV programs. Information was synthesised to identify models of NCD and HIV service delivery integration. Three models of integration were identified as follows: NCD services integrated into centres originally providing HIV care; HIV care integrated into primary health care (PHC) already offering NCD services; and simultaneous introduction of integrated HIV and NCD services. Major challenges identified included NCD supply chain, human resources, referral systems, patient education, stigma, patient records and monitoring and evaluation. The range of HIV and NCD services varied widely within and across models. Regardless of model of integration, leveraging experience from HIV care models and adapting existing systems and tools is a feasible method to provide efficient care and treatment for the growing numbers of patients with NCDs. Operational research should be conducted to further study how successful models of HIV and NCD integration can be expanded in scope and scaled-up by managers and policymakers seeking to address all the chronic care needs of their patients. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The HIV continuum of care in the Bahamas in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikkiah Forbes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The HIV cascade of care describes the spectrum of engagement in HIV care from diagnosis to viral suppression (VS. The study objective was to develop a baseline HIV cascade of care for new HIV diagnoses in the Bahamas in 2014. Methods Individuals who were newly diagnosed with HIV in 2014 and known to be alive within a year of that diagnosis were included in the cascade of care (n = 250. Individuals with one CD4 or HIV viral load (VL measure in 2014 were considered linked to care. Those with at least two CD4 counts in the year were considered retained in care. Eligibility for antiretroviral therapy (ART was based on having a CD4 count 11 months/year. VL < 1 000 copies/ml was considered suppressed. Comparisons were made in the cascades by gender and age. Results Of the 250 persons in the study, 79 of them (32% were retained in care. Antiretrovirals (ARVs were prescribed to 116 of the 250 (46%; of those 116, 48 of them (41% achieved VS. A higher proportion of women achieved VS than did men, but this difference did not reach statistical significance. Similarly, there were differences in VS based on age, but the differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions In the Bahamas, increased efforts are needed to help people living with HIV to link to and be retained in care. VS may remain suboptimal unless ART is scaled up and adherence interventions are included in measures to improve the treatment cascade.

  18. Integrating family planning into HIV care in western Kenya: HIV care providers' perspectives and experiences one year following integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newmann, Sara J; Zakaras, Jennifer M; Tao, Amy R; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R; Steinfeld, Rachel; Grossman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    With high rates of unintended pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa, integration of family planning (FP) into HIV care is being explored as a strategy to reduce unmet need for contraception. Perspectives and experiences of healthcare providers are critical in order to create sustainable models of integrated care. This qualitative study offers insight into how HIV care providers view and experience the benefits and challenges of providing integrated FP/HIV services in Nyanza Province, Kenya. Sixteen individual interviews were conducted among healthcare workers at six public sector HIV care facilities one year after the implementation of integrated FP and HIV services. Data were transcribed and analyzed qualitatively using grounded theory methods and Atlas.ti. Providers reported a number of benefits of integrated services that they believed increased the uptake and continuation of contraceptive methods. They felt that integrated services enabled them to reach a larger number of female and male patients and in a more efficient way for patients compared to non-integrated services. Availability of FP services in the same place as HIV care also eliminated the need for most referrals, which many providers saw as a barrier for patients seeking FP. Providers reported many challenges to providing integrated services, including the lack of space, time, and sufficient staff, inadequate training, and commodity shortages. Despite these challenges, the vast majority of providers was supportive of FP/HIV integration and found integrated services to be beneficial to HIV-infected patients. Providers' concerns relating to staffing, infrastructure, and training need to be addressed in order to create sustainable, cost-effective FP/HIV integrated service models.

  19. TB/HIV integration at primary care level: A quantitative assessment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-02

    Sep 2, 2012 ... HIV activities. According to the policy, for people living with. HIV (PLWH), activities include intensified case finding, isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) and infection control. For. TB patients, activities included HIV counselling and testing. (HCT), prevention ..... in quality and continuity of care.17. Despite our ...

  20. Expanded HIV Testing and Linkage to Care: Conventional vs. Point-of-Care Testing and Assignment of Patient Notification and Linkage to Care to an HIV Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bares, Sara; Eavou, Rebecca; Bertozzi-Villa, Clara; Taylor, Michelle; Hyland, Heather; McFadden, Rachel; Shah, Sachin; Pho, Mai T; Walter, James; Badlani, Sameer; Schneider, John; Prachand, Nik; Benbow, Nanette; Pitrak, David

    2016-01-01

    The University of Chicago Medicine (UCM) led the Expanded Testing and Linkage to Care (X-TLC) program for disproportionately affected populations on the South Side of Chicago. The X-TLC program aimed to expand routine HIV testing to high-prevalence communities with disproportionately affected populations (i.e., minority men and women, men who have sex with men, and intravenous drug users) according to CDC guidelines at multiple clinical sites. The X-TLC program used standard blood-based laboratory testing vs. point-of-care rapid testing or rapid laboratory testing with point-of-care results notification. Site coordinators and the linkage-to-care coordinator at UCM oversaw testing, test notification, and linkage to care. From February 1, 2011, through December 31, 2013, the X-TLC program completed 75,345 HIV tests on 67,153 unique patients. Of the total tests, 48,044 (63.8%) were performed on patients who self-identified as African American and 6,606 (8.8%) were performed on patients who self-identified as Hispanic. Of the 67,153 patients tested, 395 (0.6%) tested positive and 176 (0.3%) were previously unaware of their HIV-positive status. Seroprevalence was even higher for EDs, where 127 of 12,957 patients tested positive for HIV (1.0% seroprevalence), than for other patient care sites, including for new diagnoses, where 50 of 12,957 patients tested positive for HIV (0.4% seroprevalence). Of the 176 newly diagnosed patients, 166 of 173 (96.0%) patients who were still alive when testing was complete received their test results, and 148 of the 166 patients who were eligible for care (89.0%) were linked to care. Patients linked to X-TLC physicians did well with respect to the continuum of care: 77 of 123 (62.6%) patients achieved HIV viral load of care for HIV patients diagnosed at community sites. HIV screening and linkage to care can be accomplished by incorporating standard testing for HIV into routine medical care.

  1. Care of HIV-exposed and HIV-infected neonates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    transmission. (PMTCT) intervention programme. Important milestones achieved in 2012 include: (1) an estimated 83% of all pregnant women living with HIV in South Africa received antiretrovirals. (ARVs) for PMTCT, (2) early vertical transmission of ...

  2. Disparities in HIV clinic care across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffery V.; Laut, Kamilla Grønborg; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although advances in HIV medicine have yielded increasingly better treatment outcomes in recent years, HIV-positive people with access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) still face complex health challenges. The EuroSIDA Study Group surveyed its clinics to explore regional differences...... in clinic services. Methods: The EuroSIDA study is a prospective observational cohort study that began enrolling patients in 1994. In early 2014, we conducted a 59-item survey of the 98 then-active EuroSIDA clinics. The survey covered HIV clinical care and other aspects of patient care. The EuroSIDA East...... tuberculosis/HIV treatment integration in the East Europe group (27% versus 84% p

  3. Structure and quality of outpatient care for people living with an HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, Esther A. N.; Smit, Colette; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Reiss, Peter; Kroon, Frank P.; Brinkman, Kees; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Policy-makers and clinicians are faced with a gap of evidence to guide policy on standards for HIV outpatient care. Ongoing debates include which settings of care improve health outcomes, and how many HIV-infected patients a health-care provider should treat to gain and maintain expertise. In this

  4. HIV/AIDS and homelessness, Part 1: background and barriers to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaihy, Antoine B; Stowell, Keith R; Bui, Thuy; Daley, Dennis; Salloum, Ihsan

    2005-10-01

    Co-occurrence of homelessness and HIV/AIDS poses a complex and multidimensional challenge to the health care provider's clinical and system integration skills. Existing data support the high prevalence of HIV/AIDS among homeless persons and a high percentage of persons living with HIV/AIDS being either homeless or at imminent risk for homelessness. There are special considerations and challenges health care providers may face in caring for homeless persons with HIV/AIDS. An integrated, flexible, interdisciplinary, community-based system of care addressing the full array of medical, psychiatric/substance abuse, and housing services would optimize clinical care for this population. Areas that deserve particular attention include HIV/AIDS prevention, access to comprehensive HIV and health care, use of antiretroviral therapy, and adherence to treatment. Research is needed to better understand the multifaceted needs of this population and to develop prevention and treatment strategies applicable to daily clinical care.

  5. Late presentation for HIV care in central Haiti: factors limiting access to care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, C; Ivers, L C; Smith Fawzi, M C; Freedberg, K A; Castro, A

    2007-04-01

    Many patients with HIV infection present for care late in the course of their disease, a factor which is associated with poor prognosis. Our objective was to identify factors associated with late presentation for HIV care among patients in central Haiti. Thirty-one HIV-positive adults, approximately 10% of the HIV-infected population followed at a central Haiti hospital, participated in this research study. A two-part research tool that included a structured questionnaire and an ethnographic life history interview was used to collect quantitative as well as qualitative data about demographic factors related to presentation for HIV care. Sixty-five percent of the patients in this study presented late for HIV care, as defined by CD4 cell count below 350 cells/mm3. Factors associated with late presentation included male sex, older age, patient belief that symptoms are not caused by a medical condition, greater distance from the medical clinic, lack of prior access to effective medical care, previous requirement to pay for medical care, and prior negative experience at local hospitals. Harsh poverty was a striking theme among all patients interviewed. Delays in presentation for HIV care in rural Haiti are linked to demographic, socioeconomic and structural factors, many of which are rooted in poverty. These data suggest that a multifaceted approach is needed to overcome barriers to early presentation for care. This approach might include poverty alleviation strategies; provision of effective, reliable and free medical care; patient outreach through community health workers and collaboration with traditional healers.

  6. Uptake of HIV testing and counseling, risk perception and linkage to HIV care among Thai university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thana Khawcharoenporn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV testing and counseling (HTC with linkage to care after known infection are key components for HIV transmission prevention. This study was conducted to assess HTC uptake, HIV risk perception and linkage to care among Thai university students. Methods An outreach HTC program was conducted in a large public university in Thailand from January 2013 to December 2014. The program consisted of brief HIV knowledge assessment, free HTC, HIV risk assessment and education provided by the healthcare personnel. Students were categorized into low, moderate and high-risk groups according to the pre-defined HIV risk characteristics. Results One-thousand-eight-hundred-one students participated in the program, 494 (27 % underwent HTC. Independent characteristics associated with no HTC uptake included female sex (P < 0.001, lower HIV knowledge score (P < 0.001, younger age (P < 0.001 and students from non-health science faculties (P = 0.02. Among the 494 students undergoing HTC, 141 (29 % were categorized into moderate or high-risk group, of whom 45/141 (32 % had false perception of low HIV risk. Being heterosexual was independently associated with false perception of low HIV risk (P = 0.04. The rate of new HIV infection diagnosis was 4/494 (0.8 %. Of these 4 HIV-infected students, 3 (75 % were men who have sex with men and only 2 of the 4 students (50 % showed up for HIV continuity care. Conclusions An outreach HIV prevention program with HTC was feasible and beneficial in detecting HIV risk and infection among the university students. However, interventions to improve HTC uptake, HIV risk perception and linkage to care are needed.

  7. Find Ryan White HIV/AIDS Medical Care Providers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Find Ryan White HIV/AIDS Medical Care Providers tool is a locator that helps people living with HIV/AIDS access medical care and related services. Users can...

  8. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. OBJECTIVE: To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM, a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV? and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?". A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA <48 copies/mL at the time of the survey. We used SEM to test hypothesized relationships. RESULTS: The analyses included 489 patients (94% of eligible patients. The patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2 on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all p<.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Patient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  9. Palliative care needs in Malawi: Care received by people living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmie Mkwinda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has changed from an acute to a chronic illness in the past decade, because of highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART. Malawi’s response to the HIV challenge included provision of ART for people living with HIV or AIDS (PLWHA, which significantly reduced HIV- and AIDS-related mortality. In addition, palliative care for PLWHA was introduced as a strategy that improves the success of ART.Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore the needs of PLWHA concerning care received from primary caregivers and palliative care nurses in Malawi.Methods: A qualitative, explorative design was used and 18 participants were selected purposefully and interviewed individually using a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analysed using NVivo software package version 10.Results: Results revealed that PLWHA needed physical care from the primary caregivers due to severity of illness, integration of healthcare services, and continuity of care and proper care from nurses. They also needed knowledge from nurses in several areas which affected decision-making and needed financial and nutritional support.Conclusion: More could be done in meeting needs of PLWHA to improve their health and survival and assist them to achieve a better quality of life.Keywords: people living with HIV/AIDS, palliative care, palliative care nurse, primary caregiver, support

  10. HIV transmission during paediatric health care in sub- Saharan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health care systems in sub-Saharan Africa are challenged not only to improve care for the increasing number of HIV-infected children, but also to prevent transmission of HIV to other children and health care workers through contaminated medical procedures and needlestick accidents. HIV-infected children aged to 1 year ...

  11. A systematic review of income generation interventions, including microfinance and vocational skills training, for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Caitlin E; Fonner, Virginia A; O'Reilly, Kevin R; Sweat, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Income generation interventions, such as microfinance or vocational skills training, address structural factors associated with HIV risk. However, the effectiveness of these interventions on HIV-related outcomes in low- and middle-income countries has not been synthesized. The authors conducted a systematic review by searching electronic databases from 1990 to 2012, examining secondary references, and hand-searching key journals. Peer-reviewed studies were included in the analysis if they evaluated income generation interventions in low- or middle-income countries and provided pre-post or multi-arm measures on behavioral, psychological, social, care, or biological outcomes related to HIV prevention. Standardized forms were used to abstract study data in duplicate and study rigor was assessed. Of the 5218 unique citations identified, 12 studies met criteria for inclusion. Studies were geographically diverse, with six conducted in sub-Saharan Africa, three in South or Southeast Asia, and three in Latin America and the Caribbean. Target populations included adult women (N = 6), female sex workers/bar workers (N = 3), and youth/orphans (N = 3). All studies targeted females except two among youth/orphans. Study rigor was moderate, with two group-randomized trials and two individual-randomized trials. All interventions except three included some form of microfinance. Only a minority of studies found significant intervention effects on condom use, number of sexual partners, or other HIV-related behavioral outcomes; most studies showed no significant change, although some may have had inadequate statistical power. One trial showed a 55% reduction in intimate partner violence (adjusted risk ratio 0.45, 95% confidence interval 0.23-0.91). No studies measured incidence/prevalence of HIV or sexually transmitted infections among intervention recipients. The evidence that income generation interventions influence HIV-related behaviors and outcomes is inconclusive. However, these

  12. Handbook of pediatric HIV care

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Read, Jennifer S; Zeichner, Steven L. (Steven Leonard)

    2006-01-01

    ... and guidelines necessary for effective management of infected children. Dr. Stephen L. Zeichner received his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the University of Chicago. He trained in pediatrics and infectious diseases at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. An investigator in the HIV and AIDS Malignancy Branch, National Cancer Institute, NIH, and an adjunc...

  13. Uptake of HIV testing and counseling, risk perception and linkage to HIV care among Thai university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Chunloy, Krongtip; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha

    2016-07-12

    HIV testing and counseling (HTC) with linkage to care after known infection are key components for HIV transmission prevention. This study was conducted to assess HTC uptake, HIV risk perception and linkage to care among Thai university students. An outreach HTC program was conducted in a large public university in Thailand from January 2013 to December 2014. The program consisted of brief HIV knowledge assessment, free HTC, HIV risk assessment and education provided by the healthcare personnel. Students were categorized into low, moderate and high-risk groups according to the pre-defined HIV risk characteristics. One-thousand-eight-hundred-one students participated in the program, 494 (27 %) underwent HTC. Independent characteristics associated with no HTC uptake included female sex (P students from non-health science faculties (P = 0.02). Among the 494 students undergoing HTC, 141 (29 %) were categorized into moderate or high-risk group, of whom 45/141 (32 %) had false perception of low HIV risk. Being heterosexual was independently associated with false perception of low HIV risk (P = 0.04). The rate of new HIV infection diagnosis was 4/494 (0.8 %). Of these 4 HIV-infected students, 3 (75 %) were men who have sex with men and only 2 of the 4 students (50 %) showed up for HIV continuity care. An outreach HIV prevention program with HTC was feasible and beneficial in detecting HIV risk and infection among the university students. However, interventions to improve HTC uptake, HIV risk perception and linkage to care are needed.

  14. HIV Care Initiation: A Teachable Moment for Smoking Cessation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrine, Damon J; Frank, Summer G; Savin, Micah J; Waters, Andrew J; Li, Yisheng; Chen, Sixia; Fletcher, Faith E; Arduino, Roberto C; Gritz, Ellen R

    2017-09-25

    Tobacco use among persons living with HIV represents an important risk factor for poor treatment outcomes, morbidity, and mortality. Thus, efforts designed to inform the development of appropriate smoking cessation programs for this population remains a public health priority. To address this need, a study was conducted to longitudinally assess the relationship between intention to quit smoking and cessation over the 12 month period following initiation of HIV care. Patients initiating HIV care at a large inner city safety net clinic were enrolled (n=378) in a 12-month prospective study. Audio computer-assisted self-interviews were conducted at baseline, and at 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month post enrollment, and HIV-related clinical data were collected from participants' electronic medical records. Variables of interest included intention to quit smoking, 7-day point prevalence smoking abstinence (biochemically verified), and stage of HIV. Data were collected in Houston, Texas from 2009 to 2015. The sample was 75% male and 62% Black. Findings indicated that intention to quit smoking increased between baseline and 3 months, and subsequently trended downward from 3 to 12 months. Results from linear and generalized linear mixed models indicated that participants with advanced HIV disease (vs. not advanced) reported significantly (p<.05) higher intention to quit smoking at 3-, 6-, and 12-months post study enrollment. A similar though non-significant pattern was observed in the smoking abstinence outcome. HIV treatment initiation appears to be associated with increases in intention to quit smoking thus serves as a potential teachable moment for smoking cessation intervention. This study documents significant increases in intention to quit smoking in the 3-month period following HIV care initiation. Moreover, quit intention trended downward following the 3-month follow-up until the 12-month follow-up. In addition, a marked effect for HIV disease stage was observed, whereby

  15. Where and how does physical therapy fit? Integrating physical therapy into interprofessional HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deBoer, Heather; Andrews, Matthew; Cudd, Stephanie; Leung, Ellie; Petrie, Alana; Chan Carusone, Soo; O'Brien, Kelly K

    2018-03-13

    and interaction of contextual factors including aging, episodic nature of HIV, multimorbidity, competing priorities, continuity of care, stigma, resource security and social isolation are important for clinicians to consider in order to optimize healthcare for people living with HIV. The Framework describing the role of physical therapy in HIV care can be used by rehabilitation professionals to help inform their approach for providing client-centered HIV care.

  16. It’s a Process: Reactions to HIV Diagnosis and Engagement in HIV Care among High-Risk Heterosexuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra H. Kutnick

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available After HIV diagnosis, heterosexuals in high-poverty urban areas evidence delays in linkage to care and antiretroviral therapy initiation compared to other groups. Yet barriers to/facilitators of HIV care among these high-risk heterosexuals are understudied. Under the theory of triadic influence, putative barriers to HIV care engagement include individual/attitudinal-level (e.g., fear, medical distrust, social-level (e.g., stigma, and structural-level influences (e.g., poor access. Participants were African-American/Black and Hispanic adults found newly diagnosed with HIV (N = 25 as part of a community-based HIV testing study with heterosexuals in a high-poverty, high-HIV-incidence urban area. A sequential explanatory mixed-methods design was used. We described linkage to HIV care and clinical outcomes [CD4 counts, viral load (VL levels] over 1 year, and then addressed qualitative research questions about the experience of receiving a new HIV diagnosis, its effects on timely engagement in HIV care, and other barriers and facilitators. Participants were assessed five times, receiving a structured interview battery, laboratory tests, data extraction from the medical record, a post-test counseling session, and in-person/phone contacts to foster linkage to care. Participants were randomly selected for qualitative interviews (N = 15/25 that were recorded and transcribed, then analyzed using systematic content analysis. Participants were 50 years old, on average (SD = 7.2 years, mostly male (80%, primarily African-American/Black (88%, and low socioeconomic status. At the first follow-up, rates of engagement in care were high (78%, but viral suppression was modest (39%. Rates improved by the final follow-up (96% engaged, 62% virally suppressed. Two-thirds (69% were adequately retained in care over 1 year. Qualitative results revealed multi-faceted responses to receiving an HIV diagnosis. Problems accepting and internalizing one

  17. Factors Associated with Delayed Enrollment in HIV Medical Care among HIV-Positive Individuals in Odessa Region, Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neduzhko, Oleksandr; Postnov, Oleksandr; Perehinets, Ihor; DeHovitz, Jack; Joseph, Michael; Odegaard, David; Kaplan, Robert; Kiriazova, Tetiana

    In Ukraine, about one-third of identified HIV-positive individuals are not connected to care. We conducted a cross-sectional survey (n = 200) among patients registered at Odessa AIDS centers in October to December 2011. Factors associated with delayed enrollment in HIV care (>3 months since positive HIV test) were evaluated using logistic regression. Among study participants (mean age 35 ± 8.2 years, 47.5% female, 42.5% reported history of injecting drugs), 55% delayed HIV care enrollment. Odds of delayed enrollment were higher for those with lower educational attainment (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.65, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.04-6.76), not feeling ill (aOR: 2.98, 95% CI: 1.50-5.93), or not having time to go to the AIDS center (aOR: 3.89, 95% CI: 1.39-10.89); injection drug use was not associated with delayed enrollment. Programs linking HIV-positive individuals to specialized care should address enrollment barriers and include education on HIV care benefits and case management for direct linkage to care. HIV testing and treatment should be coupled to ensure a continuum of care.

  18. Linkage to care and treatment for TB and HIV among people newly diagnosed with TB or HIV-associated TB at a large, inner city South African hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Voss De Lima

    Full Text Available To assess the outcomes of linkage to TB and HIV care and identify risk factors for poor referral outcomes.Cohort study of TB patients diagnosed at an urban hospital.Linkage to care was determined by review of clinic files, national death register, and telephone contact, and classified as linked to care, delayed linkage to care (>7 days for TB treatment, >30 days for HIV care, or failed linkage to care. We performed log-binomial regression to identify patient and referral characteristics associated with poor referral outcomes.Among 593 TB patients, 23% failed linkage to TB treatment and 30.3% of the 77.0% who linked to care arrived late. Among 486 (86.9% HIV-infected TB patients, 38.3% failed linkage to HIV care, and 32% of the 61.7% who linked to care presented late. One in six HIV-infected patients failed linkage to both TB and HIV care. Only 20.2% of HIV-infected patients were referred to a single clinic for integrated care. A referral letter was present in 90.3%, but only 23.7% included HIV status and 18.8% CD4 cell count. Lack of education (RR 1.85 and low CD4 count (CD4≤50 vs. >250cells/mm(3; RR 1.66 were associated with failed linkage to TB care. Risk factors for failed linkage to HIV care were antiretroviral-naïve status (RR 1.29, and absence of referral letter with HIV or CD4 cell count (RR1.23.Linkage to TB/HIV care should be strengthened by communication of HIV and CD4 results, ART initiation during hospitalization and TB/HIV integration at primary care.

  19. evolution of hiv training for enhanced care provision in kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    some training on HIV management before they join the workforce. PEPFAR supported the training or ... expansion of quality prevention, care and treatment services (9). The current model of HIV care in Kenya is ... site attachments to centres of excellence reinforced by site visits by a mentor (11). Over 40,000 HIV service ...

  20. Knowledge, attitude and practices of STIs including HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Findings of the study show that adolescents in the sample have a wide gap between knowledge, attitude and practice with regards to STIs and HIV/AIDS though they become sexually active at an early age. There is also a lack of behavioural change which is reinforced by perceptions and misconception regarding STIs and ...

  1. The role of HIV nursing consultants in the care of HIV-infected patients in Dutch hospital outpatient clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervoort, Sigrid C. J. M.; Dijkstra, Boukje M.; Hazelzet, Esther E. B.; Grypdonck, Mieke H. F.; Hoepelman, Andy I. M.; Borleffs, Jan C. C.

    Objective: In the Netherlands HIV nursing consultants have participated in HIV-care since 1985: their profession has changed with developments in HIV-treatment over time. The study goal was to gather information about their role in HIV-care and to provide an useful example to other (HIV-)care

  2. The impact of the National HIV Health Care Worker Hotline on patient care in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinkel Hans-Friedemann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background South Africa has a huge burden of illness due to HIV infection. Many health care workers managing HIV infected patients, particularly those in rural areas and primary care health facilities, have minimal access to information resources and to advice and support from experienced clinicians. The Medicines Information Centre, based in the Division of Clinical Pharmacology at the University of Cape Town, has been running the National HIV Health Care Worker (HCW Hotline since 2008, providing free information for HIV treatment-related queries via telephone, fax and e-mail. Results A questionnaire-based study showed that 224 (44% of the 511 calls that were received by the hotline during the 2-month study period were patient-specific. Ninety-four completed questionnaires were included in the analysis. Of these, 72 (77% were from doctors, 13 (14% from pharmacists and 9 (10% from nurses. 96% of the callers surveyed took an action based on the advice received from the National HIV HCW Hotline. The majority of actions concerned the start, dose adaption, change, or discontinuation of medicines. Less frequent actions taken were adherence and lifestyle counselling, further investigations, referring or admission of patients. Conclusions The information provided by the National HIV HCW Hotline on patient-specific requests has a direct impact on the management of patients.

  3. Cervical Screening within HIV Care: Findings from an HIV-Positive Cohort in Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Heather; Thorne, Claire; Semenenko, Igor; Malyuta, Ruslan; Tereschenko, Rostislav; Adeyanova, Irina; Kulakovskaya, Elena; Ostrovskaya, Lyudmila; Kvasha, Liliana; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Townsend, Claire L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction HIV-positive women have an increased risk of invasive cervical cancer but cytologic screening is effective in reducing incidence. Little is known about cervical screening coverage or the prevalence of abnormal cytology among HIV-positive women in Ukraine, which has the most severe HIV epidemic in Europe. Methods Poisson regression models were fitted to data from 1120 women enrolled at three sites of the Ukraine Cohort Study of HIV-infected Childbearing Women to investigate factors associated with receiving cervical screening as part of HIV care. All women had been diagnosed as HIV-positive before or during their most recent pregnancy. Prevalence of cervical abnormalities (high/low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions) among women who had been screened was estimated, and associated factors explored. Results Overall, 30% (337/1120) of women had received a cervical screening test as part of HIV care at study enrolment (median 10 months postpartum), a third (115/334) of whom had been tested >12 months previously. In adjusted analyses, women diagnosed as HIV-positive during (vs before) their most recent pregnancy were significantly less likely to have a screening test reported, on adjusting for other potential risk factors (adjusted prevalence ratio (APR) 0.62, 95% CI 0.51–0.75 p<0.01 for 1st/2nd trimester diagnosis and APR 0.42, 95% CI 0.28–0.63 p<0.01 for 3rd trimester/intrapartum diagnosis). Among those with a cervical screening result reported at any time (including follow-up), 21% (68/325) had a finding of cervical abnormality. In adjusted analyses, Herpes simplex virus 2 seropositivity and a recent diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis were associated with an increased risk of abnormal cervical cytology (APR 1.83 95% CI 1.07–3.11 and APR 3.49 95% CI 2.11–5.76 respectively). Conclusions In this high risk population, cervical screening coverage as part of HIV care was low and could be improved by an organised cervical screening programme for HIV

  4. High rates of exposure to tuberculosis patients among HIV-infected health care workers in Botswana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, S S; Modongo, C; Zetola, N M; Wang, Q; Phologolo, T; Kestler, M; Ho-Foster, A

    2018-04-01

    To compare daily exposure to tuberculosis (TB) patients between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected health care workers (HCWs), and examine the uptake of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) among HIV-infected HCWs in Botswana. We conducted a cross-sectional study among HCWs in 30 hospitals and clinics. We determined self-reported exposure frequency to TB patients and HIV status through in-person interviews. HCWs with unknown or negative HIV status were offered rapid HIV testing. Multivariable Poisson regression modeling with robust variance was used to estimate the association between HIV status and daily exposure to TB patients. Of 1877 participants enrolled, 1388 (73.9%) with complete data were included in this study. Among 277 (20.0%) HIV-infected participants, 14.3% were newly diagnosed, 57.8% were on ART, and 34.3% reported previously receiving IPT. Daily exposure to TB patients was reported by respectively 48.4% and 52.9% of HIV-infected and non-infected participants. After adjusting for sex, age, occupation, and department, the rates of daily TB exposure remained similar between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected participants (prevalence ratio 0.96, 95%CI 0.85-1.08). We found similar rates of exposure to TB patients between HIV-infected and non-HIV-infected HCWs. Improved efforts are needed to reduce nosocomial exposure to TB among HIV-infected HCWs.

  5. Palliative care in advanced HIV

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    death, with close collaboration between acute and palliative physicians.This model of care should be encouraged ... productivity and death. BIOMEDICAL MARKERS DETER-. MINING THE TERMINAL PHASE .... nursing component of the multi- disciplinary team should facilitate strong liaison between the spe- cialised ...

  6. HIV and Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Select a Language: Fact Sheet 652 HIV and Cardiovascular Disease HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE WHY SHOULD PEOPLE WITH HIV CARE ABOUT CVD? ... OF CVD? WHAT ABOUT CHANGING MEDICATIONS? HIV AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE Cardiovascular disease (CVD) includes a group of problems ...

  7. Connecting Corrections and HIV Care: Building a Care Coordination Program for Recently Incarcerated Persons Living with HIV in Virginia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Steven; Gilmore, Kathryn; Yerkes, Lauren; Rhodes, Anne

    2017-12-16

    Incarcerated individuals are disproportionately affected by HIV and often experience risk factors associated with poor maintenance of HIV care upon release. Therefore, the transition period from incarceration to the community is a particularly critical time for persons living with HIV to ensure continuity of care and treatment. By building relationships with Department of Corrections staff and community partners, the Virginia Department of Health developed a program to link recently incarcerated persons living with HIV to care and treatment immediately upon release from correctional facilities across Virginia. Findings show that clients served by the program have better outcomes along the HIV continuum of care than the overall population living with HIV in Virginia. This paper describes the development, implementation and health outcomes of the Care Coordination program for recently incarcerated persons living with HIV in Virginia.

  8. Shifting the paradigm: using HIV surveillance data as a foundation for improving HIV care and preventing HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Patricia; Gardner, Lytt I; Buchacz, Kate; Garland, Pamela Morse; Mugavero, Michael J; Bosshart, Jeffrey T; Shouse, R Luke; Bertolli, Jeanne

    2013-09-01

    Reducing HIV incidence in the United States and improving health outcomes for people living with HIV hinge on improving access to highly effective treatment and overcoming barriers to continuous treatment. Using laboratory tests routinely reported for HIV surveillance to monitor individuals' receipt of HIV care and contacting them to facilitate optimal care could help achieve these objectives. Historically, surveillance-based public health intervention with individuals for HIV control has been controversial because of concerns that risks to privacy and autonomy could outweigh benefits. But with the availability of lifesaving, transmission-interrupting treatment for HIV infection, some health departments have begun surveillance-based outreach to facilitate HIV medical care. Guided by ethics frameworks, we explored the ethical arguments for changing the uses of HIV surveillance data. To identify ethical, procedural, and strategic considerations, we reviewed the activities of health departments that are using HIV surveillance data to contact persons identified as needing assistance with initiating or returning to care. Although privacy concerns surrounding the uses of HIV surveillance data still exist, there are ethical concerns associated with not using HIV surveillance to maximize the benefits from HIV medical care and treatment. Early efforts to use surveillance data to facilitate optimal HIV medical care illustrate how the ethical burdens may vary depending on the local context and the specifics of implementation. Health departments laid the foundation for these activities by engaging stakeholders to gain their trust in sharing sensitive information; establishing or strengthening legal, policy and governance infrastructure; and developing communication and follow-up protocols that protect privacy. We describe a shift toward using HIV surveillance to facilitate optimal HIV care. Health departments should review the considerations outlined before implementing new

  9. Reconnaissance assessment of risks for HIV transmission through health care and cosmetic services in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Mariette; Gisselquist, David

    2006-11-01

    Available information shows frequent unsterile medical injections in India, but less is known about other invasive procedures. To assess the variety and frequency of blood exposures in health care and cosmetic services, we interviewed people living with HIV/AIDS in four districts with high HIV prevalence. Eighty percent reported from 1-300 injections in the five years before testing HIV-positive. Common lifetime exposures include dental care (31%), surgery (20%), blood tests (100%), and tattooing (47%). Through observation and interviews with doctors, dentists, and others, we found evidence for common to routine re-use of unsterilized equipment for blood tests (lancets), dental care, tattoos, and surgery. Health-care professionals and the public are misinformed about HIV survival outside the body and underestimate HIV transmission efficiency through blood exposures. The challenge to implement infection control for all invasive procedures remains undefined, while attention focuses on partial solutions, including single use of disposable syringes.

  10. Patient satisfaction with health care services provided at HIV clinics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Since the establishment of free HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania a lot of research has been done to assess how health care providers discharge their duties in these clinics. Little research however has been done regarding satisfaction of HIV patients with free health care services provided.

  11. Development of an HIV Testing Dashboard to Complement the HIV Care Continuum Among MSM, PWID, and Heterosexuals in Washington, DC, 2007-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Rudy; Greenberg, Alan; Magnus, Manya; Opoku, Jenevieve; Kharfen, Michael; Kuo, Irene

    2017-07-01

    We developed an HIV testing dashboard to complement the HIV care continuum in selected high-risk populations. Using National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) data, we examined trends in HIV testing and care for men who have sex with men (MSM), persons who inject drugs (PWID), and heterosexuals at elevated risk (HET). Between 2007 and 2015, 4792 participants ≥18 years old completed a behavioral survey and were offered HIV testing. For the testing dashboard, proportions ever tested, tested in the past year, testing HIV-positive, and newly testing positive were calculated. An abbreviated care continuum for self-reported positive (SRP) persons included ever engagement in care, past year care, and current antiretroviral (ARV) use. The testing dashboard and care continuum were calculated separately for each population. Chi-square test for trend was used to assess significant trends over time. Among MSM, lifetime HIV testing and prevalence significantly increased from 96% to 98% (P = 0.01) and 14%-20% (P = 0.02) over time; prevalence was highest among black MSM at all time points. HIV prevalence among female persons who inject drugs was significantly higher in 2015 vs. 2009 (27% and 13%; P dashboard can be used to complement the HIV care continuum to display improvements and disparities in HIV testing and care over time.

  12. Informing comprehensive HIV prevention: a situational analysis of the HIV prevention and care context, North West Province South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri A Lippman

    Full Text Available Building a successful combination prevention program requires understanding the community's local epidemiological profile, the social community norms that shape vulnerability to HIV and access to care, and the available community resources. We carried out a situational analysis in order to shape a comprehensive HIV prevention program that address local barriers to care at multiple contextual levels in the North West Province of South Africa.The situational analysis was conducted in two sub-districts in 2012 and guided by an adaptation of WHO's Strategic Approach, a predominantly qualitative method, including observation of service delivery points and in-depth interviews and focus groups with local leaders, providers, and community members, in order to recommend context-specific HIV prevention strategies. Analysis began during fieldwork with nightly discussions of findings and continued with coding original textual data from the fieldwork notebooks and a select number of recorded interviews.We conducted over 200 individual and group interviews and gleaned four principal social barriers to HIV prevention and care, including: HIV fatalism, traditional gender norms, HIV-related stigma, and challenges with communication around HIV, all of which fuel the HIV epidemic. At the different levels of response needed to stem the epidemic, we found evidence of national policies and programs that are mitigating the social risk factors but little community-based responses that address social risk factors to HIV.Understanding social and structural barriers to care helped shape our comprehensive HIV prevention program, which address the four 'themes' identified into each component of the program. Activities are underway to engage communities, offer community-based testing in high transmission areas, community stigma reduction, and a positive health, dignity and prevention program for stigma reduction and improve communication skills. The situational analysis

  13. The future of digital games for HIV prevention and care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Muessig, Kathryn E; Bauermeister, José A; LeGrand, Sara; Fiellin, Lynn E

    2017-09-01

    Although there has been a significant increase in mHealth interventions addressing the HIV prevention and care continuum, interventions using game mechanics have been less explored. Digital games are rapidly becoming an important tool for improving health behaviors and supporting the delivery of care and education. The purpose of this review is to provide a historical context for the use of gamification and videogames (including those using virtual reality) used in technology-based HIV interventions and to review new research in the field. A review of recently published (1 January 2016-31 March 2017) or presented abstracts (2016) identified a paucity of technology-based interventions that included gamification elements or any terms associated with videogames or gameplay. A larger portfolio of digital gaming interventions is in the pipeline. Use of digital games that include elements of gamification or consist of standalone videogames or virtual-reality-based games, represent a promising intervention strategy to address the HIV prevention and care continuum, especially among youth. Our review demonstrates that there is significant room for growth in this area in designing, developing, testing and most importantly, implementation and dissemination these novel interventions.

  14. Outcomes of Paediatrics HIV care at the University of Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-06

    Dec 6, 2016 ... exact Test =0.003). Conclusions: About a quarter of our HIV-infected children were lost to follow up. Prompt initiation of HAART and HIV disclosure will positively influence ... of paediatric HIV disease.3 The advent of highly active antiretroviral .... Table 2: Orphan status and retention in care. LTFU = Lost To ...

  15. HIV care-seeking behaviour after HIV self-testing among men who have sex with men in Beijing, China: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xian-Long; Wu, Zun-You; Mi, Guo-Dong; McGoogan, Jennifer M; Rou, Ke-Ming; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Nanci

    2017-06-28

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) has become the group with the fastest growing HIV epidemic in China. Since many Chinese MSM are conducting HIV self-testing, we aimed to determine the rate of HIV care seeking after self-testing, examine characteristics of "seekers" compared to "non-seekers," and explore factors associated with HIV care-seeking behaviour. A cross-sectional study design was used and an online survey was conducted in Beijing, China in 2016, among users of a popular Chinese gay networking smart phone application. Chi-square test was used to compare characteristics of those who sought HIV care ("seekers") and those who did not ("non-seekers"). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess factors associated with HIV care seeking. Among 21,785 screened, 2383 participants (10.9%) were included in the study. A total of 380 participants (15.9%) reported seeking HIV care after HIV self-testing while 2003 (84.1%) did not. Lack of knowledge of the "window period" (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.68, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 0.47-0.97, P = 0.04) was associated with reduced odds of seeking HIV care, while lower monthly income (AOR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.03-1.62, P = 0.03) and obtaining HIV self-testing kits from health facilities (AOR = 2.40, 95% CI = 1.81-3.17, P seeking HIV care. Among those who sought HIV care, a large majority (92.4%) had non-reactive HIV self-testing results. Only 29 out of 265 with reactive, uncertain, or unknown results sought HIV care. We found a very low rate of HIV care seeking among our sample of urban Chinese MSM. The observation that most with reactive, uncertain, or unknown results did not seek HIV care is a cause for concern. These people should be paid more attention and helped to enter the care cascade. Our findings highlight that interventions aimed at improving linkage to care after HIV self-testing are urgently needed. However, further study is required to inform the

  16. Integration of sexually transmitted infection (STI) services into HIV care and treatment services for women living with HIV: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Caitlin E; Haberlen, Sabina A; Narasimhan, Manjulaa

    2017-06-21

    To review and critically appraise the existing evidence on integration of sexually transmitted infection (STI) services into HIV care and treatment services for women living with HIV. Systematic review. Four electronic databases were searched through 16February 2017 using keywords for HIV, STIs and integration. Reference lists of included articles and other reviews were also screened. We included studies that compared women living with HIV who received STI services integrated into HIV care and treatment services with those who received HIV care and treatment services without integrated STI services or standard of care. Of 170 articles identified, 3 studies reported in 4 articles were included. Two studies evaluated comprehensive care for people living with HIV in the UK; in both cases, quality and uptake of STI services seemed to improve following integration. The third study conducted a comparative case study across different models of care in Swaziland: two clinics integrated with sexual and reproductive health services (including STI services), and two stand-alone HIV clinics (without STI services). Coverage for Pap smears among women living with HIV was higher at the fully integrated site, but there was no significant difference in the prevalence of sexual health screening or advice on sexual health. Reported client satisfaction was generally higher at the stand-alone HIV clinic, and a diverse range of factors related to implementation of different care models challenged the notion that integrated services are always superior or desired. While there is a limited evidence base for integrating STI services into HIV care and treatment services, existing studies indicate that integration is feasible and has the potential for positive outcomes. However, diverse population needs and health system factors must be considered when designing models of care to provide STI services to women living with HIV. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  17. Association of genital mycoplasmas including Mycoplasma genitalium in HIV infected men with nongonococcal urethritis attending STD & HIV clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhas, Ashwini; Sethi, Sunil; Sharma, Meera; Wanchu, Ajay; Kanwar, A J; Kaur, Karamjit; Mehta, S D

    2009-03-01

    Acute nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) is one of the commonest sexually transmitted infections affecting men. The role of genital mycoplasmas including Mycoplasma genitalium in HIV infected men with NGU is still not known. The aim of this study was to determine the isolation pattern/detection of genital mycoplasma including M. genitalium in HIV infected men with NGU and to compare it with non HIV infected individuals. One hundred male patients with NGU (70 HIV positive, 30 HIV negative) were included in the study. Urethral swabs and urine samples obtained from patients were subjected to semi-quantitative culture for Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasama urealyticum, whereas M. genitalium was detected by PCR from urine. The primers MgPa1 and MgPa3 were selected to identify 289 bp product specific for M. genitalium. Chalmydia trachomatis antigen detection was carried out by ELISA. M. genitalium and M. hominis were detected/isolated in 6 per cent of the cases. M. genitalium was more common amongst HIV positive cases (7.1%) as compared to HIV negative cases (3.3%) but difference was not statistically significant. Co-infection of C. trachomatis and U. urealyticum was found in two HIV positive cases whereas, C. trachomatis and M. hominis were found to be coinfecting only one HIV positive individual. M. genitalium was found to be infecting the patients as the sole pathogen. Patients with NGU had almost equal risk of being infected with M. genitalium, U. urealyticum or M. hominis irrespective of their HIV status. M.genitalium constitutes one of the important causes of NGU besides other genital mycoplasmas.

  18. Factors associated with linkage to HIV care and TB treatment at community-based HIV testing services in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Sue-Ann; Sloot, Rosa; Draper, Heather R; Naidoo, Pren; Burger, Ronelle; Beyers, Nulda

    2018-01-01

    Diagnosing HIV and/or TB is not sufficient; linkage to care and treatment is conditional to reduce the burden of disease. This study aimed to determine factors associated with linkage to HIV care and TB treatment at community-based services in Cape Town, South Africa. This retrospective cohort study utilized routinely collected data from clients who utilized stand-alone (fixed site not attached to a health facility) and mobile HIV testing services in eight communities in the City of Cape Town Metropolitan district, between January 2008 and June 2012. Clients were included in the analysis if they were ≥12 years and had a known HIV status. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) logistic regression models were used to assess the association between determinants (sex, age, HIV testing service and co-infection status) and self-reported linkage to HIV care and/or TB treatment. Linkage to HIV care was 3 738/5 929 (63.1%). Linkage to HIV care was associated with the type of HIV testing service. Clients diagnosed with HIV at mobile services had a significantly reduced odds of linking to HIV care (aOR 0.7 (CI 95%: 0.6-0.8), p<0.001. Linkage to TB treatment was 210/275 (76.4%). Linkage to TB treatment was not associated with sex and service type, but was associated with age. Clients in older age groups were less likely to link to TB treatment compared to clients in the age group 12-24 years (all, p-value<0.05). A large proportion of clients diagnosed with HIV at mobile services did not link to care. Almost a quarter of clients diagnosed with TB did not link to treatment. Integrated community-based HIV and TB testing services are efficient in diagnosing HIV and TB, but strategies to improve linkage to care are required to control these epidemics.

  19. "It is easier for me to shoot up": stigma, abandonment, and why HIV-positive drug users in Russia fail to link to HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiriazova, Tetiana; Lunze, Karsten; Raj, Anita; Bushara, Natalia; Blokhina, Elena; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Bridden, Carly; Lioznov, Dmitry; Samet, Jeffrey H; Gifford, Allen L

    2017-05-01

    Many HIV-positive people who inject drugs (PWID) globally are not receiving HIV care. This represents a major challenge among key populations to end the global HIV epidemic. This qualitative study explored the process and associated barriers of linking HIV-positive PWID who are in addiction treatment to HIV care in St. Petersburg, Russia. We conducted three focus groups and seven semi-structured interviews with participants in the LINC ("Linking Infectious and Narcology Care") project at addiction and HIV hospitals in St. Petersburg. The sample consisted of 25 HIV-infected patients with opioid dependence and seven health-care providers, including addiction and infectious disease physicians and case managers. A variety of intertwining factors influence effective engagement of PWID with HIV treatment. Stigma, problematic patient-provider relationships, and fragmented health care were the main challenges for HIV care initiation by PWID, which were further exacerbated by injection drug use. Effective linkage of PWID to HIV care requires acknowledging and addressing stigma's role and different perspectives of patients and providers.

  20. Adapting Systems of Care for People Aging With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegler, Eugenia L; Brennan-Ing, Mark

    People aging with HIV have medical and psychosocial needs that require more than the HIV services network can provide. HIV providers may lack experience managing multimorbidity or the functional consequences of aging. Social support services may be unable to provide necessary services for people living with HIV (PLWH) who are becoming increasingly frail or facing cognitive impairment. HIV providers will be caring for aging PLWH whose HIV management may seem simple compared with the significant burdens of stigma, mental health needs, social isolation, multimorbidity, and aging-related syndromes. Although practices can incorporate geriatric expertise and develop facility with the aging services network, a more comprehensive integration would adapt existing geriatric long-term care models for those aging with HIV. The diversity of aging PLWH and the tenuousness of the health safety net will necessitate innovative and flexible collaboration between content experts and social service agencies. Copyright © 2017 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. HIV Care in the Swedish-Danish HIV Cohort 1995-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helleberg, Marie; Häggblom, Amanda; Sönnerborg, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Successful treatment reduces morbidity, mortality and transmission of HIV. We evaluated trends in the treatment status of HIV infected individuals enrolled in care in Sweden and Denmark during the years 1995-2010. Our aim was to assess the proportion of HIV-infected individuals who received...

  2. Impact of patient race on patient experiences of access and communication in HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korthuis, P Todd; Saha, Somnath; Fleishman, John A; McGrath, Moriah McSharry; Josephs, Joshua S; Moore, Richard D; Gebo, Kelly A; Hellinger, James; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2008-12-01

    Patient-centered care--including the domains of access and communication--is an important determinant of positive clinical outcomes. To explore associations between race and HIV-infected patients' experiences of access and communication. This was a cross-sectional survey. Nine hundred and fifteen HIV-infected adults receiving care at 14 U.S. HIV clinics. Dependent variables included patients' reports of travel time to their HIV care site and waiting time to see their HIV provider (access) and ratings of their HIV providers on always listening, explaining, showing respect, and spending enough time with them (communication). We used multivariate logistic regression to estimate associations between patient race and dependent variables, and random effects models to estimate site-level contributions. Patients traveled a median 30 minutes (range 1-180) and waited a median 20 minutes (range 0-210) to see their provider. On average, blacks and Hispanics reported longer travel and wait times compared with whites. Adjusting for HIV care site attenuated this association. HIV care sites that provide services to a greater proportion of blacks and Hispanics may be more difficult to access for all patients. The majority of patients rated provider communication favorably. Compared to whites, blacks reported more positive experiences with provider communication. We observed racial disparities in patients' experience of access to care but not in patient-provider communication. Disparities were explained by poor access at minority-serving clinics. Efforts to make care more patient-centered for minority HIV-infected patients should focus more on improving access to HIV care in minority communities than on improving cross-cultural patient-provider interactions.

  3. Care at the Crossroads: Navigating the HIV, HCV, and Substance Abuse Syndemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Rebecca; Dugdale, Caitlin; Touzard-Romo, Francine; Noska, Amanda; Flanigan, Timothy; Rich, Josiah D.

    2014-01-01

    For patients with both HIV/HCV coinfection and substance addiction, multidisciplinary teams can facilitate coordination of care and improve clinical outcomes. Such teams should include HIV/HCV treatment providers, mental health specialists, case managers, social workers, and substance abuse counselors. PMID:25520548

  4. Implementation Process of a Canadian Community-based Nurse Mentorship Intervention in HIV Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caine, Vera; Mill, Judy; O’Brien, Kelly; Solomon, Patricia; Worthington, Catherine; Dykeman, Margaret; Gahagan, Jacqueline; Maina, Geoffrey; De Padua, Anthony; Arneson, Cheryl; Rogers, Tim; Chaw-Kant, Jean

    2016-01-01

    We describe salient individual and organizational factors that influenced engagement of registered nurses in a 12-month clinical mentorship intervention on HIV care in Canada. The intervention included 48 nurses and 8 people living with HIV (PLWH) who were involved in group-based and one-on-one informal mentorship informed by transformative learning theory. We evaluated the process of implementing the mentorship intervention using qualitative content analysis. The inclusion of PLWH as mentors, the opportunities for reciprocal learning, and the long-term commitment of individual nurses and partner organizations in HIV care were major strengths. Challenges included the need for multiple ethical approvals, the lack of organizational support at some clinical sites, and the time commitment required by participants. We recommend that clinical mentorship interventions in HIV care consider organizational support, adhere to the Greater Involvement of People Living with HIV/AIDS principles, and explore questions of professional obligations. PMID:26644019

  5. Barriers to communication between HIV care providers (HCPs) and women living with HIV about child bearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ddumba-Nyanzi, Ismael; Kaawa-Mafigiri, David; Johannessen, Helle

    2016-01-01

    -depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with 48 HIV infected women receiving ART at 7 different HIV clinics providing comprehensive HIV care services in four districts in Uganda, between July and August 2012. All women were aware of their HIV diagnosis prior to pregnancy or had given birth while living with HIV......) ‘accidental pregnancy’. Conclusion: Existing evidence regarding effective provider-patient communication should be considered for its application for reproductive counseling among HIV infected women. Practice implications: These data demonstrate the need for current counseling guidelines to explore approaches...

  6. Temporal trends in presentation for outpatient HIV medical care 2000-2010: implications for short-term mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Paula S; Jackson, David A; Chamot, Eric; Willig, James H; Nevin, Christa R; Allison, Jeroan J; Raper, James L; Kempf, Mirjam C; Schumacher, Joseph E; Saag, Michael S; Mugavero, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    Many newly diagnosed patients present to outpatient care with advanced HIV infection. More timely HIV diagnosis and initiation of care has the potential to improve individual health outcomes and has public health implications. To assess temporal trends in late presentation for outpatient HIV medial care as measured by CD4 count short-term (1-year) mortality. We conducted a cohort study nested in a prospective HIV clinical cohort including patients establishing initial outpatient HIV treatment between 2000-2010. Time series regression analysis evaluated temporal trends in late presentation for care measured by the proportion of patients with a CD4 count trends in short-term mortality. Patients establishing initial outpatient HIV treatment between 2000-2010 at an academic HIV clinic. The proportion of patients with a CD4 count short-term (1-year) mortality following clinic enrollment. Among 1121 patients, 41% had an initial CD4 count Time series regression analysis demonstrated significant reductions in late presentation for HIV care and decreases in short-term mortality with temporal improvement preceding updated CDC HIV testing recommendations. We observed a significant decline in the number of patients presenting for outpatient HIV care with advanced disease, particularly in 2006-2010. A significant trend in improved short-term survival among patients establishing HIV care was also observed, likely related to more timely presentation for outpatient care in more recent years.

  7. Late presentation for HIV care across Europe: update from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE) study, 2010 to 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Hamouda, Osamah; Gunsenheimer-Bartmeyer, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Late presentation (LP) for HIV care across Europe remains a significant issue. We provide a cross-European update from 34 countries on the prevalence and risk factors of LP for 2010–2013. People aged ≥ 16 presenting for HIV care (earliest of HIV-diagnosis, first clinic visit or cohort enrolment) after 1 January 2010 with available CD4 count within six months of presentation were included. LP was defined as presentation with a CD4 count 

  8. Subclinical atherosclerosis among HIV-infected adults attending HIV/AIDS care at two large ambulatory HIV clinics in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Ssinabulya

    Full Text Available The increased immune activation and inflammation of chronic HIV-infection and the characteristic dyslipidemias associated with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART contribute to an increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease among HIV-infected adults. There is an emerging need to understand determinants of cardiovascular disease (CVD among individuals aging with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. We determined the prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis [carotid intima media thickness (CIMT ≥ 0.78 mm] and its correlation with traditional CVD risk factors among HIV-infected adults.In a cross-sectional study, HIV-infected adults (ART-naïve and ART-treated were consecutively selected from patients' enrollment registers at two large HIV clinics at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. We measured traditional CVD risk factors including age, biophysical profile, fasting blood sugar and serum lipid profile as well as biomarkers of inflammation. High resolution ultrasound was used to measure common carotid CIMT.Of 245 patients, Median age [Interquartile range (IQR] 37 years (31-43, 168 (69% were females; and 100 (41% were ART-treated for at least 7 years. Overall, 34/186 (18% had subclinical atherosclerosis; of whom 15/108 (14% were ART-naïve whereas 19/78 (24% were ART-treated. Independent predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis included age [odds ratio (OR 1.83 per 5-year increase in age; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.24-2.69; p = 0.002], body mass index (BMI; OR 1.15; CI 1.01-1.31; p = 0.041 and high low density lipoprotein (LDL [OR 2.99; CI 1.02-8.78, p = 0.046]. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP was positively correlated with traditional cardio-metabolic risk factors including waist circumference (r = 0.127, p = 0.05, triglycerides (r = 0.19, p = 0.003 and Total Cholesterol: High Density Lipoprotein ratio (TC:LDL (r = 0.225, p<0.001.The prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis was 18% among HIV-infected adults in Uganda

  9. Subclinical atherosclerosis among HIV-infected adults attending HIV/AIDS care at two large ambulatory HIV clinics in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssinabulya, Isaac; Kayima, James; Longenecker, Chris; Luwedde, Mary; Semitala, Fred; Kambugu, Andrew; Ameda, Faith; Bugeza, Sam; McComsey, Grace; Freers, Juergen; Nakanjako, Damalie

    2014-01-01

    The increased immune activation and inflammation of chronic HIV-infection and the characteristic dyslipidemias associated with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) contribute to an increased risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease among HIV-infected adults. There is an emerging need to understand determinants of cardiovascular disease (CVD) among individuals aging with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. We determined the prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis [carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) ≥ 0.78 mm] and its correlation with traditional CVD risk factors among HIV-infected adults. In a cross-sectional study, HIV-infected adults (ART-naïve and ART-treated) were consecutively selected from patients' enrollment registers at two large HIV clinics at Mulago Hospital, Kampala, Uganda. We measured traditional CVD risk factors including age, biophysical profile, fasting blood sugar and serum lipid profile as well as biomarkers of inflammation. High resolution ultrasound was used to measure common carotid CIMT. Of 245 patients, Median age [Interquartile range (IQR)] 37 years (31-43), 168 (69%) were females; and 100 (41%) were ART-treated for at least 7 years. Overall, 34/186 (18%) had subclinical atherosclerosis; of whom 15/108 (14%) were ART-naïve whereas 19/78 (24%) were ART-treated. Independent predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis included age [odds ratio (OR) 1.83 per 5-year increase in age; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.24-2.69; p = 0.002], body mass index (BMI); OR 1.15; CI 1.01-1.31; p = 0.041 and high low density lipoprotein (LDL) [OR 2.99; CI 1.02-8.78, p = 0.046]. High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) was positively correlated with traditional cardio-metabolic risk factors including waist circumference (r = 0.127, p = 0.05), triglycerides (r = 0.19, p = 0.003) and Total Cholesterol: High Density Lipoprotein ratio (TC:LDL) (r = 0.225, p<0.001). The prevalence of subclinical atherosclerosis was 18% among HIV-infected adults in Uganda

  10. Understanding the drivers of interprofessional collaborative practice among HIV primary care providers and case managers in HIV care programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavronicolas, Heather A; Laraque, Fabienne; Shankar, Arti; Campbell, Claudia

    2017-05-01

    Care coordination programmes are an important aspect of HIV management whose success depends largely on HIV primary care provider (PCP) and case manager collaboration. Factors influencing collaboration among HIV PCPs and case managers remain to be studied. The study objective was to test an existing theoretical model of interprofessional collaborative practice and determine which factors play the most important role in facilitating collaboration. A self-administered, anonymous mail survey was sent to HIV PCPs and case managers in New York City. An adapted survey instrument elicited information on demographic, contextual, and perceived social exchange (trustworthiness, role specification, and relationship initiation) characteristics. The dependent variable, perceived interprofessional practice, was constructed from a validated scale. A sequential block wise regression model specifying variable entry order examined the relative importance of each group of factors and of individual variables. The analysis showed that social exchange factors were the dominant drivers of collaboration. Relationship initiation was the most important predictor of interprofessional collaboration. Additional influential factors included organisational leadership support of collaboration, practice settings, and frequency of interprofessional meetings. Addressing factors influencing collaboration among providers will help public health programmes optimally design their structural, hiring, and training strategies to foster effective social exchanges and promote collaborative working relationships.

  11. HIV diagnosis, linkage to HIV care, and HIV risk behaviors among newly diagnosed HIV-positive female sex workers in Kigali, Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braunstein, Sarah L.; Umulisa, Marie-Michèle; Veldhuijzen, Nienke J.; Kestelyn, Evelyne; Ingabire, Chantal M.; Nyinawabega, Jeanine; van de Wijgert, Janneke H. H. M.; Nash, Denis

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate linkage-to-care, sexual behavior change, and psychosocial experiences among newly HIV-diagnosed female sex workers (FSWs) in Rwanda. FSWs (n = 800) with unknown serostatus were screened for HIV during 2007/2008. Women testing HIV positive (n = 192) were referred to care and asked to

  12. Gender differences among oral health care workers in caring for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gender differences among oral health care workers in caring for HIV/AIDS patients in Osun state, Nigeria. ... This study found significant differences in gender and ability to identify HIV/AIDS oral manifestations (p <0.001) and recognition of HIV/AIDS risk factors (p <0.001). There was statistically significant gender difference ...

  13. Care of HIV-infected adults at Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Part I. Clinical management and costs of outpatient care. Objective. To provide a detailed breakdown of clinical presentations and management of outpatients with HIV. and associated costs, in order to inform clinical practice, health service planning and projections of the costs of HIV care in South Africa Setting.

  14. Factors underlying taking a child to HIV care: implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: With the aim of reducing pediatric loss to follow-up (LTFU) from HIV clinical care programs in sub-Saharan Africa, we sought to understand the personal and socio-cultural factors associated with the behavior of caregivers taking HIV-infected and -exposed children for care in western Kenya. Methods: Between ...

  15. Facilitators and Barriers to Linkage to HIV Care among Female Sex Workers Receiving HIV Testing Services at a Community-Based Organization in Periurban Uganda: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Nakanwagi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. While four in ten female sex workers (FSWs in sub-Saharan Africa are infected with HIV, only a small proportion is enrolled in HIV care. We explored facilitators and barriers to linkage to HIV care among FSWs receiving HIV testing services at a community-based organization in periurban Uganda. Methods. The cross-sectional qualitative study was conducted among 28 HIV positive FSWs from May to July 2014. Key informant interviews were conducted with five project staff and eleven peer educators. Data were collected on facilitators for and barriers to linkage to HIV care and manually analyzed following a thematic framework approach. Results. Facilitators for linkage to HIV care included the perceived good quality of health services with same-day results and immediate initiation of treatment, community peer support systems, individual’s need to remain healthy, and having alternative sources of income. Linkage barriers included perceived stigma, fear to be seen at outreach HIV clinics, fear and myths about antiretroviral therapy, lack of time to attend clinic, and financial constraints. Conclusion. Linkage to HIV care among FSWs is influenced by good quality friendly services and peer support. HIV service delivery programs for FSWs should focus on enhancing these and dealing with barriers stemming from stigma and misinformation.

  16. Predictors of Adult Retention in HIV Care: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulsara, Shiraze M; Wainberg, Milton L; Newton-John, Toby R O

    2018-03-01

    A systematic literature review was conducted to identify predictors of poor adult retention in HIV medical care in developed and developing countries. An electronic search was conducted with MEDLINE (OVID), PubMED, EBSCO, SCOPUS, and Cochrane databases, as well as manual searches. Original, quantitative, adult studies in English, published between 1995 and 2015 were included. Only those with a focus on predictors of retention in care were reported on. Of the 345 articles identified, thirty were included following an independent assessment by two raters. In developed countries, the most frequently cited predictors of poor retention were active substance use and demographic factors. In developing countries, physical health factors were most frequently associated with poor retention in care. The results from this review suggests primary concerns for poor retention include substance use and physical health factors. Other psychosocial factors, such as psychiatric illness and social/welfare factors, were also found to be relevant.

  17. Sociocultural and structural barriers to care among undocumented Latino immigrants with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bich N; Giordano, Thomas P; Kim, Jennifer H

    2012-02-01

    Timely entry into HIV care is critical for early initiation of therapy, immunologic recovery and improved survival. However, undocumented Latinos are more likely to enter HIV care late in the disease course and with concurrent AIDS. We conducted a qualitative study to examine the circumstantial, situational and social factors that uniquely affect entry and retention in care for this population. Between June and August 2006, we conducted semi-structured, in-depth, individual interviews with 22 undocumented Latino immigrants living with HIV infection. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and reviewed for accuracy. Data was analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Word content was coded and sorted by themes using AnSWR software. Emergent themes related to health care barriers include (1) the challenges of dealing with HIV stigma and rejection from family and community; and (2) the experienced and perceived structural barriers of accessing care as an undocumented individual. Societal intolerance of HIV and stigma-related experiences result in feelings of secrecy and shame. In addition, the undocumented state complicates the situation even further. These unique barriers include fear of deportation, work restrictions, inadequate translation services and difficulties meeting paperwork requirements. This study offers insight into the unique sociocultural and structural barriers faced by undocumented Latinos with HIV infection. Understanding and addressing these barriers will prove vital in the development and implementation of strategies to promote early entry into HIV care.

  18. Late presentation to HIV care despite good access to health services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darling, Katharine Ea; Hachfeld, Anna; Cavassini, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    show that late presentation occurs in 38.3% to 49.8% of patients newly presenting for care, depending on region. In Switzerland, data from patients enrolled in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study put the rate of late presentation at 49.8% and show that patients outside established HIV risk groups are most...... likely to be late presenters. Provider-initiated testing needs to be improved to reach these groups, which include heterosexual men and women and older patients. The aim of this review is to describe the scale and implications of late presentation using cohort data from Switzerland and elsewhere...... infection rates are rising, and diagnosing HIV early in the course of infection remains a challenge. Late presentation to care in HIV refers to individuals newly presenting for HIV care with a CD4 count below 350 cells/µl or with an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining event. Late...

  19. Conspiracy Beliefs Are Not Necessarily a Barrier to Engagement in HIV Care Among Urban, Low-Income People of Color Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, J; Singer, S N; Griffin Tomas, M; Lekas, H-M

    2018-02-27

    HIV-related "conspiracy beliefs" include ideas about the genocidal origin of HIV to target minority people, and the notion that a cure for HIV is being deliberately withheld. Previous literature suggests that these beliefs may negatively affect engagement in HIV care and ART adherence, but little is known about how people who are disengaged from care may think about these ideas. Twenty-seven semi-structured interviews were conducted with low-income Black and Latinx people living with HIV in NYC who were currently disengaged from, or recently re-engaged in, HIV care. The data suggest that HIV-related "conspiracy beliefs" are not necessarily a barrier to care. Regardless of whether or not people endorsed these ideas, participants were largely dismissive, and prioritized focusing on managing their HIV and overall health and life challenges. Interventions aiming to improve ART adherence and retention in HIV care should focus on building trust between clinicians and populations that have experienced historical, as well as ongoing, marginalization. HIV care providers should ask patients open-ended questions specifically about their beliefs about HIV and ART in order to address potential suspicion. Moving away from the phrase "conspiracy beliefs" in favor of more neutral language, such as "HIV-related beliefs," can enable us to better understand these ideas in the context of people's daily lives. Further research is needed to better understand how structural inequality may shape how people experience mistrust, and how mistrust may factor into the constellation of barriers to consistent engagement in HIV care.

  20. Outpatient HIV care in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, E.A.N.

    2017-01-01

    HIV is now, as a result of cART, a treatable condition. Sadly, as reflected by the large number of annual HIV-related deaths and new infections, managing HIV infection and curbing the epidemic has proven extremely challenging. To achieve world without HIV and AIDS, we need to ensure that all

  1. Social support and delays seeking care after HIV diagnosis, North Carolina, 2000-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Sandra I; Strauss, Ronald P; MacDonald, Pia D M; Leone, Peter A; Eron, Joseph J; Miller, William C

    2009-09-01

    Many adults in the USA enter primary care late in the course of HIV infection, countering the clinical benefits of timely HIV services and missing opportunities for risk reduction. Our objective was to determine if perceived social support was associated with delay entering care after an HIV diagnosis. Two hundred and sixteen patients receiving primary care at a large, university-based HIV outpatient clinic in North Carolina were included in the study. Dimensions of functional social support (emotional/informational, tangible, affectionate, and positive social interaction) were quantified with a modified Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Scale and included in proportional hazards models to determine their effect on delays seeking care. The median delay between diagnosis and entry to primary care was 5.9 months. Levels of social support were high but only positive social interaction was moderately associated with delayed presentation in adjusted models. The effect of low perceived positive social interaction on the time to initiation of primary care differed by history of alcoholism (no history of alcoholism, hazard ratio (HR): 1.43, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.88, 2.34; history of alcoholism, HR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.40, 1.28). Ensuring timely access to HIV care remains a challenge in the southeastern USA. Affectionate, tangible, and emotional/informational social support were not associated with the time from diagnosis to care. The presence of positive social interaction may be an important factor influencing care-seeking behavior after diagnosis.

  2. Effect of the US National HIV/AIDS Strategy targets for improved HIV care engagement: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Maunank; Perry, Allison; Risher, Kathryn; Kapoor, Sunaina; Grey, Jeremy; Sharma, Akshay; Rosenberg, Eli S; Del Rio, Carlos; Sullivan, Patrick; Dowdy, David W

    2016-03-01

    The recently updated White House National HIV/AIDS Strategy (NHAS) includes specific progress indicators to improve the HIV care continuum in the USA, but the economic and epidemiological effect of achieving those indicators remains unclear. We aimed to project the impact of achieving NHAS goals on HIV incidence, prevalence, mortality, and costs among adults in the USA over 10 years. We constructed a dynamic transmission model of HIV progression and care engagement based on literature sources and the most recent published US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data. We specifically considered achievement of the 2020 targets set forth in NHAS progress indicator 1 (90% awareness of serostatus), indicator 4 (85% linkage within 1 month), and indicator 5 (90% of diagnosed individuals in care). At current rates of engagement in the HIV care continuum, we project 524,000 (95% uncertainty range 442,000-712,000) new HIV infections and 375,000 deaths (364,000-578,000) between 2016 and 2025. Achievement of NHAS progress indicators 1 and 4 has modest epidemiological effect (new infections reduced by 2·0% and 3·9%, respectively). By contrast, increasing the proportion of diagnosed individuals in care (NHAS indicator 5) averts 52% (95% UR 47-56) of new infections. Achievement of all NHAS targets resulted in a 58% reduction (95% UR 52-61) in new infections and 128 000 lives saved (106,000-223,000) at an incremental health system cost of US$105 billion. Achievement of NHAS progress indicators for screening, linkage, and particularly improving retention in care, can substantially reduce the burden of HIV in the USA, but continued and increased financial investment will be required. The National Institutes of Health, the B Frank and Kathleen Polk Assistant Professorship in Epidemiology, Emory University CFAR, Johns Hopkins University CFAR, and CDC/NCHHSTP Epidemiological and Economic Modeling Agreement (5U38PS004646). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Mathematical modeling of HIV prevention measures including pre-exposure prophylaxis on HIV incidence in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Bean; Yoon, Myoungho; Ku, Nam Su; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Ahn, Jin Young; Jeong, Su Jin; Kim, Changsoo; Kwon, Hee-Dae; Lee, Jeehyun; Smith, Davey M; Choi, Jun Yong

    2014-01-01

    Multiple prevention measures have the possibility of impacting HIV incidence in South Korea, including early diagnosis, early treatment, and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). We investigated how each of these interventions could impact the local HIV epidemic, especially among men who have sex with men (MSM), who have become the major risk group in South Korea. A mathematical model was used to estimate the effects of each these interventions on the HIV epidemic in South Korea over the next 40 years, as compared to the current situation. We constructed a mathematical model of HIV infection among MSM in South Korea, dividing the MSM population into seven groups, and simulated the effects of early antiretroviral therapy (ART), early diagnosis, PrEP, and combination interventions on the incidence and prevalence of HIV infection, as compared to the current situation that would be expected without any new prevention measures. Overall, the model suggested that the most effective prevention measure would be PrEP. Even though PrEP effectiveness could be lessened by increased unsafe sex behavior, PrEP use was still more beneficial than the current situation. In the model, early diagnosis of HIV infection was also effectively decreased HIV incidence. However, early ART did not show considerable effectiveness. As expected, it would be most effective if all interventions (PrEP, early diagnosis and early treatment) were implemented together. This model suggests that PrEP and early diagnosis could be a very effective way to reduce HIV incidence in South Korea among MSM.

  4. How Peru introduced a plan for comprehensive HIV prevention and care for transwomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Ximena; Núnez-Curto, Arón; Villayzán, Jana; Castillo, Regina; Benites, Carlos; Caballero, Patricia; Cáceres, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    As a group, transwomen in Peru have the highest prevalence of HIV (>20%) in the country, but they have little access to HIV prevention, testing and care services. Until recently, Peru's national HIV programme did not recognize transwomen and had remained essentially static for decades. This changed in December 2014, when the Ministry of Health expressed its commitment to improve programming for transwomen and to involve transwomen organizations by prioritizing the development of a "Targeted Strategy Plan of STIs/HIV/AIDS Prevention and Comprehensive Care for Transwomen." A policy dialogue between key stakeholders - Peru's Ministry of Health, academic scientists, civil society, transgender leaders and international agencies - created the conditions for a change in Peru's national HIV policy for transwomen. Supported by the effective engagement of all sectors, the Ministry of Health launched a plan to provide comprehensive HIV prevention and care for transwomen. The five-year plan includes new national guidelines for HIV prevention, care and support, and country-level investments in infrastructure and equipment. In addition to new biomedical strategies, the plan also incorporates several strategies to address structural factors that contribute to the vulnerability of transwomen. We identified three key factors that created the right conditions for this change in Peru's HIV policy. These factors include (1) the availability of solid evidence, based on scientific research; (2) ongoing efforts within the transwomen community to become better advocates of their own rights; and (3) a dialogue involving honest discussions between stakeholders about possibilities of changing the nation's HIV policy. The creation of Peru's national plan for HIV prevention and care for transwomen shows that long-term processes, focused on human rights for transwomen in Peru, can lead to organizational and public-policy change.

  5. Mobile health service for HIV screening and care in resource ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This review paper aims at demonstrating that mobile health services for HIV infection in resource-constrained countries may be particularly useful for HIV screening and treatment of HIV disease and associated co-morbidities, especially for people who have limited access to fixed health facilities, including remote ...

  6. Participant characteristics and HIV risk behaviors among individuals entering integrated buprenorphine/naloxone and HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Amina A; Botsko, Michael; Weiss, Linda; Egan, James E; Mitty, Jennifer; Estrada, Barbara; Lucas, Gregory M; Woodson, Tanita; Flanigan, Timothy P; Fiellin, David A

    2011-03-01

    This study was part of a national, multisite demonstration project evaluating the impact of integrated buprenorphine/naloxone treatment and HIV care. The goals of this study were to describe the baseline demographic, clinical, and substance use characteristics of the participants and to explore HIV transmission risk behaviors in this group. Nine sites across the United States participated. Data obtained by interview and chart review included demographic information, medical history, substance use, and risk behaviors.We performed a descriptive analysis of patient characteristics at entry and used logistic regression to evaluate factors associated with 1) unprotected anal or vaginal sex; and 2) needle-sharing within the previous 90 days. Three hundred eighty-six individuals were included in the study: 303 (78.5%) received buprenorphine/naloxone; 41 (10.6%) received methadone; and 42 (10.9%) received another form of treatment. The analysis of risk behaviors was limited to those in the buprenorphine group (n = 303). Among those reporting vaginal or anal sex in the previous 90 days, 24% had sex without a condom. Factors significantly associated with unprotected sex were: having a partner; female gender; and alcohol use in previous 30 days. A total of 8.9% of participants shared needles in the previous 90 days. Factors significantly associated with needle-sharing were: amphetamine use; marijuana use; homelessness; and anxiety. Addressing transmission risk behaviors is an important secondary HIV prevention strategy. In addition to treatment for opioid dependence, addressing other substance use, social issues, particularly housing, and mental health may have important implications for reducing HIV transmission in HIV-infected opioid-dependent patients.

  7. Linkage to HIV care, postpartum depression, and HIV-related stigma in newly diagnosed pregnant women living with HIV in Kenya: a longitudinal observational study

    OpenAIRE

    Turan, Bulent; Stringer, Kristi L; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Weiser, Sheri D; Cohen, Craig R; Turan, Janet M

    2014-01-01

    Background While studies have suggested that depression and HIV-related stigma may impede access to care, a growing body of literature also suggests that access to HIV care itself may help to decrease internalized HIV-related stigma and symptoms of depression in the general population of persons living with HIV. However, this has not been investigated in postpartum women living with HIV. Furthermore, linkage to care itself may have additional impacts on postpartum depression beyond the effect...

  8. Linkage to HIV care and antiretroviral therapy in Cape Town, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Kranzer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been scaled-up rapidly in Africa. Programme reports typically focus on loss to follow-up and mortality among patients receiving ART. However, little is known about linkage and retention in care of individuals prior to starting ART.Data on adult residents from a periurban community in Cape Town were collected at a primary care clinic and hospital. HIV testing registers, CD4 count results provided by the National Health Laboratory System and ART registers were linked. A random sample (n = 885 was drawn from adults testing HIV positive through antenatal care, sexual transmitted disease and voluntary testing and counseling services between January 2004 and March 2009. All adults (n = 103 testing HIV positive through TB services during the same time period were also included in the study. Linkage to HIV care was defined as attending for a CD4 count measurement within 6 months of HIV diagnosis. Linkage to ART care was defined as initiating ART within 6 months of HIV diagnosis in individuals with a CD4 count ≤200 cells/µl taken within 6 months of HIV diagnosis.Only 62.6% of individuals attended for a CD4 count measurement within 6 months of testing HIV positive. Individuals testing through sexually transmitted infection services had the best (84.1% and individuals testing on their own initiative (53.5% the worst linkage to HIV care. One third of individuals with timely CD4 counts were eligible for ART and 66.7% of those were successfully linked to ART care. Linkage to ART care was highest among antenatal care clients. Among individuals not yet eligible for ART only 46.3% had a repeat CD4 count. Linkage to HIV care improved in patients tested in more recent calendar period.Linkage to HIV and ART care was low in this poor peri-urban community despite free services available within close proximity. More efforts are needed to link VCT scale-up to subsequent care.

  9. HIV continuum of care in Europe and Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, R S; Rice, B; Rüütel, K; Delpech, V; Attawell, K A; Hales, D K; Velasco, C; Amato-Gauci, A J; Pharris, A; Tavoschi, L; Noori, T

    2017-08-01

    The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) supports countries to monitor progress in their response to the HIV epidemic. In line with these monitoring responsibilities, we assess how, and to what extent, the continuum of care is being measured across countries. The ECDC sent out questionnaires to 55 countries in Europe and Central Asia in 2014. Nominated country representatives were questioned on how they defined and measured six elements of the continuum. We present our results using three previously described frameworks [breakpoints; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) 90-90-90 targets; diagnosis and treatment quadrant]. Forty countries provided data for at least one element of the continuum. Countries reported most frequently on the number of people diagnosed with HIV infection (37; 93%), and on the number in receipt of antiretroviral therapy (ART) (35; 88%). There was little consensus across countries in their approach to defining linkage to, and retention in, care. The most common breakpoint (>19% reduction between two adjacent elements) related to the estimated number of people living with HIV who were diagnosed (18 of 23; 78%). We present continuum data from multiple countries that provide both a snapshot of care provision and a baseline against which changes over time in care provision across Europe and Central Asia may be measured. To better inform HIV testing and treatment programmes, standard data collection approaches and definitions across the HIV continuum of care are needed. If countries wish to ensure an unbroken HIV continuum of care, people living with HIV need to be diagnosed promptly, and ART needs to be offered to all those diagnosed. © 2017 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  10. Occupational exposure to HIV amongst health care workers in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increasing HIV sero-prevalence amongst pregnant women places health care workers in busy labour wards at high risk of occupational exposure to HIV. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether there has been a change in the prevalence of needle-stick and sharps injuries at King Edward VIII Hospital, ...

  11. Evolution of HIV Training for Enhanced Care Provision in Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Healthcare worker capacity building efforts over the past decade have resulted in decentralisation of HIV prevention, care and treatment services. Objective: To provide an overview of the evolution of HIV training in Kenya, from 2003 to date. Data sources: Various Government of Kenya publications, policy ...

  12. Migration, pastoralists, HIV infection and access to care: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The burden of HIV infection among the nomadic Fulani of northern Nigeria is unknown. Migration — a way of life for this population — is known to increase the rate of HIV transmission and may limit individuals' access to treatment and care. Many of Africa's other traditional, pastoral societies are similarly affected. This paper ...

  13. Care of children with HIV infection and AIDS in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marum, L H; Tindyebwa, D; Gibb, D

    1997-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is a major cause of pediatric morbidity and mortality, especially in Africa. The UN Joint Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) estimates that 85% of the 2.6 million children with HIV infection are from sub-Saharan Africa. About 650,000 children are living with HIV/AIDS and approximately 1000 infected infants are born every day in Africa. Since few of the 7 million infected African women have access to HIV testing and counseling, not to mention interventions such as AZT to reduce the risk of HIV transmission to their infants, the high incidence of HIV-infected children in Africa will likely continue for some time. The countries of east and southern Africa and several countries in west Africa have the highest HIV prevalence rates in the world. The development of cost-effective strategies to provide care and improve the quality of life of HIV-infected infants and children in Africa should be a priority area for increased research and support. The authors describe progress in understanding the natural history of HIV infection in African children, review strategies for managing HIV-infected children in resource-poor settings, and discuss issues of community response and counseling for children.

  14. Self-care and HIV/aids patients: nursing care systematization

    OpenAIRE

    Caetano,Joselany Áfio; Pagliuca,Lorita Marlena Freitag

    2006-01-01

    This research aimed at systematizing nursing care to HIV/aids patients in view of Orem's Self-care Deficit Nursing Theory, using the convergent-care method and the Self-Care Nursing Process. Subjects were thirteen HIV/AIDS patients attended at a non-governmental organization in Fortaleza/CE, Brazil. We used interview techniques, physical examination, observation and information records, with a structured instrument, addressing requisites related to universal self-care, development and health ...

  15. Engagement in HIV care among Kenyan adults and adolescents: results from a national population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafula, Rose; Masyuko, Sarah; Ng'ang'a, Lucy; Kim, Andrea A; Gichangi, Anthony; Mukui, Irene; Batuka, James; Ngugi, Evelyn W; Maina, William K; Schwarcz, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    Increasing access to care and treatment for HIV-infected persons is a goal in Kenya's response to the HIV epidemic. Using data from the second Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey (KAIS 2012), we describe coverage of services received among adults and adolescents who were enrolled in HIV care. KAIS 2012 was a population-based survey that collected information from persons aged 15-64 years that included self-reported HIV status, and for persons reporting HIV infection, use of HIV care and antiretroviral therapy (ART). Blood specimens were collected and tested for HIV. HIV-positive specimens were tested for CD4 counts and viral load. Among 363 persons who reported HIV infection, 93.4% [95% confidence interval (CI): 87.2 to 99.6] had ever received HIV care. Among those receiving HIV care, 96.3% (95% CI: 94.1 to 98.4) were using cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, and 74.6% (95% CI: 69.0 to 80.2) were receiving ART. A lower proportion of persons in care and not on ART reported using cotrimoxazole (89.5%, 95% CI: 82.5 to 96.5 compared with 98.6%, 95% CI: 97.1 to 100) and had a CD4 count measurement done (72.9%, 95% CI: 64.0 to 81.9 compared with 90.0%, 95% CI: 82.8 to 97.3) than persons in care and on ART, respectively. Among persons in care and not on ART, 23.2% (95% CI: 6.8 to 39.7) had CD4 counts ≤350 cells per microliter. Viral suppression was observed in 75.3% (95% CI: 68.7 to 81.9) of persons on ART. Linkage and retention in care are high among persons with known HIV infection. However, improvements in care for the pre-ART population are needed. Viral suppression rates were comparable to developed settings.

  16. DEPIVIH 2: Use of three HIV testing methods in French primary care settings - ELISA laboratory screening versus two rapid point-of-care HIV tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadima, D; Gauthier, R; Prévoteau du Clary, F; Bouée, S; Conort, G; Livrozet, J-M; Taulera, O; Wajsbrot, A; Majerholc, C; Peter, J-M; Aubert, J-P

    2018-03-01

    The primary endpoint was to evaluate the use of HIV testing methods by French primary care providers: Elisa laboratory screening, instant result HIV diagnostic test and rapid result HIV diagnostic test. The secondary endpoints were the population screening rate of unknown HIV status consulting during the study period, reasons for screening and for choosing the specific screening method, the investigators' satisfaction with the rapid diagnostic test (RDT) and problems encountered. National prospective interventional study with French family physicians (FP) from December 2013 to December 2014. FPs enrolled all consenting adults consulting for an HIV screening test during a 6-month period: the choice was an Elisa laboratory test or one of the two RDTs. During the study period, 43 FPs included 981 patients. HIV screening was performed for the first time for 31.6% of patients; 767 (78.2%) Elisa laboratory test prescriptions and 214 (21.8%) RDTs were performed, leading to a screening rate of 1.3%. For 120 (15.7%) of the Elisa laboratory tests, the result was not reported and six RDTs were not valid. Nine patients were diagnosed as HIV-infected (0.9%): five with Elisa laboratory test and four with RDT. Almost 90% of FPs were willing to keep on using RDTs in their daily practice. In general practice, RDTs may be an important additional tool to traditional HIV screening. They could account for one in five tests prescribed in this context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Development and Implementation of a Novel HIV Primary Care Track for Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, David A; Huang, Grace C; Potter, Jennifer; Baker, Joseph J; Libman, Howard

    2017-03-01

    Declining mortality has led to a rising number of persons living with HIV (PLWH) and concerns about a future shortage of HIV practitioners. To develop an HIV Primary Care Track for internal medicine residents. Academic hospital and community health center with a history of caring for PLWH and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. Internal medicine residents. We enrolled four residents annually in a 3-year track with the goal of having each provide continuity care to at least 20 PLWH. The curriculum included small group learning sessions, outpatient electives, a global health opportunity, and the development of a scholarly project. All residents successfully accrued 20 or more PLWH as continuity patients. Senior residents passed the American Academy of HIV Medicine certification exam, and 75 % of graduates took positions in primary care involving PLWH. Clinical performance of residents in HIV care quality measures was comparable to those reported in published cohorts. We developed and implemented a novel track to train medical residents in the care of PLWH and LGBT patients. Our results suggest that a designated residency track can serve as a model for training the next generation of HIV practitioners.

  18. "Wan Kanyakla" (We are together): Community transformations in Kenya following a social network intervention for HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmen, Charles R; Hickey, Matthew D; Fiorella, Kathryn J; Omollo, Dan; Ouma, Gor; Zoughbie, Daniel; Salmen, Marcus R; Magerenge, Richard; Tessler, Robert; Campbell, Harold; Geng, Elvin; Gandhi, Monica; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Cohen, Craig R

    2015-12-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, failure to initiate and sustain HIV treatment contributes to significant health, psychosocial, and economic impacts that burden not only infected individuals but diverse members of their social networks. Yet, due to intense stigma, the responsibility for managing lifelong HIV treatment rests solely, and often secretly, with infected individuals. We introduce the concept of "HIV risk induction" to suggest that social networks of infected individuals share a vested interest in improving long-term engagement with HIV care, and may represent an underutilized resource for improving HIV/AIDS outcomes within high prevalence populations. In 2012, we implemented a 'microclinic' intervention to promote social network engagement in HIV/AIDS care and treatment. A microclinic is a therapy management collective comprised of a small group of neighbors, relatives, and friends who are trained as a team to provide psychosocial and adherence support for HIV-infected members. Our study population included 369 patients on ART and members of their social networks on Mfangano Island, Kenya, where HIV prevalence approaches 30%. Here we report qualitative data from 18 focus group discussions conducted with microclinic participants (n = 82), community health workers (n = 40), and local program staff (n = 39). Participants reported widespread acceptability and enthusiasm for the microclinic intervention. Responses highlight four overlapping community transformations regarding HIV care and treatment, namely (1) enhanced HIV treatment literacy (2) reduction in HIV stigma, (3) improved atmosphere for HIV status disclosure and (4) improved material and psychosocial support for HIV-infected patients. Despite challenges, participants describe an emerging sense of "collective responsibility" for treatment among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected members of social networks. The lived experiences and community transformations highlighted by participants enrolled in this social

  19. Characteristics of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 Dually Seropositive Adults in West Africa Presenting for Care and Antiretroviral Therapy: The IeDEA-West Africa HIV-2 Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier K Ekouevi

    Full Text Available HIV-2 is endemic in West Africa. There is a lack of evidence-based guidelines on the diagnosis, management and antiretroviral therapy (ART for HIV-2 or HIV-1/HIV-2 dual infections. Because of these issues, we designed a West African collaborative cohort for HIV-2 infection within the framework of the International epidemiological Databases to Evaluate AIDS (IeDEA.We collected data on all HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dually seropositive patients (both ARV-naive and starting ART and followed-up in clinical centres in the IeDEA-WA network including a total of 13 clinics in five countries: Benin, Burkina-Faso Côte d'Ivoire, Mali, and Senegal, in the West Africa region.Data was merged for 1,754 patients (56% female, including 1,021 HIV-2 infected patients (551 on ART and 733 dually seropositive for both HIV-1 and HIV 2 (463 on ART. At ART initiation, the median age of HIV-2 patients was 45.3 years, IQR: (38.3-51.7 and 42.4 years, IQR (37.0-47.3 for dually seropositive patients (p = 0.048. Overall, 16.7% of HIV-2 patients on ART had an advanced clinical stage (WHO IV or CDC-C. The median CD4 count at the ART initiation is 166 cells/mm(3, IQR (83-247 among HIV-2 infected patients and 146 cells/mm(3, IQR (55-249 among dually seropositive patients. Overall, in ART-treated patients, the CD4 count increased 126 cells/mm(3 after 24 months on ART for HIV-2 patients and 169 cells/mm(3 for dually seropositive patients. Of 551 HIV-2 patients on ART, 5.8% died and 10.2% were lost to follow-up during the median time on ART of 2.4 years, IQR (0.7-4.3.This large multi-country study of HIV-2 and HIV-1/HIV-2 dual infection in West Africa suggests that routine clinical care is less than optimal and that management and treatment of HIV-2 could be further informed by ongoing studies and randomized clinical trials in this population.

  20. Frequency and predictors of estimated HIV transmissions and bacterial STI acquisition among HIV-positive patients in HIV care across three continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safren, Steven A; Hughes, James P; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Moore, Ayana T; Friedman, Ruth Khalili; Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai; Limbada, Mohammed; Williamson, Brian D; Elharrar, Vanessa; Cummings, Vanessa; Magidson, Jessica F; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Celentano, David D; Mayer, Kenneth H

    Successful global treatment as prevention (TasP) requires identifying HIV-positive individuals at high risk for transmitting HIV, and having impact via potential infections averted. This study estimated the frequency and predictors of numbers of HIV transmissions and bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) acquisition among sexually active HIV-positive individuals in care from three representative global settings. HIV-positive individuals ( n= 749), including heterosexual men, heterosexual women and men who have sex with men (MSM) in HIV care, were recruited from Chiang Mai (Thailand), Rio De Janeiro (Brazil) and Lusaka (Zambia). Participants were assessed on HIV and STI sexual transmission risk variables, psychosocial characteristics and bacterial STIs at enrolment and quarterly for 12 months (covering 15 months). Estimated numbers of HIV transmissions per person were calculated using reported numbers of partners and sex acts together with estimates of HIV transmissibility, accounting for ART treatment and condom use. An estimated 3.81 (standard error, (SE)=0.63) HIV transmissions occurred for every 100 participants over the 15 months, which decreased over time. The highest rate was 19.50 (SE=1.68) for every 100 MSM in Brazil. In a multivariable model, country×risk group interactions emerged: in Brazil, MSM had 2.85 (95% CI=1.45, 4.25, p STI incidence rate for the sample was 22.4% (95% CI=18.1%, 27.3%; incidence deemed negligible in heterosexual men). In the multivariable model, MSM had 12.3 times greater odds (95% CI=4.44, 33.98) of acquiring an STI than women, but this was not significant in Brazil. Higher alcohol use on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01, 1.08) was also significantly associated with increased STI incidence. In bivariate models for both HIV transmissions and STI incidence, higher depressive symptoms were significant predictors. These data help to estimate the potential number of HIV infections transmitted

  1. Occupational Exposure to HIV: Advice for Health Care Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Healthy Living Travel Occupational Health First Aid and Injury Prevention Crisis Situations Pets ... PoisoningAcute Bronchitis Home Prevention and Wellness Staying Healthy Occupational Health Occupational Exposure to HIV: Advice for Health Care ...

  2. Experiences along the HIV care continuum: perspectives of Kenyan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Experiences along the HIV care continuum: perspectives of Kenyan adolescents and caregivers. Winnie K Luseno, Bonita Iritani, Susannah Zietz, Suzanne Maman, Isabella I Mbai, Florence Otieno, Barrack Ongili, Denise Dion Hallfors ...

  3. Impact of HIV care facility characteristics on the cascade of care in HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhard, Esther A. N.; Smit, Colette; van Sighem, Ard; Reiss, Peter; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; Kroon, Frank P.; Brinkman, Kees; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Successful treatment of people infected with HIV requires that patients are retained in HIV care, use combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and ultimately reach and sustain viral suppression. Our aim was to identify health facility characteristics associated with these steps in the cascade of

  4. Low Level of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance at Two HIV Care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low Level of Transmitted HIV Drug Resistance at Two HIV Care Centres in Ghana: A Threshold Survey. EY Bonney, NA Addo, NAA Ntim, F Addo-Yobo, P Bondzie, KE Aryee, J Barnor, J brandful, V Bekoe, SA Ohene, W Ampofo ...

  5. HIV epidemic and human rights among men who have sex with men in sub-Saharan Africa: Implications for HIV prevention, care, and surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abara, Winston E; Garba, Ibrahim

    2017-04-01

    Recent research has presented evidence that men who have sex with men (MSM) bear a disproportionate burden of HIV and are at increased risk for HIV in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). However, many countries in SSA have failed to address the needs of MSM in national HIV/AIDS programmes. Furthermore, many MSM face structural barriers to HIV prevention and care, the most significant of which include laws that criminalise male-to-male sexual contact and facilitate stigma and discrimination. This in turn increases the vulnerability of MSM to acquiring HIV and presents barriers to HIV prevention, care, and surveillance. This relationship illustrates the link between human rights, social justice, and health outcomes and presents considerable challenges to addressing the HIV epidemic among MSM in SSA. The response to the HIV epidemic in SSA requires a non-discriminatory human rights approach to all at-risk groups, including MSM. Existing international human rights treaties, to which many SSA countries are signatories, and a 'health in all policies' approach provides a strong basis to reduce structural barriers to HIV prevention, care, surveillance, and research, and to ensure that all populations in SSA, including MSM, have access to the full range of rights that help ensure equal opportunities for health and wellness.

  6. Research gaps in neonatal HIV-related care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Ann Davies

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The South African prevention of mother to child transmission programme has made excellentprogress in reducing vertical HIV transmission, and paediatric antiretroviral therapyprogrammes have demonstrated good outcomes with increasing treatment initiation inyounger children and infants. However, both in South Africa and across sub-Saharan African,lack of boosted peri-partum prophylaxis for high-risk vertical transmission, loss to followup,and failure to initiate HIV-infected infants on antiretroviral therapy (ART before diseaseprogression are key remaining gaps in neonatal HIV-related care. In this issue of the Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine, experts provide valuable recommendations for addressingthese gaps. The present article highlights a number of areas where evidence is lacking toinform guidelines and programme development for optimal neonatal HIV-related care.

  7. HIV self-testing practices among Health Care Workers: feasibility and options for accelerating HIV testing services in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Bekana; Abate, Tatek; Mekonnen, Desalew

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HIV is still an enormous global burden and it is also causing loss of huge health care workers (HCWs) on the already limited human resource capacity in health care services in Sub-Saharan Africa. Variety of methods of accelerating HIV testing is required to increase the rate of HIV testing and expand treatment services. Therefore, this study was aimed to find out the prevalence, feasibility and options of HIV self-testing practices in Ethiopia. Methods A cross-sectional study design triangulated with qualitative method was conducted from February to May, 2012. The data was collected using a semi-structured pretested questionnaire and in-depth interview, at government and private health centers or clinics and hospitals. During the data collection all the available healthcare workers (HCWs) which encompass the internship students including: Medical, Health Officer, Nurses, Midwives and Laboratory students, and health professionals working in the selected health institutions were involved. Results A total of 307 HCWs were included in the analysis and we found that 288(94.4%) of them were ever tested for HIV, of which majority 203 (70.5%) were tested by themselves though 244(80%) of the HCWs had motivation or interest to be tested by themselves. Generally, of the ever tested only 85(29.5%) were tested by the help of health care providers/counselors other than self. Regarding the place where the HCWs had the test, majority 136 (69.4%) tested by themselves at the health facility and the rest were tested at their home, office, market and church. The main reason stated for self-testing was the need for confidentiality for the test result, which was mentioned by 205(82%). Moreover, 35(14.0%) claims lack of time to access the ordinary counseling and testing services. Conclusion This study depicts high rate of HIV self-testing practice among HCWs. This shows that HIV self-testing can be considered as one pillar to increase the HIV-testing services and a means for

  8. Access to HIV prevention and care for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children: a qualitative study in rural and urban Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schacht, Caroline; Lucas, Carlota; Mboa, Catarina; Gill, Michelle; Macasse, Eugenia; Dimande, Stélio A; Bobrow, Emily A; Guay, Laura

    2014-12-03

    Follow-up of HIV-exposed children for the delivery of prevention of mother-to-child transmission services and for early diagnosis and treatment of HIV infection is critical to their survival. Despite efforts, uptake of postnatal care for these children remains low in many sub-Saharan African countries. A qualitative study was conducted in three provinces in Mozambique to identify motivators and barriers to improve uptake of and retention in HIV prevention, care and treatment services for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children. Participant recommendations were also gathered. Individual interviews (n = 79) and focus group discussions (n = 32) were conducted with parents/caregivers, grandmothers, community leaders and health care workers. Using a socioecological framework, the main themes identified were organized into multiple spheres of influence, specifically at the individual, interpersonal, institutional, community and policy levels. Study participants reported factors such as seeking care outside of the conventional health system and disbelief in test results as barriers to use of HIV services. Other key barriers included fear of disclosure at the interpersonal level and poor patient flow and long waiting time at the institutional level. Key facilitators for accessing care included having hope for children's future, symptomatic illness in children, and the belief that health facilities were the appropriate places to get care. The results suggest that individual-level factors are critical drivers that influence the health-seeking behavior of caregivers of HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children in Mozambique. Noted strategies are to provide more information and awareness on the benefits of early pediatric testing and treatment with positive messages that incorporate success stories, to reach more pregnant women and mother-child pairs postpartum, and to provide counseling during tracing visits. Increasing uptake and retention may be achieved by improving

  9. Social and structural determinants of HIV treatment and care among black women living with HIV infection: a systematic review: 2005-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geter, Angelica; Sutton, Madeline Y; Hubbard McCree, Donna

    2018-04-01

    Black/African American (black) women comprised 59% of women living with HIV at the end of 2014 and 61% of HIV diagnoses among women in 2015. Black women living with HIV infection (BWLH) have poorer health outcomes compared with women of other races/ethnicities; social and structural determinants are often cited as barriers and facilitators of care. The objective of this qualitative review was to identify social and structural barriers and facilitators of HIV treatment and care among BWLH. The systematic review was conducted in six-stages using databases such as PubMed, PsycINFO, and Google Scholar: 1) searched for studies that enrolled BWLH published between January 2005 and December 2016, 2) excluded unpublished reports and commentaries, 3) limited the search to our primary keywords, 4) limited our search to studies that included participants living with HIV infection that were >60% black and 100% female, 5) extracted and summarized the data, and 6) conducted a contextual review to identify common themes. Of 534 studies retrieved, 16 were included in the final review. Studies focused on: ART medication adherence (n = 5), engagement/retention in care (n = 4), HIV care and treatment services (n = 3), viral suppression (n = 1), and addressing multiple HIV care outcomes (n = 3). Main barrier themes included lack of family and/or social support, poor quality HIV services, and HIV-related stigma, particularly from healthcare providers; facilitator themes included resilience, positive relationships between case management and support services, high racial consciousness, and addressing mental health. Interventions that decrease these noted barriers and strengthen facilitators may help improve care outcomes for BWLH. Also, more HIV stigma-reduction training for healthcare providers may be warranted.

  10. Sources and types of information on self-care symptom management strategies for HIV and AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regis R. Marie Modeste

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been reported that South Africa has the highest number of people living with HIV worldwide, with more women being infected than men. Women living with HIV have been documented as experiencing various symptoms related to HIV and use various strategies to manage these symptoms. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the sources and types of information regarding self-care symptom management strategies received by women living with HIV. Method: The study was conducted at an HIV clinic in an urban area of KwaZulu-Natal. Individual in-depth interviews were completed with 11 women who were living with HIV,exploring the sources of information received on how they manage the HIV- (and/or AIDS- related symptoms they experienced as well as the types of information received. The collecteddata were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results: The participants identified various sources, which mainly included groups of people who provided them with information on how to manage their HIV-related symptoms, namely healthcare providers, their personal networks and the community. The different sources offered different types of information, including the use of medication, complementary treatments and self-comforting activities. Conclusion: The study highlights that participants used multiple sources to get information about how to manage the experienced symptoms related to HIV, namely, healthcare providers, family and friends as well as themselves. It is to be noted that each source provided a preferred type of information.

  11. The HIV Care Cascade and sub-analysis of those linked to but not retained in care: the experience from a tertiary HIV referral service in Dublin Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGettrick, P; Ghavami-Kia, B; Tinago, W; Macken, A; O'Halloran, J; Lambert, J S; Sheehan, G; Mallon, P W G

    2017-05-01

    The HIV Care Cascade model can be used to measure how clinical services align with United Nations' (UN) HIV treatment targets. Previous models have highlighted sequential losses at each step of the Cascade with a significant proportion being not retained in care (NRIC). We aimed to assess the feasibility of meeting the UN targets and assess factors associated with, and calculate the true proportion of those, NRIC. All people living with HIV who were linked to our service, one of three specialist HIV care providers in Dublin Ireland, from its establishment in 1993 to 1 December 2014, were included in the cohort and were categorized as linked to care, retained in care (RIC), on antiretroviral therapy (on ART), virally suppressed (HIV RNA <40copies/ml), and NRIC. An analysis of those NRIC was performed to categorize their current status through direct/indirect contact. Of 1000 patients linked to care, 78.7% (n = 787) were RIC, of whom 91.5% (n = 720) were on ART, with 89.9% (n = 644) virally suppressed. Those RIC were more likely older (p = 0.006) and non-IVDU (p < 0.001). Of 213 (21.3%) NRIC, 56 (26.3%) emigrated, 27 (12.7%) transferred care, 15 (7.0%) stopped attending but were contactable, 38 (17.8%) died, and 77 (36.1%) were lost to follow-up. After revision, 10.5% of the cohort was confirmed as NRIC, with 6 of 15 defined as "stopped attending" re-linked to care following direct contact. Our HIV Care Cascade model demonstrates that the true numbers of patients NRIC may be significantly lower than previously estimated and once RIC, treatment goals approaching the United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS targets are possible with 91.5% on treatment and almost 90% of those on treatment virally suppressed. That 40% reengaged following direct contact suggests benefit through regular monitoring and direct contact based on the HIV Care Cascade model.

  12. Barriers and Facilitators to the Implementation of a National HIV Linkage, Re-Engagement, and Retention in Care Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulsby, Cathy; Sacamano, Paul; Jain, Kriti M; Enobun, Blessing; Brantley, Meredith L; Kim, Hae-Young; Riordan, Morey; Werner, Melissa; Holtgrave, David R

    2017-10-01

    The 2020 National HIV AIDS Strategy (NHAS) sets a target of 90% of diagnosed people living with HIV (PLWH) retained in HIV care. Access to Care (A2C) was a national HIV linkage, re-engagement, and retention in care program funded by AIDS United with support from the Corporation for National and Community Service that aimed to link and retain the most vulnerable PLWH into high-quality HIV care. This study explores the barriers and facilitators of implementing the A2C program from the perspective of program staff. Ninety-eight qualitative interviews were conducted with staff at implementing organizations over the 5 years of the project. Barriers included challenges with recruiting and retaining participants, staffing and administration, harmonizing partnerships, and addressing the basic and psychosocial needs of participants. Facilitators included strong relationships with partner organizations, flexible program models, and the passion and dedication of staff. Findings will inform the development of future programs and policy.

  13. Characteristics of HIV-Positive Transgender Men Receiving Medical Care: United States, 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Ansley; Beer, Linda; Finlayson, Teresa; McCree, Donna Hubbard; Lentine, Daniel; Shouse, R Luke

    2018-01-01

    To present the first national estimate of the sociodemographic, clinical, and behavioral characteristics of HIV-positive transgender men receiving medical care in the United States. This analysis included pooled interview and medical record data from the 2009 to 2014 cycles of the Medical Monitoring Project, which used a 3-stage, probability-proportional-to-size sampling methodology. Transgender men accounted for 0.16% of all adults and 11% of all transgender adults receiving HIV medical care in the United States from 2009 to 2014. Of these HIV-positive transgender men receiving medical care, approximately 47% lived in poverty, 69% had at least 1 unmet ancillary service need, 23% met criteria for depression, 69% were virally suppressed at their last test, and 60% had sustained viral suppression over the previous 12 months. Although they constitute a small proportion of all HIV-positive patients, more than 1 in 10 transgender HIV-positive patients were transgender men. Many experienced socioeconomic challenges, unmet needs for ancillary services, and suboptimal health outcomes. Attention to the challenges facing HIV-positive transgender men may be necessary to achieve the National HIV/AIDS Strategy goals of decreasing disparities and improving health outcomes among transgender persons.

  14. HIV care visits and time to viral suppression, 19 U.S. jurisdictions, and implications for treatment, prevention and the national HIV/AIDS strategy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Irene Hall

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Early and regular care and treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection are associated with viral suppression, reductions in transmission risk and improved health outcomes for persons with HIV. We determined, on a population level, the association of care visits with time from HIV diagnosis to viral suppression. METHODS: Using data from 19 areas reporting HIV-related tests to national HIV surveillance, we determined time from diagnosis to viral suppression among 17,028 persons diagnosed with HIV during 2009, followed through December 2011, using data reported through December 2012. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we assessed factors associated with viral suppression, including linkage to care within 3 months of diagnosis, a goal set forth by the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, and number of HIV care visits as determined by CD4 and viral load test results, while controlling for demographic, clinical, and risk characteristics. RESULTS: Of 17,028 persons diagnosed with HIV during 2009 in the 19 areas, 76.6% were linked to care within 3 months of diagnosis and 57.0% had a suppressed viral load during the observation period. Median time from diagnosis to viral suppression was 19 months overall, and 8 months among persons with an initial CD4 count ≤ 350 cells/µL. During the first 12 months after diagnosis, persons linked to care within 3 months experienced shorter times to viral suppression (higher rate of viral suppression per unit time, hazard ratio [HR] = 4.84 versus not linked within 3 months; 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.27, 5.48. Persons with a higher number of time-updated care visits also experienced a shorter time to viral suppression (HR = 1.51 per additional visit, 95% CI 1.49, 1.52. CONCLUSIONS: Timely linkage to care and greater frequency of care visits were associated with faster time to viral suppression with implications for individual health outcomes and for secondary prevention.

  15. Rapid voluntary testing and counseling for HIV. Acceptability and feasibility in Zambian antenatal care clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakari, J P; McKenna, S; Myrick, A; Mwinga, K; Bhat, G J; Allen, S

    2000-11-01

    Voluntary testing and counseling (VTC) for HIV/AIDS is now widely accepted as an effective HIV prevention and control strategy among heterosexual couples in sub-Saharan Africa. The most appropriate format and venue for VTC remains a topic of debate among clinicians and public health professionals. Our research done in Lusaka, Zambia, took a tripartite approach to exploring the most acceptable format and venue for VTC: a community survey of attitudes towards VTC, a pre- and postcounseling knowledge survey, and a pilot study of same-day VTC in urban antenatal care clinics. A community survey of 181 individuals was conducted in July-August 1996 based on a structured questionnaire. A pre- and post-VTC intervention knowledge survey was conducted during the same period among 82 couples attending the Zambia-UAB HIV Research Project (ZUHRP) HIV VTC center in Lusaka. Finally, same-day HIV VTC was pilot tested in six antenatal clinic locations during February-May 1997 and June-August 1998. The community survey revealed that 98% of participants support promotion of HIV VTC in the community and 83.8% prefer the same-day testing format. The knowledge survey revealed misconceptions about discordance within a couple and perinatal transmission of HIV. Pilot testing in antenatal clinics was well received, with 84% of pregnant women requesting testing and 25% having positive HIV serologies. Women with primary school or less education, those seeking antenatal care in local clinics, and those seen before the third trimester of pregnancy were more likely to request HIV testing. Testing and counseling for HIV were shown to be feasible and effective in the antenatal clinic setting. Implementation of same-day HIV VTC in antenatal clinics is an effective strategy to prevent vertical transmission and should be expanded to include couples to leverage a decrease in heterosexual transmission as well.

  16. VCT clinic HIV burden and its link with HIV care clinic at the University of Gondar hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemie Getahun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Voluntary Counselling and Testing (VCT is an important component of any HIV/AIDS control and prevention activities. VCT makes people aware of their HIV serostatus and enables early identification of those who need care. It is an important link to HIV care and support. The main aim of this study is to describe the HIV burden at VCT and define the relationship between the VCT Center and the HIV Chronic Care Clinic of the University of Gondar (UoG Hospital. Methods It is a record based descriptive study undertaken by using data collected by health professionals at the VCT center and the HIV chronic care clinic of the UoG Hospital. Patient data collected from 2005/06 to 2008/09 was investigated. Analysis was carried out using the SPSS version 16.0. Results A total of 19,168 people were tested for HIV and a prevalence of 25.4% was obtained. 4298 HIV positive people were referred to the HIV chronic care clinic but only 27% actually registered at the clinic. Chi-square analyses showed residence, age and time of VCT visit showed significant relations with hospital care attendance. Conclusion The overall HIV prevalence is high. The data obtained at the HIV care clinic regarding patients’ clinical conditions at acceptance were incomplete. Improvements are required on the link between VCT and HIV care and documentation of data.

  17. HIV Continuum of Care for Youth in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Michelle A; van den Berg, Jacob J; Westfall, Andrew O; Rudy, Bret J; Hosek, Sybil G; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Monte, Dina; Tanney, Mary R; McFarland, Elizabeth J; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill G; Wilson, Craig M

    2018-01-01

    Beneficial HIV treatment outcomes require success at multiple steps along the HIV Continuum of Care. Youth living with HIV are a key population, and sites in the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) are known for modeling optimum HIV adolescent care. A longitudinal cohort study conducted at 14 network sites across the United States assessed how the later steps of the Continuum of Care were achieved among the youth: engagement, treatment, and viral load (VL) suppression. Youth aged 13-24 who were behaviorally infected with HIV and linked to care at an ATN-affiliated site were eligible to participate. A total of 467 youth were enrolled and had 1 year of available data. Most were aged 22-24 (57%), male (79%), and black/non-Hispanic (71%). Most used alcohol (81%) and marijuana (61%) in the 3 months before enrollment, and 40% had a history of incarceration. Among this cohort of youth, 86% met criteria for care engagement; among these, 98% were prescribed antiretroviral therapy and 89% achieved VL suppression. Sustained VL suppression at all measured time points was found among 59% with initial suppression. Site characteristics were notable for the prevalence of adherence counseling (100%), case management (100%), clinic-based mental health (93%), and substance use (64%) treatment. Youth living with HIV in the United States can be successfully treated at health care sites with experience, excellence, and important resources and services. Sustained VL suppression may be an important step to add to the Continuum of Care for youth.

  18. Patient Perspectives on Improving Oral Health-Care Practices Among People Living with HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabiun, Serena; Fox, Jane E.; McCluskey, Amanda; Guevara, Ernesto; Verdecias, Niko; Jeanty, Yves; DeMayo, Michael; Mofidi, Mahyar

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the impact on oral health-care knowledge, attitudes, and practices among 39 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) participating in a national initiative aimed at increasing access to oral health care. Personal values and childhood dental experiences, beliefs about the importance of oral health in relation to HIV health, and concerns for appearance and self-esteem were found to be determinants of oral health knowledge and practice. Program participation resulted in better hygiene practices, improved self-esteem and appearance, relief of pain, and better physical and emotional health. In-depth exploration of the causes for these changes revealed a desire to continue with dental care due to the dental staff and environmental setting, and a desire to maintain overall HIV health, including oral health. Our findings emphasize the importance of addressing both personal values and contextual factors in providing oral health-care services to PLWHA. PMID:22547879

  19. Patient perspectives on improving oral health-care practices among people living with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabiun, Serena; Fox, Jane E; McCluskey, Amanda; Guevara, Ernesto; Verdecias, Niko; Jeanty, Yves; DeMayo, Michael; Mofidi, Mahyar

    2012-05-01

    This qualitative study explored the impact on oral health-care knowledge, attitudes, and practices among 39 people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) participating in a national initiative aimed at increasing access to oral health care. Personal values and childhood dental experiences, beliefs about the importance of oral health in relation to HIV health, and concerns for appearance and self-esteem were found to be determinants of oral health knowledge and practice. Program participation resulted in better hygiene practices, improved self-esteem and appearance, relief of pain, and better physical and emotional health. In-depth exploration of the causes for these changes revealed a desire to continue with dental care due to the dental staff and environmental setting, and a desire to maintain overall HIV health, including oral health. Our findings emphasize the importance of addressing both personal values and contextual factors in providing oral health-care services to PLWHA.

  20. HIV health-care providers' burnout: can organizational culture make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar; Oetzel, John; Hill, Ricky; Avila, Magdalena; Archiopoli, Ashley; Wilcox, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing those working with people living with HIV (PLWH) is the increased potential for burnout, which results in increased turnover and reduces quality of care provided for PLWH. The goal of this study was to examine the relationship among HIV health-care providers' burnout (emotional exhaustion and depersonalization) and organizational culture including teamwork, involvement in decision-making, and critical appraisal. Health-care providers for PLWH (N = 47) in federally funded clinics in a southwestern state completed a cross-sectional survey questionnaire about their perceptions of organizational culture and burnout. The results of multiple regression analysis indicated that positive organizational culture (i.e., teamwork) was negatively related to emotional burnout (p organizational culture (i.e., critical appraisal) was positively related to depersonalization (p organizational communication interventions might protect HIV health-care providers from burnout.

  1. From HIV infection to therapeutic response: a population-based longitudinal HIV cascade-of-care study in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Noah; Tanser, Frank; Bor, Jacob; Naidu, Kevindra; Mutevedzi, Tinofa; Herbst, Kobus; Porter, Kholoud; Pillay, Deenan; Bärnighausen, Till

    2017-05-01

    Standard approaches to estimation of losses in the HIV cascade of care are typically cross-sectional and do not include the population stages before linkage to clinical care. We used indiviual-level longitudinal cascade data, transition by transition, including population stages, both to identify the health-system losses in the cascade and to show the differences in inference between standard methods and the longitudinal approach. We used non-parametric survival analysis to estimate a longitudinal HIV care cascade for a large population of people with HIV residing in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. We linked data from a longitudinal population health surveillance (which is maintained by the Africa Health Research Institute) with patient records from the local public-sector HIV treatment programme (contained in an electronic clinical HIV treatment and care database, ARTemis). We followed up all people who had been newly detected as having HIV between Jan 1, 2006, and Dec 31, 2011, across six cascade stages: three population stages (first positive HIV test, HIV status knowledge, and linkage to care) and three clinical stages (eligibility for antiretroviral therapy [ART], initiation of ART, and therapeutic response). We compared our estimates to cross-sectional cascades in the same population. We estimated the cumulative incidence of reaching a particular cascade stage at a specific time with Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. Our population consisted of 5205 individuals with HIV who were followed up for 24 031 person-years. We recorded 598 deaths. 4539 individuals gained knowledge of their positive HIV status, 2818 were linked to care, 2151 became eligible for ART, 1839 began ART, and 1456 had successful responses to therapy. We used Kaplan-Meier survival analysis to adjust for censorship due to the end of data collection, and found that 8 years after testing positive in the population health surveillance, 16% had died. Among living patients, 82% knew their HIV

  2. HIV Point-of-Care Testing in Canadian Settings: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minichiello, Alexa; Swab, Michelle; Chongo, Meck; Marshall, Zack; Gahagan, Jacqueline; Maybank, Allison; Hot, Aurélie; Schwandt, Michael; Gaudry, Sonia; Hurley, Oliver; Asghari, Shabnam

    2017-01-01

    HIV point-of-care testing (POCT) was approved for use in Canada in 2005 and provides important public health benefits by providing rapid screening results rather than sending a blood sample to a laboratory and waiting on test results. Access to test results soon after testing (or during the same visit) is believed to increase the likelihood that individuals will receive their results and improve access to confirmatory testing and linkages to care. This paper reviews the literature on the utilization of HIV POCT across Canadian provinces. We searched OVID Medline, Embase, EBM Reviews, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and 20 electronic grey literature databases. All empirical studies investigating HIV POCT programs in Canada published in French or English were included. Searches of academic databases identified a total of 6,091 records. After removing duplicates and screening for eligibility, 27 records were included. Ten studies are peer-reviewed articles, and 17 are grey literature reports. HIV POCT in Canada is both feasible and accepted by Canadians. It is preferred to conventional HIV testing (ranging from 81.1 to 97%), and users are highly satisfied with the testing process (ranging between 96 and 100%). The majority of studies demonstrate that HIV POCT is feasible, preferred, and accepted by diverse populations in Canada. Losses to follow-up and linkage rates are also good. However, more research is needed to understand how best to scale up HIV POCT in contexts that currently have very limited or no access to testing.

  3. The views of undergraduate nursing students on caring for patients with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madumo, M M; Peu, M D

    2006-08-01

    A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted with the purpose of exploring and describing the views of undergraduate nursing students on caring for HIV/AIDS patients. The study population consisted of BCur III nursing students studying at the Medical University of Southern Africa (Medunsa). Participants were purposively selected. Focus group interviews were used as a data collection instrument. Guided by a group moderator and responding to a central research question, participants shared their views about caring for HIV/AIDS patients. Tesch's qualitative method of data analysis, as described by Cresswell (1994:155), was used to analyse the data. Caring for HIV/AIDS patients evoked emotions such as fear, anger and frustration among undergraduate nursing students. Students expressed needs such as the acquisition of knowledge and a reduction in the stigmatisation of patients with HIV/ AIDS, while the data analysis revealed demands such as more intensive clinical accompaniment by lecturers and antiretroviral therapy delivery by government. Suggested solutions included student participation in HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns and the upholding of patients' rights. Curriculum innovation was recommended to improve students' knowledge of HIV/AIDS and to ensure the provision of quality care for these patients.

  4. The views of undergraduate nursing students on caring for patients with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Madumo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study was conducted with the purpose of exploring and describing the views of undergraduate nursing students on caring for HIV/AIDS patients. The study population consisted of BCur III nursing students studying at the Medical University of Southern Africa (Medunsa. Participants were purposively selected. Focus group interviews were used as a data collection instrument. Guided by a group moderator and responding to a central research question, participants shared their views about caring for HIV/AIDS patients. Tesch’s qualitative method of data analysis, as described by Cresswell (1994:155, was used to analyse the data. Caring for HIV/AIDS patients evoked emotions such as fear, anger and frustration among undergraduate nursing students. Students expressed needs such as the acquisition of knowledge and a reduction in the stigmatisation of patients with HIV/ AIDS, while the data analysis revealed demands such as more intensive clinical accompaniment by lecturers and antiretroviral therapy delivery by government. Suggested solutions included student participation in HIV/AIDS prevention campaigns and the upholding of patients’ rights. Curriculum innovation was recommended to improve students’ knowledge of HIV/AIDS and to ensure the provision of quality care for these patients.

  5. Nurses' willingness to care for patients infected with HIV or Hepatitis B / C in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Tomohiro; Wada, Koji; Hoang, Huong Thi Xuan; Bui, Anh Thi My; Nguyen, Hung Dinh; Le, Hung; Smith, Derek R

    2017-03-16

    This study examined the factors associated with nurses' willingness to care for patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or hepatitis B or C virus (HBV/HCV) in Vietnam. A cross-section of 400 Vietnamese nurses from two hospitals were selected using stratified random sampling, to whom a self-administered questionnaire was administered which included demographic items, previous experience with patients infected with HIV or HBV/HCV, and their attitudes toward these patients. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression. The lifetime prevalence of needlestick or sharps injury whilst caring for a patient infected with HIV or HBV/HCV was 9 and 15.8%, respectively. The majority of participants expressed a willingness to care for patients infected with HIV (55.8%) or HBV/HCV (73.3%). Willingness to care for HIV-infected patients was positively associated with being 40-49 years of age and confidence in protecting themselves against infection. Regarding HBV/HCV infection, willingness to care was positively associated with individual confidence in protecting themselves against infection. This study revealed that Vietnamese nurses were somewhat willing to care for patients infected with HIV or HBV/HCV, and this was associated with individual confidence in protecting themselves against infection and with negative attitudes towards HIV and HBV/HCV. Establishing a positive safety culture and providing appropriate professional education to help reduce the stigma towards infected patients offers an effective way forwards to improve quality of care in Vietnam, as elsewhere.

  6. HIV-Related Stigma in Health Care Settings: A Survey of Service Providers in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wu, Zunyou; Wu, Sheng; Zhaoc, Yu; Jia, Manhong; Yan, Zhihua

    2009-01-01

    We examined how individual and institutional factors in health care settings affected discrimination toward persons with HIV/AIDS. A representative sample of 1101 Chinese service providers was recruited in 2005, including doctors, nurses, and laboratory technicians. Multiple regression models were used to describe associations among identified variables, the relationships with HIV-related personal prejudicial attitudes, and perceived institutional support and discrimination at work. Multivariate analyses revealed that respondents’ general view of persons living with HIV/AIDS and their perceived levels of support from their institutions regarding protection procedures were both important predictors for discrimination intent. Perceived institutional support varied according to age, gender, ethnicity, and training background. A better understanding of HIV-related discrimination in health care settings requires consideration of both individual and institutional factors. PMID:17949274

  7. Home-based care for reducing morbidity and mortality in people infected with HIV/AIDS

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Young, TN

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available with HIV/AIDS. Randomised and controlled clinical trials of HBC including all forms of treatment, care and support offered in the home were included. A highly sensitive search strategy was used to search central, medline, embase, AIDSearch, cinahl, PsycINFO/LIT....

  8. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitshokile Dintle Mogobe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs, and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs. SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV.

  9. Language and Culture in Health Literacy for People Living with HIV: Perspectives of Health Care Providers and Professional Care Team Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Shaibu, Sheila; Matshediso, Ellah; Sabone, Motshedisi; Ntsayagae, Esther; Nicholas, Patrice K; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rose, Carol Dawson; Johnson, Mallory O; Webel, Allison; Cuca, Yvette; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Solís Báez, Solymar S; Nokes, Kathleen; Reyes, Darcel; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reid, Paula; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Lindgren, Teri; Holzemer, William L; Wantland, Dean

    2016-01-01

    Low health literacy has been linked to inadequate engagement in care and may serve as a contributor to poor health outcomes among people living with HIV and AIDS. The purpose of this paper was to examine the perspectives of health care providers and professional care team members regarding health literacy in HIV disease. A secondary data analysis was conducted from a qualitative study aimed at understanding factors that help an HIV positive person to manage their HIV disease. Data were collected from sites in Botswana, the US, and Puerto Rico. In the parent study, data were collected through focus group discussions with 135 people living with HIV, 32 HIV health care providers (HCPs), and 39 HIV professional care team members (PCTMs). SPSS was used to analyze quantitative data while ATLAS.ti was used to analyze qualitative data. The findings from analyses of the perspectives of HCPs/PCTMs suggested that linguistic and cultural factors were important themes in the exchange of HIV information between health care providers and PLHIV. These themes included ineffective communication, health seeking behavior, cultural facilitators, and complementary and alternative/traditional healing methods. Thus, this study suggests that language and culture have a major role in health literacy for PLHIV.

  10. Brazilian Program For HIV Point-Of-Care Test Evaluation: A Decade’s Experience

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    Orlando da Costa Ferreira Jr.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The point-of-care tests (POCTs for HIV diagnosis have been widely used in Brazil in order to expand and to allow HIV diagnosis outside health units including remote areas, such as the Amazon region. In order to guarantee the quality of HIV diagnostics based on rapid tests, the Brazilian Ministry of Health (MoH implemented the HIV POCT Evaluation Program. This study compiles the Brazilian experience acquired over the last 13 years conducting the HIV POCT Evaluation Program.   Methods and Findings The selection of tests was based on the interest of manufacturers to qualify for the MoH tenders. Each round was performed with fresh whole blood and oral fluid samples, always including HIV positive and negative ones. In addition to the POCT, every sample was submitted to a reference testing protocol, based on an immunoassay followed by Western blot. The POCTs were evaluated for clinical sensitivity, clinical specificity, assay operational characteristics, detection of HIV-2 antibodies, sensitivity to subtypes panels; and sensitivity to seroconversion panels. Since its implementation in 2003, the POCT evaluation protocol has undergone some modifications aiming to improve and simplify the evaluation process, to know: (i  for HIV-positive samples, perform EIA and Western blot only if the POCT is non-reactive; (ii reduction from 800 to 600 HIV negative samples; (iii increase from one to three subtype panels (including HIV-2 samples; and (iv inclusion of seroconversion panel. We evaluated six tests, four of which met the sensitivity criteria of 99.5%: BD Chek™ HIV Multi-test (whole blood, HIV 1/2 Colloidal Gold (whole blood, OraQuick ADVANCE® Rapid HIV-1/2 Antibody Test (whole blood and oral fluid and TR DPP HIV-1/2 (whole blood, plasma and oral fluid. Regarding other evaluated criteria, all assays met the requirements.   Conclusions The successful Brazilian policy on POCT use for HIV infection diagnosis includes the evaluation of the POCT itself in

  11. Vocational Counseling of HIV-infected People: A Role for Nurses in HIV Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Marlies N; Miedema, Harald S; Kleijn, Liselotte M; van Gorp, Eric C M; Roelofs, Pepijn D D M

    2015-01-01

    People living with HIV (PLWH) face various work-related problems, such as stigma and physical difficulties. Health care professionals can help improve the employment situation of PLWH. Nurses who work in HIV care play a central role in the care of PLWH in the Netherlands. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the contributions of nurses to the vocational counseling of PLWH, and to make an inventory of needs for future care. Our findings, collected with a self-administered survey, clarified that HIV nurses in the Netherlands regularly faced patients with problems at work, but that they didn't have the required knowledge to provide assistance. Our study emphasized the important role of HIV nurses in vocational counseling because of their central positions in care and their confidential relationship with patients. The study underlined the importance of available, up-to-date knowledge about HIV and work, as well as a clear referral network. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. My brother’s keeper? : Care, support and HIV support groups in Nairobi, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Igonya, E.K.

    2017-01-01

    HIV Support Groups are a multi-faced phenomenon in Kenya’s HIV mitigation landscape. The aim of this study was to examine the significance of HIV in the transformation of care and social support systems, and, additionally, the contribution of HIV support groups in the care and support of people

  13. Improving HIV/STD Prevention in the Care of Persons Living with HIV Through a National Training Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Helen; Hsu, Katherine; Smock, Laura; Coury-Doniger, Patricia; Hall, Christopher; Marrazzo, Jeanne; Nagendra, Gowri; Rietmeijer, Cornelis; Rompalo, Ann; Thrun, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Persons living with HIV (PLWH) are living longer, remaining sexually active, and may continue risky sexual behaviors. As such, it is crucial for providers to ask all HIV-positive patients about behaviors related to HIV transmission and STD acquisition. The “Ask, Screen, Intervene” (ASI) curriculum was developed to increase provider knowledge, skills, and motivation to incorporate risk assessment and prevention services into the care of PLWH. The ASI curriculum was delivered to 2558 HIV-care providers at 137 sites between September 30, 2007 and December 31, 2010. Immediately post-training, participants self-reported significant gains in perceived confidence to demonstrate ASI knowledge and skills (pHIV-care providers self-reported more frequently performing ASI skills (pHIV-care providers, significantly increase self-reported capacity to incorporate HIV/STD prevention into the care of PLWH, and increase implementation of national recommendations. PMID:24428796

  14. [Medical care costs for HIV-positive and AIDS patients in four hospitals in Santiago, Chile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, L; Jara, C; Adauy, A; Henríquez, A; Trujillo, F; Child, R; Ortiz, E

    1998-02-01

    Medical care of HIV infected and AIDS patients may represent an important economical burden for public hospitals. To assess direct and indirect costs of medical care for HIV infected and AIDS patients in public hospitals of the Metropolitan Region of Chile. Between August 1994 and February 1995, information about outpatient and hospitalized medical care of 417 HIV infected patients was gathered (representing approximately 16% of the seropositive population). Patients were divided as having or not having AIDS. The latter were those included in groups I, II, III and category C2 of group C (group 4). The cost of medications, procedures and examinations of these patients was calculated. Thirty six percent of studied patients had AIDS. The annual cost of care for AIDS patients was US$3760 compared to US$1450 for HIV infected patients without AIDS. Medications represented 75% and 65% of total costs in patients with and without AIDS respectively. The figures for examinations and procedures were 17% and 22% and for medical attentions were 7.5% and 8.8% respectively. Medical care of patients with AIDS has higher costs than that of HIV infected patients without AIDS. Thus, the retardation of the progression of the disease would have social, humanitarian and economical benefits. Our costs are similar to those of other countries with a similar level of economic development.

  15. Multi-centred mixed-methods PEPFAR HIV care & support public health evaluation: study protocol

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    Fayers Peter

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A public health response is essential to meet the multidimensional needs of patients and families affected by HIV disease in sub-Saharan Africa. In order to appraise curret provision of HIV care and support in East Africa, and to provide evidence-based direction to future care programming, and Public Health Evaluation was commissioned by the PEPFAR programme of the US Government. Methods/Design This paper described the 2-Phase international mixed methods study protocol utilising longitudinal outcome measurement, surveys, patient and family qualitative interviews and focus groups, staff qualitative interviews, health economics and document analysis. Aim 1 To describe the nature and scope of HIV care and support in two African countries, including the types of facilities available, clients seen, and availability of specific components of care [Study Phase 1]. Aim 2 To determine patient health outcomes over time and principle cost drivers [Study Phase 2]. The study objectives are as follows. 1 To undertake a cross-sectional survey of service configuration and activity by sampling 10% of the facilities being funded by PEPFAR to provide HIV care and support in Kenya and Uganda (Phase 1 in order to describe care currently provided, including pharmacy drug reviews to determine availability and supply of essential drugs in HIV management. 2 To conduct patient focus group discussions at each of these (Phase 1 to determine care received. 3 To undertake a longitudinal prospective study of 1200 patients who are newly diagnosed with HIV or patients with HIV who present with a new problem attending PEPFAR care and support services. Data collection includes self-reported quality of life, core palliative outcomes and components of care received (Phase 2. 4 To conduct qualitative interviews with staff, patients and carers in order to explore and understand service issues and care provision in more depth (Phase 2. 5 To undertake document

  16. HIV-Related discrimination in European health care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöstlinger, Christiana; Rojas Castro, Daniela; Platteau, Tom; Dias, Sonia; Le Gall, Jean

    2014-03-01

    This cross-sectional European study assessed self-reported HIV-related discrimination and its associated factors in health care settings. Socio-demographics, health status, support needs relating to sexual and reproductive health (SRH), and self-reported HIV-related discrimination were measured using an anonymous survey in a sample of 1549 people living with HIV from 14 countries. Thirty-two per cent of the participants had experienced HIV-related discrimination during the previous 3 years; almost half of them felt discriminated against by health care providers. For this type of discrimination, logistic regression analysis revealed significant associations with not being a migrant (OR: 2.0; IC 1.0-3.7; pprevention of sexually transmitted infections (OR: 1.7; IC 1.0-3.0; pgender had a protective effect (OR: 0.2; IC 0.0-0.9; pdiscrimination. Improving health care providers' communication skills, and fostering openness about SRH topics in HIV care could contribute to destigmatization of PLHIV.

  17. HIV risk and barriers to care for African-born immigrant women: a sociocultural outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoro ON

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Olihe N Okoro,1 Shanasha O Whitson2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Minnesota, Duluth, 2Community Partnership Collaborative 2.0, Minneapolis, MN, USA Background: Data from the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report 2015 show that African-born (AB women continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV. In 2015, these women accounted for more than half (54% of all new cases of HIV reported among females in Minnesota and 34% of all known female cases in the state. This study was a needs assessment for HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP in vulnerable subgroups within the AB population and adequacy of HIV care for AB persons. The primary objective of this study was to gain an insight into the strategies that will limit the spread of HIV infection and enhance HIV care among AB immigrants. Methods: Community advocates, community-based organizations (CBOs, clinicians, and other HIV-related service providers were invited to participate in a focus group, structured interview or complete an assessment tool using the same questionnaire about HIV and PrEP among AB persons. A thematic analysis was then conducted on the open-ended questions addressing perceived barriers. Results: Findings suggest the following gender-specific sociocultural factors that drive HIV transmission and constitute barriers to HIV treatment for AB women: domestic/intimate partner violence, gender-biased stigma, discriminatory cultural beliefs and normative values/expectations, unprotected sex with husbands who have sex with other men, gender discordance in health care (preference for female provider, and sexual/reproductive health illiteracy. Recommendation: Based on recommendations, a community-based sexual and reproductive health education is being initiated with a curriculum that will be 1 broad (inclusive but not limited to HIV, 2 culturally sensitive/responsive, and 3 at appropriate

  18. HIV/AIDS and admission to intensive care units: A comparison of India, Brazil and South Africa

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    Kantharuben Naidoo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In resource-constrained settings and in the context of HIV-infected patients requiring intensive care, value-laden decisions by critical care specialists are often made in the absence of explicit policies and guidelines. These are often based on individual practitioners’ knowledge and experience, which may be subject to bias. We reviewed published information on legislation and practices related to intensive care unit (ICU admission in India, Brazil and South Africa, to assess access to critical care services in the context of HIV. Each of these countries has legal instruments in place to provide their citizens with health services, but they differ in their provision of ICU care for HIV-infected persons. In Brazil, some ICUs have no admission criteria, and this decision vests solely on the ‘availability, and the knowledge and the experience’ of the most experienced ICU specialist at the institution. India has few regulatory mechanisms to ensure ICU care for critically ill patients including HIV-infected persons. SA has made concerted efforts towards non-discriminatory criteria for ICU admissions and, despite the shortage of ICU beds, HIV-infected patients have relatively greater access to this level of care than in other developing countries in Africa, such as Botswana. Policymakers and clinicians should devise explicit policy frameworks to govern ICU admissions in the context of HIV status. S Afr J HIV Med 2013;14(1:15-16. DOI:10.7196/SAJHIVMED.887

  19. HIV/AIDS EDUCATION OF HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS

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    Ljaljević Agima

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to determine perceptions of service providers in the healthcare on their awareness and knowledge about HIV/AIDS, as well as the relationship of the above parameters and the existence of stigma and discrimination against people with HIV/AIDS. Method: The type of the study was a behavioral cross sectional study. The survey was conducted in 2012, on a representative sample of health workers in Montenegro. The main survey instrument was specifically designed questionnaire that consisted of six parts, out of which one was related to knowledge about HIV and AIDS. Data were analyzed by methods of inferential statistics. Results: More than four out of ten respondents have never attended educational workshops on HIV/AIDS. Research has shown that there is a highly significant statistical correlation between estimates of their own knowledge about HIV / AIDS and previous educations. Almost two-thirds of respondents, who attended some type of education in the field of HIV/AIDS, believe to have a satisfactory level of knowledge in the area. Conclusion: Health care service providers evaluate their knowledge of HIV/AIDS as insufficient.

  20. Closing the delivery gaps in pediatric HIV care in Togo, West Africa: using the care delivery value chain framework to direct quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiori, Kevin; Schechter, Jennifer; Dey, Monica; Braganza, Sandra; Rhatigan, Joseph; Houndenou, Spero; Gbeleou, Christophe; Palerbo, Emmanuel; Tchangani, Elfamozo; Lopez, Andrew; Bensen, Emily; Hirschhorn, Lisa R

    2016-03-01

    Providing quality care for all children living with HIV/AIDS remains a global challenge and requires the development of new healthcare delivery strategies. The care delivery value chain (CDVC) is a framework that maps activities required to provide effective and responsive care for a patient with a particular disease across the continuum of care. By mapping activities along a value chain, the CDVC enables managers to better allocate resources, improve communication, and coordinate activities. We report on the successful application of the CDVC as a strategy to optimize care delivery and inform quality improvement (QI) efforts with the overall aim of improving care for Pediatric HIV patients in Togo, West Africa. Over the course of 12 months, 13 distinct QI activities in Pediatric HIV/AIDS care delivery were monitored, and 11 of those activities met or exceeded established targets. Examples included: increase in infants receiving routine polymerase chain reaction testing at 2 months (39-95%), increase in HIV exposed children receiving confirmatory HIV testing at 18 months (67-100%), and increase in patients receiving initial CD4 testing within 3 months of HIV diagnosis (67-100%). The CDVC was an effective approach for evaluating existing systems and prioritizing gaps in delivery for QI over the full cycle of Pediatric HIV/AIDS care in three specific ways: (1) facilitating the first comprehensive mapping of Pediatric HIV/AIDS services, (2) identifying gaps in available services, and (3) catalyzing the creation of a responsive QI plan. The CDVC provided a framework to drive meaningful, strategic action to improve Pediatric HIV care in Togo.

  1. A systematic review of recent smartphone, Internet and Web 2.0 interventions to address the HIV continuum of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muessig, Kathryn E; Nekkanti, Manali; Bauermeister, Jose; Bull, Sheana; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B

    2015-03-01

    eHealth, mHealth and "Web 2.0" social media strategies can effectively reach and engage key populations in HIV prevention across the testing, treatment, and care continuum. To assess how these tools are currently being used within the field of HIV prevention and care, we systematically reviewed recent (2013-2014) published literature, conference abstracts, and funded research. Our searches identified 23 published intervention studies and 32 funded projects underway. In this synthesis we describe the technology modes applied and the stages of the HIV care cascade addressed, including both primary and secondary prevention activities. Overall trends include use of new tools including social networking sites, provision of real-time assessment and feedback, gamification and virtual reality. While there has been increasing attention to use of technology to address the care continuum, gaps remain around linkage to care, retention in care, and initiation of antiretroviral therapy.

  2. Burnout and self-reported suboptimal patient care amongst health care workers providing HIV care in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazenga, Alick C.; Simon, Katie; Yu, Xiaoying; Ahmed, Saeed; Nyasulu, Phoebe; Kazembe, Peter N.; Ngoma, Stanley; Abrams, Elaine J.

    2018-01-01

    Background The well-documented shortages of health care workers (HCWs) in sub-Saharan Africa are further intensified by the increased human resource needs of expanding HIV treatment programs. Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and a sense of low personal accomplishment (PA). HCWs’ burnout can negatively impact the delivery of health services. Our main objective was to examine the prevalence of burnout amongst HCWs in Malawi and explore its relationship to self-reported suboptimal patient care. Methods A cross-sectional study among HCWs providing HIV care in 89 facilities, across eight districts in Malawi was conducted. Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory defined as scores in the mid-high range on the EE or DP subscales. Nine questions adapted for this study assessed self-reported suboptimal patient care. Surveys were administered anonymously and included socio-demographic and work-related questions. Validated questionnaires assessed depression and at-risk alcohol use. Chi-square test or two-sample t-test was used to explore associations between variables and self-reported suboptimal patient care. Bivariate analyses identified candidate variables (p burnout. In the three dimensions of burnout, 55% reported moderate-high EE, 31% moderate-high DP, and 46% low-moderate PA. The majority (89%) reported engaging in suboptimal patient care/attitudes including making mistakes in treatment not due to lack of knowledge/experience (52%), shouting at patients (45%), and not performing diagnostic tests due to a desire to finish quickly (35%). In multivariate analysis, only burnout remained associated with self-reported suboptimal patient care (OR 3.22, [CI 2.11 to 4.90]; pBurnout was common among HCWs providing HIV care and was associated with self-reported suboptimal patient care practices/attitudes. Research is needed to understand factors that contribute to and protect against burnout and that inform the

  3. Genital infections and syndromic diagnosis among HIV-infected women in HIV care programmes in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djomand, Gaston; Gao, Hongjiang; Singa, Benson; Hornston, Sureyya; Bennett, Eddas; Odek, James; McClelland, R Scott; John-Stewart, Grace; Bock, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Control of genital infections remains challenging in most regions. Despite advocacy by the World Health Organization for syndromic case management, there are limited data on the syndromic approach, especially in HIV care settings. This study compared the syndromic approach with laboratory diagnosis among women in HIV care in Kenya. A mobile team visited 39 large HIV care programmes in Kenya and enrolled participants using population-proportionate sampling. Participants provided behavioural and clinical data with genital and blood specimens for lab testing. Among 1063 women, 68.4% had been on antiretroviral therapy >1 year; 58.9% were using cotrimoxazole prophylaxis; 51 % had CD4+T-lymphocytes Kenya have high rates of vaginal infections. Syndromic diagnosis was a poor predictor of those infections. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. The hepatitis C cascade of care among HIV infected patients: a call to address ongoing barriers to care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R Cachay

    Full Text Available The aims were to investigate the hepatitis C (HCV cascade of care among HIV-infected patients and to identify reasons for not referring for and not initiating HCV therapy after completion of HCV treatment staging.Retrospective cohort analysis of HIV-infected patients under care at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD. We identified patients screened for and diagnosed with active HCV infection. Logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with lack of referral for HCV therapy. Electronic medical records were reviewed to ascertain reasons for not initiating HCV therapy.Between 2008 and 2012, 4725 HIV-infected patients received care at the UCSD Owen clinic. Most patients [4534 (96%] were screened for HCV, 748 (16% patients had reactive serum HCV antibodies but only 542 patients had active HCV infection. Lack of engagement in care was the most important predictor of non-referral for HCV therapy [odds ratio (OR: 5.08, 95% confidence interval 3.24-6.97, p<0.00001]. Other significant predictors included unstable housing (OR: 2.26, AIDS (OR: 1.83, having a detectable HIV viral load (OR: 1.98 and being non-white (OR: 1.67. The most common reason (40% for not initiating or deferring HCV therapy was the presence of ongoing barriers to care.Screening for HCV in HIV-infected patients linked to care is high but almost half of patients diagnosed with HCV are not referred for HCV therapy. Despite improvements in HCV therapy the benefits will not be realized unless effective measures for dealing with barriers to care are implemented.

  5. Rights and duties of HIV infected health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostin, Lawrence O

    2002-01-01

    In 1991, the CDC recommended that health care workers (HCWs) infected with HIV or HBV (HbeAg positive) should be reviewed by an expert panel and should inform patients of their serologic status before engaging in exposure-prone procedures. The CDC, in light of the existing scientific uncertainty about the risk of transmission, issued cautious recommendations. However, considerable evidence has emerged since 1991 suggesting that we should reform national policy. The data demonstrates that risks of transmission of infection in the health care setting are exceedingly low. Current policy, moreover, does not improve patient safety. At the same time, implementation of current national policy at the local level poses significant human rights burdens on HCWs. Consequently, national policy should be changed to ensure patient safety while protecting the human rights of HCWs. This article proposes a new national policy, including: (1) a program to prevent bloodborne pathogen transmission; (2) a responsibility placed on infected HCWs to promote their own health and well-being and to assure patient safety; (3) a discontinuation of expert review panels and special restrictions for exposure-prone procedures; (4) a discontinuation of mandatory disclosure of a HCW's inflection status; and (5) the imposition of practice restrictions if a HCW is unable to practice safely because of a physical or mental impairment or failure to follow careful infection control techniques. A new national policy, focused on management of the workplace environment and injury prevention, would achieve high levels of patient safety without discrimination and invasion of privacy.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of Improving Health Care to People with HIV in Nicaragua

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    Edward Broughton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. A 2010 evaluation found generally poor outcomes among HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy in Nicaragua. We evaluated an intervention to improve HIV nursing services in hospital outpatient departments to improve patient treatment and retention in care. The intervention included improving patient tracking, extending clinic hours, caring for children of HIV+ mothers, ensuring medication availability, promoting self-help groups and family involvement, and coordinating multidisciplinary care. Methods. This pre/postintervention study examined opportunistic infections and clinical status of HIV patients before and after implementation of changes to the system of nursing care. Hospital expenditure data were collected by auditors and hospital teams tracked intervention expenses. Decision tree analysis determined incremental cost-effectiveness from the implementers’ perspective. Results. Opportunistic infections decreased by 24% (95% CI: 14%–34% and 11.3% of patients improved in CDC clinical stage. Average per-patient costs decreased by $133/patient/year (95% CI: $29–$249. The intervention, compared to business-as-usual strategy, saved money while improving outcomes. Conclusions. Improved efficiency of services can allow more ART-eligible patients to receive therapy. We recommended the intervention be implemented in all HIV service facilities in Nicaragua.

  7. Maternal ability to take care of children exposed to HIV

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    Julyana Gomes Freitas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to assess the ability of mothers to take care of children exposed to HIV, using the Assessment Scale of Care Skills for Children Exposed to HIV at Birth and to check the association between the scale dimensions and maternal characteristics. METHOD: this cross-sectional study involved 62 HIV+ mothers whose children of up to one year old had been exposed to the virus at birth. The Assessment Scale of Care Skills for Children Exposed to HIV at Birth consists of 52 items and five dimensions, indicating high, moderate or low care ability. RESULTS: 72.7% of the mothers appropriately offered zidovudine syrup; 86.0% were highly skilled to prepare and administer milk formula; 44.4% were moderately able to prepare and administer complementary feeding; 76.5% revealed high ability to administer prophylactic treatment against pneumonia and 95.3% demonstrated high abilities for clinical monitoring and immunization. Significant associations were found between some maternal variables and the scale dimensions. CONCLUSION: the scale permits the assessment of maternal care delivery to these children and the accomplishment of specific child health interventions.

  8. [Introduction of rapid syphilis and HIV testing in prenatal care in Colombia: qualitative analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Manjarrés, María Teresa; Gaitán-Duarte, Hernando Guillermo; Caicedo, Sidia; Gómez, Berta; Pérez, Freddy

    2016-12-01

    Interpret perceptions of Colombian health professionals concerning factors that obstruct and facilitate the introduction of rapid syphilis and HIV testing in prenatal care services. A qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews was carried out. A convenience sample was selected with 37 participants, who included health professionals involved in prenatal care services, programs for pregnant women, clinical laboratories, and directors of health care units or centers, as well as representatives from regional departments and the Ministry of Health. Colombia does not do widespread screening with rapid syphilis and HIV tests in prenatal care. The professionals interviewed stated they did not have prior experience in the use of rapid tests-except for laboratory staff-or in the course of action in response to a positive result. The insurance system hinders access to timely diagnosis and treatment. Health authorities perceive a need to review existing standards, strengthen the first level of care, and promote comprehensive prenatal care starting with contracts between insurers and health service institutional providers. Participants recommended staff training and integration between health-policymaking and academic entities for updating training programs. The market approach and the characteristics of the Colombian health system constitute the main barriers to implementation of rapid testing as a strategy for elimination of mother-to-child transmission of syphilis and HIV. Measures identified include making changes in contracts between insurers and health service institutional providers, adapting the timing and duration of prenatal care procedures, and training physicians and nurses involved in prenatal care.

  9. Retention in HIV care depends on patients' perceptions of the clinic experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessinger, Matthew H; Hennink, Monique M; Kaiser, Bonnie N; Mangal, Jed P; Gokhale, Runa H; Ruchin, Lauren; Moanna, Abeer; Rimland, David; Farber, Eugene W; Marconi, Vincent C

    2017-10-01

    Institutional barriers in HIV primary care settings can contribute substantially to disparities in retention in HIV treatment and HIV-related outcomes. This qualitative study compared the perceptions of clinic experiences of persons living with HIV (PLWH) in a Veterans Affairs HIV primary care clinic setting who were retained in care with the experiences of those who were not retained in care. Qualitative data from 25 in-depth interviews were analyzed to identify facilitators and barriers to retention in HIV care. Results showed that participants not retained in care experienced barriers to retention involving dissatisfaction with clinic wait times, low confidence in clinicians, and customer service concerns. For participants retained in care, patience with procedural issues, confidence in clinicians, and interpersonal connections were factors that enhanced retention despite the fact that these participants recognized the same barriers as those who were not retained in care. These findings can inform interventions aimed at improving retention in HIV care.

  10. What palliative care-related problems do patients experience at HIV diagnosis? A systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, Victoria M; Higginson, Irene J; Harding, Richard

    2011-11-01

    Palliative care is an essential element of HIV care throughout the disease trajectory, but there is a lack of information to guide clinical care at HIV diagnosis. This systematic review aimed to identify and appraise the evidence of palliative care-related problems at HIV diagnosis. The search strategy combined the term "HIV" with seven key words derived from the World Health Organization definition of multidimensional palliative care, in a systematic search of four databases. Abstracts and papers were screened to identify those recording problems within six months of HIV diagnosis in adults. Sample descriptions, aims, methods, and prevalence findings were extracted from these papers into common tables. Of 5443 titles retrieved, 65 met the inclusion criteria and 34 were retained. Papers included 27 original studies and seven secondary analyses of patient's records, with great heterogeneity in design, sample definition, and outcome measures. Physical and psychological symptoms were highly prevalent (pain 11%-76%, weight loss 8%-89%, fever 32%-89%, diarrhea 6%-54%, anxiety 36%-95%, and depression 18%-47%). At HIV diagnosis, well-being was impaired, suicidal thoughts were frequent, and peace and calmness were reduced. Participants lacked emotional support and feared the reaction of their families. Practical problems included hunger, homelessness, reduced ability to work, and need for childcare. Studies had methodological failings such as the use of unvalidated tools and lack of clarity reporting results. People who have recently been diagnosed with HIV have multidimensional palliative care-related problems. HIV care and support services need to assess and manage problems using integrated palliative care, with referral for complex problems. Patient centeredness must be a principle of HIV clinical research. Copyright © 2011 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. HIV counseling and testing in a tertiary care hospital in Ganjam district, Odisha, India

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    M Dash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV counseling and testing (HCT conducted at integrated counseling and testing centers (ICTCs is an entry point, cost-effective intervention in preventing transmission of HIV. Objectives: To study the prevalence of HIV among ICTC attendees, sociodemographic characteristics, and risk behaviors of HIV-seropositive clients. Materials and Methods: It was hospital record-based cross-sectional study of 26,518 registered ICTC clients at a tertiary care hospital in Ganjam district, Odisha, India over a 4-year period from January 2009 to September 2012. Results: A total of 1732 (7.5% out of 22,897 who were tested for HIV were seropositive. Among HIV-seropositives, 1138 (65.7% were males, while 594 (34.3% were females. Majority (88.3% of seropositives were between the age group of 15-49 years. Client-initiated HIV testing (12.1% was more seropositive compared to provider-initiated (2.9%. Among discordant couples, majority (95.5% were male partner/husband positive and female partner/wife negative. Positives were more amongst married, less educated, low socioeconomic status, and outmigrants (P<0.0001. Risk factors included heterosexual promiscuous (89.3%, parent-to-child transmission 5.8%, unknown 3.1%, infected blood transfusion 0.8%, homosexual 0.5%, and infected needles (0.5%. Conclusions: There is need to encourage activities that promote HCT in all health facilities. This will increase the diagnosis of new HIV cases. The data generated in ICTC provide an important clue to understand the epidemiology in a particular geographic region and local planning for care and treatment of those infected with HIV and preventive strategies for those at risk especially married, young adults, and outmigrants to reduce new infections.

  12. Alternative therapies for the holistic care of the HIV / AIDS patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alternative therapies that can be used for the holistic nursing care of HIV / AIDS infection include psychological, mental and emotional therapies, therapeutic touch, nutrition, vitamins, minerals and nutritional supplements, herbal medicine, Chinese medicine and homeopathy, traditional medicine, lifestyle changes and ...

  13. Child Care Teachers' Perspectives on Including Children with Challenging Behavior in Child Care Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesenberry, Amanda C.; Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Hamann, Kira

    2014-01-01

    In this study, 9 teachers from 5 child care centers were interviewed to examine their perceptions on including children with challenging behavior in their classrooms. The findings provide a firsthand view into how child care teachers support children's social and emotional development and address challenging behavior. Results confirm previous…

  14. Unhealthy Substance Use Behaviors as Symptom-Related Self-Care in HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, John M.; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K.; Sloane, Rick; Voss, Joachim G.; Corless, Inge B.; Lindgren, Teri G.; Wantland, Dean J.; Kemppainen, Jeanne K.; Sefcik, Elizabeth F.; Nokes, Kathleen M.; Kirksey, Kenn M.; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L.; Portillo, Carmen J.; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M.; Moezzi, Shanaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P.; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M.; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of symptoms in HIV disease can be associated with HIV disease itself, comorbid illness, and/or antiretroviral therapy. Unhealthy substance use behaviors, particularly substance-use behaviors including heavy alcohol intake, marijuana use, other illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage disease-related symptoms. This study is a secondary data analysis of baseline data from a larger randomized-controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS Symptom Management Manual. In the present study, the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy substance use behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms are examined. Subjects were recruited from a variety of settings which provide HIV/AIDS care and treatment. The mean age of the sample (n=775) was 42.8 years (SD=9.6) and nearly thirty-nine percent (38.5%) of the sample was female. The racial demographics of the sample were: 28% African American, 28% Hispanic, 21% White/Caucasian, 16% African from Kenya or South Africa, 1% Asian, and 5% self-described as “Other.” The mean number of years living with HIV was reported to be 9.1 years (SD=6.6).Specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were use of marijuana (n= 111; 14.3%), cigarette smoking (n=355; 45.8%), heavy alcohol use (n= 66; 8.5%), and illicit drugs (n= 98; 12.6%). A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance use behaviors including amphetamine and injection drug use in addition to heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. Implications for clinical practice include assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons related to self-management across the trajectory of HIV disease. PMID:21352430

  15. Exploring how substance use impedes engagement along the HIV care continuum: A qualitative exploration

    OpenAIRE

    Marya eGwadz; Marya eGwadz; Rebecca ede Guzman; Robert eFreeman; Alexandra eKutnick; Elizabeth eSilverman; Noelle Regina Leonard; Noelle Regina Leonard; Amanda Spring Ritchie; Corrine eMunoz-Plaza; Nadim eSalomon; Hannah eWolfe; Christopher eHilliard; Christopher eHilliard; Charles eCleland

    2016-01-01

    Drug use is associated with low uptake of HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART), an under-studied step in the HIV care continuum, and insufficient engagement in HIV primary care. However, the specific underlying mechanisms by which drug use impedes these HIV health outcomes are poorly understood. The present qualitative study addresses this gap in the literature, focusing on African American/Black and Hispanic persons living with HIV (PLWH) who had delayed, declined, or discontinued ART and who al...

  16. Missed opportunities: poor linkage into ongoing care for HIV-positive pregnant women in Mwanza, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Watson-Jones

    Full Text Available Global coverage of prevention of mother-to-child (PMTCT services reached 53% in 2009. However the number of pregnant women who test positive for HIV in antenatal clinics and who link into long-term HIV care is not known in many resource-poor countries. We measured the proportion of HIV-positive pregnant women in Mwanza city, Tanzania, who completed the cascade of care from antenatal HIV diagnosis to assessment and engagement in care in adult HIV clinics.Thirty antenatal and maternity ward health workers were interviewed about PMTCT activities. Nine antenatal HIV education sessions were observed. A prospective cohort of 403 HIV-positive women was enrolled by specially-trained clinicians and nurses on admission to delivery and followed for four months post-partum. Information was collected on referral and attendance at adult HIV clinics, eligibility for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART and reasons for lack of attendance.Overall, 70% of PMTCT health workers referred HIV-positive pregnant women to the HIV clinic for assessment and care. Antenatal HIV education sessions did not cover on-going care for HIV-infected women. Of 310 cohort participants tested in pregnancy, 51% had received an HIV clinic referral pre-delivery. Only 32% of 244 women followed to four months post-partum had attended an HIV clinic and been assessed for HAART eligibility. Non-attendance for HIV care was independently associated with fewer antenatal visits, poor PMTCT prophylaxis compliance, non-disclosure of HIV status, and non-Sukuma ethnicity.Most women identified as HIV-positive during pregnancy were not assessed for HAART eligibility during pregnancy or in the first four months post-partum. Initiating HAART at the antenatal clinic, improved counselling and linkages to care between PMTCT and adult HIV treatment services and reducing stigma surrounding disclosure of HIV results would benefit on-going care of HIV-positive pregnant women.

  17. Significant association between perceived HIV related stigma and late presentation for HIV/AIDS care in low and middle-income countries: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailay Abrha Gesesew

    Full Text Available Late presentation for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV care is a major impediment for the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART outcomes. The role that stigma plays as a potential barrier to timely diagnosis and treatment of HIV among people living with HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is ambivalent. This review aimed to assess the best available evidence regarding the association between perceived HIV related stigma and time to present for HIV/AIDS care.Quantitative studies conducted in English language between 2002 and 2016 that evaluated the association between HIV related stigma and late presentation for HIV care were sought across four major databases. This review considered studies that included the following outcome: 'late HIV testing', 'late HIV diagnosis' and 'late presentation for HIV care after testing'. Data were extracted using a standardized Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI data extraction tool. Meta- analysis was undertaken using Revman-5 software. I2 and chi-square test were used to assess heterogeneity. Summary statistics were expressed as pooled odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals and corresponding p-value.Ten studies from low- and middle- income countries met the search criteria, including six (6 and four (4 case control studies and cross-sectional studies respectively. The total sample size in the included studies was 3,788 participants. Half (5 of the studies reported a significant association between stigma and late presentation for HIV care. The meta-analytical association showed that people who perceived high HIV related stigma had two times more probability of late presentation for HIV care than who perceived low stigma (pooled odds ratio = 2.4; 95%CI: 1.6-3.6, I2 = 79%.High perceptions of HIV related stigma influenced timely presentation for HIV care. In order to avoid late HIV care presentation due the fear of stigma among patients, health professionals should play a key role in informing and counselling

  18. Significant association between perceived HIV related stigma and late presentation for HIV/AIDS care in low and middle-income countries: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesesew, Hailay Abrha; Tesfay Gebremedhin, Amanuel; Demissie, Tariku Dejene; Kerie, Mirkuzie Woldie; Sudhakar, Morankar; Mwanri, Lillian

    2017-01-01

    Late presentation for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care is a major impediment for the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) outcomes. The role that stigma plays as a potential barrier to timely diagnosis and treatment of HIV among people living with HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) is ambivalent. This review aimed to assess the best available evidence regarding the association between perceived HIV related stigma and time to present for HIV/AIDS care. Quantitative studies conducted in English language between 2002 and 2016 that evaluated the association between HIV related stigma and late presentation for HIV care were sought across four major databases. This review considered studies that included the following outcome: 'late HIV testing', 'late HIV diagnosis' and 'late presentation for HIV care after testing'. Data were extracted using a standardized Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) data extraction tool. Meta- analysis was undertaken using Revman-5 software. I2 and chi-square test were used to assess heterogeneity. Summary statistics were expressed as pooled odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals and corresponding p-value. Ten studies from low- and middle- income countries met the search criteria, including six (6) and four (4) case control studies and cross-sectional studies respectively. The total sample size in the included studies was 3,788 participants. Half (5) of the studies reported a significant association between stigma and late presentation for HIV care. The meta-analytical association showed that people who perceived high HIV related stigma had two times more probability of late presentation for HIV care than who perceived low stigma (pooled odds ratio = 2.4; 95%CI: 1.6-3.6, I2 = 79%). High perceptions of HIV related stigma influenced timely presentation for HIV care. In order to avoid late HIV care presentation due the fear of stigma among patients, health professionals should play a key role in informing and counselling patients

  19. [Applying the Modified Delphi Technique to Develop the Role of HIV Case Managers and Essential Nursing Competencies in HIV Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Nai-Ying; Hsieh, Chia-Yin; Chen, Yen-Chin; Tsai, Chen-Hsi; Liu, Hsiao-Ying; Liu, Li-Fang

    2015-08-01

    Since 2005, the Taiwan Centers for Disease Control (Taiwan CDC) initiated an HIV case management program in AIDS-designated hospitals to provide integrative services and risk-reduction counseling for HIV-infected individuals. In light of the increasingly complex and highly specialized nature of clinical care, expanding and improving competency-based professional education is important to enhance the quality of HIV/AIDS care. The aim of this study was to develop the essential competency framework for HIV care for HIV case managers in Taiwan. We reviewed essential competencies of HIV care from Canada, the United Kingdom, and several African countries and devised descriptions of the roles of case managers and of the associated core competencies for HIV care in Taiwan. The modified Delphi technique was used to evaluate the draft framework of these roles and core competencies. A total of 15 HIV care experts were invited to join the expert panel to review and rank the draft framework. The final framework consisted of 7 roles and 27 competencies for HIV case managers. In Round 1, only 3 items did not receive consensus approval from the experts. After modification based on opinions of the experts, 7 roles and 27 competencies received 97.06% consensus approval in Round 2 and were organized into the final framework for HIV case managers. These roles and associated core competencies were: HIV Care Expert (9 competencies), Communicator (1 competency), Collaborator (4 competencies), Navigator (2 competencies), Manager (4 competencies), Advocate (2 competencies), and Professional (5 competencies). The authors developed an essential competency framework for HIV care using the consensus of a multidisciplinary expert panel. Curriculum developers and advanced nurses and practitioners may use this framework to support developments and to ensure a high quality of HIV care.

  20. Lack of knowledge of HIV status a major barrier to HIV prevention, care and treatment efforts in Kenya: results from a nationally representative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Cherutich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We analyzed HIV testing rates, prevalence of undiagnosed HIV, and predictors of testing in the Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey (KAIS 2007. METHODS: KAIS was a nationally representative sero-survey that included demographic and behavioral indicators and testing for HIV, HSV-2, syphilis, and CD4 cell counts in the population aged 15-64 years. We used gender-specific multivariable regression models to identify factors independently associated with HIV testing in sexually active persons. RESULTS: Of 19,840 eligible persons, 80% consented to interviews and blood specimen collection. National HIV prevalence was 7.1% (95% CI 6.5-7.7. Among ever sexually active persons, 27.4% (95% CI 25.6-29.2 of men and 44.2% (95% CI 42.5-46.0 of women reported previous HIV testing. Among HIV-infected persons, 83.6% (95% CI 76.2-91.0 were unaware of their HIV infection. Among sexually active women aged 15-49 years, 48.7% (95% CI 46.8-50.6 had their last HIV test during antenatal care (ANC. In multivariable analyses, the adjusted odds ratio (AOR for ever HIV testing in women ≥35 versus 15-19 years was 0.2 (95% CI: 0.1-0.3; p<0.0001. Other independent associations with ever HIV testing included urban residence (AOR 1.6, 95% CI: 1.2-2.0; p = 0.0005, women only, highest wealth index versus the four lower quintiles combined (AOR 1.8, 95% CI: 1.3-2.5; p = 0.0006, men only, and an increasing testing trend with higher levels of education. Missed opportunities for testing were identified during general or pregnancy-specific contacts with health facilities; 89% of adults said they would participate in home-based HIV testing. CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority of HIV-infected persons in Kenya are unaware of their HIV status, posing a major barrier to HIV prevention, care and treatment efforts. New approaches to HIV testing provision and education, including home-based testing, may increase coverage. Targeted interventions should involve sexually active men, sexually

  1. Linking women who test HIV-positive in pregnancy-related services to HIV care and treatment services in Kenya: a mixed methods prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ferguson

    Full Text Available There has been insufficient attention to long-term care and treatment for pregnant women diagnosed with HIV.This prospective cohort study of 100 HIV-positive women recruited within pregnancy-related services in a district hospital in Kenya employed quantitative methods to assess attrition between women testing HIV-positive in pregnancy-related services and accessing long-term HIV care and treatment services. Qualitative methods were used to explore barriers and facilitators to navigating these services. Structured questionnaires were administered to cohort participants at enrolment and 90+ days later. Participants' medical records were monitored prospectively. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out with a sub-set of 19 participants.Only 53/100 (53% women registered at an HIV clinic within 90 days of HIV diagnosis, of whom 27/53 (51% had a CD4 count result in their file. 11/27 (41% women were eligible for immediate antiretroviral therapy (ART; only 6/11 (55% started ART during study follow-up. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, factors associated with registration at the HIV clinic within 90 days of HIV diagnosis were: having cared for someone with HIV (aOR:3.67(95%CI:1.22, 11.09, not having to pay for transport to the hospital (aOR:2.73(95%CI:1.09, 6.84, and having received enough information to decide to have an HIV test (aOR:3.61(95%CI:0.83, 15.71. Qualitative data revealed multiple factors underlying high patient drop-out related to women's social support networks (e.g. partner's attitude to HIV status, interactions with health workers (e.g. being given unclear/incorrect HIV-related information and health services characteristics (e.g. restricted opening hours, long waiting times.HIV testing within pregnancy-related services is an important entry point to HIV care and treatment services, but few women successfully completed the steps needed for assessment of their treatment needs within three months of diagnosis

  2. Systematic review of interventions to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, among young people in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Sihvonen-Riemenschneider, Henna; Laukamm-Josten, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of interventions seeking to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, among young people in the European Union.......To examine the effectiveness of interventions seeking to prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, among young people in the European Union....

  3. Self-disclosure of HIV status, disclosure counseling, and retention in HIV care in Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breger, Tiffany L; Newman, Jamie E; Mfangam Molu, Brigitte; Akam, Wilfred; Balimba, Ashu; Atibu, Joseph; Kiumbu, Modeste; Azinyue, Innocent; Hemingway-Foday, Jennifer; Pence, Brian W

    2017-07-01

    Poor retention in care is common among HIV-positive adults in sub-Saharan Africa settings and remains a key barrier to HIV management. We quantify the associations of disclosure of HIV status and referral to disclosure counseling with successful retention in care using data from three Cameroon clinics participating in the Phase 1 International epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS Central Africa cohort. Of 1646 patients newly initiating antiretroviral therapy between January 2008 and January 2011, 43% were retained in care following treatment initiation. Self-disclosure of HIV status to at least one person prior to treatment initiation was associated with a minimal increase in the likelihood of being retained in care (risk ratio [RR] = 1.14; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.94, 1.38). However, referral to disclosure counseling was associated with a moderate increase in retention (RR = 1.37; 95% CI: 1.21, 1.55) and was not significantly modified by prior disclosure status (p = .3). Our results suggest that while self-disclosure may not significantly improve retention among patients receiving care at these Cameroon sites, counseling services may play an important role regardless of prior disclosure status.

  4. Southern Africa: the Highest Priority Region for HIV Prevention and Care Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermund, Sten H; Sheldon, Emily K; Sidat, Mohsin

    2015-06-01

    The global HIV pandemic began to expand rapidly in southern Africa a decade later than was noted in central Africa, Europe, the Caribbean, and North America. Multiple factors played a role in this rapid expansion which led Southern Africa to become the most heavily afflicted region for HIV/AIDS globally. In this issue of Current HIV/AIDS Reports, investigators with active research interests in the region have reviewed key elements of the causes of and responses to the epidemic. Putative causes of the high HIV prevalence in the region are discussed, including host and viral biology, human behavior, politics and policy, structural factors, health services, health workforce, migration, traditional healers' role, and other issues. Regional epidemiological trends are described and forecasted. Issues related to the continuum of HIV care and treatment are highlighted. We hope that the reviews will prove useful to those policymakers, health care workers, and scientists who are striving to reduce the burden of HIV in the southern African region, as well as prove insightful for key issues of broader global relevance.

  5. Problems experienced by professional nurses providing care for HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to describe the problems experienced by professional nurses providing health care to patients living with HIV and AIDS in the public hospitals of Polokwane municipality, Limpopo province. A qualitative descriptive, contextual and phenomenology design was used to described the problems ...

  6. HOME BASED CARE FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Dar-es-salaam Medical Students' Journal - DMSJ October 2011. 23. Executive summary. Background: For many AIDS patients in low income countries such as African ... members who are taking care of their relatives living with HIV/AIDS and further studies should be conducted in order to explore reasons as to.

  7. The costs of HIV treatment and care in Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.S. Mikkelsen; J.A.C. Hontelez (Jan); Nonvignon, J. (Justice); Amon, S. (Sam); Asante, F.A. (Felix A.); M. Aikins (Moses Kweku); Van De Haterd, J. (Julie); R. Baltussen (R.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To determine cost functions that describe the dynamics of costs of HIV treatment and care in Ghana by CD4+ cell count at treatment initiation and over time on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design: We used detailed longitudinal healthcare utilization data from clinical health

  8. HIV care and treatment experiences among female sex workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The databases PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SCOPUS, CINAHL, Global Health, Psycinfo, Sociological Abstracts, and Popline were searched for variations of search terms related to sex work and HIV care and treatment among sub-Saharan African populations. Ten peer-reviewed articles published between January ...

  9. Do health care providers discuss HIV with older female patients?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... Trained research assistants collected data ... counselling. It is suggested that part of the challenge may lie in the mindset of health care providers. Family physicians need to become proactive in terms of their own practice as well as in terms of .... physicians, for example, do not discuss HIV risk factors with.

  10. Palliative care in children with advanced HIV/AIDS | Chunda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Palliative care in children with advanced HIV/AIDS. R Chunda, V Lavy. Abstract. No Abstract. Malawi Medical Journal Vol.17(2) 2005: 51-52. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/mmj.v17i2.10878.

  11. Care of HIV-infected adults at Baragwanath Hospital, Soweto

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laboratory investigations (30%), staff (21 %) and drugs (22%), especially for fungal, viral and tuberculosis infection, were the major contributors to costs. Conclusions. Given projected HIV infection rates and the associated, potentially enormous costs of care revealed by this study, clinicians and health service planners must.

  12. Refusal to provide health care to people with HIV in France.

    OpenAIRE

    Douay , Caroline; Toullier , Adeline; Benayoun , Sarah; Castro , Daniela Rojas; Chauvin , Pierre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Refusals to provide care to people with HIV have been reported in the USA, the UK and elsewhere in Europe but their frequency remains poorly documented. In 2015, the French parliament examined a law that includes an article on non-discrimination in access to health care and the possibility of doing tests to determine the extent and nature of the discrimination. During the legislative debates, AIDES did a situation testing survey4 to ascertain the frequency and nature o...

  13. Multi-level factors affecting entry into and engagement in the HIV continuum of care in Iringa, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica H Layer

    Full Text Available Progression through the HIV continuum of care, from HIV testing to lifelong retention in antiretroviral therapy (ART care and treatment programs, is critical to the success of HIV treatment and prevention efforts. However, significant losses occur at each stage of the continuum and little is known about contextual factors contributing to disengagement at these stages. This study sought to explore multi-level barriers and facilitators influencing entry into and engagement in the continuum of care in Iringa, Tanzania. We used a mixed-methods study design including facility-based assessments and interviews with providers and clients of HIV testing and treatment services; interviews, focus group discussions and observations with community-based providers and clients of HIV care and support services; and longitudinal interviews with men and women living with HIV to understand their trajectories in care. Data were analyzed using narrative analysis to identify key themes across levels and stages in the continuum of care. Participants identified multiple compounding barriers to progression through the continuum of care at the individual, facility, community and structural levels. Key barriers included the reluctance to engage in HIV services while healthy, rigid clinic policies, disrespectful treatment from service providers, stock-outs of supplies, stigma and discrimination, alternate healing systems, distance to health facilities and poverty. Social support from family, friends or support groups, home-based care providers, income generating opportunities and community mobilization activities facilitated engagement throughout the HIV continuum. Findings highlight the complex, multi-dimensional dynamics that individuals experience throughout the continuum of care and underscore the importance of a holistic and multi-level perspective to understand this process. Addressing barriers at each level is important to promoting increased engagement throughout

  14. Caring for the carer in the era of HIV diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lempye J. Sempane

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The care of terminally ill patients can be physically, emotionally as well as psychologically exhausting. In the era where everyone is busy with his or her hectic daily schedule, caring for someone diagnosed with HIV on her or his deathbed can be a daunting challenge. Caring for someone dying of AIDS does not only challenge the physical being but rather leaves the carer emotionally drained. What was of concern to the author was to see the struggle that the caregiver goes through whilst caring for the sufferer. More often than not, pastoral care and counselling concentrate mainly on the pain and the suffering of the sick person. In the process, pastoral care loses sight of the agony, the emotional strain and, above all, the trauma of the caregivers in their search for answers as they care for the infected. This scenario has prompted the author to look into the theology of caring with an emphasis on pastoral care of the carers with a view of alleviating their emotional burden in caring for the HIV patients.

  15. Implementation of mental health service has an impact on retention in HIV care: a nested case-control study in a japanese HIV care facility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinjiro Tominari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Poor retention in the care of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is associated with adverse patient outcomes such as antiretroviral therapy failure and death. Therefore, appropriate case management is required for better patient retention; however, which intervention in case management is important has not been fully investigated. Meanwhile, in Japan, each local government is required to organize mental health services for patients with HIV so that a case manager at an HIV care facility can utilize them, but little is known about the association between implementation of the services and loss to follow-up. Therefore, we investigated that by a nested case-control study. METHODS: The target population consisted of all patients with HIV who visited Osaka National Hospital, the largest HIV care facility in western Japan, between 2000 and 2010. Loss to follow-up was defined as not returning for follow-up care more than 1 year after the last visit. Independent variables included patient demographics, characteristics of the disease and treatment, and whether the patients have received mental health services. For each case, three controls were randomly selected and matched. RESULTS: Of the 1620 eligible patients, 88 loss to follow-up cases were identified and 264 controls were matched. Multivariate-adjusted conditional logistic regression revealed that loss to follow-up was less frequent among patients who had received mental health services implemented by their case managers (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.35 [0.16-0.76]. Loss to follow-up also occurred more frequently in patients who did not receive antiretroviral therapy (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval], 7.51 [3.34-16.9], who were under 30 years old (2.74 [1.36-5.50], or who were without jobs (3.38 [1.58-7.23]. CONCLUSION: Mental health service implementation by case managers has a significant impact on patient retention.

  16. Beyond HIV-serodiscordance: Partnership communication dynamics that affect engagement in safer conception care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn T Matthews

    Full Text Available We explored acceptability and feasibility of safer conception methods among HIV-affected couples in Uganda.We recruited HIV-positive men and women on antiretroviral therapy (ART ('index' from the Uganda Antiretroviral Rural Treatment Outcomes cohort who reported an HIV-negative or unknown-serostatus partner ('partner', HIV-serostatus disclosure to partner, and personal or partner desire for a child within two years. We conducted in-depth interviews with 40 individuals from 20 couples, using a narrative approach with tailored images to assess acceptability of five safer conception strategies: ART for the infected partner, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP for the uninfected partner, condomless sex timed to peak fertility, manual insemination, and male circumcision. Translated and transcribed data were analyzed using thematic analysis.11/20 index participants were women, median age of 32.5 years, median of 2 living children, and 80% had HIV-RNA <400 copies/mL. Awareness of HIV prevention strategies beyond condoms and abstinence was limited and precluded opportunity to explore or validly assess acceptability or feasibility of safer conception methods. Four key partnership communication challenges emerged as primary barriers to engagement in safer conception care, including: (1 HIV-serostatus disclosure: Although disclosure was an inclusion criterion, partners commonly reported not knowing the index partner's HIV status. Similarly, the partner's HIV-serostatus, as reported by the index, was frequently inaccurate. (2 Childbearing intention: Many couples had divergent childbearing intentions and made incorrect assumptions about their partner's desires. (3 HIV risk perception: Participants had disparate understandings of HIV transmission and disagreed on the acceptable level of HIV risk to meet reproductive goals. (4 Partnership commitment: Participants revealed significant discord in perceptions of partnership commitment. All four types of partnership

  17. [Implementation of a continuum of care for people living with HIV/AIDS in Hanoi (Vietnam)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Loenzien, Myriam

    2009-01-01

    Caring for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) encompasses various tasks, from prevention to palliative care. It involves a set of consistent and coordinated actions. This article presents the first free-of-charge management programme including antiretroviral treatment in Vietnam (as opposed to research and evaluation programmes). It was launched in 2004 in Hanoi. Our study was conducted in 2003-2004 as part of a collaborative research programme led by IRD (Research Institute for Development) and the National Economic University in Hanoi and was funded by ESTHER (Together for a Therapeutic Solidarity in Hospital Network) group. Data collection included 68 qualitative interviews with patients, members of their families and members of the hospital staff, observations of outpatient consultations, and analysis of inpatient files. The results show that patients, their families and hospital staff members all perceive a comprehensive care and treatment programme as very important and consider that it should include social and psychological care as well as an integrated set of actions involving various types of participants. Outpatient and inpatient care are closely linked: they take place in the same hospital department, they involve patients with similar social and demographic characteristics marked by multiple risk behaviours and recourse to several kinds of healthcare services. The observation of outpatient consultations showed the limitations of strictly biomedical care to which social and psychological care were added only lately. One of the principal difficulties is patients' difficulties in keeping their outpatient appointments. Overall, patients consider themselves lucky to able to receive care and treatment with antiretroviral drugs. They nevertheless complain about the lack of social and psychological support, which they expect should help them to tolerate and adapt to their biomedical treatment and to include counselling and information about this treatment and

  18. HIV Linkage to Care and Retention in Care Rate Among MSM in Guangzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ngai Sze; Mao, Jessica; Cheng, Weibin; Tang, Weiming; Cohen, Myron S; Tucker, Joseph D; Xu, Huifang

    2018-03-01

    Quantifying HIV service provision along the HIV care continuum is increasingly important for monitoring and evaluating HIV interventions. We examined factors associated with linkage and retention in care longitudinally among MSM (n = 1974, 4933 person-years) diagnosed and living in Guangzhou, China, in 2008-2014. We measured longitudinal change of retention in care (≥2 CD4 tests per year) from linkage and antiretroviral therapy initiation (ART). We examined factors associated with linkage using logistic regression and with retention using generalized estimating equations. The rate of linkage to care was 89% in 2014. ART retention rate dropped from 71% (year 1) to 46% (year 2), suggesting that first-year retention measures likely overestimate retention over longer periods. Lower CD4 levels and older age predicted retention in ART care. These data can inform interventions to improve retention about some subgroups.

  19. HIV-Related Stigma and Overlapping Stigmas Towards People Living With HIV Among Health Care Trainees in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Anne C; Girard, Todd; McShane, Kelly E; Margolese, Shari; Hart, Trevor A

    2017-08-01

    HIV continues to be a stigmatized disease, despite significant advances in care and concerted effort to reduce discrimination, stereotypes, and prejudice. Living with HIV is often associated with a multitude of overlapping and intersecting experiences which can, in and of themselves, also be stigmatized, and which may exacerbate HIV-related stigma. The consequences of these stigmatizing experiences are particularly impactful when the stigmatizing individual is a health care provider, as this can influence access to and quality of care. The current study empirically investigates a model of overlapping stigmas (homophobia, racism, sexism, stigma against injection drug use and stigma against sex work) potentially held by health care provider trainees in Canada to determine how these constructs overlap and intersect, and to assess whether HIV-related stigma may have unique attributes. Understanding overlapping stigmas can help inform targeted, stigma-informed training for health care trainees in order to provide effective, compassionate care for people living with HIV.

  20. Linkage to HIV care, postpartum depression, and HIV-related stigma in newly diagnosed pregnant women living with HIV in Kenya: a longitudinal observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Bulent; Stringer, Kristi L; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Weiser, Sheri D; Cohen, Craig R; Turan, Janet M

    2014-12-03

    While studies have suggested that depression and HIV-related stigma may impede access to care, a growing body of literature also suggests that access to HIV care itself may help to decrease internalized HIV-related stigma and symptoms of depression in the general population of persons living with HIV. However, this has not been investigated in postpartum women living with HIV. Furthermore, linkage to care itself may have additional impacts on postpartum depression beyond the effects of antiretroviral therapy. We examined associations between linkage to HIV care, postpartum depression, and internalized stigma in a population with a high risk of depression: newly diagnosed HIV-positive pregnant women. In this prospective observational study, data were obtained from 135 HIV-positive women from eight antenatal clinics in the rural Nyanza Province of Kenya at their first antenatal visit (prior to testing HIV-positive for the first time) and subsequently at 6 weeks after giving birth. At 6 weeks postpartum, women who had not linked to HIV care after testing positive at their first antenatal visit had higher levels of depression and internalized stigma, compared to women who had linked to care. Internalized stigma mediated the effect of linkage to care on depression. Furthermore, participants who had both linked to HIV care and initiated antiretroviral therapy reported the lowest levels of depressive symptoms. These results provide further support for current efforts to ensure that women who are newly diagnosed with HIV during pregnancy become linked to HIV care as early as possible, with important benefits for both physical and mental health.

  1. Post-accident work behavior in caring for people with HIV/Aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarinho, Mariana Vieira; Padilha, Maria Itayra

    2015-01-01

    To identify post-accident conduct in the workplace by health professionals in caring for people with HIV/Aids. A qualitative and descriptive research study with a socio-historical perspective (1986-2006), performed in a reference hospital for infectious diseases in the State of Santa Catarina. To collect data, interviews were conducted with oral history among 23 health workers and, for the treatment of data, Bardin's content analysis was used. Post-accident behaviors emerged that included assessment, accident records, chemoprophylaxis when necessary, support, monitoring of the injured worker, and mainly psychological support. In situations in which the accident could not be avoided, post-exposure behaviors were important biosecurity strategies mentioned by health workers caring for patients with HIV/Aids, in the sense of minimizing the possible transmission of the HIV virus.

  2. Survey of Attitudes and Practices of Osteopathic Primary Care Physicians Regarding Taking of Sexual Histories and HIV Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongidi, Preetam; Sierakowski, James J; Bowen, G Stephen; Jacobs, Robin J; Fernandez, M Isabel

    2010-12-01

    an estimated 252,000 to 312,000 individuals have undiagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in the United States. To date, little has been known about osteopathic physicians' attitudes and practices regarding routine HIV testing. to understand osteopathic primary care physicians' attitudes and practices toward HIV testing and sexual history taking and to examine factors associated with osteopathic physicians' recommendations of HIV testing at the initial patient visit. a cross-sectional survey of osteopathic physicians was conducted at the 106th Annual Convention of the Florida Osteopathic Medical Association in February 2009. Survey participants were asked 36 questions about osteopathic physician and patient sociodemographic factors and osteopathic physician attitudes and office practices regarding HIV testing and sexual history taking. a total of 233 osteopathic physicians completed the survey, but only 160 respondents (69%) met inclusion criteria of working in primary care and spending more than 50% of their time with patients. Almost two-thirds of participants were men, 80% were white, and the age range was 28 to 83 years. Twenty-two percent of participants recommended HIV testing at the initial patient visit, and 18% recommended annual HIV testing for all patients. Eighty-seven percent obtained a separate consent form for HIV testing, and 19% included HIV testing in general consent forms. About two-thirds of participants recommended annual HIV testing for homosexual men. Three factors were associated with recommending HIV testing at the initial patient visit: (1) recommending an annual HIV test for sexually active patients (odds ratio [OR], 12.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.97-41.67); (2) having an agree/strongly agree attitude toward HIV testing (OR, 5.59; 95% CI, 1.63-19.23); and (3) obtaining a general consent form that included permission for HIV testing (OR, 3.25; 95% CI, 1.07-9.90). osteopathic physicians who practice primary care

  3. Trust in Physicians and Racial Disparities in HIV Care

    OpenAIRE

    Saha, Somnath; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Moore, Richard D.; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Mistrust among African Americans is often considered a potential source of racial disparities in HIV care. We sought to determine whether greater trust in one's provider among African-American patients mitigates racial disparities. We analyzed data from 1,104 African-American and 201 white patients participating in a cohort study at an urban, academic HIV clinic between 2005 and 2008. African Americans expressed lower levels of trust in their providers than did white patients (8.9 vs. 9.4 on ...

  4. Changing forms of HIV-related stigma along the HIV care and treatment continuum in sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnington, O.; Wamoyi, J.; Daaki, W.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Stigma remains pervasive for people living with HIV (PLHIV) in sub-Saharan Africa, undermining care engagement. Using everyday, biographical and epochal temporalities, we explored the manifestation of stigma at different stages of the HIV care continuum in seven health and demographic...

  5. Patient perspectives on buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in the context of HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, James E; Netherland, Julie; Gass, Jonathon; Finkelstein, Ruth; Weiss, Linda

    2011-03-01

    Research has shown that buprenorphine/naloxone (bup/nx) is a safe and effective treatment for opioid dependence. Few reports, however, describe the patient perspective on bup/nx treatment and its integration into HIV care settings. We conducted qualitative interviews with 33 patients to further investigate patient satisfaction and experience with bup/nx treatment and integrated care. Interviews focused on drug use/cessation history; attitudes toward and satisfaction with bup/nx treatment; and perspectives on integrated bup/nx treatment and HIV care. Patients were overwhelmingly satisfied with the pharmacologic effects and treatment outcomes of bup/nx, including effectiveness in blocking cravings and controlling opioid use; decreased fear of withdrawal and/or missing doses; and an overall improvement in quality of life. Patients also described being more engaged with both their substance abuse treatment and HIV care, including greater ability to manage their own treatment, keep, appointments, and adhere to antiretroviral medication regimes. Counseling was seen by some patients as an important component of bup/nx treatment. Nearly all were positive about their experience with integrated care, appreciative of an improved drug treatment environment, convenience, and quality of care. Findings suggest that patients report bup/nx to be a viable treatment and many prefer it to other opioid replacement therapies.

  6. Understanding how contextual realities affect African born immigrants and refugees living with HIV in accessing care in the Twin Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othieno, Joan

    2007-08-01

    The Rapid Assessment, Response, and Evaluation (RARE) portion of the CSAD Project in the Twin Cities (Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota) was designed to identify barriers to care faced by African refugees and immigrants. Data were collected from cultural experts and African people living with HIV (PLWH) who were out of care, who had newly entered care, or who were in and out of care. Findings from RARE can be categorized into five main themes: HIV/AIDS within the African context, experiences of African PLWH, unfamiliarity with HIV and support services that facilitate access to care, cultural and religious dilemmas in seeking or remaining in care, and accessing African PLWH and getting them into care. Most of the issues identified were manifestations of stigma, gender, religion and/or faith, as well as the two main underlying cross-cutting themes of knowledge and fear. The top barriers to care included fatalistic views about HIV, fear of isolation, fear of deportation, lack of knowledge of the care system and HIV-related services, and employment issues.

  7. Beyond HIV-serodiscordance: Partnership communication dynamics that affect engagement in safer conception care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lynn T; Burns, Bridget F; Bajunirwe, Francis; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Bwana, Mwebesa; Ng, Courtney; Kastner, Jasmine; Kembabazi, Annet; Sanyu, Naomi; Kusasira, Adrine; Haberer, Jessica E; Bangsberg, David R; Kaida, Angela

    2017-01-01

    We explored acceptability and feasibility of safer conception methods among HIV-affected couples in Uganda. We recruited HIV-positive men and women on antiretroviral therapy (ART) ('index') from the Uganda Antiretroviral Rural Treatment Outcomes cohort who reported an HIV-negative or unknown-serostatus partner ('partner'), HIV-serostatus disclosure to partner, and personal or partner desire for a child within two years. We conducted in-depth interviews with 40 individuals from 20 couples, using a narrative approach with tailored images to assess acceptability of five safer conception strategies: ART for the infected partner, pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) for the uninfected partner, condomless sex timed to peak fertility, manual insemination, and male circumcision. Translated and transcribed data were analyzed using thematic analysis. 11/20 index participants were women, median age of 32.5 years, median of 2 living children, and 80% had HIV-RNA conception methods. Four key partnership communication challenges emerged as primary barriers to engagement in safer conception care, including: (1) HIV-serostatus disclosure: Although disclosure was an inclusion criterion, partners commonly reported not knowing the index partner's HIV status. Similarly, the partner's HIV-serostatus, as reported by the index, was frequently inaccurate. (2) Childbearing intention: Many couples had divergent childbearing intentions and made incorrect assumptions about their partner's desires. (3) HIV risk perception: Participants had disparate understandings of HIV transmission and disagreed on the acceptable level of HIV risk to meet reproductive goals. (4) Partnership commitment: Participants revealed significant discord in perceptions of partnership commitment. All four types of partnership miscommunication introduced constraints to autonomous reproductive decision-making, particularly for women. Such miscommunication was common, as only 2 of 20 partnerships in our sample were mutually

  8. HIV nursing consultants: patients' preferences and experiences about the quality of care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hekkink, Christine F.; Wigersma, Lode; Yzermans, C. Joris; Bindels, Patrick J. E.

    2005-01-01

    Aim and objectives. We were interested to find out how human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-patients judge the quality of care received from their HIV nursing consultants, compared with the care delivered by HIV specialists and general practitioners. Furthermore, we were interested in how the opinions

  9. Improved Prevention Counseling by HIV Care Providers in a Multisite, Clinic-Based Intervention: Positive STEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrun, Mark; Cook, Paul F.; Bradley-Springer, Lucy A.; Gardner, Lytt; Marks, Gary; Wright, Julie; Wilson, Tracey E.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; O'Daniels, Christine; Raffanti, Stephen; Thompson, Melanie; Golin, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended that HIV care clinics incorporate prevention into clinical practice. This report summarizes HIV care providers' attitudes and counseling practices before and after they received training to deliver a counseling intervention to patients. Providers at seven HIV clinics received training…

  10. Barriers to communication between HIV care providers (HCPs) and women living with HIV about child bearing: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ddumba-Nyanzi, Ismael; Kaawa-Mafigiri, David; Johannessen, Helle

    2016-05-01

    In the context of HIV clinical care, open discussion regarding sexual health and reproductive plans has become increasingly relevant. The aim of this paper is to explore barriers to communication between providers and women living with HIV regarding childbearing. In-depth interviews (IDIs) were conducted with 48 HIV infected women receiving ART at 7 different HIV clinics providing comprehensive HIV care services in four districts in Uganda, between July and August 2012. All women were aware of their HIV diagnosis prior to pregnancy or had given birth while living with HIV. Four themes emerged describing barriers to communication, from the HIV-positive women's point of view: (i) provider indifference or opposition to childbearing post HIV diagnosis, (ii) anticipation of negative response from provider, (iii) provider's emphasis on 'scientific' facts, (iv) 'accidental pregnancy'. Existing evidence regarding effective provider-patient communication should be considered for its application for reproductive counseling among HIV infected women. These data demonstrate the need for current counseling guidelines to explore approaches that encourage open, non-judgmental, non-directive discussions with HIV positive individuals around their reproductive desires and intentions in a health care setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcomes among HIV-infected children initiating HIV care and antiretroviral treatment in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, Zenebe; Lulseged, Sileshi; Wang, Chunhui; Lamb, Matthew R; Gutema, Yoseph; Teasdale, Chloe A; Ahmed, Solomon; Gadisa, Tsigereda; Habtamu, Zelalem; Bedri, Abubaker; Fayorsey, Ruby; Abrams, Elaine J

    2017-04-01

    To describe pediatric ART scale-up in Ethiopia, one of the 21 global priority countries for elimination of pediatric HIV infection. A descriptive analysis of routinely collected HIV care and treatment data on HIV-infected children (<15 years) enrolled at 70 health facilities in four regions in Ethiopia, January 2006-September 2013. Characteristics at enrollment and ART initiation are described along with outcomes at 1 year after enrollment. Among children who initiated ART, cumulative incidence of death and loss to follow-up (LTF) were estimated using survival analysis. 11 695 children 0-14 years were enrolled in HIV care and 6815 (58.3%) initiated ART. At enrollment, 31.2% were WHO stage III and 6.3% stage IV. The majority (87.9%) were enrolled in secondary or tertiary facilities. At 1 year after enrollment, 17.9% of children were LTF prior to ART initiation. Among children initiating ART, cumulative incidence of death was 3.4%, 4.1% and 4.8%, and cumulative incidence of LTF was 7.7%, 11.8% and 16.6% at 6, 12 and 24 months, respectively. Children <2 years had higher risk of LTF and death than older children (P < 0.0001). Children with more advanced disease and those enrolled in rural settings were more likely to die. Children enrolled in more recent years were less likely to die but more likely to be LTF. Over the last decade large numbers of HIV-infected children have been successfully enrolled in HIV care and initiated on ART in Ethiopia. Retention prior to and after ART initiation remains a major challenge. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The risk of HIV transmission at each step of the HIV care continuum among people who inject drugs: a modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero, Daniel J; Lurie, Mark N; Mayer, Kenneth H; King, Maximilian; Galea, Sandro; Friedman, Samuel R; Marshall, Brandon D L

    2017-07-25

    People who inject drugs (PWID) are at continued risk for HIV in the U.S., and experience disparities across the HIV care continuum compared to other high-risk groups. Estimates of the risk of HIV transmission at each stage of the care continuum may assist in identifying public health priorities for averting incident infections among PWID, in addition to transmissions to sexual partners of PWID. We created an agent-based model simulating HIV transmission and the HIV care continuum for PWID in New York City (NYC) in 2012. To account for sexual transmission arising from PWID to non-PWID, the simulation included the entire adult NYC population. Using surveillance data and estimates from the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance system, we simulated a dynamic sexual and injecting network. We estimated the proportion of HIV transmission events attributable to PWID in the following categories, those: without an HIV diagnosis ('Undiagnosed'); diagnosed but not on antiretroviral therapy (ART) ('Diagnosed - not on ART'); those who initiated ART but were not virally suppressed ('Unsuppressed'); and, those who achieved viral suppression ('Suppressed'). We estimated HIV incidence among PWID to be 113 per 100,000 person-years in 2012, with an overall incidence rate for the entire adult NYC population of 33 per 100,000 person-years. Despite accounting for only 33% of the HIV-infected PWID population, the Undiagnosed were associated with 52.6% (95% simulation interval [95% SI]: 47.1-57.0%) of total transmission events. The Diagnosed - not on ART population contributed the second-largest proportion of HIV transmissions, with 36.6% (95% SI: 32.2-41.5%). The Unsuppressed population contributed 8.7% (95% SI: 5.6-11.8%), and Suppressed 2.1% (95% SI: 1.1-3.9%), relatively little of overall transmission. Among PWID in NYC, more than half (53%) of transmissions were from those who were unaware of their infection status and more than 36% were due to PWID who knew their status, but were

  13. Transitioning HIV-Positive Adolescents to Adult Care: Lessons Learned From Twelve Adolescent Medicine Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Amanda E; Philbin, Morgan M; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2016-01-01

    To maximize positive health outcomes for youth with HIV as they transition from youth to adult care, clinical staff need strategies and protocols to help youth maintain clinic engagement and medication adherence. Accordingly, this paper describe transition processes across twelve clinics within the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN) to provide lessons learned and inform the development of transition protocols to improve health outcomes as youth shift from adolescent to adult HIV care. During a large multi-method Care Initiative program evaluation, three annual visits were completed at each site from 2010-2012 and conducted 174 semi-structured interviews with clinical and program staff (baseline n=64, year 1 n=56, year 2=54). The results underscore the value of adhering to recent American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) transition recommendations, including: developing formal transition protocols, preparing youth for transition, facilitating youth's connection to the adult clinic, and identifying necessary strategies for transition evaluation. Transitioning youth with HIV involves targeting individual-, provider-, and system-level factors. Acknowledging and addressing key barriers is essential for developing streamlined, comprehensive, and context-specific transition protocols. Adolescent and adult clinic involvement in transition is essential to reduce service fragmentation, provide coordinated and continuous care, and support individual and community level health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Information and Communication Technology to Link Criminal Justice Reentrants to HIV Care in the Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Kurth

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The United States has the world’s highest prison population, and an estimated one in seven HIV-positive persons in the USA passes through a correctional facility annually. Given this, it is critical to develop innovative and effective approaches to support HIV treatment and retention in care among HIV-positive individuals involved in the criminal justice (CJ system. Information and communication technologies (ICTs, including mobile health (mHealth interventions, may offer one component of a successful strategy for linkage/retention in care. We describe CARE+ Corrections, a randomized controlled trial (RCT study now underway in Washington, that will evaluate the combined effect of computerized motivational interview counseling and postrelease short message service (SMS text message reminders to increase antiretroviral therapy (ART adherence and linkage and retention in care among HIV-infected persons involved in the criminal justice system. In this report, we describe the development of this ICT/mHealth intervention, outline the study procedures used to evaluate this intervention, and summarize the implications for the mHealth knowledge base.

  15. Characteristics and outcomes of individuals enrolled for HIV care in a rural clinic in Coastal Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassan, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the scale up of HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in sub-Saharan Africa (sSA), characteristics of individuals enrolled for care and the continuum of care remains less well described. This thesis aimed to describe the characteristics and outcomes of individuals enrolled for HIV/AIDS care

  16. HIV testing and the care continuum among transgender women: population estimates from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil, Emilia M; Wilson, Erin C; Luz, Paula M; Velasque, Luciane; Moreira, Ronaldo I; Castro, Cristiane V; Monteiro, Laylla; Garcia, Ana Cristina F; Cardoso, Sandra W; Coelho, Lara E; McFarland, Willi; Liu, Albert Y; Veloso, Valdilea G; Buchbinder, Susan; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2017-09-19

    Evidence suggests that, of all affected populations, transgender women (transwomen) may have the heaviest HIV burden worldwide. Little is known about HIV linkage and care outcomes for transwomen. We aimed to estimate population-level indicators of the HIV cascade of care continuum, and to evaluate factors associated with viral suppression among transwomen in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. We conducted a respondent-driven sampling (RDS) study of transwomen from August 2015 to January 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and collected data on linkage and access to care, antiretroviral treatment and performed HIV viral load testing. We derived population-based estimates of cascade indicators using sampling weights and conducted RDS-weighted logistic regression analyses to evaluate correlates of viral suppression (viral load ≤50 copies/mL). Of the 345 transwomen included in the study, 89.2% (95% CI 55-100%) had been previously tested for HIV, 77.5% (95% CI 48.7-100%) had been previously diagnosed with HIV, 67.2% (95% CI 39.2-95.2) reported linkage to care, 62.2% (95% CI 35.4-88.9) were currently on ART and 35.4% (95% CI 9.5-61.4%) had an undetectable viral load. The final adjusted RDS-weighted logistic regression model for viral suppression indicated that those who self-identified as black (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 0.06, 95% CI 0.01-0.53, p  < 0.01), reported earning ≤U$160/month (aOR 0.11, 95% CI 0.16-0.87, p  = 0.04) or reported unstable housing (aOR 0.08, 95% CI 0.01-0.43, p  < 0.01) had significantly lower odds of viral suppression. Our cascade indicators for transwomen showed modest ART use and low viral suppression rates. Multi-level efforts including gender affirming care provision are urgently needed to decrease disparities in HIV clinical outcomes among transwomen and reduce secondary HIV transmission to their partners.

  17. Acute Care Management of the HIV-Infected Patient: A Report from the HIV Practice and Research Network of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Spencer H; Badowski, Melissa E; Liedtke, Michelle D; Rathbun, R Chris; Pecora Fulco, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) admitted to the hospital have complex antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens with an increased medication error rate upon admission. This report provides a resource for clinicians managing HIV-infected patients and ART in the inpatient setting. A survey of the authors was conducted to evaluate common issues that arise during an acute hospitalization for HIV-infected patients. After a group consensus, a review of the medical literature was performed to determine the supporting evidence for the following HIV-associated hospital queries: admission/discharge orders, antiretroviral hospital formularies, laboratory monitoring, altered hepatic/renal function, drug-drug interactions (DDIs), enteral administration, and therapeutic drug monitoring. With any hospital admission for an HIV-infected patient, a specific set of procedures should be followed including a thorough admission medication history and communication with the ambulatory HIV provider to avoid omissions or substitutions in the ART regimen. DDIs are common and should be reviewed at all transitions of care during the hospital admission. ART may be continued if enteral nutrition with a feeding tube is deemed necessary, but the entire regimen should be discontinued if no oral access is available for a prolonged period. Therapeutic drug monitoring is not generally recommended but, if available, should be considered in unique clinical scenarios where antiretroviral pharmacokinetics are difficult to predict. ART may need adjustment if hepatic or renal insufficiency ensues. Treatment of hospitalized patients with HIV is highly complex. HIV-infected patients are at high risk for medication errors during various transitions of care. Baseline knowledge of the principles of antiretroviral pharmacotherapy is necessary for clinicians managing acutely ill HIV-infected patients to avoid medication errors, identify DDIs, and correctly dose medications if organ

  18. Mental health service utilization is associated with retention in care among persons living with HIV at a university-affiliated HIV clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saag, Lauren A; Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Batey, D Scott; Mugavero, Michael J; Eaton, Ellen F

    2018-01-16

    Mental health (MH) comorbidities reduce retention in care for persons living with HIV (PLWH) and are associated with poor health outcomes. Optimizing retention in primary care is vital, as poor retention is associated with delayed receipt of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy, ARV non-adherence, and poor health outcomes, including failure to suppress viral load, decreased CD4 counts, and clinically significant ARV drug resistance. We hypothesized that MH service utilization would be associated with improved retention in care for patients with HIV and MH comorbidities. This is a retrospective analysis of PLWH initiating outpatient HIV health care at a university-affiliated HIV clinic between January 2007 and December 2013. We examined the association between MH service utilization and retention in care, the outcome of interest, using univariate and multivariable logistic regression. Overall, 627 (84.4%) out of 743 patients were retained in care using the Health Resources & Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau (HRSA/HAB) metric. A multivariable model adjusted for several sociodemographic factors, MH comorbidities, and MH service utilization. The results suggest that lack of health insurance (public ORadj = 0.3, p  45 years, ORadj. = 1.6, p = 0.14) and ≥ 3 MH service utilization visits (ORadj. = 6.8, p service utilization. In order to achieve the US-based National HIV/AIDS Strategy goal of 90% retention in care for PLWH, MH service utilization should be considered along with other evidence-based interventions to improve retention for PLWH newly engaged in care.

  19. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahana, Shoshana Y; Jenkins, Richard A; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B; Bauermeister, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer-assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single-headed households, percent

  20. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoshana Y Kahana

    Full Text Available The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States.The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer-assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1 being on antiretroviral therapy (ART currently; (2 being on ART for at least 6 months; (3 missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments over the past 12 months; and (4 viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability.Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%; ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%; at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50; and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%. After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single-headed households, percent

  1. Structural Determinants of Antiretroviral Therapy Use, HIV Care Attendance, and Viral Suppression among Adolescents and Young Adults Living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahana, Shoshana Y.; Jenkins, Richard A.; Bruce, Douglas; Fernandez, Maria I.; Hightow-Weidman, Lisa B.; Bauermeister, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The authors examined associations between structural characteristics and HIV disease management among a geographically diverse sample of behaviorally and perinatally HIV-infected adolescents and young adults in the United States. Methods The sample included 1891 adolescents and young adults living with HIV (27.8% perinatally infected; 72.2% behaviorally infected) who were linked to care through 20 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions Units. All completed audio computer–assisted self-interview surveys. Chart abstraction or blood draw provided viral load data. Geographic-level variables were extracted from the United States Census Bureau (e.g., socioeconomic disadvantage, percent of Black and Latino households, percent rural) and Esri Crime (e.g., global crime index) databases as Zip Code Tabulation Areas. AIDSVu data (e.g., prevalence of HIV among youth) were extracted at the county-level. Using HLM v.7, the authors conducted means-as-outcomes random effects multi-level models to examine the association between structural-level and individual-level factors and (1) being on antiretroviral therapy (ART) currently; (2) being on ART for at least 6 months; (3) missed HIV care appointments (not having missed any vs. having missed one or more appointments) over the past 12 months; and (4) viral suppression (defined by the corresponding assay cutoff for the lower limit of viral load at each participating site which denoted nondetectability vs. detectability). Results Frequencies for the 4 primary outcomes were as follows: current ART use (n = 1120, 59.23%); ART use for ≥6 months (n = 861, 45.53%); at least one missed HIV care appointment (n = 936, 49.50); and viral suppression (n = 577, 30.51%). After adjusting for individual-level factors, youth living in more disadvantaged areas (defined by a composite score derived from 2010 Census indicators including percent poverty, percent receiving public assistance, percent of female, single

  2. Receipt of HIV/STD prevention counseling by HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Yuko; Zhu, Julia; Crepaz, Nicole; Beer, Linda; Purcell, David W; Johnson, Christopher H; Valverde, Eduardo E; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-01-28

    Guidelines recommend risk-reduction counseling by HIV providers to all HIV-infected persons. Among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States, we estimated prevalence of exposure to three types of HIV/sexually transmitted disease (STD) risk-reduction interventions and described the characteristics of persons who received these interventions. Data were from the Medical Monitoring Project (MMP), a supplemental HIV surveillance system designed to produce nationally representative estimates of behavioral and clinical characteristics of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States. Descriptive analyses were conducted to estimate the exposure to each type of HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention. Bivariate and multivariable analyses were conducted to assess associations between the selected correlates with each exposure variable. About 44% of participants reported a one-on-one conversation with a healthcare provider about HIV/STD prevention, 30% with a prevention program worker, 16% reported participation in a small group risk-reduction intervention, and 52% reported receiving at least one of the three interventions in the past 12 months. Minority race/ethnicity, low income, and risky sexual behavior consistently predicted greater intervention exposure. However, 39% of persons who reported risky sex did not receive any HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. HIV-infected persons in care with fewer resources or those who engaged in risk behaviors were more likely to receive HIV/STD risk-reduction interventions. However, less than half of HIV-infected persons in care received HIV/STD prevention counseling from their provider, an intervention that has been shown to be effective and is supported by guidelines.

  3. HIV prevention in care and treatment settings: baseline risk behaviors among HIV patients in Kenya, Namibia, and Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P Kidder

    Full Text Available HIV care and treatment settings provide an opportunity to reach people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV with prevention messages and services. Population-based surveys in sub-Saharan Africa have identified HIV risk behaviors among PLHIV, yet data are limited regarding HIV risk behaviors of PLHIV in clinical care. This paper describes the baseline sociodemographic, HIV transmission risk behaviors, and clinical data of a study evaluating an HIV prevention intervention package for HIV care and treatment clinics in Africa. The study was a longitudinal group-randomized trial in 9 intervention clinics and 9 comparison clinics in Kenya, Namibia, and Tanzania (N = 3538. Baseline participants were mostly female, married, had less than a primary education, and were relatively recently diagnosed with HIV. Fifty-two percent of participants had a partner of negative or unknown status, 24% were not using condoms consistently, and 11% reported STI symptoms in the last 6 months. There were differences in demographic and HIV transmission risk variables by country, indicating the need to consider local context in designing studies and using caution when generalizing findings across African countries. Baseline data from this study indicate that participants were often engaging in HIV transmission risk behaviors, which supports the need for prevention with PLHIV (PwP.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01256463.

  4. HIV Prevention in Care and Treatment Settings: Baseline Risk Behaviors among HIV Patients in Kenya, Namibia, and Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidder, Daniel P.; Bachanas, Pam; Medley, Amy; Pals, Sherri; Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, Harriet; Ackers, Marta; Howard, Andrea; DeLuca, Nick; Mbatia, Redempta; Sheriff, Muhsin; Arthur, Gilly; Katuta, Frieda; Cherutich, Peter; Somi, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    HIV care and treatment settings provide an opportunity to reach people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) with prevention messages and services. Population-based surveys in sub-Saharan Africa have identified HIV risk behaviors among PLHIV, yet data are limited regarding HIV risk behaviors of PLHIV in clinical care. This paper describes the baseline sociodemographic, HIV transmission risk behaviors, and clinical data of a study evaluating an HIV prevention intervention package for HIV care and treatment clinics in Africa. The study was a longitudinal group-randomized trial in 9 intervention clinics and 9 comparison clinics in Kenya, Namibia, and Tanzania (N = 3538). Baseline participants were mostly female, married, had less than a primary education, and were relatively recently diagnosed with HIV. Fifty-two percent of participants had a partner of negative or unknown status, 24% were not using condoms consistently, and 11% reported STI symptoms in the last 6 months. There were differences in demographic and HIV transmission risk variables by country, indicating the need to consider local context in designing studies and using caution when generalizing findings across African countries. Baseline data from this study indicate that participants were often engaging in HIV transmission risk behaviors, which supports the need for prevention with PLHIV (PwP). Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01256463 PMID:23459196

  5. Correlation of Internet Use for Health Care Engagement Purposes and HIV Clinical Outcomes Among HIV-Positive Individuals Using Online Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberi, Parya; Johnson, Mallory O

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to describe cell phone and Internet use and assess the correlation of Internet use for health care engagement purposes and HIV clinical outcomes among HIV-positive individuals. The authors conducted a national survey using online social media to examine cell phone and Internet use, self-reported HIV viral load (detectable vs. undetectable), and antiretroviral adherence rating (excellent vs. less than excellent). Participants (N = 1,494) were asked about their Internet use for health care engagement purposes (including e-mailing health care providers, refilling medications online, and making medical appointments online). Approximately 95% of participants accessed the Internet nearly daily or daily in the past month (mean hours on Internet use per day = 5.2) and 55.5% used the Internet for health care engagement purposes. Those who used the Internet for any health care engagement purposes had a 1.52-fold odds of reporting an undetectable viral load (p = .009) and a 1.49-fold odds of reporting excellent adherence (p = .001). Although Internet access and use were similar across racial/ethnic, educational, and socioeconomic groups, disparities existed with the use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes among racial/ethnic minorities, those with low to moderate financial stability, lower education, and history of incarceration. The authors' data reveal that among HIV-positive users of online social media, use of the Internet for health care engagement purposes is associated with better self-reported virologic and adherence outcomes.

  6. Jurisdiction level differences in HIV diagnosis, retention in care, and viral suppression in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kristen Mahle; Cohen, Stacy M; Hu, Xiaohong; Li, Jianmin; Mermin, Jonathan; Hall, H Irene

    2014-02-01

    Using data from the National HIV Surveillance System, we determined the number of persons diagnosed with HIV and the percentages of persons linked to care, retained in care, and virally suppressed across 19 jurisdictions with complete reporting of CD4 and viral load test results. Reports from these jurisdictions represent 37% of persons diagnosed with HIV infection in the United States in 2011. Although 80% of persons diagnosed in 2011 were linked to HIV medical care within 3 months of diagnosis, half of all persons living with HIV in the 19 jurisdictions were not receiving ongoing care in 2010. In addition, 43% of persons living with HIV by year-end 2009 and alive at year-end 2010 did not have a suppressed viral load, with substantial variability across the 19 jurisdictions. These data highlight the need for improved outcomes along each step of the HIV continuum of care.

  7. Knowledge Level and Attitude of Health Care Workers About HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ižnci

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study,it was aimed to investigate the level of knowledge and attitudes of healty care workers about HIV/AIDS. Material and Method: Data on knowledge and attitude of health care workers about HIV/AIDS was collected with a questionnaire. Results:This research was carried out on 230 health care workers (36 doctors, 194 nurses to investigate their knowledge and attidudes on HIV/AIDS. All of the participants knew that HIV/AIDS is an infectious disease,while 90.4 % of the participants stated that HIV/AIDS can be transmitted sexually.76.5 % of the participants stated they found their work risky for HIV/AIDS. Discussion:These findings have provided a data for educational programs designed for healty care workers. We belive that education programs for healty care workers will be effecive to control HIV/AIDS.

  8. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bich N; Westbrook, Robert A; Black, William C; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM), a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV?) and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?"). A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2) on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all psatisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  9. Examining the Link between Patient Satisfaction and Adherence to HIV Care: A Structural Equation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bich N.; Westbrook, Robert A.; Black, William C.; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C.; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. Objective To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM), a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey (“Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV?) and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, (“Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?”). A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2) on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported “excellent” adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all pPatient satisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes. PMID:23382948

  10. Health care utilization and access to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing and care and treatment services in a rural area with high HIV prevalence, Nyanza Province, Kenya, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackers, Marta-Louise; Hightower, Allen; Obor, David; Ofware, Peter; Ngere, Lilian; Kubaje, Adazu; Laserson, Kayla F

    2014-02-01

    We present health and demographic surveillance system data to assess associations with health care utilization and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) service receipt in a high HIV prevalence area of western Kenya. Eighty-six percent of 15,302 residents indicated a facility/clinician for routine medical services; 60% reported active (within the past year) attendance. Only 34% reported a previous HIV test, and self-reported HIV prevalence was 6%. Active attendees lived only slightly closer to their reported service site (2.8 versus 3.1 km; P < 0.001) compared with inactive attendees. Multivariate analysis showed that younger respondents (< 30 years of age) and active and inactive attendees were more likely to report an HIV test compared with non-attendees; men were less likely to report HIV testing. Despite traveling farther for HIV services (median distance = 4.4 km), 77% of those disclosing HIV infection reported HIV care enrollment. Men and younger respondents were less likely to enroll in HIV care. Socioeconomic status was not associated with HIV service use. Distance did not appear to be the major barrier to service receipt. The health and demographic surveillance system data identified patterns of service use that are useful for future program planning.

  11. The Boston HAPPENS Program: Needs and Use of Services by HIV-Positive Compared to At-Risk Youth, Including Gender Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Elizabeth R.; Samples, Cathryn L.; Melchiono, Maurice W.; Keenan, Peter M.; Fox, Durrell J.; Chase, Louise H.; Burns, Michelle A.; Price, Virginia A.; Paradise, Jan; O'Brien, Rebecca; Claytor, Richard A., Jr.; Brooke, Robyn; Goodman, Elizabeth

    2000-01-01

    Studied the needs and use of services by HIV-positive youth of the services provided by the Boston HIV Adolescent Provider and Peer Education Network for Services (HAPPENS) program. Results for 1,044 youth shows that HIV-positive young people are accessing coordinated care. Also highlights gender differences in services needed. (SLD)

  12. HIV Diagnoses and Care Among Transgender Persons and Comparison With Men Who Have Sex With Men: New York City, 2006–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torian, Lucia V.; Merchant, Pooja; Braunstein, Sarah L.; Shepard, Colin W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. We measured HIV care outcomes of transgender persons, who have high HIV infection rates but are rarely distinguished from men who have sex with men (MSM) in HIV surveillance systems. Methods. New York City’s surveillance registry includes HIV diagnoses since 2000 and HIV laboratory test results for transgender persons since 2005. We determined immunological status at diagnosis, delayed linkage to care, and nonachievement of viral suppression 1 year after diagnosis for transgender persons diagnosed with HIV in 2006 to 2011 and compared transgender women with MSM. Results. In 2006 to 2011, 264 of 23 805 persons diagnosed with HIV were transgender (1%): 98% transgender women and 2% transgender men. Compared with MSM, transgender women had similar CD4 counts at diagnosis and rates of concurrent HIV/AIDS and delayed linkage to care but increased odds of not achieving suppression (adjusted odds ratio = 1.56; 95% confidence interval = 1.13, 2.16). Conclusions. Compared with MSM, transgender women in New York City had similar immunological status at diagnosis but lagged in achieving viral suppression. To provide appropriate assistance along the HIV care continuum, HIV care providers should accurately identify transgender persons. PMID:26691124

  13. HIV Diagnoses and Care Among Transgender Persons and Comparison With Men Who Have Sex With Men: New York City, 2006-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiewel, Ellen Weiss; Torian, Lucia V; Merchant, Pooja; Braunstein, Sarah L; Shepard, Colin W

    2016-03-01

    We measured HIV care outcomes of transgender persons, who have high HIV infection rates but are rarely distinguished from men who have sex with men (MSM) in HIV surveillance systems. New York City's surveillance registry includes HIV diagnoses since 2000 and HIV laboratory test results for transgender persons since 2005. We determined immunological status at diagnosis, delayed linkage to care, and nonachievement of viral suppression 1 year after diagnosis for transgender persons diagnosed with HIV in 2006 to 2011 and compared transgender women with MSM. In 2006 to 2011, 264 of 23 805 persons diagnosed with HIV were transgender (1%): 98% transgender women and 2% transgender men. Compared with MSM, transgender women had similar CD4 counts at diagnosis and rates of concurrent HIV/AIDS and delayed linkage to care but increased odds of not achieving suppression (adjusted odds ratio = 1.56; 95% confidence interval = 1.13, 2.16). Compared with MSM, transgender women in New York City had similar immunological status at diagnosis but lagged in achieving viral suppression. To provide appropriate assistance along the HIV care continuum, HIV care providers should accurately identify transgender persons.

  14. Exploring the HIV continuum of care among young black MSM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Hightow-Weidman

    Full Text Available HIV disproportionately impacts young, black men who have sex with men (YBMSM who experience disparities across the HIV care continuum. A more nuanced understanding of facilitators and barriers to engagement in care, missed visits, antiretroviral uptake, adherence and viral suppression could improve care and intervention design.A randomized controlled trial of an online intervention, healthMpowerment, enrolled 465 YBMSM (18-30 years; 193 identified as HIV-positive. Bivariable and multivariable analyses of baseline data explored predictors of: engagement in care, missed visits, antiretroviral uptake, self-reported adherence, and viral suppression.Mean age was 24.9 years; most identified as gay (71.0% and were receiving HIV care (89.1%. Among those in care, 52.1% reported no missed visits in the past 12 months, 41 (24.6% reported one missed visit, and 39 (23.4% reported two or more. Having insurance (prevalence odds ratio [POR] 4.5; 95% CI: 1.3, 15.8 and provider self-efficacy (POR 20.1; 95% CI: 6.1, 64.1 were associated with being in care. Those with a college degree (POR 9.1; 95% CI: 1.9, 45.2 and no recent marijuana (POR 2.6; 95% CI: 1.2, 5.6 or methamphetamine use (POR 5.4; 95% CI: 1.0, 28.5 were less likely to miss visits. Most (n = 153, 84.1% had been prescribed antiretroviral therapy. A majority of participants (70.8% reported ≥90% adherence; those with depressive symptoms had 4.7 times the odds of reporting adherence <90% (95% CI: 1.65, 13.37. Of participants who reported viral load testing in the past six months, 65% (n = 102 reported an undetectable viral load. Disclosure to sex partners was associated with viral suppression (POR 6.0; 95% CI: 1.6, 22.4.Multi-level facilitators and barriers to engagement across the continuum of care were identified in this sample of YBMSM. Understanding the distinct needs of YBMSM at each stage of the continuum and addressing them through tailored approaches is critical for long term success in care.

  15. Prevalence, self-care behaviors, and self-care activities for peripheral neuropathy symptoms of HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Voss, Joachim; Wantland, Dean; Lindgren, Teri; Huang, Emily; Holzemer, William L; Cuca, Yvette; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Portillo, Carmen; Willard, Suzanne; Arudo, John; Kirksey, Kenn; Corless, Inge B; Rosa, María E; Robinson, Linda; Hamilton, Mary J; Sefcik, Elizabeth; Human, Sarie; Rivero-Mendez, Marta; Maryland, Mary; Nokes, Kathleen M; Eller, Lucille; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Brion, John M; Bunch, Elli H; Shannon, Maureen; Nicholas, Thomas P; Viamonte-Ros, Ana; Bain, Catherine A

    2010-03-01

    As part of a larger randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual (n = 775), this study examined the prevalence of peripheral neuropathy in HIV-infected individuals at 12 sites in the USA, Puerto Rico, and Africa. Neuropathy was reported by 44% of the sample; however, only 29.4% reported initiating self-care behaviors to address the neuropathy symptoms. Antiretroviral therapy was found to increase the frequency of neuropathy symptoms, with an increased mean intensity of 28%. A principal axis factor analysis with Promax rotation was used to assess the relationships in the frequency of use of the 18 self-care activities for neuropathy, revealing three distinct factors: (i) an interactive self-care factor; (ii) a complementary medicine factor; and (iii) a third factor consisting of the negative health items of smoking, alcohol, and street drugs. The study's results suggest that peripheral neuropathy is a common symptom and the presence of neuropathy is associated with self-care behaviors to ameliorate HIV symptoms. The implications for nursing practice include the assessment and evaluation of nursing interventions related to management strategies for neuropathy.

  16. Outcomes and linkage to chronic care of HIV exposed infants among health centers and hospitals in Amhara Region, Ethiopia: implications to prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV program: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, Zemene Tigabu; Taye, Belaynew Wasie

    2016-01-01

    Numerous challenges exist in provision of prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) such as linking HIV exposed infants (HEI) and their mothers to chronic cares services, and tackling loss to follow up. Limited evidence exists in Ethiopian setting that explains the persisting high HIV infection rate among HEIs and extent of linkage to chronic care. The study assessed the proportion of HIV infection; children linked to chronic care and determinants of HIV infection among HEI in Northern Ethiopia. This institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted in health centers and hospitals of Amhara Region. A total of 484 HEI-mother pairs selected by multistage random sampling were included in the study. Data were collected from PMTCT and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) clinics using pre-tested and structured questionnaires. Quantitative data were entered in Epi Info version 7.0 and exported to SPSS 20.0 for analysis. A total of 484 mother-infant pairs with a response rate of 92.4% were included in the analysis. About 94.2% of infants and women were linked to chronic care follow-up sometime after the diagnosis. The proportion of HIV infection was 12.4%. Antenatal care attendance had a significant association with HIV infection among HEI (p care that increased institutional delivery, leads to timely initiation and high uptake of PMTCT to reduce the vertical transmission of HIV infection and meet national targets.

  17. HBV and HIV co-infection: Prevalence and clinical outcomes in tertiary care hospital Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Ali; Khan, Amer Hayat; Sulaiman, Syed Azhar Syed; Soo, Chow Ting; Khan, Kashifullah

    2016-03-01

    According to WHO, Malaysia has been classified as a concentrated epidemic country due to progression of HIV infection in the population of injecting drug users. The main objectives of current study are to determine the prevalence of HBV among HIV-positive individuals in a tertiary care hospital of Malaysia and to assess the predictors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients. A retrospective, cross-sectional study is conducted at Hospital Palau Pinang, Malaysia. The collection of socio-demographic data as well as clinical data is done with the help of data collection form. Data were analyzed after putting the collected values of required data by using statistical software SPSS version 20.0 and P > 0.05 is considered as significant. Results show that the overall prevalence of HBV was 86 (13%) including 495 (74.5%) males and 169 (25.5%) females among a total of 664 HIV-infected patients. It was observed that there is a high prevalence of HIV-HBV co-infection in males 76 (11.4%) as compared to females 10 (1.5%) (P = 0.002). The median age of the study population was 39 years. The statistical significant risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were observed in the variables of gender, age groups, and injecting drug users. The findings of the present study shows that the prevalence of HBV infection among HIV-positive patients was 13% and the risk factors involved in the outcomes of HIV-HBV co-infected patients were gender, age, and intravenous drug users. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [Evaluation of the cascade of care in prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission in Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Angelica Espinosa; Pereira, Gerson Fernando Mendes; Araujo, Maria Alix Leite; Silveira, Mariangela Freitas da; Tavares, Leonor De Lannoy; Silva, Leila Cristina Ferreira da; Moreira-Silva, Sandra Fagundes; Saraceni, Valéria

    2016-09-19

    This study aimed to assess the cascade of care in the reduction of mother-to-child HIV transmission in the states of Amazonas, Ceará, Espírito Santo, Rio de Janeiro, and Rio Grande do Sul and the Distrito Federal, Brazil, using data from the Brazilian Information System on Diseases of Notification (SINAN). From 2007 to 2012, there was an increase (from 7.3% in Distrito Federal to 46.1% in Amazonas) in intra-gestational detection of HIV in 5 states, with a 18.6% reduction in Rio de Janeiro. Fewer than 90% of the women received antiretroviral therapy during their prenatal care, including those that already knew they were HIV-positive. The elective cesarean rate was low. The AIDS detection rate in children under 5 years as a proxy for mother-to-child HIV transmission showed a reduction of 6.3% from 2007 to 2012, and was highest in Rio Grande do Sul (50%), the state with the highest rates in the period, while Espírito Santo showed the highest increase (50%). Evaluation of the cascade of HIV care in pregnant women identified flaws in all the points. A link is needed between primary care and referral centers for HIV/AIDS, organizing care for the family and better outcomes for the children.

  19. Retention in early care at an HIV outpatient clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2000–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Daniel S.; De Boni, Raquel B.; Lake, Jordan E.; Cardoso, Sandra W.; Ribeiro, Sayonara; Moreira, Ronaldo I.; Clark, Jesse L.; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Luz, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    Retention in early HIV care has been associated with virologic suppression and improved survival, but remains understudied in Brazil. We estimated retention in early HIV care for the period 2000–2013, and identified socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with good retention in an urban cohort from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Antiretroviral therapy-naïve, HIV-infected persons ≥18 years old linked to care between 2000–2011 were included. Retention in the first two years post-linkage (i.e. early care) was defined by the proportion of six-month intervals with ≥1 HIV laboratory result. “Good” retention was defined as ≥1 HIV laboratory result recorded in at least three intervals. Overall, 80% of participants met criteria for good retention and retention significantly improved over the study period. Older age, higher education level and early antiretroviral therapy initiation were associated with good retention. Efforts to improve retention in early care in this population should target younger and less-educated HIV-infected persons. PMID:26525222

  20. HIV Treatment in African American Women-Care That Makes a Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, Olihe; Odedina, Folakemi

    2017-06-01

    African American women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV disease. Socioeconomic and psycho-social factors while adding to the vulnerability of this population also contribute to non-adherence and consequently poor outcomes. The provider-patient relationship has the potential to enhance HIV medication adherence in this population. Using in-depth interviews, patient and provider perspectives are explored to identify specific elements of the provider-patient interaction that enhance patient satisfaction with care and consequently improve HIV medication adherence. Themes associated with provider attitudes and actions perceived as positively impacting care in this patient group include (1) physical touch, (2) treating (the patient) "as a person", (3) actively listening to the patient, (4) showing empathy, (5) being non-judgmental, and (6) being readily accessible. These findings suggest that the demonstration of care and commitment from the provider as perceived by the patient is important to African American women living with HIV and may significantly influence adherence behavior and enhance treatment outcomes in this population.

  1. Building Trust and Relationships Between Patients and Providers: An Essential Complement to Health Literacy in HIV Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Rose, Carol; Cuca, Yvette P; Webel, Allison R; Solís Báez, Solymar S; Holzemer, William L; Rivero-Méndez, Marta; Sanzero Eller, Lucille; Reid, Paula; Johnson, Mallory O; Kemppainen, Jeanne; Reyes, Darcel; Nokes, Kathleen; Nicholas, Patrice K; Matshediso, Ellah; Mogobe, Keitshokile Dintle; Sabone, Motshedisi B; Ntsayagae, Esther I; Shaibu, Sheila; Corless, Inge B; Wantland, Dean; Lindgren, Teri

    2016-01-01

    Health literacy is important for access to and quality of HIV care. While most models of health literacy acknowledge the importance of the patient-provider relationship to disease management, a more nuanced understanding of this relationship is needed. Thematic analysis from 28 focus groups with HIV-experienced patients (n = 135) and providers (n = 71) identified a long-term and trusting relationship as an essential part of HIV treatment over the continuum of HIV care. We found that trust and relationship building over time were important for patients with HIV as well as for their providers. An expanded definition of health literacy that includes gaining a patient's trust and engaging in a process of health education and information sharing over time could improve HIV care. Expanding clinical perspectives to include trust and the importance of the patient-provider relationship to a shared understanding of health literacy may improve patient experiences and engagement in care. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. HIV Stigma, Testing Attitudes and Health Care Access Among African-Born Men Living in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bova, Carol; Nnaji, Chioma; Woyah, Augustus; Duah, Akwasi

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe HIV-testing attitudes, HIV related stigma and health care access in African-born men taking part in the African Health Cup (AHC), a soccer tournament held annually to improve HIV awareness and testing. Venue sampling was used to collect survey and qualitative interview data related to HIV-testing attitudes, stigma and experiences associated with the AHC. The sample included 135 survey respondents and 27 interview participants. AHC participants were successfully accessing health care services. Although the AHC was viewed positively, HIV testing rates remain low due to stigma and privacy concerns. This population continues to have misconceptions about HIV transmission and to use condoms inconsistently. The AHC is a successful intervention to engage African-born men in HIV awareness and education. More work is needed to enhance these AHC aspects and address stigma and privacy concerns related to using onsite health screenings. Continuing to develop novel strategies to educate African-born immigrants about HIV is urgently needed.

  3. HIV/AIDS knowledge and occupational risk in primary care health workers from Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Baltica Cabieses; Lagunas, Lilian Ferrer; Villarroel, Luis Antonio; Acosta, Rosina Cianelli; Miner, Sarah; Silva, Margarita Bernales

    2011-07-01

    To explore the relationship between knowledge level and occupational risk exposure to HIV/AIDS in primary care health workers. Analytical cross-sectional study. 720 health workers from Santiago answered a survey about HIV/AIDS that included: knowledge level (appropriate, inappropriate), occupational risk (with or without risk), and control variables (age, gender, health center, education and marital status). Descriptive and association analysis were performed. Odds Ratio (OR) was estimated through simple and multiple regressions logistics. 58.7% of the participants reported HIV occupational risk. 63.8% of the participants from the exposed group reported an appropriate level of knowledge, versus 36.1% of the non-exposed group (Adjusted OR of 3.1, IC 95% OR: 2.0-4.8, pAID occupational risk is directly associated with the level of knowledge of the disease.

  4. Time of HIV Diagnosis and Engagement in Prenatal Care Impact Virologic Outcomes of Pregnant Women with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momplaisir, Florence M; Brady, Kathleen A; Fekete, Thomas; Thompson, Dana R; Diez Roux, Ana; Yehia, Baligh R

    2015-01-01

    HIV suppression at parturition is beneficial for maternal, fetal and public health. To eliminate mother-to-child transmission of HIV, an understanding of missed opportunities for antiretroviral therapy (ART) use during pregnancy and HIV suppression at delivery is required. We performed a retrospective analysis of 836 mother-to-child pairs involving 656 HIV-infected women in Philadelphia, 2005-2013. Multivariable regression examined associations between patient (age, race/ethnicity, insurance status, drug use) and clinical factors such as adequacy of prenatal care measured by the Kessner index which classifies prenatal care as inadequate, intermediate, or adequate prenatal care; timing of HIV diagnosis; and the outcomes: receipt of ART during pregnancy and viral suppression at delivery. Overall, 25% of the sample was diagnosed with HIV during pregnancy; 39%, 38%, and 23% were adequately, intermediately, and inadequately engaged in prenatal care. Eight-five percent of mother-to-child pairs received ART during pregnancy but only 52% achieved suppression at delivery. Adjusting for patient factors, pairs diagnosed with HIV during pregnancy were less likely to receive ART (AOR 0.39, 95% CI 0.25-0.61) and achieve viral suppression (AOR 0.70, 95% CI 0.49-1.00) than those diagnosed before pregnancy. Similarly, women with inadequate prenatal care were less likely to receive ART (AOR 0.06, 95% CI 0.03-0.11) and achieve viral suppression (AOR 0.31, 95% CI 0.20-0.47) than those with adequate prenatal care. Targeted interventions to diagnose HIV prior to pregnancy and engage HIV-infected women in prenatal care have the potential to improve HIV related outcomes in the perinatal period.

  5. Delayed entry into HIV care after diagnosis in two specialized care and treatment centres in Cameroon: the influence of CD4 count and WHO staging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah F. Takah

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Delayed entry into HIV care has complicated the challenges faced in sub-Saharan Africa due to the high HIV burden. A clear knowledge of the factors affecting delayed entry will be essential in directing interventions towards reducing delayed entry into HIV care. There exist very limited data on delayed entry in Cameroon despite its relevance; hence this study was conducted to determine the rate of delayed entry and its associated factors in HIV programmes in Cameroon. Methods Data used for this study was routine data obtained from the files of HIV patients who were diagnosed between January 1, 2015 and June 30, 2015 at Limbe and Buea regional hospital HIV centers in the South West region of Cameroon. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 20. Results Of the 223 patients included in the study, nearly one-quarter of patients (22.4 % delayed to enter HIV care within 3 months. Those who delayed to enter care were less likely to present at first diagnosis (using HIV rapid test with symptoms such as fever > 1 month (5 % versus 30 %, p = 0.01 and weight loss > 10 % (13 % versus 48 %, p < 0.001. Alcohol consumption, WHO stage and CD4 count levels were also associated with delayed entry in bivariate analysis. In multivariate analysis only CD4 count greater than 500cells/μl and WHO stages I and II were independently associated with delayed entry into HIV care within 3 months. Conclusion In the South West region of Cameroon, approximately 1 out of 4 patients delay to enter HIV care. This high proportion of patients who delay to enter care correlates to the findings recorded by other studies in sub Saharan Africa. Interventions tackling delayed entry into HIV care might need to be favorably directed towards patients that have high CD4 counts and are at very early WHO clinical stages.

  6. HIV-1 incidence among people seeking voluntary counseling and testing centers, including pregnant women, in Pernambuco State, Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Kledoaldo Oliveira de; Salustiano, Daniela Medeiros; Cavalcanti, Ana Maria Salustiano; Leal, Élcio de Souza; Lacerda, Heloísa Ramos

    2015-06-01

    The HIV-1 epidemic in Brazil has displayed new characteristics over time, with an increase in heterosexual transmission and a decline in the male-to-female ratio in AIDS cases. HIV screening was offered to patients attending the Voluntary Counseling and Testing Center in Paulista, Greater Metropolitan Recife, Pernambuco State, in Northeast Brazil, to determine HIV-1 incidence. BED capture enzyme immunoassay (BED-CEIA) was used to measure HIV-1 incidence, comparing it to the AxSYM avidity index method (Ax-AI). From 2006 to 2009, 14,014 individuals were tested, and only 18 pregnant women were diagnosed with HIV infection, resulting in 0.15% annual incidence (95%CI: 0-0.33), significantly lower than in men (1.03; 95%CI: 0.45-1.61) and non-pregnant women (0.50; 95%CI: 0.11-0.89). Despite the low HIV-1 incidence in pregnant women, the high rate of recent infection detected during prenatal care emphasizes the need to increase measures to prevent vertical transmission.

  7. TUBERCULOSIS AND HIV COINFECTION: A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE The aim of the present study is to record the clinical, radiological profile of pulmonary and extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB in HIV positive patients. To win the battle against AIDS we have to fight against TB. Unlike HIV/AIDS, TB is completely curable in the vast majority of cases. MATERIALS AND METHODS This prospective study was conducted in the department of pulmonary medicine, Gadag institute of medical sciences, Gadag. All newly diagnosed HIV patients during the study period were included and screened for TB. HIV infection was confirmed by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay using two different antigens and a rapid test as recommended by NACO. RESULTS Among 370 newly diagnosed HIV positive patients, 113(30.54% patients were diagnosed to have TB. Most common affected age group was 31-40years with a mean age of 38.08 years. Unprotected heterosexual contact was the most common mode of HIV transmission. Fever, weight loss and cough were the commonest symptoms at presentation. Pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 85(22.97% patients, EPTB in 21(5.67% and disseminated TB in 7(1.8% patients. Among the EPTB patients, 2(9.5% patients had extra thoracic lymphadenopathy. Cervical lymph node was the commonest lymph node involved. 14(66.66% patients had pleural effusion, 3(14.28% had abdominal TB, 1(4.76% had tubercular meningitis and 1(4.76% patient had TB testis. CONCLUSION The prevalence of HIV–TB co-infection was high. Moreover, HIV positive patients need early diagnosis and treatment of active TB. However large sample size prospective studies are needed to correlate the clinical and CD4 count with the occurrence of different types of tuberculosis.

  8. HIV Serostatus and Having Access to a Physician for Regular Hepatitis C Virus Care Among People Who Inject Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Tara; Hayashi, Kanna; Milloy, Michael J; Nosova, Ekaterina; DeBeck, Kora; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas; Ti, Lianping

    2018-05-01

    People who inject drugs (PWIDs) and who are living with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are vulnerable to a range of health-related harms, including liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and death. There is limited evidence describing how HIV serostatus shapes access to a physician for regular HCV care among PWID. Data were collected through the Vancouver Injection Drug Users Study (VIDUS), the AIDS Care Cohort to evaluate Exposure to Survival Services (ACCESS), and the At-Risk Youth Study (ARYS), 3 prospective cohorts involving people who use illicit drugs in Vancouver, Canada, between 2005 and 2015. Using generalized estimating equations, we examined the relationship between HIV-seropositivity and having access to a physician for regular HCV care. We conducted a mediation analysis to examine whether this association was mediated by increased frequency of engagement in health care. In total, 1627 HCV-positive PWID were eligible for analysis; 582 (35.8%) were HIV-positive at baseline; and 31 (1.9%) became HIV-positive during follow-up. In multivariable analyses, after adjusting for a range of confounders, HIV serostatus [adjusted odds ratio = 1.99; 95% confidence interval: 1.77 to 2.24] was significantly associated with having access to HCV care. Approximately 26% of the effect was due to mediation. Our results demonstrate a positive relationship between HIV-seropositivity and having access to a physician for regular HCV care, which is partially explained through increased frequency of engagement in health care. These findings highlight the need to address patterns of inequality in access to HCV care among PWID.

  9. From 'half-dead' to being 'free': resistance to HIV stigma, self-disclosure and support for PMTCT/HIV care among couples living with HIV in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, Sydney A; Abuogi, Lisa L; Akama, Eliud; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Helova, Anna; Musoke, Pamela; Nalwa, Wafula Z; Odeny, Thomas A; Onono, Maricianah; Wanga, Iris; Turan, Janet M

    2017-08-16

    In sub-Saharan Africa, self-disclosure of HIV-positive status may be a pivotal action for improving access to prevention of mother-to-child transmission services. However, understanding of HIV stigma and disclosure, and their effects on demand for care remains incomplete - particularly in the current context of new antiretroviral therapy guidelines. The purpose of this study was to explore these issues among self-disclosed couples living in southwest Kenya. We conducted 38 in-depth interviews with HIV-positive pregnant or postpartum women and their male partners. Of the 19 couples, 10 were HIV seroconcordant and 9 were serodiscordant. The textual analysis showed that HIV stigma continues to restrict full participation in community life and limit access to care by promoting fear, isolation and self-censorship. Against this backdrop, however, participants' narratives revealed varying forms and degrees of resistance to HIV stigma, which appeared to both produce and emerge from acts of self-disclosure. Such disclosure enabled participants to overcome fears and gain critical support for engaging in HIV care while further resisting HIV stigma. These findings suggest that programme interventions designed explicitly to stimulate and support processes of HIV stigma resistance and safe self-disclosure may be key to improving demand for and retention in HIV services.

  10. The HIV care cascade in Switzerland: reaching the UNAIDS/WHO targets for patients diagnosed with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Philipp; Schmidt, Axel J; Cavassini, Matthias; Furrer, Hansjakob; Calmy, Alexandra; Battegay, Manuel; Bernasconi, Enos; Ledergerber, Bruno; Vernazza, Pietro

    2015-11-28

    To describe the HIV care cascade for Switzerland in the year 2012. Six levels were defined: (i) HIV-infected, (ii) HIV-diagnosed, (iii) linked to care, (iv) retained in care, (v) on antiretroviral treatment (ART), and (vi) with suppressed viral load. We used data from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS) complemented by a nationwide survey among SHCS physicians to estimate the number of HIV-patients not registered in the cohort. We also used Swiss ART sales data to estimate the number of patients treated outside the SHCS network. Based on the number of patients retained in care, we inferred the estimates for levels (i) to (iii) from previously published data. We estimate that (i) 15 200 HIV-infected individuals lived in Switzerland in 2012 (margins of uncertainty, 13 400-19 300). Of those, (ii) 12 300 (81%) were diagnosed, (iii) 12 200 (80%) linked, and (iv) 11 900 (79%) retained in care. Broadly based on SHCS network data, (v) 10 800 (71%) patients were receiving ART, and (vi) 10 400 (68%) had suppressed (Switzerland is substantially lower than previously reported, halving previous national HIV prevalence estimates to 0.2%. In Switzerland in 2012, 91% of patients in care were receiving ART, and 96% of patients on ART had suppressed viral load, meeting recent UNAIDS/WHO targets.

  11. Facilitators and barriers for retention in HIV care between testing and treatment in Asia-A study in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Lao, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines and Vietnam.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushil Koirala

    Full Text Available The need for efficient retention in HIV care is more evident than ever because of the expansion of earlier ART initiation and the shift towards 'Test and Treat'. This study assesses factors affecting participation in the HIV care cascade among people living with HIV (PLHIV in the Asia-Pacific Region.A total of 7843 PLHIV aged 18-50 years were recruited using targeted and venue-based sampling between October 1, 2012, and May 31, 2013, across 59 sites in 7 countries (Bangladesh, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines and Vietnam. Statistically significant associations between demographic and health system determinants, and various steps in the HIV care cascade were computed using a generalized structural equation model.A high proportion of PLHIV (40-51% presented late for HIV care and delayed linkage to care in all seven countries. However, once PLHIV enrolled in care, retention in the various steps of the care cascade including adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART was satisfactory. The proportion still engaged in HIV care at 36 months post HIV diagnosis, varied from 78% in Nepal to >90% in Lao PDR. Similarly, the proportion of ART initiation who also were adherent to ART ranged from 91% in Bangladesh to >95% in Philippines/ Vietnam and from 70% in Lao PDR to 89% in the Philippines respectively. The following factors enhanced the likelihood of ART initiation and high adherence to HIV care and ART: good client-provider communication, high HIV treatment literacy, a referral from a health worker and TB/HIV co-infection. The following barriers were identified: young age, sex work, imprisonment, transgender identity, illiteracy, rural residence, alcohol/ injecting drug use, perceived poor health status, lack of health insurance, fear of confidentiality breach, self-referral for HIV testing, and public hospital as the place of HIV diagnosis.HIV programme planners should ensure easy access to HIV testing

  12. Facilitators and barriers for retention in HIV care between testing and treatment in Asia—A study in Bangladesh, Indonesia, Lao, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines and Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nampaisan, Oranuch; Marrone, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The need for efficient retention in HIV care is more evident than ever because of the expansion of earlier ART initiation and the shift towards ‘Test and Treat’. This study assesses factors affecting participation in the HIV care cascade among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in the Asia-Pacific Region. Methods A total of 7843 PLHIV aged 18–50 years were recruited using targeted and venue-based sampling between October 1, 2012, and May 31, 2013, across 59 sites in 7 countries (Bangladesh, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic (Lao PDR), Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines and Vietnam). Statistically significant associations between demographic and health system determinants, and various steps in the HIV care cascade were computed using a generalized structural equation model. Results A high proportion of PLHIV (40–51%) presented late for HIV care and delayed linkage to care in all seven countries. However, once PLHIV enrolled in care, retention in the various steps of the care cascade including adherence to antiretroviral treatment (ART) was satisfactory. The proportion still engaged in HIV care at 36 months post HIV diagnosis, varied from 78% in Nepal to >90% in Lao PDR. Similarly, the proportion of ART initiation who also were adherent to ART ranged from 91% in Bangladesh to >95% in Philippines/ Vietnam and from 70% in Lao PDR to 89% in the Philippines respectively. The following factors enhanced the likelihood of ART initiation and high adherence to HIV care and ART: good client-provider communication, high HIV treatment literacy, a referral from a health worker and TB/HIV co-infection. The following barriers were identified: young age, sex work, imprisonment, transgender identity, illiteracy, rural residence, alcohol/ injecting drug use, perceived poor health status, lack of health insurance, fear of confidentiality breach, self-referral for HIV testing, and public hospital as the place of HIV diagnosis. Conclusions HIV programme planners

  13. Ethical dilemmas in care for HIV infection among French general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moatti, J P; Souville, M; Obadia, Y; Morina, M; Sebbah, R; Gamby, T; Gallais, H; Gastaut, J A

    1995-03-01

    A survey was carried out in May-June 1992, in the city of Marseille (South-Eastern France), to analyze attitudes towards ethical issues associated with the care of HIV-infected patients in a random sample of general practitioners (GPs) (telephone interviews; answer rate = 78.6%; n = 313). A total of 70.6% were consulted by HIV carriers and 48.9% regularly took care of these patients over the past year. Multi-dimensional analysis showed that support for HIV mandatory screening was related to lack of knowledge and experience with HIV infection, high perception of risks associated with HIV care, and the individual characteristics of GPs, such as religious beliefs and intolerance to uncertain situations. GPs with experience of regular care of HIV carriers had the same opinions than the rest of the sample about 'creation of specialized hospitals for AIDS patients' and similar attitudes toward HIV testing 'without patients' consent' or breaching of confidentiality of HIV diagnosis. Debates on ethical issues among GPs cannot be reduced to a simplistic division of a 'liberal group' highly involved in prevention and HIV care and a 'conservative' majority more or less inclined to stigmatize HIV-infected patients. Ambiguous messages on these issues from health authorities and professional ethical bodies may have very negative impacts on the attitudes of primary care physicians regarding the acceptability of HIV-infected patients.

  14. Development of The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Adult/Geriatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner Program in HIV Prevention, Treatment, and Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Jason E; Stewart, Jennifer; Kub, Joan; Cumpsty-Fowler, Carolyn; Lowensen, Kelly; Becker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In response to the call to create an AIDS Education and Training Center for Nurse Practitioner Education by the Health Resources and Services Administration, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing embarked on a transformative curriculum overhaul to integrate HIV prevention, treatment, and care into the Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program. A six-step process outlined in the Curriculum Development for Medical Education was followed. A pilot cohort of Adult/Geriatric Nurse Practitioner students were enrolled, including 50% primary care setting and 50% HIV-focused primary care through a 12-month HIV continuity clinic experience. Through this pilot, substantive changes to the program were adopted. Programmatic outcomes were not compromised with the modification in clinical hours. The model of a 12-month HIV continuity clinical experience reduced the number of required preceptors. This model has important implications for the HIV workforce by demonstrating successful integration of HIV and primary care training for nurse practitioners. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Challenges and emerging opportunities for the HIV prevention, treatment and care cascade in men who have sex with men in Asia Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Griensven, Frits; Guadamuz, Thomas E; de Lind van Wijngaarden, Jan Willem; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Lo, Ying-Ru

    2017-08-01

    In Asia Pacific, most countries have expanded HIV treatment guidelines to include all those with HIV infection and adopted antiretroviral treatment for prevention (TFP) as a blanket strategy for HIV control. Although the overall epidemic development associated with this focus is positive, the HIV epidemic in men who have sex with men (MSM) is continuing unperturbed without any signs of decline or reversal. This raises doubt about whether TFP as a blanket HIV prevention policy is the right approach. This paper reviews currently available biomedical HIV prevention strategies, national HIV prevention policies and guidelines from selected countries and published data on the HIV cascade in MSM. No evidence for efficacy of TFP in protecting MSM from HIV infection was found. The rationale for this approach is based on assumptions about biological plausibility and external validity of latency-based efficacy found in heterosexual couples. This is different from the route and timing of HIV transmission in MSM. New HIV infections in MSM principally occur in chains of acutely HIV-infected highly sexually active young men, in whom acquisition and transmission are correlated in space and time. By the time TFP renders its effects, most new HIV infections in MSM will have already occurred. On a global level, less than 6% of all reports regarding the HIV care cascade from 1990 to 2016 included MSM, and only 2.3% concerned MSM in low/middle-income countries. Only one report originated from Asia Pacific. Generally, HIV cascade data in MSM show a sobering picture of TFP in engaging and retaining MSM along the continuum. Widening the cascade with a preventive extension, including pre-exposure prophylaxis, the first proven efficacious and only biomedical HIV prevention strategy in MSM, will be instrumental in achieving HIV epidemic control in this group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No

  16. HIV transmission and retention in care among HIV-exposed children enrolled in Malawi's prevention of mother-to-child transmission programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Andreas D; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Tenthani, Lyson; Jahn, Andreas; Zwahlen, Marcel; Msukwa, Malango T; Davies, Mary-Ann; Tal, Kali; Phiri, Nozgechi; Spoerri, Adrian; Chimbwandira, Frank; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia

    2017-09-04

    In Malawi, HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women are offered lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART) regardless of CD4 count or clinical stage (Option B+). Their HIV-exposed children are enrolled in the national prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) programme, but many are lost to follow-up. We estimated the cumulative incidence of vertical HIV transmission, taking loss to follow-up into account. We abstracted data from HIV-exposed children enrolled into care between September 2011 and June 2014 from patient records at 21 health facilities in central and southern Malawi. We used competing risk models to estimate the probability of loss to follow-up, death, ART initiation and discharge, and used pooled logistic regression and inverse probability of censoring weighting to estimate the vertical HIV transmission risk. A total of 11,285 children were included; 9285 (82%) were born to women who initiated ART during pregnancy. At age 30 months, an estimated 57.9% (95% CI 56.6-59.2) of children were lost to follow-up, 0.8% (0.6-1.0) had died, 2.6% (2.3-3.0) initiated ART, 36.5% (35.2-37.9) were discharged HIV-negative and 2.2% (1.5-2.8) continued follow-up. We estimated that 5.3% (95% CI 4.7-5.9) of the children who enrolled were HIV-infected by the age of 30 months, but only about half of these children (2.6%; 95% CI 2.3-2.9) were diagnosed. Confirmed mother-to-child transmission rates were low, but due to poor retention only about half of HIV-infected children were diagnosed. Tracing of children lost to follow-up and HIV testing in outpatient clinics should be scaled up to ensure that all HIV-positive children have access to early ART.

  17. "Where It Falls Apart": Barriers to Retention in HIV Care in Latino Immigrants and Migrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levison, Julie H; Bogart, Laura M; Khan, Iman F; Mejia, Dianna; Amaro, Hortensia; Alegría, Margarita; Safren, Steven

    2017-09-01

    Latino immigrants in the United States are disproportionately affected by HIV. Barriers to consistent attendance (retention) in HIV primary care constrain opportunities for HIV treatment success, but have not been specifically assessed in this population. We conducted semistructured interviews with 37 HIV-infected Latinos (aged ≥18 years and born in Puerto Rico or a Latin American Spanish-speaking country) and 14 HIV providers in metropolitan Boston (total n = 51). The Andersen Model of Healthcare Utilization informed a semistructured interview guide, which bilingual research staff used to explore barriers to HIV care. We used thematic analysis to explore the processes of retention in care. Six ubiquitous themes were perceived to influence HIV clinic attendance: (1) stigma as a barrier to HIV serostatus disclosure; (2) social support as a safety net during negative life circumstances; (3) unaddressed trauma and substance use leading to interruption in care; (4) a trusting relationship between patient and provider motivating HIV clinic attendance; (5) basic unmet needs competing with the perceived value of HIV care; and (6) religion providing a source of hope and optimism. Cultural subthemes were the centrality of family (familismo), masculinity (machismo), and trusting relationships (confianza). The timing of barriers was acute (e.g., eviction) and chronic (e.g., family conflict). These co-occurring and dynamic constellation of factors affected HIV primary care attendance over time. HIV-infected Latino immigrants and migrants experienced significant challenges that led to interruptions in HIV care. Anticipatory guidance to prepare for these setbacks may improve retention in HIV care in this population.

  18. Late presentation to HIV care despite good access to health services: current epidemiological trends and how to do better.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Katharine Ea; Hachfeld, Anna; Cavassini, Matthias; Kirk, Ole; Furrer, Hansjakob; Wandeler, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, there were 36.9 million people worldwide living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLWH), of whom 17.1 million did not know they were infected. Whilst the number of new human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections has declined globally since 2000, there are still regions where new infection rates are rising, and diagnosing HIV early in the course of infection remains a challenge. Late presentation to care in HIV refers to individuals newly presenting for HIV care with a CD4 count below 350 cells/µl or with an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-defining event. Late presentation is associated with increased patient morbidity and mortality, healthcare costs and risk of onward transmission by individuals unaware of their status. Further, late presentation limits the effectiveness of all subsequent steps in the cascade of HIV care. Recent figures from 34 countries in Europe show that late presentation occurs in 38.3% to 49.8% of patients newly presenting for care, depending on region. In Switzerland, data from patients enrolled in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study put the rate of late presentation at 49.8% and show that patients outside established HIV risk groups are most likely to be late presenters. Provider-initiated testing needs to be improved to reach these groups, which include heterosexual men and women and older patients. The aim of this review is to describe the scale and implications of late presentation using cohort data from Switzerland and elsewhere in Europe, and to highlight initiatives to improve early HIV diagnosis. The importance of recognising indicator conditions and the potential for missed opportunities for HIV testing is illustrated in three clinical case studies.

  19. The role of the general practitioner in the Australian approach to HIV care: interviews with 'key informants' from government, non-government and professional organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Christy E; de Wit, John B F; Kippax, Susan C; Reynolds, Robert H; Canavan, Peter G; Kidd, Michael R

    2012-03-01

    HIV care is provided in a range of settings in Australia, but advances in HIV treatment and demographic and geographic changes in the affected population and general practitioner (GP) workforce are testing the sustainability of the special role for GPs. This paper explores how a group of 'key informants' described the role of the GP in the Australian approach to HIV care, and conceptualised the challenges currently inspiring debate around future models of care. A thematic analysis was conducted of semistructured interviews carried out in 2010 with 24 professionals holding senior roles in government, non-government and professional organisations that influence Australian HIV care policy. The strengths of the role of the GP were described as their community setting, collaborative partnership with other medical and health professions, and focus on patient needs. A number of associated challenges were also identified including the different needs of GPs with high and low HIV caseloads, the changing expectations of professional roles in general practice, and barriers to service accessibility for people living with HIV. While there are many advantages to delivering HIV services in primary care, GPs need flexible models of training and accreditation, support in strengthening relationships with other health and medical professionals, and assistance in achieving service accessibility. Consideration of how to support the GP workforce so that care can be made available in the broadest range of geographical and service settings is also critical if systems of HIV care delivery are to be realistic and cost-effective and meet consumer needs.

  20. New Hope for Stopping HIV - Testing and Medical Care Save Lives

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-29

    This podcast is based on the December 2011 CDC Vital Signs report, "HIV Prevention through Care and Treatment" that shares new hope for preventing HIV and improving the health of people with HIV.  Created: 11/29/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/29/2011.

  1. New Hope for Stopping HIV - Testing and Medical Care Save Lives PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-29

    This 60 second PSA is based on the December 2011 CDC Vital Signs report, "HIV Prevention through Care and Treatment" that shares new hope for preventing HIV and improving the health of people with HIV.  Created: 11/29/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/29/2011.

  2. Barriers to HIV Care and Treatment by Doctors: A review of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper provides a review of the reported barriers that prevent doctors from managing HIV infected patients. The four most commonly reported barriers were: fear of contagion, fear of losing patients, unwillingness to care, and inadequate knowledge /training about treating HIV patients. Barriers to treating HIV infected ...

  3. Sweden, the first country to achieve the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)/World Health Organization (WHO) 90-90-90 continuum of HIV care targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisslén, M; Svedhem, V; Lindborg, L; Flamholc, L; Norrgren, H; Wendahl, S; Axelsson, M; Sönnerborg, A

    2017-04-01

    The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)/World Health Organization (WHO) 90-90-90 goals propose that 90% of all people living with HIV should know their HIV status, 90% of those diagnosed should receive antiretroviral therapy (ART), and 90% of those should have durable viral suppression. We have estimated the continuum of HIV care for the entire HIV-1-infected population in Sweden. The Swedish InfCare HIV Cohort Study collects viral loads, CD4 counts, and viral sequences, along with demographic and clinical data, through an electronic clinical decision support system. Almost 100% of those diagnosed with HIV infection are included in the database, corresponding to 6946 diagnosed subjects living with HIV-1 in Sweden by 31 December 2015. Using HIV surveillance data reported to the Public Health Agency of Sweden, it was estimated that 10% of all HIV-infected subjects in Sweden remain undiagnosed. Among all diagnosed patients, 99.8% were linked to care and 97.1% of those remained in care. On 31 December 2015, 6605 of 6946 patients (95.1%) were on ART. A total of 6395 had been on treatment for at least 6 months and 6053 of those (94.7%) had a viral load 73% of all patients living with HIV should be virologically suppressed by 2020. Sweden has already achieved this target, with 78% suppression, and is the first country reported to meet all the UNAIDS/WHO 90-90-90 goals. © 2016 The Authors. HIV Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British HIV Association.

  4. Barriers to men's participation in antenatal and prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission care in Cameroon, Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkuoh, Godlove N; Meyer, Dorothy J; Tih, Pius M; Nkfusai, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Men's role in HIV prevention is pivotal to changing the course of the epidemic. When men participate in Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission (PMTCT) programs, their knowledge of HIV increases, their behavior becomes supportive, and their receptiveness to HIV testing increases. In Cameroon, Africa, multiple efforts have been implemented that encourage men to "follow" their wives to obstetric/PMTCT care and to undergo HIV testing. However, only 18% of men have participated in this care. As a quality improvement initiative, a survey was administered to identify men's knowledge and attitudes regarding antenatal care (ANC), PMTCT, and HIV. The survey consisted of a questionnaire with an emphasis on identifying barriers to men's participation in PMTCT programs and obtaining HIV testing. A convenience sampling method was used, and no participant identifying information was collected. Men's participation in ANC/PMTCT is affected by sociocultural barriers centered in tribal beliefs and traditional gender roles. The barriers identified included the belief that pregnancy is a "woman's affair"; the belief that a man's role is primarily to provide financial support for the woman's care; the man's perception that he will be viewed as jealous by the community if he comes to clinic with his pregnant wife; and cultural gender-based patterns of communication. Most men consider accompanying their wife to ANC/PMTCT a good practice. Yet fewer men actually do this, because they feel that the provision of finance for ANC registration and delivery fees is their most important role in supporting their wife's pregnancy. Health care workers should encourage individuals and community leaders to build upon the traditional value of financial responsibility, expanding a man's involvement to include supportive social roles in obstetric care, PMTCT, and HIV testing. Copyright 2010 American College of Nurse-Midwives. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevalence of HIV infection and median CD4 counts among health care workers in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Daniela; Veriava, Youssef; Roberts, Sue; Tsotetsi, Josephine; Jordan, Annie; DeSilva, Eliot; Rosen, Sydney; DeSilva, Mary Bachman

    2007-02-01

    To determine the prevalence of HIV infection and the extent of disease progression based on CD4 count in a public health system workforce in southern Africa. Cross-sectional voluntary, anonymous, unlinked survey including an oral fluid or blood sample and a brief demographic questionnaire. Two public hospitals in Gauteng, South Africa. All 2 032 professional and support staff employed by the two hospitals. HIV prevalence and CD4 cell count distribution. Overall prevalence of HIV was 11.5%. By occupation, prevalence was highest among student nurses (13.8%) and nurses (13.7%). The highest prevalence by age was in the 25 - 34-year group (15.9%). Nineteen per cent of HIV-positive participants who provided blood samples had CD4 counts less than or equal to 200 cells/ microl 28% had counts 201 - 350 cells/ microl, 18% had counts 351 - 500 cells/ microl, and 35% had counts above 500 cells/ microl. One out of 7 nurses and nursing students in this public sector workforce was HIV-positive. A high proportion of health care workers had CD4 counts below 350 cells/ microl, and many were already eligible for antiretroviral therapy under South African treatment guidelines. Given the short supply of nurses in South Africa, knowledge of prevalence in this workforce and provision of effective AIDS treatment are crucial for meeting future staffing needs.

  6. Rehabilitation: A crucial component in the future of HIV care and support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Nixon

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART is not an end in itself but a means to achieving improved wellness for people living with HIV. Rehabilitation, broadly defined, is another key contributor to wellness within this context. Understanding the potential for rehabilitation requires that one is able to consider HIV not only within a biomedical model that focuses on body systems, diagnoses and symptoms, but also within a rehabilitation framework that focuses on how these diagnoses and symptoms affect people’s lives more broadly. Furthermore, rehabilitation is a human rights imperative, which deserves the energetic attention enjoyed by other aspects of HIV treatment and care. In particular, the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD is shining a long-overdue spotlight on the human rights imperatives associated with disability. For South Africa and other countries, proactively and meaningfully engaging rehabilitation in the HIV response will require major shifts on several fronts, including practice, education, policy and research. We argue that in settings where ART delivery is now widespread, HIV should be understood not only as a medical issue, but as a rehabilitation and disability concern. Whereas medicine adds years to life, it is rehabilitation that aims to add life to years.

  7. Harm reduction interventions in HIV care: a qualitative exploration of patient and provider perspectives

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    Suzanne Carlberg-Racich

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. A culture of stringent drug policy, one-size-fits-all treatment approaches, and drug-related stigma has clouded clinical HIV practice in the United States. The result is a series of missed opportunities in the HIV care environment. An approach which may address the broken relationship between patient and provider is harm reduction—which removes judgment and operates at the patient’s stage of readiness. Harm reduction is not a routine part of care; rather, it exists outside clinic walls, exacerbating the divide between compassionate, stigma-free services and the medical system. Methods. Qualitative, phenomenological, semi-structured, individual interviews with patients and providers were conducted in three publicly-funded clinics in Chicago, located in areas of high HIV prevalence and drug use and serving African-American patients (N = 38. A deductive thematic analysis guided the process, including: the creation of an index code list, transcription and verification of interviews, manual coding, notation of emerging themes and refinement of code definitions, two more rounds of coding within AtlasTi, calculation of Cohen’s Kappa for interrater reliability, queries of major codes and analysis of additional common themes. Results. Thematic analysis of findings indicated that the majority of patients felt receptive to harm reduction interventions (safer injection counseling, safer stimulant use counseling, overdose prevention information, supply provision from their provider, and expressed anticipated gratitude for harm reduction information and/or supplies within the HIV care visit, although some were reluctant to talk openly about their drug use. Provider results were mixed, with more receptivity reported by advanced practice nurses, and more barriers cited by physicians. Notable barriers included: role-perceptions, limited time, inadequate training, and the patients themselves. Discussion. Patients are willing to receive harm

  8. Harm reduction interventions in HIV care: a qualitative exploration of patient and provider perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg-Racich, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Background. A culture of stringent drug policy, one-size-fits-all treatment approaches, and drug-related stigma has clouded clinical HIV practice in the United States. The result is a series of missed opportunities in the HIV care environment. An approach which may address the broken relationship between patient and provider is harm reduction-which removes judgment and operates at the patient's stage of readiness. Harm reduction is not a routine part of care; rather, it exists outside clinic walls, exacerbating the divide between compassionate, stigma-free services and the medical system. Methods. Qualitative, phenomenological, semi-structured, individual interviews with patients and providers were conducted in three publicly-funded clinics in Chicago, located in areas of high HIV prevalence and drug use and serving African-American patients (N = 38). A deductive thematic analysis guided the process, including: the creation of an index code list, transcription and verification of interviews, manual coding, notation of emerging themes and refinement of code definitions, two more rounds of coding within AtlasTi, calculation of Cohen's Kappa for interrater reliability, queries of major codes and analysis of additional common themes. Results. Thematic analysis of findings indicated that the majority of patients felt receptive to harm reduction interventions (safer injection counseling, safer stimulant use counseling, overdose prevention information, supply provision) from their provider, and expressed anticipated gratitude for harm reduction information and/or supplies within the HIV care visit, although some were reluctant to talk openly about their drug use. Provider results were mixed, with more receptivity reported by advanced practice nurses, and more barriers cited by physicians. Notable barriers included: role-perceptions, limited time, inadequate training, and the patients themselves. Discussion. Patients are willing to receive harm reduction interventions from

  9. Barriers to control syphilis and HIV vertical transmission in the health care system in the city of Sao Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdete Maria Ramos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to identify possible barriers to control vertical transmission of syphilis and HIV through the analysis of the orientation process of pregnant women from prenatal care to the obstetric center at an university hospital in Sao Paulo (Reference and their return (with their exposed babies for follow-up after hospital discharge (counter-reference. METHODS: It is a retrospective cross-sectional study including interviews with healthcare personnel. Pregnant women with syphilis and/or HIV-infection admitted for labor or miscarriage were identified from August 2006 to August 2007. Routine care for mothers and babies were analyzed. RESULTS: 56 pregnant women were identified: 43 were HIV-infected, 11 had syphilis and two were coinfected (syphilis/HIV; 22 health care professionals were interviewed. Prenatal care was identified in 91.1% of these women: 7/11 (63.6% with syphilis; 44/45 (97.8% HIV-infected or coinfected. The reference for delivery was satisfactory for 57.7% of the syphilis-infected women and 97.7% of the HIV-infected ones. The counter-reference was satisfactory for all babies and mothers at hospital discharge, besides the non-adherence to this recommendation. Interviews with health care professionals showed there are better routines for assisting and following-up pregnant women, puerperal women and HIV-infected or exposed babies than for those infected with syphilis. The epidemiological report and surveillance system are also better for HIV-infected patients. CONCLUSION: The difficulties in the reference and counter-reference system of these women and their babies are evident barriers to control the vertical transmission of these infectious diseases.

  10. Barriers to control syphilis and HIV vertical transmission in the health care system in the city of Sao Paulo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Valdete Maria; Figueiredo, Elisabeth Niglio de; Succi, Regina Célia de Menezes

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify possible barriers to control vertical transmission of syphilis and HIV through the analysis of the orientation process of pregnant women from prenatal care to the obstetric center at an university hospital in Sao Paulo (Reference) and their return (with their exposed babies) for follow-up after hospital discharge (counter-reference). It is a retrospective cross-sectional study including interviews with healthcare personnel. Pregnant women with syphilis and/or HIV-infection admitted for labor or miscarriage were identified from August 2006 to August 2007. Routine care for mothers and babies were analyzed. 56 pregnant women were identified: 43 were HIV-infected, 11 had syphilis and two were coinfected (syphilis/HIV); 22 health care professionals were interviewed. Prenatal care was identified in 91.1% of these women: 7/11 (63.6%) with syphilis; 44/45 (97.8%) HIV-infected or coinfected. The reference for delivery was satisfactory for 57.7% of the syphilis-infected women and 97.7% of the HIV-infected ones. The counter-reference was satisfactory for all babies and mothers at hospital discharge, besides the non-adherence to this recommendation. Interviews with health care professionals showed there are better routines for assisting and following-up pregnant women, puerperal women and HIV-infected or exposed babies than for those infected with syphilis. The epidemiological report and surveillance system are also better for HIV-infected patients. The difficulties in the reference and counter-reference system of these women and their babies are evident barriers to control the vertical transmission of these infectious diseases.

  11. The promise of outreach for engaging and retaining out-of-care persons in HIV medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Judith B

    2007-01-01

    From the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, outreach workers have been on the frontlines of HIV prevention, working in community venues to increase knowledge and promote behaviors to reduce HIV transmission. As demographics of the HIV-infected population have changed, the need has grown to locate out-of-care individuals and learn how to engage and retain them in HIV care. Through the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Special Projects of National Significance (SPNS) Outreach Initiative, 10 sites across the United States implemented and evaluated enhanced outreach models designed to increase engagement and retention in HIV care for underserved, disadvantaged HIV-infected individuals. Although the models differed in response to local needs and organizational characteristics, all made use of a common conceptual framework, and all used the same data collection and reporting protocols. Study teams enrolled and provided behavioral interventions to HIV-infected individuals who have been noticeably absent from research and from practice. Their interventions incorporated coaching, skills-building, and education, and were successful in reducing or removing structural, financial, and personal/cultural barriers that interfered with equitable access to HIV care. Desired outcomes of increased engagement and retention in HIV health care were achieved. Results demonstrate that interventions to promote equitable access to HIV care for disadvantaged population groups can be built from outreach models. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the multisite data indicates that further development and evaluation of outreach-based interventions will result in effective tools for reaching HIV-infected individuals who would otherwise remain without needed care.

  12. Effects of vitamins, including vitamin A, on HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Saurabh; Fawzi, Wafaie

    2007-01-01

    An estimated 25 million lives have been lost to acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS) since the immunodeficiency syndrome was first described in 1981. The progress made in the field of treatment in the form of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV disease/AIDS has prolonged as well as improved the quality of life of HIV-infected individuals. However, access to such treatment remains a major concern in most parts of the world, especially in the developing countries. Hence, there is a constant need to find low-cost interventions to complement the role of ART in prevention of HIV infection and slowing clinical disease progression. Nutritional interventions, particularly vitamin supplementation, have the potential to be a low-cost method for being such an intervention by virtue of their modulation of the immune system. Among all the vitamins, the role of vitamin A has been studied most extensively; most observational studies have found that low vitamin A levels are associated with increased risk of transmission of HIV from mother to child. This finding has not been supported by large randomized trials of vitamin A supplementation; on the contrary, these trials have found that vitamin A supplementation increases the risk of mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). There are a number of potential mechanisms that might explain these contradictory findings. One is the issue of reverse causality in observational studies-for instance, advanced HIV disease may suppress release of vitamin A from the liver. This would lead to low levels of vitamin A in the plasma despite the body having enough vitamin A liver stores. Further, advanced HIV disease is likely to increase the risk of MTCT, and hence it would appear that low serum vitamin A levels are associated with increased MTCT. The HIV genome also has a retinoic acid receptor element-hence, vitamin A may increase HIV replication via interacting with this element, thus increasing risk of MTCT. Finally, vitamin A is known to

  13. TB/HIV integration at primary care level: A quantitative assessment at 3 clinics in Johannesburg, South Africa

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    L Page-Shipp

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 2004 the World Health Organization (WHO released the Interim Policy on Collaborative TB/HIV activities. According to the policy, for people living with HIV (PLWH, activities include intensified case finding, isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT and infection control. For TB patients, activities included HIV counselling and testing (HCT, prevention messages, and cotrimoxazole preventive therapy (CPT, care and support, and antiretroviral therapy (ART for those with HIV-associated TB. While important progress has been made in implementation, targets of the WHO Global Plan to Stop TB have not been reached. Objective. To quantify TB/HIV integration at 3 primary healthcare clinics in Johannesburg, South Africa. Methods. Routinely collected TB and HIV data from the HCT register, TB ‘suspect’ register, TB treatment register, clinic files and HIV electronic database, collected over a 3-month period, were reviewed. Results. Of 1 104 people receiving HCT: 306 (28% were HIV-positive; a CD4 count was documented for 57%; and few received TB screening or IPT. In clinic encounters among PLWH, 921 (15% had documented TB symptoms; only 10% were assessed by smear microscopy, and few asymptomatic PLWH were offered IPT. Infection control was poorly documented and implemented. HIV status was documented for 155 (75% of the 208 TB patients; 90% were HIV-positive and 88% had a documented CD4 count. Provision of CPT and ART was poorly documented. Conclusion. The coverage of most TB/HIV collaborative activities was below Global Plan targets. The lack of standardised recording tools and incomplete documentation impeded assessment at facility level and limited the accuracy of compiled data.

  14. European AIDS Clinical Society Standard of Care meeting on HIV and related coinfections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussini, C; Antinori, A; Bhagani, S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the 1st European AIDS Clinical Society meeting on Standard of Care in Europe was to raise awareness of the European scenario and come to an agreement on actions that could be taken in the future. METHODS: Data-driven presentations were given on specific topics followed...... by interactive panel discussions. RESULTS: In Eastern European countries, the epidemic is largely driven by injecting drug use, in contrast with Western Europe where the infection mainly occurs through heterosexual contact. A high proportion of people living with HIV remain unaware of their infection...... diagnosed multi-drug-resistant cases. Hepatitis C is widespread in selected geographical areas and risk groups. CONCLUSIONS: The key conclusion from the meeting was that a high-priority group of actions could be identified, including: increasing HIV awareness and testing, improving training for health care...

  15. Missed Opportunities for Early Access to Care of HIV-Infected Infants in Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, Malik; Meda, Nicolas; Yonaba, Caroline; Ouedraogo, Sylvie; Congo, Malika; Barry, Mamoudou; Thio, Elisabeth; Siribié, Issa; Koueta, Fla; Ye, Diarra; Kam, Ludovic; Blanche, Stéphane; Van De Perre, Phillipe; Leroy, Valériane

    2014-01-01

    Objective The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended a universal antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all HIV-infected children before the age of two since 2010, but this implies an early identification of these infants. We described the Prevention of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission (PMTCT) cascade, the staffing and the quality of infrastructures in pediatric HIV care facilities, in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 2011 in all health care facilities involved in PMTCT and pediatric HIV care in Ouagadougou. We assessed them according to their coverage in pediatric HIV care and WHO standards, through a desk review of medical registers and a semi-structured questionnaire administered to health-care workers (HCW). Results In 2011, there was no offer of care in primary health care facilities for HIV-infected children in Ouagadougou. Six district hospitals and two university hospitals provided pediatric HIV care. Among the 67 592 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in 2011, 85.9% were tested for HIV. The prevalence of HIV was 1.8% (95% Confidence Interval: 1.7%–1.9%). Among the 1 064 HIV-infected pregnant women attending antenatal clinics, 41.4% received a mother-to-child HIV transmission prevention intervention. Among the HIV-exposed infants, 313 (29.4%) had an early infant HIV test, and 306 (97.8%) of these infants tested received their result within a four-month period. Among the 40 children initially tested HIV-infected, 33 (82.5%) were referred to a health care facility, 3 (9.0%) were false positive, and 27 (90.0%) were initiated on ART. Although health care facilities were adequately supplied with HIV drugs, they were hindered by operational challenges such as shortage of infrastructures, laboratory reagents, and trained HCW. Conclusions The PMTCT cascade revealed bottle necks in PMTCT intervention and HIV early infant diagnosis. The staffing in HIV care and quality of health care infrastructures were also

  16. STIGMA AROUND HIV IN DENTAL CARE: PATIENTS' EXPERIENCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brondani, Mario A; Phillips, J Craig; Kerston, R Paul; Moniri, Nardin R

    2016-02-01

    Tooth decay and other oral diseases can be highly prevalent among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Even though dental professionals are trained to provide equal and non-judgemental services to all, intentional or unintentional biases may exist with regard to PLWHA. We conducted qualitative descriptive research using individual interviews to explore the experiences of PLWHA accessing dental care services in Vancouver, Canada. We interviewed 25 PLWHA, aged 23-67 years; 21 were men and 60% reported fair or poor oral health. Thematic analysis showed evidence of both self-stigma and public stigma with the following themes: fear, self-stigma and dental care; overcoming past offences during encounters with dental care professionals; resilience and reconciliation to achieve quality care for all; and current encounters with dental care providers. Stigma attached to PLWHA is detrimental to oral care. The social awareness of dental professionals must be enhanced, so that they can provide the highest quality care to this vulnerable population.

  17. Knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufuno Makhado

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The challenges of caring for people living with HIV (PLWH in a low-resource setting has had a negative impact on the nursing profession, resulting in a shortage of skilled nurses. In response to this shortage and perceived negative impact, we conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study to describe the level of knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for PLWH at a regional hospital in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A total of 233 nurses, the majority being female, participated and were stratified into professional nurses (n = 108, enrolled nurses (n = 58 and enrolled nursing auxiliaries (n = 66. Data were collected using HIV/AIDS knowledge questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory; AIDS Impact Scale and Beck's Depression Inventory. The total knowledge score obtained by all the participants ranged from 2 to 16, with an average of 12.93 (SD = 1.92 on HIV/AIDS knowledge. Depersonalization (D (83.7% and emotional exhaustion (EE (53.2% were reported among participating nurses caring for PLWH. Burnout was higher among professional nurses as compared to both enrolled nurses and enrolled nursing auxiliaries. There was a moderate negative significant correlation between HIV knowledge with the nurses' emotional exhaustion (r = −0.592, depression (r = −0.584 and stigma and discrimination (r = −0.637. A moderate to high level of burnout was evident among all levels of nurses. These findings lead to the recommendations for support of nurses caring for PLWH that include structured nursing educational support, organisational support with respect to employee wellness programmes that address depression and work burnout, as well as social support. The provision of these support mechanisms has the potential of creating a positive practice environment for nurses in the Vhembe District of the Limpopo Province in particular, and South Africa in general, and in improved care for PLWH.

  18. Knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufuno Makhado

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The challenges of caring for people living with HIV (PLWH in a low-resource setting has had a negative impact on the nursing profession, resulting in a shortage of skilled nurses. In response to this shortage and perceived negative impact, we conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional study to describe the level of knowledge and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses caring for PLWH at a regional hospital in Limpopo Province, South Africa. A total of 233 nurses, the majority being female, participated and were stratified into professional nurses (n =108, enrolled nurses (n = 58 and enrolled nursing auxiliaries (n = 66. Data were collected using HIV/AIDS knowledge questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory; AIDS Impact Scale and Beck's Depression Inventory. The total knowledge score obtained by all the participants ranged from 2 to 16, with an average of 12.93 (SD = 1.92 on HIV/AIDS knowledge. Depersonalization (D (83.7% and emotional exhaustion (EE (53.2% were reported among participating nurses caring for PLWH. Burnout was higher among professional nurses as compared to both enrolled nurses and enrolled nursing auxiliaries. There was a moderate negative significant correlation between HIV knowledge with the nurses' emotional exhaustion (r = 0.592, depression (r = 0.584 and stigma and discrimination (r = 0.637. A moderate to high level of burnout was evident among all levels of nurses. These findings lead to the recommendations for support of nurses caring for PLWH that include structured nursing educational support, organisational support with respect to employee wellness programmes that address depression and work burnout, as well as social support. The provision of these support mechanisms has the potential of creating a positive practice environment for nurses in the Vhembe District of the Limpopo Province in particular, and South Africa in general, and in improved care for PLWH.

  19. HIV transmission in the dental setting and the HIV-infected oral health care professional: workshop 1C.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flint, S R

    2011-04-01

    This workshop addressed two important issues: first, the global evidence of HIV transmission from health care provider to patient and from patient to health care provider in the general health care environment and the dental practice setting; second, in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy, whether oral health care professionals living with HIV pose a risk of transmission to their patients and whether standard infection control is adequate to protect both the patient and the oral health care professional in dental practice. The workshop culminated in a general discussion and the formulation of a consensus statement from the participating delegates, representing more than 30 countries, on the criteria under which an HIV-infected oral health care professional might practice dentistry without putting patients at risk. This consensus statement, the Beijing Declaration, was agreed nem con.

  20. Barriers and facilitators for men to attend prenatal care and obtain HIV voluntary counseling and testing in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeganeh, Nava; Simon, Mariana; Mindry, Deborah; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Chaves, Maria Cristina; Santos, Breno; Melo, Marineide; Mendoza, Brenna; Gorbach, Pamina

    2017-01-01

    Providing HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) to men who attend their partner's prenatal care is an intervention with potential to reduce HIV transmission to women and infants during the vulnerable period of pregnancy. Little is known about the acceptability of this intervention in global settings outside of Africa. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews to evaluate potential barriers and facilitators to prenatal care attendance for HIV VCT with 20 men who did and 15 men who did not attend prenatal care with their partners at Hospital Conceiçao in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Men were recruited at the labor and delivery unit at Hospital Conceiçao via a scripted invitation while visiting their newborn infant. Interviews lasted from 35-55 minutes and were conducted in Portuguese by a local resident trained extensively in qualitative methods. All interviews were transcribed verbatim, translated, and then analyzed using Atlast.ti software. An analysis of themes was then conducted using direct quotes and statements. We applied and adapted the AIDS Risk Reduction Theoretical Model and HIV Testing Decisions Model to the qualitative data to identify themes in the 35 interviews. If offered HIV testing during prenatal care, all men in both groups stated they would accept this intervention. Yet, individual, relationship and systemic factors were identified that affect these Brazilian men's decision to attend prenatal care, informing our final conceptual model. The men interviewed had a general understanding of the value of HIV prevention of mother to child transmission. They also described open and communicative relationships with their significant others and displayed a high level of enthusiasm towards optimizing the health of their expanding family. The major barriers to attending prenatal care included perceived stigma against HIV infected individuals, men's lack of involvement in planning of the pregnancy as well as inconvenient scheduling of prenatal care, due to

  1. Barriers and facilitators for men to attend prenatal care and obtain HIV voluntary counseling and testing in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nava Yeganeh

    Full Text Available Providing HIV voluntary counseling and testing (VCT to men who attend their partner's prenatal care is an intervention with potential to reduce HIV transmission to women and infants during the vulnerable period of pregnancy. Little is known about the acceptability of this intervention in global settings outside of Africa.We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews to evaluate potential barriers and facilitators to prenatal care attendance for HIV VCT with 20 men who did and 15 men who did not attend prenatal care with their partners at Hospital Conceiçao in Porto Alegre, Brazil. Men were recruited at the labor and delivery unit at Hospital Conceiçao via a scripted invitation while visiting their newborn infant. Interviews lasted from 35-55 minutes and were conducted in Portuguese by a local resident trained extensively in qualitative methods. All interviews were transcribed verbatim, translated, and then analyzed using Atlast.ti software. An analysis of themes was then conducted using direct quotes and statements. We applied and adapted the AIDS Risk Reduction Theoretical Model and HIV Testing Decisions Model to the qualitative data to identify themes in the 35 interviews.If offered HIV testing during prenatal care, all men in both groups stated they would accept this intervention. Yet, individual, relationship and systemic factors were identified that affect these Brazilian men's decision to attend prenatal care, informing our final conceptual model. The men interviewed had a general understanding of the value of HIV prevention of mother to child transmission. They also described open and communicative relationships with their significant others and displayed a high level of enthusiasm towards optimizing the health of their expanding family. The major barriers to attending prenatal care included perceived stigma against HIV infected individuals, men's lack of involvement in planning of the pregnancy as well as inconvenient scheduling of

  2. Implementation of integrated stepped care for unhealthy alcohol use in HIV clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, E Jennifer; Hansen, Nathan B; Cutter, Christopher J; Danton, Cheryl; Fiellin, Lynn E; O'Connor, Patrick G; Williams, Emily C; Maisto, Stephen A; Bryant, Kendall J; Fiellin, David A

    2016-01-13

    Effective counseling and pharmacotherapy for unhealthy alcohol use are rarely provided in HIV treatment settings to patients. Our goal was to describe factors influencing implementation of a stepped care model to address unhealthy alcohol use in HIV clinics from the perspectives of social workers, psychologists and addiction psychiatrists. We conducted two focus groups with Social Workers (n = 4), Psychologists (n = 2), and Addiction Psychiatrists (n = 4) involved in an ongoing randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of integrated stepped care for unhealthy alcohol use in HIV-infected patients at five Veterans Health Administration (VA) HIV clinics. Data collection and analyses were guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) domains, with a focus on the three domains which we considered to be most relevant: intervention characteristics (i.e. motivational interviewing, pharmacotherapy), the inner setting (i.e. HIV clinics), and characteristics of individuals (i.e. the providers). A multidisciplinary team used directed content analysis to identify major themes. From the providers' perspective, the major implementation themes that emerged by CFIR domain included: (1) Intervention characteristics: providers valued tools and processes for facilitating patient motivation for treatment of unhealthy alcohol use given their perceived lack of motivation, but expressed a desire for greater flexibility; (2) Inner setting: treating unhealthy alcohol use in HIV clinics was perceived by providers to be consistent with VA priorities; and (3) Characteristics of individuals: there was high self-efficacy to conduct the intervention, an expressed need for more consistent utilization to maintain skills, and consideration of alternative models for delivering the components of the intervention. Use of the CFIR framework reveals that implementation of integrated stepped care for unhealthy alcohol use in HIV clinics is facilitated by

  3. Individuals motivated to participate in adherence, care and treatment (imPACT: development of a multi-component intervention to help HIV-infected recently incarcerated individuals link and adhere to HIV care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol E. Golin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Policy-makers promote a seek, test, treat and retain (STTR strategy to expand HIV testing, support linkage and engagement in care, and enhance the continuous use of antiretroviral therapy for those HIV-infected. This HIV prevention strategy is particularly appropriate in correctional settings where HIV screening and treatment are routinely available yet many HIV-infected individuals have difficulty sustaining sufficient linkage and engagement in care, disease management, and viral suppression after prison release. Methods/design Our research team developed Project imPACT (individuals motivated to Participate in Adherence, Care and Treatment, a multi-component approach for HIV-Infected recently incarcerated individuals that specifically targets their care linkage, retention, and medication adherence by addressing multiple barriers to care engagement after release. The ultimate goals of this intervention are to improve the health of HIV-infected individuals recently released from prison and reduce HIV transmission to their communities by maintaining viral suppression. This paper describes the intervention and technology development processes, based on best practices for intervention development and process evaluation. These processes included: 1 identifying the target population; 2 clarifying the theoretical basis for intervention design; 3 describing features of its foundational interventions; 4 conducting formative qualitative research; 5 integrating and adapting foundational interventions to create and refine intervention content based on target audience feedback. These stages along with the final intervention product are described in detail. The intervention is currently being evaluation and a two arm randomized, controlled trial in two US state prison systems. Discussion Based on a literature review, qualitative research, integration of proven interventions and behavioral theory, the final imPACT intervention focused on

  4. Role and outcomes of community health workers in HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwai, Grace W; Mburu, Gitau; Torpey, Kwasi; Frost, Peter; Ford, Nathan; Seeley, Janet

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The provision of HIV treatment and care in sub-Saharan Africa faces multiple challenges, including weak health systems and attrition of trained health workers. One potential response to overcome these challenges has been to engage community health workers (CHWs). Methodology A systematic literature search for quantitative and qualitative studies describing the role and outcomes of CHWs in HIV care between inception and December 2012 in sub-Saharan Africa was performed in the following databases: PubMed, PsychINFO, Embase, Web of Science, JSTOR, WHOLIS, Google Scholar and SAGE journals online. Bibliographies of included articles were also searched. A narrative synthesis approach was used to analyze common emerging themes on the role and outcomes of CHWs in HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa. Results In total, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria, documenting a range of tasks performed by CHWs. These included patient support (counselling, home-based care, education, adherence support and livelihood support) and health service support (screening, referral and health service organization and surveillance). CHWs were reported to enhance the reach, uptake and quality of HIV services, as well as the dignity, quality of life and retention in care of people living with HIV. The presence of CHWs in clinics was reported to reduce waiting times, streamline patient flow and reduce the workload of health workers. Clinical outcomes appeared not to be compromised, with no differences in virologic failure and mortality comparing patients under community-based and those under facility-based care. Despite these benefits, CHWs faced challenges related to lack of recognition, remuneration and involvement in decision making. Conclusions CHWs can clearly contribute to HIV services delivery and strengthen human resource capacity in sub-Saharan Africa. For their contribution to be sustained, CHWs need to be recognized, remunerated and integrated in wider health systems. Further

  5. Role and outcomes of community health workers in HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwai, Grace W; Mburu, Gitau; Torpey, Kwasi; Frost, Peter; Ford, Nathan; Seeley, Janet

    2013-09-10

    The provision of HIV treatment and care in sub-Saharan Africa faces multiple challenges, including weak health systems and attrition of trained health workers. One potential response to overcome these challenges has been to engage community health workers (CHWs). A systematic literature search for quantitative and qualitative studies describing the role and outcomes of CHWs in HIV care between inception and December 2012 in sub-Saharan Africa was performed in the following databases: PubMed, PsychINFO, Embase, Web of Science, JSTOR, WHOLIS, Google Scholar and SAGE journals online. Bibliographies of included articles were also searched. A narrative synthesis approach was used to analyze common emerging themes on the role and outcomes of CHWs in HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa. In total, 21 studies met the inclusion criteria, documenting a range of tasks performed by CHWs. These included patient support (counselling, home-based care, education, adherence support and livelihood support) and health service support (screening, referral and health service organization and surveillance). CHWs were reported to enhance the reach, uptake and quality of HIV services, as well as the dignity, quality of life and retention in care of people living with HIV. The presence of CHWs in clinics was reported to reduce waiting times, streamline patient flow and reduce the workload of health workers. Clinical outcomes appeared not to be compromised, with no differences in virologic failure and mortality comparing patients under community-based and those under facility-based care. Despite these benefits, CHWs faced challenges related to lack of recognition, remuneration and involvement in decision making. CHWs can clearly contribute to HIV services delivery and strengthen human resource capacity in sub-Saharan Africa. For their contribution to be sustained, CHWs need to be recognized, remunerated and integrated in wider health systems. Further research focusing on comparative costs of CHW

  6. Late presentation for HIV care across Europe: update from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE) study, 2010 to 2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens; Antinori, Andrea; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Brännström, Johanna; Bonnet, Fabrice; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Casabona, Jordi; Castagna, Antonella; Costagliola, Dominique; de Wit, Stéphane; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Furrer, Hansjakob; Jadand, Corinne; Johnson, Anne; Lazanas, Mario; Leport, Catherine; Moreno, Santiago; Mussini, Christina; Obel, Niels; Post, Frank; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Skaletz-Rorowski, Adriane; Suarez-Loano, Ignacio; Torti, Carlo; Warszawski, Josiane; Wittkop, Linda; Zangerle, Robert; Chene, Genevieve; Raben, Dorthe; Kirk, Ole; Touloumi, Giota; Meyer, Laurence; Dabis, François; Krause, Murielle Mary; Ghosn, Jade; Wit, Ferdinand; Prins, Maria; Bucher, Heiner; Gibb, Diana; del Amo, Julia; Thorne, Claire; Stephan, Christoph; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Hamouda, Osamah; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Chkhartishvili, Nikoloz; Noguera-Julian, Antoni; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Prieto, Luis; Conejo, Pablo Rojo; Soriano-Arandes, Antoni; Battegay, Manuel; Kouyos, Roger; Mussini, Cristina; Tookey, Pat; Miró, Jose M.; Konopnick, Deborah; Goetghebuer, Tessa; Sönnerborg, Anders; Teira, Ramon; Garrido, Myriam; Haerry, David; Chêne, Geneviève; Judd, Ali; Barger, Diana; Schwimmer, Christine; Termote, Monique; Campbell, Maria; Frederiksen, Casper M.; Friis-Moller, Nina; Kjaer, Jesper; Brandt, Rikke Salbøl; Berenguer, Juan; Bohlius, Julia; Bouteloup, Vincent; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Davies, Mary-Anne; Dorrucci, Maria; Dunn, David; Egger, Matthias; Guiguet, Marguerite; Grabar, Sophie; Lambotte, Olivier; Leroy, Valériane; Lodi, Sara; Matheron, Sophie; Monge, Susana; Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Paredes, Roger; Phillips, Andrew; Puoti, Massimo; Schomaker, Michael; Smit, Colette; Sterne, Jonathan; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; van der Valk, Marc; Wyss, Natasha

    2015-01-01

    Late presentation (LP) for HIV care across Europe remains a significant issue. We provide a cross-European update from 34 countries on the prevalence and risk factors of LP for 2010-2013. People aged >= 16 presenting for HIV care (earliest of HIV-diagnosis, first clinic visit or cohort enrolment)

  7. Assessing the effects of anti-homosexuality legislation in Uganda on HIV prevention, treatment, and care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semugoma, Paul; Beyrer, Chris; Baral, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Uganda's response to the HIV epidemic has been lauded for its robustness and achievements. However, a key component of HIV prevention programming has been missing, for men who have sex with men (MSM). The main reason cited has been criminalization of male homosexual behavior. In 2009, the Anti-Homosexuality Bill (AHB) was introduced in the parliament to enhance existing anti-homosexuality law. A multi-disciplinary team made a Health Impact Assessment of the proposed AHB. The bill as tabled would severely increase punishments, increased closeting. Social capital of MSM would be eroded by clauses mandating reporting by friends, relatives, and acquaintances. Health-care professionals would have to inform on homosexuals. Mandatory HIV testing would be a blow to programming. Probable disclosure of HIV status in a public space (court) would also be a deterrent. Heftier punishments for those testing positive increases stigma and hobbles subsequent care. The AHB argues for exclusion, and more discrimination targeting persons living with HIV and sexual minorities. It will exacerbate the negative public health consequences of the existing legislation. The government of Uganda should review guidance documents published by authoritative bodies including the World Bank, World Health Organization to develop and bring to scale Human rights-affirming HIV prevention, treatment, and care responses.

  8. Scaling up paediatric HIV care with an integrated, family-centred approach: an observational case study from Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Luyirika

    Full Text Available Family-centred HIV care models have emerged as an approach to better target children and their caregivers for HIV testing and care, and further provide integrated health services for the family unit's range of care needs. While there is significant international interest in family-centred approaches, there is a dearth of research on operational experiences in implementation and scale-up. Our retrospective case study examined best practices and enabling factors during scale-up of family-centred care in ten health facilities and ten community clinics supported by a non-governmental organization, Mildmay, in Central Uganda. Methods included key informant interviews with programme management and families, and a desk review of hospital management information systems (HMIS uptake data. In the 84 months following the scale-up of the family-centred approach in HIV care, Mildmay experienced a 50-fold increase of family units registered in HIV care, a 40-fold increase of children enrolled in HIV care, and nearly universal coverage of paediatric cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. The Mildmay experience emphasizes the importance of streamlining care to maximize paediatric capture. This includes integrated service provision, incentivizing care-seeking as a family, creating child-friendly service environments, and minimizing missed paediatric testing opportunities by institutionalizing early infant diagnosis and provider-initiated testing and counselling. Task-shifting towards nurse-led clinics with community outreach support enabled rapid scale-up, as did an active management structure that allowed for real-time review and corrective action. The Mildmay experience suggests that family-centred approaches are operationally feasible, produce strong coverage outcomes, and can be well-managed during rapid scale-up.

  9. Attitudes of nursing students towards caring for people with HIV/AIDS: thematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickles, David; King, Lindy; Belan, Ingrid

    2009-11-01

    Attitudes of nursing students towards caring for people with HIV/AIDS: thematic literature review. This paper is a report of a literature review conducted to examine current research studies into attitudes of nursing students towards caring for people with HIV/AIDS and to identify factors that influenced those attitudes to inform current nursing practice and to develop nursing education regarding care provided to people with HIV/AIDS. Attitudes of nurses towards people living with HIV/AIDS have long been scrutinized. Studies show that some nurses have negative attitudes and are reluctant to provide care to people with HIV/AIDS, resulting in poorer quality nursing support being provided. Attitudes of nursing students towards caring for people with HIV/AIDS is thus of vital importance since they become the future practising nurses. Eight electronic data bases were searched from 1996-2008. Criteria used for study selection were: attitudes of nursing students towards caring for people with HIV/AIDS, primary research studies, published in English language in peer reviewed journals from 1996 to June 2008. Sixteen studies were identified for inclusion in this thematic review. The following themes were identified: education and knowledge of HIV/AIDS; fear of contracting HIV/AIDS; reluctance to care for people with HIV/AIDS; homophobia; and stigma associated with HIV/AIDS. There is reluctance on the part of some nursing students in specific regions of the world to provide care for people with HIV/AIDS. Educational programmes based on research evidence must play a leading role in developing strategies to help nursing students understand and overcome such attitudes.

  10. Technologies for HIV prevention and care: challenges for health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksud, Ivia; Fernandes, Nilo Martinez; Filgueiras, Sandra Lucia

    2015-09-01

    This article aims to consider some relevant challenges to the provision of "new prevention technologies" in health services in a scenario where the "advances" in the global response to AIDS control are visible. We take as material for analysis the information currently available on the HIV post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), treatment as prevention (TASP) and over the counter. The methodology consisted of the survey and analysis of the Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde (BVS: MEDLINE, LILACS, WHOLIS, PAHO, SciELO) articles that addressed the issue of HIV prevention and care in the context of so-called new prevention technologies. The results of the studies show that there is assistance on the ground of clinics for the treatment of disease responses, but there are several challenges related to the sphere of prevention. The articles list some challenges regarding to management, organization of services and the attention given by health professionals to users. The current context shows evidence of the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy in reducing the risk of HIV transmission, but the challenges for the provision of preventive technologies in health services permeate health professionals and users in their individual dimensions and health services in organizational and structural dimension. Interventions should be made available in a context of community mobilization; there should be no pressure on people to make HIV testing, antiretroviral treatment or for prevention. In the management is responsible for the training of health professionals to inform, clarify and make available to users, partners and family information about the new antiretroviral use strategies.

  11. Enhanced Personal Contact With HIV Patients Improves Retention in Primary Care: A Randomized Trial in 6 US HIV Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Lytt I.; Giordano, Thomas P.; Marks, Gary; Wilson, Tracey E.; Craw, Jason A.; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Keruly, Jeanne C.; Rodriguez, Allan E.; Malitz, Faye; Moore, Richard D.; Bradley-Springer, Lucy A.; Holman, Susan; Rose, Charles E.; Girde, Sonali; Sullivan, Meg; Metsch, Lisa R.; Saag, Michael; Mugavero, Michael J.; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn; Ferreira, Cintia; Koppelman, Lisa; McDoom, Maya; Naisteter, Michal; Osella, Karina; Ruiz, Glory; Skolnik, Paul; Sullivan, Meg; Gibbs-Cohen, Sophia; Desrivieres, Elana; Frederick, Mayange; Gravesande, Kevin; Holman, Susan; Johnson, Harry; Taylor, Tonya; Wilson, Tracey; Cheever, Laura; Malitz, Faye; Mills, Robert; Craw, Jason; Gardner, Lytt; Girde, Sonali; Marks, Gary; Batey, Scott; Gaskin, Stephanie; Mugavero, Michael; Murphree, Jill; Raper, Jim; Saag, Michael; Thogaripally, Suneetha; Willig, James; Zinski, Anne; Arya, Monisha; Bartholomew, David; Biggs, Tawanna; Budhwani, Hina; Davila, Jessica; Giordano, Tom; Miertschin, Nancy; Payne, Shapelle; Slaughter, William; Jenckes, Mollie; Keruly, Jeanne; McCray, Angie; McGann, Mary; Moore, Richard; Otterbein, Melissa; Zhou, Liming; Garzon, Carolyn; Jean-Simon, Jesline; Mercogliano, Kathy; Metsch, Lisa; Rodriguez, Allan; Saint-Jean, Gilbert; Shika, Marvin; Bradley-Springer, Lucy; Corwin, Marla

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to determine whether enhanced personal contact with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients across time improves retention in care compared with existing standard of care (SOC) practices, and whether brief skills training improves retention beyond enhanced contact. Methods. The study, conducted at 6 HIV clinics in the United States, included 1838 patients with a recent history of inconsistent clinic attendance, and new patients. Each clinic randomized participants to 1 of 3 arms and continued to provide SOC practices to all enrollees: enhanced contact with interventionist (EC) (brief face-to-face meeting upon returning for care visit, interim visit call, appointment reminder calls, missed visit call); EC + skills (organization, problem solving, and communication skills); or SOC only. The intervention was delivered by project staff for 12 months following randomization. The outcomes during that 12-month period were (1) percentage of participants attending at least 1 primary care visit in 3 consecutive 4-month intervals (visit constancy), and (2) proportion of kept/scheduled primary care visits (visit adherence). Results. Log-binomial risk ratios comparing intervention arms against the SOC arm demonstrated better outcomes in both the EC and EC + skills arms (visit constancy: risk ratio [RR], 1.22 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.09–1.36] and 1.22 [95% CI, 1.09–1.36], respectively; visit adherence: RR, 1.08 [95% CI, 1.05–1.11] and 1.06 [95% CI, 1.02–1.09], respectively; all Ps < .01). Intervention effects were observed in numerous patient subgroups, although they were lower in patients reporting unmet needs or illicit drug use. Conclusions. Enhanced contact with patients improved retention in HIV primary care compared with existing SOC practices. A brief patient skill-building component did not improve retention further. Additional intervention elements may be needed for patients reporting illicit

  12. High rate of unplanned pregnancy in the context of integrated family planning and HIV care services in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Oladele Vincent; Ajayi, Anthony Idowu; Moyaki, Mayowa Gabriel; Goon, Daniel Ter; Avramovic, Gordana; Lambert, John

    2018-02-27

    Integration of family planning services into HIV care was implemented in South Africa as a core strategy aimed at reducing unintended pregnancies among childbearing women living with HIV. However, it is unclear whether this strategy has made any significant impact at the population level. This paper describes the prevalence and correlates of self-reported unplanned pregnancy among HIV-infected parturient women attending three large maternity centres in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. We also compare unplanned pregnancy rates between HIV-infected parturient women already in care (who have benefitted from services' integration) and newly diagnosed parturient women (who have not benefitted from services' integration). Drawing from the baseline data of the East London Prospective Cohort Study (ELPCS), data of 594 parturient women living with HIV in the Eastern Cape were included. Chi-square statistics and binary logistics regression were employed to determine the correlates of unplanned pregnancy among the cohort. The prevalence of unplanned pregnancy was 71% (n = 422) with a higher rate among parturient women newly diagnosed during the index pregnancy (87%). Unplanned pregnancy was significantly associated with younger age, single status, HIV diagnosis at booking, high parity and previous abortion. Women who reported unplanned pregnancy were more likely to book late and have lower CD4 counts. After adjusting for confounding variables, having one child and five to seven children (AOR = 2.2; CI = 1.3-3.1), age less than 21 years (AOR = 3.3; CI = 1.1-9.8), late booking after 27 weeks (AOR = 2.7; CI = 1.5-5.0), not married (AOR = 4.3; CI = 2.7-6.8) and HIV diagnosis at booking (AOR = 3.0; CI = 1.6-5.8) were the significant correlates of unplanned pregnancy in the cohort. Unplanned pregnancy remains high overall among parturient women living with HIV in the region, however, with significant reduction among those who were

  13. Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-11-26

    In this podcast, CDC’s Dr. Steve Nesheim discusses perinatal HIV transmission, including the importance of preventing HIV among women, preconception care, and timely HIV testing of the mother. Dr. Nesheim also introduces the revised curriculum Eliminating Perinatal HIV Transmission intended for faculty of OB/GYN and pediatric residents and nurse midwifery students.  Created: 11/26/2012 by Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention.   Date Released: 11/26/2012.

  14. An assessment of the supply chain management for HIV/AIDS care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4Barcelona Centre for International Health Research, Barcelona, Spain ... To cope with the stock-out situation CTCs staff had to stop testing for HIV, substitute the ..... NACP (2009) Quality improvement for HIV/AIDS care and treatment in Tanzania. A Report on a. Baseline Assessment of 553 Primary Health Care Facilities.

  15. Information, motivation, and behavioral skills for early pre-ART engagement in HIV care among patients entering clinical care in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Laramie R; Amico, K Rivet; Shuper, Paul A; Christie, Sarah; Fisher, William A; Cornman, Deborah H; Doshi, Monika; MacDonald, Susan; Pillay, Sandy; Fisher, Jeffrey D

    2013-01-01

    Little is known regarding factors implicated in early engagement and retention in HIV care among individuals not yet eligible for antiretroviral therapy (pre-ART) in sub-Saharan Africa. Identifying such factors is critical for supporting retention in pre-ART clinical care to ensure timely ART initiation and optimize long-term health outcomes. We assessed patients' pre-ART HIV care-related information, motivation, and behavioral skills among newly diagnosed ART-ineligible patients, initiating care in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The survey was interviewer-administered to eligible patients, who were aged 18 years or older, newly entering care (diagnosed within the last six-months), and ineligible for ART (CD4 count > 200 cells/mm(3)) in one of four primary care clinical sites. Self-reported information, motivation, and behavioral skills specific to retention in pre-ART HIV-care were characterized by categorizing responses into those reflecting potential strengths and those reflective of potential deficits. Information, motivation, and behavioral skills deficits sufficiently prevalent in the overall sample (i.e.,≥30% prevalent) were identified as areas in need of specific attention through intervention efforts adapted to the clinic level. Gender-based differences were also evaluated. A total of 288 patients (75% female) completed structured interviews. Across the sample, eight information, eight motivation, and eight behavioral skills deficit areas were identified as sufficiently prevalent to warrant specific targeted attention. Gender differences did not emerge. The deficits in pre-ART HIV care-related information, motivation, and behavioral skills that were identified suggest that efforts to improve accurate information on immune function and HIV disease are needed, as is accurate information regarding HIV treatment and transmission risk prior to ART initiation. Additional efforts to facilitate the development of social support, including positive interactions

  16. The Effect of HIV-Centered Obstetric Care on Perinatal Outcomes Among a Cohort of Women Living With HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Anna M; DeVita, Julia M; Ogburu-Ogbonnaya, Amartha; Peterson, Andrea; Lazenby, Gweneth B

    2017-08-01

    Elimination of perinatal transmission is possible but limited by missed care opportunities. Our objective was to investigate the effects of HIV-centered obstetric care (HCC) on missed care opportunities and perinatal HIV transmission in 2 obstetric cohorts at our institution from 2000 to 2014. This was a retrospective cohort study of HIV-exposed mother-infant pairs delivering from 2000 to 2014, analyzed according to SQUIRE 2.0 (Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence) guidelines. Before 2009, women received care in high-risk obstetric care (HRC); subsequently, an HCC service was established. Women who received HRC vs HCC obstetric care were compared to determine differences in maternal and neonatal outcomes. Continuous variables were compared with Student t test and Wilcoxon rank sum tests. Categorical variables were compared using χ test and Fisher exact test. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine factors associated with outcomes of interest. Over 14 years, 161 women delivered 217 HIV-exposed infants; 78 (36%) women received HCC. Two perinatal HIV transmissions (1.5%) occurred in HRC group compared with none in the HCC group (P = 0.3). Women in HCC were more likely to have HIV RNA viral load <1000 copies per milliliter at delivery (12% vs 26%, P = 0.02), have a contraception plan before delivery (93% vs 60%, P < 0.001), return for postpartum evaluation (80% vs 63%, P = 0.01), and have undetectable HIV viral load postpartum (50 copies per milliliter vs 2067, P < 0.0001). HCC can potentially reduce the risk of perinatal HIV transmission by improving maternal virologic control during pregnancy and postpartum and increasing postpartum contraceptive use.

  17. Clinician stress and patient-clinician communication in HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanawongsa, Neda; Korthuis, P Todd; Saha, Somnath; Roter, Debra; Moore, Richard D; Sharp, Victoria L; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2012-12-01

    Clinician stress is common, but few studies have examined its relationship with communication behaviors. To investigate associations between clinician stress and patient-clinician communication in primary HIV care. Observational study. Thirty-three primary HIV clinicians and 350 HIV-infected adult, English-speaking patients at three U.S. HIV specialty clinic sites. Clinicians completed the Perceived Stress Scale, and we categorized scores in tertiles. Audio-recordings of patient-clinician encounters were coded using the Roter Interaction Analysis System. Patients rated the quality of their clinician's communication and overall quality of medical care. We used regression with generalized estimating equations to examine associations between clinician stress and communication outcomes, controlling for clinician gender, clinic site, and visit length. Among the 33 clinicians, 70 % were physicians, 64 % were women, 67 % were non-Hispanic white, and the mean stress score was 3.9 (SD 2.4, range 0-8). Among the 350 patients, 34 % were women, 55 % were African American, 23 % were non-Hispanic white, 16 % were Hispanic, and 30 % had been with their clinicians >5 years. Verbal dominance was higher for moderate-stress clinicians (ratio=1.93, pstress clinicians (ratio=1.76, p=0.01), compared with low-stress clinicians (ratio 1.45). More medical information was offered by moderate-stress clinicians (145.5 statements, p stress clinicians (125.9 statements, p=0.02), compared with low-stress clinicians (97.8 statements). High-stress clinicians offered less psychosocial information (17.1 vs. 19.3, p=0.02), and patients of high-stress clinicians rated their quality of care as excellent less frequently than patients of low-stress clinicians (49.5 % vs. 66.9 %, pstress clinicians offered more partnering statements (27.7 vs. 18.2, p=0.04) and positive affect (3.88 vs. 3.78 score, p=0.02) than low-stress clinicians, and their patients' ratings did not differ. Although higher stress was

  18. Role of substance use in HIV care cascade outcomes among people who inject drugs in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrisov, Bulat; Lunze, Karsten; Cheng, Debbie M; Blokhina, Elena; Gnatienko, Natalia; Quinn, Emily; Bridden, Carly; Walley, Alexander Y; Bryant, Kendall J; Lioznov, Dmitry; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2017-12-04

    Engaging people who drink alcohol or inject drugs in HIV care can be challenging, particularly in Eastern Europe. Healthcare facilities in Russia are organized by specialty; therefore linking patients from addiction care to HIV hospitals has been difficult. The HIV care cascade outlines stages of HIV care (e.g., linkage to care, prescribed antiretroviral therapy [ART], and achieving HIV viral suppression). We hypothesized that unhealthy alcohol use, injection drug use, and opioid craving are associated with unfavorable HIV care cascade outcomes. We analyzed data from a cohort (n = 249) of HIV-positive Russians who have been in addiction hospital treatment in the past year and had a lifetime history of injection drug use (IDU). We evaluated the association between unhealthy alcohol use (AUDIT score > 7 [both hazardous drinking and dependence]), past-month injection drug use (IDU), and opioid craving (visual analogue scale from 1 to 100) with HIV care cascade outcomes. The primary outcome was linkage to HIV care within 12 months. Other outcomes were prescription of ART (secondary) and achievement of undetectable HIV viral load (HVL < 500 copies/mL) within 12 months (exploratory); the latter was analyzed on a subset in which HVL was measured (n = 48). We assessed outcomes via medical record review (linkage, ART) and serum tests (HVL). To examine the primary outcome, we used multiple logistic regression models controlling for potential confounders. Among 249 study participants, unhealthy alcohol use (n = 148 [59%]) and past-month IDU (n = 130 [52%]) were common. The mean opioid craving score was 49 (SD: 38). We were unable to detect significant associations between the independent variables (i.e., unhealthy alcohol use, IDU and opioid craving) and any HIV care cascade outcomes in unadjusted and adjusted analyses. In this cohort of HIV-positive Russians with a history of IDU, individual substance use factors were not significantly associated with achieving

  19. 78 FR 25304 - Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-30

    ..., USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), Including On-Site Leased Workers From Source... Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology), including on- site leased... of February 2013, Siemens Medical Solutions, USA, Inc., Oncology Care Systems (Radiation Oncology...

  20. Provider-initiated HIV testing in rural Haiti: low rate of missed opportunities for diagnosis of HIV in a primary care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freedberg Kenneth A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As HIV treatment is scaled-up in resource-poor settings, the timely identification of persons with HIV infection remains an important challenge. Most people with HIV are unaware of their status, and those who are often present late in the course of their illness. Free-standing voluntary counseling and testing sites often have poor uptake of testing. We aimed to evaluate a 'provider-initiated' HIV testing strategy in a primary care clinic in rural resource-poor Haiti by reviewing the number of visits made to clinic before an HIV test was performed in those who were ultimately found to have HIV infection. In collaboration with the Haitian Ministry of Health, a non-governmental organization (Partners In Health scaled up HIV care in central Haiti by reinforcing primary care clinics, instituting provider-initiated HIV testing and by providing HIV treatment in the context of primary medical care, free of charge to patients. Among a cohort of people with HIV infection, we assessed retrospectively for delays in or 'missed opportunities' for diagnosis of HIV by the providers in one clinic. Of the first 117 patients diagnosed with HIV in one clinic, 100 (85% were diagnosed at the first medical encounter. Median delay in diagnosis for the remaining 17 was only 62 days (IQR 19 – 122; range 1 – 272. There was no statistical difference in CD4 cell count between those with and without a delay. 3787 HIV tests were performed in the period reviewed. Provider-initiated testing was associated with high volume uptake of HIV testing and minimal delay between first medical encounter and diagnosis of HIV infection. In scale up of HIV care, provider-initiated HIV testing at primary care clinics can be a successful strategy to identify patients with HIV infection.

  1. Prevalence and predictors of late presentation for HIV care in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomundam, H N; Tesfay, A R; Mushipe, S A; Mosina, M B; Boshielo, C T; Nyambi, H T; Larsen, A; Cheyip, M; Getahun, A; Pillay, Y

    2017-11-27

    Many people living with HIV in South Africa (SA) are not aware of their seropositive status and are diagnosed late during the course of HIV infection. These individuals do not obtain the full benefit from available HIV care and treatment services. To describe the prevalence of late presentation for HIV care among newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals and evaluate sociodemographic variables associated with late presentation for HIV care in three high-burden districts of SA. We used data abstracted from records of 8 138 newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals in 35 clinics between 1 June 2014 and 31 March 2015 to determine the prevalence of late presentation among newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals in selected high-prevalence health districts. Individuals were categorised as 'moderately late', 'very late' or 'extremely late' presenters based on specified criteria. Descriptive analysis was performed to measure the prevalence of late presentation, and multivariate regression analysis was conducted to identify variables independently associated with extremely late presentation. Overall, 79% of the newly diagnosed cases presented for HIV care late in the course of HIV infection (CD4+ count ≤500 cells/µL and/or AIDS-defining illness in World Health Organization (WHO) stage III/IV), 19% presented moderately late (CD4+ count 351 - 500 cells/µL and WHO clinical stage I or II), 27% presented very late (CD4+ count 201 - 350 cells/µL or WHO clinical stage III), and 33% presented extremely late (CD4+ count ≤200 cells/µL and/or WHO clinical stage IV) for HIV care. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that males, non-pregnant women, individuals aged >30 years, and those accessing care in facilities located in townships and inner cities were more likely to present late for HIV care. The majority of newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals in the three high-burden districts (Gert Sibande, uThukela and City of Johannesburg) presented for HIV care late in the

  2. Prevalence and predictors of late presentation for HIV care in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomundam, H N; Tesfay, A R; Mushipe, S A; Mosina, M B; Boshielo, C T; Nyambi, H T; Larsen, A; Cheyip, M; Getahun, A; Pillay, Y

    2018-01-01

    Background Many people living with HIV in South Africa (SA) are not aware of their seropositive status and are diagnosed late during the course of HIV infection. These individuals do not obtain the full benefit from available HIV care and treatment services. Objectives To describe the prevalence of late presentation for HIV care among newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals and evaluate sociodemographic variables associated with late presentation for HIV care in three high-burden districts of SA. Methods We used data abstracted from records of 8 138 newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals in 35 clinics between 1 June 2014 and 31 March 2015 to determine the prevalence of late presentation among newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals in selected high-prevalence health districts. Individuals were categorised as ‘moderately late’, ‘very late’ or ‘extremely late’ presenters based on specified criteria. Descriptive analysis was performed to measure the prevalence of late presentation, and multivariate regression analysis was conducted to identify variables independently associated with extremely late presentation. Results Overall, 79% of the newly diagnosed cases presented for HIV care late in the course of HIV infection (CD4+ count ≤500 cells/ μL and/or AIDS-defining illness in World Health Organization (WHO) stage III/IV), 19% presented moderately late (CD4+ count 351 – 500 cells/μL and WHO clinical stage I or II), 27% presented very late (CD4+ count 201 – 350 cells/μL or WHO clinical stage III), and 33% presented extremely late (CD4+ count ≤200 cells/μL and/or WHO clinical stage IV) for HIV care. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that males, non-pregnant women, individuals aged >30 years, and those accessing care in facilities located in townships and inner cities were more likely to present late for HIV care. Conclusions The majority of newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals in the three high-burden districts (Gert Sibande, u

  3. Supportive and palliative care for patients with chronic mental illness including dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd-Williams, Mari; Abba, Katharine; Crowther, Jacqueline

    2014-09-01

    People with preexisting mental illness are known to have difficulty accessing healthcare services including palliative care and people with dementia have similar issues accessing palliative care. The review addressed the time period from January 2013 to March 2014. There were few articles addressing issues for palliative and supportive care for patients with preexisting mental health issues. The main factor that would improve care is interdisciplinary working between mental healthcare teams and palliative care teams. In contrast, there were many published articles on the palliative and supportive care needs for people with dementia. These articles included consensus statements, models of care; studies of why models of care, for example Advanced Care Planning were not being implemented; and carer reports of care in the last year of life. Urgent research is required as to how support for people with preexisting mental illness who require palliative care can be improved--excellent liaison between mental health and palliative care teams is essential. There is much research on palliative care needs for people with dementia but an apparent lack of innovative approaches to care including care of people within their family home.

  4. Types and delivery of emotional support to promote linkage and engagement in HIV care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook CL

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Christa L Cook,1 Shantrel Canidate,2 Nicole Ennis,3 Robert L Cook4 1Department of Family, Community, and Health System Science, College of Nursing, 2Social and Behavioral Science, College of Public Health and Health Profession, 3Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, College of Public Health and Health Professions, 4Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health and Health Professions and College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Purpose: Despite recommendations for early entry into human immunodeficiency virus (HIV care, many people diagnosed with HIV delay seeking care. Multiple types of social support (ie, cognitive, emotional, and tangible are often needed for someone to transition into HIV care, but a lack of emotional support at diagnosis may be the reason why some people fail to stay engaged in care. Thus, the purpose of this study was to identify how people living with HIV conceptualized emotional support needs and delivery at diagnosis. Method: We conducted a secondary analysis of qualitative data from 27 people living with HIV, many of whom delayed entry into HIV care. Results: Participants described their experiences seeking care after an HIV diagnosis and identified components of emotional support that aided entry into care – identification, connection, and navigational presence. Many participants stated that these types of support were ideally delivered by peers with HIV. Conclusion: In clinical practice, providers often use an HIV diagnosis as an opportunity to educate patients about HIV prevention and access to services. However, this type of social support may not facilitate engagement in care if emotional support needs are not met. Keywords: linkage to care, engagement in care, social support, qualitative

  5. Gender-based violence and HIV across the life course: adopting a sexual rights framework to include older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bergen; Crockett, Cailin

    2015-11-01

    It is widely known that older women are at lesser risk for sexual violence than younger women, but current inattention to older women in the gender-based violence (GBV) field has minimized the experiences of older women survivors at great detriment to their health and rights. For example, health providers seldom ask older women about their sexual activity and relationships, a neglect that leads to older women being excluded from necessary HIV testing and care as well as support services for abuse. This oversight is increasingly worrisome given the rise in new HIV infections among adults age 50 and older in recent years, with the majority of transmissions stemming from individuals unaware of their HIV-positive status. Building on sexual rights scholarship, this paper argues for an approach to public health interventions for GBV and HIV that acknowledges older women--their sexuality, sexual agency, and activity-- so that health providers and advocates acknowledge and serve older survivors. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. An epidemiological modelling study to estimate the composition of HIV-positive populations including migrants from endemic settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakagawa, F; Delpech, V; Albert, J

    2017-01-01

    of these people, 24 600 (15 000-36 200) were estimated to be undiagnosed; this number has remained stable over the last decade. An estimated 32% of the total undiagnosed population had CD4 cell count less than 350 cells/μl in 2013. Twenty-five and 23% of black African men and women heterosexuals living with HIV......OBJECTIVE: Migrants account for a significant number of people living with HIV in Europe, and it is important to fully consider this population in national estimates. Using a novel approach with the UK as an example, we present key public health measures of the HIV epidemic, taking into account...... diagnoses, number of deaths, CD4 cell count at diagnosis, as well as time of arrival into the UK for migrants and the annual number of people receiving care were used. RESULTS: An estimated 106 400 (90% plausibility range: 88 700-124 600) people were living with HIV in the UK in 2013. Twenty-three percent...

  7. Factors associated with delayed entry into HIV medical care after HIV diagnosis in a resource-limited setting: Data from a cohort study in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Alvarez-Uria

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies from sub-Saharan Africa have shown that a substantial proportion of patients diagnosed with HIV enter into HIV medical care late. However, data from low or middle-income countries outside Africa are scarce. In this study, we investigated risk factors associated with delayed entry into care stratified by gender in a large cohort study in India. 7701 patients were diagnosed with HIV and 5410 entered into care within three months of HIV diagnosis. Nearly 80% entered into care within a year, but most patients who did not enter into care within a year remained lost to follow up or died. Patient with risk factors related to having a low socio-economic status (poverty, being homeless, belonging to a disadvantaged community and illiteracy were more likely to enter into care late. In addition, male gender and being asymptomatic at the moment of HIV infection were factors associated with delayed entry into care. Substantial gender differences were found. Younger age was found to be associated with delayed entry in men, but not in women. Widows and unmarried men were more likely to enter into care within three months. Women belonging to disadvantaged communities or living far from a town were more likely to enter into care late. The results of this study highlight the need to improve the linkage between HIV diagnosis and HIV treatment in India. HIV programmes should monitor patients diagnosed with HIV until they engage in HIV medical care, especially those at increased risk of attrition.

  8. Nurse led home-based care for people with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Elizabeth M; Zani, Babalwa; Esterhuizen, Tonya M; Young, Taryn

    2018-03-27

    Home-based care is used in many countries to increase quality of life and limit hospital stay, particularly where public health services are overburdened. Home-based care objectives for HIV/AIDS can include medical care, delivery of antiretroviral treatment and psychosocial support. This review assesses the effects of home-based nursing on morbidity in people infected with HIV/AIDS. The trials studied are in HIV positive adults and children, regardless of sex or setting and all randomised controlled. Home-based care provided by qualified nurses was compared with hospital or health-facility based treatment. The following electronic databases were searched from January 1980 to March 2015: AIDSearch, CINAHL, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO/LIT, with an updated search in November 2016. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts from the electronic search based on the study design, interventions and types of participant. For all selected abstracts, full text articles were obtained. The final study selection was determined with use of an eligibility form. Data extraction was performed independently from assessment of risk of bias. The results were analysed by narrative synthesis, in order to be able to obtain relevant effect measures plus 95% confidence intervals. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria. The trial size varied from 37 to 238 participants. Only one trial was conducted in children. Five studies were conducted in the USA and two in China. Four studies looked at home-based adherence support and the rest at providing home-based psychosocial support. Reported adherence to antiretroviral drugs improved with nurse-led home-based care but did not affect viral load. Psychiatric nurse support in those with existing mental health conditions improved mental health and depressive symptoms. Home-based psychological support impacted on HIV stigma, worry and physical functioning and in certain cases depressive symptoms

  9. Partner testing, linkage to care, and HIV-free survival in a program to prevent parent-to-child transmission of HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmone, Andy; Bomai, Korai; Bongi, Wayaki; Frank, Tarua Dale; Dalepa, Huleve; Loifa, Betty; Kiromat, Mobumo; Das, Sarthak; Franke, Molly F.

    2014-01-01

    Background To eliminate new pediatric HIV infections, interventions that facilitate adherence, including those that minimize stigma, enhance social support, and mitigate the influence of poverty, will likely be required in addition to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined the relationship between partner testing and infant outcome in a prevention of parent-to-child transmission of HIV program, which included a family-centered case management approach and a supportive environment for partner disclosure and testing. Design We analyzed routinely collected data for women and infants who enrolled in the parent-to-child transmission of HIV program at Goroka Family Clinic, Eastern Highlands Provincial Hospital, Papua New Guinea, from 2007 through 2011. Results Two hundred and sixty five women were included for analysis. Of these, 226 (85%) had a partner, 127 (56%) of whom had a documented HIV test. Of the 102 HIV-infected partners, 81 (79%) had been linked to care. In adjusted analyses, we found a significantly higher risk of infant death, infant HIV infection, or loss to follow-up among mother–infant pairs in which the mother reported having no partner or a partner who was not tested or had an unknown testing status. In a second multivariable analysis, infants born to women with more time on ART or who enrolled in the program in later years experienced greater HIV-free survival. Conclusions In a program with a patient-oriented and family-centered approach to prevent vertical HIV transmission, the majority of women's partners had a documented HIV test and, if positive, linkage to care. Having a tested partner was associated with program retention and HIV-free survival for infants. Programs aiming to facilitate diagnosis disclosure, partner testing, and linkage to care may contribute importantly to the elimination of pediatric HIV. PMID:25172429

  10. What role can gender-transformative programming for men play in increasing men's HIV testing and engagement in HIV care and treatment in South Africa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Paul J; Colvin, Chris; Peacock, Dean; Dworkin, Shari L

    2016-11-01

    Men are less likely than women to test for HIV and engage in HIV care and treatment. We conducted in-depth interviews with men participating in One Man Can (OMC) - a rights-based gender equality and health programme intervention conducted in rural Limpopo and Eastern Cape, South Africa - to explore masculinity-related barriers to HIV testing/care/treatment and how participation in OMC impacted on these. Men who participated in OMC reported an increased capability to overcome masculinity-related barriers to testing/care/treatment. They also reported increased ability to express vulnerability and discuss HIV openly with others, which led to greater willingness to be tested for HIV and receive HIV care and treatment for those who were living with HIV. Interventions that challenge masculine norms and promote gender equality (i.e. gender-transformative interventions) represent a promising new approach to address men's barriers to testing, care and treatment.

  11. The HIV Care Continuum among Female Sex Workers: A Key Population in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Elizabeth Lancaster

    Full Text Available The HIV care continuum among female sex workers (FSW, a key population, has not been well characterized, especially within the generalized epidemics of sub-Saharan Africa. This was the first study to characterize the HIV care continuum among FSW in Lilongwe, Malawi.From July through September 2014, we used venue-based sampling to enroll 200 adult FSW in Lilongwe, Malawi into a cross-sectional evaluation assessing HIV care continuum outcomes. Seropositive FSW, identified using HIV rapid testing, received rapid CD4 counts in addition to viral loads using dried blood spots. We calculated proportions of HIV-infected FSW who had history of care, were on ART, and had suppressed viral load and we used Poisson regression to estimate the associations of demographic characteristics and transmission risk behaviors with each outcome.HIV seroprevalence was 69% (n = 138. Among all FSW the median age was 24 years (IQR: 22-28. Among the 20% who were newly diagnosed and reported previously testing negative, the median time since last HIV test was 11 months (interquartile range: 3-17. The majority (69% of HIV-infected FSW had a history of HIV care, 52% reported current ART use, and 45% were virally suppressed. Of the FSW who reported current ART use, 86% were virally suppressed. Transmission risk behaviors were not associated with continuum outcomes.FSW in Lilongwe were predominately young and have a high HIV prevalence. Only half of HIV-infected FSW reported current ART use, but the majority of those on ART were virally suppressed. To reduce ongoing transmission and improve health outcomes, increased HIV testing, care engagement, and ART coverage is urgently needed among FSW. Universal testing and treatment strategies for all FSW in Malawi must be strongly considered.

  12. HIV/AIDS knowledge and occupational risk in primary care health workers from Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Baltica Cabieses; Lagunas, Lilian Ferrer; Villarroel, Luis Antonio; Acosta, Rosina Cianelli; Miner, Sarah; Silva, Margarita Bernales

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between knowledge level and occupational risk exposure to HIV/AIDS in primary care health workers. Methodology Analytical cross-sectional study. 720 health workers from Santiago answered a survey about HIV/AIDS that included: knowledge level (appropriate, inappropriate), occupational risk (with or without risk), and control variables (age, gender, health center, education and marital status). Descriptive and association analysis were performed. Odds Ratio (OR) was estimated through simple and multiple regressions logistics. Results 58.7% of the participants reported HIV occupational risk. 63.8% of the participants from the exposed group reported an appropriate level of knowledge, versus 36.1% of the non-exposed group (Adjusted OR of 3.1, IC95%OR: 2.0-4.8, p<0.0001). Technicians and cleaning staff reported a lower proportion of appropriate level of knowledge compared to the employees with college education (p<0.0001). Conclusion The level of HIV/AID occupational risk is directly associated with the level of knowledge of the disease. PMID:25284913

  13. A systematic review of task- shifting for HIV treatment and care in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Nathan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shortages of human resources for health (HRH have severely hampered the rollout of antiretroviral therapy (ART in sub-Saharan Africa. Current rollout models are hospital- and physician-intensive. Task shifting, or delegating tasks performed by physicians to staff with lower-level qualifications, is considered a means of expanding rollout in resource-poor or HRH-limited settings. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review. Medline, the Cochrane library, the Social Science Citation Index, and the South African National Health Research Database were searched with the following terms: task shift*, balance of care, non-physician clinicians, substitute health care worker, community care givers, primary healthcare teams, cadres, and nurs* HIV. We mined bibliographies and corresponded with authors for further results. Grey literature was searched online, and conference proceedings searched for abstracts. Results We found 2960 articles, of which 84 were included in the core review. 51 reported outcomes, including research from 10 countries in sub-Saharan Africa. The most common intervention studied was the delegation of tasks (especially initiating and monitoring HAART from doctors to nurses and other non-physician clinicians. Five studies showed increased access to HAART through expanded clinical capacity; two concluded task shifting is cost effective; 9 showed staff equal or better quality of care; studies on non-physician clinician agreement with physician decisions was mixed, with the majority showing good agreement. Conclusions Task shifting is an effective strategy for addressing shortages of HRH in HIV treatment and care. Task shifting offers high-quality, cost-effective care to more patients than a physician-centered model. The main challenges to implementation include adequate and sustainable training, support and pay for staff in new roles, the integration of new members into healthcare teams, and the compliance of

  14. Anaemia among HIV infected children attending care and treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Anaemia is common among HIV infected patients; causes of anaemia in these patients are multifactorial. Anemia is noted as one of important predictors of outcome in HIV infected patients. Tis study was carried out to determine the prevalence of anaemia among HIV infected children attending HIV clinic at ...

  15. Scaling a waterfall: a meta-ethnography of adolescent progression through the stages of HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shannon; Renju, Jenny; Ghilardi, Ludovica; Wringe, Alison

    2017-09-15

    Observational studies have shown considerable attrition among adolescents living with HIV across the "cascade" of HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa, leading to higher mortality rates compared to HIV-infected adults or children. We synthesized evidence from qualitative studies on factors that promote or undermine engagement with HIV services among adolescents living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. We systematically searched five databases for studies published between 2005 and 2016 that met pre-defined inclusion criteria. We used a meta-ethnographic approach to identify first, second and third order constructs from eligible studies, and applied a socio-ecological framework to situate our results across different levels of influence, and in relation to each stage of the HIV cascade. We identified 3089 citations, of which 24 articles were eligible for inclusion. Of these, 17 were from Southern Africa while 11 were from Eastern Africa. 6 explored issues related to HIV testing, 11 explored treatment adherence, and 7 covered multiple stages of the cascade. Twelve third-order constructs emerged to explain adolescents' engagement in HIV care. Stigma was the most salient factor impeding adolescents' interactions with HIV care over the past decade. Self-efficacy to adapt to life with HIV and support from family or social networks were critical enablers supporting uptake and retention in HIV care and treatment programmes. Provision of adolescent-friendly services and health systems issues, such as the availability of efficient, confidential and comfortable services, were also reported to drive sustained care engagement. Individual-level factors, including past illness experiences, identifying mechanisms to manage pill-taking in social situations, financial (in)stability and the presence/absence of future aspirations also shaped adolescents HIV care engagement. Adolescents' initial and ongoing use of HIV care was frequently undermined by individual-level issues; although family

  16. Pregnancy and linkage to care among women diagnosed with HIV infection in 61 CDC-funded health departments in the United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzHarris, Lauren F; Hollis, Natasha D; Nesheim, Steven R; Greenspan, Julia L; Dunbar, Erica K

    2017-07-01

    Timely linkage to HIV care (LTC) following an HIV diagnosis is especially important for pregnant women with HIV to prevent perinatal transmission and improve maternal health. However, limited data are available on LTC among U.S. pregnant women. Our analysis aimed to identify HIV diagnoses among childbearing age (CBA) women (15-44 years old) by pregnancy status and to compare LTC of HIV-infected pregnant women to HIV-infected non-pregnant women. We analyzed 2013 CDC-funded HIV testing data from 61 health departments and 151 directly funded community-based organizations among CBA women. LTC includes linkage at any time after an HIV diagnosis and within 90 days after HIV diagnosis. Pearson's chi-square was used to compare LTC of pregnant and non-pregnant women. Data were analyzed using SAS v9.3. Among the 1,379,860 HIV testing events among CBA women in 2013, 0.3% (n = 3690) were HIV-positive. Among all HIV-positive diagnoses with an available pregnancy status (n = 1987), 7%, (n = 138) were pregnant. Among women with pregnancy status data, LTC any time after an HIV-positive diagnosis was 73.2% for pregnant women and 60.7% for non-pregnant women. LTC within 90 days was 71.7% for pregnant women and 56.2% for non-pregnant women. Pregnancy was associated with LTC any time (p < 0.01) and within 90 days of diagnosis (p < 0.01). Compared with non-pregnant women, a higher proportion of pregnant women with HIV were linked to care overall, and linked within 90 days. Pregnancy appears to facilitate better LTC, but improvements are needed for women overall and pregnant women specifically.

  17. Encouraging innovation: ten research priorities for achieving universal access to HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment and care in Europe by 2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeff; Laukamm-Josten, Ulrich; Atun, Rifat A

    2008-01-01

    there have been many declarations and strategies addressing HIV/AIDS, today the goal is universal access to HIV/AIDS prevention, treatment, care and support services by 2010. The articles included in this thematic issue of the Central European Journal of Public Health on HIV/AIDS reflect this, while the ten...... priorities listed below are immediate and sometimes innovative research needs in the context of preventing HIV among the most-at-risk populations. While by no means exhaustive, they are intended to point out gaps in existing knowledge and thus serve as inspiration for future research efforts....

  18. Scaling Up HIV Testing in an Academic Emergency Department: An Integrated Testing Model with Rapid Fourth-Generation and Point-of-Care Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signer, Danielle; Peterson, Stephen; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Haider, Somiya; Saheed, Mustapha; Neira, Paula; Wicken, Cassie; Rothman, Richard E

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated two approaches for implementing routine HIV screening in an inner-city, academic emergency department (ED). These approaches differed by staffing model and type of HIV testing technology used. The programmatic outcomes assessed included the total number of tests performed, proportion of newly identified HIV-positive patients, and proportion of newly diagnosed individuals who were linked to care. This study examined specific outcomes for two distinct, successive approaches to implementing HIV screening in an inner-city, academic ED, from July 2012 through June 2013 (Program One), and from August 2013 through July 2014 (Program Two). Program One used a supplementary staff-only HIV testing model with point-of-care (POC) oral testing. Program Two used a triage-integrated, nurse-driven HIV testing model with fourth-generation blood and POC testing, and an expedited linkage-to-care process. During Program One, 6,832 eligible patients were tested for HIV with a rapid POC oral HIV test. Sixteen patients (0.2%) were newly diagnosed with HIV, of whom 13 were successfully linked to care. During Program Two, 8,233 eligible patients were tested for HIV, of whom 3,124 (38.0%) received a blood test and 5,109 (62.0%) received a rapid POC test. Of all patients tested in Program Two, 29 (0.4%) were newly diagnosed with HIV, four of whom had acute infections and 27 of whom were successfully linked to care. We found a statistically significant difference in the proportion of the eligible population tested-8,233 of 49,697 (16.6%) in Program Two and 6,832 of 46,818 (14.6%) in Program One. These differences from Program One to Program Two corresponded to increases in testing volume (n=1,401 tests), number of patients newly diagnosed with HIV (n=13), and proportion of patients successfully linked to care (from 81.0% to 93.0%). Integrating HIV screening into the standard triage workflow resulted in a higher proportion of ED patients being tested for HIV as compared with the

  19. The cascade of HIV care among refugees and nationals in Nakivale Refugee Settlement in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Laughlin, K N; Kasozi, J; Rabideau, D J; Parker, R A; Mulogo, E; Faustin, Z M; Greenwald, K E; Doraiswamy, S; Walensky, R P; Bassett, I V

    2017-08-01

    Refugees living in Uganda come from HIV-endemic countries, and many remain in refugee settlements for over a decade. Our objective was to evaluate the HIV care cascade in Nakivale Refugee Settlement and to assess correlates of linkage to care. We prospectively enrolled individuals accessing clinic-based HIV testing in Nakivale Refugee Settlement from March 2013 to July 2014. Newly HIV-diagnosed clients were followed for 3 months post-diagnosis. Clients underwent a baseline survey. The following outcomes were obtained from HIV clinic registers in Nakivale: clinic attendance ('linkage to HIV care'), CD4 testing, antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility, and ART initiation within 90 days of testing. Descriptive data were reported as frequency with 95% confidence interval (CI) or median with interquartile range (IQR). The impact of baseline variables on linkage to care was assessed with logistic regression models. Of 6850 adult clients tested for HIV, 276 (4%; CI: 3-5%) were diagnosed with HIV infection, 148 (54%; CI: 47-60%) of those were linked to HIV care, 54 (20%; CI: 15-25%) had a CD4 test, 22 (8%; CI: 5-12%) were eligible for ART, and 17 (6%; CI: 3-10%) initiated ART. The proportions of refugees and nationals at each step of the cascade were similar. We identified no significant predictors of linkage to care. Less than a quarter of newly HIV-diagnosed clients completed ART assessment, considerably lower than in other reports from sub-Saharan Africa. Understanding which factors hinder linkage to and engagement in care in the settlement will be important to inform interventions specific for this environment. © 2017 British HIV Association.

  20. Differences in risk behaviors, care utilization, and comorbidities in homeless persons based on HIV status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R David; Dykema, Shana

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional pilot project measured differences by HIV status in chronic health conditions, primary care and emergency department use, and high-risk behaviors of homeless persons through self-report. Using selective random sampling, 244 individuals were recruited from a homeless shelter. The reported HIV prevalence was 6.56% (n = 16), with the odds of HIV higher in persons reporting crack cocaine use. HIV-infected persons were more likely to report a source of regular medical care and less likely to use the emergency department than uninfected persons. Validation of findings through exploration of HIV and health care access in homeless persons is needed to confirm that HIV-infected homeless persons are more likely to have primary care. Distinctions between primary care and specialty HIV care also need to be explored in this context. If findings are consistent, providers who care for the homeless could learn more effective ways to engage homeless patients. Copyright © 2014 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. HIV/AIDS stigma among primary health care workers in Ilorin, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekoni, O O; Owoaje, E T

    2013-03-01

    Stigma and discrimination pose major obstacles to accessing care and support by People Living With HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Information on HIV stigma and discrimination towards PLWHA among Nigerian health workers has mainly been at higher levels of care. This paper examined HIV stigma and discrimination at the primary health care level with the objective of identifying its occurrence and determinants among health workers at this level. A total sample of all health care workers (341) at the primary health care level in Ilorin, Kwara State were surveyed via questionnaire between July and August 2007 to obtain information on their sociodemographic characteristics and the four domains of stigma viz: fear of casual transmission of HIV, shame and blame, discrimination and disclosure. Majority of the respondents had fear of casual transmission of HIV (87.7%), exhibited shame and blame (89.4%), reported observing discrimination against PLWHA by other health workers in their facilities (97.7%) and believed that disclosure of patients HIV status to health workers was imperative. Nurses/midwives were more likely to have fear of casual transmission of HIV and believe that disclosure of HIV status of patients was imperative. Respondents who had received in service training were less likely to exhibit shame and blame (p Stigma occurred in all stigma domains among this group of health workers but previous training was found to play a role in the reduction of shame and blame. Training of health care workers within the context of the various stigma domains is advocated.

  2. Engagement in HIV care and its correlates among people who inject drugs in St Petersburg, Russian Federation and Kohtla-Järve, Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimer, Robert; Usacheva, Nina; Barbour, Russell; Niccolai, Linda M; Uusküla, Anneli; Levina, Olga S

    2017-08-01

    HIV infection and mortality in Eastern Europe are driven by unsafe injection drug use. We sought to compare engagement in care from HIV testing through receipt of antiretroviral treatment among HIV-positive people who inject drugs (PWID) in St Petersburg, Russian Federation (RF) and Kohtla-Järve, Estonia and identify factors associated significantly with failure to progress at each stage of the HIV treatment cascade. Cross-sectional biobehavioral surveys of PWID with an analysis stratified by location-two Russian-speaking regions with similar HIV epidemic histories and current prevalence. Field-based surveys conducted in St Petersburg, RF and Kohtla-Järve, Estonia. We recruited 452 HIV-positive PWID in St Petersburg (November 2012 to June 2013) and 370 HIV-positive PWID in Kohtla-Järve (June-August 2012) using respondent-driven sampling. Participants were tested for antibodies to HIV, and administered a questionnaire focusing on participants' medical care histories. Engagement in care was categorized as a cascade of five transitional steps through six stages, ranging from HIV testing to current receipt of antiretroviral medications. Progress along the cascade was greater in Kohtla Järve (32.7% were receiving antiretroviral medications) than in St Petersburg (9.7%). In both locations, we found the steps with high failure rates were the transitions from being aware of one's HIV diagnosis to being in regular care and initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Factors associated significantly with transition failure in both locations and across steps included high alcohol consumption, variables associated with drug choice and injection frequency and lack of basic medical insurance. The two steps in treatment cascade for HIV-positive PWID in St Petersburg, RF and Kohtla-Järve, Estonia requiring greatest improvement are retention in regular care and initiation of HAART. Both individual behavioral and structural factors are associated with failure to

  3. Factors associated with a clinician's offer of screening HIV-positive patients for sexually transmitted infections, including syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R; Fernando, I; MacDougall, M

    2011-06-01

    This retrospective study assessed whether Quality Improvement Scotland national standards for the sexual health care offered to HIV-positive individuals are being met by the Edinburgh genitourinary (GU) medicine clinic; specifically whether HIV-positive patients are offered: (a) sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening annually and (b) syphilis testing six-monthly. The study also reviewed what factors were associated with a clinician's offer of STI screening and syphilis testing. Of the 509 patients seen within the study period, case notes documented that 64% were offered STI screens, and 69% were offered syphilis testing, results consistent with audits of services elsewhere. Sexual orientation (P offer of STI screening, while gender (P offer of syphilis testing. Our results suggest that one explanation for clinicians failing to offer STI screens and syphilis serology testing is their (implicit) risk assessment that STI testing is not required in individual patients.

  4. Prevalence of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis and utility of microbiological determinants for its diagnosis in a tertiary care center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakur Rajeev

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection continues to be the most important risk factor for the development of central nervous system (CNS cryptococcosis, which in turn is an important contributor to morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. Early diagnosis of such patients is the key to their therapeutic success. Aims: This study was undertaken to find out the prevalence of CNS cryptococcosis and to assess the role of microbiological parameters for its specific diagnosis in HIV-reactive hospitalized patients admitted with meningeal signs in a tertiary care setting. Materials and Methods: A total of 104 patients suspected to be suffering from meningitis/meningoencephalitis were subjected to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis (including India ink preparation, culture by conventional methods and Bactec MGIT 960 system, antigen detection and tests for HIV antibodies by standard laboratory operating procedures. Results: The prevalence of HIV infection in our study group was 12.5% (13/104, while the prevalence of cryptococcal CNS infection in HIV-reactive cohort was 46% (6/13. Additionally, 15.3% (2/13 of the patients from this cohort were positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Conclusions: High prevalence of cryptococcal CNS infections in HIV-infected patients underscores the importance of precise and early microbiological diagnosis for better management of such patients

  5. "I don't want financial support but verbal support." How do caregivers manage children's access to and retention in HIV care in urban Zimbabwe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busza, Joanna; Dauya, Ethel; Bandason, Tsitsi; Mujuru, Hilda; Ferrand, Rashida A

    2014-01-01

    Children living with HIV experience particular challenges in accessing HIV care. Children usually rely on adult caregivers for access to care, including timely diagnosis, initiation of treatment and sustained engagement with HIV services. The aim of this study was to inform the design of a community-based intervention to support caregivers of HIV-positive children to increase children's retention in care as part of a programme introducing decentralized HIV care in primary health facilities. Using an existing conceptual framework, we conducted formative research to identify key local contextual factors affecting children's linkages to HIV care in Harare, Zimbabwe. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 primary caregivers of HIV-positive children aged 6-15 years enrolled at a hospital clinic for at least six months, followed by interviews with nine key informants from five community-based organizations providing adherence support or related services. We identified a range of facilitators and barriers that caregivers experience. Distance to the hospital, cost of transportation, fear of disclosing HIV status to the child or others, unstable family structure and institutional factors such as drug stock-outs, healthcare worker absenteeism and unsympathetic school environments proved the most salient limiting factors. Facilitators included openness within the family, availability of practical assistance and psychosocial support from community members. The proposed decentralization of HIV care will mitigate concerns about distance and transport costs but is likely to be insufficient to ensure children's sustained retention. Following this study, we developed a package of structured home visits by voluntary lay workers to proactively address other determinants such as disclosure within families, access to available services and support through caregivers' social networks. A randomized controlled trial is underway to assess impact on children's retention in care

  6. Evaluation of Routine HIV Opt-Out Screening and Continuum of Care Services Following Entry into Eight Prison Reception Centers--California, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Kimberley D; Eckert, Valorie; Behrends, Czarina N; Wheeler, Charlotte; MacGowan, Robin J; Mohle-Boetani, Janet C

    2016-02-26

    Early diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) improves health outcomes and prevents HIV transmission. Before 2010, HIV testing was available to inmates in the California state prison system upon request. In 2010, the California Correctional Health Care Services (CCHCS) integrated HIV opt-out screening into the health assessment for inmates entering California state prisons. Under this system, a medical care provider informs the inmate that an HIV test is routinely done, along with screening for sexually transmitted, communicable, and vaccine-preventable diseases, unless the inmate specifically declines the test. During 2012-2013, CCHCS, the California Department of Public Health, and CDC evaluated HIV screening, rates of new diagnoses, linkage to and retention in care, ART response, and post-release linkage to care among California prison inmates. All prison inmates are processed through one of eight specialized reception center facilities, where they undergo a comprehensive evaluation of their medical needs, mental health, and custody requirements for placement in one of 35 state prisons. Among 17,436 inmates who entered a reception center during April-September 2012, 77% were screened for HIV infection; 135 (1%) tested positive, including 10 (0.1%) with newly diagnosed infections. Among the 135 HIV-positive patient-inmates, 134 (99%) were linked to care within 90 days of diagnosis, including 122 (91%) who initiated ART. Among 83 who initiated ART and remained incarcerated through July 2013, 81 (98%) continued ART; 71 (88%) achieved viral suppression (prison, continuity of care in the community remains a challenge. An infrastructure for post-release linkage to care is needed to help ensure sustained HIV disease control.

  7. Enhancing Public Health HIV Interventions: A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis and Systematic Review of Studies to Improve Linkage to Care, Adherence, and Retention

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    Joseph D. Tucker

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although HIV services are expanding, few have reached the scale necessary to support universal viral suppression of individuals living with HIV. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the qualitative evidence evaluating public health HIV interventions to enhance linkage to care, antiretroviral drug (ARV adherence, and retention in care. We searched 19 databases without language restrictions. The review collated data from three separate qualitative evidence reviews addressing each of the three outcomes along the care continuum. 21,738 citations were identified and 24 studies were included in the evidence review. Among low and middle-income countries in Africa, men living with HIV had decreased engagement in interventions compared to women and this lack of engagement among men also influenced the willingness of their partners to engage in services. Four structural issues (poverty, unstable housing, food insecurity, lack of transportation mediated the feasibility and acceptability of public health HIV interventions. Individuals living with HIV identified unmet mental health needs that interfered with their ability to access HIV services. Persistent social and cultural factors contribute to disparities in HIV outcomes across the continuum of care, shaping the context of service delivery among important subpopulations.

  8. Enhancing Public Health HIV Interventions: A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis and Systematic Review of Studies to Improve Linkage to Care, Adherence, and Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joseph D; Tso, Lai Sze; Hall, Brian; Ma, Qingyan; Beanland, Rachel; Best, John; Li, Haochu; Lackey, Mellanye; Marley, Gifty; Rich, Zachary C; Sou, Ka-Lon; Doherty, Meg

    2017-03-01

    Although HIV services are expanding, few have reached the scale necessary to support universal viral suppression of individuals living with HIV. The purpose of this systematic review was to summarize the qualitative evidence evaluating public health HIV interventions to enhance linkage to care, antiretroviral drug (ARV) adherence, and retention in care. We searched 19 databases without language restrictions. The review collated data from three separate qualitative evidence reviews addressing each of the three outcomes along the care continuum. 21,738 citations were identified and 24 studies were included in the evidence review. Among low and middle-income countries in Africa, men living with HIV had decreased engagement in interventions compared to women and this lack of engagement among men also influenced the willingness of their partners to engage in services. Four structural issues (poverty, unstable housing, food insecurity, lack of transportation) mediated the feasibility and acceptability of public health HIV interventions. Individuals living with HIV identified unmet mental health needs that interfered with their ability to access HIV services. Persistent social and cultural factors contribute to disparities in HIV outcomes across the continuum of care, shaping the context of service delivery among important subpopulations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessing the accessibility of HIV care packages among tuberculosis patients in the Northwest Region, Cameroon

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    Miguel San

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV co-infection is a major source of morbidity and mortality globally. The World Health Organization (WHO has recommended that HIV counselling and testing be offered routinely to TB patients in order to increase access to HIV care packages. We assessed the uptake of provider-initiated testing and counselling (PITC, antiretroviral (ART and co-trimoxazole preventive therapies (CPT among TB patients in the Northwest Region, Cameroon. Methods A retrospective cohort study using TB registers in 4 TB/HIV treatment centres (1 public and 3 faith-based for patients diagnosed with TB between January 2006 and December 2007 to identify predictors of the outcomes; HIV testing/serostatus, ART and CPT enrolment and factors that influenced their enrolment between public and faith-based hospitals. Results A total of 2270 TB patients were registered and offered pre-HIV test counselling; 2150 (94.7% accepted the offer of a test. The rate of acceptance was significantly higher among patients in the public hospital compared to those in the faith-based hospitals (crude OR 1.97; 95% CI 1.33 - 2.92 and (adjusted OR 1.92; 95% CI 1.24 - 2.97. HIV prevalence was 68.5% (1473/2150. Independent predictors of HIV-seropositivity emerged as: females, age groups 15-29, 30-44 and 45-59 years, rural residence, previously treated TB and smear-negative pulmonary TB. ART uptake was 50.3% (614/1220 with 17.2% (253/1473 of missing records. Independent predictors of ART uptake were: previously treated TB and extra pulmonary TB. Finally, CPT uptake was 47.0% (524/1114 with 24% (590/1114 of missing records. Independent predictors of CPT uptake were: faith-based hospitals and female sex. Conclusion PITC services are apparently well integrated into the TB programme as demonstrated by the high testing rate. The main challenges include improving access to ART and CPT among TB patients and proper reporting and monitoring of

  10. Strategic roles for health communication in combination HIV prevention and care programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermund, Sten H; Van Lith, Lynn M; Holtgrave, David

    2014-08-15

    This special issue of JAIDS: Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes is devoted to health communication and its role in and impact on HIV prevention and care. The authors in this special issue have tackled a wide swath of topics, seeking to introduce a wider biomedical audience to core health communication principles, strategies, and evidence of effectiveness. Better awareness of health communication strategies and concepts can enable the broader biomedical community to partner with health communication experts in reducing the risk of HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and tuberculosis and maximize linkage and adherence to care. Interventions can be strengthened when biomedical and health communication approaches are combined in strategic and evidence-based ways. Several of the articles in this special issue present the current evidence for health communication's impact. These articles show how far we have come and yet how much further we have to go to document impact convincingly. Examples of the biomedical approaches to HIV control include treatment as prevention, voluntary medical male circumcision, preexposure prophylaxis, sterile needle exchange, opiate substitution therapy, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission. None will succeed without behavior change, which can be facilitated by effective health communication.

  11. Adolescent and Adult HIV Providers' Definitions of HIV-Infected Youths' Successful Transition to Adult Care in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbin, Morgan M; Tanner, Amanda E; Ma, Alice; Chambers, Brittany D; Ware, Samuella; Kinnard, Elizabeth N; Hussen, Sophia A; Lee, Sonia; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2017-10-01

    It is important for both individual- and population-level health that HIV-infected individuals progress through the Care Continuum. However, HIV-infected youth frequently disengage from care during transition from pediatric/adolescent to adult care; only 50% remain in adult care after 1 year. Understanding how providers define and approach a successful healthcare transition can improve the delivery of HIV-related services during critical years of HIV treatment. We conducted 58 staff interviews across 14 Adolescent Trials Network clinics (n = 30) and 20 adult clinics (n = 28). We used the constant comparative method to examine how providers defined and approached youths' successful transition. Providers identified four components critical to successful transition: (1) clinical outcomes (e.g., medication adherence and viral suppression); (2) youth knowing how to complete treatment-related activities (e.g., refilling prescriptions and making appointments); (3) youth taking responsibility for treatment-related activities and their overall health (e.g., "when they stop reaching out to the adolescent [clinic] to solve all their problems."); and (4) youth feeling a connection and trust toward the adult clinic (e.g., "they feel safe here"), with some providers even prioritizing connectedness over clinical outcomes (e.g., "Even if they're not taking meds but are connected [to care], …that's a success."). The identification of key components of successful transition can guide focused interventions and resources to improve youth maintenance in the HIV Care Continuum as they transition to adult care. Identifying what facilitates successful transitions, and the gaps that interventions can target, will help to ensure HIV-infected youth remain healthy across their lifespan.

  12. Self-help groups can improve utilization of post-natal care by HIV-positive mothers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.A.; Oosterhoff, P.; Yen, P.N.; Wright, P.; Hardon, A.

    2009-01-01

    HIV prevention within maternal-child health services has increased in many developing countries, but many HIV-infected women in developing countries still receive insufficient postnatal care. This study explored the experience of 30 HIV-infected women in Vietnam in accessing HIV-related postnatal

  13. Alarming attrition rates among HIV-infected individuals in pre-antiretroviral therapy care in Myanmar, 2011–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, Myo Minn; Gupta, Vivek; Aung, Thet Ko; Kyaw, Nang Thu Thu; Oo, Htun Nyunt; Kumar, Ajay MV

    2016-01-01

    Background High retention rates have been documented among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Myanmar. However, there is no information on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in care before initiation of ART (pre-ART care). We assessed attrition (loss-to-follow-up [LTFU] and death) rates among HIV-infected individuals in pre-ART care and their associated factors over a 4-year period. Design In this retrospective cohort study, we extracted routinely collected data of HIV-infected adults (>15 years old) entering pre-ART care (June 2011–June 2014) as part of an Integrated HIV Care (IHC) programme, Myanmar. Attrition rates per 100 person-years and cumulative incidence of attrition were calculated. Factors associated with attrition were examined by calculating hazard ratios (HRs). Results Of 18,037 HIV-infected adults enrolled in the IHC programme, 11,464 (63%) entered pre-ART care (60% men, mean age 37 years, median cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count 160 cells/µL). Of the 11,464 eligible participants, 3,712 (32%) underwent attrition of which 43% were due to deaths and 57% were due to LTFU. The attrition rate was 78 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 75–80). The cumulative incidence of attrition was 70% at the end of a 4-year follow-up, of which nearly 90% occurred in the first 6 months. Male sex (HR 1.5, 95% CI 1.4–1.6), WHO clinical Stage 3 and 4, CD4 count ART care attrition among persons living with HIV in Myanmar was alarmingly high – with most attrition occurring within the first 6 months. Strategies aimed at improving early HIV diagnosis and initiation of ART are needed. Suggestions include comprehensive nutrition support and intensified monitoring to prevent pre-ART care attrition by tracking patients who do not return for pre-ART care appointments. It is high time that Myanmar moves towards a ‘test and treat’ approach and ultimately eliminates the need for pre-ART care. PMID:27562473

  14. Emergence of Lamivudine-Resistant HBV during Antiretroviral Therapy Including Lamivudine for Patients Coinfected with HIV and HBV in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yijia; Zhu, Ting; Song, Xiaojing; Huang, Ying; Yang, Feifei; Guan, Shuo; Xie, Jing; Gohda, Jin; Hosoya, Noriaki; Kawana-Tachikawa, Ai; Liu, Wenjun; Gao, George Fu; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Li, Taisheng; Ishida, Takaomi

    2015-01-01

    In China, HIV-1-infected patients typically receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) that includes lamivudine (3TC) as a reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) (ART-3TC). Previous studies from certain developed countries have shown that, in ART-3TC, 3TC-resistant HBV progressively emerges at an annual rate of 15–20% in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV. This scenario in China warrants investigation because >10% of all HIV-infected patients in China are HBV carriers. We measured the occurrence of 3TC-resistant HBV during ART-3TC for HIV-HBV coinfection and also tested the effect of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) used as an additional RTI (ART-3TC/TDF) in a cohort study in China. We obtained 200 plasma samples collected from 50 Chinese patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV (positive for hepatitis B surface antigen) and examined them for the prevalence of 3TC-resistant HBV by directly sequencing PCR products that covered the HBV reverse-transcriptase gene. We divided the patients into ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups and compared the efficacy of treatment and incidence of drug-resistance mutation between the groups. HIV RNA and HBV DNA loads drastically decreased in both ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups. In the ART-3TC group, HBV breakthrough or insufficient suppression of HBV DNA loads was observed in 20% (10/50) of the patients after 96-week treatment, and 8 of these patients harbored 3TC-resistant mutants. By contrast, neither HBV breakthrough nor treatment failure was recorded in the ART-3TC/TDF group. All of the 3TC-resistant HBV mutants emerged from the cases in which HBV DNA loads were high at baseline. Our results clearly demonstrated that ART-3TC is associated with the emergence of 3TC-resistant HBV in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV and that ART-3TC/TDF reduces HBV DNA loads to an undetectable level. These findings support the use of TDF-based treatment regimens for patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV. PMID:26288093

  15. Emergence of Lamivudine-Resistant HBV during Antiretroviral Therapy Including Lamivudine for Patients Coinfected with HIV and HBV in China.

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    Lijun Gu

    Full Text Available In China, HIV-1-infected patients typically receive antiretroviral therapy (ART that includes lamivudine (3TC as a reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (RTI (ART-3TC. Previous studies from certain developed countries have shown that, in ART-3TC, 3TC-resistant HBV progressively emerges at an annual rate of 15-20% in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV. This scenario in China warrants investigation because >10% of all HIV-infected patients in China are HBV carriers. We measured the occurrence of 3TC-resistant HBV during ART-3TC for HIV-HBV coinfection and also tested the effect of tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF used as an additional RTI (ART-3TC/TDF in a cohort study in China. We obtained 200 plasma samples collected from 50 Chinese patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV (positive for hepatitis B surface antigen and examined them for the prevalence of 3TC-resistant HBV by directly sequencing PCR products that covered the HBV reverse-transcriptase gene. We divided the patients into ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups and compared the efficacy of treatment and incidence of drug-resistance mutation between the groups. HIV RNA and HBV DNA loads drastically decreased in both ART-3TC and ART-3TC/TDF groups. In the ART-3TC group, HBV breakthrough or insufficient suppression of HBV DNA loads was observed in 20% (10/50 of the patients after 96-week treatment, and 8 of these patients harbored 3TC-resistant mutants. By contrast, neither HBV breakthrough nor treatment failure was recorded in the ART-3TC/TDF group. All of the 3TC-resistant HBV mutants emerged from the cases in which HBV DNA loads were high at baseline. Our results clearly demonstrated that ART-3TC is associated with the emergence of 3TC-resistant HBV in patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV and that ART-3TC/TDF reduces HBV DNA loads to an undetectable level. These findings support the use of TDF-based treatment regimens for patients coinfected with HIV-1 and HBV.

  16. The Men Who Have Sex with Men HIV Care Cascade in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

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    Rodolfo Castro

    Full Text Available Brazil has a concentrated HIV epidemic and men who have sex with men (MSM are disproportionately affected. Yet, no data is available on the HIV care cascade for this population. This study aimed to assess the HIV care cascade among MSM newly diagnosed through innovative testing strategies in Rio de Janeiro. Data from 793 MSM and travestites/transgender women (transwomen tested for HIV at a non-governmental LGBT organization and a mobile testing unit located at a gay friendly venue were analyzed. A 12-month-after-HIV-diagnosis-censored cohort was established using CD4, viral load and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART longitudinal data from those diagnosed with HIV. A cross-sectional HIV care cascade was built using this data. The relative risks of achieving each cascade-stage were estimated using generalized linear models according to age, self-declared skin-color, education, history of sexually transmitted diseases (STD, drug use and prior HIV testing. From Jan-2013 to Jan-2014, 793 MSM and transwomen were tested, 131 (16.5% were HIV-infected. As of January 2015, 95 (72.5% were linked to HIV care, 90 (68.7% were retained in HIV care, 80 (61.1% were on cART, and 50 (38.2% were virally suppressed one year after HIV diagnosis. Being non-white (Relative risk [lower bound; upper bound of 95% confidence interval] = 1.709 [1.145; 2.549] and having a prior HIV-test (1.954 [1.278; 2.986] were associated with an HIV-positive diagnosis. A higher linkage (2.603 [1.091; 6.211] and retention in care (4.510 [1.880; 10.822] were observed among those who were older than 30 years of age. Using community-based testing strategies, we were able to access a high-risk MSM population and a small sample of transwomen. Despite universal care coverage and the test-and-treat policy adopted in Brazil, the MSM cascade of care indicates that strategies to increase linkage to care and prompt cART initiation targeted to these populations are critically needed

  17. The Men Who Have Sex with Men HIV Care Cascade in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Rodolfo; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Corrêa, Renato Girade; Derrico, Monica; Lemos, Katia; Grangeiro, Jose Roberto; Jesus, Beto de; Pires, Denise; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Brazil has a concentrated HIV epidemic and men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected. Yet, no data is available on the HIV care cascade for this population. This study aimed to assess the HIV care cascade among MSM newly diagnosed through innovative testing strategies in Rio de Janeiro. Data from 793 MSM and travestites/transgender women (transwomen) tested for HIV at a non-governmental LGBT organization and a mobile testing unit located at a gay friendly venue were analyzed. A 12-month-after-HIV-diagnosis-censored cohort was established using CD4, viral load and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) longitudinal data from those diagnosed with HIV. A cross-sectional HIV care cascade was built using this data. The relative risks of achieving each cascade-stage were estimated using generalized linear models according to age, self-declared skin-color, education, history of sexually transmitted diseases (STD), drug use and prior HIV testing. From Jan-2013 to Jan-2014, 793 MSM and transwomen were tested, 131 (16.5%) were HIV-infected. As of January 2015, 95 (72.5%) were linked to HIV care, 90 (68.7%) were retained in HIV care, 80 (61.1%) were on cART, and 50 (38.2%) were virally suppressed one year after HIV diagnosis. Being non-white (Relative risk [lower bound; upper bound of 95% confidence interval] = 1.709 [1.145; 2.549]) and having a prior HIV-test (1.954 [1.278; 2.986]) were associated with an HIV-positive diagnosis. A higher linkage (2.603 [1.091; 6.211]) and retention in care (4.510 [1.880; 10.822]) were observed among those who were older than 30 years of age. Using community-based testing strategies, we were able to access a high-risk MSM population and a small sample of transwomen. Despite universal care coverage and the test-and-treat policy adopted in Brazil, the MSM cascade of care indicates that strategies to increase linkage to care and prompt cART initiation targeted to these populations are critically needed. Interventions

  18. The Men Who Have Sex with Men HIV Care Cascade in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Corrêa, Renato Girade; Derrico, Monica; Lemos, Katia; Grangeiro, Jose Roberto; de Jesus, Beto; Pires, Denise; Veloso, Valdilea G.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Brazil has a concentrated HIV epidemic and men who have sex with men (MSM) are disproportionately affected. Yet, no data is available on the HIV care cascade for this population. This study aimed to assess the HIV care cascade among MSM newly diagnosed through innovative testing strategies in Rio de Janeiro. Data from 793 MSM and travestites/transgender women (transwomen) tested for HIV at a non-governmental LGBT organization and a mobile testing unit located at a gay friendly venue were analyzed. A 12-month-after-HIV-diagnosis-censored cohort was established using CD4, viral load and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) longitudinal data from those diagnosed with HIV. A cross-sectional HIV care cascade was built using this data. The relative risks of achieving each cascade-stage were estimated using generalized linear models according to age, self-declared skin-color, education, history of sexually transmitted diseases (STD), drug use and prior HIV testing. From Jan-2013 to Jan-2014, 793 MSM and transwomen were tested, 131 (16.5%) were HIV-infected. As of January 2015, 95 (72.5%) were linked to HIV care, 90 (68.7%) were retained in HIV care, 80 (61.1%) were on cART, and 50 (38.2%) were virally suppressed one year after HIV diagnosis. Being non-white (Relative risk [lower bound; upper bound of 95% confidence interval] = 1.709 [1.145; 2.549]) and having a prior HIV-test (1.954 [1.278; 2.986]) were associated with an HIV-positive diagnosis. A higher linkage (2.603 [1.091; 6.211]) and retention in care (4.510 [1.880; 10.822]) were observed among those who were older than 30 years of age. Using community-based testing strategies, we were able to access a high-risk MSM population and a small sample of transwomen. Despite universal care coverage and the test-and-treat policy adopted in Brazil, the MSM cascade of care indicates that strategies to increase linkage to care and prompt cART initiation targeted to these populations are critically needed. Interventions

  19. Novel drugs and vaccines based on the structure and function of HIV pathogenic proteins including Nef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Ahmed A

    2005-11-01

    Evidence is presented to suggest that HIV-1 accessory protein Nef could be involved in AIDS pathogenesis. When present in extracellular medium, Nef causes the death of a wide variety of cells in vitro and may therefore be responsible for the depletion of bystander cells in lymphoid tissues during HIV infection. When present inside the cell, Nef could prevent the death of infected cells and thereby contribute to increased viral load. Intracellular Nef does this by preventing apoptosis of infected cells by either inhibiting proteins involved in apoptosis or preventing the infected cells from being recognized by CTLs. Neutralization of extracellular Nef could prevent the death of uninfected immune cells and thereby the destruction of the immune system. Neutralization of intracellular Nef could hasten the death of infected cells and help reduce the viral load. Nef is therefore a very important molecular target for developing therapeutics that slow progression to AIDS. The N-terminal region of Nef and the naturally occurring bee venom mellitin have very similar primary and tertiary structures, and they both act by destroying membranes. Chemical analogs of a mellitin inhibitor prevent Nef-mediated cell death and inhibit the interaction of Nef with cellular proteins involved in apoptosis. Naturally occurring bee propolis also contains substances that prevent Nef-mediated cell lysis and increases proliferation of CD4 cells in HIV-infected cultures. These chemical compounds and natural products are water soluble and nontoxic and are therefore potentially very useful candidate drugs.

  20. Retention of antiretroviral naïve patients registered in HIV care in a program clinic in Pune, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghate, Manisha V.; Zirpe, Sunil S.; Gurav, Nilam P.; Rewari, Bharat B.; Gangakhedkar, Raman R.; Paranjape, Ramesh S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Retention in HIV care ensures delivery of services like secondary prevention, timely initiation of treatment, support, and care on a regular basis. The data on retention in pre antiretroviral therapy (ART) care in India is scanty. Materials and Methods: Antiretroviral naïve HIV-infected adult patients registered between January 2011 and March 2012 in HIV care (pre-ART) were included in the study. The follow-up procedures were done as per the national guidelines. Patients who did not report to the clinic for 1 year were considered as pre-ART lost to follow-up (pre-ART LFU). They were contacted either telephonically or by home visits. Logistic regression analysis was done to find out factors associated with pre-ART loss to follow-up. Results: A total of 689 antiretroviral naïve adult patients were registered in the HIV care. Fourteen (2%) patients died and 76 (11%) were LFU till March 2013. The multivariate analysis showed that baseline CD4 count >350 cells/mm3 (P ART LFUs, 35 (46.1%) informed that they would visit the clinic at their convenient time. NGOs that referred 16 female sex workers (FSWs) who were LFU (21.1%) informed that they would make efforts to refer them to the clinic. Conclusion: Higher CD4 count and illiteracy were significantly associated with lower retention in pre-ART care. Developing effective “retention package” for patients and strengthening linkage strategies between key sub-population such as FSWs and ART programming will help to plug the leaky cascade in HIV care. PMID:26396447

  1. Performance of rapid point-of-care and laboratory tests for acute and established HIV infection in San Francisco.

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    Christopher D Pilcher

    Full Text Available Current laboratory and point-of-care tests for HIV detect different analytes and use different sample types. Some have fast turnaround times (<1 hour. We investigated how HIV test choice could impact case finding by testing programs.We analyzed 21,234 consecutive HIV tests with venous blood obtained by San Francisco HIV testing programs from 2003 to 2008. For a subset, oral fluid (n = 6446 or fingerstick blood (n = 8127 samples were also obtained for rapid testing. In all cases, HIV status was determined using an HIV antibody-plus-RNA test algorithm. We assessed how the screening antibody tests performed individually versus the gold standard of the full algorithm. We then evaluated the potential ability of other tests (including new tests to detect more cases, by re-testing all specimens that had negative/discrepant antibody results on initial screening.The antibody-RNA algorithm identified 58 acute and 703 established HIV infection cases. 1(st-generation (Vironostika and 3(rd-generation (Genetic Systems immunoassays had 92 and 96 percent sensitivity, respectively. The Oraquick rapid test had clinical sensitivity of only 86 percent on oral fluid samples, but 92 percent on finger-stick blood. Newer 4(th-generation, antigen-antibody combo rapid immunoassay (ARCHITECT detected HIV in 87 percent of all the acute cases that had been missed by one of the previous screening assays. A point-of-care 4(th generation antigen-antibody combo rapid test (Determine detected about 54 percent of such acute cases.Our study suggests that some rapid antibody blood tests will give similar case detection to laboratory antibody tests, but that oral fluid testing greatly reduces ability to detect HIV. New 4(th-generation combo tests can detect the majority of acute infections detectable by HIV RNA but with rapid results. Using these tests as a primary screening assay in high-risk HIV testing programs could reduce or eliminate the need for HIV RNA testing.

  2. Scaling-up access to antiretroviral therapy for children: a cohort study evaluating care and treatment at mobile and hospital-affiliated HIV clinics in rural Zambia.

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    Janneke H van Dijk

    Full Text Available Travel time and distance are barriers to care for HIV-infected children in rural sub-Saharan Africa. Decentralization of care is one strategy to scale-up access to antiretroviral therapy (ART, but few programs have been evaluated. We compared outcomes for children receiving care in mobile and hospital-affiliated HIV clinics in rural Zambia.Outcomes were measured within an ongoing cohort study of HIV-infected children seeking care at Macha Hospital, Zambia from 2007 to 2012. Children in the outreach clinic group received care from the Macha HIV clinic and transferred to one of three outreach clinics. Children in the hospital-affiliated clinic group received care at Macha HIV clinic and reported Macha Hospital as the nearest healthcare facility.Seventy-seven children transferred to the outreach clinics and were included in the analysis. Travel time to the outreach clinics was significantly shorter and fewer caretakers used public transportation, resulting in lower transportation costs and fewer obstacles accessing the clinic. Some caretakers and health care providers reported inferior quality of service provision at the outreach clinics. Sixty-eight children received ART at the outreach clinics and were compared to 41 children in the hospital-affiliated clinic group. At ART initiation, median age, weight-for-age z-scores (WAZ and CD4(+ T-cell percentages were similar for children in the hospital-affiliated and outreach clinic groups. Children in both groups experienced similar increases in WAZ and CD4(+ T-cell percentages.HIV care and treatment can be effectively delivered to HIV-infected children at rural health centers through mobile ART teams, removing potential barriers to uptake and retention. Outreach teams should be supported to increase access to HIV care and treatment in rural areas.

  3. Sensitivity and specificity of point-of-care rapid combination syphilis-HIV-HCV tests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen L Hess

    Full Text Available New rapid point-of-care (POC tests are being developed that would offer the opportunity to increase screening and treatment of several infections, including syphilis. This study evaluated three of these new rapid POC tests at a site in Southern California.Participants were recruited from a testing center in Long Beach, California. A whole blood specimen was used to evaluate the performance of the Dual Path Platform (DPP Syphilis Screen & Confirm, DPP HIV-Syphilis, and DPP HIV-HCV-Syphilis rapid tests. The gold-standard comparisons were Treponema pallidum passive particle agglutination (TPPA, rapid plasma reagin (RPR, HCV enzyme immunoassay (EIA, and HIV-1/2 EIA.A total of 948 whole blood specimens were analyzed in this study. The sensitivity of the HIV tests ranged from 95.7-100% and the specificity was 99.7-100%. The sensitivity and specificity of the HCV test were 91.8% and 99.3%, respectively. The treponemal-test sensitivity when compared to TPPA ranged from 44.0-52.7% and specificity was 98.7-99.6%. The non-treponemal test sensitivity and specificity when compared to RPR was 47.8% and 98.9%, respectively. The sensitivity of the Screen & Confirm test improved to 90.0% when cases who were both treponemal and nontreponemal positive were compared to TPPA+/RPR ≥ 1 ∶ 8.The HIV and HCV on the multi-infection tests showed good performance, but the treponemal and nontreponemal tests had low sensitivity. These results could be due to a low prevalence of active syphilis in the sample population because the sensitivity improved when the gold standard was limited to those more likely to be active cases. Further evaluation of the new syphilis POC tests is required before implementation into testing programs.

  4. Decreased Chronic Morbidity but Elevated HIV Associated Cytokine Levels in HIV-Infected Older Adults Receiving HIV Treatment: Benefit of Enhanced Access to Care?

    OpenAIRE

    Mutevedzi, Portia C.; Rodger, Alison J.; Kowal, Paul; Nyirenda, Makandwe; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of HIV with chronic morbidity and inflammatory markers (cytokines) in older adults (50+years) is potentially relevant for clinical care, but data from African populations is scarce. Objective To examine levels of chronic morbidity by HIV and ART status in older adults (50+years) and subsequent associations with selected pro-inflammatory cytokines and body mass index. Methods Ordinary, ordered and generalized ordered logistic regression techniques were employed to co...

  5. Status and methodology of publicly available national HIV care continua and 90-90-90 targets: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Granich

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS issued treatment goals for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The 90-90-90 target specifies that by 2020, 90% of individuals living with HIV will know their HIV status, 90% of people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive antiretroviral treatment (ART, and 90% of those taking ART will be virally suppressed. Consistent methods and routine reporting in the public domain will be necessary for tracking progress towards the 90-90-90 target.For the period 2010-2016, we searched PubMed, UNAIDS country progress reports, World Health Organization (WHO, UNAIDS reports, national surveillance and program reports, United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR Country Operational Plans, and conference presentations and/or abstracts for the latest available national HIV care continuum in the public domain. Continua of care included the number and proportion of people living with HIV (PLHIV who are diagnosed, on ART, and virally suppressed out of the estimated number of PLHIV. We ranked the described methods for indicators to derive high-, medium-, and low-quality continuum. For 2010-2016, we identified 53 national care continua with viral suppression estimates representing 19.7 million (54% of the 2015 global estimate of PLHIV. Of the 53, 6 (with 2% of global burden were high quality, using standard surveillance methods to derive an overall denominator and program data from national cohorts for estimating steps in the continuum. Only nine countries in sub-Saharan Africa had care continua with viral suppression estimates. Of the 53 countries, the average proportion of the aggregate of PLHIV from all countries on ART was 48%, and the proportion of PLHIV who were virally suppressed was 40%. Seven countries (Sweden, Cambodia, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Denmark, Rwanda, and Namibia were within 12% and 10% of achieving the 90-90-90 target for "on ART" and for "viral suppression

  6. Status and methodology of publicly available national HIV care continua and 90-90-90 targets: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granich, Reuben; Gupta, Somya; Hall, Irene; Aberle-Grasse, John; Hader, Shannon; Mermin, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    In 2014, the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) issued treatment goals for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The 90-90-90 target specifies that by 2020, 90% of individuals living with HIV will know their HIV status, 90% of people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive antiretroviral treatment (ART), and 90% of those taking ART will be virally suppressed. Consistent methods and routine reporting in the public domain will be necessary for tracking progress towards the 90-90-90 target. For the period 2010-2016, we searched PubMed, UNAIDS country progress reports, World Health Organization (WHO), UNAIDS reports, national surveillance and program reports, United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Country Operational Plans, and conference presentations and/or abstracts for the latest available national HIV care continuum in the public domain. Continua of care included the number and proportion of people living with HIV (PLHIV) who are diagnosed, on ART, and virally suppressed out of the estimated number of PLHIV. We ranked the described methods for indicators to derive high-, medium-, and low-quality continuum. For 2010-2016, we identified 53 national care continua with viral suppression estimates representing 19.7 million (54%) of the 2015 global estimate of PLHIV. Of the 53, 6 (with 2% of global burden) were high quality, using standard surveillance methods to derive an overall denominator and program data from national cohorts for estimating steps in the continuum. Only nine countries in sub-Saharan Africa had care continua with viral suppression estimates. Of the 53 countries, the average proportion of the aggregate of PLHIV from all countries on ART was 48%, and the proportion of PLHIV who were virally suppressed was 40%. Seven countries (Sweden, Cambodia, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Denmark, Rwanda, and Namibia) were within 12% and 10% of achieving the 90-90-90 target for "on ART" and for "viral suppression

  7. Identifying drivers of overall satisfaction in patients receiving HIV primary care: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bich N Dang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study seeks to understand the drivers of overall patient satisfaction in a predominantly low-income, ethnic-minority population of HIV primary care patients. The study's primary aims were to determine 1 the component experiences which contribute to patients' evaluations of their overall satisfaction with care received, and 2 the relative contribution of each component experience in explaining patients' evaluation of overall satisfaction. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 489 adult patients receiving HIV primary care at two clinics in Houston, Texas, from January 13-April 21, 2011. The participation rate among eligible patients was 94%. The survey included 15 questions about various components of the care experience, 4 questions about the provider experience and 3 questions about overall care. To ensure that the survey was appropriately tailored to our clinic population and the list of component experiences reflected all aspects of the care experience salient to patients, we conducted in-depth interviews with key providers and clinic staff and pre-tested the survey instrument with patients. RESULTS: Patients' evaluation of their provider correlated the strongest with their overall satisfaction (standardized β = 0.445, p<0.001 and accounted for almost half of the explained variance. Access and availability, like clinic hours and ease of calling the clinic, also correlated with overall satisfaction, but less strongly. Wait time and parking, despite receiving low patient ratings, did not correlate with overall satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: The patient-provider relationship far exceeds other component experiences of care in its association with overall satisfaction. Our study suggests that interventions to improve overall patient satisfaction should focus on improving patients' evaluation of their provider.

  8. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Afonso Martins Abati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient’s year of admission – P1 (1999-2002, P2 (2003-2006, and P3 (2007-2010 – for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner’s seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country.

  9. Intimate partner violence and engagement in HIV care and treatment among women: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Abigail M; Smout, Elizabeth M; Turan, Janet M; Christofides, Nicola; Stöckl, Heidi

    2015-10-23

    We aimed to estimate the odds of engagement in HIV care and treatment among HIV-positive women reporting intimate partner violence (IPV). We systematically reviewed the literature on the association between IPV and engagement in care. Data sources included searches of electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, CINAHL and PsychoInfo), hand searches and citation tracking. Two reviewers screened 757 full-text articles, extracted data and independently appraised study quality. Included studies were peer-reviewed and assessed IPV alongside engagement in care outcomes: antiretroviral treatment (ART) use; self-reported ART adherence; viral suppression; retention in HIV care. Odds ratios (ORs) were pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Thirteen cross-sectional studies among HIV-positive women were included. Measurement of IPV varied, with most studies defining a 'case' as any history of physical and/or sexual IPV. Meta-analysis of five studies showed IPV to be significantly associated with lower ART use [OR 0.79, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.64-0.97]. IPV was associated with poorer self-reported ART adherence in six studies (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.30-0.75) and lower odds of viral load suppression in seven studies (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.46-0.90). Lack of longitudinal data and measurement considerations should temper interpretation of these results. IPV is associated with lower ART use, half the odds of self-reported ART adherence and significantly worsened viral suppression among women. To ensure the health of HIV-positive women, it is essential for clinical programmes to address conditions that impact engagement in care and treatment. IPV is one such condition, and its association with declines in ART use and adherence requires urgent attention.

  10. Bolstering the Evidence Base for Integrating Abortion and HIV Care: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Manski

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-positive women have abortions at similar rates to their HIV-negative counterparts, yet little is known about clinical outcomes of abortion for HIV-positive women or the best practices for abortion provision. To fill that gap, we conducted a literature review of clinical outcomes of surgical and medication abortion among HIV-positive women. We identified three studies on clinical outcomes of surgical abortion among HIV-positive women; none showed significant differences in infectious complications by HIV status. A review of seven articles on similar gynecological procedures found no differences in complications by HIV status. No studies evaluated medication abortion among HIV-positive women. However, we did find that previously expressed concerns regarding blood loss and vomiting related to medication abortion for HIV-positive women are unwarranted based on our review of data showing that significant blood loss and vomiting are rare and short lived among women. We conclude that although there is limited research that addresses clinical outcomes of abortion for HIV-positive women, existing data suggest that medication and surgical abortion are safe and appropriate. Sexual and reproductive health and HIV integration efforts must include both options to prevent maternal mortality and morbidity and to ensure that HIV-positive women and women at risk of HIV can make informed reproductive decisions.

  11. Antiretroviral therapy for adults infected with HIV: Guidelines for health care professionals from the Quebec HIV care committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Danielle; Fortin, Claude; Trottier, Benoît; Lalonde, Richard; Lapointe, Normand; Côté, Pierre; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Matte, Marie-France; Tsarevsky, Irina; Baril, Jean-Guy

    2011-01-01

    The appropriate use of antiretrovirals reduces morbidity and mortality caused by HIV infection. The present article provides health care professionals with a practical guide for the use of antiretrovirals. Therapy should be initiated based predominantly on clinical presentation and CD4 count, and should consist of three active drugs or at least two active drugs when this is not possible, as in cases of some treatment-experienced patients. This is the most effective way to achieve long-term suppression of viral replication. Selection of individual drugs in the regimen should consider the weight of the evidence supporting these choices, as well as their tolerability profiles and ease of use, the patients’ comorbidities and treatment history. Treatment interruption is not recommended, either in aviremic patients or in those who have experienced virological failure. Instead, the therapeutic regimen should be adjusted to minimize side effects, promote adherence and suppress viral replication. PMID:22654926

  12. Antiretroviral therapy for adults infected with HIV: Guidelines for health care professionals from the Quebec HIV care committee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Rouleau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate use of antiretrovirals reduces morbidity and mortality caused by HIV infection. The present article provides health care professionals with a practical guide for the use of antiretrovirals. Therapy should be initiated based predominantly on clinical presentation and CD4 count, and should consist of three active drugs or at least two active drugs when this is not possible, as in cases of some treatment-experienced patients. This is the most effective way to achieve long-term suppression of viral replication. Selection of individual drugs in the regimen should consider the weight of the evidence supporting these choices, as well as their tolerability profiles and ease of use, the patients’ comorbidities and treatment history. Treatment interruption is not recommended, either in aviremic patients or in those who have experienced virological failure. Instead, the therapeutic regimen should be adjusted to minimize side effects, promote adherence and suppress viral replication.

  13. HIV/AIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Key populations are groups who are at increased risk of HIV irrespective of epidemic type or local context. They include: men who have sex with men, ... HIV testing and counselling; HIV treatment and care; risk-reduction ... management of STIs, tuberculosis and viral hepatitis. Elimination of ...

  14. Willingness to care for children orphaned by HIV/AIDS: a study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study explores adoptive and foster parents' (n = 175) willingness to care for a child orphaned by HIV/AIDS. Although some differences were noted depending on the HIV status of the child and whether the respondent was an adoptive or foster parent, results indicate an overall willingness in these populations to ...

  15. Attitude of Health-Care Workers to HIV/AIDS | Sadah | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The current 5% prevalence rate of HIV in Nigeria represents a significant population of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). Discrimination against PLWHA has profound impact on the care and support required fro their optimal management particularly in resource-constrained settings. The study sought to assess the ...

  16. Attitude of Lesotho health care workers towards HIV/AIDS and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was evidence that HIV/AIDS caused the population pyramid base to shrink, and an indentation in the active population. Conclusion: Health care workers attributed HIV/AIDS to changing the demographic profile of Lesotho, also reflected in the population pyramid. Lesotho Disaster Management Authority played a ...

  17. HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients seeking care at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV and parasitic co-infections among patients seeking care at health facilities in Tanzania. ... there have been few studies conducted in resource limited settings to ascertain the interaction of parasitic co-infection where HIV/AIDS management largely depends on CD4+ T lymphocyte cells counts and WHO clinical staging.

  18. Future challenges for clinical care of an ageing population infected with HIV: a modelling study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Mikaela; Brinkman, Kees; Geerlings, Suzanne; Smit, Colette; Thyagarajan, Kalyani; Sighem, Ard van; de Wolf, Frank; Hallett, Timothy B.

    2015-01-01

    The population infected with HIV is getting older and these people will increasingly develop age-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We aimed to quantify the scale of the change and the implications for HIV care in the Netherlands in the future. We constructed an individual-based model of the

  19. Serum selenium status of HIV-infected children on care and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reduce mortality in HIV-infected persons not receiving highly-active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).[5]. Although the use of ... Children aged ≥7 years who refused to assent to the study or whose caregivers refused consent, as well as ... Serum selenium status of HIV-infected children on care and treatment in Enugu, Nigeria.

  20. Three years of HIV/AIDS care and treatment services in Tanzania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Tanzania HIV Care and Treatment Plan was launched in October 2004 aiming at providing 440,000 AIDS patients with antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) and track disease progression in 1.2 million HIV+ persons by the end of the 2008. This paper is intended to provide information to stake holders of the achievements and ...

  1. HIV Care Saves Lives: Viral Suppression is Key PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-11-25

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement is based on the December 2014 Vital Signs. For people living with HIV, Viral suppression is critical. By getting tested and taking HIV medicines, individuals living with HIV can achieve very low levels of HIV in the body.  Created: 11/25/2014 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 11/25/2014.

  2. Get Tested for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevention Living with HIV HIV and women's health Barriers to care for HIV Finding your HIV care ... some HIV tests look for antibodies (the body's natural immune response to a foreign invader) that your ...

  3. Building laboratory capacity to support HIV care in Nigeria: Harvard/APIN PEPFAR, 2004–2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald J. Hamel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: From 2004–2012, the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria, funded through the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief programme, scaled up HIV care and treatment services in Nigeria. We describe the methodologies and collaborative processes developed to improve laboratory capacity significantly in a resource-limited setting. These methods were implemented at 35 clinic and laboratory locations. Methods: Systems were established and modified to optimise numerous laboratory processes. These included strategies for clinic selection and management, equipment and reagent procurement, supply chains, laboratory renovations, equipment maintenance, electronic data management, quality development programmes and trainings. Results: Over the eight-year programme, laboratories supported 160 000 patients receiving HIV care in Nigeria, delivering over 2.5 million test results, including regular viral load quantitation. External quality assurance systems were established for CD4+ cell count enumeration, blood chemistries and viral load monitoring. Laboratory equipment platforms were improved and standardised and use of point-of-care analysers was expanded. Laboratory training workshops supported laboratories toward increasing staff skills and improving overall quality. Participation in a World Health Organisation-led African laboratory quality improvement system resulted in significant gains in quality measures at five laboratories. Conclusions: Targeted implementation of laboratory development processes, during simultaneous scale-up of HIV treatment programmes in a resource-limited setting, can elicit meaningful gains in laboratory quality and capacity. Systems to improve the physical laboratory environment, develop laboratory staff, create improvements to reduce costs and increase quality are available for future health and laboratory strengthening programmes. We hope that the strategies employed may inform

  4. Factors associated with presentation to care with advanced HIV disease in Brussels and Northern France: 1997-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choisy Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our objective was to determine the frequency and determinants of presentation to care with advanced HIV disease in patients who discover their HIV diagnosis at this stage as well as those with delayed presentation to care after HIV diagnosis in earlier stages. Methods We collected data on 1,819 HIV-infected patients in Brussels (Belgium and Northern France from January 1997 to December 2007. "Advanced HIV disease" was defined as CD4 count 3 or clinically-defined AIDS at study inclusion and was stratified into two groups: (a late testing, defined as presentation to care with advanced HIV disease and HIV diagnosis ≤6 months before initiation of HIV care; and (b delayed presentation to care, defined as presentation to care with advanced HIV disease and HIV diagnosis >6 months before initiation of HIV care. We used multinomial logistic regression to determine the factors associated with delayed presentation to care and late testing. Results Of the 570 patients initiating care with advanced HIV disease, 475 (83.3% were tested late and 95 (16.7% had delayed presentation to care. Risk factors for delayed presentation to care were: age 30-50 years, injection drug use, and follow-up in Brussels. Risk factors for late testing were: sub-Saharan African origin, male gender, and older age. HIV transmission through heterosexual contact was associated with an increased risk of both delayed presentation to care and late testing. Patients who initiated HIV care in 2003-2007 were less likely to have been tested late or to have a delayed presentation to care than patients who initiated care before 2003. Conclusion A considerable proportion of HIV-infected patients present to care with advanced HIV disease. Late testing, rather than a delay in initiating care after earlier HIV testing, is the main determinant of presentation to care with advanced HIV disease. The factors associated with delay presentation to care differ from those associated

  5. Low Non-structured Antiretroviral Therapy Interruptions in HIV-Infected Persons Who Inject Drugs Receiving Multidisciplinary Comprehensive HIV Care at an Outpatient Drug Abuse Treatment Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecillo, Gabriel; Mojal, Sergio; Roquer, Albert; Samos, Pilar; Luque, Sonia; Martinez, Diana; Martires, Paula Karen; Torrens, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Continuous HIV treatment is necessary to ensure successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of patient-initiated non-structured treatment interruptions in HIV-infected persons who inject drugs and who received a multidisciplinary comprehensive program, including medical HIV care, drug-dependence treatment and psychosocial support, at a drug outpatient addiction center. Non-structured treatment interruptions were defined as ≥30 consecutive days off cART without medical indication. During a median follow-up of 53.8 months, 37/132 (28 %) patients experienced the first non-structured treatment interruptions. The cumulative probability of cART interruption at 5 years was 31.2 % (95 % CI 22.4-40.0). Current drug use injection ≥1/day (HR 14.77; 95 % CI 5.90-36.96) and cART naive patients (HR 0.35, 95 % CI 0.14-0.93) were predictive factors for non-structured treatment interruptions. HIV care provided at a drug addiction center is a useful strategy to sustain continuous cART, however, drug abstinence is essential for the long-term maintenance of cART.

  6. "You're in a world of chaos": experiences accessing HIV care and adhering to medications after incarceration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Alexis C; Barrington, Clare; Hino, Sayaka; Gould, Michele; Wohl, David; Golin, Carol E

    2015-01-01

    Most HIV-infected inmates leave prison with a suppressed viral load; many, however, become disconnected from care and nonadherent to medications during reentry to community life. In this secondary data analysis of focus groups (n = 6) and in-depth interviews (n = 9) with 46 formerly incarcerated HIV-infected people during reentry, we used an inductive analytic approach to explore the interplay between individual, interpersonal, community, and structural factors and HIV management. Participants described barriers and facilitators to care engagement and adherence at each of these four levels, as well as a milieu of HIV and incarceration-related stigma and discrimination. The constellation of barriers and facilitators created competing demands and a sense of chaos in participants' lives, which led them to address reentry-related basic needs (e.g., housing, food) before health care needs. Interventions that simultaneously address multiple levels, including augmenting employment and housing opportunities, enhancing social support, and reducing stigma, are needed. Copyright © 2015 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pregnancy Outcomes in HIV-Infected Women: Experience from a Tertiary Care Center in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadhwal, Vatsla; Sharma, Aparna; Khoiwal, Kavita; Deka, Dipika; Sarkar, Plaboni; Vanamail, P

    2017-01-01

    There is conflicting data on the effect of HIV infection as well as antiretroviral therapy (ART) on pregnancy outcome. The objectives of this study were to compare pregnancy outcomes in women with and without HIV infection, and to evaluate the effect of HAART on pregnancy in HIV-infected women. This is a prospective case record analysis of 212 HIV-infected women delivering between 2002 and 2015, in a tertiary health care center in India. The pregnancy outcome in HIV-infected women was compared to 238 HIV-uninfected controls. Women received ART for prevention of mother to child transmission as per protocol which varied during the period of study. Effect of use of ART on preterm birth (PTB) and intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) was analyzed. HIV-infected women were more likely to have PTB, IUGR, and anemia (9.4%, 9.9%, 5.2%) compared to uninfected women (7.6%, 5%, 3.8%), this did not reach statistical significance (P-value = >0.05). The incidence of PIH, diabetes mellitus and intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy was similar in both groups. Mean birth weight was significantly lower in neonates of HIV-infected women (2593.60±499g) than HIV-uninfected women (2919±459g) [P-value=0.001]. neonatal intensive care unit admissions were also significantly higher in infants born to HIV-infected women (P-value=0.002). HIV-infected women on ART had decreased incidence of PTB and IUGR. Good antenatal care and multidisciplinary team approach can optimize pregnancy outcomes in HIV-infected women.

  8. Sex Practices by HIV Awareness and Engagement in the Continuum of Care Among MSM: A National HIV Behavioral Surveillance Analysis in 21 U.S. Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitham, Hilary K; Sansom, Stephanie L; Wejnert, Cyprian; Finlayson, Teresa; Huang, Ya-Lin A; An, Qian; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2018-03-01

    Using National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) cross-sectional survey and HIV testing data in 21 U.S. metropolitan areas, we identify sex practices among sexually active men who have sex with men (MSM) associated with: (1) awareness of HIV status, and (2) engagement in the HIV care continuum. Data from 2008, 2011, and 2014 were aggregated, yielding a sample of 5079 sexually active MSM living with HIV (MLWH). Participants were classified into HIV status categories: (1) unaware; (2) aware and out of care; (3) aware and in care without antiretroviral therapy (ART); and (4) aware and on ART. Analyses were conducted examining sex practices (e.g. condomless sex, discordant condomless sex, and number of sex partners) by HIV status. Approximately 30, 5, 10 and 55% of the sample was classified as unaware, aware and out of care, aware and in care without ART, and aware and on ART, respectively. Unaware MLWH were more likely to report condomless anal sex with a last male partner of discordant or unknown HIV status (25.9%) than aware MLWH (18.0%, p value aware MLWH (17.3 and 5.6%, p-value HIV status (ranging from 17.7 to 21.3%), and median number of both male and female sex partners were similar. In conclusion, awareness of HIV and engagement in care was not consistently associated with protective sex practices, highlighting the need for continued prevention efforts.

  9. Seroconversion rate among health care workers exposed to HIV-contaminated body fluids: The University of Pittsburgh 13-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaiwu, Chibueze A; Egro, Francesco M; Smith, Saundra; Harper, Jay D; Spiess, Alexander M

    2017-08-01

    The studies enumerating the risk of HIV transmission to health care workers (HCWs) as 0.3% after percutaneous exposure to HIV-positive blood, and 0.09% after a mucous membrane exposure, are weakened by dated literature. Our study aims to demonstrate the seroconversion rate after exposure to HIV-contaminated body fluids in a major academic center in the United States. A prospectively maintained database of reported occupational injuries occurring between 2002 and 2015 at an academic medical center was analyzed. Data collected included the type of injury, injured body part, type of fluid, contamination of sharps, involvement of resident physicians, use of postexposure prophylaxis, and patients' HIV, hepatitis B virus, and hepatitis C virus status. A total of 266 cases were included in the study. Most exposures were caused by percutaneous injuries (52.6%), followed by 43.2% mucocutaneous injuries. Of the injuries, 52.6% were to the hand and 33.5% to the face and neck. Blood exposure accounted for 64.3% of all cases. Of the patients, 21.1% received postexposure prophylaxis. None of the HCWs exposed to HIV-contaminated body fluids seroconverted (seroconversion rate, 0%). HIV does not seem to be as easily transmitted by needlestick, laceration, or splash injuries as previously surmised. Further large-scale and multicenter studies are needed for a more accurate estimation of the risk of transmission of HIV in U.S. health care workers. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Persisting stigma reduces the utilisation of HIV-related care and support services in Viet Nam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanh Duong Cong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seeking and utilisation of HIV prevention, treatment, care, and support services for people living with HIV is often hampered by HIV-related stigma. The study aimed to explore the perceptions and experiences regarding treatment, care, and support amongst people living with HIV in Viet Nam, where the HIV epidemic is concentrated among injecting drug users, sex workers, and men who have sex with men. Methods In-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted during September 2007 in 6 districts in Hai Phong with a very high HIV prevalence among injecting drug users. The information obtained was analysed and merged within topic areas. Illustrative quotes were selected. Results Stigma and discrimination against people living with HIV in the community and healthcare settings was commonly reported, and substantially hampered the seeking and the utilisation of HIV-related services. The informants related the high level of stigma to the way the national HIV preventive campaigns played on fear, by employing a “scare tactic” mainly focusing on drug users and sex workers, who were defined as “social evils” in the anti-drug and anti-prostitution policy. There was a strong exclusion effect caused by the stigma, with serious implications, such as loss of job opportunities and isolation. The support and care provided by family members was experienced as vital for the spirit and hope for the future among people living with HIV. Conclusions A comprehensive care and support programme is needed. The very high levels of stigma experienced seem largely to have been created by an HIV preventive scare tactic closely linked to the “social evil“ approach in the national policy on drug and prostitution. In order to reduce the stigma and create more effective interventions, this tactic will have to be replaced with approaches that create better legal and policy environments for drug users and sex workers.

  11. HIV/AIDS and home-based health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne TS

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper highlights the socio-economic impacts of HIV/AIDS on women. It argues that the socio-cultural beliefs that value the male and female lives differently lead to differential access to health care services. The position of women is exacerbated by their low financial base especially in the rural community where their main source of livelihood, agricultural production does not pay much. But even their active involvement in agricultural production or any other income ventures is hindered when they have to give care to the sick and bedridden friends and relatives. This in itself is a threat to household food security. The paper proposes that gender sensitive policies and programming of intervention at community level would lessen the burden on women who bear the brunt of AIDS as caregivers and livelihood generators at household level. Improvement of medical facilities and quality of services at local dispensaries is seen as feasible since they are in the rural areas. Other interventions should target freeing women's and girls' time for education and involvement in income generating ventures. Two separate data sets from Western Kenya, one being quantitative and another qualitative data have been used.

  12. HIV sexual transmission risks in the context of clinical care: a prospective study of behavioural correlates of HIV suppression in a community sample, Atlanta, GA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar; Merely, Cindy; Welles, Brandi; Pellowski, Jennifer; Kegler, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves the health of people living with HIV and has the potential to reduce HIV infectiousness, thereby preventing HIV transmission. However, the success of ART for HIV prevention hinges on sustained ART adherence and avoiding sexually transmitted infections (STI). To determine the sexual behaviours and HIV transmission risks of individuals with suppressed and unsuppressed HIV replication (i.e., viral load). Assessed HIV sexual transmission risks among individuals with clinically determined suppressed and unsuppressed HIV. Participants were 760 men and 280 women living with HIV in Atlanta, GA, USA, who completed behavioural assessments, 28-daily prospective sexual behaviour diaries, one-month prospective unannounced pill counts for ART adherence, urine screening for illicit drug use and medical record chart abstraction for HIV viral load. Individuals with unsuppressed HIV demonstrated a constellation of behavioural risks for transmitting HIV to uninfected sex partners that included symptoms of STI and substance use. In addition, 15% of participants with suppressed HIV had recent STI symptoms/diagnoses, indicating significant risks for sexual infectiousness despite their HIV suppression in blood plasma. Overall, 38% of participants were at risk for elevated sexual infectiousness and just as many engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse with non-HIV-infected partners. Implementation strategies for using HIV treatments as HIV prevention requires enhanced behavioural interventions that extend beyond ART to address substance use and sexual health that will otherwise undermine the potential preventive impact of early ART.

  13. HIV Model Parameter Estimates from Interruption Trial Data including Drug Efficacy and Reservoir Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Rutao; Piovoso, Michael J.; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2012-01-01

    Mathematical models based on ordinary differential equations (ODE) have had significant impact on understanding HIV disease dynamics and optimizing patient treatment. A model that characterizes the essential disease dynamics can be used for prediction only if the model parameters are identifiable from clinical data. Most previous parameter identification studies for HIV have used sparsely sampled data from the decay phase following the introduction of therapy. In this paper, model parameters are identified from frequently sampled viral-load data taken from ten patients enrolled in the previously published AutoVac HAART interruption study, providing between 69 and 114 viral load measurements from 3–5 phases of viral decay and rebound for each patient. This dataset is considerably larger than those used in previously published parameter estimation studies. Furthermore, the measurements come from two separate experimental conditions, which allows for the direct estimation of drug efficacy and reservoir contribution rates, two parameters that cannot be identified from decay-phase data alone. A Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo method is used to estimate the model parameter values, with initial estimates obtained using nonlinear least-squares methods. The posterior distributions of the parameter estimates are reported and compared for all patients. PMID:22815727

  14. Optimal HIV testing and earlier care: the way forward in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coenen, T; Lundgren, J; Lazarus, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    The articles in this supplement were developed from a recent pan-European conference entitled 'HIV in Europe 2007: Working together for optimal testing and earlier care', which took place on 26-27 November in Brussels, Belgium. The conference, organized by a multidisciplinary group of experts......: current barriers to HIV testing across Europe, trends in the epidemiology of HIV in the region, problems associated with undiagnosed infection and the psychosocial barriers impacting on testing. The supplement also provides a summary of the World Health Organization's recommendations for HIV testing...

  15. Treatment eligibility and retention in clinical HIV care: A regression discontinuity study in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Jacob; Fox, Matthew P; Rosen, Sydney; Venkataramani, Atheendar; Tanser, Frank; Pillay, Deenan; Bärnighausen, Till

    2017-11-01

    Loss to follow-up is high among HIV patients not yet receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Clinical trials have demonstrated the clinical efficacy of early ART; however, these trials may miss an important real-world consequence of providing ART at diagnosis: its impact on retention in care. We examined the effect of immediate (versus deferred) ART on retention in care using a regression discontinuity design. The analysis included all patients (N = 11,306) entering clinical HIV care with a first CD4 count between 12 August 2011 and 31 December 2012 in a public-sector HIV care and treatment program in rural South Africa. Patients were assigned to immediate versus deferred ART eligibility, as determined by a CD4 count linear regression models with a data-driven bandwidth and with the algorithm for selecting the bandwidth chosen ex ante. Among patients with CD4 counts close to the 350-cells/μl threshold, having an ART-eligible CD4 count (<350 cells/μl) was associated with higher 12-month retention than not having an ART-eligible CD4 count (50% versus 32%), an intention-to-treat risk difference of 18 percentage points (95% CI 11 to 23; p < 0.001). The decision to start ART was determined by CD4 count for one in four patients (25%) presenting close to the eligibility threshold (95% CI 20% to 31%; p < 0.001). In this subpopulation, having an ART-eligible CD4 count was associated with higher 12-month retention than not having an ART-eligible CD4 count (91% versus 21%), a complier causal risk difference of 70 percentage points (95% CI 42 to 98; p < 0.001). The major limitations of the study are the potential for limited generalizability, the potential for outcome misclassification, and the absence of data on longer-term health outcomes. Patients who were eligible for immediate ART had dramatically higher retention in HIV care than patients who just missed the CD4-count eligibility cutoff. The clinical and population health benefits of offering immediate ART regardless

  16. Family model of HIV care and treatment: a retrospective study in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Nyanza Province, Kenya, had the highest HIV prevalence in the country at 14.9% in 2007, more than twice the national HIV prevalence of 7.1%. Only 16% of HIV-infected adults in the country accurately knew their HIV status. Targeted strategies to reach and test individuals are urgently needed to curb the HIV epidemic. The family unit is one important portal. Methods A family model of care was designed to build on the strengths of Kenyan families. Providers use a family information table (FIT) to guide index patients through the steps of identifying family members at HIV risk, address disclosure, facilitate family testing, and work to enrol HIV-positive members and to prevent new infections. Comprehensive family-centred clinical services are built around these steps. To assess the approach, a retrospective study of patients receiving HIV care between September 2007 and September 2009 at Lumumba Health Centre in Kisumu was conducted. A random sample of FITs was examined to assess family reach. Results Through the family model of care, for each index patient, approximately 2.5 family members at risk were identified and 1.6 family members were tested. The approach was instrumental in reaching children; 61% of family members identified and tested were children. The approach also led to identifying and enrolling a high proportion of HIV- positive partners among those tested: 71% and 89%, respectively. Conclusions The family model of care is a feasible approach to broaden HIV case detection and service reach. The approach can be adapted for the local context and should continue to utilize index patient linkages, FIT adaption, and innovative methods to package services for families in a manner that builds on family support and enhances patient care and prevention efforts. Further efforts are needed to increase family member engagement. PMID:22353553

  17. Prevalence of Substance Use in an HIV Primary Care Safety Net Clinic: A Call for Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson-Rose, Carol; Draughon, Jessica E.; Zepf, Roland; Cuca, Yvette P.; Huang, Emily; Freeborn, Kellie; Lum, Paula J.

    2015-01-01

    Substance use complicates HIV care and prevention. Primary care clinics are an ideal setting to screen for and offer interventions for unhealthy alcohol and drug use; however, few HIV clinics routinely screen for substance use. We enrolled 208 clinic patients at an urban underserved HIV primary care clinic. We screened the patients for substance use with the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Score Test (ASSIST) and measured urine toxicology. Of the 168 participants who completed screening, the majority reported tobacco or non-prescribed substance use in the previous 3 months. White men reported significantly more amphetamine-type stimulant use compared to African American and Latino men (p < 0.001). Implementing standard clinic practice for screening and assessing substance use in HIV primary care clinics is needed. PMID:26763795

  18. Trust in physicians and racial disparities in HIV care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Somnath; Jacobs, Elizabeth A; Moore, Richard D; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2010-07-01

    Mistrust among African Americans is often considered a potential source of racial disparities in HIV care. We sought to determine whether greater trust in one's provider among African-American patients mitigates racial disparities. We analyzed data from 1,104 African-American and 201 white patients participating in a cohort study at an urban, academic HIV clinic between 2005 and 2008. African Americans expressed lower levels of trust in their providers than did white patients (8.9 vs. 9.4 on a 0-10 scale; p African Americans were also less likely than whites to be receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) when eligible (85% vs. 92%; p = 0.02), to report complete ART adherence over the prior 3 days (83% vs. 89%; p = 0.005), and to have a suppressed viral load (40% vs. 47%; p = 0.04). Trust in one's provider was not associated with receiving ART or with viral suppression but was significantly associated with adherence. African Americans who expressed less than complete trust in their providers (0-9 of 10) had lower ART adherence than did whites (adjusted OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.25-0.66). For African Americans who expressed complete trust in their providers (10 of 10), the racial disparity in adherence was less prominent but still substantial (adjusted OR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.36-0.95). Trust did not affect disparities in receipt of ART or viral suppression. Our findings suggest that enhancing trust in patient-provider relationships for African-American patients may help reduce disparities in ART adherence and the outcomes associated with improved adherence.

  19. Computer-based intervention in HIV clinical care setting improves antiretroviral adherence: the LifeWindows Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jeffrey D; Amico, K Rivet; Fisher, William A; Cornman, Deborah H; Shuper, Paul A; Trayling, Cynthia; Redding, Caroline; Barta, William; Lemieux, Anthony F; Altice, Frederick L; Dieckhaus, Kevin; Friedland, Gerald

    2011-11-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of LifeWindows, a theory-based, computer-administered antiretroviral (ARV) therapy adherence support intervention, delivered to HIV + patients at routine clinical care visits. 594 HIV + adults receiving HIV care at five clinics were randomized to intervention or control arms. Intervention vs. control impact in the intent-to-treat sample (including participants whose ARVs had been entirely discontinued, who infrequently attended care, or infrequently used LifeWindows) did not reach significance. Intervention impact in the On Protocol sample (328 intervention and control arm participants whose ARVs were not discontinued, who attended care and were exposed to LifeWindows regularly) was significant. On Protocol intervention vs. control participants achieved significantly higher levels of perfect 3-day ACTG-assessed adherence over time, with sensitivity analyses maintaining this effect down to 70% adherence. This study supports the utility of LifeWindows and illustrates that patients on ARVs who persist in care at clinical care sites can benefit from adherence promotion software.

  20. Patient Experiences of Decentralized HIV Treatment and Care in Plateau State, North Central Nigeria: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace O. Kolawole

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Decentralization of care and treatment for HIV infection in Africa makes services available in local health facilities. Decentralization has been associated with improved retention and comparable or superior treatment outcomes, but patient experiences are not well understood. Methods. We conducted a qualitative study of patient experiences in decentralized HIV care in Plateau State, north central Nigeria. Five decentralized care sites in the Plateau State Decentralization Initiative were purposefully selected. Ninety-three patients and 16 providers at these sites participated in individual interviews and focus groups. Data collection activities were audio-recorded and transcribed. Transcripts were inductively content analyzed to derive descriptive categories representing patient experiences of decentralized care. Results. Patient participants in this study experienced the transition to decentralized care as a series of “trade-offs.” Advantages cited included saving time and money on travel to clinic visits, avoiding dangers on the road, and the “family-like atmosphere” found in some decentralized clinics. Disadvantages were loss of access to ancillary services, reduced opportunities for interaction with providers, and increased risk of disclosure. Participants preferred decentralized services overall. Conclusion. Difficulty and cost of travel remain a fundamental barrier to accessing HIV care outside urban centers, suggesting increased availability of community-based services will be enthusiastically received.

  1. Influence of Jail Incarceration and Homelessness Patterns on Engagement in HIV Care and HIV Viral Suppression among New York City Adults Living with HIV/AIDS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Lim

    Full Text Available Both homelessness and incarceration are associated with housing instability, which in turn can disrupt continuity of HIV medical care. Yet, their impacts have not been systematically assessed among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA.We studied a retrospective cohort of 1,698 New York City PLWHA with both jail incarceration and homelessness during 2001-05 to evaluate whether frequent transitions between jail incarceration and homelessness were associated with a lower likelihood of continuity of HIV care during a subsequent one-year follow-up period. Using matched jail, single-adult homeless shelter, and HIV registry data, we performed sequence analysis to identify trajectories of these events and assessed their influence on engagement in HIV care and HIV viral suppression via marginal structural modeling.Sequence analysis identified four trajectories; 72% of the cohort had sporadic experiences of both brief incarceration and homelessness, whereas others experienced more consistent incarceration or homelessness during early or late months. Trajectories were not associated with differential engagement in HIV care during follow-up. However, compared with PLWHA experiencing early bouts of homelessness and later minimal incarceration/homelessness events, we observed a lower prevalence of viral suppression among PLWHA with two other trajectories: those with sporadic, brief occurrences of incarceration/homelessness (0.67, 95% CI = 0.50,0.90 and those with extensive incarceration experiences (0.62, 95% CI = 0.43,0.88.Housing instability due to frequent jail incarceration and homelessness or extensive incarceration may exert negative influences on viral suppression. Policies and services that support housing stability should be strengthened among incarcerated and sheltered PLWHA to reduce risk of adverse health conditions.

  2. Met and unmet palliative care needs of people living with HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rising number of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) worldwide has made health care professionals and policy makers search for accessible health care that will meet the needs of people who are suffering from the disease and enhance their quality of life (QoL).This study investigated met and unmet palliative care ...

  3. Performance evaluation of the point-of-care SAMBA I and II HIV-1 Qual whole blood tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Allyson V; Goel, Neha; Sembongi, Hiroshi; Lehga, Jesse; Farleigh, Laura E; Edemaga, Daniel; Wisniewski, Craig A; Lee, Helen H

    2016-11-01

    The SAMBA HIV-1 Qual Whole Blood Test is a nucleic acid-based amplification assay for the qualitative detection of HIV-1 in whole blood of adults or infants. The test can be run on either the semi-automated SAMBA I system for clinical use or the fully automated, including readout, SAMBA II system for point-of-care use in resource-limited settings. We have assessed the performance characteristics of the SAMBA HIV-1 Qual Whole Blood Test on SAMBA I and SAMBA II. The limit of detection obtained for the two tests were 518IU/ml and 399copies/ml on SAMBA I and 457IU/ml and 433copies/ml on SAMBA II. Test specificity on both systems was 100% with a panel of 503 HIV-1 negative samples. Evaluation of test reproducibility showed 100% concordance with expected gold standard results as well as 100% agreement between operators, days, and runs as well as within runs on both SAMBA I and SAMBA II. Our results thus show that the SAMBA HIV-1 Qual Whole Blood Test performs equivalently on SAMBA I and SAMBA II, and also suggest that the test is suitable for implementation in medium-throughput clinical facilities (SAMBA I) or low-throughput point-of-care (POC) settings (SAMBA II) in resource-poor regions. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthollet Bwira Kaboru

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (TB are major contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The two diseases have been described as a harmful synergy as they are biologically and epidemiologically linked. Control of TB/HIV co-infection is an integral and most challenging part of both national TB and national HIV control programmes, especially in contexts of instability where health systems are suffering from political and social strife. This study aimed at assessing the provision of HIV/TB co-infection services in health facilities in the conflict-ridden region of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo. Methods A cross-sectional survey of health facilities that provide either HIV or TB services or both was carried out. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Results Eighty facilities were identified, of which 64 facilities were publicly owned. TB care was more available than HIV care (in 61% vs. 9% of facilities. Twenty-three facilities (29% offered services to co-infected patients. TB/HIV co-infection rates among patients were unknown in 82% of the facilities. Only 19 facilities (24% reported some coordination with and support from concerned diseases’ control programmes. HIV and TB services are largely fragmented, indicating imbalances and poor coordination by disease control programmes. Conclusion HIV and TB control appear not to be the focus of health interventions in this crisis affected region, despite the high risks of TB and HIV infection in the setting. Comprehensive public health response to this setting calls for reforms that promote joint TB/HIV co-infection control, including improved leadership by the HIV programmes that accuse weaknesses in this conflict-ridden region.

  5. TB/HIV Co-Infection Care in Conflict-Affected Settings: A Mapping of Health Facilities in the Goma Area, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaboru, Berthollet Bwira; Ogwang, Brenda A; Namegabe, Edmond Ntabe; Mbasa, Ndemo; Kabunga, Deka Kambale; Karafuli, Kambale

    2013-09-01

    HIV/AIDS and Tuberculosis (TB) are major contributors to the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa. The two diseases have been described as a harmful synergy as they are biologically and epidemiologically linked. Control of TB/HIV co-infection is an integral and most challenging part of both national TB and national HIV control programmes, especially in contexts of instability where health systems are suffering from political and social strife. This study aimed at assessing the provision of HIV/TB co-infection services in health facilities in the conflict-ridden region of Goma in Democratic Republic of Congo. A cross-sectional survey of health facilities that provide either HIV or TB services or both was carried out. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect the data which was analysed using descriptive statistics. Eighty facilities were identified, of which 64 facilities were publicly owned. TB care was more available than HIV care (in 61% vs. 9% of facilities). Twenty-three facilities (29%) offered services to co-infected patients. TB/HIV co-infection rates among patients were unknown in 82% of the facilities. Only 19 facilities (24%) reported some coordination with and support from concerned diseases' control programmes. HIV and TB services are largely fragmented, indicating imbalances and poor coordination by disease control programmes. HIV and TB control appear not to be the focus of health interventions in this crisis affected region, despite the high risks of TB and HIV infection in the setting. Comprehensive public health response to this setting calls for reforms that promote joint TB/HIV co-infection control, including improved leadership by the HIV programmes that accuse weaknesses in this conflict-ridden region.

  6. 78 FR 43055 - Accelerating Improvements in HIV Prevention and Care in the United States Through the HIV Care...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... treat HIV. Accordingly, further Federal action is appropriate in response to these new developments. For example, a breakthrough research trial supported by the National Institutes of Health showed that... quantitative goals for reducing new HIV infections, improving health outcomes for people living with HIV, and...

  7. Acute kidney injury among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D W; Brima, N; Walker, D; Connolly, J; Laing, C; Copas, A J; Edwards, S G; Batson, S; Miller, R F

    2015-11-01

    We describe the incidence, associations and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). We retrospectively analysed 223 admissions to an inner-London, University-affiliated ICU between 1999 and 2012, and identified those with AKI and performed multivariate analysis to determine associations with AKI. Of all admissions, 66% were affected by AKI of any severity and 35% developed stage 3 AKI. In multivariate analysis, AKI was associated with chronic kidney disease (odds ratio [OR] = 3.19; p = 0.014), a previous AIDS-defining illness (OR = 1.93; p = 0.039) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, (OR = 3.49; p = 0.018, if > 30). No associations were demonstrated with use of anti-retroviral medication (including tenofovir), or an individual's HIV viral load or CD4 count. AKI was associated with higher inpatient mortality and longer duration of ICU admission. Among patients with stage 3 AKI, only 41% were alive 90 days after ICU admission. Among survivors, 74% regained good renal function, the remainder were dependent on renal replacement therapy or were left with significant ongoing renal dysfunction. Of note, many patients had baseline serum creatinine concentrations well below published reference ranges. AKI among HIV-infected patients admitted to ICU carries a poor prognosis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Critical Review: Building on the HIV Cascade: A Complementary "HIV States and Transitions" Framework for Describing HIV Diagnosis, Care, and Treatment at the Population Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kimberly A; Miller, William C

    2015-07-01

    The HIV cascade--often referred to as "the HIV continuum"--provides a valuable framework for population-level representations of engagement with the HIV healthcare system. The importance and appeal of this framework are evidenced by a large body of scientific literature, as well as by the adoption of cascade-related indicators by medical and public health organizations worldwide. Despite its centrality in the fields of HIV treatment and prevention, however, the traditional cascade provides limited description of the processes affecting the numbers it represents. Representations that describe these processes and capture the dynamic nature of HIV-infected persons' pathways through the healthcare system are essential for monitoring and predicting intervention effects and epidemic trends. We propose here a complementary schema--termed the "HIV States and Transitions" framework--designed to maintain key strengths of the traditional cascade while addressing key limitations and more fully describing the dynamic aspects of HIV testing, care, and treatment at the population level.

  9. Late presentation for HIV care across Europe: update from the Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research Europe (COHERE) study, 2010 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocroft, Amanda; Lundgren, Jens; Antinori, Andrea; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Brännström, Johanna; Bonnet, Fabrice; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Casabona, Jordi; Castagna, Antonella; Costagliola, Dominique; De Wit, Stéphane; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Furrer, Hansjakob; Jadand, Corinne; Johnson, Anne; Lazanas, Mario; Leport, Catherine; Moreno, Santiago; Mussini, Christina; Obel, Niels; Post, Frank; Reiss, Peter; Sabin, Caroline; Skaletz-Rorowski, Adriane; Suarez-Loano, Ignacio; Torti, Carlo; Warszawski, Josiane; Wittkop, Linda; Zangerle, Robert; Chene, Genevieve; Raben, Dorthe; Kirk, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Late presentation (LP) for HIV care across Europe remains a significant issue. We provide a cross-European update from 34 countries on the prevalence and risk factors of LP for 2010-2013. People aged ≥ 16 presenting for HIV care (earliest of HIV-diagnosis, first clinic visit or cohort enrollment) after 1 January 2010 with available CD4 count within six months of presentation were included. LP was defined as presentation with a CD4 count defining event (at any CD4), in the six months following HIV diagnosis. Logistic regression investigated changes in LP over time. A total of 30,454 people were included. The median CD4 count at presentation was 368/mm(3) (interquartile range (IQR) 193-555/mm(3)), with no change over time (p = 0.70). In 2010, 4,775/10,766 (47.5%) were LP whereas in 2013, 1,642/3,375 (48.7%) were LP (p = 0.63). LP was most common in central Europe (4,791/9,625, 49.8%), followed by northern (5,704/11,692; 48.8%), southern (3,550/7,760; 45.8%) and eastern Europe (541/1,377; 38.3%; p < 0.0001). There was a significant increase in LP in male and female people who inject drugs (PWID) (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)/year later 1.16; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.32), and a significant decline in LP in northern Europe (aOR/year later 0.89; 95% CI: 0.85-0.94). Further improvements in effective HIV testing strategies, with a focus on vulnerable groups, are required across the European continent.

  10. Foster Care History and HIV Infection among Drug-Using African American Female Sex Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surratt, Hilary L.; Kurtz, Steven P.

    2011-01-01

    Foster care has been associated with increased HIV risk behaviors among youth, yet long-term association with HIV infection has not been examined. This study explored the associations between foster placement, victimization, mental health, onset of sex work and HIV infection among highly vulnerable female sex workers. 562 drug-involved African American women were enrolled into an intervention study to increase health services utilization and reduce HIV risk. Seventeen percent reported a history of foster placement. Foster history was associated with significantly lower educational attainment, higher victimization, and more severe mental health problems. Women with foster histories reported significantly earlier entry into paid sex work, with some 62% active in the sex trade before age 18. Multivariate analyses found that foster care was independently associated with HIV seropositivity, and that early sex work partially mediated this association. The potential long-term health vulnerabilities associated with foster placement are understudied and warrant additional research. PMID:21818654

  11. Why increasing availability of ART is not enough: a rapid, community-based study on how HIV-related stigma impacts engagement to care in rural South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treves-Kagan, Sarah; Steward, Wayne T; Ntswane, Lebogang; Haller, Robin; Gilvydis, Jennifer M; Gulati, Harnik; Barnhart, Scott; Lippman, Sheri A

    2016-01-28

    Stigma is a known barrier to HIV testing and care. Because access to antiretroviral therapy reduces overt illness and mortality, some scholars theorized that HIV-related stigma would decrease as treatment availability increased. However, the association between ART accessibility and stigma has not been as straightforward as originally predicted. We conducted a "situational analysis"--a rapid, community-based qualitative assessment to inform a combination HIV prevention program in high prevalence communities. In the context of this community-based research, we conducted semi-structured interviews and focus groups with 684 individuals in four low-resource sub-districts in North West Province, South Africa. In addition to using this data to inform programming, we examined the impact of stigma on the uptake of services. Findings suggested that anticipated stigma remains a barrier to care. Although participants reported less enacted stigma, or hostility toward people living with HIV, they also felt that HIV remains synonymous with promiscuity and infidelity. Participants described community members taking steps to avoid being identified as HIV-positive, including avoiding healthcare facilities entirely, using traditional healers, or paying for private doctors. Such behaviors led to delays in testing and accessing care, and problems adhering to medications, especially for men and youth with no other health condition that could plausibly account for their utilization of medical services. We conclude that providing access to ART alone will not end HIV-related stigma. Instead, individuals will remain hesitant to seek care as long as they fear that doing so will lead to prejudice and discrimination. It is critical to combat this trend by increasing cultural acceptance of being seropositive, integrating HIV care into general primary care and normalizing men and youths' accessing health care.

  12. Decreased chronic morbidity but elevated HIV associated cytokine levels in HIV-infected older adults receiving HIV treatment: benefit of enhanced access to care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutevedzi, Portia C; Rodger, Alison J; Kowal, Paul; Nyirenda, Makandwe; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2013-01-01

    The association of HIV with chronic morbidity and inflammatory markers (cytokines) in older adults (50+years) is potentially relevant for clinical care, but data from African populations is scarce. To examine levels of chronic morbidity by HIV and ART status in older adults (50+years) and subsequent associations with selected pro-inflammatory cytokines and body mass index. Ordinary, ordered and generalized ordered logistic regression techniques were employed to compare chronic morbidity (heart disease (angina), arthritis, stroke, hypertension, asthma and diabetes) and cytokines (Interleukins-1 and -6, C-Reactive Protein and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha) by HIV and ART status on a cross-sectional random sample of 422 older adults nested within a defined rural South African population based demographic surveillance. Using a composite measure of all morbidities, controlling for age, gender, BMI, smoking and wealth quintile, HIV-infected individuals on ART had 51% decreased odds (95% CI:0.26-0.92) of current morbidity compared to HIV-uninfected. In adjusted regression, compared to HIV-uninfected, the proportional odds (aPOR) of having elevated inflammation markers of IL6 (>1.56 pg/mL) was nearly doubled in HIV-infected individuals on (aPOR 1.84; 95%CI: 1.05-3.21) and not on (aPOR 1.94; 95%CI: 1.11-3.41) ART. Compared to HIV-uninfected, HIV-infected individuals on ART had >twice partial proportional odds (apPOR=2.30;p=0.004) of having non-clinically significant raised hsCRP levels(>1 ug/mL); ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals had >double apPOR of having hsCRP levels indicative of increased heart disease risk(>3.9 ug/mL;p=0.008). Although HIV status was associated with increased inflammatory markers, our results highlight reduced morbidity in those receiving ART and underscore the need of pro-actively extending these services to HIV-uninfected older adults, beyond mere provision at fixed clinics. Providing health services through regular community chronic disease

  13. Decreased chronic morbidity but elevated HIV associated cytokine levels in HIV-infected older adults receiving HIV treatment: benefit of enhanced access to care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portia C Mutevedzi

    Full Text Available The association of HIV with chronic morbidity and inflammatory markers (cytokines in older adults (50+years is potentially relevant for clinical care, but data from African populations is scarce.To examine levels of chronic morbidity by HIV and ART status in older adults (50+years and subsequent associations with selected pro-inflammatory cytokines and body mass index.Ordinary, ordered and generalized ordered logistic regression techniques were employed to compare chronic morbidity (heart disease (angina, arthritis, stroke, hypertension, asthma and diabetes and cytokines (Interleukins-1 and -6, C-Reactive Protein and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha by HIV and ART status on a cross-sectional random sample of 422 older adults nested within a defined rural South African population based demographic surveillance.Using a composite measure of all morbidities, controlling for age, gender, BMI, smoking and wealth quintile, HIV-infected individuals on ART had 51% decreased odds (95% CI:0.26-0.92 of current morbidity compared to HIV-uninfected. In adjusted regression, compared to HIV-uninfected, the proportional odds (aPOR of having elevated inflammation markers of IL6 (>1.56 pg/mL was nearly doubled in HIV-infected individuals on (aPOR 1.84; 95%CI: 1.05-3.21 and not on (aPOR 1.94; 95%CI: 1.11-3.41 ART. Compared to HIV-uninfected, HIV-infected individuals on ART had >twice partial proportional odds (apPOR=2.30;p=0.004 of having non-clinically significant raised hsCRP levels(>1 ug/mL; ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals had >double apPOR of having hsCRP levels indicative of increased heart disease risk(>3.9 ug/mL;p=0.008.Although HIV status was associated with increased inflammatory markers, our results highlight reduced morbidity in those receiving ART and underscore the need of pro-actively extending these services to HIV-uninfected older adults, beyond mere provision at fixed clinics. Providing health services through regular community chronic disease

  14. Effective interventions to improve young adults' linkage to HIV care in Sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavegam, Bertille Octavie; Pharr, Jennifer R; Cruz, Patricia; Ezeanolue, Echezona E

    2017-10-01

    HIV/AIDS remains a major public health problem despite the efforts to prevent and decrease its spread. Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) represents 70% of the global number of people living with HIV and 73% of all HIV/AIDS-related deaths. Young adults age 15-24 years are disproportionately impacted by HIV/AIDS in SSA with 34% of people living with HIV (PLWHIV) and 37% of newly diagnosed individuals being in this age group. It is important that PLWHIV be linked to care to facilitate antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation and limit the spread of infection. We conducted a systematic literature review to identify effective interventions designed to improve linkage to care among HIV-infected young adults in SSA. One hundred and forty-six titles and abstracts were screened, 28 full-texts were reviewed, and 6 articles met the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Home-based HIV counseling and testing, home-based HIV self-testing, and mobile HIV counseling and testing followed by proper referral of HIV-positive patients to HIV care were effective for improving linkage of young adults to care. Other factors such as referral forms, transportation allowance, home initiation of HIV care, and volunteer escort to the HIV treatment clinic were effective in reducing time to linkage to care. There is a vast need for research and interventions that target HIV-positive young adults in SSA which aim to improve their linkage and access to HIV care. The results of this study illustrate effective interventions in improving linkage to care and reducing time to linkage to care of young adults in SSA.

  15. Unhealthy substance-use behaviors as symptom-related self-care in persons with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, John M; Rose, Carol Dawson; Nicholas, Patrice K; Sloane, Rick; Corless, Inge B; Lindgren, Teri G; Wantland, Dean J; Kemppainen, Jeanne K; Sefcik, Elizabeth F; Nokes, Kathleen M; Kirksey, Kenn M; Eller, Lucille; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L; Portillo, Carmen J; Mendez, Marta Rivero; Robinson, Linda M; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Ros, Ana Viamonte; Nicholas, Thomas P; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Bain, Catherine; Tyer-Viola, Lynda; Zang, Sheryl M; Shannon, Maureen; Peters-Lewis, Angelleen; Willard, Suzanne

    2011-03-01

    Unhealthy substance-use behaviors, including a heavy alcohol intake, illicit drug use, and cigarette smoking, are engaged in by many HIV-positive individuals, often as a way to manage their disease-related symptoms. This study, based on data from a larger randomized controlled trial of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual, examines the prevalence and characteristics of unhealthy behaviors in relation to HIV/AIDS symptoms. The mean age of the sample (n = 775) was 42.8 years and 38.5% of the sample was female. The mean number of years living with HIV was 9.1 years. The specific self-reported unhealthy substance-use behaviors were the use of marijuana, cigarettes, a large amount of alcohol, and illicit drugs. A subset of individuals who identified high levels of specific symptoms also reported significantly higher substance-use behaviors, including amphetamine and injection drug use, heavy alcohol use, cigarette smoking, and marijuana use. The implications for clinical practice include the assessment of self-care behaviors, screening for substance abuse, and education of persons regarding the self-management of HIV.

  16. Meeting the milestones. Strategies for including high-value care education in pulmonary and critical care fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtright, Katherine R; Weinberger, Steven E; Wagner, Jason

    2015-04-01

    Physician decision making is partially responsible for the roughly 30% of U.S. healthcare expenditures that are wasted annually on low-value care. In response to both the widespread public demand for higher-quality care and the cost crisis, payers are transitioning toward value-based payment models whereby physicians are rewarded for high-value, cost-conscious care. Furthermore, to target physicians in training to practice with cost awareness, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has created both individual objective milestones and institutional requirements to incorporate quality improvement and cost awareness into fellowship training. Subsequently, some professional medical societies have initiated high-value care educational campaigns, but the overwhelming majority target either medical students or residents in training. Currently, there are few resources available to help guide subspecialty fellowship programs to successfully design durable high-value care curricula. The resource-intensive nature of pulmonary and critical care medicine offers unique opportunities for the specialty to lead in modeling and teaching high-value care. To ensure that fellows graduate with the capability to practice high-value care, we recommend that fellowship programs focus on four major educational domains. These include fostering a value-based culture, providing a robust didactic experience, engaging trainees in process improvement projects, and encouraging scholarship. In doing so, pulmonary and critical care educators can strive to train future physicians who are prepared to provide care that is both high quality and informed by cost awareness.

  17. Request for HIV serology in primary care: A survey of medical and nursing professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichiule-Castañeda, Myrian; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas; Esteban-Vasallo, María D; García-Riolobos, Carmen; Álvarez-Castillo, M Carmen; Astray-Mochales, Jenaro

    2018-01-15

    In the Community of Madrid there is 42.7% late HIV diagnosis. Primary care is the gateway to the health system and the frequency of serological tests requested by these professionals is unknown. The objectives were to establish the frequency of requests for HIV serology by medical and nursing primary care professionals in the Community of Madrid and the factors associated with these requests. An 'on-line' survey was conducted, asking professionals who participated in the evaluation study of strategies to promote early diagnosis of HIV in primary care in the Community of Madrid (ESTVIH) about the number of HIV-serology tests requested in the last 12 months. The association between HIV-serology requesting and the sociodemographic and clinical practice characteristics of the professionals was quantified using adjusted odds ratios (aOR) according to logistic regression. 264 surveys (59.5% physicians). Eighty-two point two percent of medical and 18.7% of nursing professionals reported requesting at least one HIV-serology in the last 12 months (median: 15 and 2 HIV-serology request, respectively). The doctors associated the request with: being male (aOR: 2.95; 95% CI: 0.82-10.56), being trained in pre-post HIV test counselling (aOR: 2.42; 95% CI: 0.84-6.93) and the nurses with: age (13 years; aOR: 3.02; 95% CI: 1.07-8.52). It is necessary to promote HIV testing and training in pre-post HIV test counselling for medical and nursing professionals in primary care centres. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Late Presentation for HIV Care in the United States and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Keri N.; Gange, Stephen J.; Klein, Marina B.; Brooks, John T.; Hogg, Robert S.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Horberg, Michael A.; Saag, Michael S.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Justice, Amy C.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Eron, Joseph J.; Rourke, Sean B.; Gill, M. John; Rodriguez, Benigno; Sterling, Timothy R.; Calzavara, Liviana M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Rachlis, Anita R.; Napravnik, Sonia; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Collier, Ann C.; Benson, Constance A.; Silverberg, Michael J.; Kushel, Margot; Goedert, James J.; McKaig, Rosemary G.; Van Rompaey, Stephen E.; Zhang, Jinbing; Moore, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Initiatives to improve early detection and access to HIV services have increased over time. We assessed the immune status of patients at initial presentation for HIV care from 1997-2007 in 13 US and Canadian clinical cohorts. Methods: We analyzed data from 44,491 HIV-infected patients enrolled in the North American – AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design. We identified first presentation for HIV care as the time of first CD4+ T-lymphocyte (CD4) measurement and excluded patients who prior to this date had HIV RNA measurements, evidence of antiretroviral exposure, or a history of AIDS-defining illness. Trends in mean CD4 count (measured as cells/mm3) and 95% confidence intervals ([,]) were determined using linear regression adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, HIV transmission risk and cohort. Results: Median age at first presentation for HIV care increased over time (range 40-43 years, p<0.01), while the proportion of patients with injection drug use HIV transmission risk decreased (26% to 14%, p<0.01) and heterosexual transmission risk increased (16% to 23%, p<0.01). Median CD4 at presentation increased from 256 (IQR: 96-455) to 317 (IQR: 135-517) in 1997 to 2007 (p<0.01). The proportion with a CD4 count ≥350 at first presentation also increased from 1997 to 2007 (38% to 46%, p=<0.01). The estimated adjusted mean CD4 count increased at a rate of 6 [5, 7] per year. Conclusion: CD4 count at first presentation for HIV care has increased annually over the past 11 years, but has remained <350 cells/mm3, suggesting the urgent need for earlier HIV diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20415573

  19. Patient Enrolment into HIV Care and Treatment within 90 Days of HIV Diagnosis in Eight Rwandan Health Facilities: A Review of Facility-Based Registers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Fikse, Hadassa; Mugisha, Veronicah; Asiimwe, Anita; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has increased greatly in sub-Saharan Africa. However many patients do not enrol timely into HIV care and treatment after HIV diagnosis. We studied enrolment into care and treatment and determinants of non-enrolment in Rwanda. Methods: Data were

  20. Professional nurses' views regarding stigma and discrimination in the care of HIV and AIDS patients in rural hospitals of the Limpopo province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganye, Bumani S; Maluleke, Thelmah X; Lebese, Rachel T

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the views of professional nurses on the manifestations of HIV and AIDS stigma and discrimination and their influence on the quality of care rendered to people living with HIV and AIDS in three rural hospitals of Limpopo province, South Africa. The study was qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual in nature. The population included all professional nurses registered with the South African Nursing Council who were working with confirmed HIV-positive patients in the three hospitals and had received specialised training in voluntary counselling and testing (VCT), antiretrovirals (ARV), prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and couple counselling. A purposive sampling method was used to select both the wards and participants, based on set criteria. A total of 9 wards (6 adult medical and 3 maternity) and 37 participants were selected. Focus group discussions and semi-structured and key informant interviews were conducted. Data were analysed using a combination of data analysis guidelines from different sources. Results revealed that professional nurses were aware of the existence of HIV and AIDS stigma and discrimination in their wards and regarded these as bad and improper care of HIV-positive patients. Behaviour included leaving care of HIV patients to junior members of staff with limited skills and knowledge of HIV and AIDS; showing HIV-positive patients that their disease was dangerous and contagious; judgmental behaviour towards and stereotyping of HIV-positive patients; and regarding patients with HIV and AIDS as uncooperative and problematic in the wards.

  1. Late presenters to HIV care and treatment, identification of associated risk factors in HIV-1 infected Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauhan Neeraj K

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Timely access to antiretroviral therapy is a key to controlling HIV infection. Late diagnosis and presentation to care diminish the benefits of antiretrovirals and increase risk of transmission. We aimed to identify late presenters in patients sent for first CD4 T cell count after HIV diagnosis, for therapy initiation evaluation. Further we aimed at identifying patient factors associated with higher risk of late presentation. Methods Retrospective data collection and analysis was done for 3680 subjects visiting the laboratory for CD4 T cell counts between 2001 and 2007. We segregated the patients on basis of their CD4 T cell counts after first HIV diagnosis. Factors associated with risk of late presentation to CD4 T cell counts after HIV diagnosis were identified using univariate analysis, and the strength of association of individual factor was assessed by calculation of odds ratios. Results Of 3680 subjects, 2936 (83.37% were defined as late presenters. Late testing varied among age groups, transmission categories, and gender. Males were twice as likely to present late as compared to females. We found significant positive association of heterosexual transmission route (p p = 0.0004 to late presentation. Female sex, children below 14 years of age and sexual contact with HIV positive spouse were associated with significantly lower risks to presenting late. Intravenous drug users were also associated with lower risks of late presentation, in comparison to heterosexual transmission route. Conclusions The study identifies HIV infected population groups at a higher risk of late presentation to care and treatment. The risk factors identified to be associated with late presentation should be utilised in formulating targeted public health interventions in order to improve early HIV diagnosis.

  2. Effect of point-of-care CD4 cell count results on linkage to care and antiretroviral initiation during a home-based HIV testing campaign: a non-blinded, cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mitesh A; Okal, Dancun O; Rose, Charles E; Ndivo, Richard; Oyaro, Boaz; Otieno, Fredrick O; Williams, Tiffany; Chen, Robert T; Zeh, Clement; Samandari, Taraz

    2017-09-01

    HIV disease staging with referral laboratory-based CD4 cell count testing is a key barrier to the initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART). Point-of-care CD4 cell counts can improve linkage to HIV care among people living with HIV, but its effect has not been assessed with a randomised controlled trial in the context of home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBCT). We did a two-arm, cluster-randomised, controlled efficacy trial in two districts of western Kenya with ongoing HBCT. Housing compounds were randomly assigned (1:1) to point-of-care CD4 cell counts (366 compounds with 417 participants) or standard-of-care (318 compounds with 353 participants) CD4 cell counts done at one of three referral laboratories serving the study catchment area. In each compound, we enrolled people with HIV not engaged in care in the previous 6 months. All participants received post-test counselling and referral for HIV care. Point-of-care test participants received additional counselling on the result, including ART eligibility if CD4 was less than 350 cells per μL, the cutoff in Kenyan guidelines. Participants were interviewed 6 months after enrolment to ascertain whether they sought HIV care, verified through chart reviews at 23 local clinics. The prevalence of loss to follow-up at 6 months (LTFU) was listed as the main outcome in the study protocol. We analysed linkage to care at 6 months (defined as 1-LTFU) as the primary outcome. All analyses were by intention to treat. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02515149. We enrolled 770 participants between July 1, 2013, and Feb 28, 2014. 692 (90%) had verified linkage to care status and 78 (10%) were lost to follow-up. Of 371 participants in the point-of-care group, 215 (58%) had linked to care within 6 months versus 108 (34%) of 321 in the standard-of-care group (Cox proportional multivariable hazard ratio [HR] 2·14, 95% CI 1·67-2·74; log rank pPoint-of-care CD4 cell counts in a resource-limited HBCT

  3. HIV testing and treatment in the antenatal care setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coulter-Smith, S

    2012-02-01

    Routine linked HIV antenatal screening, with "opt-out", was introduced at the Rotunda in January 1998. This paper reviews the screening and subsequent pregnancy management and outcome in HIV positive women from 1998 to 2006. During this time 225 women (280 pregnancies) were HIV positive and 194 women subsequently delivered at the Rotunda, representing 233 liveborn infants. Overall anti-HIV prevalence was 0.42%, increasing from 0.06% in 1998 to 0.57% in 2006. Of 233 livebirths, 111 (48%) were delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery (SVD). HIV treatment was started pre-pregnancy in 14 (6%) pregnancies and antenatally in 208 (90%). The vertical transmission rate in mothers receiving >4 weeks of treatment was 0%. We conclude that routine antenatal HIV screening is effective and significantly benefits the health of mother and child.

  4. HIV testing and treatment in the antenatal care setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Coulter-Smith, S

    2010-01-01

    Routine linked HIV antenatal screening, with "opt-out", was introduced at the Rotunda in January 1998. This paper reviews the screening and subsequent pregnancy management and outcome in HIV positive women from 1998 to 2006. During this time 225 women (280 pregnancies) were HIV positive and 194 women subsequently delivered at the Rotunda, representing 233 liveborn infants. Overall anti-HIV prevalence was 0.42%, increasing from 0.06% in 1998 to 0.57% in 2006. Of 233 livebirths, 111 (48%) were delivered by spontaneous vaginal delivery (SVD). HIV treatment was started pre-pregnancy in 14 (6%) pregnancies and antenatally in 208 (90%). The vertical transmission rate in mothers receiving >4 weeks of treatment was 0%. We conclude that routine antenatal HIV screening is effective and significantly benefits the health of mother and child.

  5. Impact of systematic HIV testing on case finding and retention in care at a primary care clinic in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clouse, Kate; Hanrahan, Colleen F; Bassett, Jean; Fox, Matthew P; Sanne, Ian; Van Rie, Annelies

    2014-12-01

    Systematic, opt-out HIV counselling and testing (HCT) may diagnose individuals at lower levels of immunodeficiency but may impact loss to follow-up (LTFU) if healthier people are less motivated to engage and remain in HIV care. We explored LTFU and patient clinical outcomes under two different HIV testing strategies. We compared patient characteristics and retention in care between adults newly diagnosed with HIV by either voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) plus targeted provider-initiated counselling and testing (PITC) or systematic HCT at a primary care clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. One thousand one hundred and forty-four adults were newly diagnosed by VCT/PITC and 1124 by systematic HCT. Two-thirds of diagnoses were in women. Median CD4 count at HIV diagnosis (251 vs. 264 cells/μl, P = 0.19) and proportion of individuals eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) (67.2% vs. 66.7%, P = 0.80) did not differ by HCT strategy. Within 1 year of HIV diagnosis, half were LTFU: 50.5% under VCT/PITC and 49.6% under systematic HCT (P = 0.64). The overall hazard of LTFU was not affected by testing policy (aHR 0.98, 95%CI: 0.87-1.10). Independent of HCT strategy, males, younger adults and those ineligible for ART were at higher risk of LTFU. Implementation of systematic HCT did not increase baseline CD4 count. Overall retention in the first year after HIV diagnosis was low (37.9%), especially among those ineligible for ART, but did not differ by testing strategy. Expansion of HIV testing should coincide with effective strategies to increase retention in care, especially among those not yet eligible for ART at initial diagnosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Supply-side dimensions and dynamics of integrating HIV testing and counselling into routine antenatal care: a facility assessment from Morogoro Region, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Selena J; George, Asha S; LeFevre, Amnesty E; Mpembeni, Rose; Mosha, Idda; Mohan, Diwakar; Yang, Ann; Chebet, Joy; Lipingu, Chrisostom; Baqui, Abdullah H; Killewo, Japhet; Winch, Peter J; Kilewo, Charles

    2015-10-04

    Integration of HIV into RMNCH (reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health) services is an important process addressing the disproportionate burden of HIV among mothers and children in sub-Saharan Africa. We assess the structural inputs and processes of care that support HIV testing and counselling in routine antenatal care to understand supply-side dynamics critical to scaling up further integration of HIV into RMNCH services prior to recent changes in HIV policy in Tanzania. This study, as a part of a maternal and newborn health program evaluation in Morogoro Region, Tanzania, drew from an assessment of health centers with 18 facility checklists, 65 quantitative and 57 qualitative provider interviews, and 203 antenatal care observations. Descriptive analyses were performed with quantitative data using Stata 12.0, and qualitative data were analyzed thematically with data managed by Atlas.ti. Limitations in structural inputs, such as infrastructure, supplies, and staffing, constrain the potential for integration of HIV testing and counselling into routine antenatal care services. While assessment of infrastructure, including waiting areas, appeared adequate, long queues and small rooms made private and confidential HIV testing and counselling difficult for individual women. Unreliable stocks of HIV test kits, essential medicines, and infection prevention equipment also had implications for provider-patient relationships, with reported decreases in women's care seeking at health centers. In addition, low staffing levels were reported to increase workloads and lower motivation for health workers. Despite adequate knowledge of counselling messages, antenatal counselling sessions were brief with incomplete messages conveyed to pregnant women. In addition, coping mechanisms, such as scheduling of clinical activities on different days, limited service availability. Antenatal care is a strategic entry point for the delivery of critical tests and counselling messages

  7. Structural and Behavioral Correlates of HIV Infection among Pregnant Women in a Country with a Highly Generalized HIV Epidemic: A Cross-Sectional Study with a Probability Sample of Antenatal Care Facilities in Swaziland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhekumusa Wellington Lukhele

    Full Text Available HIV disproportionately affects women in Sub-Saharan Africa. Swaziland bears the highest HIV prevalence of 41% among pregnant women in this region. This heightened HIV-epidemic reflects the importance of context-specific interventions. Apart from routine HIV surveillance, studies that examine structural and behavioral factors associated with HIV infection among women may facilitate the revitalization of existing programs and provide insights to inform context-specific HIV prevention interventions.This cross-sectional study employed a two-stage random cluster sampling in ten antenatal health care facilities in the Hhohho region of Swaziland in August and September 2015. Participants were eligible for the study if they were 18 years or older and had tested for HIV. Self-administered tablet-based questionnaires were used to assess HIV risk factors. Of all eligible pregnant women, 827 (92.4% participated, out of which 297 (35.9% were self-reportedly HIV positive. Among structural factors, family function was not significantly associated with self-reported HIV positive status, while lower than high school educational attainment (AOR, 1.65; CI, 1.14-3.38; P = 0.008, and income below minimum wage (AOR, 1.81; CI, 1.09-3.01; P = 0.021 were significantly associated with self-reported HIV positive status. Behavioral factors significantly associated with reporting a positive HIV status included; ≥2 lifetime sexual partners (AOR, 3.16; CI, 2.00-5.00; P<0.001, and ever cohabited (AOR, 2.39; CI, 1.66-3.43; P = 0.00. The most cited reason for having multiple sexual partners was financial gain. HIV/AIDS-related knowledge level was high but not associated to self-reported HIV status (P = 0.319.Structural and behavioral factors showed significant association with self-reported HIV infection among pregnant women in Swaziland while HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and family function did not. This suggests that HIV interventions should be reinforced taking into

  8. Structural and Behavioral Correlates of HIV Infection among Pregnant Women in a Country with a Highly Generalized HIV Epidemic: A Cross-Sectional Study with a Probability Sample of Antenatal Care Facilities in Swaziland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukhele, Bhekumusa Wellington; Techasrivichien, Teeranee; Suguimoto, S Pilar; Musumari, Patou Masika; El-Saaidi, Christina; Haumba, Samson; Tagutanazvo, Oslinah Buru; Ono-Kihara, Masako; Kihara, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    HIV disproportionately affects women in Sub-Saharan Africa. Swaziland bears the highest HIV prevalence of 41% among pregnant women in this region. This heightened HIV-epidemic reflects the importance of context-specific interventions. Apart from routine HIV surveillance, studies that examine structural and behavioral factors associated with HIV infection among women may facilitate the revitalization of existing programs and provide insights to inform context-specific HIV prevention interventions. This cross-sectional study employed a two-stage random cluster sampling in ten antenatal health care facilities in the Hhohho region of Swaziland in August and September 2015. Participants were eligible for the study if they were 18 years or older and had tested for HIV. Self-administered tablet-based questionnaires were used to assess HIV risk factors. Of all eligible pregnant women, 827 (92.4%) participated, out of which 297 (35.9%) were self-reportedly HIV positive. Among structural factors, family function was not significantly associated with self-reported HIV positive status, while lower than high school educational attainment (AOR, 1.65; CI, 1.14-3.38; P = 0.008), and income below minimum wage (AOR, 1.81; CI, 1.09-3.01; P = 0.021) were significantly associated with self-reported HIV positive status. Behavioral factors significantly associated with reporting a positive HIV status included; ≥2 lifetime sexual partners (AOR, 3.16; CI, 2.00-5.00; Pfinancial gain. HIV/AIDS-related knowledge level was high but not associated to self-reported HIV status (P = 0.319). Structural and behavioral factors showed significant association with self-reported HIV infection among pregnant women in Swaziland while HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and family function did not. This suggests that HIV interventions should be reinforced taking into consideration these findings. The findings also suggest the importance of future research sensitive to the Swazi and African sociocultural contexts

  9. Housing Status, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes Among People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael G.; Shubert, Virginia; Gogolishvili, David; Globerman, Jason; Rueda, Sergio; Bozack, Anne K.; Caban, Maria; Rourke, Sean B.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Accumulating evidence suggests responses to HIV that combine individual-level interventions with those that address structural or contextual factors that influence risks and health outcomes of infection. Housing is such a factor. Housing occupies a strategic position as an intermediate structural factor, linking “upstream” economic, social, and cultural determinants to the more immediate physical and social environments in which everyday life is lived. The importance of housing status for HIV prevention and care has been recognized, but much of this attention has focused on homeless individuals as a special risk group. Analyses have less often addressed community housing availability and conditions as factors influencing population health or unstable, inadequate, or unaffordable housing as a situation or temporary state. A focus on individual-level characteristics associated with literal homelessness glosses over social, economic, and policy drivers operating largely outside any specific individual’s control that affect housing and residential environments and the health resources or risk exposures such contexts provide. Objectives. We examined the available empirical evidence on the association between housing status (broadly defined), medical care, and health outcomes among people with HIV and analyzed results to inform future research, program development, and policy implementation. Search methods. We searched 8 electronic health and social science databases from January 1, 1996, through March 31, 2014, using search terms related to housing, dwelling, and living arrangements and HIV and AIDS. We contacted experts for additional literature. Selection criteria. We selected articles if they were quantitative analyses published in English, French, or Spanish that included at least 1 measure of housing status as an independent variable and at least 1 health status, health care, treatment adherence, or risk behavior outcome among people with HIV in

  10. Housing Status, Medical Care, and Health Outcomes Among People Living With HIV/AIDS: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidala, Angela A; Wilson, Michael G; Shubert, Virginia; Gogolishvili, David; Globerman, Jason; Rueda, Sergio; Bozack, Anne K; Caban, Maria; Rourke, Sean B

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests responses to HIV that combine individual-level interventions with those that address structural or contextual factors that influence risks and health outcomes of infection. Housing is such a factor. Housing occupies a strategic position as an intermediate structural factor, linking "upstream" economic, social, and cultural determinants to the more immediate physical and social environments in which everyday life is lived. The importance of housing status for HIV prevention and care has been recognized, but much of this attention has focused on homeless individuals as a special risk group. Analyses have less often addressed community housing availability and conditions as factors influencing population health or unstable, inadequate, or unaffordable housing as a situation or temporary state. A focus on individual-level characteristics associated with literal homelessness glosses over social, economic, and policy drivers operating largely outside any specific individual's control that affect housing and residential environments and the health resources or risk exposures such contexts provide. We examined the available empirical evidence on the association between housing status (broadly defined), medical care, and health outcomes among people with HIV and analyzed results to inform future research, program development, and policy implementation. We searched 8 electronic health and social science databases from January 1, 1996, through March 31, 2014, using search terms related to housing, dwelling, and living arrangements and HIV and AIDS. We contacted experts for additional literature. We selected articles if they were quantitative analyses published in English, French, or Spanish that included at least 1 measure of housing status as an independent variable and at least 1 health status, health care, treatment adherence, or risk behavior outcome among people with HIV in high-income countries. We defined housing status to include

  11. Pediatric palliative care for youth with HIV/AIDS: systematic review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilkins ML

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Megan L Wilkins,1 Ronald H Dallas,1 Kathleen E Fanone,2 Maureen E Lyon3,4 1St Jude Children's Research Hospital, Department of Infectious Diseases, Memphis, TN, USA; 2Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Children's National Medical Center, 4George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC, USA Abstract: Improvement in treatment has led to decreased death in youth with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV in developed countries. Despite this, youth with HIV are still at risk for increased mortality and morbidity compared with their uninfected counterparts. In developing countries, high numbers of youth die from acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS-related illnesses due to lack of access to consistent antiretroviral treatment. As a result, pediatric palliative care is a relevant topic for those providing care to youth with HIV. A systematic review was conducted to gather information regarding the status of the literature related to pediatric palliative care and medical decision-making for youth with HIV. The relevant literature published between January 2002 and June 2012 was identified through searches conducted using PubMed, CINAHL, Scopus, and PSYCInfo databases and a series of key words. Articles were reviewed by thematic analysis using the pillars of palliative care set out by the National Consensus Project. Twenty-one articles were retained after review and are summarized by theme. In general, few empirically based studies evaluating palliative care and medical decision-making in youth with HIV were identified. Articles identified focused primarily on physical aspects of care, with less attention paid to psychological, social, ethical, and cultural aspects of care. We recommend that future research focuses on broadening the evaluation of pediatric palliative care among youth with HIV by directly evaluating the psychological, social, ethical, and cultural

  12. Impact of a bilingual/bicultural care team on HIV-related health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Maithe; Farnan, Rose; Cheng, An-Lin; Almeida, Amalia; Del Valle, Daniel; Pulido-Parra, Maria; Flores, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to examine the impact of a bilingual/bicultural care team on HIV-related health outcomes among Hispanic/Latino adults (N = 43) who received care in an academic HIV specialty clinic. Demographic and health data extracted from medical records from March 2005 to March 2007 were compared over two time periods: 1 year before and 1 year after implementation of the care team. Results indicated that there were more clinic visits per patient and that a higher percentage of individuals had suppressed HIV viral loads to workers who are bilingual/bicultural, together with the use of culturally and linguistically appropriate patient education materials, may enhance health outcomes among Hispanic adults living with HIV infection.

  13. How Advances in Technology Improve HIV/AIDS Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Tehrani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the U.S., the number of individuals aged 50 and older who are living with HIV has increased, leading to a phenomenon called the graying of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Advances in treating HIV have brought about a large growing population of seniors with HIV who are simultaneously facing social, psychological, and physical challenges correlated with the aging process. The stigma against HIV/AIDS has been linked to poor health, depression, and loneliness. In a recent study, about 39.1% of HIV/AIDS patients showed symptoms of major depression (C. Grov et al, 2010. Consequently, to reduce lasting effects of major depressive symptoms, there is a vital need for service providers to employ innovative efforts to confront the stigma and psychosocial and physical health problems that are characteristic of an older HIV/AIDS population. The new technological approaches to healthcare delivery have resulted in faster, more accurate diagnosis and monitoring, in more sophisticated coordination across regions and agencies, and in sophisticated risk-checking procedures. New healthcare technology that can help the AIDS/HIV patient is called Health Information Technology, a basic element of Health Relationship Management Services (HRMS, which is a new approach to healthcare. HRMS can assist individuals with HIV/AIDS in managing not only their physical, but also their mental health.

  14. Management and Treatment of Hepatitis B Virus in Patients with Hiv Infection: A Practical Guide for Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina B. Klein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The management and treatment of HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV-coinfected patients present specific challenges for clinicians. The morbidity and mortality related to these concomitant infections are growing concerns, while the use of antiviral drugs effective against both viruses complicates therapeutic decision making. The present document provides guidelines for physicians regarding care and treatment of patients coinfected with HIV and HBV. Primary prevention of HBV in HIV-positive patients is achieved through appropriate vaccination schedules. Follow-up before treatment of HBV may include liver biopsy, screening for hepatocellular carcinoma and testing for esophageal varicies in cases of cirrhosis. In HBV-infected patients requiring treatment, recommendations regarding initiation, duration and choice of first-line drugs are made. Finally, in the case of resistance, appropriate alternative therapies are necessary.

  15. Management and treatment of hepatitis B virus in patients with HIV infection: A practical guide for health care professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Marina B; Baril, Jean-Guy; Charron, Marc-André; Fortin, Claude; Lalonde, Richard; Matte, Marie-France; Poliquin, Marc; Talbot, Annie; Therrien, Rachel; Tremblay, Cécile; Trottier, Benoît; Tsarevsky, Irina; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The management and treatment of HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV)-coinfected patients present specific challenges for clinicians. The morbidity and mortality related to these concomitant infections are growing concerns, while the use of antiviral drugs effective against both viruses complicates therapeutic decision making. The present document provides guidelines for physicians regarding care and treatment of patients coinfected with HIV and HBV. Primary prevention of HBV in HIV-positive patients is achieved through appropriate vaccination schedules. Follow-up before treatment of HBV may include liver biopsy, screening for hepatocellular carcinoma and testing for esophageal varicies in cases of cirrhosis. In HBV-infected patients requiring treatment, recommendations regarding initiation, duration and choice of first-line drugs are made. Finally, in the case of resistance, appropriate alternative therapies are necessary. PMID:22942885

  16. HIV-positive migrants’ encounters with the Swedish health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehdiyar, Manijeh; Andersson, Rune; Hjelm, Katarina

    2016-01-01

    that participants experienced frustration and discrimination because they were required to provide sexual partners with information about their HIV status, which is compulsory under the Swedish Disease Act. The study also showed that the bias or fear regarding HIV infection among general health care professionals...... of access and adversity’ was identified as the core category of the study. Three additional categories were ‘appreciation of free access to treatment’, ‘the impact of the Swedish Disease Act on everyday life’, and ‘encountering discrimination in the general health care system’. The main finding indicated...... of this study felt discrimination in health care settings outside of the infectious diseases clinics. There is a need to reduce the discrimination in general health care services and to optimize the social support system and social network of this vulnerable group. Keywords: HIV-positive; migrants; health care...

  17. Association between pregnancy at enrollment into HIV care and loss to care among women in the Democratic Republic of Congo, 2006-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jonathan; Edmonds, Andrew; Hoover, Donald R; Shi, Qiuhu; Anastos, Kathryn; Lelo, Patricia; Behets, Frieda; Yotebieng, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    Loss to care is high among asymptomatic HIV-infected women initiated on antiretroviral therapy (ART) during pregnancy or in the postpartum period. However, whether pregnancy itself plays a role in the high loss to care rate is uncertain. We compared loss to care over seven years between pregnant and non-pregnant women at enrollment into HIV care in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). We conducted a retrospective analysis of all ART-naive women aged 15-45 initiating HIV care at two large clinics in Kinshasa, DRC, from 2007-2013. Pregnancy status was recorded at care enrollment. Patients were classified as having no follow-up if they did not return to care after the initial enrollment visit. Among those with at least one follow-up visit after enrollment, we classified patients as lost to care if more than 365 days had passed since their last clinic visit. We used logistic regression to model the association between pregnancy status and no follow-up, and Cox proportional hazards regression to model the association between pregnancy status and time to loss to care. Of 2175 women included in the analysis, 1497 (68.8%) were pregnant at enrollment. Compared to non-pregnant women, pregnant women were less likely to be over 35 years of age (19.1% vs. 31.9%, p<0.0001) and less likely to be in WHO stage III or IV (9.0% vs. 26.3%, p<0.0001). Among pregnant women, 106 (7.1%) were not seen after enrollment, versus 25 (3.7%) non-pregnant women (adjusted odds ratio 2.01, 95% CI 1.24-3.24). Of the 2,044 women with at least one follow-up visit, 46.5% of pregnant women and 46.7% of non-pregnant women were lost to care by 5 years; hazards of loss to care were similar for pregnant and non-pregnant women (adjusted hazard ratio 1.08, 95% CI 0.93-1.26). In this large cohort of HIV-infected women, patients pregnant at care enrollment were more likely to never return for follow-up. Among those who attended at least one follow-up visit, loss to care was not different between pregnant and

  18. The costs of HIV/AIDS care at government hospitals in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Chapman, Glyn; Chitsike, Inam

    2000-01-01

    and care of HIV/AIDS patients in health facilities is necessary in order to have an idea of the likely costs of the increasing number of HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, the present study estimated the costs per in-patient day as well as per in-patient stay for patients in government health facilities...... of the study indicate that hospital care for HIV/AIDS patients was considerably higher than for non-HIV/AIDS patients. In five of the seven hospitals visited, the average costs of an in-patient stay for an HIV/AIDS patient were found to be as much as twice as high as a non-HIV/AIDS patient. This difference...... could be attributed to higher direct costs per in-patient day (medication, laboratory tests and X-rays) as well as longer average lengths of stay in hospital for HIV/AIDS patients compared with non-infected patients. Therefore, the impact on hospital services of increasing number of HIV/AIDS patients...

  19. Treatment eligibility and retention in clinical HIV care: A regression discontinuity study in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Bor

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Loss to follow-up is high among HIV patients not yet receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART. Clinical trials have demonstrated the clinical efficacy of early ART; however, these trials may miss an important real-world consequence of providing ART at diagnosis: its impact on retention in care.We examined the effect of immediate (versus deferred ART on retention in care using a regression discontinuity design. The analysis included all patients (N = 11,306 entering clinical HIV care with a first CD4 count between 12 August 2011 and 31 December 2012 in a public-sector HIV care and treatment program in rural South Africa. Patients were assigned to immediate versus deferred ART eligibility, as determined by a CD4 count < 350 cells/μl, per South African national guidelines. Patients referred to pre-ART care were instructed to return every 6 months for CD4 monitoring. Patients initiated on ART were instructed to return at 6 and 12 months post-initiation and annually thereafter for CD4 and viral load monitoring. We assessed retention in HIV care at 12 months, as measured by the presence of a clinic visit, lab test, or ART initiation 6 to 18 months after initial CD4 test. Differences in retention between patients presenting with CD4 counts just above versus just below the 350-cells/μl threshold were estimated using local linear regression models with a data-driven bandwidth and with the algorithm for selecting the bandwidth chosen ex ante. Among patients with CD4 counts close to the 350-cells/μl threshold, having an ART-eligible CD4 count (<350 cells/μl was associated with higher 12-month retention than not having an ART-eligible CD4 count (50% versus 32%, an intention-to-treat risk difference of 18 percentage points (95% CI 11 to 23; p < 0.001. The decision to start ART was determined by CD4 count for one in four patients (25% presenting close to the eligibility threshold (95% CI 20% to 31%; p < 0.001. In this subpopulation, having an ART-eligible CD

  20. Quality assuring HIV point of care testing using whole blood samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare-Smith, Raellene; Badrick, Tony; Cunningham, Philip; Kesson, Alison; Badman, Susan

    2016-08-01

    The Royal College of Pathologists Australasia Quality Assurance Programs (RCPAQAP), have offered dedicated external quality assurance (EQA) for HIV point of care testing (PoCT) since 2011. Prior to this, EQA for these tests was available within the comprehensive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) module. EQA testing for HIV has typically involved the supply of serum or plasma, while in the clinic or community based settings HIV PoCT is generally performed using whole blood obtained by capillary finger-stick collection. RCPAQAP has offered EQA for HIV PoCT using stabilised whole blood since 2014. A total of eight surveys have been undertaken over a period of 2 years from 2014 to 2015. Of the 962 responses received, the overall consensus rate was found to be 98% (941/962). A total of 21 errors were detected. The majority of errors were attributable to false reactive HIV p24 antigen results (9/21, 43%), followed by false reactive HIV antibody results (8/21, 38%). There were 4/21 (19%) false negative HIV antibody results and no false negative HIV p24 antigen results reported. Overall performance was observed to vary minimally between surveys, from a low of 94% up to 99% concordant. Encouraging levels of testing proficiency for HIV PoCT are indicated by these data, but they also confirm the need for HIV PoCT sites to participate in external quality assurance programs to ensure the ongoing provision of high quality patient care. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia. All rights reserved.

  1. Community impact of HIV status disclosure through an integrated community home-based care programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncama, Busisiwe; Uys, Leana

    2006-11-01

    The integration of HIV-prevention activities into care has received little attention within or outside formal healthcare settings. The contribution of community home-based care services in facilitating disclosure of HIV status and reducing stigma have also not been described. This study examines the community impact of an integrated community home-based care (ICHC) programme on HIV-prevention efforts and disclosure of status. Quantitative data was collected from 363 people living with HIV (PLHIV) and 1 028 members of their micro-communities; of these, 211 and 586, respectively, were in the ICHC programme (thus representing the ICHC-served group) and 152 and 442, respectively, were not in the programme (representing the non-served or control group). The micro-community group served by the ICHC programme reported significantly more positive attitudes towards HIV, better knowledge of HIV, fewer instances of sexually-transmitted infections, a tendency for fewer sexual partners, and less perceived risk of acquiring HIV than the non-served micro-community group. Also, the micro-community served by the programme did not show significantly better uptake of voluntary counselling and testing than did the non-served micro-community. There was no difference in condom-use between the two groups.

  2. A Review of Social Media Technologies Across the Global HIV Care Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garett, Renee; Smith, Justin; Young, Sean D

    2016-06-01

    HIV remains one of the main health global threats of the 21 st century. There is a great need to reach HIV at-risk and HIV+ populations across the HIV care continuum to improve HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. New technologies, such as Social Media (SM) and Social Networking Sites (SNS) have shown early promise in HIV research studies. To assess the state of research on the use of SM/SNSs across the HIV continuum, we conducted a systematic literature review on HIV-related research using SM during the last 10 years. A total of 44 papers were identified, of which 17 (38.6%) were classified as intervention studies and 19 (61.3%) as observational. The focus areas of the studies was evenly distributed between outreach outreach/recruitment (n=15, 34.1%), surveillance/observation (n=13, 29.5%) and prevention/treatment (n=16, 36.4%). Researchers engaged the community through Facebook (n=26, 59.1%), multiple-platforms (n=13, 29.5%), or one of several geo-social networking sites (n=10, 22.7%). Studies primarily targeted MSM (n=24, 54.5%) and youth (n=13, 29.5%) with little research focused on HIV+ populations (n=5, 11.4%). The current state of the field, trends, and limitations of this work are discussed.

  3. The experiences of family caregivers concerning their care of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-13

    Nov 13, 2008 ... orphanages, most of Africa's orphans have been absorbed into extended family networks. ... It is recommended that health care workers, including social workers and home-based caregivers be trained on available social support ..... and negative emotional states such as helplessness, decreasing self-.

  4. Survival analysis of patients under chronic HIV-care and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    survival may also reflect differences in access to health care (e.g. access to testing, counseling, preventive .... The database for this study included patients of age from. 15 to 75 years who had come to the clinic from the ... The data were stored in Excel, and then imported to. SPSS, SAS and Stata for further analysis. Most of ...

  5. HIV testing experiences and their implications for patient engagement with HIV care and treatment on the eve of 'test and treat'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wringe, Alison; Moshabela, Mosa; Nyamukapa, Constance

    2017-01-01

    without consent, which could lead to disengagement from care. Conflicting rationalities for HIV testing between health workers and their clients caused tensions that undermined engagement in HIV care among people living with HIV. Although many health workers helped clients to accept their diagnosis...... and engage in care, some delivered static, morally charged messages regarding sexual behaviours and expectations of clinic use which discouraged future care seeking. Repeat testing was commonly reported, reflecting patients’ doubts over the accuracy of prior results and beliefs that antiretroviral therapy...

  6. COST OF INPATIENT CARE FOR HIV- POSITIVE PATIENTS AT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    2004-11-01

    Nov 1, 2004 ... laboratory investigations done, surgical procedures performed and medication prescribed were obtained from the patient records. ... HIV+ patients were 4.7 times more likely to die in hospital than HIV-ve patients. Their average ..... discharge (as soon as they are stabilised) back into the cycle of poverty, and ...

  7. Care of women with HIV infection - a gynaecologist/obstetrician's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Women, especially those in the reproductive age group, make up more than 50% of people living with HIV/AIDS worldwide. Most of these infections are acquired via heterosexual transmission, and therefore the interaction between HIV infection and most of the gynaecological conditions is to be expected. Further research is ...

  8. Hypertension and obesity among HIV patients in a care programme ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of hypertension and obesity among HIV patients enrolled in the Sex Worker Outreach Programme (SWOP), Nairobi, Kenya. Design: A retrospective astudy. Setting: SWOP managed by the University of Manitoba, Nairobi team. Subjects: We selected clinic visit records from HIV patients ...

  9. Socio-demographic determinants of basic knowledge on HIV care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    14, 85.7%), p=0.029, so were those with secondary and post-secondary education (36/46, 78.3%), p=0.002, those who got HIV information from multiple sources (70/91, 76.9%), p<0.001, and those with HIV infection for 8 years (60/76, 75.9%).

  10. Risk factors for anaemia among HIV infected children attending care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is paucity of data describing the risk factors for anaemia among HIV infected children in Tanzania. This cross sectional study was carried out to determine the contributing factors for anaemia among HIV-infected children attending Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam. Both univariate and multivariate logistic ...

  11. Task shifting in Mozambique: cross-sectional evaluation of non-physician clinicians' performance in HIV/AIDS care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rolanda

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many resource-constrained countries now train non-physician clinicians in HIV/AIDS care, a strategy known as 'task-shifting.' There is as yet no evidence-based international standard for training these cadres. In 2007, the Mozambican Ministry of Health (MOH conducted a nationwide evaluation of the quality of care delivered by non-physician clinicians (técnicos de medicina, or TMs, after a two-week in-service training course emphasizing antiretroviral therapy (ART. Methods Forty-four randomly selected TMs were directly observed by expert clinicians as they cared for HIV-infected patients in their usual worksites. Observed clinical performance was compared to national norms as taught in the course. Results In 127 directly observed patient encounters, TMs assigned the correct WHO clinical stage in 37.6%, and correctly managed co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in 71.6% and ART in 75.5% (adjusted estimates. Correct management of all 5 main aspects of patient care (staging, co-trimoxazole, ART, opportunistic infections, and adverse drug reactions was observed in 10.6% of encounters. The observed clinical errors were heterogeneous. Common errors included assignment of clinical stage before completing the relevant patient evaluation, and initiation or continuation of co-trimoxazole or ART without indications or when contraindicated. Conclusions In Mozambique, the in-service ART training was suspended. MOH subsequently revised the TMs' scope of work in HIV/AIDS care, defined new clinical guidelines, and initiated a nationwide re-training and clinical mentoring program for these health professionals. Further research is required to define clinically effective methods of health-worker training to support HIV/AIDS care in Mozambique and similarly resource-constrained environments.

  12. Do HIV care providers appropriately manage hepatitis B in coinfected patients treated with antiretroviral therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Mamta K; Opio, Christopher K; Osuagwu, Chukwuma C; Pillai, Rathi; Keiser, Philip; Lee, William M

    2007-04-01

    The common occurrence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in patients who carry the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) demands that both viruses be recognized, evaluated, and treated when appropriate. We identified 357 HIV- and hepatitis B surface antigen-positive patients who underwent testing from 1999 to 2003; 155 patients who were new to our clinic and who initiated therapy for HIV and HBV coinfection were considered for inclusion in the study. The frequency of HIV testing (to determine HIV load and CD4+ cell count) performed during the first year of therapy was compared with the frequency of HBV measurements (to determine hepatitis B e antigen, antibody to hepatitis B e antigen, and HBV load), abdominal ultrasound examination, and measurement of levels of alpha-fetoprotein in serum. HBV load data were obtained for only 16% of patients before initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), whereas HIV load was determined for 99% of patients before initiation of ART. The total number of HIV load measurements obtained during the first year after ART initiation was 497 (median number of HIV load measurements per patient, 3.0), compared with 85 measurements of HBV load (median number of HBV load measurements per patient, <1; P<.001). The percentage of patients who received any level of HBV monitoring (i.e., tests to determine hepatitis B e antigen, antibody to hepatitis B e antigen, and HBV load) after ART initiation increased from 7% in 1999 to 52% in 2001 (P<.001), whereas the percentage of patients who underwent HIV load testing remained at 80%-90% during the same period. Health care providers treating patients with HIV infection during the period 1999-2003 infrequently monitored HBV response in coinfected patients, but they systematically monitored HIV response after ART initiation. Improved physician adherence to guidelines that better delineate HBV treatment and monitoring for patients with HIV-HBV coinfection is needed.

  13. TB/HIV integration at primary care level: A quantitative assessment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. In 2004 the World Health Organization (WHO) released the Interim Policy on Collaborative TB/HIV activities. According to the policy, for people living with HIV (PLWH), activities include intensified case finding, isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) and infection control. For TB patients, activities included HIV ...

  14. A historical review of HIV prevention and care initiatives in British Columbia, Canada: 1996-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olding, Michelle; Enns, Ben; Panagiotoglou, Dimitra; Shoveller, Jean; Harrigan, P Richard; Barrios, Rolando; Kerr, Thomas; Montaner, Julio S G; Nosyk, Bohdan

    2017-09-19

    British Columbia has made significant progress in the treatment and prevention of HIV since 1996, when Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) became available. However, we currently lack a historical summary of HIV prevention and care interventions implemented in the province since the introduction of HAART and how they have shaped the HIV epidemic. Guided by a socio-ecological framework, we present a historical review of biomedical and health services, community and structural interventions implemented in British Columbia from 1996-2015 to prevent HIV transmission or otherwise enhance the cascade of HIV care. We constructed a historical timeline of HIV interventions implemented in BC between 1996 and 2015 by reviewing publicly available reports, guidelines and other documents from provincial health agencies, community organizations and AIDS service organizations, and by conducting searches of peer-reviewed literature through PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE. We collected further programmatic information by administering a data collection form to representatives from BC's regional health authorities and an umbrella agency representing 45 AIDS Service organizations. Using linked population-level health administrative data, we identified key phases of the HIV epidemic in British Columbia, as characterized by distinct changes in HIV incidence, HAART uptake and the provincial HIV response. In total, we identified 175 HIV prevention and care interventions implemented in BC from 1996 to 2015. We identify and describe four phases in BC's response to HIV/AIDS: the early HAART phase (1996-1999); the harm reduction and health service scale-up phase (2000-2005); the early Treatment as Prevention phase (2006-2009); and the STOP HIV/AIDS phase (2010-present). In doing so, we provide an overview of British Columbia's universal and centralized HIV treatment system and detail the role of community-based and provincial stakeholders in advancing innovative prevention and harm reduction

  15. Clinic Network Collaboration and Patient Tracing to Maximize Retention in HIV Care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H McMahon

    Full Text Available Understanding retention and loss to follow up in HIV care, in particular the number of people with unknown outcomes, is critical to maximise the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. Individual-level data are not available for these outcomes in Australia, which has an HIV epidemic predominantly focused amongst men who have sex with men.A network of the 6 main HIV clinical care sites was established in the state of Victoria, Australia. Individuals who had accessed care at these sites between February 2011 and June 2013 as assessed by HIV viral load testing but not accessed care between June 2013 and February 2014 were considered individuals with potentially unknown outcomes. For this group an intervention combining cross-referencing of clinical data between sites and phone tracing individuals with unknown outcomes was performed. 4966 people were in care in the network and before the intervention estimates of retention ranged from 85.9%-95.8% and the proportion with unknown outcomes ranged from 1.3-5.5%. After the intervention retention increased to 91.4-98.8% and unknown outcomes decreased to 0.1-2.4% (p<.01 for all sites for both outcomes. Most common reasons for disengagement from care were being too busy to attend or feeling well. For those with unknown outcomes prior to the intervention documented active psychiatric illness at last visit was associated with not re-entering care (p = 0.04.The network demonstrated low numbers of people with unknown outcomes and high levels of retention in care. Increased levels of retention in care and reductions in unknown outcomes identified after the intervention largely reflected confirmation of clinic transfers while a smaller number were successfully re-engaged in care. Factors associated with disengagement from care were identified. Systems to monitor patient retention, care transfer and minimize disengagement will maximise individual and population-level outcomes for populations with HIV.

  16. Knowledge of HIV-related disabilities and challenges in accessing care: Qualitative research from Zimbabwe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena Morgon Banks

    Full Text Available While the rapid expansion in antiretroviral therapy access in low and middle income countries has resulted in dramatic declines in mortality rates, many people living with HIV face new or worsening experiences of disability. As nearly 1 in 20 adults are living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa-many of whom are likely to develop disabling sequelae from long-term infection, co-morbidities and side effects of their treatment-understanding the availability and accessibility of services to address HIV-related disabilities is of vital importance. The aim of this study thus is to explore knowledge of HIV-related disabilities amongst stakeholders working in the fields of HIV and disability and factors impacting uptake and provision of interventions for preventing, treating or managing HIV-related disabilities.In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten stakeholders based in Harare, Zimbabwe, who were working in the fields of either disability or HIV. Stakeholders were identified through a priori stakeholder analysis. Thematic Analysis, complemented by constant comparison as described in Grounded Theory, was used to analyse findings.All key informants reported some level of knowledge of HIV-related disability, mostly from observations made in their line of work. However, they reported no interventions or policies were in place specifically to address HIV-related disability. While referrals between HIV and rehabilitation providers were not uncommon, no formal mechanisms had been established for collaborating on prevention, identification and management. Additional barriers to accessing and providing services to address HIV-related disabilities included: the availability of resources, including trained professionals, supplies and equipment in both the HIV and rehabilitation sectors; lack of disability-inclusive adaptations, particularly in HIV services; heavy centralization of available services in urban areas, without accessible, affordable

  17. Occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance among Drug-naïve pregnant women in selected HIV-care centres in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Odoom, Alexander; Adiku, Theophilus; Delgado, Elena; Lartey, Margaret; Ampofo, William K

    2017-03-01

    Access to antiretroviral therapy in Ghana has been scaled up across the country over the last decade. This study sought to determine the occurrence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in pregnant HIV-1 positive women yet to initiate antiretroviral therapy at selected HIV Care Centres in Ghana. Plasma specimens from twenty-six (26) HIV seropositive pregnant women who were less than 28weeks pregnant with their first pregnancy and ART naïve were collected from selected HIV care centres in three (3) regions in Ghana. Genotypic testing was done for the reverse transcriptase gene and the sequences generated were analyzed for HIV-1 drug resistance mutations using the Stanford University HIV Drug Resistance Database. Resistance mutations associated with the reverse transcriptase gene were detected in 4 (15.4%) of the participants. At least one major drug resistance mutation in the reverse transcriptase gene was found in 3 (11.5%) of the women. The detection of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in this drug-naïve group in two regional HIV care sites is an indication of the need for renewed action in monitoring the emergence of transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance in Ghana. None declared.

  18. Linkage to HIV care after home-based HIV counselling and testing in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzagira, Eugene; Baisley, Kathy; Kamali, Anatoli; Biraro, Samuel; Grosskurth, Heiner

    2017-07-01

    Home-based HIV counselling and testing (HBHCT) has the potential to increase HIV testing uptake in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), but data on linkage to HIV care after HBHCT are scarce. We conducted a systematic review of linkage to care after HBHCT in SSA. Five databases were searched for studies published between 1st January 2000 and 19th August 2016 that reported on linkage to care among adults newly identified with HIV infection through HBHCT. Eligible studies were reviewed, assessed for risk of bias and findings summarised using the PRISMA guidelines. A total of 14 studies from six countries met the eligibility criteria; nine used specific strategies (point-of-care CD4 count testing, follow-up counselling, provision of transport funds to clinic and counsellor facilitation of HIV clinic visit) in addition to routine referral to facilitate linkage to care. Time intervals for ascertaining linkage ranged from 1 week to 12 months post-HBHCT. Linkage ranged from 8.2% [95% confidence interval (CI), 6.8-9.8%] to 99.1% (95% CI, 96.9-99.9%). Linkage was generally lower (80%) if additional strategies were used. Only one study assessed linkage by means of a randomised trial. Five studies had data on cotrimoxazole (CTX) prophylaxis and 12 on ART eligibility and initiation. CTX uptake among those eligible ranged from 0% to 100%. The proportion of persons eligible for ART ranged from 16.5% (95% CI, 12.1-21.8) to 77.8% (95% CI, 40.0-97.2). ART initiation among those eligible ranged from 14.3% (95% CI, 0.36-57.9%) to 94.9% (95% CI, 91.3-97.4%). Additional linkage strategies, whilst seeming to increase linkage, were not associated with higher uptake of CTX and/or ART. Most of the studies were susceptible to risk of outcome ascertainment bias. A pooled analysis was not performed because of heterogeneity across studies with regard to design, setting and the key variable definitions. Only few studies from SSA investigated linkage to care among adults newly diagnosed with HIV through

  19. Uptake, outcomes, and costs of antenatal, well-baby, and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services under routine care conditions in Zambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callie A Scott

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zambia adopted Option A for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT in 2010 and announced a move to Option B+ in 2013. We evaluated the uptake, outcomes, and costs of antenatal, well-baby, and PMTCT services under routine care conditions in Zambia after the adoption of Option A. METHODS: We enrolled 99 HIV-infected/HIV-exposed (index mother/baby pairs with a first antenatal visit in April-September 2011 at four study sites and 99 HIV-uninfected/HIV-unexposed (comparison mother/baby pairs matched on site, gestational age, and calendar month at first visit. Data on patient outcomes and resources utilized from the first antenatal visit through six months postpartum were extracted from site registers. Costs in 2011 USD were estimated from the provider's perspective. RESULTS: Index mothers presented for antenatal care at a mean 23.6 weeks gestation; 55% were considered to have initiated triple-drug antiretroviral therapy (ART based on information recorded in site registers. Six months postpartum, 62% of index and 30% of comparison mother/baby pairs were retained in care; 67% of index babies retained had an unknown HIV status. Comparison and index mother/baby pairs utilized fewer resources than under fully guideline-concordant care; index babies utilized more well-baby resources than comparison babies. The average cost per comparison pair retained in care six months postpartum was $52 for antenatal and well-baby services. The average cost per index pair retained was $88 for antenatal, well-baby, and PMTCT services and increased to $185 when costs of triple-drug ART services were included. CONCLUSIONS: HIV-infected mothers present to care late in pregnancy and many are lost to follow up by six months postpartum. HIV-exposed babies are more likely to remain in care and receive non-HIV, well-baby care than HIV-unexposed babies. Improving retention in care, guideline concordance, and moving to Option B+ will result in

  20. Engagement with Care, Substance Use, and Adherence to Therapy in HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice K. Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Engagement with care for those living with HIV is aimed at establishing a strong relationship between patients and their health care provider and is often associated with greater adherence to therapy and treatment (Flickinger, Saha, Moore, and Beach, 2013. Substance use behaviors are linked with lower rates of engagement with care and medication adherence (Horvath, Carrico, Simoni, Boyer, Amico, and Petroli, 2013. This study is a secondary data analysis using a cross-sectional design from a larger randomized controlled trial (n=775 that investigated the efficacy of a self-care symptom management manual for participants living with HIV. Participants were recruited from countries of Africa and the US. This study provides evidence that substance use is linked with lower self-reported engagement with care and adherence to therapy. Data on substance use and engagement are presented. Clinical implications of the study address the importance of utilizing health care system and policy factors to improve engagement with care.

  1. Engagement with Care, Substance Use, and Adherence to Therapy in HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Patrice K; Willard, Suzanne; Thompson, Clinton; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Corless, Inge B; Wantland, Dean J; Sefcik, Elizabeth F; Nokes, Kathleen M; Kirksey, Kenn M; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Holzemer, William L; Portillo, Carmen J; Rivero Mendez, Marta; Robinson, Linda M; Rosa, Maria; Human, Sarie P; Cuca, Yvette; Huang, Emily; Maryland, Mary; Arudo, John; Eller, Lucille Sanzero; Stanton, Mark A; Driscoll, Marykate; Voss, Joachim G; Moezzi, Shahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Engagement with care for those living with HIV is aimed at establishing a strong relationship between patients and their health care provider and is often associated with greater adherence to therapy and treatment (Flickinger, Saha, Moore, and Beach, 2013). Substance use behaviors are linked with lower rates of engagement with care and medication adherence (Horvath, Carrico, Simoni, Boyer, Amico, and Petroli, 2013). This study is a secondary data analysis using a cross-sectional design from a larger randomized controlled trial (n = 775) that investigated the efficacy of a self-care symptom management manual for participants living with HIV. Participants were recruited from countries of Africa and the US. This study provides evidence that substance use is linked with lower self-reported engagement with care and adherence to therapy. Data on substance use and engagement are presented. Clinical implications of the study address the importance of utilizing health care system and policy factors to improve engagement with care.

  2. HIV in Kenya: Sexual behaviour and quality of care of sexually transmitted diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A.C.M. Voeten (Hélène)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes three important determinants of HIV spread in Kenya: 1. Sexual behaviour of female sex workers, their clients, and young adults 2. Health care seeking behaviour for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) 3. Quality of STD care in the public and private health

  3. Mobile health for early retention in HIV care: a qualitative study in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... that increased communication via the text messaging intervention has the potential to enable early identification of problems, leading to timely problem solving that may improve retention and engagement in care during the first year after diagnosis. Keywords: engagement in care, HIV, mobile health, sub-Saharan Africa ...

  4. The Family Context of Care in HIV/AIDS: A Study of Mumbai, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Cruz, Premilla

    2004-01-01

    Though the continuum of care model has been adopted in HIV/AIDS intervention, there is little empirical work documenting the experiences of caregiving families. Addressing this gap, a study on family caregiving and care receiving was undertaken in Mumbai, India. In-depth interviews were conducted with seven seropositive caregivers, seven…

  5. HIV/AIDS and admission to intensive care units: A comparison of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We reviewed published information on legislation and practices related to intensive care unit (ICU) admission in India, Brazil and South Africa, to assess access to critical care services in the context of HIV. Each of these countries has legal instruments in place to provide their citizens with health services, but they differ in ...

  6. Vulnerable children in Ukraine : impact of institutional care and HIV on the development of preschoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobrova-Krol, Natasha

    2009-01-01

    Although institutional care jeopardizes children’s development, some studies suggest that well-functioning child-care institutions may offer children a better environment than their own dysfunctional families. For the growing number of HIV-infected children who often live in underprivileged families

  7. TB/HIV integration at primary care level: A quantitative assessment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-02

    Sep 2, 2012 ... asymptomatic PLWH were offered IPT. Infection control. TB/HIV integration at primary care level: A quantitative assessment at 3 clinics in. Johannesburg, South Africa. L Page-Shipp, Y Voss De Lima,K Clouse,J de Vos, L Evarts, J Bassett, I Sanne, A Van Rie. Right to Care, Johannesburg. L Page-Shipp, MB ...

  8. A Novel Educational Strategy Targeting Health Care Workers in Underserved Communities in Central America to Integrate HIV into Primary Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flys, Tamara; González, Rosalba; Sued, Omar; Suarez Conejero, Juana; Kestler, Edgar; Sosa, Nestor; McKenzie-White, Jane; Monzón, Irma Irene; Torres, Carmen-Rosa; Page, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background Current educational strategies to integrate HIV care into primary medical care in Central America have traditionally targeted managers or higher-level officials, rather than local health care workers (HCWs). We developed a complementary online and on-site interactive training program to reach local HCWs at the primary care level in underserved communities. Methods The training program targeted physicians, nurses, and community HCWs with limited access to traditional onsite training in Panama, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, and Guatemala. The curriculum focused on principles of HIV care and health systems using a tutor-supported blended educational approach of an 8-week online component, a weeklong on-site problem-solving workshop, and individualized project-based interventions. Results Of 258 initially active participants, 225 (225/258 = 87.2%) successfully completed the online component and the top 200 were invited to the on-site workshop. Of those, 170 (170/200 = 85%) attended the on-site workshop. In total, 142 completed all three components, including the project phase. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation instruments included knowledge assessments, reflexive essays, and acceptability surveys. The mean pre and post-essay scores demonstrating understanding of social determinants, health system organization, and integration of HIV services were 70% and 87.5%, respectively, with an increase in knowledge of 17.2% (p<0.001). The mean pre- and post-test scores evaluating clinical knowledge were 70.9% and 90.3%, respectively, with an increase in knowledge of 19.4% (p<0.001). A survey of Likert scale and open-ended questions demonstrated overwhelming participant satisfaction with course content, structure, and effectiveness in improving their HIV-related knowledge and skills. Conclusion This innovative curriculum utilized technology to target HCWs with limited access to educational resources. Participants benefited from technical skills acquired