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Sample records for included gravely impoverished

  1. Association between TSH-Receptor Autoimmunity, Hyperthyroidism, Goitre, and Orbitopathy in 208 Patients Included in the Remission Induction and Sustenance in Graves' Disease Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurberg, Peter; Nygaard, Birte; Andersen, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Background. Graves' disease may have a number of clinical manifestations with varying degrees of activity that may not always run in parallel. Objectives. To study associations between serum levels of TSH-receptor autoantibodies and the three main manifestations of Graves' disease (hyperthyroidism...... and Sustenance in Graves' Disease (RISG)." Patients were systematically tested for degree of biochemical hyperthyroidism, enlarged thyroid volume by ultrasonography, and the presence of orbitopathy. Results. Positive correlations were found between the levels of TSH-receptor autoantibodies in serum and the three...... manifestations of Graves' disease: severeness of hyperthyroidism, presence of enlarged thyroid, and presence of orbitopathy, as well as between the different types of manifestations. Only around half of patients had enlarged thyroid gland at the time of diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, whereas 25-30% had...

  2. Graves' Disease

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    ... 2011 survey of clinical practice patterns in the management of Graves' disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2012 Dec;97( ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  3. Hashimoto's thyroiditis following Graves' disease.

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    Umar, Husaini; Muallima, Nur; Adam, John M F; Sanusi, Harsinen

    2010-01-01

    Both Graves' disease and chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis) are autoimmune diseases of thyroid gland. Graves' disease is caused by stimulation of TSH receptor located on the thyroid gland by an antibody, which is known as TSH receptor antibody (TRAb). Furthermore, this may lead to hyperplasia and hyperfunction of the thyroid gland. On the contrary, the cause of Hashimoto's thyroiditis is thought due to a TSH stimulation-blocking antibody (TSBAb) which blocks the action of TSH hormone and subsequently brings damage and atrophy to thyroid gland. Approximately 15-20% of patients with Graves' disease had been reported to have spontaneous hypothyroidism resulting from the chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease). Pathogenesis for chronic thyroiditis following anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Graves' disease remains unclear. It has been estimated that chronic thyroiditis or Hashimoto's disease, which occurs following the Graves' disease episode is due to extended immune response in Graves' disease. It includes the immune response to endogenous thyroid antigens, i.e. thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin, which may enhance lymphocyte infiltration and finally causes Hashimoto's thyroiditis. We report four cases of chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto's disease) in patients who have been previously diagnosed with Graves' hyperthyroidism. In three cases, Hashimoto's thyroiditis occurs in 7 to 25 years after the treatment of Grave's disease; while the other case has it only after few months of Grave's disease treatment. The diagnosis of Hashimoto's disease (chronic thyroiditis) was based on clinical manifestation, high TSHs level, positive thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroglobulin antibody, and supported by positive results of fine needle aspiration biopsy. Moreover, the result of histopathological test has also confirmed the diagnosis in two cases. All cases have been successfully treated by levothyroxine treatment.

  4. The influence of health expenditures on household impoverishment in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Crispim Boing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To analyze the variation in the proportion of households living below the poverty line in Brazil and the factors associated with their impoverishment. METHODS Income and expenditure data from the Household Budget Survey, which was conducted in Brazil between 2002-2003 (n = 48,470 households and 2008-2009 (n = 55,970 households with a national sample, were analyzed. Two cutoff points were used to define poverty. The first cutoff is a per capita monthly income below R$100.00 in 2002-2003 and R$140.00 in 2008-2009, as recommended by the Bolsa Família Program. The second, which is proposed by the World Bank and is adjusted for purchasing power parity, defines poverty as per capita income below US$2.34 and US$3.54 per day in 2002-2003 and 2008-2009, respectively. Logistic regression was used to identify the sociodemographic factors associated with the impoverishment of households. RESULTS After subtracting health expenditures, there was an increase in households living below the poverty line in Brazil. Using the World Bank poverty line, the increase in 2002-2003 and 2008-2009 was 2.6 percentage points (6.8% and 2.3 percentage points (11.6%, respectively. Using the Bolsa Família Program poverty line, the increase was 1.6 (11.9% and 1.3 (17.3% percentage points, respectively. Expenditure on prescription drugs primarily contributed to the increase in poor households. According to the World Bank poverty line, the factors associated with impoverishment include a worse-off financial situation, a household headed by an individual with low education, the presence of children, and the absence of older adults. Using the Bolsa Família Program poverty line, the factors associated with impoverishment include a worse-off financial situation and the presence of children. CONCLUSIONS Health expenditures play an important role in the impoverishment of segments of the Brazilian population, especially among the most disadvantaged.

  5. The influence of health expenditures on household impoverishment in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boing, Alexandra Crispim; Bertoldi, Andréa Dâmaso; Posenato, Leila Garcia; Peres, Karen Glazer

    2014-10-01

    To analyze the variation in the proportion of households living below the poverty line in Brazil and the factors associated with their impoverishment. Income and expenditure data from the Household Budget Survey, which was conducted in Brazil between 2002-2003 (n = 48,470 households) and 2008-2009 (n = 55,970 households) with a national sample, were analyzed. Two cutoff points were used to define poverty. The first cutoff is a per capita monthly income below R$100.00 in 2002-2003 and R$140.00 in 2008-2009, as recommended by the Bolsa Família Program. The second, which is proposed by the World Bank and is adjusted for purchasing power parity, defines poverty as per capita income below US$2.34 and US$3.54 per day in 2002-2003 and 2008-2009, respectively. Logistic regression was used to identify the sociodemographic factors associated with the impoverishment of households. After subtracting health expenditures, there was an increase in households living below the poverty line in Brazil. Using the World Bank poverty line, the increase in 2002-2003 and 2008-2009 was 2.6 percentage points (6.8%) and 2.3 percentage points (11.6%), respectively. Using the Bolsa Família Program poverty line, the increase was 1.6 (11.9%) and 1.3 (17.3%) percentage points, respectively. Expenditure on prescription drugs primarily contributed to the increase in poor households. According to the World Bank poverty line, the factors associated with impoverishment include a worse-off financial situation, a household headed by an individual with low education, the presence of children, and the absence of older adults. Using the Bolsa Família Program poverty line, the factors associated with impoverishment include a worse-off financial situation and the presence of children. Health expenditures play an important role in the impoverishment of segments of the Brazilian population, especially among the most disadvantaged.

  6. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated by Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Ayumi; Tamura, Atsushi; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2002-12-01

    The report describes a woman with primary antiphospholipid antibody syndrome complicated with Grave's disease. Developing symptoms included a small cutaneous nodule on her finger and subsequently ecchymotic purpura on the cheeks, ears, buttocks and lower legs. Histological examinations showed thrombosed vessels in the dermis without or with hemorrhage, respectively. Laboratory investigation revealed positive lupus anticoagulant and immunogenic hyperthyroidism due to Grave's disease. There is a close relationship between the cutaneous manifestation of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and the activities of Grave's disease and a possible link of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome with Grave's disease was suggested both by the etiology of the disease as well as the disease activity.

  7. Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones can produce a number of effects, including fever, profuse sweating, vomiting, diarrhea, delirium, severe weakness, seizures, markedly irregular heartbeat, yellow skin and eyes (jaundice), severe low blood pressure, ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Graves disease

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    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Graves disease Graves disease Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Graves disease is a condition that affects the function of ...

  9. Progress on impoverishing health spending in 122 countries: a retrospective observational study.

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    Wagstaff, Adam; Flores, Gabriela; Smitz, Marc-François; Hsu, Justine; Chepynoga, Kateryna; Eozenou, Patrick

    2018-02-01

    The goal of universal health coverage (UHC) requires that families who get needed health care do not suffer financial hardship as a result. This can be measured by instances of impoverishment, when a household's consumption including out-of-pocket spending on health is more than the poverty line but its consumption, excluding out-of-pocket spending, is less than the poverty line. This links UHC directly to the policy goal of reducing poverty. We measure the incidence and depth of impoverishment as the difference in the poverty head count and poverty gap with and without out-of-pocket spending included in household total consumption. We use three poverty lines: the US$1·90 per day and $3·10 per day international poverty lines and a relative poverty line of 50% of median consumption per capita. We estimate impoverishment in 122 countries using 516 surveys between 1984 and 2015. We estimate the global incidence of impoverishment due to out-of-pocket payments by aggregating up from each country, using a survey for the year in question when available, and interpolation and model-based estimates otherwise. We do not derive global estimates to measure the depth of impoverishment but focus on the median depth for the 122 countries in our sample, accounting for 90% of the world's population. We find impoverishment due to out-of-pocket spending even in countries where the entire population is officially covered by a health insurance scheme or by national or subnational health services. Incidence is negatively correlated with the share of total health spending channelled through social security funds and other government agencies. Across countries, the population-weighted median annual rate of change of impoverishment is negative at the $1·90 per day poverty line but positive at the $3·10 per day and relative poverty lines. We estimate that at the $1·90 per day poverty line, the worldwide incidence of impoverishment decreased between 2000 and 2010, from 131 million

  10. Miastenia grave y miastenia grave ocular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Naranjo Fernández

    Full Text Available La miastenia grave es una enfermedad caracterizada por debilidad y fatiga de los músculos voluntarios debido a una trasmisión anómala a nivel de la unión neuromuscular. La prevalencia es aproximadamente de 5 casos/100 000 personas. La miastenia grave puede ser bulbar, ocular o generalizada.Existen formas clínicas en la infancia como son la miastenia neonatal transitoria, la miastenia congénita y la miastenia juvenil. Los músculos oculares, faciales y bulbares son los más frecuentes afectados por la enfermedad. Cuando los síntomas se limitan a la musculatura cercana al ojo se denomina miastenia grave ocular. Una vez el oftalmólogo diagnostica o sospecha la miastenia grave, un neurólogo generalmente dirige la comprobación y tratamiento. El papel del oftalmólogo continúa siendo importante, además de chequear la motilidad y disfunción palpebral y proporcionar el alivio sintomático para estos desórdenes, debe estar alerta a la posibilidad de ambliopía.

  11. Genetic susceptibility to Grave's disease.

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    Li, Hong; Chen, Qiuying

    2013-06-01

    The variety of clinical presentations of eye changes in patients with Graves' disease (GD) suggests that complex interactions between genetic, environmental, endogenous and local factors influence the severity of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). It is thought that the development of GO might be influenced by genetic factors and environmental factors, such as cigarette smoking. At present, however, the role of genetic factors in the development of GO is not known. On the basis of studies with candidate genes and other genetic approaches, several susceptibility loci in GO have been proposed, including immunological genes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA), cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), regulatory T-cell genes and thyroid-specific genes. This review gives a brief overview of the current range of major susceptibility genes found for GD.

  12. Postoperative hypocalcemia after thyroidectomy for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Catherine E; Shiue, Zita; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Umbricht, Christopher B; Tufano, Ralph P; Dackiw, Alan P B; Kowalski, Jeanne; Zeiger, Martha A

    2010-11-01

    It is believed that patients who undergo thyroidectomy for Graves' disease are more likely to experience postoperative hypocalcemia than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. However, no study has directly compared these two groups of patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was an increased incidence or severity of postoperative hypocalcemia in patients who underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. An institutional review board-approved database was created of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 1998 to 2009 at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. There were a total of 68 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgery. Fifty-five patients who underwent total thyroidectomy were randomly selected and served as control subjects. An analysis was conducted that examined potential covariates for postoperative hypocalcemia, including age, gender, ethnicity, preoperative alkaline phosphatase level, size of goiter, whether parathyroid tissue or glands were present in the specimen, and the reason the patient underwent surgery. Specific outcomes examined were calcium levels on postoperative day 1, whether or not patients experienced symptoms of hypocalcemia, whether or not Rocaltrol was required, the number of calcium tablets prescribed upon discharge, whether or not postoperative tetany occurred, and calcium levels 1 month after discharge. Each outcome was analyzed using a logistic regression. Graves' disease patients had a significantly (p-value Graves' disease and no patient in the control group were readmitted with tetany (p = 0.033). There was a trend, though not significant, toward patients with Graves' disease having a higher prevalence of hypocalcemia the day after thyroidectomy and 1 month later. Patients with Graves' disease are more likely to require increased dosages of calcium as well as experience tetany postoperatively than patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for other indications. This suggests that

  13. Thyroid surgery for Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy.

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    Liu, Zi Wei; Masterson, Liam; Fish, Brian; Jani, Piyush; Chatterjee, Krishna

    2015-11-25

    of Graves' disease based on clinical features and biochemical findings of hyperthyroidism were eligible for inclusion. Trials had to directly compare at least two surgical techniques of thyroidectomy. There was no age limit to study inclusion. Two review authors independently extracted and cross-checked the data for analysis, evaluation of risk of bias and establishment of 'Summary of findings' tables using the GRADE instrument. The senior review authors reviewed the data and reconciled disagreements. We included five RCTs with a total of 886 participants; 172 were randomised to total thyroidectomy, 383 were randomised to bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy, 309 were randomised to the Dunhill procedure and 22 were randomised to either bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy or the Dunhill procedure. Follow-up ranged between six months and six years. One trial had three comparison arms. All five trials were conducted in university hospitals or tertiary referral centres for thyroid disease. All thyroidectomies were performed by experienced surgeons. The overall quality of the evidence ranged from low to moderate. In all trials, blinding procedures were insufficiently described. Outcome assessment for objective outcomes was blinded in one trial. Surgeons were not blinded in any of the trials. One trial blinded participants. Attrition bias was a substantial problem in one trial, with 35% losses to follow-up. In one trial the analysis was not carried out on an intention-to-treat basis.Total thyroidectomy was more effective than subtotal thyroidectomy techniques (both bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy and the Dunhill procedure) at preventing recurrent hyperthyroidism in 0/150 versus 11/200 participants (OR 0.14 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.46); P = 0.001; 2 trials; moderate quality evidence). Total thyroidectomy was also more effective than bilateral subtotal thyroidectomy at preventing recurrent hyperthyroidism in 0/150 versus 10/150 participants (odds ratio (OR) 0.13 (95% confidence interval

  14. Evidence is good for your health system: policy reform to remedy catastrophic and impoverishing health spending in Mexico.

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    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Méndez-Carniado, Oscar; Bryson-Cahn, Chloe; Barofsky, Jeremy; Maguire, Rachel; Miranda, Martha; Sesma, Sergio

    2006-11-18

    Absence of financial protection in health is a recently diagnosed "disease" of health systems. The most obvious symptom is that families face economic ruin and poverty as a consequence of financing their health care. Mexico was one of the first countries to diagnose the problem, attribute it to lack of financial protection, and propose systemic therapy through health reform. In this article we assess how Mexico turned evidence on catastrophic and impoverishing health spending into a catalyst for institutional renovation through the reform that created Seguro Popular (Popular Health Insurance). We present 15-year trends on the evolution of catastrophic and impoverishing health spending, including evidence on how the situation is improving. The results of the Mexican experience suggest an important role for the organisation and financing of the health system in reducing impoverishment and protecting households during periods of individual and collective financial crisis.

  15. [Evidence is good for your health system: policy reform to remedy catastrophic and impoverishing health spending in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Méndez-Carniado, Oscar; Bryson-Cahn, Chloe; Barofsky, Jeremy; Maguire, Rachel; Miranda, Martha; Sesma, Sergio

    2007-01-01

    Absence of financial protection in health is a recently diagnosed "disease" of health systems. The most obvious symptom is that families face economic ruin and poverty as a consequence of financing their health care. Mexico was one of the first countries to diagnose the problem, attribute it to lack of financial protection, and propose systemic therapy through health reform. In this article we assess how Mexico turned evidence on catastrophic and impoverishing health spending into a catalyst for institutional renovation through the reform that created Seguro Popular de Salud (Popular Health Insurance). We present 15-year trends on the evolution of catastrophic and impoverishing health spending, including evidence on how the situation is improving. The results of the Mexican experience suggest an important role for the organisation and financing of the health system in reducing impoverishment and protecting households during periods of individual and collective financial crisis.

  16. Højfolkets Grave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    For the special exhibition 'Højfolkets Grave - Oak Coffins from Borum Eshøj' on Moesgaard Museum in 2007: The development of 3D graphics which was displayed on a big screen in the exhibition. The animation shows - in a very stylistic way - the design principles behind the construction of Bronze Age...

  17. Management of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2007-01-01

    Management of Graves' ophthalmopathy is preferably done in a multidisciplinary setting. Smoking is associated with worse disease outcome. (131)I therapy for hyperthyroidism can also worsen ophthalmopathy, especially if administered during active disease or to patients who smoke or have severe

  18. Neonatal Graves' Disease with Maternal Hypothyroidism.

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    Akangire, Gangaram; Cuna, Alain; Lachica, Charisse; Fischer, Ryan; Raman, Sripriya; Sampath, Venkatesh

    2017-07-01

    Neonatal Graves' disease presenting as conjugated hyperbilirubinemia is a diagnostic challenge because the differential includes a gamut of liver and systemic diseases. We present a unique case of neonatal Graves' disease in a premature infant with conjugated hyperbilirubinemia born to a mother with hypothyroidism during pregnancy and remote history of Graves' disease. Infant was treated with a combination of methimazole, propranolol, and potassium iodide for 4 weeks. Thyroid function improved after 8 weeks of treatment with full recovery of thyroid function, disappearance of thyroid-stimulating antibodies, and resolution of failure to thrive and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. This case provides several clinical vignettes as it is a rare, severe, presentation of an uncommon neonatal disease, signs, symptoms, and clinical history presented a diagnostic challenge for neonatologists and endocrinologists, normal newborn screen was misleading, and yet timely treatment led to a full recovery.

  19. Microchimerism in Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galofré, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Microchimerism is the presence of cells from one individual in another genetically distinct individual. Pregnancy is the main cause of natural microchimerism through transplacental bidirectional cell trafficking between mother and fetus. The consequences of pregnancy-related microchimerism are under active investigation. However, many authors have suggested a close relationship linking fetal microchimerism and the development of autoimmune diseases. It has been more than ten years now since the demonstration of the presence of a significant high number of fetal microchimeric cells residing in thyroid glands from operated patients with Graves' disease. This intrathyroidal fetal microchimerism is an attractive candidate mechanism for the modulation of Graves' disease in pregnancy and the postpartum period. PMID:22577597

  20. [Grave's disease in 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Jacques

    2009-04-08

    Grave's disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland characterized by hyperthyroidism, a homogenous goiter and occasionally an ophtalmopathy. It occurs in less than 1% of the population with a large predominance in women (10/1). Treatment is directed to inhibit thyroid hormone synthesis with carbimazole during 12-18 months. Recurrence rates after stopping treatment is about 50%; in these patients, radioactive iodine is the preferred treatment.

  1. School violence in an impoverished South African community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, C

    1998-08-01

    The aim of this anthropological study was to create an understanding of school-related violence experienced by adolescents in the context of chronic poverty in a South African community. Qualitative methods of data collection such as participant observation, interviews, and group discussions were utilized for data collection. Sixteen children and three adults in turn kept diaries and wrote reports during the research period of three and one-half years (June 1992-December 1995). All the Standard seven pupils (N = 76) of the local school completed a self-concept questionnaire and wrote two essays about themselves and their lives, respectively. The ideology and structures of apartheid created a context of impoverishment and structural violence to which children were exposed. The school was one of the social institutions where children were subjected to structural, psychological, and physical violence on a daily basis. Violent behavior or discipline was justified as being just and an effective teaching practice by authoritarian parents and teachers. The manifestations of poverty included emotional erosion, a negative self-concept, and reactive violence. School-related violence was structurally interwoven with the very fabric of the social hierarchy of the school set-up and was sanctioned as an effective strategy to gain social control and discipline children. Poverty in itself provided the breeding-ground for violence at home and in the school. Children were caught up in a vicious circle of pro- and reactive violence and socialized to accept violence as an instrument of empowerment. Recommendations for possible intervention and further research are offered.

  2. The global impact of non-communicable diseases on households and impoverishment: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Loes; Colpani, Veronica; Chaker, Layal; van der Lee, Sven J; Muka, Taulant; Imo, David; Mendis, Shanthi; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Bramer, Wichor M; Falla, Abby; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar H

    2015-03-01

    The global economic impact of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) on household expenditures and poverty indicators remains less well understood. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature evaluating the global economic impact of six NCDs [including coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer (lung, colon, cervical and breast), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD)] on households and impoverishment. Medline, Embase and Google Scholar databases were searched from inception to November 6th 2014. To identify additional publications, reference lists of retrieved studies were searched. Randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, cohorts, case-control, cross-sectional, modeling and ecological studies carried out in adults and assessing the economic consequences of NCDs on households and impoverishment. No language restrictions. All abstract and full text selection was done by two independent reviewers. Data were extracted by two independent reviewers and checked by a third independent reviewer. Studies were included evaluating the impact of at least one of the selected NCDs and on at least one of the following measures: expenditure on medication, transport, co-morbidities, out-of-pocket (OOP) payments or other indirect costs; impoverishment, poverty line and catastrophic spending; household or individual financial cost. From 3,241 references, 64 studies met the inclusion criteria, 75% of which originated from the Americas and Western Pacific WHO region. Breast cancer and DM were the most studied NCDs (42 in total); CKD and COPD were the least represented (five and three studies respectively). OOP payments and financial catastrophe, mostly defined as OOP exceeding a certain proportion of household income, were the most studied outcomes. OOP expenditure as a proportion of family income, ranged between 2 and 158% across the different NCDs and countries. Financial catastrophe due to

  3. Thyroid cancer in Graves' disease: is surgery the best treatment for Graves' disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamatea, Jade A U; Tu'akoi, Kelson; Conaglen, John V; Elston, Marianne S; Meyer-Rochow, Goswin Y

    2014-04-01

    Graves' disease is a common cause of thyrotoxicosis. Treatment options include anti-thyroid medications or definitive therapy: thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine (I(131) ). Traditionally, I(131) has been the preferred definitive treatment for Graves' disease in New Zealand. Reports of concomitant thyroid cancer occurring in up to 17% of Graves' patients suggest surgery, if performed with low morbidity, may be the preferred option. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of thyroid cancer and surgical outcomes in a New Zealand cohort of patients undergoing thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. This study is a retrospective review of Waikato region patients undergoing thyroid surgery for Graves' disease during the 10-year period prior to 1 December 2011. A total of 833 patients underwent thyroid surgery. Of these, 117 were for Graves' disease. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 82, near-total in 33 and subtotal in 2 patients. Recurrent thyrotoxicosis developed in one subtotal patient requiring I(131) therapy. There were two cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism and one of permanent recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. Eight patients (6.8%) had thyroid cancer detected, none of whom had overt nodal disease. Five were papillary microcarcinomas (one of which was multifocal), two were papillary carcinomas (11 mm and 15 mm) and one was a minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. Thyroid cancer was identified in approximately 7% of patients undergoing surgery for Graves' disease. A low complication rate (<2%) of permanent hypoparathyroidism and nerve injury (<1%) supports surgery being a safe alternative to I(131) especially for patients with young children, ophthalmopathy or compressive symptoms. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  4. Prevention of Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalena, Luigi

    2012-06-01

    Smoking is the most important risk factor for the occurrence/progression of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), as well as for its lower/slower response to immunosuppression. Accordingly, refrain from smoking should be urged, both as primary prevention (removal of risk factors in Graves' patients without GO), secondary prevention (early detection and treatment of asymptomatic/very mild GO) and tertiary prevention (reduction of complications/disability of overt GO). A 6-month course of 200 μg/day sodium selenite can prevent progression of mild GO to more severe GO and is, therefore, a form of secondary prevention and, probably, primary prevention. Correction of thyroid dysfunction and stable maintenance of euthyroidism are important preventive measures. The optimal treatment for hyperthyroidism in patients with GO is uncertain, because evidence demonstrating the superiority of antithyroid drugs over thyroid ablation (radioiodine, thyroidectomy, or both) is lacking. If radioiodine is used, low-dose steroid prophylaxis is recommended, particularly in smokers, to prevent radioiodine-associated GO progression. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Current Concepts in Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girgis, Christian M.; Champion, Bernard L.; Wall, Jack R.

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the developed world. It is caused by an immune defect in genetically susceptible individuals in whom the production of unique antibodies results in thyroid hormone excess and glandular hyperplasia. When unrecognized, Graves' disease impacts negatively on quality of life and poses serious risks of psychosis, tachyarrhythmia and cardiac failure. Beyond the thyroid, Graves' disease has diverse soft-tissue effects that reflect its systemic autoimmune nature. Thyroid eye disease is the most common of these manifestations and is important to recognise given its risk to vision and potential to deteriorate in response to radioactive iodine ablation. In this review we discuss the investigation and management of Graves' disease, the recent controversy regarding the hepatotoxicity of propylthiouracil and the emergence of novel small-molecule thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor ligands as potential targets in the treatment of Graves' disease. PMID:23148179

  6. Graves' disease following subacute thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Yoshishige; Kurihara, Hideo; Sasaki, Jun

    2011-12-01

    Subacute thyroiditis is a painful, inflammatory disease frequently accompanied with fever. It is suspected to be a viral infectious disease, while Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease. Thus, there appears to be no etiological relationship between the two diseases. A total of 25,267 thyroid disease patients made their first visits to our thyroid clinic during a period of 24 years between 1985 and 2008. Among them, subacute thyroiditis and Graves' disease accounted for 918 patients (3.6%) and 4,617 patients (18.2%), respectively. We have encountered 7 patients (one male and six female) with subacute thyroiditis followed by Graves' disease in this period (0.15% of the 4,617 patients with Graves' disease and 0.76% of the 918 patients with subacute thyroiditis). The age ranges were 40~66 years (mean 48.7 years) at the onset of subacute thyroiditis. The intervals between the onsets of subacute thyroiditis and Graves' disease were 1~8 months (mean 4.7 months). Because Graves' disease was preceded by subacute thyroiditis, the signs and symptoms of both diseases were evident together in the intervening period. The diagnosis of Graves' disease in those patients is always difficult because of atypical signs and symptoms and an unclear onset time. The causes of the Graves'disease that followed subacute thyroiditis are still unknown. However, the inflammatory nature of subacute thyroiditis may lead to the activation of the autoimmune response in susceptible subjects, resulting in the onset of Graves' disease. Graves' disease should be suspected when a high blood level of thyroid hormone persists after subacute thyroiditis.

  7. Graves' disease with special reference to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seegenschmidt, M. H.; Heyd, R.; Esser, J.; Mould, R.F.

    2006-01-01

    Graves' disease, although not malignant, nevertheless can lead to serious events such as permanent loss of vision if it remains untreated. This review article describes the clinical symptoms of the disease, includes a commentary on the Graves' disease subgroup of thyroid-associated orbitipathy (TAO), and defines clinical activity scoring systems which grade the severity of the disease in patients (clinical activity, NOSPECS and LEMO scoring ). An review of radiotherapy in the 1980s is followed by a summary of the 2003 German national survey on radiotherapy for Graves' disease. Radiation therapy technique is then described and discussed. Case histories are from the Alfred Krupp Hospital in Essen. (author)

  8. Predictive factors of thyroid cancer in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meng; Wu, Mu Chao; Shang, Chang Zhen; Wang, Xiao Yi; Zhang, Jing Lu; Cheng, Hua; Xu, Ming Tong; Yan, Li

    2014-01-01

    The best preoperative examination in Graves' disease with thyroid cancer still remains uncertain. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the prevalence of thyroid cancer in Graves' disease patients, and to identify the predictive factors and ultrasonographic features of thyroid cancer that may aid the preoperative diagnosis in Graves' disease. This retrospective study included 423 patients with Graves' disease who underwent surgical treatment from 2002 to 2012 at our institution. The clinical features and ultrasonographic findings of thyroid nodules were recorded. The diagnosis of thyroid cancer was determined according to the pathological results. Thyroid cancer was discovered in 58 of the 423 (13.7 %) surgically treated Graves' disease patients; 46 of those 58 patients had thyroid nodules, and the other 12 patients were diagnosed with incidentally discovered thyroid carcinomas without thyroid nodules. Among the 58 patients with thyroid cancer, papillary microcarcinomas were discovered in 50 patients, and multifocality and lymph node involvement were detected in the other 8 patients. Multivariate regression analysis showed younger age was the only significant factor predictive of metastatic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonographic findings of calcification and intranodular blood flow in thyroid nodules indicate that they are more likely to harbor thyroid cancers. Because the influencing factor of metastatic thyroid cancers in Graves' disease is young age, every suspicious nodule in Graves' disease patients should be evaluated and treated carefully, especially in younger patients because of the potential for metastasis.

  9. Psychiatric manifestations of Graves' hyperthyroidism: pathophysiology and treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevicius, Robertas; Prange, Arthur J

    2006-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Other symptoms associated with the disease are goitre, ophthalmopathy, and psychiatric manifestations such as mood and anxiety disorders and, sometimes, cognitive dysfunction. Graves' hyperthyroidism may result in these latter manifestations via the induction of hyperactivity of the adrenergic nervous system. This review addresses the psychiatric presentations, and their pathophysiology and treatment, in patients with hyperthyroidism, based on literature identified by a PubMed/MEDLINE database search. Although the focus is on mental symptoms associated with Graves' disease, it is not always clear from the literature whether patients had Graves' disease: in some studies, the patients were thought to have Graves' disease based on clinical findings such as diffuse goitre or ophthalmopathy or on measurements of thyroid antibodies in serum; however, in other studies, no distinction was made between Graves' hyperthyroidism and hyperthyroidism from other causes. Antithyroid drugs combined with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are the treatments of choice for hyperthyroidism, as well as for the psychiatric disorders and mental symptoms caused by hyperthyroidism. A substantial proportion of patients have an altered mental state even after successful treatment of hyperthyroidism, suggesting that mechanisms other than hyperthyroidism, including the Graves' autoimmune process per se and ophthalmopathy, may also be involved. When psychiatric disorders remain after restoration of euthyroidism and after treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists, specific treatment for the psychiatric symptoms, especially psychotropic drugs, may be needed.

  10. Thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniforth, Joy U L; Erdirimanne, Senarath; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid carcinoma is increasing worldwide. Graves' disease is the most common hyperthyroid disease. Studies have suggested an increased risk of thyroid malignancy in Graves' disease: there has not yet been a meta-analysis to allow quantitative comparison. The purpose of this study was to determine the risk of thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease, and to gather information on the histological subtypes of carcinoma and the co-existence of thyroid nodules. Several databases and article reference lists were searched. Inclusion criteria included appropriate diagnostic criteria for thyroid conditions and a diagnoses of carcinoma based on histology. 33 studies were selected, all reporting on surgically-resected specimens. The event rate of thyroid carcinoma in Graves' disease was 0.07 (95% CI 0.04 to 0.12). There was no data to allow comparison with patients without hyperthyroid diseases. There was no increase in the odds of developing carcinoma in Graves' disease compared to toxic multinodular goitre and toxic uninodular goitre. 88% of thyroid carcinomas in Graves' disease were papillary, with solitary papillary micro-carcinoma (diameter 10 mm or less) comprising 23% of all detected thyroid carcinomas. Patients with Graves' disease and co-existing thyroid nodules were almost 5 times more likely to be diagnosed with thyroid carcinoma than those without nodules. Thyroid malignancy in Graves' disease requiring surgical treatment should be considered as likely as in other hyperthyroid diseases needing surgical treatment. Clinicians should consider screening selected patients with Graves' disease for nodules whilst being aware of potentially over-diagnosing papillary micro-carcinoma. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mouse Models of Graves' Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nagayama, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    Graves' disease is characterized by overstimulation of the thyroid gland with agonistic autoantibodies against the thyrotropin (TSH) receptor, leading to hyperthyroidism and diffuse hyperplasia of the thyroid gland. Our and other laboratories have recently established several animal models of Graves' hyperthyroidism with novel immunization approaches, i.e., in vivo expression of the TSH receptor by injection of syngeneic living cells co-expressing the TSH receptor and major histocompatibility...

  12. Graves disease with ophthalmopathy following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, D.R.; Fleming, B.J.

    1984-01-01

    The number of patients achieving long-term survival following neck irradiation for Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies is increasing. Paralleling this increase in survivors is the development of late complications of the therapy itself. Eleven patients have previously been reported who developed Graves ophthalmopathy 18 months to seven years after receiving neck radiotherapy for nonthyroidal malignancies. The seven patients who had HLA typing were all HLA-B8 negative, despite the reported association of the HLA-B8 antigen with Graves disease. A patient who is HLA-B8 positive who developed Graves ophthalmopathy and hyperthyroidism nine years after receiving mantle radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease is reported. It is recommended that Graves disease be included among the thyroid diseases that receive consideration during follow-up of patients who have received mantle radiotherapy

  13. Hyperthyroidism: diagnosis and management of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, J S

    1997-06-01

    Hyperthyroidism, or thyrotoxicosis, results when the body's tissues are exposed to excessive levels of thyroid hormone. Hyperthyroidism affects 2% of women but only one-tenth as many men. Graves' disease is the most common form of hyperthyroidism, often occurring in young adults. It is an autoimmune disorder with an important genetic component. Hyperthyroidism's hallmarks include goiter and myriad signs and symptoms related to increased metabolic activity in virtually all body tissues. Increased sensitivity to circulating catecholamines adds to the clinical picture. Diagnosed by patient history, physical examination, and laboratory tests, Graves' disease is treated with antithyroid drugs, radioactive iodine, and/or surgery, plus supportive therapy. A good treatment outcome can be expected; long-term follow-up is indicated.

  14. [Grave's disease and stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A Matos; Nobre, E Lacerda; Garcia e Costa, J; Nogueira, P J; Macedo, Ana; De Castro, J Jácome; Teles, A Galvão

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, there have been many reports about a possible association between Stressful Life Events (SLE) and the onset of Graves' Disease (GD). Nevertheless, most papers have been criticised and no such association has yet been proven. To assess the possible associations between SLE and the onset of GD. Retrospective study of 62 subjects, divided into 2 groups of 31 each, GD (Gp1) and controls (Gp2). The patients in Gp1 had thyroid disease diagnosed within the last 12 months, with clinical and biochemical confirmation. In Gp2, psychopathological and endocrine disturbances had been ruled out. Each 2 group consisted of 9 males (29%) and 22 females (71%). The mean age was 38.48 + 10.9 in Gp1 and 41.1 + 11.8 in Gp2. SLE evaluation (number and impact) was reported for the 12 months preceding the onset of symptoms of thyroid disease. To assess SLE, we used the Life Experiences Survey-LES from Saranson, Johnson and Siegel (1978; 1985). Statistical analysis was done using Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Patients with GD had a significantly greater number of SLEs compared to Controls (p < .001). The number and impact of negative SLEs was significantly higher in Gp1 compared to Gp2 (p < .001). There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of the number and impact of both positive and neutral SLEs. The findings of this study support that SLEs may contribute to the precipitation of GD. We observed that patients with GD had significantly more negative events and experienced a greater negative impact from them prior to the onset of GD. The association of SLEs with GD is probably related to the association of stress with changes in the immune system, which can play an important role in the aetiology of thyrotoxicosis.

  15. Immunosuppression in Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Rong; Kuang Anren; Qin Weishi; Zhang Huimin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is a disease that seriously threatens the health of patients. But up to now, no optimal therapies have been established. Immunosuppressive treatment is usually used in the management of GO, but they may cause side effects. Recently, 99 Tc-MDP, commercially named 'Yun Ke', is used in the management of autoimmune disease. Therefore, a randomized trial was done to compare the values in the treatment of GO with between Yun Ke and immunosuppression. Methods: 42 consecutive patients with moderate or severe GO were randomly assigned to receive either Yun Ke therapy or immunosuppressive therapy. The degree of ocular involvement and responses to the treatment were evaluated by numerical scoring (ophthalmopathy index, OI) and clinical assessment. Therapy outcome was assessed 4 months after the start of treatment by the change in the highest NOSPECS class and OI. Data analysis was performed with the SPASS statistic software. Chi-square test was used to compare percentages, logistic regression was performed to identify which variables might correlated with the treatment outcome. Results: The remarkably effective outcome was observed in 14 (67%) cases in immunosuppression treated group and 13 (62%) cases in Yun Ke treated group. There were no significant differences in the degree of improvements in ocular involvements. There was a marked decrease of thyroid antibody titres in both groups. The variables found to correlated significantly with treatment outcome were thyroid antibody titres and GO activity. Side effects were more frequent and severe during immunosuppressive therapy. No side effects were found during Yun Ke treatment. Conclusion: Yun Ke and immunosuppression appeared to be equally effective in the management of GO, but Yun Ke is safer for patients during treatment

  16. Hyperparathyroidism after radioactive iodine therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esselstyn, C.B. Jr.; Schumacher, O.P.; Eversman, J.; Sheeler, L.; Levy, W.J.

    1982-01-01

    The association of external ionizing radiation to the head and neck and the subsequent development of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands has been documented in recent years. This also has been demonstrated experimentally in animals. Despite the numbers of patients with Graves disease who have been treated with radioactive iodine, there are no reports in the literature of parathyroid surgery for hyperparathyroidism secondary to earlier treatment with radioactive iodine for Graves disease. This report describes the operative and pathologic findings in four patients with hyperparathyroidism. These patients had previously been treated with radioactive iodine for Graves disease. The pathologic findings at surgery included in three cases a single enlarged hyperplastic gland consistent with a parathyroid adenoma. One patient had hyperplasia of all four glands. The two largest glands and halves of the two remaining glands were removed. In a long-term follow-up of children and adolescents treated with radioactive iodine for Graves disease, Levy and Schumacher found calcium elevations in 10 of 159 patients. The increased incidence of hyperparathyroidism following radioactive iodine treatment for Graves disease in children and adolescents would seem several times higher than normal. Whether adults who have radioactive iodine treatment for Graves disease have a similar increase incidence is not known. Meanwhile it would seem reasonable to suggest that patients whose hyperthyroidism is treated with radioactive iodine should have their serum calcium levels determined at 5-year intervals

  17. Grave's disease 1835-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weetman, A P

    2003-01-01

    This brief review describes the history of Graves' disease, starting with the original descriptions by Parry, Graves and von Basedow. The true aetiology of the disorder was uncovered in the 1950s and 1960s, based on the search for a novel thyroid stimulator which turned out to be an immunoglobulin G autoantibody. Assays for these thyroid stimulatory antibodies have been continually refined and their epitopes on the thyroid stimulating hormone receptor are increasingly well characterized. We also understand far more about the genetic and environmental susceptibility factors that predispose to disease, and even thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy has now been better defined as primarily a T-cell-mediated disease resulting from cytokine stimulation of orbital fibroblasts. These advances should improve treatment options for Graves' disease in the foreseeable future.

  18. Protecting patients with cardiovascular diseases from catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment by health finance reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Fan, Yancun; McNeil, Edward

    2015-12-01

    To compare the incidences of catastrophic health expenditure (CHE) and impoverishment, the risk protection offered by two health financial reforms and to explore factors associated with CHE and impoverishment among patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) in rural Inner Mongolia, China. Cross-sectional study conducted in 2014 in rural Inner Mongolia, China. Patients with CVDs aged over 18 years residing in the sample areas for at least one year were eligible. The definitions of CHE and impoverishment recommended by WHO were adopted. The protection of CHE and impoverishment was compared between the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) alone and NCMS plus National Essential Medicines Scheme (NEMS) using the percentage change of incidences for CHE and impoverishment. Logistic regression was used to explore factors associated with CHE and impoverishment. The incidences of CHE and impoverishment under NCMS plus NEMS were 11.26% and 3.30%, respectively, which were lower than those under NCMS alone. The rates of protection were higher among households with patients with CVDs covered by NCMS plus NEMS (25.68% and 34.65%, respectively). NCMS plus NEMS could protect the poor households more from CHE but not impoverishment. NCMS plus NEMS protected more than one-fourth of households from CHE and more than one-third from impoverishment. NCMS plus NEMS was more effective at protecting households with patients with CVDs from CHE and impoverishment than NCMS alone. An integration of NCMS with NEMS should be expanded. However, further strategies to minimise catastrophic health expenditure after this health finance reform are still needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Optimal management of Graves orbitopathy: a multidisciplinary approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soeters, M. R.; van Zeijl, C. J. J.; Boelen, A.; Kloos, R.; Saeed, P.; Vriesendorp, T. M.; Mourits, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Graves' thyroid disease is a relatively common disorder in endocrinology and general internal medicine practice. Graves' hyperthyroidism is mediated by circulating stimulating autoantibodies. Up to 60% of patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism develop some form of Graves' orbitopathy. Immune

  20. Graves disease hyperthyroidism and glycometabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Qiting; Zhao Deshan

    2010-01-01

    The Patients with Graves disease hyperthyroidism are often accompanied by disorder of glycometabolism. β-cell dysfunction and insulin resistance play a main role in this disease, while the immune and genetic factors are also relevant with the disease. The blood glycose level can become normal gradually with the recovery of thyroid hormone after 131 I and antithyroid drug treatment. Therefore, the blood glycose level could be improved and complications could be prevented by early treatment in the patients with Graves disease hyperthyroidism accompanied with glycometabolism disorder is helpful for improving the blood glycose level. (authors)

  1. Graves' disease and Thyroid anaplasic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero E, Helena; Quintero A, Flor Maria; Carmona C, Antonio

    1992-01-01

    A case of a 34 year-old patient is presented, who was diagnosed with Graves' disease and developed a thyroid anaplastic carcinoma from a clinically detected nodular mass. The incidence of thyroid cancer associated with Graves' disease is revisited

  2. Death by suicide in Graves' disease and Graves' orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferløv-Schwensen, Charlotte; Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hegedus, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Graves' disease is associated with excess morbidity and mortality, but little is known about unnatural manners of death and the potential relation with Graves' orbitopathy. Here we investigate the risk of unnatural death in Graves' patients with orbitopathy (GO) and without (GD), comp...... in the pathophysiological mechanisms of suicidal behavior. Beyond independent confirmation, reasons for this need to be explored in order to introduce preventive measures....... with GD, and 3,965 with GO were identified and matched for age and gender with four subjects from the background population. Manner of death was identified and hazard ratios (HR) for mortality due to unnatural deaths (accident, suicide, violence/homicide, and unknown) were calculated using Cox regression...... analyses, adjusted for pre-existing somatic and psychiatric morbidity. RESULTS: In Graves' disease overall there was an increased risk of death from unknown unnatural manners [HR: 2.01 (95% confidence interval: 1.17-3.45); P=0.012] and of suicide, although the latter difference was not with certainty...

  3. Temporal relationship between onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and onset of thyroidal Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Smit, T.; van der Gaag, R.; Koornneef, L.

    1988-01-01

    The temporal relationship between the onset of Graves' ophthalmopathy and the onset of thyroidal Graves' disease was evaluated in 125 consecutive patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Thyroidal Graves' disease--past or present--was clinically evident in 99 patients (79%): hyperthyroidism in 3 cases.

  4. Secrets of a Mass Grave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Caitlin Marie; Graham, Theodore J.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a unit of study in which students examine skeletons and draw conclusions from the evidence they find in a simulated mass grave. The activity involves the foundation of forensic anthropology--interpreting the structure of skeletal remains to determine sex, age, height, and possible cause of death. Working through a series of…

  5. Medical management of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, M. F.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1995-01-01

    In most patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism the eye signs are self-limiting and mostly subclinical. However, about one-third of the patients have clinically relevant ophthalmopathy, which can be disabling and disfiguring. The mechanical causes of the symptoms and signs of the eye disease are

  6. Biologiske behandlingsmuligheder ved Graves' oftalmopati

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Fassi, Daniel; Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2008-01-01

    The current medical treatment options for Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) are unsatisfactory. Recent treatment of GO patients with the B-lymphocyte depleting monoclonal antibody rituximab or with the anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha agents etanercept and infliximab has shown promising results. We...

  7. Remote semantic memory is impoverished in hippocampal amnesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klooster, Nathaniel B; Duff, Melissa C

    2015-12-01

    The necessity of the hippocampus for acquiring new semantic concepts is a topic of considerable debate. However, it is generally accepted that any role the hippocampus plays in semantic memory is time limited and that previously acquired information becomes independent of the hippocampus over time. This view, along with intact naming and word-definition matching performance in amnesia, has led to the notion that remote semantic memory is intact in patients with hippocampal amnesia. Motivated by perspectives of word learning as a protracted process where additional features and senses of a word are added over time, and by recent discoveries about the time course of hippocampal contributions to on-line relational processing, reconsolidation, and the flexible integration of information, we revisit the notion that remote semantic memory is intact in amnesia. Using measures of semantic richness and vocabulary depth from psycholinguistics and first and second language-learning studies, we examined how much information is associated with previously acquired, highly familiar words in a group of patients with bilateral hippocampal damage and amnesia. Relative to healthy demographically matched comparison participants and a group of brain-damaged comparison participants, the patients with hippocampal amnesia performed significantly worse on both productive and receptive measures of vocabulary depth and semantic richness. These findings suggest that remote semantic memory is impoverished in patients with hippocampal amnesia and that the hippocampus may play a role in the maintenance and updating of semantic memory beyond its initial acquisition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vegetation impoverishment despite greening: a case study from central Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Stefanie M.; Tappan, G. Gray

    2013-01-01

    Recent remote sensing studies have documented a greening trend in the semi-arid Sahel and Sudan zones of West Africa since the early 1980s, which challenges the mainstream paradigm of irreversible land degradation in this region. What the greening trend means on the ground, however, has not yet been explored. This research focuses on a region in central Senegal to examine changes in woody vegetation abundance and composition in selected sites by means of a botanical inventory of woody vegetation species, repeat photography, and perceptions of local land users. Despite the greening, an impoverishment of the woody vegetation cover was observed in the studied sites, indicated by an overall reduction in woody species richness, a loss of large trees, an increasing dominance of shrubs, and a shift towards more arid-tolerant, Sahelian species since 1983. Thus, interpretation of the satellite-derived greening trend as an improvement or recovery is not always justified. The case of central Senegal represents only one of several possible pathways of greening throughout the region, all of which result in similar satellite-derived greening signals.

  9. Graves' disease. Manifestations and therapeutic options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, K.F.; Saleeby, G.

    1988-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Clinical features include thyroid enlargement, eye signs, tachycardia, heat intolerance, emotional lability, weight loss, and hyperkinesis. Three modes of therapy are available. The preferences of the patient and physician are usually prime considerations in devising the therapeutic plan. Radioactive iodine is the most frequently used and safest method of treatment for adults. Antithyroid drugs are preferred for children and pregnant women. Surgery is usually reserved for patients in whom the other forms of treatment are not acceptable. Considerable patient education during the decision-making process enhances the success of the therapeutic plan

  10. TSHR intronic polymorphisms (rs179247 and rs12885526) and their role in the susceptibility of the Brazilian population to Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalo, N E; Dos Santos, R B; Marcello, M A; Piai, R P; Secolin, R; Romaldini, J H; Ward, L S

    2015-05-01

    Intronic thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor polymorphisms have been associated with the risk for both Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy, but results have been inconsistent among different populations. We aimed to investigate the influence of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor intronic polymorphisms in a large well-characterized population of GD patients. We studied 279 Graves' disease patients (231 females and 48 males, 39.80 ± 11.69 years old), including 144 with Graves' ophthalmopathy, matched to 296 healthy control individuals. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor genotypes of rs179247 and rs12885526 were determined by Real Time PCR TaqMan(®) SNP Genotyping. A multivariate analysis showed that the inheritance of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor AA genotype for rs179247 increased the risk for Graves' disease (OR = 2.821; 95 % CI 1.595-4.990; p = 0.0004), whereas the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor GG genotype for rs12885526 increased the risk for Graves' ophthalmopathy (OR = 2.940; 95 % CI 1.320-6.548; p = 0.0083). Individuals with Graves' ophthalmopathy also presented lower mean thyrotropin receptor antibodies levels (96.3 ± 143.9 U/L) than individuals without Graves' ophthalmopathy (98.3 ± 201.9 U/L). We did not find any association between the investigated polymorphisms and patients clinical features or outcome. We demonstrate that thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor intronic polymorphisms are associated with the susceptibility to Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy in the Brazilian population, but do not appear to influence the disease course.

  11. An update on the medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinò, Michele; Latrofa, Francesco; Menconi, Francesca; Chiovato, Luca; Vitti, Paolo

    2014-11-01

    Medical treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism is based on the use of thionamides; namely, methimazole and propylthiouracil. In the past, methimazole was preferred by European endocrinologists, whereas propylthiouracil was the first choice for the majority of their North American colleagues. However, because of the recent definition of a better side-effect profile, methimazole is nowadays the first choice world while. Although thionamides are quite effective for the short-term control of Graves' hyperthyroidism, a relatively high proportion of patients relapses after thionamide withdrawal. Other possible medical treatments, include iodine and compounds containing iodine, perchlorate, lithium (as an adjuvant in patients undergoing radioiodine therapy), β-adrenergic antagonists, glucocorticoids, and some new molecules still under investigation. Management of Graves' hyperthyroidism using thionamides as well as the other available medical treatments is here reviewed in detail, with a special mention of situations such as pregnancy and lactation, as well as neonatal and fetal thyrotoxicosis.

  12. Assessing the burden of medical impoverishment by cause: a systematic breakdown by disease in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verguet, Stéphane; Memirie, Solomon Tessema; Norheim, Ole Frithjof

    2016-10-21

    Out-of-pocket (OOP) medical expenses often lead to catastrophic expenditure and impoverishment in low- and middle-income countries. Yet, there has been no systematic examination of which specific diseases and conditions (e.g., tuberculosis, cardiovascular disease) drive medical impoverishment, defined as OOP direct medical costs pushing households into poverty. We used a cost and epidemiological model to propose an assessment of the burden of medical impoverishment in Ethiopia, i.e., the number of households crossing a poverty line due to excessive OOP direct medical expenses. We utilized disease-specific mortality estimates from the Global Burden of Disease study, epidemiological and cost inputs from surveys, and secondary data from the literature to produce a count of poverty cases due to OOP direct medical costs per specific condition. In Ethiopia, in 2013, and among 20 leading causes of mortality, we estimated the burden of impoverishment due to OOP direct medical costs to be of about 350,000 poverty cases. The top three causes of medical impoverishment were diarrhea, lower respiratory infections, and road injury, accounting for 75 % of all poverty cases. We present a preliminary attempt for the estimation of the burden of medical impoverishment by cause for high mortality conditions. In Ethiopia, medical impoverishment was notably associated with illness occurrence and health services utilization. Although currently used estimates are sensitive to health services utilization, a systematic breakdown of impoverishment due to OOP direct medical costs by cause can provide important information for the promotion of financial risk protection and equity, and subsequent design of health policies toward universal health coverage, reduction of direct OOP payments, and poverty alleviation.

  13. Dynamic Microsimulation Model of Impoverishment Among Elderly Women in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichi Inagaki

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing poverty rate for elderly women is a growing concern in Japan and is generally due to their lifestyle changes and the public pension system based on the pre-1980s (old lifestyle. At that time, women were expected to get married and become homemakers. Therefore, the public pension system is generous for married women and widows but not for never-married and divorced women. Using a dynamic microsimulation model, the Integrated Analytical Model for Household Simulation (INAHSIM, previous research has shown that poverty rates for elderly people will increase significantly in the future due to changes in nuptiality behavior after the 1980s. However, this approach is an indirect method, and the mechanism of impoverishment remains unclear. This study uses the same dynamic microsimulation model but attempts a more direct approach to interpret the effects of these behavioral changes on poverty rates for elderly women. Specifically, under the baseline scenario, it makes future projections on key distributions related to poverty by marital status and illustrates how they will face the poverty problem. It shows the future projections of (1 the distribution of pension amounts by gender and marital status, (2 poverty rates for elderly women by marital status, and (3 poverty rates for elderly people by gender. After the 1980s in Japan, the marriage rate decreased and the divorce rate increased significantly. Nevertheless, society still suffers from wage inequality between men and women. As a result, the number of never-married or divorced women will increase and these women will receive poor pension benefits due to an unfavorable public pension system. In addition, they have a higher risk of living in a single-person household because they have no or very few children. In the end, they will face the risk of poverty and raise the overall poverty rate.

  14. Dynamic Microsimulation Model of Impoverishment among Elderly Women in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, Seiichi

    2018-03-01

    The increasing poverty rate for elderly women is a growing concern in Japan and is generally due to their lifestyle changes and the public pension system based on the pre-1980s (old) lifestyle. At that time, women were expected to get married and become homemakers. Therefore, the public pension system is generous for married women and widows but not for never-married and divorced women. Using a dynamic microsimulation model, the Integrated Analytical Model for Household Simulation (INAHSIM), previous research has shown that poverty rates for elderly people will increase significantly in the future due to changes in nuptiality behavior after the 1980s. However, this approach is an indirect method, and the mechanism of impoverishment remains unclear. This study uses the same dynamic microsimulation model but attempts a more direct approach to interpret the effects of these behavioral changes on poverty rates for elderly women. Specifically, under the baseline scenario, it makes future projections on key distributions related to poverty by marital status and illustrates how they will face the poverty problem. It shows the future projections of (1) the distribution of pension amounts by gender and marital status, (2) poverty rates for elderly women by marital status, and (3) poverty rates for elderly people by gender. After the 1980s in Japan, the marriage rate decreased and the divorce rate increased significantly. Nevertheless, society still suffers from wage inequality between men and women. As a result, the number of never-married or divorced women will increase and these women will receive poor pension benefits due to an unfavorable public pension system. In addition, they have a higher risk of living in a single-person household because they have no or very few children. In the end, they will face the risk of poverty and raise the overall poverty rate.

  15. Graves' disease presenting as pseudotumor cerebri: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas Cláudia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pseudotumor cerebri is an entity characterized by elevated intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid and no structural abnormalities detected on brain MRI scans. Common secondary causes include endocrine pathologies. Hyperthyroidism is very rarely associated and only three case reports have been published so far. Case presentation We report the case of a 31-year-old Luso-African woman with clinical symptoms and laboratory confirmation of Graves' disease that presented as pseudotumor cerebri. Conclusion This is a rare form of presentation of Graves' disease and a rare cause of pseudotumor cerebri. It should be remembered that hyperthyroidism is a potential cause of pseudotumor cerebri.

  16. Graves' Disease Pharmacotherapy in Women of Reproductive Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunty, Jeremy J; Heise, Crystal D; Chaffin, David G

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder in which inappropriate stimulation of the thyroid gland results in unregulated secretion of thyroid hormones resulting in hyperthyroidism. Graves' disease is the most common cause of autoimmune hyperthyroidism during pregnancy. Treatment options for Graves' disease include thioamide therapy, partial or total thyroidectomy, and radioactive iodine. In this article, we review guideline recommendations for Graves' disease treatment in women of reproductive age including the recent guideline from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Controversy regarding appropriate thioamide therapy before, during, and after pregnancy is reviewed. Surgical and radioactive iodine therapy considerations in this patient population are also reviewed. In patients who may find themselves pregnant during therapy or develop Graves' disease during their pregnancy, consideration should be given to the most appropriate treatment course for the mother and fetus. Thioamide therapy should be used with either propylthiouracil or methimazole at appropriate doses that target the upper range of normal to slightly hyperthyroid to avoid creating hypothyroidism in the fetus. Consideration should also be given to the adverse effects of thioamide, such as agranulocytosis and hepatotoxicity, with appropriate patient consultation regarding signs and symptoms. Individuals who wish to breastfeed their infants while taking thioamide should receive the lowest effective dose. Surgery should be reserved for extreme cases and limited to the second trimester, if possible. Radioactive iodine therapy may be used in nonpregnant individuals, with limited harm to future fertility. Radioactive iodine therapy should be withheld in pregnant women and those who are actively breastfeeding. Clinicians should keep abreast of developments in clinical trials and evidence-based recommendations regarding Graves' disease in reproductive-age women for any changes in evidence

  17. Graves' disease in Albanian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjikopulli, A; Tomori, Sonila; Kollçaku, L; Hoxha, P; Grimci, Lindita; Ylli, Zamira

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) accounts for 10-15% of thyroid disorders in patients less than 18 years of age. It is the most common cause of thyrotoxicosis in children and accounts for at least 95% of cases in children. Pediatric Treatment of Graves' disease consists of anti-thyroid drugs, radioactive iodide and thyroidectomy but the optimal treatment of GD in children is still controversial. To review treatment outcome of pediatric Graves' disease in Albania. Descriptive review of 15 children with Graves' disease, diagnosed from Jan.2007 to Dec. 2013, at the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Centre "Mother Teresa", Albania was performed. All patients, mean age 10.56 ± 3.37 years, (range 2.02-16.09 years) were presented with goiter and increased serum FT4, mean 39.80 ± 16.02 ng/mL, (range 21.0-74.70 ng/mL), serum FT3, mean 12.98 ± 3.45 pg/mL, (range 6.90 -17.90 pg/mL) and suppressed TSH levels, mean 0.02 ± 0.01 mUI/L, (range 0.01-0.05 mUI/L). Anti TSH Receptor were positive in 100% of patients mean value 6.51 ± 3.61 UI/mL (range 1.63 - 14.10 UI/mL). Anti-thyroglobulin and Anti-TPO antibodies were positive in 60% and 46.6% respectively. Clinical course of 15 patients after treatment with anti-thyroid drugs mainly MMI for 3.19 ± 1.48 (range 0.60 - 6.20) years is as follows: seven (46.66%) underwent remission, five out of seven (71.41%) who underwent remission, relapsed. Three of them (20%) were treated with I(131), and two (13.3%) underwent to total thyroidectomy. MMI was the most common first line therapy in the presented patients with Graves' disease. Remission rate was 46.66% after an average 1.48 ± 0.71 years (range 0.60 - 2.70 years) of treatment with anti-thyroid drugs. Remission period was 2.70 ± 0.36 years (2.1 - 3.1 years) Relapse occurred in 71.41% of patient. I(131) and thyroidectomy were used as second line therapy in the present study.

  18. Serum immunoglobulin G4 levels and Graves' disease phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Carmen Sorina; Sirbu, Anca Elena; Betivoiu, Minodora Andreea; Florea, Suzana; Barbu, Carmen Gabriela; Fica, Simona Vasilica

    2017-02-01

    We investigated, at diagnosis, the relationship between serum immunoglobulin G4 levels and the main characteristics of Graves' disease: hyperthyroidism severity, goiter size, presence of active Graves' ophthalmopathy, antithyroid antibodies status, and titer. This prospective study included 80 newly diagnosed Graves' disease patients. The main parameters measured at diagnosis: thyroid-stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, free triiodothyronine, total triiodothyronine, thyroglobulin, antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, anti-thyroglobulin antibodies, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies, immunoglobulin G4. In Graves' disease patients, serum immunoglobulin G4 levels were higher than in general population (p = 0.028) and higher in men compared to women (p = 0.002). Only one female patient with intense hypoechoic goiter, high anti-thyroglobulin antibody, and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titers had an elevated serum immunoglobulin G4 level at diagnosis. Patients with immunoglobulin G4 levels above the 75th percentile (>237.52 mg/dl, N = 20) were younger at Graves' ophthalmopathy onset (p 286.28 mg/dl, N = 8) had lower total triiodothyronine values (p = 0.001) than patients with IgG below the 90th percentile. No significant correlations were found between smoking status (p = 0.58), goiter size (p = 0.50), the presence of ophthalmopathy (p = 0.42) or thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody titers (p = 0.45) and the mean value of immunoglobulin G4 levels at diagnosis. Our data suggest that Graves' disease patients with elevated immunoglobulin G4 levels at diagnosis have a phenotype characterized by higher anti-thyroglobulin antibody and antithyroid peroxidase antibody titers, less severe T3 hyperthyroidism, younger age at ophthalmopathy onset and require a shorter duration of the first methimazole treatment cycle.

  19. Thyroid Ultrasonography in Differentiation between Graves' Disease and Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishdad, P; Pishdad, G R; Tavanaa, S; Pishdad, R; Jalli, R

    2017-03-01

    Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis are the most common causes of hyper and hypothyroidism, respectively. Differentiation of these 2 diseases, if the patient is euthyroid, may sometimes be extremely difficult on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of gray scale sonography in differentiation of Graves' disease from Hashimoto's thyroiditis. This study included 149 patients divided into three groups, patients with Graves' disease (34 patients, mean age = 36.8 ± 10.17 years), Patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (62 patients, mean age = 33.4 ± 12.16 years) and control group (53 healthy people, mean age = 34.74 ± 16.87 years). Members of all groups were referred to a single radiologist for thyroid sonography for evaluation of thyroid echogenicity pattern. A total of 117 women and 32 men were examined by sonography. The most common sonographic pattern in Hashimoto and Graves' was homogenous hypo-echogenicity which was observed in 45.2% and 47.1% of cases, respectively. Peripheral hypo-echogenicity pattern was seen in 40.3% of Hashimoto's group with 100% specificity and 40.3% sensitivity. Central-hypoechogenic pattern was observed in 17.6% of Graves' group with 100% and 17.6% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Our findings indicate that sonography has high specificity but low sensitivity in the diagnosis of either Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis. It is therefore not possible to differentiate between these two diseases using sonography alone. Confirmation by laboratory data is also needed.

  20. Graves' orbitopathy as a rare disease in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perros, Petros; Hegedüs, L; Bartalena, L.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is an autoimmune condition, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes including impaired quality of life and socio-economic status. Current evidence suggests that the incidence of GO in Europe may be declining, however data on the prevalence of this dise...

  1. Classification of the eye changes of Graves' disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, W. M.; Prummel, M. F.; Mourits, M. P.; Koornneef, L.; Buller, H. R.

    1991-01-01

    Classification of the eye changes of Graves' disease may have clinical use in the description of the present eye state, in the assessment of treatment results, and in the choice of therapy. Requirements for any classification system should include simplicity, clinical nature (i.e., easily carried

  2. Premature hair greying may predict reduced bone mineral density in Graves' disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leary, A C

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Premature hair greying has been associated with low bone mineral density (BMD), and it may be more frequent in Graves\\' disease. AIMS: To determine whether premature greying is associated with reduced BMD in women with Graves\\' disease and in control women, and to examine whether premature greying is more common in Graves\\' disease. METHODS: Premature greying (> 50% grey by 40 years) and BMD were determined in 44 women with a history of Graves\\' disease and 133 female controls referred for routine BMD measurement. Exclusion criteria included diseases or drugs known to affect BMD. RESULTS: Mean Z and T scores at the lumbar spine were significantly lower (P < 0.04) in subjects with premature greying than in those not prematurely grey among women with Graves\\' disease, but not among control women. Multiple regression confirmed this difference between Graves\\' and control women (P = 0.041). There were no differences at other measurement sites. Of Graves\\' patients, 36% were prematurely grey compared with 25% of control women (P = 0.14). CONCLUSION: Premature greying may be a weak marker for reduced BMD in women with a history of Graves\\' disease, but it is not a marker in normal women.

  3. Clinical significance and changes of TRAb and TSI assay in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaolin; Zhang Haiyan

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes and clinical significance of TRAb and TSI detection in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum TRAb and TSI levels were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and thyroid hormone levels were detected by microparticle enzyme immunoassay, including normal controls, Graves' disease in period of onset, catabsis group and hashimotos thyroiditis group. Results: The positive rate of TRAb and TSI in Graves' in period of onset group is 86.67% and 95.0%, TGA and TMA in hashimotos thyroiditis group is 85.29% and 91.18%, respectively. More importantly these results were significant difference than normal controls. Conclusions: It's very important for Graves' disease patients to detect TRAb, TSI, TGA, TMA and thyroid hormone simulta-neously, especially to the curative effect and prognosis criterin in patients with Graves' disease and antidi-astole in patients with hashimotos thyroiditis. (authors)

  4. Regression of the carotid intima media thickness by propylthiouracil therapy in Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilir, Cemil; Gökosmanoglu, Feyzi; Caliskan, Mustafa; Cinemre, Hakan; Akdemir, Ramazan

    2012-04-01

    One of the cardiovascular effects of hyperthyroidism is increased carotid intima media thickness (CIMT). The aim of this study is to investigate the CIMT in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism and the effect of propylthiouracil (PTU) therapy on CIMT. Twenty-six patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism and 33 healthy controls were included in the study. CIMT was measured at the right and left external carotid arteries in every patient in both groups. CIMT was measured before and after the PTU therapy in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. There was a significant difference in CIMT between the group of Graves' hyperthyroid patients and the control group (0.72 versus 0.55 mm, P treatment, CIMT decreased significantly compared with the baseline values [0.84 (0.54-1.3) to 0.72 (0.50-1.2), change 0.12 mm, P hyperthyroidism is associated with atherosclerosis as assessed by CIMT. Treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism with PTU decreases the CIMT.

  5. Graves' orbitopathy as a rare disease in Europe: a European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) position statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perros, P.; Hegedüs, L.; Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Kahaly, G. J.; Baldeschi, L.; Salvi, M.; Lazarus, J. H.; Eckstein, A.; Pitz, S.; Boboridis, K.; Anagnostis, P.; Ayvaz, G.; Boschi, A.; Brix, T. H.; Currò, N.; Konuk, O.; Marinò, M.; Mitchell, A. L.; Stankovic, B.; Törüner, F. B.; von Arx, G.; Zarković, M.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2017-01-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is an autoimmune condition, which is associated with poor clinical outcomes including impaired quality of life and socio-economic status. Current evidence suggests that the incidence of GO in Europe may be declining, however data on the prevalence of this disease are sparse.

  6. Atresia biliar: una enfermedad grave

    OpenAIRE

    Ramonet, Margarita; Ciocca, Mirta; Alvarez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    La atresia biliar es una grave enfermedad que se manifiesta en los recién nacidos, y se desconoce su causa. La inflamación y destrucciónprogresiva de los conductos biliares conducen a la aparición de ictericia, coluria y acolia entre la segunda y sexta semana de vida. Como existen múltiples causas de colestasis neonatal en esta etapa de la vida, es necesario realizar un diagnóstico y derivación precoz para ofrecer un tratamiento quirúrgico, con el fin de restablecer el flujo biliar. Alrededor...

  7. CD28/CTLA-4/ICOS haplotypes confers susceptibility to Graves' disease and modulates clinical phenotype of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak-Adamska, Edyta; Frydecka, Irena; Bolanowski, Marek; Tomkiewicz, Anna; Jonkisz, Anna; Karabon, Lidia; Partyka, Anna; Nowak, Oskar; Szalinski, Marek; Daroszewski, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Graves' disease, an autoimmune disease with heterogeneous symptoms including Graves' orbitopathy, has a combined genetic/environmental background, where variations within CD28/CTLA-4/ICOS genes are considered as disease markers.Association of CD28c.17+3T>C(rs3116496), CTLA-4g.319C>T(rs5742909), CTLA-4c.49A>G(rs231775), CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33), CT60(rs3087243), Jo31(rs11571302), ICOSc.1554+4GT(8_15) polymorphisms with susceptibility to Graves' disease and clinical outcome was investigated. The study group comprised of 561 Polish Caucasians, including 172 unrelated Graves' disease patients. CTLA-4c.49A>G, CTLA-4g.319C>T, and CT60 were genotyped by PCR-RFLP; Jo31 and CD28c.17+3C>T by minisequencing; CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33) and ICOSc.1554+4GT(8_15)-PCR and fluorescence-based technique. CD28c.17+3T>C(rs3116496)T/CTLA-4g.319C>T(rs5742909)C/CTLA-4c.49A>G(rs231775)G/CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33)(AT 16-21 )/CT60(rs3087243)G/Jo31(rs11571302)G/ICOSc.1554+4GT(8_15)(m) and TCA(AT Graves' disease, especially in males, as well as overall Graves' orbitopathy development with severe outcome. TCG(AT 16-21 )GG(l) haplotype increased risk of Graves' disease and reduced the chance of successful medical treatment. Although this haplotype was mainly observed in patients without signs of Graves' orbitopathy, if Graves' orbitopathy developed it favored a Graves' orbitopathy outcome. Haplotype TCA(AT >21 )GT(m) increased Graves' disease risk in women and, in all patients, was linked to Graves' disease without Graves' orbitopathy. TCG(AT Graves' disease risk factor, whereas CT60 was an independent factor for disease progression. Sporadic Graves' disease was related to presence of CTLA-4c.49A>G[A] and the rare CTLA-4g.319C>T[T] allele variant. Familial background of the disease was exclusively associated with CTLA-4g.*642AT(8_33)[AT >21 ]/[AT >21 ] genotype. CD28/CTLA-4/ICOS loci may confer inherited susceptibility to Graves' disease or may be involved in susceptibility to Graves' disease and play a

  8. Histological Changes in Autoimmune Hepatitis with Graves' Disease: A Child Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mamiko; Shibata, Hironori; Masugi, Yohei; Ishi, Tomohiro; Kameyama, Kaori; Ebinuma, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2017-08-15

    We herein report a child case of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) accompanied with Graves' disease. Elevated aminotransferase levels were found in a 12-year-old Japanese girl with Graves' disease. In her first liver biopsy, necrosis and inflammation was limited to the centrilobular area, while the second biopsy showed different findings. Namely, portal injury newly appeared, including interface hepatitis, which represents the histological characteristics of AIH. As the histological findings at the onset of AIH do not always show typical findings, a re-biopsy is considered to be important in individuals suspected to have AIH. AIH should be included in the differential diagnosis of liver dysfunction in Graves' disease, even in children.

  9. Epidemiology and prevention of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Bartalena, Luigi

    2002-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy is clinically relevant in approximately 50% of patients with Graves' disease, severe forms affecting 3%-5% of patients. Two age peaks of incidence are observed in the fifth and seventh decades of life, with slight differences between women and men. The disease is more frequent

  10. PREGO (presentation of Graves' orbitopathy) study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perros, Petros; Žarković, Miloš; Azzolini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: The epidemiology of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) may be changing. The aim of the study was to identify trends in presentation of GO to tertiary centres and initial management over time. METHODS: Prospective observational study of European Group On Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) centres...

  11. Quality control of 131I treatment of graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zeng; Liu Guoqiang

    2009-01-01

    To make a preliminary quality control (QC) criteria and apply on the various stages of clinic 131 I treatment of Graves' disease in order to decrease the early happening of hypothyroidism and enhance the onetime 131 I cure rate of Graves' disease, the quality control criteria in the stochastic outpatient with 131 I treatment, such as plan of the indication, contraindication, method of treatment, matters needing attention, follow-up observation and curative effect appraisal, patient selection, RAIU, thyroid gland weight measurement and 131 I dose criteria for the various steps of 131 I medication were determined. The 131 I treatment effects of Graves' disease including the once-cure rate, the improving rate, duplicate cure rate and the early happening rate of hypothyroidism were analyzed in patients with applying QC and without QC ccriteria. The results showed that the oncecure rate in patients with applying QC criteria was increased from 76.6% to 90.9% (P≤0.01); the improving rate was decreased from 12.2% to 7.0% (P≤0.01); the duplicate cure rate was increased from 90.1% to 93.0% (P>0.05); the early happening rate of hypothyroidism was decreased from 11.0% to 2.1% (P≤0.01). The 131 I treatment of Graves' disease applying with QC criteria had tremendously improved the oncecure rate and decreased the early happening of hypothyroidism rate. (authors)

  12. [Rituximab: a new therapeutic alternative in Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello-Winniczuk, Nina; Díaz-Jouanen, Efraín

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism, affecting mainly young aged women, with an etiology of autoimmune basis. One of its manifestations, Graves' ophthalmopathy whose pathophysiology is unknown, represents one of the greatest therapeutic challenges in these patients, because they require aggressive treatment with steroids and multiple subsequent reconstructive surgeries in certain cases. It also represents a high burden to the health system. Drugs targeting B cells have been very effective for many autoimmune diseases. Rituximab is a murine humanized monoclonal antibody against CD20 + cells currently being studied in various autoimmune diseases including Graves' disease. The objective of this paper is to expose possible mechanisms by which rituximab could act in both hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease, as well as the experience with its use acquired so far. The employment of rituximab in recently diagnosed patients or with mild ophthalmopathy is questionable with the evidence available today however, we think that it may have a role in refractory cases or those who have a contraindication for steroid use.

  13. Follow-up of newborns of mothers with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Shraga, Yael; Tamir-Hostovsky, Liran; Boyko, Valentina; Lerner-Geva, Liat; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit

    2014-06-01

    Overt neonatal Graves' disease is rare, but may be severe, even life threatening, with deleterious effects on neural development. The main objective of this study was to describe the course of thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxin (fT4) levels, as well as postnatal weight gain in relation to fT4 levels, in neonates born to women with Graves' disease without overt neonatal thyrotoxicosis. Such information is important to deduce the optimal schedule for evaluation. We conducted a retrospective chart review of neonates born to mothers with Graves' disease between January 2007 and December 2012. The records were reviewed for sex, gestational age, birth weight, maternal treatment during pregnancy, and maternal thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin (TSI) level. For each visit in the clinic, the data included growth parameters, presence of symptoms suspected for hyperthyroidism, blood test results (levels of TSH, fT4, and TSI), and treatment. Ninety-six neonates were included in the study (49 males), with a total of 320 measurements of thyroid function tests (TSH and fT4). Four neonates (4%) had overt neonatal Graves' disease; one of them along with nine others were born preterm. In 77 (92.9%) of the remaining 83 neonates (the subclinical group), fT4 levels were above the 95th percentile on day 5. All had normal fT4 on day 15. A negative association was found between fT4 and weight gain during the first two weeks. In this cohort, most neonates born to mothers with Graves' disease had a subclinical course with abnormal fT4 levels that peaked at day 5. After day 14, all measurements of fT4 returned to the normal range, although measurements of TSH remained suppressed for up to three months. Elevated fT4 was associated with poor weight gain.

  14. SUBTOTAL THYROIDECTOMY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF GRAVE'S DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, P J; Garg, M K; Singh, Y; Bhalla, V P; Datta, S

    2001-07-01

    Treatment options for Grave's disease include radio-iodine ablation, which is the standard treatment in the USA, antithyroid drug therapy, which is popular in Japan, and surgery, which is commonly employed in Europe and India. There are very few reports about the outcome of surgery in Grave's disease in the Indian setting. Surgery for Grave's disease is an attractive option in under developed countries to cut short prolonged drug treatment, costly follow up and avoid the need for radio-isotope facilities for 1311 ablation. Aim of the present study was to assess the result of subtotal thyroidectomy in 32 cases of Grave's Disease referred for surgery by the endocrinologist in a teaching hospital. Patients were prepared for surgery with Lugol's iodine and propranalol. Subtotal thyroidectomy was performed by a standard technique, which included dissection and exposure of recurrent laryngeal nerves and parathyroid glands. Actual estimation of weight of the remnant gland was not part of the study. Duration of follow up ranged from 6 months to 4 years. 13 of 32 cases were males. Age ranged from 20 to 57 years. There was 1 death in the immediate post-operative period. There were no cases of permanent hypoparathyroidism or recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. 1 patient developed temporary hypoparathyroidism. 1 patient developed recurrence of hyperthyroidism and 3 cases developed hypothyroidism all within 2 years of surgery. The study has demonstrated the safety and effectiveness of surgery for Grave's Disease in comparison to the reported high incidence of hypothyroidism following radio-iodine therapy and high recurrence rate after anti thyroid drug therapy.

  15. A questionnaire survey on the management of Graves' orbitopathy in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perros, P.; Baldeschi, L.; Boboridis, K.; Dickinson, A. J.; Hullo, A.; Kahaly, G. J.; Kendall-Taylor, P.; Krassas, G. E.; Lane, C. M.; Lazarus, J. H.; Marcocci, C.; Marino, M.; Mourits, M. P.; Nardi, M.; Orgiazzi, J.; Pinchera, A.; Pitz, S.; Prummel, M. F.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine management patterns among clinicians who treat patients with Graves' orbitopathy (GO) in Europe. DESIGN AND METHODS: Questionnaire survey including a case scenario of members of professional organisations representing endocrinologists, ophthalmologists and nuclear medicine

  16. Radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease. An assessment of its potential risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, G.D.; Burman, K.D.

    1986-01-01

    Concern about the side effects of radiation exposure has deterred physicians from using radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease, although the efficacy and safety of this treatment have been established in the 35 years since its introduction. In that time, no significant side effects have been discovered. We believe iodine-131 should be considered the treatment of choice in most patients with Graves' disease. This article reviews the current understanding of the risks in radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease, including the risks for teratogenicity, genetic damage, carcinogenesis, and cellular dysfunction

  17. Long-term sequential monitoring of controlled graves representing common burial scenarios with ground penetrating radar: Years 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, John J.; Walter, Brittany S.; Healy, Carrie

    2016-09-01

    Geophysical techniques such as ground-penetrating radar (GPR) have been successfully used for forensic searches to locate clandestine graves and physical evidence. However, additional controlled research is needed to fully understand the applicability of this technology when searching for clandestine graves in various environments, soil types, and for longer periods of time post-burial. The purpose of this study was to determine the applicability of GPR for detecting controlled graves in a Spodosol representing multiple burial scenarios for Years 2 and 3 of a three-year monitoring period. Objectives included determining how different burial scenarios are factors in producing a distinctive anomalous response; determining how different GPR imagery options (2D reflection profiles and horizontal time slices) can provide increased visibility of the burials; and comparing GPR imagery between 500 MHz and 250 MHz dominant frequency antennae. The research site contained a grid with eight graves representing common forensic burial scenarios in a Spodosol, a common soil type of Florida, with six graves containing a pig carcass (Sus scrofa). Burial scenarios with grave items (a deep grave with a layer of rocks over the carcass and a carcass wrapped in a tarpaulin) produced a more distinctive response with clearer target reflections over the duration of the monitoring period compared to naked carcasses. Months with increased precipitation were also found to produce clearer target reflections than drier months, particularly during Year 3 when many grave scenarios that were not previously visible became visible after increased seasonal rainfall. Overall, the 250 MHz dominant frequency antenna imagery was more favorable than the 500 MHz. While detection of a simulated grave may be difficult to detect over time, long term detection of a grave in a Spodosol may be possible if the disturbed spodic horizon is detected. Furthermore, while grave visibility increased with the 2D

  18. Supervoltage orbital radiotherapy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kriss, J.P.; McDougall, I.R.; Petersen, I.A.; Donaldson, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    Since 1968 we have employed supervoltage orbital radiation as treatment for severe progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. A numerical ophthalmic index was used to asess pre- and post-treatment serverity. In the past 20 years we have treated 311 patients of whom 275 have been followed for ≤ 1 year or until any eye surgery was performed. An orbital radiation dosage of 2000 rads in 2 weeks was used for the majority of patients (Series I and III). Series II patients received an orbital dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks. Demographic differences were observed between these series, thus mandating presentation of the results of each separately. Analyses excluded any result achieved by any post-radiation surgical procedure on the eyes. Post-theraphy worsening of ophtalmopathy occurred in only 29 of 1025 observations. Improvement or complete resolution was observed within each category of eye involvement, but lack of favorable response was also recorded in significant numbers. Improvement in proptosis occurred with the lowest frequency and magnitude. About 30% of the patients required eye muscle surgery to correct residual diplopia. Analysis of the data by step-wise linear regression analysis enabled us a. to derive formulae predicting the problable response to radiation therapy according to sign and severity, and b. identify parameters which diminished the likelihood or the extent of a favorable response. The latter included male sex, never thyrotoxic, age greater than 60 years, and requirement for concomitant treatment for hyperthyroidism. No long-term adverse reactions attributable to the radiotherapy have been observed. We conclude that supervoltage orbital radiotherapy, combined with later eye muscle surgery if necessary, is an effective treatment strategy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author)

  19. Current treatment of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, T.; Shimaoka, K.; Mimura, T.; Ito, K.

    1987-01-01

    In this review we have described the rationale for the appropriate treatment of patients with Graves' disease. Because the etiology of this disorder remains obscure, its management remains controversial. Since antithyroid drugs and radioiodine became readily available in the early 1950s, they have been widely used for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, and the number of cases treated surgically has markedly decreased. However, almost four decades of experience have disclosed an unexpectedly high incidence of delayed hypothyroidism after radioiodine treatment and a low remission rate after antithyroid therapy. As a result, surgery is again being advocated as the treatment of choice. The three modalities of treatment have different advantages and disadvantages, and selection of treatment is of importance. In principle, we believe that for most patients a subtotal thyroidectomy should be performed after the patient has been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. We attempt to leave a thyroid remnant of 6 to 8 gm.36 references

  20. Radioiodine treatment of Grave's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, P.; Vogt, H.; Dorn, R.; Graf, G.; Kopp, J.

    2001-01-01

    In Germany radioiodine therapy of Grave's disease is performed in patients older than 20 years, after at least one year of unsuccessful antithyroid therapy, intolerance against antithyroid medication, recurrences after surgical interventions and small goiters. Hyperthyroidism is eliminated with an ablative dose concept (300 Gy) in more than 90% associated with rate of hypothyroidism in the outcome of also more than 90%. Adverse prognostic factors are an insufficient dose to the thyroid and/or concomitant antithyreoid medication. Radioiodine therapy in Germany must be an inpatient single time approach due to quality assurance and radiation protection reasons. The mean hospitalization is only 3-4 days with the patient being discharged at an annual dose of less than 1 mSv at 2 m distance (dose rate at discharge [de

  1. [Orbital decompression in Grave's ophtalmopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longueville, E

    2010-01-01

    Graves disease orbitopathy is a complex progressive inflammatory disease. Medical treatment remains in all cases the proposed treatment of choice. Surgical treatment by bone decompression can be considered as an emergency mainly in cases of optic neuropathy or ocular hypertension not being controlled medically or in post-traumatic exophthalmos stage. Emergency bone decompression eliminates compression or stretching of the optic nerve allowing visual recovery. The uncontrolled ocular hypertension will benefit from decompression. The normalization of intraocular pressure may be obtained by this surgery or if needed by the use of postoperative antiglaucoma drops or even filtration surgery. In all operated cases, the IOP was normalized with an average decrease of 7.71 mmHg and a cessation of eye drops in 3/7 cases. Regarding sequelae, our therapeutic strategy involves consecutively surgery of the orbit, extraocular muscles and eyelids. The orbital expansion gives excellent results on the cosmetic level and facilitates the implementation of subsequent actions.

  2. Hypocalcaemia after total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease and for benign atoxic multinodular goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgrimsson, Páll; Nordenström, E; Bergenfelz, A; Almquist, M

    2012-10-01

    Postoperative hypocalcaemia has been reported to be more common after total thyroidectomy (TT) for Graves' disease than after TT for benign atoxic multinodular goitre (MNG). The reasons for this potential association are not clear. In the present study, the frequency and risk factors of hypocalcaemia after TT for Graves' vs MNG were compared. Between January 1999 and October 2009, patients with first-time surgery for Graves' disease or MNG treated with a TT were included in the study. Postoperative hypocalcaemia was defined by symptoms, calcium levels and treatment with calcium and/or vitamin D analogues during postoperative hospital stay, at discharge, and at the 6-week and 6-month follow-ups. Outcomes were compared with Mann-Whitney, chi(2) and Fishers' exact test where appropriate and by multivariable logistic regression analysis. There were 128 patients with Graves' disease and 81 patients with MNG. Patients with Graves' disease were younger than patients with MNG (median age, 35 vs 51 years, p Graves' disease (p Graves' disease, there was no difference in the overall frequency of biochemical hypocalcaemia, low levels of PTH and/or treatment with calcium and vitamin D.

  3. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for Graves' orbitopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyd, R.; Herkstroeter, M.; Martin, T.; Zamboglou, N.; Strassmann, G.

    2001-01-01

    Background: Radiotherapy (RT) has been proven effective in the management of Graves' orbitopathy in numerous studies. Most commonly is the use of conventional fractionated RT and the value of hypofractionated irradiation has not been investigated. Materials and methods: The results in 33 euthyroid cases who underwent RT with a total dose of 21.0 Gy given in three weekly fractions of 3.0 Gy are retrospectively analyzed. The duration of symptoms ranged from 1-84 months and all of the cases had treatment failure after previous administration of corticosteroids. After a mean follow-up period of 33.6 months the overall results were assessed according to the criteria by Donaldson et al. and for evaluation of the clinical outcome a classification with the main criteria being eye-lid changes, exophthalmos, myopathy and eye nerve involvement was used. Results: At follow-up, the overall response to RT was 84.8% (28/33 cases). The analysis with the clinical classification demonstrated that in 19/33 (57.6%) cases occurred a decrease of eye lid changes and exophthalmos and 12/33 (36.4%) had a relief of myopathy. 2/33 cases (6.0%) developed an eye nerve compression causing the necessity of surgical decompression. 3/33 cases (9.0%) had a progression of at least of one of the single criteria of the score and therefore they were classified as non-responders. Conclusions: Hypofractionated RT has been proven effective for treatment of severe cases of Graves' orbitopathy in cases with a prolongated duration of symptoms. The comparison with literature data demonstrate that the results after hypofractionated RT are comparable to those obtained after conventional fractionated RT. (orig.)

  4. B-cell depletion with rituximab in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Graves' ophthalmopathy the latest addition to an expanding family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; El Fassi, Daniel; Hasselbalch, Hans K

    2007-01-01

    In this review, the authors summarise the clinical results obtained after therapy with rituximab in autoimmune diseases, including Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy. On the basis of qualitative and quantitative analyses of B- and T-cell subsets, and autoantibody levels obtained in other...... diseases before and after rituximab therapy, the authors interpret the results of the only two clinical investigations of the efficacy of rituximab in the treatment of Graves' disease and Graves' opthalmopathy reported so far. No significant effect on autoantibody levels was observed. Nonetheless, 4 out...... of 10 Graves' disease patients remained in remission 400 days after rituximab treatment versus none in the control group, and remarkable improvements in the eye symptoms of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were observed. This supports a role for B cells in the pathogenesis of Graves' ophthalmopathy...

  5. p27kip1 expression distinguishes papillary hyperplasia in Graves' disease from papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, L A; Yousef, O M; Jin, L; Lohse, C M; Pankratz, V S; Lloyd, R V

    2000-09-01

    In most cases, the histopathologic and cytologic distinction between Graves' disease and papillary thyroid carcinoma is relatively easy, but on occasion Graves' disease may simulate a thyroid papillary carcinoma. For example, papillary fronds with fibrovascular cores may be present in both Graves' disease and papillary carcinoma. p27kip1 (p27) is a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitory protein that has been shown to be an independent prognostic factor in a variety of human tumors. Our previous studies of p27 expression in hyperplastic and neoplastic endocrine lesions showed that the level of p27 was quite different in these two conditions. To determine if this distinction could also be made between Graves' disease and papillary carcinoma, we analyzed expression of p27 and other cell cycle proteins in a series of cases of Graves' disease with papillary hyperplasia and a series of papillary thyroid carcinomas. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 61 randomly selected patients with thyroid disease, including 29 cases of Graves' disease with papillary architectural features and 32 cases of papillary carcinoma, were analyzed for expression of p27, Ki-67, and DNA topoisomerase II alpha (topo II alpha) by immunostaining. The distribution of immunoreactivity was analyzed by quantifying the percentage of positive nuclei that was expressed as the labeling index (LI) plus or minus the standard error of the mean. The papillary hyperplasia of Graves' disease had a p27 LI of 68.2 +/- 3.1 (range, 24 to 88), whereas papillary carcinomas had a LI of 25.6 +/- 2.5 (range, 12 to 70) (P hyperplasia in Graves' disease and papillary carcinoma. These results indicate that p27 protein expression is significantly higher in papillary hyperplasia of Graves' disease compared to papillary carcinoma, which may be diagnostically useful in difficult cases.

  6. Resolution of Graves' disease after renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yvonne; Butani, Lavjay; Glaser, Nicole; Nguyen, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    We report a case of an adolescent boy with Down's syndrome and ESRD on hemodialysis who developed mild Graves' disease that was not amenable to radioablation, surgery, or ATDs. After 14 months of observation without resolution of Graves' disease, he successfully received a DDRT with a steroid minimization protocol. Thymoglobulin and a three-day course of steroids were used for induction and he was started on tacrolimus, MMF, and pravastatin for maintenance transplant immunosuppression. One month after transplantation, all biochemical markers and antibody profiling for Graves' disease had resolved and remain normal one yr later. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nodular Graves' disease with medullary thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat Hussain; Rather, Tanveer Ahmed; Makhdoomi, Rumana; Malik, Dharmender

    2015-01-01

    Co-existence of thyroid nodules with Graves' disease has been reported in various studies. 10-15% of such nodules harbor thyroid cancer with papillary thyroid cancer being the commonest. Medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) in nodules associated with Graves' disease is rare. On literature survey, we came across 11 such cases reported so far. We report a 62-year-old female with Graves' disease who also had a thyroid nodule that on fine-needle aspiration cytology and the subsequent postthyroidectomy histopathological examination was reported to be MTC.

  8. Relationship between the management of Graves' disease and the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Suping; Kuang Anren

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To perform literature search and review on the controversial relationship between therapies of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease (GD) and the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). Methods: We searched the database of MEDLINE (1966-2006.3), EMBASE (1984-2005), Cochrane Library(2006 No. 1), CBMdisc (1978.1-2006.4) and CNKI (1994-2006). The methodological quality of the studies selected for review was assessed according to the quality assessment criteria suggested by the Cochrane systematic review guideline. Meta-analysis was performed by RevMan 4.2 software. Results: Eight studies were included in the systematic review. Meta-analysis showed that there was statistically significant difference between mi and other forms of therapy [surgery or antithyroid drugs (ATD)] (test value: 2.31, 5.97, 3.70, 5.55; all P 0.05). There were not yet any studies on the impact between early prevention of hypothyroidism after mi therapy and GO. Conclusions: Based on meta-analysis on literature data, if early measures are not performed to prevent hypothyroidism after mi therapy, it may induce or aggravate GO more frequently than ATD or surgical treatment. Symptomatic relief of GO after 131 I therapy is also less effective than the other 2 forms of therapy. Therefore, 131 I therapy should be delivered carefully in those patients with GO. (authors)

  9. Assessing catastrophic and impoverishing effects of health care payments in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwesiga, Brendan; Zikusooka, Charlotte M; Ataguba, John E

    2015-01-22

    Direct out-of-pocket payments for health care are recognised as limiting access to health care services and also endangering the welfare of households. In Uganda, such payments comprise a large portion of total health financing. This study assesses the catastrophic and impoverishing impact of paying for health care out-of-pocket in Uganda. Using data from the Uganda National Household Surveys 2009/10, the catastrophic impact of out-of-pocket health care payments is defined using thresholds that vary with household income. The impoverishing effect of out-of-pocket health care payments is assessed using the Ugandan national poverty line and the World Bank poverty line ($1.25/day). A high level and intensity of both financial catastrophe and impoverishment due to out-of-pocket payments are recorded. Using an initial threshold of 10% of household income, about 23% of Ugandan households face financial ruin. Based on both the $1.25/day and the Ugandan poverty lines, about 4% of the population are further impoverished by such payments. This represents a relative increase in poverty head count of 17.1% and 18.1% respectively. The absence of financial protection in Uganda's health system calls for concerted action. Currently, out-of-pocket payments account for a large share of total health financing and there is no pooled prepayment system available. There is therefore a need to move towards mandatory prepayment. In this way, people could access the needed health services without any associated financial consequence.

  10. Principals Learning from Veteran Teachers Serving Impoverished Students: Social Justice Implications for Professors of Educational Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosine, Dale

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study of ten elementary veteran teachers used Hargrove's single, double, and triple-loop thinking to understand their perceptions regarding knowledge new principals need to be social justice leaders working in impoverished schools. Findings in three categories revealed the importance of principals learning to identify their…

  11. Comparison of curative effect of 131I and antithyroid drugs in Graves' disease: a meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ju; Lu, Xiuqing; Yue, Yan

    2017-03-01

    Radioactive 131I is currently reported to be a potential effective intervention for Graves' Disease treatment in China. Whether 131I treatment was associated with effective outcome or reduced risk of side effects, reccurence rate remained unknown. Eligible studies were selected from Chinese VIP, Wangfang, CNKI databases using the keywords "Iodine" and "Graves Disease". Finally, 13 clinical trials met the inclusion criterion and were included this meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis included 1355 patients diagnosed of Graves' Disease with regular anti-thyroid drugs oral administration and 1320 patients with 131I therapy. The results showed that there was significant symptom improvement with radioactive iodine intervention (Odd Ratio (OR)=4.50, 95% CI [3.55, 5.71], PGraves' Disease. Treatment with 131I was associated with better clinical outcome; it reduced side effects and reccurence rate but increased hypothyroidism in Graves' Disease.

  12. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossage, A.A.R.; Crawley, J.C.W.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of [ 9 -9μTc]pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity - TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p<0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination

  13. Hyperthyroidism and Graves? disease: Is an ultrasound examination needed?

    OpenAIRE

    Varadhan, Lakshminarayanan; Varughese, George Iype; Sankaranarayanan, Sailesh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of our study was to assess the limitation of clinical examination in determining the morphology of thyroid gland in patients with hyperthyroidism and its implications. Methods: A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with hyperthyroidism seen in a tertiary endocrine clinic were analyzed. Sub-analysis was performed on patients with proven Graves' disease. Results: Of the 133 patients included in this study with hyperthyroidism, 60 (45%) patients had significant nodularity...

  14. Postoperative Outcomes in Graves' Disease Patients: Results from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Gustavo A; Koru-Sengul, Tulay; Vaghaiwalla, Tanaz M; Parikh, Punam P; Farra, Josefina C; Lew, John I

    2017-06-01

    Current surgical indications for Graves' disease include intractability to medical and/or radioablative therapy, compressive symptoms, and worsening ophthalmopathy. Total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease may be technically challenging and lead to untoward perioperative outcomes. This study examines outcomes in patients with Graves' disease who underwent total thyroidectomy and assesses its safety for this patient population. A retrospective cross-sectional analysis was performed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2006 to 2011. Total thyroidectomy performed in patients with Graves' disease, benign multinodular goiter (MNG), and thyroid cancer was identified. Demographic factors, comorbidities, and postoperative complications were evaluated. Chi-square, one-way analysis of variance, and risk-adjusted multivariable logistic regression were performed. Of 215,068 patients who underwent total thyroidectomy during the study period, 11,205 (5.2%) had Graves' disease, 110,124 (51.2%) MNG, and 93,739 (43.6%) thyroid malignancy. Patients with Graves' disease were younger than MNG and thyroid cancer patients (M age  = 42.8 years vs. 55.5 and 51.0 years; p Graves' disease group included a higher proportion of women (p Graves' disease was independently associated with a higher risk of vocal-cord paralysis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.36 [confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.69]), tracheostomy (OR = 1.35 [CI 1.1-1.67]), postoperative hypocalcemia (OR = 1.65 [CI 1.54-1.77]), and hematoma requiring reoperation (OR = 2.79 [CI 2.16-3.62]) compared to MNG patients. High-volume centers for total thyroidectomy were independently associated with lower risk of postoperative complications, including in patients with Graves' disease. Despite low overall morbidity following total thyroidectomy, Graves' disease patients are at increased risk of postoperative complications, including bleeding, vocal-cord paralysis, tracheostomy, and hypocalcemia. These risks appear

  15. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharani Loganathan

    Full Text Available While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking.We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur and rural (Kuala Terengganu setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained.Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38% were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; p<0.001. The mean direct and indirect costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis consisted 20% of monthly household income in Kuala Lumpur, as compared with only 5% in Kuala Terengganu. Direct medical costs paid out-of-pocket caused 141 (33% households in Kuala Lumpur to experience catastrophic expenditure and 11 (3% households to incur poverty. However in Kuala Terengganu, only one household (0.5% experienced catastrophic healthcare expenditure and none were impoverished. The lowest income quintile in Kuala Lumpur was more likely to experience catastrophic payments compared to the highest quintile (87% vs 8%. The concentration index for out-of-pocket healthcare payments was closer to zero at Kuala Lumpur (0.03 than at Kuala Terengganu (0.24.While urban households were wealthier, healthcare expenditure due to gastroenteritis had more catastrophic and poverty impact on the urban poor. Universal rotavirus vaccination would reduce both disease burden and health

  16. [Thyroid cancer in patients with Grave's Disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mssrouri, R; Benamr, S; Essadel, A; Mdaghri, J; Mohammadine, El H; Lahlou, M-K; Taghy, A; Belmahi, A; Chad, B

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of thyroid carcinoma in patients operated on for Graves' disease, to identify criteria which may predict malignancy, and to develop a practical approach to determine the extensiveness of thyroidectomy. Retrospective study of all patients who underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease between 1995 and 2005. 547 patients underwent subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves' disease during this period. Post-operative pathology examination revealed six cases of thyroid cancer (1.1%). All six cases had differentiated thyroid carcinoma (papillary carcinoma in 3 cases, follicular carcinoma in 2 cases and papillo-follicular carcinoma in 1 case). The indication for initial thyroidectomy was a palpable thyroid nodule in 3 cases (50%), failure of medical treatment for Grave's disease in 2 cases (33%), and signs of goiter compression in 1 case (17%). Five patients underwent re-operative total thyroidectomy. This study shows that while malignancy in Grave's disease is uncommon, the presence of thyroid nodule(s) in patients with Grave's disease may be considered as an indication for radical surgery. The most adequate radical surgery in this situation is to perform a total thyroidectomy.

  17. Hyperthyroidism and Graves' disease: Is an ultrasound examination needed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshminarayanan Varadhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of our study was to assess the limitation of clinical examination in determining the morphology of thyroid gland in patients with hyperthyroidism and its implications. Methods: A retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with hyperthyroidism seen in a tertiary endocrine clinic were analyzed. Sub-analysis was performed on patients with proven Graves' disease. Results: Of the 133 patients included in this study with hyperthyroidism, 60 (45% patients had significant nodularity on ultrasound (US. However, only 67% of these were identified on clinical examination. In patients with confirmed Graves' disease (n = 73, the discordance between US and clinical examination was very similar (18 of 30 patients, 60%. Conclusion: US should form an essential part of the evaluation of hyperthyroidism as the morphology of thyroid gland could be variable and nodules in these glands would also need to be appropriately investigated. This would also significantly influence decision-making and appropriate immediate and follow-up management plan.

  18. Smoking and other lifestyle factors and the risk of Graves' hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Ingrid A; Manson, Joann E; Michels, Karin B; Alexander, Erik K; Willett, Walter C; Utiger, Robert D

    2005-07-25

    Hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease is common in women, yet little is known about risk factors for the disease. We sought to determine whether lifestyle factors, including smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity level, and body mass index, are risk factors for Graves' hyperthyroidism. This analysis was conducted using data from the Nurses' Health Study II, among 115109 women aged 25 to 42 at entry. Incident reports of women with Graves' hyperthyroidism, confirmed to have the disorder, were included. During 1 328 270 person-years of follow-up, incident diagnoses of Graves' hyperthyroidism were confirmed in 543 women; the 12-year incidence was 4.6 per 1000 women. Cigarette smoking was a predictor of Graves' hyperthyroidism. The hazard ratio among current smokers was 1.93 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54-2.43), and among past smokers it was 1.27 (95% CI, 1.03-1.56), after adjusting for recent pregnancy, parity, and other variables. Among current smokers, the hazard ratio increased with the intensity of smoking and was 2.63 (95% CI, 1.71-4.04) among women who smoked 25 or more cigarettes daily. Obesity was associated with a decreased risk of Graves' hyperthyroidism. The hazard ratio for the disorder among women with a body mass index of 30 kg/m(2) or higher was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.49-0.92). Alcohol intake and physical activity level were not associated with risk of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Smoking is a risk factor for Graves' hyperthyroidism in women. Obesity may be associated with a reduced risk, although weight loss as the first manifestation of hyperthyroidism cannot be excluded.

  19. Radioiodine treatment for pediatric hyperthyroid Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ma; Jiawei, Xie; Guoming, Wang; Jianbin, Liu; Wanxia, Liu; Driedger, Al; Shuyao, Zuo; Qin, Zhang

    2009-10-01

    Grave's disease (GD) is an autoimmune disease in which excessive amounts of thyroid hormones circulate in the blood. Treatment for pediatric GD includes (1) antithyroid drugs (ATD), (2) radioiodine, and (3) thyroidectomy. Yet, the optimal therapy remains controversial. We collected studies from all electronically available sources as well as from conferences held in China. All studies using radioiodine and/or ATD and/or thyroidectomy were included. Information was found on 1,874 pediatric GD patients treated with radioiodine, 1,279 patients treated with ATD and 1,362 patients treated surgically. The cure rate for radioiodine was 49.8%; the incidence of hypothyroidism, 37.8%; of relapse, 6.3%; of adverse effects, 1.55%; and of drop outs, 0.6%. These data show that radioiodine treatment is safe and effective in pediatric GD with significant lower incidence of relapse and adverse effects but significantly higher incidence of hypothyroidism as compared with both ATD and thyroidectomy. For the time being, radioiodine treatment for pediatric GD remains an excellent first-line therapy and a good second-line therapy for patients with ATD failure, severe complications, or poor compliance.

  20. Pooled genome wide association detects association upstream of FCRL3 with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, Jwu Jin; Burdon, Kathryn P; Lu, Yi; Laurie, Kate; Leonardos, Lefta; Baird, Paul N; Sahebjada, Srujana; Walsh, John P; Gajdatsy, Adam; Ebeling, Peter R; Hamblin, Peter Shane; Wong, Rosemary; Forehan, Simon P; Fourlanos, Spiros; Roberts, Anthony P; Doogue, Matthew; Selva, Dinesh; Montgomery, Grant W; Macgregor, Stuart; Craig, Jamie E

    2016-11-18

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disease of complex inheritance. Multiple genetic susceptibility loci are thought to be involved in Graves' disease and it is therefore likely that these can be identified by genome wide association studies. This study aimed to determine if a genome wide association study, using a pooling methodology, could detect genomic loci associated with Graves' disease. Nineteen of the top ranking single nucleotide polymorphisms including HLA-DQA1 and C6orf10, were clustered within the Major Histo-compatibility Complex region on chromosome 6p21, with rs1613056 reaching genome wide significance (p = 5 × 10 -8 ). Technical validation of top ranking non-Major Histo-compatablity complex single nucleotide polymorphisms with individual genotyping in the discovery cohort revealed four single nucleotide polymorphisms with p ≤ 10 -4 . Rs17676303 on chromosome 1q23.1, located upstream of FCRL3, showed evidence of association with Graves' disease across the discovery, replication and combined cohorts. A second single nucleotide polymorphism rs9644119 downstream of DPYSL2 showed some evidence of association supported by finding in the replication cohort that warrants further study. Pooled genome wide association study identified a genetic variant upstream of FCRL3 as a susceptibility locus for Graves' disease in addition to those identified in the Major Histo-compatibility Complex. A second locus downstream of DPYSL2 is potentially a novel genetic variant in Graves' disease that requires further confirmation.

  1. Applied anatomy of thyroid arteries for interventional embolization of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Zhongxiang; Zhao Wei; Hou Jialin; Xiang Shutian; Li Liyuan; Zou Zhirong; Li Xingguo; Song Dianping; Yuan Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the anatomy and imaging manifestations of thyroid arteries for improving the efficiency and lowering the complication in interventional embolization of Graves' disease. Methods: Thyroid arteries were investigated, including 16 adult cadavers (Cadaver group), 8 non-thyropathic patients (Normal group)and 17 Graves patients (Graves group). The inner diameters of the trunk and supplying branches of thyroid artery, the angles between the origination of branches and the beginning of the trunk, and the angles between the trunk of thyroid artery and carotid or subclavian artery were measured. In addition, data of the three groups were statistically analyzed. Results: Many non-thyroid arterial branches arose from thyroid artery, with no statistical difference in their indexes between Cadaver group and Normal group. The thyroid arteries showed much longer, obviously wider in diameter, and larger angles between the trunk of thyroid artery and carotid artery in Graves group than those of Cadaver group and Normal group; outcoming with significant statistical differences; and furthermore, with increase of interglandular branches and dangerous internal and external anastomoses. Conclusions: The specific thyroid arterial changes of Graves' disease are helpful for the interventional embolization. Non-thyroid branches and dangerous anastomoses should not be embolized as far as possible, for decreasing the complications of the interventional procedure for Graves' disease. (authors)

  2. The role of diffusion weighted MR imaging for differentiation between Graves' disease and Hashimoto thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, T; Bozgeyik, Z; Ozturk, F; Burakgazi, G; Akyol, M; Coskun, S; Ozkan, Y; Ogur, E

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWMRI) for differentation between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Fifty patients (27 Graves diseases and 23 Hashimoto thyroiditis) and twenty healthy volunteers were examined using T1, T2 and DWMRI. The patients were diagnosed on the basis of physical findings and the results of thyroid function tests and serological tests. Circular ROIs were positioned on the bilateral thyroid lobes and isthmus. All measurements were repeated three different b values including 100, 600 and 1000 s/mm2 in all cases. ADC (Apparent diffusion coefficient) maps were calculated automatically with the MR system. Mean ADC values were 2.93 × 10-3, 1.97 × 10-3 and 1.62 × 10-3 mm2/s in the healthy volunteers; 3.47 × 10-3, 2.25 × 10-3 and 1.64 × 10-3 mm2/s in Graves' disease; 2.53 × 10-3, 1.76 × 10-3, 1.28 × 10-3 mm2/s in Hashimoto thyroiditis for b100, b600 and b1000, respectively. The ADC values of the Graves diseases were higher than healty volunteers and Hashimoto thyroiditis. ADC values were statistically significant for differentation between Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease all b values (p Hashimoto thyroiditis and Graves' disease.

  3. The physical impoverishment and decay of Danish villages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    For the latest 30 years the physical environment (buildings, gardens, roads and spaces, etc.) in the Danish villages has undergone drastic changes. Many villages near the large towns are drowned in growth and modern buildings, and other villages in the Danish outskirts are hit by decline and phys......, a regional and local authority level as well as the local level, including a discussion of the Danish rural district policy before and after the re-adjustment of the farm subsidypolicy in the EU....

  4. Assessing catastrophic and impoverishing effects of health care payments in Uganda

    OpenAIRE

    Kwesiga, Brendan; Zikusooka, Charlotte M; Ataguba, John E

    2015-01-01

    Background Direct out-of-pocket payments for health care are recognised as limiting access to health care services and also endangering the welfare of households. In Uganda, such payments comprise a large portion of total health financing. This study assesses the catastrophic and impoverishing impact of paying for health care out-of-pocket in Uganda. Methods Using data from the Uganda National Household Surveys 2009/10, the catastrophic impact of out-of-pocket health care payments is defined ...

  5. [Serum glycosaminoglycans in Graves' disease patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna B; Olczyk, Krystyna Z; Koźma, Ewa M; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna B; Wisowski, Grzegorz R; Marcisz, Czesław

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the blood serum sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and hyaluronic acid (HA) concentration of Graves' disease patients before treatment and after attainment of the euthyroid state. The study was carried out on the blood serum obtained from 17 patients with newly recognised Graves' disease and from the same patients after attainment of the euthyroid state. Graves' patients had not any clinical symptoms neither of ophthalmopathy nor pretibial myxedema. GAGs were isolated from the blood serum by the multistage extraction and purification using papaine hydrolysis, alkali elimination, as well as cetylpyridium chloride binding. Total amount of GAGs was quantified by the hexuronic acids assay. HA content in obtained GAGs sample was evaluated by the ELISA method. Increased serum concentration of sulfated GAGs in non-treated Graves' disease patients was found. Similarly, serum HA level in untreated patients was significantly elevated. The attainment of euthyroid state was accompanied by the decreased serum sulfated GAGs level and by normalization of serum HA concentration. In conclusion, the results obtained demonstrate that the alterations of GAGs metabolism connected with Graves' disease can lead to systemic changes of the extracellular matrix properties.

  6. An impoverished machine: challenges to human learning and instructional technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraban, Roman

    2008-08-01

    Many of the limitations to human learning and processing identified by cognitive psychologists over the last 50 years still hold true, including computational constraints, low learning rates, and unreliable processing. Instructional technology can be used in classrooms and in other learning contexts to address these limitations to learning. However, creating technological innovations is not enough. As part of psychological science, the development and assessment of instructional systems should be guided by theories and practices within the discipline. The technology we develop should become an object of research like other phenomena that are studied. In the present article, I present an informal account of my own work in assessing instructional technology for engineering thermodynamics to show not only the benefits, but also the limitations, in studying the technology we create. I conclude by considering several ways of advancing the development of instructional technology within the SCiP community, including interdisciplinary research and envisioning learning contexts that differ radically from traditional learning focused on lectures and testing.

  7. [Neonatal hyperthyroidism and maternal Graves disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ameur, K; Chioukh, F Z; Marmouch, H; Ben Hamida, H; Bizid, M; Monastiri, K

    2015-04-01

    The onset of Graves disease during pregnancy exposes the neonate to the risk of hyperthyroidism. The newborn must be monitored and treatment modalities known to ensure early treatment of the newborn. We report on the case of an infant born at term of a mother with Graves disease discovered during pregnancy. He was asymptomatic during the first days of life, before declaring the disease. Neonatal hyperthyroidism was confirmed by hormonal assays. Hyperthyroidism was treated with antithyroid drugs and propranolol with a satisfactory clinical and biological course. Neonatal hyperthyroidism should be systematically sought in infants born to a mother with Graves disease. The absence of clinical signs during the first days of life does not exclude the diagnosis. The duration of monitoring should be decided according to the results of the first hormonal balance tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Changes of hepatofibrosis markers in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Feihua; Xu Haifeng; Zhou Runsuo; Gao Feng; Wang Lei

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of hepatofibrosis markers (IV-C, PC III, HA, LN) in Graves' disease. Methods: Serum levels of hepatofibrosis were measured with RIA in 40 patients with Graves' disease (CD) before any treatment and 35 patients with Graves' disease after successful anti-thyroid drug therapy as well as in 30 controls. Results: The serum IV-C and PC III levels in GD patients were significant higher than those in controls before treatment (P<0.01). After successful treatment, the IV-C, PC III levels dropped markedly (vs before treatment, P<0.01). However, there were no significant differences among the serum HA, LN levels in all the subjects tested. Conclusion: Serum levels of IV-C and PC III increased markedly with hyperthyroidim. When IV-C and PC III levels were taken for assessment of degree of hepatofibeosis, GD must be ruled out first. (authors)

  9. The floor effect: impoverished spatial memory for elevator buttons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendetti, Michael; Castel, Alan D; Holyoak, Keith J

    2013-05-01

    People typically remember objects to which they have frequently been exposed, suggesting that memory is a by-product of perception. However, prior research has shown that people have exceptionally poor memory for the features of some objects (e.g., coins) to which they have been exposed over the course of many years. Here, we examined how people remember the spatial layout of the buttons on a frequently used elevator panel, to determine whether physical interaction (rather than simple exposure) would ensure the incidental encoding of spatial information. Participants who worked in an eight-story office building displayed very poor recall for the elevator panel but above-chance performance on a recognition test. Performance was related to how often and how recently the person had used the elevator. In contrast to their poor memory for the spatial layout of the elevator buttons, most people readily recalled small distinctive graffiti on the elevator walls. In a more implicit test, the majority were able to locate their office floor and the eighth floor button when asked to point toward these buttons when in the actual elevator, with the button labels covered. However, identification was very poor for other floors (including the first floor), suggesting that even frequent interaction with information does not always lead to accurate spatial memory. These findings have implications for understanding the complex relationships among attention, expertise, and memory.

  10. Pancytopenia in a Patient with Grave's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Huai Heng; Tan, Florence

    2013-08-01

    Pancytopenia can rarely complicate Grave's disease. It can be due to uncontrolled thyrotoxicosis or as a result of rare side effect of antithyroid medication. Pernicious anemia leading to Vitamin B12 deficiency is another rare associated cause. We report a case of a patient with Grave's disease and undiagnosed pernicious anemia whom was assumed to have antithyroid drug induced pancytopenia. Failure to recognize this rare association of pernicious anemia as a cause of pancytopenia had resulted in delay in treatment and neurological complication in our patient.

  11. Rituximab in relapsing Graves' disease, a phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemstra, Karen A.; Toes, Rene E.; Sepers, Jan; Pereira, Alberto M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Romijn, Johannes A.; Smit, Johannes W.

    2008-01-01

    Conventional therapies for Graves' disease, consisting of medical therapy or radioiodine are unsatisfactory, because of limited efficacy and adverse events. Interventions aimed at the underlying autoimmune pathogenesis of Graves' disease may be worthwhile to explore. We therefore performed a

  12. Comparison of Bilateral Axillo-Breast Approach Robotic Thyroidectomy with Open Thyroidectomy for Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyungju; Yi, Jin Wook; Song, Ra-Yeong; Chai, Young Jun; Kim, Su-jin; Choi, June Young; Lee, Kyu Eun

    2016-03-01

    There is an ongoing debate about whether robotic thyroidectomy (RT) is appropriate for Graves' disease. The aim of this study was to compare the safety of bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) RT with that of open thyroidectomy (OT) in patients with Graves' disease. From January 2008 to June 2014, 189 (44 BABA RT and 145 OT) patients underwent total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease. Recurrence of Graves' disease, intraoperative blood loss, hospital stay, and complication rates including recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) palsy and hypoparathyroidism were analyzed between BABA RT and OT groups, after propensity score matching according to age, gender, body mass index, surgical indication, the extent of operation, excised thyroid weight, and follow-up period. No patient experienced recurrence of Graves' disease after median follow-up of 35.0 months. Intraoperative blood loss (151.8 ± 165.4 mL vs. 134.5 ± 75.4 mL; p = 0.534) and hospital stay (3.4 ± 0.7 day vs. 3.3 ± 0.7 day; p = 0.564) were not different between BABA RT and OT groups. Complication rates including transient RLN palsy (11.4 vs. 11.4%; p = 1.000), transient hypoparathyroidism (18.2 vs. 20.5%; p = 0.787), permanent RLN palsy (0 vs. 2.3%; p = 0.315), and permanent hypoparathyroidism (2.3 vs. 2.3%; p = 1.000) were also comparable between groups. BABA RT for Graves' disease showed comparable surgical completeness and complications to conventional OT. BABA RT can be recommended as an alternative surgical option for patients with Graves' disease who are concerned about cosmesis.

  13. Sjiele sacrifices, Odin treasures and Saami graves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Zachrisson

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents archaeological findings described as Saami metal deposits. These well-known "Finds from Lapp Places of Sacrifice", objects from the Viking Age and Early Middle Ages, were mostly found in northern Sweden. The author also presents a research project dealing with prehistoric and medieval Saami graves from the south Saami area.

  14. Graves' orbitopathy: Management of difficult cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2012-01-01

    Management of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is based on three pillars: to stop smoking, to restore and maintain euthyroidism, and to treat the eye changes according to severity and activity of GO. Difficulties are frequently encountered in each of these three management issues. The advice to

  15. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossage, A.A.; Crawley, J.C.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of [/sup 99m/Tc]pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity--TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p less than 0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination

  16. Assessing the impoverishing effects, and factors associated with the incidence of catastrophic health care payments in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barasa, Edwine W; Maina, Thomas; Ravishankar, Nirmala

    2017-02-06

    Monitoring the incidence and intensity of catastrophic health expenditure, as well as the impoverishing effects of out of pocket costs to access healthcare, is a key part of benchmarking Kenya's progress towards reducing the financial burden that households experience when accessing healthcare. The study relies on data from the nationally-representative Kenya Household Expenditure and Utilization Survey conducted in 2013 (n =33,675). We undertook health equity analysis to estimate the incidence and intensity of catastrophic expenditure. Households were considered to have incurred catastrophic expenditures if their annual out of-pocket health expenditures exceeded 40% of their annual non-food expenditure. We assessed the impoverishing effects of out of pocket payments using the Kenya national poverty line. We distinguished between direct payments for healthcare such as payments for consultation, medicines, medical procedures, and total healthcare expenditure that includes direct healthcare payments and the cost of transportation to and from health facilities. We used logistic regression analysis to explore the factors associated with the incidence of catastrophic expenditures. When only direct payments to healthcare providers were considered, the incidence of catastrophic expenditures was 4.52%. When transport costs are included, the incidence of catastrophic expenditure increased to 6.58%. 453,470 Kenyans are pushed into poverty annually as a result of direct payments for healthcare. When the cost of transport is included, that number increases by more than one third to 619,541. Unemployment of the household head, presence of an elderly person, a person with a chronic ailment, a large household size, lower household social-economic status, and residence in marginalized regions of the country are significantly associated with increased odds of incurring catastrophic expenditures. Kenyan policy makers should prioritize extending pre-payment mechanisms to more

  17. Application of new therapies in Graves' disease and thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy: animal models and translation to human clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banga, J Paul; Nielsen, Claus H; Gilbert, Jacqueline A

    2008-01-01

    Most current approaches for treating Graves' disease are based essentially upon regimes developed nearly 50 years ago. Moreover, therapeutic approaches for complications such as thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO) and dermopathy are singularly dependent on conventional approaches of nonspecific...... immunosuppression. The recent development of an induced model of experimental Graves' disease, although incomplete as it lacks the extrathyroidal manifestations, provided opportunities to investigate immune intervention strategies, including influence upon the autoreactive B and T cell players in the autoimmune...... process. These major advances are generating new possibilities for therapeutic interventions for patients with Graves' disease and TAO....

  18. Age and stress as determinants of the severity of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease in newly diagnosed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Xander G; Smit, Natalie; Endert, Erik; Brosschot, Jos F; Tijssen, Jan G P; Wiersinga, Wilmar M

    2009-02-01

    The evidence that stress may provoke Graves' hyperthyroidism in genetically susceptible subjects is substantial. Whether exposure to stress is related to the severity of thyrotoxicosis has not been studied. Advancing age is associated with not only less severe Graves' hyperthyroidism but also self-reported stress. We tested the hypothesis whether advancing age is associated with less exposure to stress, resulting in a lower immunological response, and less severe Graves' hyperthyroidism. Cross-sectional multicenter study. Two hundred and sixty-three consecutive untreated patients with a first episode of Graves' hyperthyroidism were included. The severity of Graves' hyperthyroidism was evaluated biochemically (freeT(4)-index and freeT(3)-index, thyrotropin-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII)) and clinically by the hyperthyroid symptom scale score (HSS score). Stress exposure was quantitated by three questionnaires. Advancing age was associated with less severe Graves' hyperthyroidism, both biochemically by lower serum freeT(3)-index and freeT(4)-index (Phyperthyroidism. Advancing age was associated with lower scores for stress exposure. Multivariate regression analysis showed that HSS score was independently related to the tendency to report negative feelings (Phyperthyroidism. Because no direct relationship exists between stress exposure and TBII or freeT(3)-index and freeT(4)-index, we reject our hypothesis that less stress is causally related to biochemically less severe Graves' hyperthyroidism in old age. HSS score is primarily determined by negative feelings and not by age.

  19. Graves' disease. Manifestations and therapeutic options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarland, K.F.; Saleeby, G.

    1988-03-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Clinical features include thyroid enlargement, eye signs, tachycardia, heat intolerance, emotional lability, weight loss, and hyperkinesis. Three modes of therapy are available. The preferences of the patient and physician are usually prime considerations in devising the therapeutic plan. Radioactive iodine is the most frequently used and safest method of treatment for adults. Antithyroid drugs are preferred for children and pregnant women. Surgery is usually reserved for patients in whom the other forms of treatment are not acceptable. Considerable patient education during the decision-making process enhances the success of the therapeutic plan.

  20. Abilities in tactile discrimination of textures in adult rats exposed to enriched or impoverished environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeon, Stéphanie; Xerri, Christian; Coq, Jacques-Olivier

    2004-08-12

    In previous studies, we have shown that housing in enriched environment for about 3 months after weaning improved the topographic organization and decreased the size of the receptive fields (RFs) located on the glabrous skin surfaces in the forepaw maps of the primary somatosensory cortex (SI) in rats [Exp. Brain Res. 121 (1998) 191]. In contrast, housing in impoverished environment induced a degradation of the SI forepaw representation, characterized by topographic disruptions, a reduction of the cutaneous forepaw area and an enlargement of the glabrous RFs [Exp. Brain Res. 129 (1999) 518]. Based on these two studies, we postulated that these representational alterations could underlie changes in haptic perception. Therefore, the present study was aimed at determining the influence of housing conditions on the rat's abilities in tactile texture discrimination. After a 2-month exposure to enriched or impoverished environments, rats were trained to perform a discrimination task during locomotion on floorboards of different roughness. At the end of every daily behavioral session, rats were replaced in their respective housing environment. Rats had to discriminate homogeneous (low roughness) from heterogeneous floorboards (combination of two different roughness levels). To determine the maximum performance in texture discrimination, the roughness contrast of the heterogeneous texture was gradually reduced, so that homogeneous and heterogeneous floorboards became harder to differentiate. We found that the enriched rats learned the first steps of the behavioral task faster than the impoverished rats, whereas both groups exhibited similar performances in texture discrimination. An individual "predilection" for either homogeneous or heterogeneous floorboards, presumably reflecting a behavioral strategy, seemed to account for the absence of differences in haptic discrimination between groups. The sensory experience depending on the rewarded texture discrimination task

  1. Effect of 131I therapy on outcomes of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Renfei; Tan Jian; Zhang Guizhi; Yin Liang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the correlation between the therapeutic effect of Graves' hyperthyroidism and the outcomes of Graves' ophthalmopathy after 131 I therapy, and to explore the effect of 131 I treatment on turnout of Graves' ophthalmopathy. Methods: Six hundreds and fifty-two patients of Graves' disease accompanied with Graves' ophthalmopathy, received one-time 131 I treatment according to routine procedure. We recorded exophthalmometer readings, the signs and symptoms of eyes before therapy. Regular follow-up and appraisal of curative effect were carried out. Results: At least six months after 131 I therapy, the effective rate of Graves' hyperthyroidism and Graves' ophthalmopathy were 94.3% and 73.3% respectively. The total effective rate of hyperthyroidism with ophthalmopathy was 71.2%. There was a significant correlation between the prognosis of Graves' ophthalmopathy and therapeutic efficacy of hyperthyroidism (r=0.302, P 131 I therapy (χ 2 =0.296, P>0.05). Conclusions: The key to treat Graves' ophthalmopathy is the cure of Graves' hyperthyroidism through 131 I therapy. The timely diagnosis and replacement treatment of hypothyroidism can effectively avoid the aggravation of Graves' ophthalmopathy after 131 I therapy. (authors)

  2. Follow up of Graves' Opthalmopathy after radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M.S.R.; Paul, A. K.; Rahman, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy may first appear or worsen during or after treatment for hyperthyroidism. We followed up 158 Graves' hyperthyroid patients treated with radioiodine of which 49 had Grave's' ophthalmopathy during presentation in Nuclear Medicine Centre, Khulna during the period from 1995 to 2000. The aim of our study is to see the effect of radioiodine in Graves' ophthalmopathy. All the patients received radioiodine at fixed dose regime ranged from 7 mCi to 12 mCi. The duration of follow up was at least 12 months Graves' ophthalmopathy patients, 4 (4/49 i.e., 8.2%) showed exaggeration of ophthalmopathy and the rest (45/49 i.e., 91.8%) remained unchanged. None of ophthalmopathy developed among any of Graves' hyperthyroid or disappeared after radioiodine treatment during follow up period. From the study we concluded that eye changes in Graves' hyperthyroidism remain unchanged or exaggerated after radioiodine therapy and needs ophthalmologist care.(author)

  3. Financial Burden and Impoverishment Due to Cardiovascular Medications in Low and Middle Income Countries: An Illustration from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Kiran Raj; Meltzer, David O

    2016-01-01

    Health expenditures are a major financial burden for many persons in low and middle-income countries, where individuals often lack health insurance. We estimate the effect of purchasing cardiovascular medicines on poverty in low and middle-income populations using rural and urban India as an example. We created step-up treatment regimens for prevention of ischemic heart disease for the most common cardiovascular medications in India based on their cost and relative risk reduction. Cost was measured by Government of India mandated ceiling prices in rupees (Rs. 1 = $0·016) for essential medicines plus taxes. We calculated step-wise projected incidence and intensity of impoverishment due to medicine purchase. To do this we measured the resources available to individuals as daily per-capita expenditures from the latest National Sample Survey, subtracted daily medication costs, and compared this to 2014 poverty thresholds recommended by an expert group. Analysis of cost-effectiveness resulted in five primary prevention drug regimens, created by progressive addition of Aspirin 75 mg, Hydrochlorothiazide 12.5mg, Losartan 25 mg, and Atorvastatin 10 mg or 40mg. Daily cost from steps 1 to 5 increased from Rs. 0·13, Rs. 1.16, Rs. 3.81, Rs. 10.07, to Rs. 28.85. At baseline, 31% of rural and 27% percent of urban Indian population are poor at the designated poverty thresholds. The Rs. 28.85 regimen would be unaffordable to 81% and 58% of rural and urban people. A secondary prevention regimen with aspirin, hydrochlorothiazide, atenolol and atorvastatin could be unaffordable to 81% and 57% rural and urban people respectively. According to our estimates, 17% of the rural 32% of the urban adult population could benefit with these medications, and their out of pocket purchase could impoverish 17 million rural and 10 million urban people in India and increase respective poverty gaps by 2.9%. Medication costs for cardiovascular disease have the potential to cause financial burden to

  4. Financial Burden and Impoverishment Due to Cardiovascular Medications in Low and Middle Income Countries: An Illustration from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Kiran Raj; Meltzer, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Background Health expenditures are a major financial burden for many persons in low and middle-income countries, where individuals often lack health insurance. We estimate the effect of purchasing cardiovascular medicines on poverty in low and middle-income populations using rural and urban India as an example. Methods We created step-up treatment regimens for prevention of ischemic heart disease for the most common cardiovascular medications in India based on their cost and relative risk reduction. Cost was measured by Government of India mandated ceiling prices in rupees (Rs. 1 = $0·016) for essential medicines plus taxes. We calculated step-wise projected incidence and intensity of impoverishment due to medicine purchase. To do this we measured the resources available to individuals as daily per-capita expenditures from the latest National Sample Survey, subtracted daily medication costs, and compared this to 2014 poverty thresholds recommended by an expert group. Findings Analysis of cost-effectiveness resulted in five primary prevention drug regimens, created by progressive addition of Aspirin 75 mg, Hydrochlorothiazide 12.5mg, Losartan 25 mg, and Atorvastatin 10 mg or 40mg. Daily cost from steps 1 to 5 increased from Rs. 0·13, Rs. 1.16, Rs. 3.81, Rs. 10.07, to Rs. 28.85. At baseline, 31% of rural and 27% percent of urban Indian population are poor at the designated poverty thresholds. The Rs. 28.85 regimen would be unaffordable to 81% and 58% of rural and urban people. A secondary prevention regimen with aspirin, hydrochlorothiazide, atenolol and atorvastatin could be unaffordable to 81% and 57% rural and urban people respectively. According to our estimates, 17% of the rural 32% of the urban adult population could benefit with these medications, and their out of pocket purchase could impoverish 17 million rural and 10 million urban people in India and increase respective poverty gaps by 2.9%. Conclusion Medication costs for cardiovascular disease have the

  5. Comparative Study on the Long-Acting Thyroid Stimulator in Graves' Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong Sup; Koh, Chang Soon; Lee, Mun Ho

    1973-01-01

    In order to study the role of LATS in the pathogenesis of the Graves' disease, the serum activity of the LATS was determined by the bioassay of the modified McKenzie method. The subjects examined in the study consisted of 76 individuals including 12 cases of normal control, 54 cases with typical Graves' disease and 10 cases of chronic thyroiditis. The data observed in the patients with the Graves' disease were analyzed in comparison with the clinical features, laboratory findings, and responsiveness to the treatment. The results obtained are as follows: 1) None of the subjects which did not have the Graves' disease showed a positive LATS activity, except one case with the chronic thyroiditis. 2) Twenty-two oui of the 54 cases with the Graves' disease showed positive results for LATS (40.7%). The positivity was significantly higher in the patients who had been treated with antithyroid regimen but still showed hyperthyroidism than in the patients who had not been treated. 3) The activity of LATS was gradually decreased or even became absent as the hyperthyroidism was corrected after the treatment. 4) No significant difference was noticed in age and-sex between the positive and negative groups of LATS. 5) There was no evidence of significant correlation between the LATS activity and clinical features.

  6. Catastrophic Health Expenditure and Household Impoverishment: a case of NCDs prevalence in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mwai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and problem: Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs have become one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Kenya. Their claim on financial and time resources adversely affects household welfare. Health care cost for NCDs in Kenya is predominantly paid by households as OOP. Health expenditure on NCD stands at 6.2% of Total Health Expenditure which is 0.4 % of the total gross domestic product of the country. This expenditure scenario could have implications on household welfare through catastrophic expenditure in Kenya. Most studies done on catastrophic expenditure in Kenya have not looked at the effect of NCD on poverty. Methodology: The paper has investigated the determinants of catastrophic health spending in a household with special focus on the NCDs. It has also investigated the effect of catastrophic expenditure on household welfare.A National household level survey data on expenditure and utilization is used. Controlling for endogeneity, the results revealed that NCDs and communicable diseases contribute significantly to the likelihood of a household incurring catastrophic expenditure. Results: Although all types of sicknesses have negative effects on household welfare, NCDs have more severe impacts on impoverishment. Policy wise, government and development partners should put in place a health financing plan entailing health insurance and resource pooling as a mean towards social protection. Key words:  Non-Communicable Diseases (NCD, Catastrophic Health Expenditure, endogeneity Impoverishment

  7. Environmental impoverishment and aging alter object recognition, spatial learning, and dentate gyrus astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Daniel G; Foro, César A R; Rego, Carla M D; Gloria, David A; de Oliveira, Fabio R R; Paes, Juliana M P; de Sousa, Aline A; Tokuhashi, Tatyana P; Trindade, Lucas S; Turiel, Maíra C P; Vasconcelos, Erick G R; Torres, João B; Cunnigham, Colm; Perry, Victor H; Vasconcelos, Pedro F da Costa; Diniz, Cristovam W P

    2010-08-01

    Environmental and age-related effects on learning and memory were analysed and compared with changes observed in astrocyte laminar distribution in the dentate gyrus. Aged (20 months) and young (6 months) adult female albino Swiss mice were housed from weaning either in impoverished conditions or in enriched conditions, and tested for episodic-like and water maze spatial memories. After these behavioral tests, brain hippocampal sections were immunolabeled for glial fibrillary acid protein to identify astrocytes. The effects of environmental enrichment on episodic-like memory were not dependent on age, and may protect water maze spatial learning and memory from declines induced by aging or impoverished environment. In the dentate gyrus, the number of astrocytes increased with both aging and enriched environment in the molecular layer, increased only with aging in the polymorphic layer, and was unchanged in the granular layer. We suggest that long-term experience-induced glial plasticity by enriched environment may represent at least part of the circuitry groundwork for improvements in behavioral performance in the aged mice brain.

  8. Phylogenetic impoverishment of Amazonian tree communities in an experimentally fragmented forest landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bráulio A; Tabarelli, Marcelo; Melo, Felipe P L; Camargo, José L C; Andrade, Ana; Laurance, Susan G; Laurance, William F

    2014-01-01

    Amazonian rainforests sustain some of the richest tree communities on Earth, but their ecological and evolutionary responses to human threats remain poorly known. We used one of the largest experimental datasets currently available on tree dynamics in fragmented tropical forests and a recent phylogeny of angiosperms to test whether tree communities have lost phylogenetic diversity since their isolation about two decades previously. Our findings revealed an overall trend toward phylogenetic impoverishment across the experimentally fragmented landscape, irrespective of whether tree communities were in 1-ha, 10-ha, or 100-ha forest fragments, near forest edges, or in continuous forest. The magnitude of the phylogenetic diversity loss was low (phylogenetic diversity, we observed a significant decrease of 50% in phylogenetic dispersion since forest isolation, irrespective of plot location. Analyses based on tree genera that have significantly increased (28 genera) or declined (31 genera) in abundance and basal area in the landscape revealed that increasing genera are more phylogenetically related than decreasing ones. Also, the loss of phylogenetic diversity was greater in tree communities where increasing genera proliferated and decreasing genera reduced their importance values, suggesting that this taxonomic replacement is partially underlying the phylogenetic impoverishment at the landscape scale. This finding has clear implications for the current debate about the role human-modified landscapes play in sustaining biodiversity persistence and key ecosystem services, such as carbon storage. Although the generalization of our findings to other fragmented tropical forests is uncertain, it could negatively affect ecosystem productivity and stability and have broader impacts on coevolved organisms.

  9. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chao; Xie, Jiawei; Wang, Hui; Li, Jinsong; Chen, Suyun

    2016-02-18

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Both antithyroid medications and radioiodine are commonly used treatments but their frequency of use varies between regions and countries. Despite the commonness of the diagnosis, any possible differences between the two treatments with respect to long-term outcomes remain unknown. To assess the effects of radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease. We performed a systematic literature search in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and EMBASE and the trials registers ICTRP Search Portal and ClinicalTrials.gov. The date of the last search was September 2015 for all databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the effects of radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid medications for Graves' disease with at least two years follow-up. Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts for relevance. One author carried out screening for inclusion, data extraction and 'Risk of bias' assessment and a second author checked this. We presented data not suitable for meta-analysis as descriptive data. We analysed the overall quality of evidence utilising the GRADE instrument. We included two RCTs involving 425 adult participants with Graves' disease in this review. Altogether 204 participants were randomised to radioiodine therapy and 221 to methimazole therapy. A single dose of radioiodine was administered. The duration of methimazole medication was 18 months. The period of follow-up was at least two years, depending on the outcome measured. For most outcome measures risk of bias was low; for the outcomes health-related quality of life as well as development and worsening of Graves' ophthalmopathy risks of performance bias and detection bias were high in at least one of the two RCTs.Health-related quality of life appeared to be similar in the radioiodine and methimazole treatment groups, however no quantitative data were reported (425 participants; 2 trials; low quality evidence

  10. The change of serum TRAb after 131I radiotherapy in patients of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Bangping; Jiang Changbin; Hu Wei; Yang Jianhua; Guo Zugao

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The clinical value of thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb) in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism was investigated during 131 I radiotherapy. Methods: A total of 130 patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism and 50 normal controls were included in the study. Serum concentration of TRAb was measured by radioreceptor assay (RRA) before and at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months after 131 I radiotherapy. Results: Abnormally higher TRAb level [(92.93±68.99)U/L] was noted in patients before treatment(P 131 I radiotherapy, the TRAb [(12.99±5.52) U/L] was back to normal with no difference to that of controls (P>0.05). Conclusion: Serum concentration of TRAb was of clinical significance in the diagnosis of Graves' hyperthyroidism and in the monitoring of 131 I radiotherapy. (authors)

  11. The mid-to-long term therapeutic efficacy of Graves' disease after interventional embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weiduo; Yang Jianyong; Zhuang Wenquan; Chen Wei; Li Heping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mid-to-long term therapeutic efficacy of Graves' disease after interventional embolization. Methods: Twenty-five patients of Graves' disease treated with interventional embolization were followed up for 24-57 months. T 3 and T 4 were monitored at pre-operation, six months, 12 months, 2, 3 and 4 years after operation, respectively. Other references included pulse, thyroid size, and vessel's murmur. Results: Twenty-two patients completely relieved from the hyperthyroidism during the follow-up. Only one patient suffered from recurrence. Other two patients were still on maintaining dosage of antithyroid drug therapy. No hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism was found during this term. Conclusion: Mid-to-long term follow-up showed satisfactory efficacy of interventional therapy, offering another alternative for treatment of refractory Graves' disease

  12. The microclimate within a Neolithic passage grave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klenz Larsen, Poul; Aasbjerg Jensen, Lars; Ryhl-Svendsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Microclimate measurements in a Neolithic passage grave in Denmark have shown that natural ventilation through the open entrance destabilizes the relative humidity (RH), whereas a sealed entrance gives a much more stable RH, above 90%. Episodes of condensation occur on the stone surfaces in summer...... with too much ventilation and in winter with too little ventilation. Soil moisture measurements above, below, and beside the grave mound indicate that rainfall on the mound is not a significant source of moisture to the chamber, whereas the ground below the sealed chamber is constantly moist. The chamber...... can be kept dry all year by putting a moisture barrier membrane over the floor. Apart from the more variable climate within the open chamber, there is also a significant penetration of ozone, which is absent in the sealed chamber. The ozone may have deteriorated the folds of birch bark put between...

  13. Tratamiento de la enfermedad de Graves Basedow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernando Vargas-Uricoechea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión narrativa rigurosa de la literatura inglesa y en español sobre diferentes aspectos de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow e hipertiroidismo. Esta patología –parte de la llamada “enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune”- se produce como consecuencia de la presencia de anticuerpos circulantes que se unen y activan al receptor de tirotropina, desencadenándose generalmente el hipertiroidismo en asociación con un estrés agudo. En este artículo actualizamos tanto el manejo de hipertiroidismo como el de problemas especiales con el que puede estar asociado. La fisiopatología y el diagnóstico de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow son motivo de otra publicación.

  14. A mild Grave's ophthalmopathy during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbouda, Alessandro; Trimboli, Pierpaolo; Bruscolini, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid ophthalmopathy is a complication most commonly associated with Grave's disease. The disease course ranges from mild to severe, with severe cases resulting in major visual impairment. A complete ophthalmic examination in a 35-year-old secundigravida to 14 weeks of gestation presented to the hospital for a routine ophthalmological examination with eyelid retraction in the right eye was made. We studied the course of ocular disease through the gestation with orbit ecography and a 3T MRI. A diagnosis of Grave's Ophthalmopathy was made. This case presents an unusual course of the GD during pregnancy and a normal post-partum relapse, according to the Th1/Th2 balance. The frequent follow-up and the use of MRI allowed a prompt identification and complete control of the disease.

  15. Osteogenesis imperfecta in combination with Graves disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina S. Sheremeta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI – is a group of genetically disorders, which are charaterized by a disturbed bone formation. In turn, the excess of thyroid hormones in Graves' disease (GD also posses a negative effect on bone tissue, thereby aggravating OI. That requires from the endocrinologist the most careful management of patients with the combination of these pathologies. In this article, we present a unique clinical case of a combination of GD and OI.

  16. Graves hyperthyroidism and pregnancy: a clinical update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil-Sisodia, Komal; Mestman, Jorge H

    2010-01-01

    To provide a clinical update on Graves' hyperthyroidism and pregnancy with a focus on treatment with antithyroid drugs. We searched the English-language literature for studies published between 1929 and 2009 related to management of hyperthyroidism in pregnancy. In this review, we discuss differential diagnosis of hyperthyroidism, management, importance of early diagnosis, and importance of achieving proper control to avoid maternal and fetal complications. Diagnosing hyperthyroidism during pregnancy can be challenging because many of the signs and symptoms are similar to normal physiologic changes that occur in pregnancy. Patients with Graves disease require prompt treatment with antithyroid drugs and should undergo frequent monitoring for signs of fetal and maternal hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism. Rates of maternal and perinatal complications are directly related to control of hyperthyroidism in the mother. Thyroid receptor antibodies should be assessed in all women with hyperthyroidism to help predict and reduce the risk of fetal or neonatal hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism. The maternal thyroxine level should be kept in the upper third of the reference range or just above normal, using the lowest possible antithyroid drug dosage. Hyperthyroidism may recur in the postpartum period as Graves disease or postpartum thyroiditis; thus, it is prudent to evaluate thyroid function 6 weeks after delivery. Preconception counseling, a multidisciplinary approach to care, and patient education regarding potential maternal and fetal complications that can occur with different types of treatment are important. Preconception counseling and a multifaceted approach to care by the endocrinologist and the obstetric team are imperative for a successful pregnancy in women with Graves hyperthyroidism.

  17. Thyroidectomy for Graves' disease: is hypothyroidism inevitable?

    OpenAIRE

    Davenport, M.; Talbot, C. H.

    1989-01-01

    The outcome of 234 patients with Graves' disease treated by subtotal thyroidectomy over a 12-year period is analysed with specific reference to hypothyroidism. Of definite hypothyroid cases, 98% occurred within 2 years. Failure to develop hypothyroidism was statistically related to large remnant size and a large goitre preoperatively. Histological review showed that any degree of lymphocytic infiltration was associated with the development of hypothyroidism (50% vs 22%). Late onset hypothyroi...

  18. Resultados do tratamento da pancreatite aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Robert Apodaca-Torrez

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados do Protocolo de Atendimento de pacientes com diagnóstico de pancreatite aguda grave. MÉTODOS: Foram analisados, consecutivamente, a partir de janeiro de 2002, idade, sexo, etiologia, tempo de internação, tipo de tratamento e mortalidade de 37 pacientes portadores de pancreatite aguda grave. RESULTADOS: A idade dos pacientes variou de 20 a 88 anos (média de 50 anos; 27% foram do sexo feminino e 73% do masculino. O tempo médio global de internação foi 47 dias. Treze pacientes foram tratados cirurgicamente; a média de operações realizadas foi duas por paciente. Ocorreram seis óbitos dentre os pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico (46% e dois óbitos no grupo submetido somente ao tratamento clínico (8,3%. A mortalidade global foi 21% CONCLUSÃO: Após a modificação na forma de abordagem dos pacientes com pancreatite aguda grave, houve diminuição da mortalidade e uma tendência para a conduta expectante.

  19. Grave Tending: With Mom at the Cemetery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Ellis

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This autoethnographic story shows the process of tending the graves of family members. In the past, the author reluctantly accompanied her mother on her visits to the family cemetery. Once there, she took on the role of distant observer as her mother took care of the family cemetery plots. When her mother becomes disabled, the author begins to arrange the flowers on the graves. Doing so leads her to examine the meaning of visiting the cemetery, feel and connect with her losses, and consider the customs she wants to be part of her own death. When her mother dies, the next generation of women in the family—the author, her sister, and sister-in-law—take on the role of tending the graves, connected in their love and respect for their mother and their feelings of family and family responsibility. This story examines the meanings of family rituals around death and how they are passed from generation to generation. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0302285

  20. Periodic Granulocyte Count Measuring Is Useful for Detecting Asymptomatic Agranulocytosis in Antithyroid Drug-Treated Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Ide, Akane; Kudo, Takumi; Nishihara, Eijun; Ito, Mitsuru; Miyauchi, Akira

    2016-12-01

    Finding agranulocytosis (AG) at an early stage is important to improve outcome, but periodic granulocyte count monitoring is not generally recommended for patients with Graves' disease, because AG develops suddenly. At the Kuma Hospital, Graves' patients under antithyroid drug (ATD) treatment in an outpatient clinic have a granulocyte count examination during each visit, and if it is Graves' disease were 131 I-radioisotope therapy (19 patients), thyroidectomy (2 patients), inorganic iodine (1 patient), or another ATD (1 patient). Among the 33 GP patients, 31 (94%), including 20 asymptomatic cases, were discovered during periodic granulocyte count monitoring. Most of them stopped ATD, and other treatments for Graves' disease were selected. Periodic monitoring of granulocyte counts is useful for identifying AG and GP patients with no or minimum infection symptoms.

  1. Thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma simultaneously existing with Graves' disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Nobuhiko; Inaba, Makoto; Ichijyo, Takamasa; Kagami, Hiroshi; Mine, Yutaka

    2017-01-06

    Thyrotropin-producing pituitary tumor is relatively rare. In particular, concurrent cases associated with Graves' disease are extremely rare and only nine cases have been reported so far. We describe a case of a thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma concomitant with Graves' disease, which was successfully treated. A 40-year-old Japanese woman presented with mild signs of hyperthyroidism. She had positive anti-thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody, anti-thyroglobulin antibody, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody. Her levels of serum thyroid-stimulating hormone, which ranged from low to normal in the presence of high levels of serum free thyroid hormones, were considered to be close to a state of syndrome of inappropriate secretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a macropituitary tumor. The coexistence of thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma and Graves' disease was suspected. Initial therapy included anti-thyroid medication, which was immediately discontinued due to worsening symptoms. Subsequently, surgical therapy for the pituitary tumor was conducted, and her levels of free thyroid hormones, including the thyroid-stimulating hormone, became normal. On postoperative examination, her anti-thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody levels decreased, and the anti-thyroglobulin antibody became negative. The coexistence of thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma and Graves' disease is rarely reported. The diagnosis of this condition is complicated, and the appropriate treatment strategy has not been clearly established. This case suggests that physicians should consider the coexistence of thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma with Graves' disease in cases in which thyroid-stimulating hormone values range from low to normal in the presence of thyrotoxicosis, and the surgical treatment of thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma could be the first-line therapy in patients with both thyrotropin-producing pituitary adenoma

  2. Evaluation of the patients with Grave's ophthalmopathy after the corticosteroids treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Mirjana Janićijević; Sarenac, Tatjana; Srećković, Suncica; Petrović, Marko; Vulović, Dejan; Janićijević, Katarina

    2012-03-01

    Graves' ophthalmopthy is one of the most common causes of exophthalmos as well as the most common manifestation of Graves' disease. The treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy includes ophthalmological and endocrinological therapy. The aim of this study was to clinically evaluate the patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy treated with corticosteroids. Evaluation of 21 patients was performed in the Ophthalmology Clinic and Endocrinology Clinic, Clinical Centre Kragujevac, in the period from 2009 to 2010. They were treated with pulse doses of intravenous corticosteroids. They were referred to ophthalmologist by endocrinologist in euthyroid condition in the active phase of Graves' ophthalmopathy (ultrasonography of orbit findings and positive findings of antithyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody--anti-TSH R Ab). The clinical activity score (CAS) and NO SPECS classification for evaluation of disease severity were used. Ophthalmological examination includes: best corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp exam, Hertels' test, direct ophthalmoscopy and ultrasonography of the orbit. According to our results 76.19% of the patients were female; mean age of the patients was 35.2 +/- 5.6 years. According to CAS classification after 6 months of the treatment recovery was shown in 23.81% of the patients, partial amelioration in 47.62% and no clinical amelioration in 28.57% of the patients. We achieved better results with male, young patients with high clinical activity score. Good results were observed after the first dose of corticosteroids, much better CAS after the third dose, which maintained until 6 months after the first treatment. Our results signify that intravenous pulse dose of corticosteroids treatment of the patients with Graves' ophthalmopthy is safe, comfortable, clinically justified and accessible for the clinicians and patients. Positive results are achieved after the first dose with increasing trend up to the third dose, which was maintained for the next three months.

  3. Treatment of Graves' disease with I131: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Povis, J.E.; Sandoval Okuma, J.C.; Contreras Carreno, S.E.; Cabello Morales, E.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To describe the response and complications in children and teenagers suffering Graves' disease who received radioactive iodine therapy. Material and Methods: The clinical records of the patients attended at Paediatric Endocrinology Unit of Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia who received therapy with I 131 were reviewed. Demographic characteristics, thyroid weight, radioactive iodine uptake, I 131 dose and clinical and thyroid function evolution were registered. Results: We include thirteen patients: 1 male and 12 females. The mean thyroid weight obtained was 47.56 ± 10.70 gr. Initial calculated dose was 3.92 ± 0.95 mCi, with a total dose of 4.47 ± 1.66 mCi, and mean following period of 2.76 years. Ten patients received only one dose, 2 patients received two doses and one patient received three doses; all cases remitted. Patients who received only 1 dose showed disease remission at 13.13 weeks and mean remission period of the population was 24.62 weeks. Hypothyroidism prevalence up to six months from initiating treatment was 66.66%, and up to 257 weeks 83.33%. Conclusions: We conclude that I 131 was 100% effective in the treatment of children and adolescents suffering Graves' disease in this small series. (author)

  4. Evaluation of public subsidy for medical travel: does it protect against household impoverishment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzana, Mariyam; Walls, Helen; Smith, Richard; Hanefeld, Johanna

    2018-03-06

    In resource-constrained health systems medical travel is a common alternative to seeking unavailable health services. This paper was motivated by the need to understand better the impact of such travel on households and health systems. We used primary data from 344 subsidized and 471 non-subsidized inbound medical travellers during June to December 2013 drawn from the North, Centre and South regions of the Maldives where three international airports are located. Using a researcher-administered questionnaire to acquire data, we calculated annual out-of-pocket (OOP) spending on health, food and non-food items among households where at least one member had travelled to another country for medical care within the last year and estimated the poverty head count using household income as a living standard measure. Most of the socio demographic indicators, and costs of treatment abroad among Maldivian medical travellers were similar across different household income levels with no statistical difference between subsidized and non-subsidized travellers (p value: 0.499). The government subsidy across income quintiles was also similar indicating that the Maldivian health financing structure supports equality rather than being equity-sensitive. There was no statistical difference in OOP expenditure on medical care abroad and annual OOP expenditure on healthcare was similar across income quintiles. Diseases of the circulatory system, eye and musculoskeletal system had the most impoverishing effect - diseases for which half of the patients, or less, did not receive the public subsidy. Annually, 6 and 14% of the medical travellers in the Maldives fell into poverty ($2 per day) before and after making OOP payments to health care. Evidence of a strong association between predominant public financing of medical travel and equality was found. With universal eligibility to the government subsidy for medical travel, utilization of treatment abroad, medical expenditures abroad and OOP

  5. Analysis of the factors associated with Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake in thyrotoxicosis and Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kidokoro-kunii, Yo; Emoto, Naoya; Cho, Keiichi; Oikawa, Shinichi

    2006-01-01

    To determine the factors associated with 20 minute Tc-99m pertechnetate thyroid uptake, we examined all patients in whom thyrotoxicosis was diagnosed at Chiba-Hokusoh Hospital, Nippon Medical School from 2001 April through 2003 March. Patients with thyrotoxicosis diagnosed during this period were 57 with Graves' disease (76%), 11 with transient hyperthyroxinemia (TH) (14.7%), and 7 with subacute thyroiditis (SAT) (9.3%). The uptake of Tc-99m ranged from 0.97% to 40.1% in Graves' disease and from 0.15% to 0.8% in TH. Although TH may include spontaneous resolution of Graves' disease as well as painless thyroiditis, no treatment was necessary for these patients. Uptake in all patients with SAT was less than 0.5%. There were significant correlations between the level of Tc-99m uptake and the levels of free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH)-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin (TBII), and thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) in patients with Graves' disease. Older patients with Graves' disease showed lower uptake than did younger patients. Both Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake and TBII levels, but not fT3, fT4 or TSAb levels, at the beginning of antithyroid drug treatment correlated significantly with the duration of treatment until the daily dose of methimazole reached 5 mg. These data suggest that Tc-99m pertechnetate uptake reflects the severity of Graves' disease and its response to the medical treatment and that antithyroid drug therapy is not necessary when the uptake is less than 0.9%. (author)

  6. Epidemiology, management and outcomes of Graves' disease-real life data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Y S; Hookham, J C; Allahabadia, A; Balasubramanian, S P

    2017-06-01

    Treatment options in Graves' disease are clearly defined, but management practices and the perceptions of success are varied. The outcomes of treatment in large consecutive cohorts of Graves' disease have not been well characterised. The study describes the epidemiology, management strategies and medium term outcomes following anti-thyroid drug treatment, radio-iodine ablation and surgery in Graves' disease. All patients (n = 659) who received treatment for a new diagnosis of Graves' disease in secondary care over a 5 year period were included with a median (interquartile range) follow-up of 42.9 (29-57.5) months. The age adjusted incidence of adult onset Graves' disease in Sheffield, UK was 24.8 per 100,000 per year. Excluding 35 patients lost to follow-up, 93.1% (n = 581) were controlled on anti-thyroid drug treatment. Of these, 73.6% went into remission following withdrawal of anti-thyroid drugs; 5.2% were still undergoing initial therapy; 13.3% lost control whilst on anti-thyroid drugs; and 7.9% went on to have either surgery or radio-iodine ablation whilst controlled on anti-thyroid drugs. Of the 428 patients who achieved remission, 36.7% relapsed. Of 144 patients who had radio-iodine ablation treatment, 5.6% relapsed and needed further treatment. Of 119 patients having surgery, 5.2% had long-term hypoparathyroidism and none had documented long-term recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy. In the follow-up, 39.9% of patients underwent surgery or radio-iodine ablation with little morbidity. Up to two-thirds of patients who achieved remission did not relapse. Data on effectiveness and risks of treatments for Graves' disease presented in this study will help clinicians and patients in decision making.

  7. [Association Budd Chiari syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouelhi, Leila; Chaieb, Mouna; Debbeche, Radhouane; Salem, Mohamed; Sfar, Imene; Trabelsi, Sinda; Gorgi, Yosr; Najjar, Taoufik

    2009-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome in 5% of the cases. Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis, foetal loss and positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies, namely lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I. Anticardiolipin antibodies was reported in auto-immune thyroid disorders, particularly in Grave's disease. Antiphospholipid syndrome associated to Grave's disease was reported in only three cases. To describe a case report of association of Grave's disease and antiphospholipid syndrome. We report the first case of Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. Our observation is particular by the fact that it is about a patient presenting a Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. This triple association has never been reported in literature. Although association between antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease was previously described, further studies evaluating the coexistence of these two affections in the same patient would be useful.

  8. Genetic association between Interleukin-17A gene polymorphisms and the pathogenesis of Graves' disease in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yicheng; Zheng, Huan; Liu, Nan; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Shu; Cui, Bin; Ning, Guang

    2015-01-19

    Graves' disease, one of the commonest autoimmune disorders, has a complex genetic basis. Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) is an important cytokine involved in innate and adaptive immune responses. This case-control study sought to investigate genetic association between the IL-17A gene and the process of Graves' disease (GD). Our pilot study was performed on a cohort from Shanghai, which included 713 patients with GD and 756 healthy controls. A replicate cohort was from Xiamen, recruiting 444 patients with GD and 427 healthy subjects. Six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs4711998, rs3819024, rs2275913, rs8193037, rs3819025 and rs3748067) within the IL-17A gene were genotyped by the SNPstream Genotyping Systems and Taqman PCR method. In Shanghai cohorts, the frequencies of rs8193037 alleles were strongly different between patients with Graves' disease (G, 87·6% and A, 12·4%) and healthy controls (G, 91·4% and A, 8·6%) (P = 0·00067). The A carriers were associated with increased Graves' disease risks when compared with the G carriers (OR = 1·51, 95%CI = 1·19-1·92). In replicate cohorts, the proportion of individuals carrying the A allele of rs8193037 was significantly higher in patients with Graves' disease than in controls [Graves' disease vs control, 14·3% vs 9·1%, OR = 1·66 (95% CI: 1·23-2·24), P allele  = 0·0082]. In addition, rs8193037 and rs3748067 were found to be different in both genotype and allele distributions in Graves' disease-associated ophthalmopathy patients and controls in Shanghai cohorts. Haplotype association analysis also identified five main haplotypes of those six SNPs. These results suggested that the polymorphism of IL-17A rs8193037 was strongly associated with Graves' disease susceptibility in the Chinese Han population.z. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Equity Impact Vaccines May Have On Averting Deaths And Medical Impoverishment In Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Angela Y; Riumallo-Herl, Carlos; Perales, Nicole A; Clark, Samantha; Clark, Andrew; Constenla, Dagna; Garske, Tini; Jackson, Michael L; Jean, Kévin; Jit, Mark; Jones, Edward O; Li, Xi; Suraratdecha, Chutima; Bullock, Olivia; Johnson, Hope; Brenzel, Logan; Verguet, Stéphane

    2018-02-01

    With social policies increasingly directed toward enhancing equity through health programs, it is important that methods for estimating the health and economic benefits of these programs by subpopulation be developed, to assess both equity concerns and the programs' total impact. We estimated the differential health impact (measured as the number of deaths averted) and household economic impact (measured as the number of cases of medical impoverishment averted) of ten antigens and their corresponding vaccines across income quintiles for forty-one low- and middle-income countries. Our analysis indicated that benefits across these vaccines would accrue predominantly in the lowest income quintiles. Policy makers should be informed about the large health and economic distributional impact that vaccines could have, and they should view vaccination policies as potentially important channels for improving health equity. Our results provide insight into the distribution of vaccine-preventable diseases and the health benefits associated with their prevention.

  10. Diagnosis of Grave's disease with pulmonary hypertension on chest CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwa Yeon; Yoo, Seung Min; Kim, Hye Rin; Chun, Eun Ju; White, Charles S

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of chest CT findings to diagnose Grave's disease in pulmonary hypertension. We retrospectively evaluated chest CT and the medical records of 13 patients with Grave's disease with (n=6) or without pulmonary hypertension (n=7) and in 17 control patients. Presence of iso-attenuation of diffusely enlarged thyroid glands compared with adjacent neck muscle on non-enhanced CT as a diagnostic clue of Grave's disease, and assessment of pulmonary hypertension on CT has high diagnostic accuracy. Chest CT has the potential to diagnose Grave's disease with pulmonary hypertension in the absence of other information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of Graves' disease with particular emphasis on appropriate techniques in nuclear medicine. General state of knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasek, Karolina; Płazińska, Maria Teresa; Królicki, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease. It accounts for 50-80% of cases of hyperthyroidism. Antibodies against the TSH receptor (TRAb) are responsible for hyperthyroidism (TRAB). The key role in monitoring and diagnosis of Graves' disease plays the level of hormones of free thyroxine and triiodothyronine. Helpful is an ultrasound of the thyroid scintigraphy which due to its functional character is both a valuable addition to morphological studies as well as plays an important role in the diagnosis and therapy in patients with Graves' disease. There is no perfect treatment for Graves' disease. The reason for this is the lack of therapy directed against primary pathogenic mechanisms. Currently available treatments need to be thoroughly discussed during the first visit as the patient's understanding of the choice of a treatment constitutes a vital role in the success of therapy. Graves' disease treatment is based on three types of therapies that have been carried out for decades including: pharmacological treatment anti-thyroid drugs, I131 therapy and radical treatment - thyroidectomy. The purpose of the treatment is to control symptoms and patient to return to euthyreosis. Treatment of Graves' disease is of great importance because if left untreated, it can lead to long-term harmful effects on the heart, bone and mental well-being of patients.

  12. Orbital flourine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography in patients with Graves' disease for evaluation of active inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu-Beşli, Lebriz; Kabasakal, Levent; Sağer, Sait; Cicik, Erdoğan; Asa, Sertaç; Sönmezoğlu, Kerim

    2017-11-01

    Prediction and early diagnosis of orbitopathy is needed in patients with Graves' disease, especially when radioiodine therapy is planned. Positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) using flourine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) is an effective imaging modality in detection of inflammation, however, its ability to detect orbital inflammation has not been well studied. The aim of our study is to determine the ability of FDG PET/CT to detect orbital inflammation related with Graves' disease, identify active orbitopathy, predict the radioiodine-triggered orbitopathy, and find out the effects of radioiodine on orbital inflammation. Total 31 Graves' disease patients and 17 controls were included. All Graves' disease patients underwent cranial FDG PET/CT imaging prior therapy. Radioiodine therapy and post-treatment PET/CT study was applied to 21 patients. PET/CT images of all examinees were evaluated, measuring extraocular muscle maximum standard uptake value (SUVmax) and muscle thickness. FDG uptake was increased in the majority of extraocular muscles in Graves' disease patients in comparison to controls and this increase was found to be irrelevant from muscle thickness. Extraocular muscle SUVmax values did not increase in Graves' orbitopathy patients who received radioiodine under corticosteroid prophylaxis. SUVmax level of all orbital rectus muscles were increased after radioiodine therapy in nonsmokers, whereas no increase was detected in smokers. FDG PET/CT may be helpful in detection of extraocular muscle inflammation and it may show ongoing orbitopathy in early stages of inflammation before anatomical changes occur.

  13. Variation in the use of definitive treatment options in the management of Graves' disease: a UK clinician survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hookham, Jessica; Collins, Emma E; Allahabadia, Amit; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P

    2017-04-01

    Graves' disease can be treated with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioiodine or surgery. Use of definitive treatments (radioiodine or surgery) varies widely across centres. Specific clinical circumstances, local facilities, patient and clinician preferences and perceptions will affect the choice of treatment. Detailed understanding of UK clinicians' views and their rationale for different treatments is lacking. To study the preferences and perceptions of UK clinicians on the role of surgery and radioiodine in the management of Graves' disease. 'British Thyroid Association' (BTA), 'Society for Endocrinology' (SFE) and 'British Association of Endocrine and Thyroid Surgeons' (BAETS) members were invited to complete an online survey examining their management decisions in Graves' disease and factors that influenced their decisions. 158 responses from UK consultants were included. The ratio of physicians to surgeons was 11:5 and males to females was 12:4. Most clinicians would commence ATDs in uncomplicated first presentation of Graves' disease. A wide range of risk estimates on the effectiveness and risks of treatment was given by clinicians. Radioiodine was used most frequently in relapsed Graves' disease. However, severe eye disease and pregnancy strongly influenced choice in favour of surgery. Surgeons underestimated the success of radioiodine (pGraves' disease. The variation appeared to be dependent on patient and disease-specific factors as well as physician experience, gender and specialty. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  14. Correlation of orbital muscle changes evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging and thyroid-stimulating antibody in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishikawa, M.; Yoshimura, M.; Inada, M.

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between eye changes and autoantibody to the thyrotropin receptor in patients with Graves' disease, the authors evaluated the eye changes using magnetic resonance imaging and the results were correlated with thyroid-stimulating antibody, thyrotropin binding inhibitor immunoglobulin and thyroid growth activity. Subjects were 15 patients with Graves' disease who had Graves' ophthalmopathy, including exophthalmos and other signs and symptoms, and 9 patients without ophthalmopathy; all were maintained in a euthyroid state by antithyroid drugs. The thyrotropin-binding inhibitor imunoglobulin was measured by a kit, and thyroid-stimulating antibody and thyroid growth activity were evaluated by cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate production and [ 3 H]thymidine incorporation, respectively, by cultured functional rat thyroid lined cells. The sum of the swelling ratios of the four extraocular muscles correlated well with the degree of exophthalmos. The thyrotropin-binding inhibitor immunoglobulin was positive in 9 out of 15 patients with ophthalmopathy; however, no correlation was observed between the activity and exophthalmos or muscle swelling. No significant correlation was observed between muscle changes and thyroid growth activity either. On the other hand, thyroid-stimulating antibody in Graves' patients with ophthalmopathy was significantly higher than that in patients without ophthalmopathy. Moreover, the level of the stimulating activity in Graves' patients with ophthalmopathy showed a significant positive correlation with the sum of the swelling ratios of the individual eight eye muscles. These results suggest that thyroid-stimulating antibody has a close relation to Graves' ophthalmopathy. 23 refs., 4 figs

  15. Preoperative management in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantanida, Eliana

    2017-10-01

    Graves' disease is the most frequent cause of hyperthyroidism in iodine-sufficient geographical areas and is characterized by the presence in patients' serum of autoantibodies directed against the thyrotropin receptor (TRAb) that cause overproduction and release of thyroid hormones. Clinical presentation results from both hyperthyroidism and underlying autoimmunity. The diagnosis is based on characteristic clinical features and biochemical abnormalities. If serum thyrotropin (TSH) is low, serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations should be measured to distinguish between subclinical (with normal circulating thyroid hormones) and overt hyperthyroidism (with increased circulating thyroid hormones). Graves' disease is treated with any of three effective and relatively safe initial treatment options: antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioactive iodine ablation (RAIU), and surgery. Total thyroidectomy is favored in several clinical situations, such as intolerance, ineffectiveness or recurrence after ATD treatment, radioiodine therapy contraindicated, documented or suspected thyroid malignancy, one or more large thyroid nodules, coexisting moderate-to-severe active Graves' orbitopathy, women planning a pregnancy within 6 months. Whenever surgery is selected as treatment, selection of an expert high-volume thyroid surgeons is fundamental and careful preoperative management is essential to optimize surgical outcomes. Pretreatment with ATDs in order to promptly achieve the euthyroid state is recommended to avoid the risk of precipitating thyroid storm during surgery. For the majority of patients, euthyroidism is achieved after few weeks of ATD treatment. Beta-blockers, such as propranolol, are often added effectively to control hyperthyroid symptoms. Saturated solution of potassium iodide (SSKI) or potassium iodine (Lugol's solution), given for a short period prior to surgery, in order to reduce both thyroid hormone release and thyroid gland

  16. Why Distinctive Information Reduces False Memories: Evidence for Both Impoverished Relational-Encoding and Distinctiveness Heuristic Accounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hege, Amanda C. G.; Dodson, Chad S.

    2004-01-01

    Two accounts explain why studying pictures reduces false memories within the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm (J. Deese, 1959; H. L. Roediger & K. B. McDermott, 1995). The impoverished relational-encoding account suggests that studying pictures interferes with the encoding of relational information, which is the primary basis for false memories…

  17. Tratamiento de la enfermedad de Graves Basedow

    OpenAIRE

    Hernando Vargas-Uricoechea; Carlos Hernán Sierra-Torres; Ivonne Alejandra Meza-Cabrera

    2014-01-01

    Se realizó una revisión narrativa rigurosa de la literatura inglesa y en español sobre diferentes aspectos de la Enfermedad de Graves-Basedow e hipertiroidismo. Esta patología –parte de la llamada “enfermedad tiroidea autoinmune”- se produce como consecuencia de la presencia de anticuerpos circulantes que se unen y activan al receptor de tirotropina, desencadenándose generalmente el hipertiroidismo en asociación con un estrés agudo. En este artículo actualizamos tanto el manejo de hipertiroid...

  18. Pancreatitis aguda grave asociada a gangrena vesicular

    OpenAIRE

    Arroyo-Sánchez, Abel S; Aguirre-Mejía, Rosa Y; Echenique-Martínez, Sergio E

    2014-01-01

    Se presenta el caso un paciente diabético que desarrolló un cuadro de pancreatitis aguda grave asociada a gangrena vesicular, en el que se evaluó la aplicabilidad de los criterios de clasificación y manejo de la hoja de ruta para pancreatitis aguda, así mismo se proponen algunos tópicos que pudieran ser investigados a futuro We present a diabetic patient who developed severe acute pancreatitis associated to gallbladder gangrene, in this case we assessed the applicability of classification ...

  19. Graves' disease and idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gutch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH is a central nervous system disorder characterized by raised intracranial pressure with normal cerebrospinal fluid composition and absence of any structural anomaly on neuroimaging. Among all endocrine disorders associated with the development of IIH, the association of hyperthyroidism and IIH is very rare with few cases reported till date. Thyroid disturbances have a unique association with IIH. Hypo- and hyper-thyroidism have been reported in association with this disorder. We present a rare case of a 25-year-old man with Graves' disease with intractable headache that was later investigated and attributed to development of IIH.

  20. Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daubner, D.; Spieth, S.; Engellandt, K.; Kummer, R. von

    2012-01-01

    Imaging of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) includes radiological and nuclear medicine procedures. Depending on the method used they provide information about the distribution and activity of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is not only a helpful tool for making the diagnosis it also enables differentiation of the active and inactive forms of GO due to intramuscular edema. The modality is therefore appropriate to evaluate the disease activity and the course of therapy. The disease leads to the typical enlargement of the muscle bodies of the extraocular muscles. The inferior rectus, medial rectus and levator palpebrae muscles are mostly involved. Signal changes of the intraconal and extraconal fat tissue are possible and a bilateral manifestation is common. The differential diagnosis includes inflammatory diseases and tumors, of which orbital pseudotumor (idiopathic, unspecific orbital inflammation), ocular myositis and orbital lymphoma are the most important. The specific patterns (localization, involvement of orbital structures and signal changes) can be differentiated by MRI. (orig.) [de

  1. Review of Mouse Models of Graves' Disease and Orbitopathy-Novel Treatment by Induction of Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerer, Martin; Faßbender, Julia; Li, Zhongmin; Münch, Götz; Holthoff, Hans-Peter

    2017-04-01

    Various approaches have been used to model human Graves' disease in mice, including transfected fibroblasts, and plasmid or adenoviral immunisations with the extracellular A subunit of the human thyrotropin receptor (TSHR). Some of these models were only observed for a short time period or were self-limiting. A long-term model for human Graves' disease was established in mice using continuing immunisations (4-weekly injections) with recombinant adenovirus expressing TSHR. Generation of TSHR binding cAMP-stimulatory antibodies, thyroid enlargement and alterations, elevated serum thyroxin levels, tachycardia and cardiac hypertrophy were maintained for at least 9 months in all Ad-TSHR-immunised mice. Here, we show that these mice suffer from orbitopathy, which was detected by serial orbital sectioning and histomorphometry. Attempts to treat established Graves' disease in preclinical mouse model studies have included small molecule allosteric antagonists and specific antagonist antibodies which were isolated from hypothyroid patients. In addition, novel peptides have been conceived which mimic the cylindrical loops of the TSHR leucine-rich repeat domain, in order to re-establish tolerance toward the antigen. Here, we show preliminary results that one set of these peptides improves or even cures all signs and symptoms of Graves' disease in mice after six consecutive monthly injections. First beneficial effects were observed 3-4 months after starting these therapies. In immunologically naïve mice, administration of the peptides did not induce any immune response.

  2. Dosimetry-based treatment for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Steve L; Pratt, Brenda; Gray, Matthew; Chittenden, Sarah; Du, Yong; Harmer, Clive L; Flux, Glenn D

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the long-term outcome of a personalized dosimetry approach in Graves' disease aiming to render patients euthyroid from a planned thyroid absorbed dose of 60 Gy. A total of 284 patients with Graves' disease were followed prospectively following administration of radioiodine calculated to deliver an absorbed dose of 60 Gy. Patients with cardiac disease were excluded. Outcomes were analysed at yearly intervals for up to 10 years with a median follow-up of 37.5 months. A single radioiodine administration was sufficient to render a patient either euthyroid or hypothyroid in 175 (62%) patients, the remainder requiring further radioiodine. The median radioactivity required to deliver 60 Gy was 77 MBq. Less than 2% patients required 400-600 MBq, the standard activity administered in many centres. In the cohort receiving a single administration, 38, 32 and 26% were euthyroid on no specific thyroid medication at 3, 5 and 10 years, respectively. Larger thyroid volumes were associated with the need for further therapy. The presence of nodules on ultrasonography did not adversely affect treatment outcome. A personalized dosimetric approach delayed the long-term onset of hypothyroidism in 26% of patients. This was achieved using much lower administered activities than currently recommended. Future studies will aim to identify those patients who would benefit most from this approach.

  3. Thymic hyperplasia in a patient with Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzaoui, Amira A; Klii, Rim R; Salem, Randa R; Kochtali, Ines I; Golli, Mondher M; Mahjoub, Silvia S

    2012-02-09

    Hyperplastic changes of the thymus may be found in patients with Graves' disease. However, this rarely presents as an anterior mediastinal mass, particularly among adults. In this report, we describe a 46-year old woman with Graves' disease and thymic hyperplasia.

  4. Thymic hyperplasia in a patient with Grave's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzaoui Amira A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyperplastic changes of the thymus may be found in patients with Graves' disease. However, this rarely presents as an anterior mediastinal mass, particularly among adults. In this report, we describe a 46-year old woman with Graves' disease and thymic hyperplasia.

  5. [Diagnostic difficulties in Grave's orbitopathy--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzejowski, Maciej; Grzesiuk, Wiesław; Szwejda, Elzbieta; Bar-Andziak, Ewa

    2004-03-01

    Graves' orbitopathy is caused by intraorbital inflammatory reaction due to autoimmune thyroid disease. In most cases the diagnosis is based on the coexistence of typical eye signs and hyperthyroidism symptoms. In presented case, the absence of thyroid dysfunction implicated performance of differential diagnosis. Among many available diagnostic tools nuclear magnetic resonance seems to be the most accurate in confirmation of diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy.

  6. The natural history and prognostic factors of Graves' disease in Korean children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Min Song

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in children and adolescents. In this study, we investigated the natural course and the prognostic factors of Graves' disease in Korean children and adolescents. Methods : One-hundred thirteen (88 girls and 25 boys patients were included in this study. A retrospective analysis was made of all patients who were diagnosed with Graves' disease. The following parameters were recorded and analyzed: patient's sex, age at diagnosis, duration of disease, laboratory findings, symptoms and signs, and family history of autoimmune thyroid disease. Results : All patients were initially treated with antithyroid drugs, either methimazole (93.8% or propylthiouracil (6.2%. Antithyroid drugs had been discontinued in 75 (66.4% of 113 patients. Of these 75 patients, 23 (20.4% relapsed after 25.5¡?#?3.7; months. Thirteen (11.5% of 23 patients, who experienced the first relapse, showed a second remission. However, 2 (1.8% of 13 patients relapsed again. Euthyroid state could not be achieved by antithyroid drugs in 1 patient, and radioactive iodine therapy was performed. The older the patient at diagnosis, the greater the likelihood of remission (P =0.034. Conclusion : Age at diagnosis seems to be a prognostic factor in Korean children and adolescents with Graves' disease, and should be taken into account in treatment plan determination.

  7. Notes on Glasinac: The chronology of princely graves

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    Vasić Rastko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Princely graves of the Iron Age represent a particular phenomenon in archaeology, which is constantly the subject of interest. They are usually dated to the end of the 6th and the beginning of the 5th century. The author discusses the chronology of princely graves in the Central Balkans and analyses their appearance in each part of this territory: on the Glasinac plateau, in Serbia, Kosovo and Metohija, Montenegro, North Albania and Nordwest Bulgaria. He concludes that they date from the middle of the 7th to the middle of the 4th century, depending on the cultural and socio-economic situation in the respective area. In the middle of the 7th century princely graves in the true sense of the word were known only on the Glasinac plateau, in the Ilijak necropolis. At the end of the 7th and in the beginning of the 6th century they still appear on Glasinac, though in greater number and in various parts of the plateau. In northwest Bulgaria a grave dating to the second half of the 7th century was found, which would, according to grave goods, correspond to the Glasinac princely graves. On the other hand, there are no princely graves in Serbia and north Albania from that time but some outstanding warrior graves are known, belonging possibly to the chiefs of smaller warlike bands, whose power was limited. Princely graves from Arareva gromila on Glasinac, Pilatovići by Požega and Lisijevo Polje by Berane date to the beginning of the second half of the 6th century, and according to their characteristics represent princes, whose power and wealth were considerable and known to the neighbours. Culmination of the rise of the princes in this region was demonstrated by the graves from Novi Pazar, Atenica, and Pećka banja, which date to the end of the 6th and the first quarter of the 5th century. Some decades later there are several rich graves, e.g. the recently discovered grave from Velika Krsna, which could belong to a prince, but can not be compared with the

  8. Application of lithium carbonate on radioiodine treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zha Jinshun; Huang Chunling; Jiang Tingyin; Jiang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Effectiveness of radioiodine for Graves' hyperthyroidism depends on retention time of 131 I in the thyroid, and may be effected by several factors, including previous treatment with antithyroid drugs,goiter volume, 24 h thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake and so on. A short course of therapy with low dose of lithium carbonate increased retention of 131 I in the thyroid and prolong the intrathyroidal effective half-life of 131 I before and after 131 I therapy in patients with Graves' disease, because of the actions that lithium blocks the release of organic iodine and thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland without affecting thyroidal radioactive iodine uptake. Therefore, using lithium as adjunct to radioiodine therapy increases the radiation dose delivered to the thyroid, to result in reduced the activity required and whole-body radiation dose in patients with very short effective half-life, and so improve the cure rate of hyperthyroidism. A short course of lithium carbonate therapy can be considered a useful adjunct to 131 I therapy for obtaining a more rapid control of thyrotoxicosis and avoiding its transient exacerbation because of methimazole withdrawal prior to 131 I administration or in patients who cannot tolerate or do not respond to antithyroid drugs, and for helping to prevent the radioiodine-associated increase in serum free thyroid hormone concentrations. In addition, lithium carbonate enhances the effectiveness of 131 I therapy, in terms of prompter control of hyperthyroidism in patients with small or large goiters. At the same time, lithium also may increases the rate of permanent control of hyperthyroidism in patients with large goiters. In summary, in the short-term lithium plays an important role as an adjunct to 131 I, since it helps to prevent the 131 I-associated increase in serum free thyroid hormone concentrations and allows a more prompt control of thyrotoxicosis. This is of particular importance in high risk patients, such as the elderly

  9. Atypical Clinical Manifestations of Graves' Disease: An Analysis in Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazi, Mohamed Osama; Ahmed, Sherif

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been an increase in the number of reports about newly recognized (atypical or unusual) manifestations of Graves' disease (GD), that are related to various body systems. One of these manifestations is sometimes the main presenting feature of GD. Some of the atypical manifestations are specifically related to GD, while others are also similarly seen in patients with other forms of hyperthyroidism. Lack of knowledge of the association between these findings and GD may lead to delay in diagnosis, misdiagnosis, or unnecessary investigations. The atypical clinical presentations of GD include anemia, vomiting, jaundice, and right heart failure. There is one type of anemia that is not explained by any of the known etiological factors and responds well to hyperthyroidism treatment. This type of anemia resembles anemia of chronic disease and may be termed GD anemia. Other forms of anemia that are associated with GD include pernicious anemia, iron deficiency anemia of celiac disease, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Vomiting has been reported as a presenting feature of Graves' disease. Some cases had the typical findings of hyperthyroidism initially masked, and the vomiting did not improve until hyperthyroidism has been detected and treated. Hyperthyroidism may present with jaundice, and on the other hand, deep jaundice may develop with the onset of overt hyperthyroidism in previously compensated chronic liver disease patients. Pulmonary hypertension is reported to be associated with GD and to respond to its treatment. GD-related pulmonary hypertension may be so severe to produce isolated right-sided heart failure that is occasionally found as the presenting manifestation of GD. PMID:22132347

  10. The 2016 European Thyroid Association/European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy Guidelines for the Management of Graves' Orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartalena, Luigi; Baldeschi, Lelio; Boboridis, Kostas; Eckstein, Anja; Kahaly, George J.; Marcocci, Claudio; Perros, Petros; Salvi, Mario; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Adamidou, Fotini; Anagnostis, Panagiotis; Ayvaz, Goksun; Azzolini, Claudio; Boschi, Antonella; Bournaud, Claire; Clarke, Lucy; Currò, Nicola; Daumerie, Chantal; Dayan, Colin; Fuhrer, Dagmar; Konuk, Onur; Marinò, Michele; Morris, Daniel; Nardi, Marco; Pearce, Simon; Pitz, Susanne; Rudovsky, Gottfried; Vannucchi, Guia; Vardanian, Christine; von Arx, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is the main extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, though severe forms are rare. Management of GO is often suboptimal, largely because available treatments do not target pathogenic mech anisms of the disease. Treatment should rely on a thorough assessment of the

  11. Predictive score for the development or progression of Graves' orbitopathy in patients with newly diagnosed Graves' hyperthyroidism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiersinga, Wilmar; Žarković, Miloš; Bartalena, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To construct a predictive score for the development or progression of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) in Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH). DESIGN: Prospective observational study in patients with newly diagnosed GH, treated with antithyroid drugs (ATD) for 18 months at ten participating centers f...

  12. Outcome of very long-term treatment with antithyroid drugs in Graves' hyperthyroidism associated with Graves' orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elbers, Laura; Mourits, Maarten; Wiersinga, Wilmar

    2011-01-01

    It is still debated which treatment modality for Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) is most appropriate when Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is present. The preference in our center has been always to continue antithyroid drugs for GH (as the block-and-replace [B-R] regimen) until all medical and/or surgical

  13. Graves' ophthalmopathy and 131I therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcocci, C.; Bartalena, L.; Tanda, M.L.; Manetti, L.; Dell'Unto, E.; Mazzi, B.; Rocchi, R.; Barbesino, G.; Pinchera, A.

    1999-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy is an autoimmune process initiated and maintained by antigen(s) shared by the thyroid and the orbit. A matter of argument concerns the choice of the method of treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism when clinically evident ophthalmopathy is present. Restoration of euthyroidism appears to be beneficial for ophthalmopathy. On the other hand the continuing disease activity associated with the recurrence of hyperthyroidism appears to adversely affect the course of ophthalmopathy. For these reasons it is our opinion that in patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy the permanent control of thyroid hyper function by ablation of thyroid tissue should be obtained by radioiodine therapy or thyroidectomy. The rationale for an ablative strategy is the following: i) permanent control of hyperthyroidism avoids exacerbations of eye disease associated with recurrence of hyperthyroidism; i i) hypothyroidism, which follows thyroid tissue ablation, should be regarded as a therapeutic end point rather than as an undesirable result; iii) ablation of thyroid tissue may result in the removal of both the thyroid-orbit cross-reacting antigen(s) and the major source of thyroid-auto reactive lymphocytes. The relationship between radioiodine therapy and the course of GO is a matter of controversy, and some authors have suggested that radioiodine administration ma be associated with a worsening of preexisting ophthalmopathy. This was not observed when radioiodine treatment was associated with a 3-month oral course of prednisone. The development or progression of GO after radioiodine therapy might be due to the release of thyroid antigens following radiation injury and to subsequent exacerbations of autoimmune reactions directed towards antigens shared by the thyroid and the orbit. The view that radioiodine therapy may be associated with a progression of ophthalmopathy is not shared by some authors who claim that the apparent link between progression of

  14. A grave of a Cuman noble woman in the Kislyakovsky 13 kurgan cemetery (Krasnodar kray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Raev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kislyakovskiy 13 kurgan cemetery was excavated in 2008 by an expedition of the Southern Scientific Center, RAS. Kurgan 2 contained two graves – one dated to the first centuries AD, the other to the Middle Ages, when the North Black Sea steppes were inhabited by the nomadic Polovеts tribes. This article discusses grave 2. The burial was made in a chamber in the form of a niche. Robbers destroyed one of the grave’s walls but the burial remained undisturbed. The buried woman of 35-40 years old was laying extended on back, head to west. Decayed wood from the funerary stretchers preserved under the skeleton. The rich grave goods included a bronze cauldron, an iron knife, two silver torques, hair rings, and a mirror. Fragments of the wooden frame, felt, textile, and gilded silver foil from a headdress preserved in area of the woman’s chest. The kurgan was encircled by a ditch; its northern part had two ledged niches made in the outer wall. Animal bones and ceramic shards with remains of the funerary feast were unearthed on the ditch bottom. The ditch was thoroughly made and has unique construction features. Judging by its lower layers, the dug-out soil was stacked not only on the kurgan’s surface but also round the ditch’s outer perimeter. The ditch remained opened for a long time and was gradually filled with flooded soil. Grave goods are typical for the Cuman graves of the 12th - early 13th centuries. The assemblage suggests a high social status of the buried woman. It is possible that for some time the area surrounded by the ditch was used as a sanctuary; afterwards the burial of a noble woman was performed, the kurgan was covered with a layer of soil.

  15. Association between polymorphisms in the TSHR gene and Graves' orbitopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Jurecka-Lubieniecka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graves' orbitopathy (GO as well as Graves' disease (GD hyperthyroidism originate from an autoimmune reaction against the common auto-antigen, thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR. GO phenotype is associated with environmental risk factors, mainly nicotinism, as well as genetic risk factors which initiate an immunologic reaction. In some patients GO is observed before diagnosis of GD hyperthyroidism, while it can also be observed far after diagnosis. The intensity of GO symptoms varies greatly in these patients. Thus, the pathogenesis of GD and GO may correlate with different genetic backgrounds, which has been confirmed by studies of correlations between GO and polymorphisms in cytokines involved in orbit inflammation. The aim of our analysis was to assess genetic predisposition to GO in young patients (age of diagnosis ≤30 years of age, for whom environmental effects had less time to influence outcomes than in adults. METHODS: 768 GD patients were included in the study. 359 of them had clinically evident orbitopathy (NOSPECS ≥2. Patients were stratified by age at diagnosis. Association analyses were performed for genes with a known influence on development of GD - TSHR, HLA-DRB1, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA4 and lymphoid protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPN22. RESULTS: The rs179247 TSHR polymorphism was associated with GO in young patients only. In young GO-free patients, allele A was statistically more frequent and homozygous carriers had a considerable lower risk of disease incidence than patients with AG or GG genotypes. Those differences were not found in either elderly patients or the group analyzed as a whole. CONCLUSIONS: Allele A of the rs179247 polymorphism in the TSHR gene is associated with lower risk of GO in young GD patients.

  16. Management of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgiazzi, J.

    1987-06-01

    Management of Graves' disease hyperthyroidism, a life-long disease, hinges on a clear strategy and involves the patient's understanding and adherence. Antithyroid drug treatment is difficult to adapt to each patient's need; so far, the more efficient use of antithyroid drug remains on long-term courses of 18 months or more. Although a picture is evolving of patients more likely to go into remission after the medical treatment, its characteristics are not yet reliable. Radical (ablative) treatments are often necessary. In general, surgery might appear less appealing than /sup 131/I irradiation which, as compared to surgery, carries only the risk of later hypothyroidism. It is hoped that basic as well as clinical research is able to generate innovative, better adapted, and pathophysiologically oriented new therapeutic means. 124 references.

  17. Radiation therapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawamura, Toshiki; Koga, Sukehiko; Anno, Hirofumi; Komai, Satoshi (Fujita-Gakuen Health Univ., Toyoake, Aichi (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    During the decade from 1978 to 1987, 20 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with irradiation of 2000 cGy to the orbital tissue. We examined the effects of the therapy on 17 such patients. Exophthalmos tended to decrease. When the degree of deviation of the exophthalmic eye was small, the effect of therapy tended to be better than when it was large. Two cases that showed an increase in retrobulbar fatty tissue without thickening of the extraocular muscles did not respond as well as those that had thickening of the extraocular muscles. Diplopia tended to improve both subjectively and objectively. Ocular movement improved in 11 of the 17 patients. There were no serious radiation injuries after the radiation therapy, except for some transient swelling of the eyelid. (author).

  18. Pathogenesis of Graves' disease and therapeutic implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seif, F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Graves' disease presents itself clinically mainly as hyperthyroidism and infiltrative ophthalmopathy and to a minimal extent also as dermopathy and acropachy. Autoimmune processes are the basic pathogenesis. Stimulating antibodies against the TSH receptor cause hyperthyroidism. Autoantibodies and autoreactive T lymphocytes against primarily thyroidal antigens cross-react with similar antigens of the eye muscles and orbital connective tissue, thus spreading the disease from the thyroid to the eyes. The therapeutic goal comprises not only the treatment of hyperthyroidism, but also the induction of a steady immuntolerance in order to minimize the irreversible damage to the eye. The therapeutic armamentarium is formed by antithyroid drugs, glucocorticoids, retrobulbar radition and thyroid ablation, either by nearly total thyroidectomy or by radioiodine. The different indications for both ablative procedures are discussed. (orig.) [de

  19. Acute stress in adulthood impoverishes social choices and triggers aggressiveness in preclinical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eNosjean

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult C57BL/6J mice are known to exhibit high level of social flexibility while mice lacking the β2 subunit of nicotinic receptors (β2-/- mice present social rigidity. We asked ourselves what would be the consequences of a restraint acute stress (45 min on social interactions in adult mice of both genotypes, hence the contribution of neuronal nicotinic receptors in this process. We therefore dissected social interaction complexity of stressed and not stressed dyads of mice in a social interaction task. We also measured plasma corticosterone levels in our experimental conditions. We showed that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood reduced and disorganized social interaction complexity in both C57BL/6J and β2-/- mice. These stress-induced maladaptive social interactions involved alteration of distinct social categories and strategies in both genotypes, suggesting a dissociable impact of stress depending on the functioning of the cholinergic nicotinic system. In both genotypes, social behaviors under stress were coupled to aggressive reactions with no plasma corticosterone changes. Thus, aggressiveness appeared a general response independent of nicotinic function. We demonstrate here that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood is sufficient to impoverish social interactions: stress impaired social flexibility in C57BL/6J mice whereas it reinforced β2-/- mice behavioral rigidity.

  20. Acute stress in adulthood impoverishes social choices and triggers aggressiveness in preclinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosjean, Anne; Cressant, Arnaud; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Chauveau, Frédéric; Granon, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Adult C57BL/6J mice are known to exhibit high level of social flexibility while mice lacking the β2 subunit of nicotinic receptors (β2(-/-) mice) present social rigidity. We asked ourselves what would be the consequences of a restraint acute stress (45 min) on social interactions in adult mice of both genotypes, hence the contribution of neuronal nicotinic receptors in this process. We therefore dissected social interaction complexity of stressed and not stressed dyads of mice in a social interaction task. We also measured plasma corticosterone levels in our experimental conditions. We showed that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood reduced and disorganized social interaction complexity in both C57BL/6J and β2(-/-) mice. These stress-induced maladaptive social interactions involved alteration of distinct social categories and strategies in both genotypes, suggesting a dissociable impact of stress depending on the functioning of the cholinergic nicotinic system. In both genotypes, social behaviors under stress were coupled to aggressive reactions with no plasma corticosterone changes. Thus, aggressiveness appeared a general response independent of nicotinic function. We demonstrate here that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood is sufficient to impoverish social interactions: stress impaired social flexibility in C57BL/6J mice whereas it reinforced β2(-/-) mice behavioral rigidity.

  1. Acute stress in adulthood impoverishes social choices and triggers aggressiveness in preclinical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosjean, Anne; Cressant, Arnaud; de Chaumont, Fabrice; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Chauveau, Frédéric; Granon, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Adult C57BL/6J mice are known to exhibit high level of social flexibility while mice lacking the β2 subunit of nicotinic receptors (β2−/− mice) present social rigidity. We asked ourselves what would be the consequences of a restraint acute stress (45 min) on social interactions in adult mice of both genotypes, hence the contribution of neuronal nicotinic receptors in this process. We therefore dissected social interaction complexity of stressed and not stressed dyads of mice in a social interaction task. We also measured plasma corticosterone levels in our experimental conditions. We showed that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood reduced and disorganized social interaction complexity in both C57BL/6J and β2−/− mice. These stress-induced maladaptive social interactions involved alteration of distinct social categories and strategies in both genotypes, suggesting a dissociable impact of stress depending on the functioning of the cholinergic nicotinic system. In both genotypes, social behaviors under stress were coupled to aggressive reactions with no plasma corticosterone changes. Thus, aggressiveness appeared a general response independent of nicotinic function. We demonstrate here that a single stress exposure occurring in adulthood is sufficient to impoverish social interactions: stress impaired social flexibility in C57BL/6J mice whereas it reinforced β2−/− mice behavioral rigidity. PMID:25610381

  2. Earliest floral grave lining from 13,700-11,700-y-old Natufian burials at Raqefet Cave, Mt. Carmel, Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadel, Dani; Danin, Avinoam; Power, Robert C; Rosen, Arlene M; Bocquentin, Fanny; Tsatskin, Alexander; Rosenberg, Danny; Yeshurun, Reuven; Weissbrod, Lior; Rebollo, Noemi R; Barzilai, Omry; Boaretto, Elisabetta

    2013-07-16

    Flowering plants possess mechanisms that stimulate positive emotional and social responses in humans. It is difficult to establish when people started to use flowers in public and ceremonial events because of the scarcity of relevant evidence in the archaeological record. We report on uniquely preserved 13,700-11,700-y-old grave linings made of flowers, suggesting that such use began much earlier than previously thought. The only potentially older instance is the questionable use of flowers in the Shanidar IV Neanderthal grave. The earliest cemeteries (ca. 15,000-11,500 y ago) in the Levant are known from Natufian sites in northern Israel, where dozens of burials reflect a wide range of inhumation practices. The newly discovered flower linings were found in four Natufian graves at the burial site of Raqefet Cave, Mt. Carmel, Israel. Large identified plant impressions in the graves include stems of sage and other Lamiaceae (Labiatae; mint family) or Scrophulariaceae (figwort family) species; accompanied by a plethora of phytoliths, they provide the earliest direct evidence now known for such preparation and decoration of graves. Some of the plant species attest to spring burials with a strong emphasis on colorful and aromatic flowers. Cave floor chiseling to accommodate the desired grave location and depth is also evident at the site. Thus, grave preparation was a sophisticated planned process, embedded with social and spiritual meanings reflecting a complex preagricultural society undergoing profound changes at the end of the Pleistocene.

  3. Radiotherapy in the management of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Koh-ichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atsushi; Shidou, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Morita, Kazuo; Osanai, Hajime; Ohtsuka, Kenji; Hinoda, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    To report the results of radiotherapy for patients with failure, adverse reactions or relative contraindications to the use of steroids or immunosuppressants, by using newly developed quantitative indexes. Fourteen female and six male patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with radiotherapy between 1989 and 1996. Prior to radiotherapy, eight patients received treatment with prednisone, four received immunosuppressants and four received a combination of both. Four patients with contraindications to steroids were initially managed with radiotherapy. Most of the patients received a dose of 24-28 Gy in 2 Gy fractions. We used the newly developed motility limitation index to assess extraocular motility. Treatment was well tolerated. There have been no late complications. All 12 patients with soft tissue signs such as edema, irritation, tearing and pain were improved. Proptosis did not improve or improved only slightly, 3 mm at best. However, proptosis in all but two has been stabilized and has not deteriorated in the follow-up period. Most of the patients have experienced an improvement of eye-muscle motility. Extraocular muscles that work for elevation were impaired more severely than the other muscles and this tended to remain. Of the 16 patients using steroids before or when radiotherapy was initiated, 15 were tapered off and only one patient required additional steroids, thus sparing the majority from steroid adverse reactions. Radiotherapy was effective in preventing exacerbations of active inflammatory ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves' disease with minimal morbidity and thus eliminated the adverse reactions associated with protracted corticosteroid use. The newly developed motility limitation index was useful in detecting delicate changes in motility of individual extraocular muscles. (author)

  4. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hea Min; Park, Soon Hyun; Lee, Jae Min; Park, Kang Seo

    2013-09-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  5. Graves' Disease that Developed Shortly after Surgery for Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hea Min Yu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder that may present with various clinical manifestations of hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease have a greater number of thyroid nodules and a higher incidence of thyroid cancer compared with patients with normal thyroid activity. However, cases in which patients are diagnosed with recurrence of Graves' disease shortly after partial thyroidectomy for thyroid cancer are very rare. Here we report a case of hyperthyroid Graves' disease that occurred after partial thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid cancer. In this case, the patient developed hyperthyroidism 9 months after right hemithyroidectomy, and antithyroglobulin autoantibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor stimulating autoantibody were positive. Therefore, we diagnosed Graves' disease on the basis of the laboratory test results and thyroid ultrasonography findings. The patient was treated with and maintained on antithyroid drugs. The mechanism of the recurrence of Graves' disease in this patient is still unclear. The mechanism may have been the improper response of the immune system after partial thyroidectomy. To precisely determine the mechanisms in Graves' disease after partial thyroidectomy, further studies based on a greater number of cases are needed.

  6. [The effect of Seguro Popular de Salud on catastrophic and impoverishing expenditures in Mexico, 2004-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Wong, Rebeca; Lugo-Palacios, David G; Méndez-Carniado, Oscar

    2018-01-01

    To determine the impact of Seguro Popular (SPS) on catastrophic and impoverishing household expenditures and on the financial protection of the Mexican health system. The propensity score matching (PSM) method was applied to the population affiliated to SPS to determine the program's attributable effect on health expenditure. This analysis uses the National Household Income and Expenditure Survey (ENIGH) during 2004-2012, conducted by Mexico's National Institute of Statistics andGeography (INEGI). It was found that SPS has a significant effect on reducing the likelihood that households will incur impoverishing expenditures. A negative effect on catastrophic expenditures was also found, but it was not statistically significant. This paper shows the effect that SPS, in particular health insurance, has as an instrument of financial protection. Future studies using longer periods of ENIGH data should analyze the persistence of high out-of-pocket expenditure.

  7. Death by Suicide in Graves' Disease and Graves' Orbitopathy: A Nationwide Danish Register Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferløv-Schwensen, Charlotte; Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-12-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is associated with excess morbidity and mortality, but little is known about unnatural manners of death and the potential relation with Graves' orbitopathy (GO). This study investigated the risk of unnatural death in Graves' patients with and without orbitopathy compared to matched control populations. This was a cohort study covering all adult Danes (≥18 years) diagnosed with GD or GO during 1995-2012. Median follow-up time was 7.9 years (range 0-17.5 years). Utilizing the Danish Register of Causes of Death and the Danish National Patient Registry, 28,461 subjects with GD and 3965 with GO were identified and matched for age and sex with four subjects from the background population. The manner of death was identified, and hazard ratios (HR) for mortality due to unnatural deaths (accident, suicide, violence/homicide, and unknown) were calculated using Cox regression analyses, adjusted for pre-existing somatic and psychiatric morbidity. In Graves' disease overall (GD + GO), there was an increased risk of death from unknown unnatural manners (HR = 2.01 [confidence interval (CI) 1.17-3.45], p = 0.012) and of suicide, although the latter difference was not with certainty statistically significant (HR = 1.43 [CI 1.00-2.04], p = 0.053). There was no significant difference in risk of death from suicide in GD subjects compared to their controls (HR = 1.27 [CI 0.85-1.89], p = 0.253). However, GO patients had a significantly higher risk of death from suicide (HR = 2.71 [CI 1.16-6.32], p = 0.022). Mortality by suicide was increased in Graves' disease overall, most significantly in patients with GO, also after adjustment for pre-existing somatic and psychiatric disease. These findings indicate that GD and GO may have a significant role in the pathophysiological mechanisms of suicidal behavior. Beyond independent confirmation, reasons for this need to be explored in order to introduce preventive measures.

  8. Impact of marriage on HIV/AIDS risk behaviors among impoverished, at-risk couples: A multilevel latent variable approach

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, JA; Nyamathi, A; Ullman, JB; Bentler, PM

    2007-01-01

    Studies among normative samples generally demonstrate a positive impact of marriage on health behaviors and other related attitudes. In this study, we examine the impact of marriage on HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and attitudes among impoverished, highly stressed, homeless couples, many with severe substance abuse problems. A multilevel analysis of 368 high-risk sexually intimate married and unmarried heterosexual couples assessed individual and couple-level effects on social support, substance us...

  9. Non-evidence-based policy: how effective is China's new cooperative medical scheme in reducing medical impoverishment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Winnie; Hsiao, William C

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, many lower to middle income countries have looked to insurance as a means to protect their populations from medical impoverishment. In 2003, the Chinese government initiated the New Cooperative Medical System (NCMS), a government-run voluntary insurance program for its rural population. The prevailing model of NCMS combines medical savings accounts with high-deductible catastrophic hospital insurance (MSA/Catastrophic). To assess the effectiveness of this approach in reducing medical impoverishment, we used household survey data from 2006 linked to claims records of health expenditures to simulate the effect of MSA/Catastrophic on reducing the share of individuals falling below the poverty line (headcount), and the amount by which household resources fall short of the poverty line (poverty gap) due to medical expenses. We compared the effects of MSA/Catastrophic to Rural Mutual Health Care (RMHC), an experimental model that provides first dollar coverage for primary care, hospital services and drugs with a similar premium but a lower ceiling. Our results show that RMHC is more effective at reducing medical impoverishment than NCMS. Under the internationally accepted poverty line of US$1.08 per person per day, the MSA/Catastrophic models would reduce the poverty headcount by 3.5-3.9% and the average poverty gap by 11.8-16.4%, compared with reductions of 6.1-6.8% and 15-18.5% under the RMHC model. The primary reason for this is that NCMS does not address a major cause of medical impoverishment: expensive outpatient services for chronic conditions. As such, health policymakers need first to examine the disease profile and health expenditure pattern of a population before they can direct resources to where they will be most effective. As chronic diseases impose a growing share of the burden on the population in developing countries, it is not necessarily true that insurance coverage focusing on expensive hospital care alone is the most effective at

  10. Maternal-related deaths and impoverishment among adolescent girls in India and Niger: findings from a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verguet, Stéphane; Nandi, Arindam; Filippi, Véronique; Bundy, Donald A P

    2016-09-26

    High levels of maternal mortality and large associated inequalities exist in low-income and middle-income countries. Adolescent pregnancies remain common, and pregnant adolescent women face elevated risks of maternal mortality and poverty. We examined the distribution across socioeconomic groups of maternal deaths and impoverishment among adolescent girls (15-19 years old) in Niger, which has the highest total fertility rate globally, and India, which has the largest number of maternal deaths. In Niger and India, among adolescent girls, we estimated the distribution per income quintile of: the number of maternal deaths; and the impoverishment, measured by calculating the number of cases of catastrophic health expenditure incurred, caused by complicated pregnancies. We also examined the potential impact on maternal deaths and poverty of increasing adolescent girls' level of education by 1 year. We used epidemiological and cost inputs sourced from surveys and the literature. The number of maternal deaths would be larger among the poorer adolescents than among the richer adolescents in Niger and India. Impoverishment would largely incur among the richer adolescents in Niger and among the poorer adolescents in India. Increasing educational attainment of adolescent girls might avert both a large number of maternal deaths and a significant number of cases of catastrophic health expenditure in the 2 countries. Adolescent pregnancies can lead to large equity gaps and substantial impoverishment in low-income and middle-income countries. Increasing female education can reduce such inequalities and provide financial risk protection and poverty alleviation to adolescent girls. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Concomitant Graves' disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, presenting as primary hypothyroidism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, C C

    2012-02-03

    Hypothyroidism in patients with Graves\\' disease is usually the result of ablative treatment. We describe a 58 year old man with Graves\\' ophthalmopathy and pre-tibial myxoedema, who presented with spontaneous primary hypothyroidism. Circulating TSH receptor antibody activity was increased, while thyroid microsomal antibody was detectable in titres greater than one in one hundred thousand. It is likely that the TSH receptor antibody of Graves\\' disease was ineffective in stimulating hyperthyroidism because of concomitant thyroid destruction due to Hashimoto\\'s disease. Alternatively, primary hypothyroidism could have resulted from the effects of a circulating TSH receptor blocking antibody.

  12. Standardization of 131I therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Jianlin; Li Yuying; Gao Liuyan; Tang Xiuping; Hu Hongyong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To establish the normative and standard measures, to ensure medical safety and quality of care of the patients with Graves disease treated by 131 I therapy. Methods: Formulating and strictly implementing the medical organizational and technical measures of 131 I therapy for Graves disease and regular follow-up. Results: Receiving 131 I treatment of 104 patients, follow-up 6-36 months, no adverse events, the cure rate of 59.6%, the efficient rate is 99.9%. Conclusion: It is important guarantee for the medical quality and safety to standardize the 131 I therapy of Graves disease. (authors)

  13. Immunoreactive 'TSH' in urinary concentrates of Graves' disease patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Herle, A.; Orgiazzi, J.; Greipel, M.A.; Slucher, J.A.; Honbo, K.S.; Hopital de l'Antiquaille, 69 - Lyon

    1978-01-01

    A double antibody radioimmunoassay was used to analyse immunoreactive thyrotrophin in urinary concentrates from fourteen patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease, in three subjects with primary hypothyroidism, and in six normal subjects. Immunoreactive thyrotrophin was detectable in eleven subjects with Graves' disease, in one subject with primary hypothyroidism, and in four normal subjects. The mean urinary thyrotrophin concentration was significantly higher in Graves' disease (492+-99.9μU/24h(SEM)(n=11)) than in normal subjects (177+-26.4μU/24h(SEM)(n=4)(P [de

  14. Persistent hyperthyroidism and de novo Graves' ophthalmopathy after total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Wei Lin; Loh, Wann Jia; Lee, Lianne Ai Ling; Chng, Chiaw Ling

    2017-01-01

    We report a patient with Graves' disease who remained persistently hyperthyroid after a total thyroidectomy and also developed de novo Graves' ophthalmopathy 5 months after surgery. She was subsequently found to have a mature cystic teratoma containing struma ovarii after undergoing a total hysterectomy and salpingo-oophorectomy for an incidental ovarian lesion. It is important to investigate for other causes of primary hyperthyroidism when thyrotoxicosis persists after total thyroidectomy.TSH receptor antibody may persist after total thyroidectomy and may potentially contribute to the development of de novo Graves' ophthalmopathy.

  15. Grave's disease associated with immunoglobulin A nephropathy: A rare association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, I; Bhat, R A; Khan, I; Hameed, I

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (Ig A) nephropathy is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis. The association of Ig A nephropathy with Grave's disease has not been reported so far. We report a case of 20-year-old female with Grave's disease who presented with edema, facial puffiness, and decreased urine output. She was found to be hypertensive with renal failure and nephrotic range proteinuria. Renal biopsy revealed features of Ig A nephropathy. The patient was treated with oral corticosteroids (1 mg/kg/day). To our knowledge, this is the first case showing association of Grave's disease with Ig A nephropathy.

  16. Factors affecting catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment from medical expenses in China: policy implications of universal health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Wu, Qunhong; Xu, Ling; Legge, David; Hao, Yanhua; Gao, Lijun; Ning, Ning; Wan, Gang

    2012-09-01

    To assess the degree to which the Chinese people are protected from catastrophic household expenditure and impoverishment from medical expenses and to explore the health system and structural factors influencing the first of these outcomes. Data were derived from the Fourth National Health Service Survey. An analysis of catastrophic health expenditure and impoverishment from medical expenses was undertaken with a sample of 55 556 households of different characteristics and located in rural and urban settings in different parts of the country. Logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of catastrophic health expenditure. The rate of catastrophic health expenditure was 13.0%; that of impoverishment was 7.5%. Rates of catastrophic health expenditure were higher among households having members who were hospitalized, elderly, or chronically ill, as well as in households in rural or poorer regions. A combination of adverse factors increased the risk of catastrophic health expenditure. Families enrolled in the urban employee or resident insurance schemes had lower rates of catastrophic health expenditure than those enrolled in the new rural corporative scheme. The need for and use of health care, demographics, type of benefit package and type of provider payment method were the determinants of catastrophic health expenditure. Although China has greatly expanded health insurance coverage, financial protection remains insufficient. Policy-makers should focus on designing improved insurance plans by expanding the benefit package, redesigning cost sharing arrangements and provider payment methods and developing more effective expenditure control strategies.

  17. Effect of abnormal thyroid function on the severity of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, M. F.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Mourits, M. P.; Koornneef, L.; Berghout, A.; van der Gaag, R.

    1990-01-01

    Many clinicians have the impression that treatment of thyroid dysfunction ameliorates ophthalmopathy in Graves' disease. The aim of our study was to relate thyroid function to the severity of Graves' ophthalmopathy. We studied 90 patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy and Graves' hyperthyroidism in

  18. Affective symptoms and cognitive functions in the acute phase of Graves' thyrotoxicosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Asmus; Elberling, Tina V; Hørding, Merete

    2007-01-01

    of cognitive deficits) had decreased significantly, with further normalisation 1-year after treatment initiation. In conclusion, patients had subjective reports of cognitive deficits in the toxic phase of Graves' thyrotoxicosis but comprehensive neuropsychological testing revealed no cognitive impairment......In the acute phase of Graves' thyrotoxicosis patients often have subjective cognitive complaints. Continuing controversy exists about the nature of these symptoms and whether they persist after treatment. This prospective study included 31 consecutively referred, newly diagnosed, and untreated....... No significant differences between the patient and the control group on neuropsychological test performances were found. Thyroid levels did not correlate with the neuropsychological test performances or psychiatric ratings. After reaching euthyroidism the level of affective symptoms (including reports...

  19. Development of Graves' disease following radiation therapy in Hodgkin's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeffler, J.S.; Tarbell, N.J.; Garber, J.R.; Mauch, P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation-related thyroid dysfunction is a common occurrence in patients with Hodgkin's disease treated with mantle field radiation. Although chemical and clinical hypothyroidism are most commonly seen, Graves' disease has also been described. We have examined the records of 437 surgically staged patients who received mantle field irradiation between April 1969 and December 1980 to ascertain the frequency of manifestations of Graves' disease. Within this group, seven patients developed hyperthyroidism accompanied by ophthalmic findings typical of those seen in Graves' disease. The actuarial risk of developing Graves' disease at 10 years following mantle irradiation for Hodgkin's disease was 3.3% in female patients and 1% in male patients in this study. The observed/expected ratios were 5.9 and 5.1 for female and male patients, respectively. This observed risk significantly exceeded that seen in the general population

  20. Graves' Disease Associated with Cerebrovascular Disease and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Khochtali

    2010-01-01

    have increased risk for developing thromboembolic accidents, which are favoured by a simultaneous presence of antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome. in this paper, we describe the case of a patient with Graves' disease, who developed strokes with antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome.

  1. Thyroid Function after Subtotal Thyroidectomy in Patients with Graves' Hyperthyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limonard, E. J.; Bisschop, P. H.; Fliers, E.; Nieveen van Dijkum, E. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Subtotal thyroidectomy is a surgical procedure, in which the surgeon leaves a small thyroid remnant in situ to preserve thyroid function, thereby preventing lifelong thyroid hormone supplementation therapy. Aim. To evaluate thyroid function after subtotal thyroidectomy for Graves'

  2. An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of psychiatric disturbances in graves disease in a medical college in eastern India. ... standard error of difference, the chi-square test, and paired Student's T-test. ... The common symptoms were insomnia, irritability, and anxiety.

  3. CASE REPORT : GRAVE'S DISEASE PRESENTING AS PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, S.K.; Hatwal, A.; Agarwal, J.K.; Bajpai, H.S.; Sharma, I.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY The case of a 37 year old male is described who initially presented as paranoid schizophrenia unresponsive to anti-psychotic drug treatment and subsequently developed features of Grave's disease. Treatment with carbimazole alone improved his psychiatric symptoms.

  4. Predictor factors in the effectiveness of the therapeutic dose in the Graves diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puscar, Ana

    2006-01-01

    The treatment of the Graves diseases includes different options, between which are the antithyroid drugs, 131 I and/or the surgery. Of all of them, the 131 I, it has been increasing the use through the years, going to constitute the treatment of election for many authors, due to the big effectiveness to obtain a rapid healing of this illness. On the other hand, controversies exist about this use, related about the administration doses of 131 I [es

  5. The observation of curative effects by therapy with low-dose 131I in younger with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Liqun; Li Lingling; Zhang Chenggang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the the curative effects in younger with Graves disease therapied by 131 I. Methods: The dose of 131 I is administrated with 1480-2220kBq/g of thyroid tissue which was decided by many factors that include the paticnt's Age, volume of thyroid, course and if antihyroid drug is administrated. The curative effects was classfide into four groups: complete remission, excellence, parts of remission, no effect. Results: 47 were complete remission, 34 were excellence, 10 were the parts of remission and 0 was no effects. The total effective power was 100%. Conclusions: Therapy with low-dose of mi for younger with Graves' disease is an effect, simple and safe method. Repeating treatment with 131 I will improve the curative rate of Graves' disease in younger, and the incidence of hypothyroidism cannot be increased. (authors)

  6. Study progress on free radicals and graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruiguo; Jin Jianhua

    2009-01-01

    Free radical-mediated oxidative injury has been closely implicated in the occurrence and development of many diseases. Graves disease was also accompanied by changes of the free radicals, especially for reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen, et al, and the oxidative stress can cause a certain degree of injury on the thyroid and other human important organs. Antithyroid drug and 131 I treatment of Graves disease, the oxidative and antioxidative parameters can also be changed. (authors)

  7. An evaluation of supervoltage orbital irradiation for Graves' opthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, C.S.; Crombie, A.L.; Hall, R.; Ross, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Twenty patients with moderately severe ophthalmopathy due to Graves' disease or ophtalmic Graves' disease were treated by supervoltage orbital radiotherapy generated by a linear accelerator. Seven patients (35%) showed some response within 3 weeks of the treatment, four patients (20%) improved minimally while nine patients (45%) were unchanged. Improvement was noted mainly in soft tissue changes while proptosis decreased in only four patients. With one exception, ophthalmoplegia did not improve after the radiotherapy. The benefit obtained with the treatment was not impressive. (author)

  8. Airway complication occurring during radioiodine treatment for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinuya, Seigo; Yoneyama, Tatsuya; Michigishi, Takatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Airway complications rarely occur in 131 I radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease. This study presents two cases in which 131 I therapy caused this acute complication. The patients complained of the symptom 6 h and 33 h after administration of 131 I. A histamine H1 receptor antagonist and hydrocortisone rapidly resolved symptoms in both cases. These two cases remind physicians that 131 I therapy for Graves' disease may cause potentially life-threatening complications. (author)

  9. Infección odontogénica grave: Posibles factores predictores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar García-Roco Pérez

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Se analizaron factores que pudieran predisponer a una infección odontogénica grave que requiera cuidados intensivos. Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo a 100 pacientes ingresados consecutivamente con infección odontogénica severa en el Hospital "Manuel Ascunce Domenech" de Camagüey desde 1999 al 2001. A partir de las historias clínicas se estudiaron diferentes variables que incluyeron parámetros médicos, sociales y procedimientos dentales previos. Se prestó particular atención al resultado de los cultivos bacterianos. La edad media de los 59 pacientes masculinos y 41 femeninos fue de 41 ± 15,8 años; 18 pacientes requirieron cuidados intensivos. El 41 % de los pacientes era de bajo nivel de escolaridad; 11 pacientes graves (61,1 % y 42 no graves (51,2 % eran fumadores. Dos pacientes (11,1 % de los graves y 8 (9,8 % de los no graves referían consumo excesivo de bebidas alcohólicas. La prevalencia de enfermedades crónicas fue mayor entre los no graves (31,7 %. La afección subyacente más común fue la osteítis periapical (70 % de los episodios infecciosos, seguido por la extracción dental en el 27,5 % de los graves y 10,9 % de los no graves. Ninguno de estos factores predijo la necesidad de cuidados intensivos. No existieron diferencias significativas en cuanto a síntomas, demora en solicitar atención médica, procedimientos dentales previos o terapéutica antimicrobiana. Predominaron los estreptococos aerobios (grupo S. milleri asociados con bacterias anaerobias variadas. No se encontraron variables sociales o clínicas predictoras de un curso grave en infecciones odontogénicas. Todos los pacientes deben ser cuidadosamente monitoreados para evitar complicaciones severas.Those factors that may predispose to a severe odontogenic infection requiring intensive care were analyzed. An observational descriptive study was conducted among 100 patients that were consecutively admitted with severe odontogenic infection at

  10. GRAVE: An Interactive Geometry Construction and Visualization Software System for the TORT Nuclear Radiation Transport Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakeman, E.D.

    2000-01-01

    A software system, GRAVE (Geometry Rendering and Visual Editor), has been developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to perform interactive visualization and development of models used as input to the TORT three-dimensional discrete ordinates radiation transport code. Three-dimensional and two-dimensional visualization displays are included. Display capabilities include image rotation, zoom, translation, wire-frame and translucent display, geometry cuts and slices, and display of individual component bodies and material zones. The geometry can be interactively edited and saved in TORT input file format. This system is an advancement over the current, non-interactive, two-dimensional display software. GRAVE is programmed in the Java programming language and can be implemented on a variety of computer platforms. Three- dimensional visualization is enabled through the Visualization Toolkit (VTK), a free-ware C++ software library developed for geometric and data visual display. Future plans include an extension of the system to read inputs using binary zone maps and combinatorial geometry models containing curved surfaces, such as those used for Monte Carlo code inputs. Also GRAVE will be extended to geometry visualization/editing for the DORT two-dimensional transport code and will be integrated into a single GUI-based system for all of the ORNL discrete ordinates transport codes

  11. Delineation of graves using electrical resistivity tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nero, Callistus; Aning, Akwasi Acheampong; Danuor, Sylvester K.; Noye, Reginald M.

    2016-03-01

    A suspected old royal cemetery has been surveyed at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) campus, Kumasi, Ghana using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) with the objective of detecting graves in order to make informed decisions with regard to the future use of the area. The survey was conducted on a 10,000 m2 area. Continuous Vertical Electrical Sounding (CVES) was combined with the roll along technique for 51 profiles with 1 m probe separation separated by 2 m. Inverted data results indicated wide resistivity variations ranging between 9.34 Ωm and 600 Ωm in the near surface. Such heterogeneity suggests a disturbance of the soil at this level. Both high (≥ 600 Ωm) and low resistivity (≤ 74.7 Ωm) anomalies, relative to background levels, were identified within the first 4 m of the subsurface. These were suspected to be burial tombs because of their rectangular geometries and resistivity contrasts. The results were validated with forward numerical modeling results. The study area is therefore an old cemetery and should be preserved as a cultural heritage site.

  12. Lymphocyte-platelet crosstalk in Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznik, Boris I; Vitkovsky, Yuri A; Gvozdeva, Olga V; Solpov, Alexey V; Magen, Eli

    2014-03-01

    Platelets can modulate lymphocytes' role in the pathophysiology of thyroid autoimmune diseases. The present study was performed to clarify the status of platelet-lymphocyte subpopulations aggregation in circulating blood in patients with Graves' disease (GD). One hundred and fifty patients with GD (GD group) and 45 hyperthyroid patients with toxic multinodular goiter (TMG group) were recruited in the study. Control group consisted 150 healthy subjects. Immunophenotyping of lymphocytes was performed by flow cytometry. Detection of lymphocyte-platelet aggregates (LPAs) was done using light microscope after Ficoll-gradient centrifugation. The group of GD patients exhibited reduced CD8 lymphocyte and higher CD19 cell counts compared with TMG group and healthy controls. A greater number of activated CD3, HLA-DR+ lymphocytes were observed in GD than in TMG group and control group. GD group was characterized by lower blood platelet count (232 ± 89 × 10 cells/µL) than TMG group (251 ± 97 × 10 cells/µL; P TMG group (116 ± 67/µL, P < 0.005) and control group (104 ± 58 /µL; P < 0.001). GD is associated with higher levels of activated lymphocytes and lymphocyte-platelet aggregates.

  13. Concurrence of Grave's disease and Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Takata, I; Taketani, T; Saida, K; Nakajima, H

    1977-01-01

    Early histological changes in the thyroid gland were examined in 30 patients with juvenile thyrotoxicosis, by means of needle biopsy. Based on the degree of lymphocytic infiltration and degenerative changes in follicular epithelium, results were classified into four groups. A: hyperplastic changes without cellular infiltration (6 patients, 20%); B: hyperplastic changes with areas of focal thyroiditis less than 30% of specimen (10 patients, 33%); C: those with 30 to 60% areas ot thyroiditis (10 patients, 33%); D: almost diffuse thyroiditis (4 patients, 13%). Moderate to severe lymphocytic thyroiditis was frequently present in the early stage of hyperplastic thyroid glands. The clinical significance of the 4 histological groups was evaluated. Neither clinical signs nor routine laboratory tests could differentiate these groups except group D, in which thyrotoxic signs were mild and transient. However, serum antithyroid antibodies tended to increase in accordance with severity of thyroiditis. The rate of remission was high in groups C and D, whereas relapse was frequent in group A. These results suggest that Grave's disease and chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis are closely related in the early stage of thyrotoxicosis in children, and that the clinical course may be considerably altered by the degree of associated thyroiditis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 3 PMID:580172

  14. Strategies of radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrinology, PET Center Klagenfurt, LKH Klagenfurt (Austria)

    2002-08-01

    Several therapeutic options are available for the treatment of Graves' disease (GD), including long-term antithyroid drug medication (ATD), near-total resection (NTR) and radioiodine therapy (RIT). These treatments are used with different frequencies depending on geographical location, size of the goitre, age of the patient and experience of the physician. It should be noted that RIT is still being applied more frequently in the United States than in Europe. Despite the fact that RIT was introduced as long ago as 1941, several questions are still the subject of debate: Should a fixed dose or a calculated dose be used. If the dose is calculated, how many Grays (Gy) should be delivered to the thyroid? What is the goal of RIT in GD? Which factors, including ATD, influence the outcome of RIT? Is RIT appropriate in GD with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO)? Although not all these questions have been answered yet, conclusions can be derived regarding a general strategy for use of RIT in GD. As with surgery, the goal of RIT in GD is euthyroidism with or without L-thyroxine medication. There is a clear advantage of dose calculation over use of a fixed dose because the only factor influencing the outcome is the dose delivered to a certain thyroid volume. To minimise recurrent hyperthyroidism, an ablative approach using a delivered dose of 250 Gy is widely accepted. Beside pretherapeutic T{sub 3} levels, thyroid volume and 24-h thyroid uptake, ATD may influence the outcome of RIT. Today it is accepted by most thyroidologists that, if ATD medication is necessary in overt hyperthyroidism, it should be withdrawn at least 2 days before RIT. In patients with GD and GO, RIT may worsen GO. If RIT is performed in GO it should be done under a 3-month steroid medication regimen. In conclusion, RIT can be considered an appropriate and cost-effective therapy in GD, although the decision regarding treatment should be taken on an individual basis, paying due respect to the course and

  15. Graves' disease in children: long-term outcomes of medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabon, Shona; Burton, Amy M; White, Perrin C

    2016-10-01

    Management options are limited for the treatment of Graves' disease, and there is controversy regarding optimal treatment. We describe the demographic and biochemical characteristics of children with Graves' disease and the outcomes of its management. This is a retrospective study reviewing medical records from 2001 to 2011 at a tertiary-care paediatric hospital. Diagnostic criteria included elevated free T4 and total T3, suppressed TSH, and either positive thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin or thyroid receptor antibodies or clinical signs suggestive of Graves' disease, for example exophthalmos. Patients were treated with antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine, or thyroidectomy. The main outcome measures were remission after medical therapy for at least 6 months and subsequent relapse. A total of 291 children met diagnostic criteria. A total of 62 were male (21%); 117 (40%) were Hispanic, 90 (31%) Caucasian, and 59 (20%) African American. Mean age (±standard deviation) at diagnosis was 12·3 ± 3·8 (range 3-18·5) years. At diagnosis, 268 patients were started on an antithyroid drug and 23 underwent thyroid ablation or thyroidectomy. Fifty-seven (21%) children achieved remission and 16 (28%) of these patients relapsed, almost all within 16 months. Gender and ethnicity did not affect rates of remission or relapse. Of 251 patients treated with methimazole, 53 (21%) had an adverse reaction, including rash, arthralgias, elevated transaminases, or neutropenia. Most children with Graves' disease treated with ATD do not experience remission, but most remissions do not end in relapse. Adverse reactions to methimazole are common but generally mild. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Diagnostic Utility of Contrast-enhanced 3D T1-weighted Imaging in Acute Cerebral Infarction Associated with Graves Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gon, Yasufumi; Sakaguchi, Manabu; Oyama, Naoki; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2017-02-01

    Graves disease is rarely complicated with cerebrovascular steno-occlusive diseases. Previous studies have suggested several hypotheses for this occurrence, including excess thyroid hormone, which stimulates the sympathetic nervous system, which in turn causes an abnormal hemodynamic response with consequent atherosclerotic changes, and antithyroid antibodies cause local vascular inflammation in patients with Graves disease. However, radiological findings of vasculitis in patients with Graves disease and cerebral infarction remain less known. We report the case of a 30-year-old Japanese woman with acute cerebral infarction due to vasculitis associated with Graves disease. She was admitted to our hospital with a 4-day history of intermittent transient dysarthria and limb shaking of the left leg when standing. Three weeks before admission, she went to a local hospital because of general malaise and was diagnosed with Graves disease. Neurological examination revealed paralytic dysarthria, left central facial nerve palsy, and left hemiparesis (manual muscle testing, 4 of 5). Blood examinations showed hyperthyroidism (thyroid-stimulating hormone ≤.010 µU/mL; free T3 ≥25.0 pg/mL; free T4 ≥8.0 ng/dL) and elevation of antithyroid antibody levels (thyroid peroxidase antibody, 87 IU/mL). The vessel wall of the right internal carotid artery was markedly enhanced on contrast-enhanced three-dimensional T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, suggesting vasculitis. Magnetic resonance angiography revealed right internal carotid artery occlusion after the branching ophthalmic artery. Arterial stenosis due to vasculitis was considered the cause of hemodynamic ischemic stroke. Vessel wall imaging such as high-resolution contrast-enhanced T1-weighted imaging seems useful for assessing the underlying mechanism of stroke in patients with Graves disease. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Antithyroid Drug Therapy for Graves' Disease and Implications for Recurrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jing; Xu, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism worldwide. Current therapeutic options for GD include antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine, and thyroidectomy. ATD treatment is generally well accepted by patients and clinicians due to some advantages including normalizing thyroid function in a short time, hardly causing hypothyroidism, and ameliorating immune disorder while avoiding radiation exposure and invasive procedures. However, the relatively high recurrence rate is a major concern for ATD treatment, which is associated with multiple influencing factors like clinical characteristics, treatment strategies, and genetic and environmental factors. Of these influencing factors, some are modifiable but some are nonmodifiable. The recurrence risk can be reduced by adjusting the modifiable factors as much as possible. The titration regimen for 12–18 months is the optimal strategy of ATD. Levothyroxine administration after successful ATD treatment was not recommended. The addition of immunosuppressive drugs might be helpful to decrease the recurrence rate of GD patients after ATD withdrawal, whereas further studies are needed to address the safety and efficacy. This paper reviewed the current knowledge of ATD treatment and mainly focused on influencing factors for recurrence in GD patients with ATD treatment. PMID:28529524

  18. Resituating the ethical gaze: government morality and the local worlds of impoverished Indigenous women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline L. Tait

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Over generations, government policies have impacted upon the lives of Indigenous peoples of Canada in unique and often devastating ways. In this context, Indigenous women who struggle with poverty, mental illness, trauma and substance abuse are among the most vulnerable, as are Indigenous children involved in child welfare systems. Objective. By examining the life history of Wanda, a First Nations woman, this article examines the intergenerational role that government policies play in the lives of impoverished Indigenous women and their families. Questions of moral governance and responsibility and the need for ethical policies are raised. Design. The life narrative presented in this article is part of a larger qualitative research programme that has collected over 100 life histories of Indigenous women with addictions and who have involvement with the child welfare system, as children or adults. Wanda’s life story exemplifies the impact of government policies that is characteristic of vulnerable Indigenous women and draws attention to the lack of ethical standards in government policymaking in child welfare, public health and mental health/addictions. Results. The path to recovery for Canadian Indigenous women in need of treatment for co-occurring mental disorders and substance addiction is too frequently characterized by an inadequate and ever shifting continuum of care. For those who feel intimidated, suspicious or have simply given up on seeking supports, a profound invisibility or forgetting of their struggle exists in areas of government policy and programming provision. Living outside the scope of mental health and addiction priorities, they become visible to the human service sector only if they become pregnant, their parenting draws the attention of child and family services (CFS, they need emergency health care, or are in trouble with the law. The intergenerational cycle of substance abuse, mental illness and poverty is

  19. Out-of-pocket healthcare payments on chronic conditions impoverish urban poor in Bangalore, India

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    Bhojani Upendra

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The burden of chronic conditions is on the rise in India, necessitating long-term support from healthcare services. Healthcare, in India, is primarily financed through out-of-pocket payments by households. Considering scarce evidence available from India, our study investigates whether and how out-of-pocket payments for outpatient care affect individuals with chronic conditions. Methods A large census covering 9299 households was conducted in Bangalore, India. Of these, 3202 households that reported presence of chronic condition were further analysed. Data was collected using a structured household-level questionnaire. Out-of-pocket payments, catastrophic healthcare expenditure, and the resultant impoverishment were measured using a standard technique. Results The response rate for the census was 98.5%. Overall, 69.6% (95%CI=68.0-71.2 of households made out-of-pocket payments for outpatient care spending a median of 3.2% (95%CI=3.0-3.4 of their total income. Overall, 16% (95%CI=14.8-17.3 of households suffered financial catastrophe by spending more than 10% of household income on outpatient care. Occurrence and intensity of financial catastrophe were inequitably high among poor. Low household income, use of referral hospitals as place for consultation, and small household size were associated with a greater likelihood of incurring financial catastrophe. The out-of-pocket spending on chronic conditions doubled the number of people living below the poverty line in one month, with further deepening of their poverty. In order to cope, households borrowed money (4.2% instances, and sold or mortgaged their assets (0.4% instances. Conclusions This study provides evidence from India that the out-of-pocket payment for chronic conditions, even for outpatient care, pushes people into poverty. Our findings suggest that improving availability of affordable medications and diagnostics for chronic conditions, as well as strengthening the

  20. Out-of-pocket healthcare payments on chronic conditions impoverish urban poor in Bangalore, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhojani, Upendra; Thriveni, Bs; Devadasan, Roopa; Munegowda, Cm; Devadasan, Narayanan; Kolsteren, Patrick; Criel, Bart

    2012-11-16

    The burden of chronic conditions is on the rise in India, necessitating long-term support from healthcare services. Healthcare, in India, is primarily financed through out-of-pocket payments by households. Considering scarce evidence available from India, our study investigates whether and how out-of-pocket payments for outpatient care affect individuals with chronic conditions. A large census covering 9299 households was conducted in Bangalore, India. Of these, 3202 households that reported presence of chronic condition were further analysed. Data was collected using a structured household-level questionnaire. Out-of-pocket payments, catastrophic healthcare expenditure, and the resultant impoverishment were measured using a standard technique. The response rate for the census was 98.5%. Overall, 69.6% (95%CI=68.0-71.2) of households made out-of-pocket payments for outpatient care spending a median of 3.2% (95%CI=3.0-3.4) of their total income. Overall, 16% (95%CI=14.8-17.3) of households suffered financial catastrophe by spending more than 10% of household income on outpatient care. Occurrence and intensity of financial catastrophe were inequitably high among poor. Low household income, use of referral hospitals as place for consultation, and small household size were associated with a greater likelihood of incurring financial catastrophe.The out-of-pocket spending on chronic conditions doubled the number of people living below the poverty line in one month, with further deepening of their poverty. In order to cope, households borrowed money (4.2% instances), and sold or mortgaged their assets (0.4% instances). This study provides evidence from India that the out-of-pocket payment for chronic conditions, even for outpatient care, pushes people into poverty. Our findings suggest that improving availability of affordable medications and diagnostics for chronic conditions, as well as strengthening the gate keeping function of the primary care services are important

  1. Resituating the ethical gaze: government morality and the local worlds of impoverished Indigenous women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Caroline L

    2013-01-01

    Over generations, government policies have impacted upon the lives of Indigenous peoples of Canada in unique and often devastating ways. In this context, Indigenous women who struggle with poverty, mental illness, trauma and substance abuse are among the most vulnerable, as are Indigenous children involved in child welfare systems. By examining the life history of Wanda, a First Nations woman, this article examines the intergenerational role that government policies play in the lives of impoverished Indigenous women and their families. Questions of moral governance and responsibility and the need for ethical policies are raised. The life narrative presented in this article is part of a larger qualitative research programme that has collected over 100 life histories of Indigenous women with addictions and who have involvement with the child welfare system, as children or adults. Wanda's life story exemplifies the impact of government policies that is characteristic of vulnerable Indigenous women and draws attention to the lack of ethical standards in government policymaking in child welfare, public health and mental health/addictions. The path to recovery for Canadian Indigenous women in need of treatment for co-occurring mental disorders and substance addiction is too frequently characterized by an inadequate and ever shifting continuum of care. For those who feel intimidated, suspicious or have simply given up on seeking supports, a profound invisibility or forgetting of their struggle exists in areas of government policy and programming provision. Living outside the scope of mental health and addiction priorities, they become visible to the human service sector only if they become pregnant, their parenting draws the attention of child and family services (CFS), they need emergency health care, or are in trouble with the law. The intergenerational cycle of substance abuse, mental illness and poverty is commonly associated with child welfare involvement

  2. Factores de Risco da Asma Grave

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    N. Adel

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: Apesar da rápida progressão do conhecimento da fisiopatologia da asma e da larga difusão de meios terapêuticos de eficácia acrescida, observase um aumento da morbalidade e da morbildade da asma em numerosos paises, em particular nos paises industrialtzados, por razões ainda pouco conhecidas Estes factos permitem questionar o funcionamento do sistema de cuidados de saúde e a difusão dos progressos terapêuticos na população asmática. Os autores definem o concetto de asma aguda grave, salientando dois tipos: o tipo 1, de «instalação progressiva» em algumas horas ou dtas eo upo 2 de «instalação brutal» em menos de três horas Os factores de risco para cada urn deles parecem ser diferentes.Os autores fazem uma revisão dos factores de risco da asma grave, tendo em conta as caracterisucas individuais do doente, os factores ambientats e a intervenção da sociedade.Em relação aos factores individuais como a idade e o sexo, verificase que na infância, as taxas de internarmento por asma são mais elevadas no sexo masculino, sendo no total de internamentos em todas as idades, mais elevadas no sexo feminino e em doentes com internamentos anteriores por asma. O aumento da mortalidade por asma atinge em particular os doentes jovens economicamente desfavorecidos, pela dificuldade no acesso aos cuidados de saúde e na compra dos medicamentos, por utilizarem com menor frequência os tratamentos de crise e de fundo. Os factores psicológicos podem predispor à morte por asma no adolescente, sendo relevantes a subvalo-rização e a negação da doença por parte do doente ou da família Verificase por outro lado, um aumento da prevalência da depressão e do desespero nas cnanças com asma grave. As reacçõs psicológicas face a acontecimentos negauvos, como a morte de um ente próximo, a perda de emprego, conflitos familiares, provocam maior

  3. Miastenia grave ocular Severe ocular myastenia

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    Yaimir Estevéz Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La miastenia grave es una enfermedad autoinmune de la unión neuromuscular que se caracteriza por la variabilidad de la debilidad muscular, que empeora o está provocada por el ejercicio del músculo o de los grupos musculares implicados, mientras que el descanso la mejora. La primera descripción de la enfermedad data de 1672, su relación con una afección del timo no se estableció hasta 1901. La enfermedad es poco frecuente, afecta a todas las etnias por igual, y no tiene predilección geográfica. Se reporta un paciente masculino de 28 años de edad atendido en el Servicio de Oftalmología Pediátrica del Instituto Cubano de Oftalmología "Ramón Pando Ferrer" por presentar visión doble, ptosis palpebral ligera en ojo derecho que empeora con el transcurso del día. Por el interrogatorio y el cuadro clínico se sospecha de una miastenia grave, se remite al clínico y el neurólogo. En los estudios realizados de neuroimágenes, tomografía y electroencefalograma no se encontraron alteraciones. Se decide valorar el caso con el servicio de Neuroftalmología de nuestro centro y por el Instituto de Neurología y es confirmado el diagnóstico.Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune illness of the neuromuscular joint that is characterized by the variability of the muscular weakness that worsens or caused by exercising of the muscle or the involved muscular groups; resting helps in improving the condition of the muscle. The first description of the illness dates back to 1672, but its linking to a thymus disorder was not discovered until 1901. This illness is not very frequent, affects equally to all the races, and it does not predominate in any particular geographic region. This paper presented a male patient aged 28 years who went to the Ophthalmologic Service at "Ramón Pando Ferrer" Cuban Institute of Ophthalmology because he suffered from double vision, slight palpebral ptosis in his right eye that became worse as the day went by. After the

  4. Pretibial myxedema without ophthalmopathy: an initial presentation of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiya, Sheela; Lohiya, Vipin; Stahl, Elizabeth J

    2013-07-01

    To report a rare case of Graves' disease without ophthalmopathy presenting with pretibial myxedema (PM) as an initial presentation. We present the clinical history, physical findings, laboratory studies and biopsy data of a 62-year-old man with a history of uncontrolled type 2 diabetes (DM2) presenting with arm and leg skin lesions in the absence of other physical findings. Histopathology confirmed PM. Graves' disease and its association with PM without Graves' ophthalmopathy and the pertinent literature are reviewed. A 60-year-old man with a history of uncontrolled DM2 presented for glycemic management. He described symptoms of anxiety, insomnia and fatigue for the last 5 to 6 months. He described diffuse chest pain, occasionally associated with palpitations, and a 50-pound weight loss. He also complained of severe itching and burning of his arms and legs for the past several months. Subsequent thyroid studies revealed hyperthyroidism suggestive of Graves' disease. In the interim, he was hospitalized for atrial flutter and was cardioverted. After being started on methimazole, his symptoms abated. His skin lesions were biopsied, and the leg biopsy was consistent with PM. He however had no lid lag or proptosis characteristic of Graves' disease. He subsequently underwent radioiodine ablation. His hyperglycemia was better control led after treatment of his hyperthyroidism. PM is an autoimmune manifestation of Graves' disease. Almost all cases of thyroid dermopathy are associated with relatively severe ophthalmopathy. Usually ophthalmopathy appears first and dermopathy much later. However, this case represents a rare initial presentation of Graves' disease with PM without ophthalmologic symptoms or findings. Hyperthyroidism is typically associated with worsening glycemic control and increased insulin requirements. In patients with diabetes having hyperthyroidism, deterioration in glycemic control should be anticipated and treatment should be adjusted accordingly

  5. Graves' disease: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges (multimedia activity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Grebe, Stefan K G; Lupo, Mark A; McDonald, Nicole; Sipos, Jennifer A

    2011-06-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the United States. Graves' disease occurs more often in women with a female:male ratio of 5:1 and a population prevalence of 1% to 2%. A genetic determinant to the susceptibility to Graves' disease is suspected because of familial clustering of the disease, a high sibling recurrence risk, the familial occurrence of thyroid autoantibodies, and the 30% concordance in disease status between identical twins. Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by the infiltration of immune effector cells and thyroid antigen-specific T cells into the thyroid and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor expressing tissues, with the production of autoantibodies to well-defined thyroidal antigens, such as thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin, and the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor is central to the regulation of thyroid growth and function. Stimulatory autoantibodies in Graves' disease activate the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor leading to thyroid hyperplasia and unregulated thyroid hormone production and secretion. Below-normal levels of baseline serum thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, normal to elevated serum levels of T4, elevated serum levels of T3 and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor autoantibodies, and a diffusely enlarged, heterogeneous, hypervascular (increased Doppler flow) thyroid gland confirm diagnosis of Graves' disease (available at: http://supplements.amjmed.com/2010/hyperthyroid/faculty.php). This Resource Center is also available through the website of The American Journal of Medicine (www.amjmed.com). Click on the “Thyroid/Graves' Disease” link in the “Resource Centers” section, found on the right side of the Journal homepage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. I-131 Treatment of Graves' Disease in an Unsuspected First Trimester Pregnancy; the Potential for Adverse Effects on the Fetus and a Review of the Current Guidelines for Pregnancy Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phuong Tran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a thyroid-specific autoimmune disorder in which the body makes antibodies to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor leading to hyperthyroidism. Therapeutic options for the treatment of Graves' disease include medication, radioactive iodine ablation, and surgery. Radioactive iodine is absolutely contraindicated in pregnancy as exposure to I-131 to the fetal thyroid can result in fetal hypothyroidism and cretinism. Here we describe a case of a female patient with recurrent Graves' disease, who inadvertently received I-131 therapy when she was estimated to be eight days pregnant. This was despite the obtaining of a negative history of pregnancy and a negative urine pregnancy test less than 24 hours prior to ablation. At birth, the infant was found to have neonatal Graves' disease. The neonatal Graves' disease resolved spontaneously. It was suspected that the fetal thyroid did not trap any I-131 as it does not concentrate iodine until 10 weeks of gestation.

  7. I-131 Treatment of Graves' Disease in an Unsuspected First Trimester Pregnancy; the Potential for Adverse Effects on the Fetus and a Review of the Current Guidelines for Pregnancy Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrett Mark

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a thyroid-specific autoimmune disorder in which the body makes antibodies to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor leading to hyperthyroidism. Therapeutic options for the treatment of Graves' disease include medication, radioactive iodine ablation, and surgery. Radioactive iodine is absolutely contraindicated in pregnancy as exposure to I-131 to the fetal thyroid can result in fetal hypothyroidism and cretinism. Here we describe a case of a female patient with recurrent Graves' disease, who inadvertently received I-131 therapy when she was estimated to be eight days pregnant. This was despite the obtaining of a negative history of pregnancy and a negative urine pregnancy test less than 24 hours prior to ablation. At birth, the infant was found to have neonatal Graves' disease. The neonatal Graves' disease resolved spontaneously. It was suspected that the fetal thyroid did not trap any I-131 as it does not concentrate iodine until 10 weeks of gestation.

  8. Dr Google: The readability and accuracy of patient education websites for Graves' disease treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, Amanda C; Idriss, Almoatazbellah; Ahern, Susan; Lin, Elizabeth; Elfenbein, Dawn M

    2017-11-01

    National guidelines emphasize the importance of incorporating patient preferences into the recommendations for the treatment of Graves' disease. Many patients use the Internet to obtain health information, and search results can affect their treatment decisions. This study compares the readability and accuracy of patient-oriented online resources for the treatment of Graves' disease by website affiliation and treatment modality. A systematic Internet search was used to identify the top websites discussing the treatment of Graves' disease. Readability was measured using 5 standardized tests. Accuracy was assessed by a blinded, expert panel, which scored the accuracy of sites on a scale of 1 to 5. Mean readability and accuracy scores were compared among website affiliations and treatment modalities. We identified 13 unique websites, including 2 academic, 2 government, 5 nonprofit, and 4 private sites. There was a difference in both readability (mean 13.2, range 9.1-15.7, P = .003) and accuracy (mean 4.04, range 2.75-4.50, P = .019) based on website affiliation. Government sites (mean readability 11.1) were easier to read than academic (14.3, P < .01), nonprofit (13.9, P < .01), and private sites (13.5, P < .05). Academic sites (mean accuracy 4.50) were more accurate than private sites (3.56, P < .05). Online patient resources for the treatment of Graves' disease are written at an inappropriately high reading level. Academic sites contain both the most accurate and the most difficult to read information. Private sites represented the majority of our top results but contained the least accurate information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Both interleukin-23A polymorphism and serum interlukin-23 expression are associated with Graves' disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huiying; Tao, Feng; Liu, Changqin; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Shu; Cui, Bin; Ning, Guang

    2015-03-01

    Two independent Chinese cohorts were used to study the genetic association between the interleukin-23A (IL-23A) gene polymorphism (rs11171806) and susceptibility to Graves' disease (GD). The initial Shanghai cohort consisted of 712 unrelated patients with GD and 705 healthy control subjects, and the replication cohort from Xiamen Island included 433 patients with GD and 410 healthy control subjects. The serum concentration of IL-23 in GD patients was measured significantly higher than in health controls. Moreover in the subgroup analysis, higher concentrations of IL-23 were identified in patients of older age (⩾40 years) and female gender. We also performed an association study with the IL-23 gene polymorphism rs11171806 in both cohorts, in Shanghai cohorts, the frequencies of rs11171806 alleles were strongly different between Graves' disease patients (G 95.7% and A 4.3%) and healthy controls (G 97.7% and A 2.3%) (P=2.6×10(-3), OR=1.93 (95% CI: 1.25-2.97)), and in Xiamen cohorts, the proportion of individuals carrying the A allele of rs11171806 was the same significantly higher in Graves' disease patients than in controls [Graves' disease vs. control, 4.8% vs. 4.3%, OR=2.15 (95% CI: 1.23-3.79), P(allele)=6.3×10(-3)]. The distribution of rs11171806 genotype was also investigated in subgroups according to the age and gender. All of these findings suggested that IL-23 may play an important role in the development of GD, and the IL-23A gene is a genetic risk marker for GD in Han Chinese population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Related factors of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy in patents with Graves' disease after 131I treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Lian; Lu Keyi; Chen Xia; Zhao Deshan; Liu Jianzhong; Li Sijin; Li Xianfeng; Sun Bin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To analysis the related factors of thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy(TAO) in patients with Graves' disease after 131 I treatment. Methods: Five hundred and sixty two patients with Graves' disease were followed up after 131 I treatment, included 243 cases with TAO and 319 cases without TAO. Logistic multivariate regression analysis was used to analyse the data of the improvement of the TAO, stability and progression. Results: Of the patients without TAO, 10 new cases of TAO were diagnosed (3.13%). Of the patients with TAO, 134 (55.14%) had experienced improvement, 99 (40.74%) cases with stable disease and 10 (4.12%) cases with progressed disease. The progression rate were no difference between the part of patients with and without TAO (χ 2 =0.576, P>0.05), and were difference between simple and invasive prominent eyes groups (χ 2 =11.893, P 2 =10.621, P 131 I therapy had no obviously influence between Graves' disease with and without TAO, and early controling the risk factors and treatment with glucocorticoid could prevent aggravation of TAO. (authors)

  11. Chronology of the Third – Fifth Centuries Male Graves from the Tarasovo Burial Ground

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    Goldina Rimma D.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the chronological attribution of male graves from the late Mazunino stage of the Tarasovo burial ground and is a sequel to an earlier article about dating of the early Nyrgynda stage (1st – 2nd centuries of the same site. The three main methods employed in this research include those of formal typology, cultural stratigraphy and the nearest neighbor method. Eighty-six male graves of the third-fifth centuries were analyzed, with 12 identified as a result: first half of the 3rd c. AD (group 1, second half of the 3rd c. AD (2; 3rd c. (3; first half of the 4th c. (group 4; second half of the 3rd – 4th c. (5; third quarter of the 4th c. (6; fourth quarter of the 4th c. (group 7; second half of the 4th c. (8; second half of the 4th – 5th c. (9; 4th – 5th cc. (10; second half of the 3rd – 5th cc. (11 and 3rd – 5th cc. (12. This article minutes investigates the first six groups, while the rest will be covered in the next publication. Artifacts form the third – fifth century female graves of the Tarasovo burial ground will be studied separately.

  12. Apoptotic study in Graves disease treated with thyroid arterial embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Wei; Gao Bulang; Yi Genfa

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate apoptosis in the thyroid of Graves disease (GD) induced by thyroid arterial embolization. Forty one patients with clinically and laboratorily ascertained GD were treated with thyroid arterial embolization and followed up for 3-54 months following embolization. Prior to embolization and at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 36 months following embolization, thyroid autoimmune antibodies were tested respectively, including thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb), thyroglobulin antibody (TGAb) and thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb). Thyroid biopsy was performed under the guidance of computed tomography for immunohistochemistry examination using semi-quantity analysis. The positive staining of Fas and FasL was mostly in the cytoplasma and cell membrane, the positive expression of Bax was mainly in the cytoplasma, and no positive expression of P53 was detected in the thyroid cells before embolization. After arterial embolziation, the positive cell number and staining degree of these genes were both greater than before embolization. The treatment method of thyroid arterial embolization can effectively enhance the positive expression of pro-apoptotic genes of Fas, FasL, Bax, Bcl-2 and P53 in GD thyroid, thus promoting apoptosis of GD thyroid and helping restore the thyroid size and function to normal conditions. (author)

  13. Significance of changes of serum TPOAb and TRAb levels in patients with Graves' disease (GD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhongshu Xu Ruiji; Wang Guohong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the significance of changes of serum TPOAb and TRAb levels in patients with Graves' dis- ease (GD). Methods: Serum TPOAb (with RIA) and TRAb (with RRA) levels were determined in 27 patients with Graves' disease, before treatment 10 patients with Graves' disease clinically cured and 35 controls. Results: The serum levels and positive rates of TPOAb and TRAb in patients with Graves' disease before treatment were significantly higher than those in the patients with Graves' disease clinically cured and controls (P<0.01). Conclusion: TPOAb and TRAb were involved in the pathogenesis of Graves' dis- ease and could be used as diagnostic and treatment indicators. (authors)

  14. Epidemiological survey of graves' disease in Tianjin area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shuo; Fang Peihua; Lai Zemin; Chen Bingzhong; Lu Tizhang; Zhou Yinbao; Tan Jian; Ni Xiaoyan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the incidence of Graves' disease and associated factors. Methods: From 1997.4 to 1999.12, by using cluster and stratified sampling, total of 31530 people aged 6 years and over were surveyed epidemiologically for Graves' disease in five districts and one county of Tianjin area where the study subjects had been resided for at least one year. The researching team consisted of endocrinologists, epidemiologists and technicians and was divided into three branches, they served as investigators, professional experts and technicians, respectively. The serum thyroid hormones, thyroid antibodies, iodine in table salt, urine iodine and B-US were examined for the suspected cases, the final diagnoses were concluded by the professional experts. Results: Eighty-nine patients with Graves' disease were confirmed, 26 (0.166%) of them were males and 63(0.397%) of them were females, the total incidence was 0.282%. The incidence significantly associated with sex (female higher than male, P<0.001), age (50-60 group for male and 30-40 group for female higher than others, P<0.001) and family history (the patients with vs without family history, P<0.001). The survey showed an ascending trend of incidence of Graves' disease, along with decreasing of goiter rate and increasing of iodine contents in table salt and in urine. Further research work should be pursued. Conclusion: This study may provide some theoretical basis for prevention and treatment of Graves' disease

  15. Hickam's dictum: Myasthenia Gravis presenting concurrently with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Shekhar; Rebello, Roshan; Wolmarans, Louise; Elston, Marianne

    2017-09-07

    We present two patients with Graves' disease and concurrent myasthenia gravis. The impact of the dual diagnosis on the clinical course and the potential for a delayed diagnosis of myasthenia gravis is discussed. Patient 1, a 28-year-old man was diagnosed with Graves' disease following his second respiratory arrest. His history was strongly suggestive of a second pathology. Patient 2, a 66-year-old Cantonese woman with established Graves' disease presented with thionamide-related neutropaenia. Examination revealed bilateral ptosis and right lateral rectus palsy. Both patients had thyrotoxicosis secondary to Graves' disease with concurrent myasthenia gravis. Although neuromuscular weakness is common in Graves' disease, coexisting myasthenia gravis (MG) is rare and can cause profound morbidity. Ocular signs in both diseases may cause diagnostic confusion although ptosis suggests coexisting MG. In both cases, the thyrotoxicosis delayed the diagnosis of MG. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Vitamin D and Graves' disease: a meta-analysis update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mei-Yan; Cao, Bing; Yin, Jian; Wang, Dong-Fang; Chen, Kai-Li; Lu, Qing-Bin

    2015-05-21

    The association between vitamin D levels and Graves' disease is not well studied. This update review aims to further analyze the relationship in order to provide an actual view of estimating the risk. We searched for the publications on vitamin D and Graves' disease in English or Chinese on PubMed, EMBASE, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Biology Medical and Wanfang databases. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for the vitamin D levels. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% CI were calculated for vitamin D deficiency. We also performed sensitivity analysis and meta-regression. Combining effect sizes from 26 studies for Graves' disease as an outcome found a pooled effect of SMD = -0.77 (95% CI: -1.12, -0.42; p Graves' disease were more likely to be deficient in vitamin D compared to the controls (OR = 2.24, 95% CI: 1.31, 3.81) with a high heterogeneity (I2 = 84.1%, p Graves' disease.

  17. Transient hypothyroidism after 131I treatment of Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianfeng; Fang Yi; Zhang Xiuli; Ye Genyao; Xing Jialiu; Zhang Youren

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results of the transient hypothyroidism after 131 I treatment of Graves disease. Methods: A total of 32 transient hypothyroidism patients treated with 131 I for Graves disease were studied and followed up. Results: Transient hypothyroidism occurred within 2-6 months after 131 I treatment and 19 patients were symptomatic. At diagnosis of transient hypothyroidism, T 3 and T 4 levels were decreased had normal, TSH levels were increased, normal or low. Follow-up examination found that 20 patients were normal and 12 patients had relapse of hyperthyroidism. Conclusions: Therapy of Graves disease with low doses of 131 I causes a high incidence of transient hypothyroidism. After recovery of transient hypothyroidism, some patients have relapse of hyperthyroidism

  18. Radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinyoun, J.L.; Kalina, R.E.; Brower, S.A.; Mills, R.P.; Johnson, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that orbital irradiation for Graves' ophthalmopathy is sometimes beneficial, particularly for dysthyroid optic neuropathy, and is not associated with serious complications. We are aware, however, of four patients who were found to have radiation retinopathy after orbital irradiation for Grave's ophthalmopathy. All four patients have decreased central acuity, and three of the four are legally blind in one or both eyes. Computer reconstruction of the dosimetry, based on computed tomography and beam profiles, shows that errors in dosage calculations and radiotherapy technique probably account for the radiation retinopathy in three of the four patients. Radiotherapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy should be administered only by competent radiotherapists who are experienced in the treatment of this disease. Similar errors in dosage calculations and treatment techniques may account for other reports of radiation retinopathy after reportedly safe dosages

  19. Esclerodermia, tireoidite e miastenia grave: estudo de um caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio L. dos Santos Werneck

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available Uma paciente de 36 anos com miastenia grave desenvolveu após dois anos intolerância ao frio, o que conduziu ao diagnóstico de tireoidite de Hashimoto. Quatro anos mais tarde apresentou pele espessada nas mãos (esclerodermia limitada. O quadro clínico e os exames complementares encaminharam o diagnóstico para a forma CREST de esclerodermia sistêmica progressiva. Discute-se a dificuldade diagnóstica da esclerodermia, assim como suas síndromes de superposição. Doença de Hashimoto e miastenia grave constituem associação pouco frequente. A presença de esclerodermia e miastenia grave é rara. Não encontramos na literatura a coincidência destas três doenças.

  20. Clinical experience of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagashima, Hisako; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Murata, Osamu; Ishizeki, Kei; Shimaya, Sanae; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo [Gunma Univ., Maebashi (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-11-01

    The effect of radiation therapy for Graves` ophthalmopathy was evaluated. Ten patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy were treated with radiation therapy between 1992 and 1993 in Gunma University Hospital. All patients had a past history of hyperthyroidism and received 2,000 cGy to the retrobulbar tissues in 20 fractions. Nine of ten patients were treated with radiation therapy after the failure of corticosteroids. Six patients (60%) showed good or excellent responses. The exophthalmos type was more responsive to radiation therapy than the double vision type in this series. Two of five patients with the exophthalmos type demonstrated excellent responses, and their symptoms disappeared almost completely. The improvement of symptoms appeared within 3-6 months, and obvious clinical effects were demonstrated after 6 months of radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and we have not observed any side effects of radiation therapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy is effective treatment for Graves` ophthalmopathy. (author)

  1. Clinical experience of radiation therapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Takeo; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Nagashima, Hisako; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Murata, Osamu; Ishizeki, Kei; Shimaya, Sanae; Hayakawa, Kazushige; Niibe, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    The effect of radiation therapy for Graves' ophthalmopathy was evaluated. Ten patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with radiation therapy between 1992 and 1993 in Gunma University Hospital. All patients had a past history of hyperthyroidism and received 2,000 cGy to the retrobulbar tissues in 20 fractions. Nine of ten patients were treated with radiation therapy after the failure of corticosteroids. Six patients (60%) showed good or excellent responses. The exophthalmos type was more responsive to radiation therapy than the double vision type in this series. Two of five patients with the exophthalmos type demonstrated excellent responses, and their symptoms disappeared almost completely. The improvement of symptoms appeared within 3-6 months, and obvious clinical effects were demonstrated after 6 months of radiotherapy. Radiation therapy was well tolerated, and we have not observed any side effects of radiation therapy. In conclusion, radiation therapy is effective treatment for Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author)

  2. F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boerner, A.R.; Voth, E.; Schicha, H.; Wienhard, K.; Wagner, R.

    1998-01-01

    This study evaluates F-18-FDG PET of the thyroid in Graves' disease. Methods: Thirty patients were investigated the day before radioiodine therapy, 15 patients 3-10 days after radioiodine therapy. Twenty patients with cancer of the head or neck and normal thyroid function served as controls. Results: F-18-FDG uptake was higher in Graves' disease patients than in controls. Negative correlations of F-18-FDG uptake with half-life of radioiodine and absorbed radiation dose due to radioiodine therapy were found along with a positive correlation to autoantibody levels. Conclusion: Thus F-18-FDG PET is likely to give information on the biological activity of Graves' disease as well as on early radiation effects. (orig.) [de

  3. A case of severe autoimmune hepatitis associated with Graves' disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia Abdulla Bokhari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a common condition and is known to have a wide range of effects on a variety of organs. Hepatic dysfunction ranging from mild to severe due to direct effect of high circulating thyroid hormones as well as a deleterious effect of antithyroid medications (methimazole and propylthiouracil has been well - documented in literature. However, severe autoimmune hepatitis (AIH associated with Graves' disease is rare and limited to few case reports only. A 38-year-old woman presented with abdominal pain and yellowish discolouration of conjunctivae. On investigation, she was found to have Graves' disease and AIH. The liver histopathology showed typical features of AIH. She responded excellently to glucocorticoid therapy with normalisation of thyroid function and liver histology. The case is discussed with relevant literature review.

  4. The Dynamics of Catastrophic and Impoverishing Health Spending in Indonesia: How Well Does the Indonesian Health Care Financing System Perform?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, Budi; Mohammed, Shafiu; Haque, Md Aminul; Allegri, Manuela De

    2017-09-01

    Our study examines the incidence and intensity of catastrophic and impoverishing health spending in Indonesia. A panel data set was used from 4 waves of the Indonesian Family Life Surveys 1993, 1997, 2000, and 2007. Catastrophic health expenditure was measured by calculating the ratio of out-of-pocket payments to household income. Then, we calculated poverty indicators as a measure of impoverishing spending in the health care financing system. Head count, overshoot, and mean positive overshoot for each given threshold in 2000 were lower than other surveyed periods; otherwise, fraction headcount in 2007 of households were the higher. Between 1993 and 2007, the percentage of households in poverty decreased, both in gross and net of health payments. However, in each year, the percentages of households in poverty using net health payments were higher than the gross. The estimates of poverty gap, normalized poverty gap, and normalized mean positive gap decreased across the survey periods. The health care financing system performance has shown positive evidence for financial protection offerings. A sound relationship between improvements of health care financing performance and the existing health reform demonstrated a mutual reinforcement, which should be maintained to promote equity and fairness in health care financing in Indonesia.

  5. Choosing a miracle: Impoverishment, mistrust, and discordant views in abandonment of treatment of children with cancer in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossell, Nuria; Challinor, Julia; Gigengack, Roy; Reis, Ria

    2017-09-01

    In El Salvador, at the only hospital offering pediatric oncology care, the number of children abandoning treatment for cancer has decreased in recent years (13%-3%). An investigation of caregivers' motives for abandonment was performed over 15 months from 2012 to 2014. Caregiver and health team perspectives on abandonment are reported using the explanatory model (EM) framework. Semistructured in-depth interviews and in hospital participant observations were conducted with caregivers of children diagnosed with cancer, who abandoned their child's treatment or were considering abandoning, and with members of the medical team. Of the 41 caregivers interviewed, 26 caregivers (of 19 children) abandoned their child's treatment, returned from a series of missed appointments, or showed a risk of abandoning. Caregivers of 8 children stated that a miraculous cure was the main reason for abandoning; increasing impoverishment and misgivings toward treatment and outcomes were also mentioned. The responses of the medical team demonstrated a discordant EM for the child's cancer and treatment effects and that only biomedical treatment was effective for cure. The caregivers' increasing impoverishment (not only financial) and misgivings about the child's treatment caused them to reconsider their therapeutic choices and rely on their belief in a miraculous cure, thus abandoning. The caregivers and medical team's discordant EM about the child's cancer and treatment must be acknowledged and shared decision making considered, together with consistency in the strategies that currently demonstrate to be effective decreasing abandonment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Impoverishing and dehumanising violence against women: An opportunity for service by churches in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah K. Tenai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An ongoing armed conflict in Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo continues to impoverish and dehumanise women. Sexual violence meted on women has negative consequences that affect whole communities. Churches nationally and in the region have not done enough to respond to the challenge of armed conflict in general and the nefariousness of sexual violence towards women in particular. By utilising the sustainable livelihoods framework, churches in the region can be re-positioned for a constructive advocacy response to armed conflict(s and sexual violence(s, particularly in solidarity with the women.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: This study is made feasible through extensive intradisciplinary and interdisciplinary research. The subject matter demands on the investigator the necessity to make use of the knowledge from across the socio-scientific spectrum to understand the ongoing conflict and its impact on the local people. The study entrenches an advocacy role on regional churches as a means to lend a voice to the vulnerable women, who are impoverished and dehumanised by and within the context of an armed conflict.

  7. La enfermedad de Graves, signos y síntomas

    OpenAIRE

    Young, P.; Finn, B. C.; Bruetman, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    La enfermedad de Graves es la causa más común de hipertiroidismo, es de patogenia autoinmune. Se distingue clínicamente de otras formas de hipertiroidismo por la presencia de bocio difuso, oftalmopatía y ocasionalmente mixedema pretibial. En este artículo describimos la vida y obra de Robert Graves, realizando posteriormente una revisión de los signos y síntomas de la enfermedad. En el mundo de la medicina actual, en donde la tecnología juega un rol preponderante, queremos recordar la importa...

  8. Dissociative disorder due to Graves' hyperthyroidism: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, Kaoru; Nishimura, Katsuji; Ichihara, Atsuhiro; Ishigooka, Jun

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 20-year-old Japanese woman with no psychiatric history with apparent dissociative symptoms. These consisted of amnesia for episodes of shoplifting behaviors and a suicide attempt, developing together with an exacerbation of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Patients with Graves' disease frequently manifest various psychiatric disorders; however, very few reports have described dissociative disorder due to this disease. Along with other possible causes, for example, encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroid disease, clinicians should be aware of this possibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Treating the thyroid in the presence of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo; Bonnema, Steen J; Smith, Terry J

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) remains enigmatic. Optimal therapeutic choices for the hyperthyroidism associated with Graves' disease (GD) in the presence of GO remain controversial. Whether antithyroid drugs (ATDs), radioiodine (RAI), or thyroidectomy should be favored in such patients...... - independent of extent - do not influence the natural course of GO. RAI can cause de novo development or progression of GO, which is largely preventable with oral steroid prophylaxis. In patients with mild GO, the thyroid treatment is largely independent of GO. Moderate to severe GO should be treated promptly...

  10. CT volumetric measurements of the orbits in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahe, T.; Schlolaut, K.H.; Poss, T.; Trier, H.G.; Lackner, K.; Bonn Univ.; Bonn Univ.

    1989-01-01

    The volumes of the four recti muscles and the orbital fat was measured by CT in 40 normal persons and in 60 patients with clinically confirmed Graves' disease. Compared with normal persons, 42 patients (70%) showed an increase in muscle volume and 28 patients (46.7%) an increase in the amount of fat. In nine patients (15%) muscle volume was normal, but the fat was increased. By using volumetric measurements, the amount of fat in the orbits in patients with Graves' disease could be determined. (orig.) [de

  11. Facts and fallacies about radioactive iodine therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The therapeutic options available in the hyerthyroidism of Graves' disease are two basic treatments. Firstly antithyroid drugs and secondly one can 'ablate' the thyroid gland by means of thyroidectomy or radioactive iodine ( 131 I). At present 131 I is the current treatment of chioce for Graves' disease. In a follow-up study of 21 714 patients who were treated with 131 I and observed for a period of 8 years, there was no increase in the incidence of thyriod carcinoma. A possible explanation for this is that the dose of 131 I used destroys the ability of the thyroid cells to replicate and thus transmit genetically damaged material

  12. Severe aplastic anaemia and Grave's disease in a paediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manjusha; Goldman, Jeffrey

    2002-07-01

    Severe aplastic anaemia (SAA) is considered to be an autoimmune disorder affecting the haematopoietic cells and most often is idiopathic. An association between SAA and other autoimmune diseases is rare and has been described in adults for eosinophilic fasciitis, thymomas, systemic lupus erythematosus and thyroid disorders. We describe the first paediatric patient with chronic relapsing SAA and Grave's disease. We discuss the difficulty in diagnosis of Grave's disease, the possibility of its manifestation due to withdrawal of immunosuppressants, and issues to consider in the treatment of this disease in the setting of bone marrow failure.

  13. Graves' ophthalmopathy evaluated by infrared eye-movement recordings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldon, S.E.; Unsoeld, R.

    1982-01-01

    Thirteen patients with varying degrees of Graves' ophthalmopathy were examined using high-resolution infrared oculography to determine peak velocities for horizontal eye movements between 3 degrees and 30 degrees. As severity of the orbital disease increased, peak velocities became substantially lower. Vertical-muscle surgery failed to have any effect on peak velocity of horizontal eye movements. In contrast, orbital decompression caused notable improvement in peak velocity of eye movements. Eye-movement recordings, which provide a measure of extraocular muscle function rather than structure, may provide a safe, sensitive, and accurate method for classifying and following up patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy

  14. A controlled monitoring study of simulated clandestine graves using 3D ground penetrating radar

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    van Schoor, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A controlled three-dimensional ground penetrating radar monitoring study over simulated clandestine graves was conducted near Pretoria, South Africa, in which the detectability of graves as a function of post-burial interval was assessed...

  15. Genotypes in relation to phenotypic appearance and exposure to environmental factors in Graves' hyperthyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Xander G.; Endert, Erik; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genetic polymorphisms and environmental factors are both involved in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease, but their interaction and effect on Graves' phenotypes have scarcely been investigated. Objective: To test the hypothesis that subjects with susceptibility genotypes develop more

  16. Auto-estima na forma inativa da oftalmopatia de Graves Inactive Graves' ophthalmopathy and self-esteem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique de Toledo Magalhães

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar a auto-estima dos pacientes com oftalmopatia de Graves na fase inativa. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 30 pacientes portadores de oftalmopatia de Graves, eutireoideanos, na fase inativa, com idade variando entre 26 e 65 anos, média 43 ± 11,0 anos, denominado grupo estudo e 39 indivíduos que não apresentavam oftalmopatia de Graves, com idade variando entre 18 e 67 anos, média de 41 ± 13,4 anos, selecionados na população geral denominado grupo controle. Para avaliar a auto-estima foi utilizada a escala de auto-estima Rosenberg Unifesp-EPM aplicada por meio de entrevista. Os valores dos escores de auto-estima nos dois grupos estudados foram comparados pelo teste não paramétrico de Mann-Whitney. O mesmo teste foi aplicado com objetivo de comparar os resultados obtidos no grupo oftalmopatia de Graves considerando a gravidade da doença. RESULTADOS: Não foi observada alteração com significância estatística na auto-estima dos pacientes com oftalmopatia de Graves (p=0,057. O grupo estudo apresentou, em média, valores inferiores de auto-estima, comparado ao grupo controle. Não houve diferença da auto-estima entre os pacientes dos subgrupos leve e moderado-grave (P=0,2710. CONCLUSÃO: A oftalmopatia de Graves na fase inativa não afetou a auto-estima dos pacientes, no grupo estudado.PURPOSE: To assess the self-esteem of Graves' ophthalmopathy patients in the inactive phase. METHODS: Thirty euthyroid patients were evaluated in the inactive phase of disease with age ranging from 26 to 65 years, average of 43 ± 11,0 years, called study group and 39 individuals without Graves' ophthalmopathy with age ranging from 18 to 67 years, average of 41 ± 13,4 years, selected from the general population called control group. To evaluate the self-esteem the Rosenberg UNIFESP/EPM self-esteem scale, applied by means of an interview, was utilized. The self-esteem scores in the two studied groups were compared by means of the non

  17. Messiniense: compleja y grave crisis ecologica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguirre, E.

    2003-08-01

    yacimientos de mamíferos fósiles en España y otras regiones con importantes novedades, entre ellas diversos intercambios intercontinentales, en el mismo intervalo cronológico añaden cuestiones de interés además de obligar a la correlación entre la estratigrafía basada en series marinas y la biostratigrafía continental. A las singularidades de estas series se añade el descubrimiento reciente de homínidos fósiles con indicios de bipedia en edades comprendidas en este intervalo. En el mismo se han datado graves eventos paleogeográficos, geodinámicos, paleoambientales y paleoclimáticos, que empezaron a investigarse hace 40 años como la «Crisis de Salinidad del Mediterráneo*, y sobre cuyo desarrollo e interacciones se han publicado diversos modelos más o menos incompletos: aislamiento del mediterráneo, descenso global del nivel del mar, acreción continental y orogenia, glaciación, deterioro de la cubierta vegetal. Una interpretación de la secuencia de eventos en estos diversos campos de estudio de Historia de la Tierra y de la Vida, y sus interacciones, puede trazarse con una calibración del orden de los cien mil años.

  18. Late stage and grave prognosis of esophageal cancer in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nun-Anan, Pongjarat; Vilaichone, Ratha-Korn

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is one of the major health concerns in Southeast Asian countries, including Thailand. However, only a limited number of studies have been reported from this region. This study was designed to evaluate the prevalence, clinical characteristics and survival rate of esophageal cancer in Thailand. Clinical information, histological features and endoscopic findings were collected from a tertiary care center in central region of Thailand between September 2011- November 2014 and reviewed. A total of 64 esophageal cancer patients including 58 men and 6 women with mean age of 62.6 years were enrolled. Common presenting symptoms were dysphagia (74%), dyspepsia (10%) and hematemesis (8%). Mean duration of symptoms prior to diagnosis was 72 days. Esophageal stenosis with contact bleeding was the most common endoscopic finding (55.6%). The location of cancer was found in proximal (16%), middle (50%) and distal (34%) esophagus. Squamous cell carcinoma was far more common histology than adenocarcinoma (84.2% vs 10.5%). However, esophageal adenocarcinoma was significantly more common than squamous cell carcinoma in distal area of esophagus (100% vs 22.9%; p=0.0001, OR=1.6, 95%CI=1.1-2.2). Esophageal cancer stages 3 and 4 accounted for 35.2% and 59.3% respectively. Overall 2-year survival rate was 20% and only 16% in metastatic patients. Most esophageal cancer patients in Thailand have squamous cell carcinoma and nearly all present at advanced stage with a grave prognosis. Screening of high risk individuals and early detection might be important keys to improve the survival rate and treatment outcome in Thailand.

  19. 77 FR 39406 - Safety Zone; Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks, Port Bay, Wolcott, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ...-AA00 Safety Zone; Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks, Port Bay, Wolcott, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION..., NY. This safety zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of Port Bay during the Tom Graves... necessary to ensure the safety of spectators and vessels during the Tom Graves Memorial Fireworks. This zone...

  20. Grave's Disease and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis—An Unusual and Challenging Association

    OpenAIRE

    Shetty, Shiran; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar; Venkatakrishnan, Leela

    2013-01-01

    Jaundice in Grave's diseases is uncommon, but when it does occur, complication of thyrotoxicosis (heart failure/infection) or intrinsic liver disease should be considered. Grave's disease can cause asymptomatic elevation of liver enzymes, jaundice and rarely acute liver failure. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like autoimmune hepatitis, or primary biliary cirrhosis. The cause of jaundice in Grave's disease is multifactorial.

  1. Grave's Disease and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis-An Unusual and Challenging Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shiran; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar; Venkatakrishnan, Leela

    2014-03-01

    Jaundice in Grave's diseases is uncommon, but when it does occur, complication of thyrotoxicosis (heart failure/infection) or intrinsic liver disease should be considered. Grave's disease can cause asymptomatic elevation of liver enzymes, jaundice and rarely acute liver failure. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like autoimmune hepatitis, or primary biliary cirrhosis. The cause of jaundice in Grave's disease is multifactorial.

  2. The plundering of the ship graves from Oseberg and Gokstad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bill, Jan; Daly, Aoife

    2012-01-01

    Not the least of the unusual revelations that have come from the wonderfully preserved ninth-century Norwegian ship burials at Oseberg and Gokstad, is the fact that both had been later broken into-by interlopers who defaced the ship, damaged the grave goods and pulled out and dispersed the bones...

  3. Diabetes mellitus: a risk factor in patients with Graves' orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalmann, R.; Mourits, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS: To assess the prevalence of dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) and Graves' orbitopathy (GO) and to investigate the complications of surgery for GO in these patients. METHODS: The records of 482 consecutive patients with GO referred in a 5 year period were

  4. Contrast sensitivity function in Graves' ophthalmopathy and dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp-Schulten, M. S.; Tijssen, R.; Mourits, M. P.; Apkarian, P.

    1993-01-01

    Contrast sensitivity function was measured by a computer automated method on 38 eyes with dysthyroid optic neuropathy and 34 eyes with Graves' ophthalmopathy only. The results were compared with 74 healthy control eyes. Disturbances of contrast sensitivity functions were found in both groups when

  5. 131I therapy of Graves' disease using lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kenshi

    1983-01-01

    Lithium is known to cause goiter and hypothyroidism. In the mechanism of goitrogenesis, there is general agreement that lithium inhibits the release of the thyroid hormones from the thyroid gland without significantly impairing other thyroid functions. The present study was undertaken, therefore, to investigate the usefulness of lithium in the radioiodine treatment of Graves' disease. Nine patients with Graves' disease who were all, except one, previously treated with antithyroid drugs were studied. 600 mg of lithium carbonate were administered daily to investigate the effects on thyroidal 131 I uptake, disappearance rate of 131 I from the prelabeled thyroid and the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones. Lithium showed no significant effect on the thyroidal 131 I uptake when the 24 hour thyroidal 131 I uptakes were determined both before and during lithium treatment in the five cases. On the other hand, lithium clearly prolonged the mean value of effective half-lives of 131 I to approximately 8 days vs. 5.1 days before lithium treatment (p 4 and T 3 levels significantly decreased during lithium treatment, from 21.3 to 12.4μg/dl (n=9, p 131 I for the Graves' disease can be reduced by using lithium, the radiation exposure to the total body is decreased. Moreover, it is possible to perform the 131 I therapy while improving the thyrotoxicosis with lithium. Finally, it is concluded that lithium is a very useful drug to be combined with the 131 I therapy of Graves' disease. (author)

  6. [Guideline for the treatment of Graves' disease with antithyroid drug].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2006-12-01

    We have published "Guideline for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug in Japan 2006" in the middle of May from the Japan Thyroid Association. The background, working process, composition, aim and significance of this guideline are described. The most remarkable feature of this guideline is "evidence based".

  7. Radiotherapy for Graves' orbitopathy : randomised placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mourits, MP; van Kempen-Harteveld, ML; Garcia, MBG; Koppeschaar, HPF; Tick, L; Terwee, CB

    2000-01-01

    Background The best treatment (steroids, irradiation, or both) for moderately severe Graves' orbitopathy, a self-limiting disease is not known. We tested the efficacy of external beam irradiation compared with sham-irradiation. Methods In a double-blind randomised clinical trial, 30 patients with

  8. CASE REPORT : GRAVE'S DISEASE PRESENTING AS PARANOID SCHIZOPHRENIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.K.; Hatwal, A.; Agarwal, J.K.; Bajpai, H.S.; Sharma, I.

    1989-01-01

    SUMMARY The case of a 37 year old male is described who initially presented as paranoid schizophrenia unresponsive to anti-psychotic drug treatment and subsequently developed features of Grave's disease. Treatment with carbimazole alone improved his psychiatric symptoms. PMID:21927380

  9. Prevalence and severity of ocular involvement in Graves' disease according to sex and age: A clinical study from Babol, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Sara; Moazezi, Zoleika; Bayani, Mohammad Ali

    2018-01-01

    Thyroid-associated eye disease (TED), previously known as Graves' ophthalmopathy is a cosmetically and functionally debilitating disease that is seen worldwide. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and clinical severity of ocular manifestations of Graves' disease according to sex, age and duration in northern Iran. Between April 2011 and March 2012, 105 patients with Graves' disease, underwent ophthalmic examination, including ocular motility, exophthalmometry, intraocular pressure (IOP), slit lamp and fundoscopy. Patients received scores according to modified Werner's NO SPECS classification. Ocular involvement was found in 70 patients with established Graves's disease. The mean age was 35.0 years, (SD 13.0, range 15 to 69). The most common ocular findings were exophthalmometric proptosis of more than 20 mm (63.8%), lid lag (55.7%), lid retraction (52.8%) and tearing (38.6%). Almost 70% of patients had bilateral involvement. Elevated IOP was seen in 15 (25.4%) patients, and was significantly related to proptosis (P=0.007). More than half of the patients (n=36, 52.2%) had a modified Werner's NO SPECS score of 3.00. Clinical severity as shown by the increasing number of signs and symptoms per patient was correlated to increasing age (r=0.31, P=0.01) but not to gender (P=0.17). Both functional (ocular motility disorders, increased IOP) and cosmetic (proptosis, periorbital edema) sequels are common ocular presentations in patients with Graves' disease. Proptosis was the most common finding in this study and was associated with elevated IOP. Clinical severity was found to correlate to increasing age.

  10. 99Tcm-octreotide scintigraphy in patients with graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Li Yongjun

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 99 Tc m -Octreotide scintigraphy in patients with Graves' ophthalmopahty (GO). Methods: 11 confirmed GO patients (3 male and 8 female, with average age of 47.7 years, average GD history 9.3 mo and average GO history 9.2 mo), who were being treated with anti-thyroid drugs but never immunosuppressive medications, were included. Clinical activity score (CAS) were recorded before imaging. At 2 hours after administration of 99 Tc m -Octreotide (20 mCi, I.V), scintigraphy were performed with SPECT. Regions of interesting (ROI) of orbit and skull were draw on transverse slices. Counts per pixel (c/p) in each ROI and the ratio of orbit counts to skull counts (O/S) were calculated. The difference of c/p between ROI of orbit and skull were tested, while the correlations between CAS and O/S were evaluated. Results: Accumulation of radioactivity in orbit of all cases were intense than that in skull. The difference of c/p between orbit and skull were significant ( p=0.0027 left eye, 0.0014 right eye). Average O/S was 1.57 and CAS were between 3-7. The correlation factors of O/S and CAS were: left eye 0.64 (p=0.032), right eye 0.73 (p=0.011). Conclusion: SM receptor scintigraphy with 99 Tc m -Octreotide, a newly developed SM receptor imaging agent, could be used as a objective means to evaluate the activity of GO. (authors)

  11. Prognostic factors in the radiotherapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, I.A.; Kriss, J.P.; McDougall, I.R.; Donaldson, S.S.

    1990-01-01

    Between April 1968 and February 1988, 311 patients with symptomatic and progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy were treated with megavoltage orbital radiotherapy. The patients were divided into three groups: I treated with 20 Gy/2 weeks; II treated with 30 Gy/3 weeks, and III received 20 Gy/2 weeks. The degree of eye involvement was evaluated numerically before and after therapy for each of five parameters: soft tissue signs, proptosis, eye muscle impairment, corneal involvement, and sight loss. Pre-treatment and current thyroid diagnosis and status were also noted. To evaluate the effects of radiotherapy alone, follow-up was terminated at the time any eye surgery was done; for those not treated surgically the minimum follow-up was 12 months. Because there were significant demographic differences between the patient groups, the results of each group were analyzed separately. A stepwise linear regression analysis was performed to determine if there were any significant variables affecting outcome. Based on these data formulae were derived which enable outcome to be predicted in any patient. Before therapy more than 90% of patients in all groups had soft tissue and eye muscle involvement, whereas 65-75% had proptosis and about half 50% had some degree of sight loss. Radiotherapy arrested progression of ophthalmic parameters in all but 1-6% of the patients. Objective and symptomatic improvement was noted for all parameters assessed, but there was marked individual variability. The best responses were noted for soft tissue, corneal involvement, and sight loss; however over half the patients had some improvement in eye muscle function and proptosis. Factors which resulted in less favorable outcome included male gender, advanced age, need for concurrent therapy for hyperthyroidism, and no history of hyperthyroidism. No complications have been observed

  12. Personalised immunomodulating treatments for Graves' disease: fact or fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struja, Tristan Mirko; Kutz, Alexander; Fischli, Stefan; Meier, Christian; Müller, Beat; Schütz, Philipp

    2017-08-14

    Although Graves' disease has been recognised for more than 100 years, its physiopathological mechanisms are incompletely understood. Treatment strategies today mainly focus on suppression of thyroid hormone production by use of antithyroid drugs or radio-iodine, but neglect the underlying immunological mechanisms. Although Graves' disease is often seen as a prototype for an autoimmune mechanism, it is more likely to be a heterogeneous syndrome showing characteristics of both autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. The interplay of these two mechanisms may well characterise the physiopathology of this disease and its complications. Immunodeficiency may be either genetically determined or secondarily acquired. Various triggering events lead to autoimmunity with stimulation of the thyroid gland resulting in the clinical syndrome of hyperthyroidism. Also, relapse risk differs from patient to patient and can be estimated from clinical parameters incorporated into the Graves' Recurrent Events After Therapy (GREAT) score. Accurate risk stratification may help to distinguish high-risk patients for whom a more definitive treatment approach should be used from others where there is a high probability that the disease will recover with medical treatment alone. Several smaller trials having found positive effects of immunosuppressive drugs on recurrence risk in Graves' disease; therefoore, there is great potential in the use of novel immunomodulating drugs in addition to the currently used antithyroid drugs for the successful treatment of this condition. Further in-depth exploration of susceptibility, triggering factors and immunological mechanisms has the potential to improve treatment of Graves' disease, with more personalised, risk-adapted treatment strategies based on the different physiopathological concepts of this heterogeneous condition.

  13. Persistent Graves' hyperthyroidism despite rapid negative conversion of thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assay results: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Kitazawa, Masaru; Uemura, Yasuyuki; Minagawa, Shinichi; Miyakoshi, Masashi; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2017-02-06

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by hyperthyroidism, and patients exhibit thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody. The major methods of measuring circulating thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody include the thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assays. Although the diagnostic accuracy of these assays has been improved, a minority of patients with Graves' disease test negative even on second-generation and third-generation thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulins. We report a rare case of a thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin-positive patient with Graves' disease who showed rapid lowering of thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin levels following administration of the anti-thyroid drug thiamazole, but still experienced Graves' hyperthyroidism. A 45-year-old Japanese man presented with severe hyperthyroidism (serum free triiodothyronine >25.0 pg/mL; reference range 1.7 to 3.7 pg/mL) and tested weakly positive for thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulins on second-generation tests (2.1 IU/L; reference range hyperthyroidism for more than 8 years, requiring 15 mg/day of thiamazole to correct. During that period, he tested negative on all first-generation, second-generation, and third-generation thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assays, but thyroid scintigraphy revealed diffuse and increased uptake, and thyroid ultrasound and color flow Doppler imaging showed typical findings of Graves' hyperthyroidism. The possible explanations for serial changes in the thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin results in our patient include the presence of thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibody, which is bioactive but less reactive on thyroid-stimulating hormone-binding inhibitory immunoglobulin assays, or the effect of reduced levels of circulating thyroid

  14. Impact of marriage on HIV/AIDS risk behaviors among impoverished, at-risk couples: a multilevel latent variable approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Judith A; Nyamathi, Adeline; Ullman, Jodie B; Bentler, Peter M

    2007-01-01

    Studies among normative samples generally demonstrate a positive impact of marriage on health behaviors and other related attitudes. In this study, we examine the impact of marriage on HIV/AIDS risk behaviors and attitudes among impoverished, highly stressed, homeless couples, many with severe substance abuse problems. A multilevel analysis of 368 high-risk sexually intimate married and unmarried heterosexual couples assessed individual and couple-level effects on social support, substance use problems, HIV/AIDS knowledge, perceived HIV/AIDS risk, needle-sharing, condom use, multiple sex partners, and HIV/AIDS testing. More variance was explained in the protective and risk variables by couple-level latent variable predictors than by individual latent variable predictors, although some gender effects were found (e.g., more alcohol problems among men). The couple-level variable of marriage predicted lower perceived risk, less deviant social support, and fewer sex partners but predicted more needle-sharing.

  15. The Eye/Brain Radioactivity Ratio for Assessment of Graves Ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B. W.; Sung, S. K.; Suh, K. S.; Park, W.; Choi, D. J.; Kim, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    In Graves' disease, changes in orbital tissue and structure are caused by inflammatory infiltration, which induces increase of capillary permeability and breakdown of blood-tissue barriers. Using the uptake of 99m Tc-DTPA in inflammatory lesion, Eye/Brain radioactivity ratios in brain scintigraphy were evaluated in 15 normal controls and 40 Graves' patients. The results were as follows; 1) Eye/Brain radioactivity ratio was significantly higher in Graves' ophthalmopathy group than in control group (p 99m Tc-DTPA brain scintigraphy may be useful to determine the activity of Graves' ophthalmopathy and whether treatment of Graves' ophthalmopathy is necessary or not.

  16. [Treatment of eyelid retraction in Grave's disease by recession of the levator complex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichter, N; Schittkowski, M; Guthoff, R F

    2004-11-01

    The chronic stage in Grave's orbitopathy is characterised by fibrotic changes within the orbital soft tissues, especially the extraocular muscles. Retraction of the eyelids is a common clinical feature of this phenomenon. To solve this problem several techniques for lengthening the upper eyelid have been described with variable rates of success. In this report we describe our modified Harvey's technique for the correction of upper eyelid retraction which includes a complete recession of the Muller's muscle/levator complex from the tarsal plate without the interposition of a spacer. Finally only the skin and the superficial orbicularis muscle are sutured. We also report about our results with this procedure. 8 patients (1 male, 7 female) with lid retraction in Grave's ophthalmopathy were recorded who had undergone the modified lengthening technique by an external approach between 2001 and 2004. Four patients underwent a bilateral procedure and 1 patient showed a significant under-correction, necessitating reoperation. So a total of 13 procedures were included in this follow-up study. Beside the common ophthalmological examination, special interest was put in the difference of the two eyelid apertures in primary position pre- and postoperatively. Within a follow-up period of at least 3 months we recorded an averaged lengthening of the upper eyelid of 3.1 mm. The difference of the two eyelid apertures in primary position improved from 2.2 mm preoperatively to 1.0 mm postoperatively. Only 1 patient needed reoperation because of a significant under-correction. There were no late over-corrections observed. The modified Harvey's technique to lengthen the upper eyelid is a safe and effective method to reduce upper eyelid retraction in Grave's disease. An eventually required orbital decompression or extraocular muscle surgery has to be done before the lid surgery.

  17. The clinical value of serum thyrotrophin receptor antibody level in patients with Graves ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Chaodian; Shi Yuhong; Yan Bing

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore the value of serum thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb) on the pathological mechanism of Graves ophthalmopathy. Methods: Two hundred and nineteen newly diagnosed Graves disease patients who were divided into Graves ophthalmopathy group (n=121) and without Graves ophthalmopathy group (n=98) were tested serum concentration with thyroid function, thyroperoxidase antibodies (TPOAb), thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) and TRAb. According to the consensus statement of the European Group on Graves ophthalmopathy, clinical activity score (CAS) and severity evaluation were carried out on Graves ophthalmopathy patients. Results: There was no significant difference in serum concentration of free thyroxine (FT 4 ), free triiodothyronine (FT 3 ), TPOAb and TRAb between the Graves ophthalmopathy group and the without Graves ophthalmopathy group. Serum concentration of TRAb was not correlated with the severity and CAS of Graves ophthalmopathy. Conclusions: The CAS and the severity of Graves ophthalmopathy were irrelevant to the serum concentration of TRAb. Therefore, the correlation between TRAb and Graves ophthalmopathy still needs further study. (authors)

  18. Quantifying the impoverishing effects of purchasing medicines: A cross-country comparison of the affordability of medicines in the developing world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Niëns (Laurens); A. Cameron (ALexandra); E. Van de Poel (Ellen); M. Ewen (Margaret); W.B.F. Brouwer (Werner); R. Laing (Richard)

    2010-01-01

    markdownabstract_Background:_ Increasing attention is being paid to the affordability of medicines in low- and middle-income countries (LICs and MICs) where medicines are often highly priced in relation to income levels. The impoverishing effect of medicine purchases can be estimated by determining

  19. Ultrasonographic Features of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Patients with Graves' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jin Ook; Cho, Dong Hyeok; Chung, Dong Jin

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims To characterize ultrasonographic findings in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) combined with Graves' disease. Methods Medical records and ultrasonographic findings of 1,013 patients with Graves' disease and 3,380 patients without Graves' disease were analyzed retrospectively. A diagnosis of PTC was based on a pathologic examination. Results The frequency of hypoechogenicity was lower in patients with PTC and Graves' disease than in patients with PTC alone (p Graves' disease was significantly higher than in those with PTC alone (p Graves' disease was characterized by more ill-defined borders and less frequency of overall calcification, punctate calcification, and heterogeneous echogenicity, although the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Our results suggest that patients with Graves' disease more frequently have atypical PTC findings on ultrasonography. PMID:20195406

  20. Clinical significance of determination of serum TRAb levels in patients with relapsing graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chunlei; Zhou Jiaqiang; Li Wenpeng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum TRAb levels in patients with relapsing Graves' disease. Methods: Serum TRAb (with RRA) and several other thyroid-related hormones (TT 4 , TT 3 , TSH, FT 3 , with CLIA) were determined in the following subjects: 1. 25 cases of relapsing Graves' disease after previous successful treatment; 2. 18 cases of recently diagnosed Graves' disease; 3. 31 cases of successfully treated Graves' disease; 4. 15 cases of simple goiter; 5. 10 cases of nodular goiter; 6. 18 cases of hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto disease. Results: Positive rate of TRAb was 76.00% in patients with relapsing Graves' disease and 77.78% in recently diagnosed Graves' disease cases, both being significantly higher than that in all the other sets of patients studied (P<0.01). Conclusion: Determination of serum TRAb levels was helpful for the diagnosis of relapse in Graves' disease

  1. Predicting relapse of Graves' disease following treatment with antithyroid drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, LIN; LU, HONGWEN; LIU, YANG; LIU, CHANGSHAN; XUN, CHU

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to monitor long term antithyroid drug treatments and to identify prognostic factors for Graves' disease (GD). A total of 306 patients with GD who were referred to the Endocrinology Clinic at Weifang People's Hospital (Weifang, China) between August 2005 and June 2009 and treated with methimazole were included in the present study. Following treatment, patients were divided into non-remission, including recurrence and constant treatment subgroups, and remission groups. Various prognosis factors were analyzed and compared, including: Patient age, gender, size of thyroid prior to and following treatment, thyroid hormone levels, disease relapse, hypothyroidism and drug side-effects, and states of thyrotropin suppression were observed at 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Sixty-five patients (21.2%) were male, and 241 patients (78.8%) were female. The mean age was 42±11 years, and the follow-up was 31.5±6.8 months. Following long-term treatment, 141 patients (46%) demonstrated remission of hyperthyroidism with a mean duration of 18.7±1.9 months. The average age at diagnosis was 45.6±10.3 years in the remission group, as compared with 36.4±8.8 years in the non-remission group (t=3.152; P=0.002). Free thyroxine (FT)3 levels were demonstrated to be 25.2±8.9 and 18.7±9.4 pmol/l in the non-remission and remission groups, respectively (t=3.326, P=0.001). The FT3/FT4 ratio and thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb) levels were both significantly higher in the non-remission group (t=3.331, 3.389, P=0.001), as compared with the remission group. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that elevated thyroid size, FT3/FT4 ratio and TRAb at diagnosis were associated with poor outcomes. The ratio of continued thyrotropin suppression in the recurrent subgroup was significantly increased, as compared with the remission group (P=0.001), as thyroid function reached euthyroid state at 3, 6 and 12 months post-treatment. Patients with GD exhibiting

  2. Case report of Graves' disease manifesting with odynophagia and heartburn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evsyutina, Yulia; Trukhmanov, Alexander; Ivashkin, Vladimir; Storonova, Olga; Godjello, Elina

    2015-12-28

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease, which can manifest with a variety of extrathyroidal clinical syndromes like ophthalmopathy, pretibial myxedema (dermopathy), acropathy, cardiomyopathy, and encephalopathy. Though quite rare, this disease can also manifest with gastrointestinal symptoms such as dysphagia, heartburn, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. We report a clinical case of Graves' disease manifesting with dysfunction of the esophagus and heartburn in a 61-year-old man. In the muscular layer of the esophagus we found dystrophic changes led to its atony, which was documented by endoscopy and high-resolution manometry. The pathology features of esophageal symptoms were: focal proliferation of the basal cells, vascular distension, and dystrophy of the epithelial cells. Antithyroid treatment led to decrease of all clinical symptoms after 5 d of Thiamazole administration. Complete restoration of peristalsis in the esophagus, according to manometry, was observed in 1 mo after initiation of treatment.

  3. The role of radiation therapy in Graves` ophthalmopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, A.D.; Moriaty, M.J. [Saint Luke`s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    1996-11-01

    Graves` ophthalmopathy can occur in 25-30% of patients with hyperthyroidism. This condition can result in serious visual disturbance and disfigurement. The treatment options for symptomatic disease are oral corticosteroids or orbital irradiation. Ten patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy were treated with external beam radiotherapy at Saint Lukes Hospital from March 1991 to February 1994. Eight of these patients had excellent response with minimal morbidity. A dose of 2000 cGy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks is considered to be sufficient to alleviate symptoms in most patients. It is concluded that orbital radiotherapy is effective and well tolerated, and should replace corticosteroid therapy as the initial treatment modality in these patients. A minimum follo-up of 6 months is considered adequate for detecting radiation-induced complications. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

  5. Ecocardiograma e fatores de risco cardiovascular em obesos graves

    OpenAIRE

    Elaine Gonçalves Moreira Rocha, Isaura

    2003-01-01

    Introducão: Alterações em parâmetros hemodinâmicos e na função cardíaca ocorrem na obesidade grave, em associação a outros fatores de risco cardiovascular, como dislipidemia, hipertensão arterial e diabete melito. Material e métodos: Foi descrito o perfil clínico, metabólico, ecocardiográfico e o risco de doença cardiovascular, avaliado através do escore de Framingham, em 32 obesos graves candidatos à gastroplastia, no Hospital das Clínicas da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, entre jane...

  6. Generalised pruritus as a presentation of Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ce; Loh, Ky

    2013-01-01

    Pruritus is a lesser known symptom of hyperthyroidism, particularly in autoimmune thyroid disorders. This is a case report of a 27-year-old woman who presented with generalised pruritus at a primary care clinic. Incidental findings of tachycardia and a goiter led to the investigations of her thyroid status. The thyroid function test revealed elevated serum free T4 and suppressed thyroid stimulating hormone levels. The anti-thyroid antibodies were positive. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease and treated with carbimazole until her symptoms subsided. Graves' disease should be considered as an underlying cause for patients presenting with pruritus. A thorough history and complete physical examination are crucial in making an accurate diagnosis. Underlying causes must be determined before treating the symptoms.

  7. [Orbital decompression in Grave's disease: comparison of techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellari-Franceschini, S; Berrettini, S; Forli, F; Bartalena, L; Marcocci, C; Tanda, M L; Nardi, M; Lepri, A; Pinchera, A

    1999-12-01

    Grave's ophthalmopathy is an inflammatory, autoimmune disorder often associated with Grave's disease. The inflammatory infiltration involves the retrobulbar fatty tissue and the extrinsic eye muscles, causing proptosis, extraocular muscle dysfunction and often diplopia. Orbital decompression is an effective treatment in such cases, particularly when resistant to drugs and external radiation therapy. This work compares the results of orbital decompression performed by removing: a) the medial and lateral walls (Mourits technique) in 10 patients (19 orbits) and b) the medial and lower walls (Walsh-Ogura technique) in 17 patients (31 orbits). The results show that removing the floor of the orbit enables better reduction of proptosis but more easily leads to post-operative diplopia. Thus it proves necessary to combine the two techniques, modifying the surgical approach on a case-by-case basis.

  8. [Efficacy of treatment with I(131) in paediatric Graves disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enes Romero, P; Martín-Frías, M; de Jesús, M; Caballero Loscos, C; Alonso Blanco, M; Barrio Castellanos, R

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine is an important therapeutic option in young patients with Grave's disease (GD). In the United States it is a widespread therapy, but in Europe its use in paediatrics is still controversial. To report our experience in radioiodine therapy of paediatric GD patients and analyse its effectiveness and safety. We retrospectively studied our paediatric population (de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Graves' hyperthyroidism and moderate alcohol consumption: evidence for disease prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carle, A.; Bülow Pedersen, I.; Knudsen, N.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We recently demonstrated that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism, similar to findings in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. We aimed to study a possible....... CONCLUSIONS: Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of Graves' disease with hyperthyroidism - irrespective of age and sex. Autoimmune thyroid disease seems to be much more dependent on environmental factors than hitherto anticipated....

  10. Does radioiodine cause the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDougall, I.R.

    1993-01-01

    This editorial briefly reviews studies which might answer the question as to whether radioiodine treatment causes the ophthalmopathy of Graves' disease. However, the data do not allow any conclusion one way or the other. Other possible causal factors are discussed. Further studies are required to define whether treatment of hyperthyroidism aggravates the ophthalmopathy and whether one thereby is worse than the others and by how much. (UK)

  11. 233. Explante emergente de una corevalve por leak grave objetivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gomera

    2012-04-01

    Conclusiones: La implantación de TAVI está demostrando ser una buena opción para el tratamiento de la estenosis aórtica grave no susceptible de sustitución quirúrgica. Sin embargo, está terapia aún está lejos de estar libre de complicaciones que requieran cirugía urgente de rescate.

  12. A Patient with Grave's Disease and Tuberculous Lymphadenitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, M F; Chowdhury, M H; Khan, A H; Rahman, M; Barman, T K; Chowdhury, M J

    2016-04-01

    Immune reactivity between Mycobacteria and human antigens can play an important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. We report a case of Graves's disease and tuberculous lymphadenitis to explain the mechanism of correlation between immune-mediated diseases and tuberculosis and to raise awareness of the importance of screening for TB in this context, especially in endemic country. Screening for latent TB at immune mediated disease diagnosis and regular timely screening thereafter may be beneficial.

  13. Graves' disease: A comparison of CT and orthoptic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilbertz, T.; Markl, A.; Pickardt, C.R.; Boergen, K.P.; Muenchen Univ.; Muenchen Univ.

    1988-01-01

    The correlation between the loss of function of the extrinsic rectus eyemuscles and their appearance on computed tomography images in patients with Graves' disease was examined. Pathologic changes of a single rectus eyemuscle normally blockade the movement of the corresponding antagonistic muscle. This is caused by the impossibility to relax due to fibrotic alterations. Nevertheless there are some hints, which indicate, that in some cases, especially concerning the lateral rectus muscle, the inherent function of the thickened muscle is restricted. (orig.) [de

  14. Treatment of Graves' disease and the course of ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridama, V.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    Contradictory results have been obtained with regards to the effect of various treatment modes on the exacerbation of Graves' ophthalmopathy, probably because the number of patients in each study was small and some studies were analyzed only in relation to one type of treatment. To circument these problems, we studied the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy after various modes of therapy for thyrotoxicosis among 537 patients with Graves' disease. A total of 537 patients with Graves' disease were prospectively studied over an 11-year period. Thirty-one patients were lost to follow-up during the first six months after treatment and were excluded from the study. Of those remaining, 426 received one form of treatment, 79 received two kinds of therapy, and one received three kinds of therapy. Thus, surgical treatments numbered 164, radioactive iodine-131 ( 13 1I) treatments numbered 241, and medical treatments numbered 182. Ocular signs were considered improved or exacerbated by the following criteria: decrement or increment of the exophthalmos of 2 mm or more, improvement or deterioration of visual acuity, and regression or progression of extraocular muscle involvement causing diplopia. Among patients who did not have infiltrative ophthalmopathy before treatment, there was no difference in the occurrence of posttreatment exophthalmos in the surgically, medically, and 131I-treated patients (7.1%, 6.7%, and 4.9%, respectively). The incidence and the degree of progression of ophthalmopathy in patients who already had exophthalmos before treatment were similar in the medically, surgically, and 131I-treated groups (19.2%, 19.8%, and 22.7%, respectively). Most of the progression occurred in the posttreatment euthyroid stage. The incidence of improvement of ophthalmopathy was also similar 14.1%, 12.6%, and 12.3% in the medically, surgically, and 131I-treated patients

  15. PREGO (presentation of Graves' orbitopathy) study: changes in referral patterns to European Group On Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) centres over the period from 2000 to 2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perros, Petros; Žarković, Miloš; Azzolini, Claudio; Ayvaz, Göksun; Baldeschi, Lelio; Bartalena, Luigi; Boschi, Antonella; Bournaud, Claire; Brix, Thomas Heiberg; Covelli, Danila; Ćirić, Slavica; Daumerie, Chantal; Eckstein, Anja; Fichter, Nicole; Führer, Dagmar; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Kahaly, George J.; Konuk, Onur; Lareida, Jürg; Lazarus, John; Leo, Marenza; Mathiopoulou, Lemonia; Menconi, Francesca; Morris, Daniel; Okosieme, Onyebuchi; Orgiazzi, Jaques; Pitz, Susanne; Salvi, Mario; Vardanian-Vartin, Cristina; Wiersinga, Wilmar; Bernard, Martine; Clarke, Lucy; Currò, Nicola; Dayan, Colin; Dickinson, Jane; Knežević, Miroslav; Lane, Carol; Marcocci, Claudio; Marinò, Michele; Möller, Lars; Nardi, Marco; Neoh, Christopher; Pearce, Simon; von Arx, George; Törüner, Fosun Baloş

    2015-01-01

    The epidemiology of Graves' orbitopathy (GO) may be changing. The aim of the study was to identify trends in presentation of GO to tertiary centres and initial management over time. Prospective observational study of European Group On Graves' Orbitopathy (EUGOGO) centres. All new referrals with a

  16. Grave pit modifications and wooden structures in the Great Moravian graves and their information potential for cognition of the social structure of the Great Moravian society

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazuch, Marian; Hladík, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 2 (2013), s. 45-55 ISSN 1211-7250 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-20936P Keywords : Early Middle Ages * Great Moravia * Mikulčice * burial sites * graves * grave pits * burial pits * wooden structures * funeral rite * social structure * GIS * statistics Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  17. Radioiodine therapy versus antithyroid drugs in Graves' disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This meta-analysis was performed to compare radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in terms of clinical outcomes, including development or worsening of ophthalmopathy, hyperthyroid cure rate, hypothyroidism, relapse rate and adverse events. Methods: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, SinoMed and National Knowledge Infrastructure, China, were systematically reviewed to compare the effects of radioiodine therapy with antithyroid drugs in patients with Graves' disease. Results were expressed as risk ratio with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and weighted mean differences with 95% CIs. Pooled estimates were performed using a fixed-effects model or random-effects model, depending on the heterogeneity among studies. Results: 17 RCTs involving 4024 patients met the inclusion criteria and were included. Results showed that radioiodine treatment has increased risk in new ophthalmopathy, development or worsening of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Whereas, compared with antithyroid drugs, radioiodine treatment seems to have a higher hyperthyroid cure rate, lower recurrence rate and lower incidence of adverse events. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy is associated with a higher hyperthyroid cure rate and lower relapse rate compared with antithyroid drugs. However, it also increases the risk of ophthalmopathy and hypothyroidism. Advances in knowledge: Considering that antithyroid drug treatment can be associated with unsatisfactory control of hyperthyroidism, we would recommend radioiodine therapy as the treatment of choice for patients with Graves' disease. PMID:27266544

  18. Adverse Events Associated with Methimazole Therapy of Graves' Disease in Children

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    Kerry Stephenson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the pediatric population. Antithyroid medications used in children and adults include propylthiouracil (PTU and methimazole (MMI. At our center we have routinely used MMI for Graves' disease therapy. Our goals are to provide insights into adverse events that can be associated with MMI use. Methods. We reviewed the adverse events associated with MMI use in our last one hundred consecutive pediatric patients treated with this medication. Results. The range in the patient age was 3.5 to 18 years. The patients were treated with an average daily dose of MMI of 0.3±0.2 mg/kg/day. Adverse events attributed to the use of the medication were seen in 19 patients at 17±7 weeks of therapy. The most common side effects included pruritus and hives, which were seen in 8 patients. Three patients developed diffuse arthralgia and joint pain. Two patients developed neutropenia. Three patients developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome, requiring hospitalization in 1 child. Cholestatic jaundice was observed in 1 patient. No specific risk-factors for the development of adverse events were identified. Conclusions. MMI use in children is associated with a low but real risk of minor and major side effects.

  19. Predictive factors for intraoperative excessive bleeding in Graves' disease.

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    Yamanouchi, Kosho; Minami, Shigeki; Hayashida, Naomi; Sakimura, Chika; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    In Graves' disease, because a thyroid tends to have extreme vascularity, the amount of intraoperative blood loss (AIOBL) becomes significant in some cases. We sought to elucidate the predictive factors of the AIOBL. A total of 197 patients underwent thyroidectomy for Graves' disease between 2002 and 2012. We evaluated clinical factors that would be potentially related to AIOBL retrospectively. The median period between disease onset and surgery was 16 months (range: 1-480 months). Conventional surgery was performed in 125 patients, whereas video-assisted surgery was performed in 72 patients. Subtotal and near-total/total thyroidectomies were performed in 137 patients and 60 patients, respectively. The median weight of the thyroid was 45 g (range: 7.3-480.0 g). Univariate analysis revealed that the strongest correlation of AIOBL was noted with the weight of thyroid (p Graves' disease, and preparation for blood transfusion should be considered in cases where thyroids weigh more than 200 g. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  20. Piezosurgery in Modified Pterional Orbital Decompression Surgery in Graves Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogel, Juergen; Scheiwe, Christian; Masalha, Waseem; Jarc, Nadja; Grauvogel, Tanja; Beringer, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Piezosurgery uses microvibrations to selectively cut bone, preserving the adjacent soft tissue. The present study evaluated the use of piezosurgery for bone removal in orbital decompression surgery in Graves disease via a modified pterional approach. A piezosurgical device (Piezosurgery medical) was used in 14 patients (20 orbits) with Graves disease who underwent orbital decompression surgery in additional to drills and rongeurs for bone removal of the lateral orbital wall and orbital roof. The practicability, benefits, and drawbacks of this technique in orbital decompression surgery were recorded. Piezosurgery was evaluated with respect to safety, preciseness of bone cutting, and preservation of the adjacent dura and periorbita. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcome data were assessed. The orbital decompression surgery was successful in all 20 orbits, with good clinical outcomes and no postoperative complications. Piezosurgery proved to be a safe tool, allowing selective bone cutting with no damage to the surrounding soft tissue structures. However, there were disadvantages concerning the intraoperative handling in the narrow space and the efficiency of bone removal was limited in the orbital decompression surgery compared with drills. Piezosurgery proved to be a useful tool in bone removal for orbital decompression in Graves disease. It is safe and easy to perform, without any danger of damage to adjacent tissue because of its selective bone-cutting properties. Nonetheless, further development of the device is necessary to overcome the disadvantages in intraoperative handling and the reduced bone removal rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Efeito da hipertermia na pancreatite aguda grave experimental

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    Maurício Gustavo Ieri Yamanari

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo deste estudo é avaliar os efeitos da hipertermia na pancreatite aguda (PA grave experimental induzida por ácido taurocólico. MÉTODO: A PA grave foi induzida pela injeção retrógrada de ácido taurocólico a 2,5% ou 5% no ducto pancreático principal. Após a indução, os animais foram colocados numa gaiola contendo duas lâmpadas de 100 W. A temperatura corporal foi aumentada para 39,5ºC e mantida neste nível por 45 minutos. Foram estudados taxa de mortalidade em 72 horas, permeabilidade vascular no pâncreas, porcentagem de água no tecido pancreático, amilase sérica, histologia (edema, necrose acinar e infiltrado inflamatório e níveis séricos de IL-6 e IL-10. RESULTADOS: Não houve alteração em nenhum dos parâmetros avaliados. CONCLUSÃO: Não há benefício da hipertermia na PA grave experimental induzida por ácido taurocólico.

  2. Treatment of Grave's hyperthyroidism-prognostic factors for outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfadda, A.; Malabu, Usman H.; El-Desouki, Mahmoud I.; Al-Rubeaan, Khalid A.; Al-Ruhaily, Atallah D.; Fouda, Mona A.; Al-Maatouq, Mohamed A.; Sulimani, Riad A.

    2007-01-01

    To determine clinical and biochemical features of Grave's disease at presentation predict response to medical and radioiodine treatment. We carried out a retrospective 10-year study of 194 consecutive Saudi subjects with Grave's disease who was treated with antithyroid drugs, radioiodine therapy, or both, between January 1995 and December 2004 at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. At diagnosis, the mean age was 32+-0.9 years. Only 26% of patients had successful outcome after a course of antithyroid medication. None of the clinical or biochemical factors were associated with a favorable outcome of antithyroid treatment. One dose of radioiodine [13-15 mCi (481-555 MBq)] cured hyperthyroidism in 83% of patients. Presence of ophthamopathy at presentation was shown to be a significant contributing factor to failure to respond to a single dose of radioiodine (odds ratio, 6.4; 95%CI, 1.51-24.4; p<0.01). Failure of radioiodine treatment was also associated with higher serum free T3 concentration at presentation (p=0.003). In patients with Grave's hyperthyroidism, radioiodine treatment is associated with higher success rate than antithyroid drugs. A dose of 13-15 mCi (481-555 MBq) seems to practical and effective, and should be considered as first line therapy. Patients with high free T3 concentration and, those with ophthalmopathy at presentation were more likely to fail radioiodine treatment. A higher dose of radioiodine may be advisable in such patients. (author)

  3. Graves' disease and toxic nodular goiter - radioiodine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schicha, H.; Dietlein, M.

    2002-01-01

    At the 15th conference on the human thyroid in Heidelberg in 2001 the following aspects of the radioiodine therapy of benign thyroid disorders were presented: General strategies for therapy of benign thyroid diseases, criterions for conservative or definitive treatment of hyperthyroidism as first line therapy and finally preparation, procedural details, results, side effects, costs and follow-up care of radioiodine therapy as well as legal guidelines for hospitalization in Germany. The diagnosis Graves' hyperthyroidism needs the decision, if rather a conservative treatment or if primary radioiodine therapy is the best therapeutic approach. In the USA 70-90% of these patients are treated with radioiodine as first line therapy, whereas in Germany the conservative therapy for 1-1.5 years is recommended for 90%. This review describes subgroups of patients with Graves' disease showing a higher probability to relapse after conservative treatment. Comparing benefits, adverse effects, costs, and conveniences of both treatment strategies the authors conclude that radioiodine therapy should be preferred as first line therapy in 60-70% of the patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. (orig.) [de

  4. Hyperparathyroidism after radioactive iodine therapy for Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Juichi; Tobisu, Kenichi; Sanada, Shingo

    1983-01-01

    Herein we report a 36-year-old man with hyperparathyroidism and a past history of internal irradiation to the thyroid. Twelve years previously at age 24 years he had received 8 mCi of radioactive iodine for Graves' disease. An additional dose of 4 mCi was required 3 years later. A right lower parathyroid adenoma (28 x 23 x 20 mm, 5.7 g) was found at neck exploration. Although the association of external ionizing radiation to the head and neck and the subsequent development of hyperfunctioning parathyroid glands has been described in recent years, there are only 4 cases in the literature of parathyroid surgery for hyperparathyroidism secondary to earlier treatment with radioactive iodine for Graves' disease. In a long-term follow-up of 180 patients treated with radioactive iodine for Graves' disease, neither hypercalcemia nor hypophosphatemia was found. Whether internal radiation therapy can be a causative factor in the development of hyperparathyroidism should be elucidated in future. However, it seems reasonable to suggest that patients whose hyper-thyroidism has been treated with radioactive iodine should have their scrum calcium levels examined at 5-year intervals. (author)

  5. [Epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic and evolutive aspects of Basedow-Graves disease in the Depatment of Internal Medicine at CHU Aristide Le Dantec, Dakar (Senegal)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagne, Nafissatou; Faye, Atoumane; Ndao, Awa Cheikh; Djiba, Boundia; Kane, Baidy Sy; Ndongo, Souhaibou; Pouye, Abdoulaye

    2016-01-01

    Basedow-Graves disease is an autoimmune affection characterized by the association of thyrotoxicosis with variable frequency events such as goiter, ophthalmopathy and pretibial myxedema. Its diagnosis is often easy, while its management remains difficult. A simple medical treatment exposes patient to recurrence risk. In Senegal and Sub-Saharan Africa few studies have focused on Basedow-Graves disease. This study aims to describe the epidemiological, clinical, therapeutic and evolutionary aspects of Basedow-Graves disease at a Hospital in Dakar. This was a retrospective study conducted from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2013 in the Department of Internal Medicine at the Aristide Le Dantec University Hospital. During this period, 108 patients receiving outpatient treatment for Basedow-Graves disease were included out of a total of 834 patients receiving outpatient treatment. The diagnosis was made on the basis of clinical, biological and immunological signs. One hundred and eight patients suffering from Basedow-Graves disease were included out of a total of 834 consultations. Sex ratio was 7.3 and the average age was 34.6 years. The main reasons for consultation were: palpitations and weight loss in 46.3% and 39.8% of cases respectively. Thyrotoxicosis syndrome was found in 93.5% of patients, goiter was found in 87% of patients and exophthalmos in 78.7% of patients. The main complication was cardiothyreosis found in 11.1% of patients. All patients underwent antithyroid synthetic drugs treatment. The evolution was favorable in 19,4% of cases. Disease recurrence was observed in 57% of cases and in 23.1% of patients were lost to follow-up. Basedow-Graves disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism, The patient's clinical picture is dominated by manifestations related to hypermetabolism. This study highlights that thyroidectomy isn't the first-line of treatment if we consider the high number of recurrences after medical treatment.

  6. Enhanced thyroid iodine metabolism in patients with triiodothyronine-predominant Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamatsu, J.; Hosoya, T.; Naito, N.

    1988-01-01

    Some patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease have increased serum T3 and normal or even low serum T4 levels during treatment with antithyroid drugs. These patients with elevated serum T3 to T4 ratios rarely have a remission of their hyperthyroidism. The aim of this study was to investigate thyroid iodine metabolism in such patients, whom we termed T3-predominant Graves' disease. Mean thyroid radioactive iodine uptake was 51.0 +/- 18.1% ( +/- SD) at 3 h, and it decreased to 38.9 +/- 20.1% at 24 h in 31 patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease during treatment. It was 20.0 +/- 11.4% at 3 h and increased to 31.9 +/- 16.0% at 24 h in 17 other patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease who had normal serum T3 and T4 levels and a normal serum T3 to T4 ratio during treatment (control Graves' disease). The activity of serum TSH receptor antibodies was significantly higher in the patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in control Graves' disease patients. From in vitro studies of thyroid tissue obtained at surgery, both thyroglobulin content and iodine content in thyroglobulin were significantly lower in patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in the control Graves' disease patients. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity determined by a guaiacol assay was 0.411 +/- 0.212 g.u./mg protein in the T3-predominant Graves' disease patients, significantly higher than that in the control Graves' disease patients. Serum TPO autoantibody levels determined by immunoprecipitation also were greater in T3-predominant Graves' disease patients than in control Graves' disease patients. Binding of this antibody to TPO slightly inhibited the enzyme activity of TPO, but this effect of the antibody was similar in the two groups of patients

  7. Thyrotropin receptor antibody activities significantly correlate with the outcome of radioiodine (131I) therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaise, Kazuro; Kaise, Nobuko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Mori, Koki; Yamamoto, Makiko; Sakurada, Toshiro; Saito, Shintaro; Yoshinaga, Kaoru

    1991-01-01

    The outcome of 131 I therapy for 109 patients with Graves' disease was analysed according to pretreatment laboratory data including thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) activities. Forty-five percent of patients became euthyroid, and 13% of patients became hypothyroid within one year after 131 I therapy. Forty-two percent of patients remained hyperthyroid one year after 131 I therapy. Pretreatment values for serum T 4 , T 3 , and the estimated weight of the thyroid were significantly higher in the hyperthyroid group. The mean for the TRAb index of the hyperthyroid group was significantly higher than that of the euthyroid group. Life table analysis revealed a significant effect of the TRAb index on the rate of hyperthyroidism after 3 months or later. These results appear to suggest that the TRAb index is one of the factors which influence the outcome of 131 I therapy for Graves' disease. (author)

  8. Evidence for the possible occurrence of Grave's disease in a blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintard, Benoît; Giorgiadis, Marine; Feirrera, Xavier; Lefaux, Brice; Schohn, Christophe; Lemberger, Karin

    2018-03-01

    The blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) is classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as critically endangered. A 23-year-old male housed at Mulhouse Zoo presented with lethargy, polyphagia, alopecia, and chronic weight loss. Clinical examination suggested an endocrine pathology such as hyperthyroidism. Secondary examinations included cervical ultrasound, thyroid biopsy, and scintigraphy. The latter revealed elevated thyroid activity. Blood analysis was performed to measure the level of anti-receptor thyroid-stimulating hormone antibodies, which allowed us to test the autoimmune hypothesis. The high level of antibodies together with levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone and the scintigraphy images led to the diagnosis of Grave's disease. Carbimazole treatment followed by thyroidectomy resulted in a quick weight gain and general improvement in health status. The following breeding season, the treated individual sired an offspring. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of likely Grave's disease in a non-human primate.

  9. Irisin and Myostatin Levels in Patients with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Mehmet Muhittin; Akturk, Mujde; Tohma, Yusuf; Cerit, Ethem Turgay; Altinova, Alev Eroglu; Arslan, Emre; Yetkin, Ilhan; Toruner, Fusun Balos

    2016-08-01

    Skeletal muscle system, which is one of the primary targets for thyroid hormones, has an important role in energy metabolism. Some myokines such as irisin and myostatin have considerable effects on energy metabolism in addition to the musculoskeletal system. Our aim was to investigate circulating irisin and myostatin levels in patients with Graves' Disease (GD). This study included 41 patients with GD who were in overt hyperthyroid status and 44 healthy subjects. Serum irisin levels were higher in patients with hyperthyroidism than in control group (p = 0.003). However, there was no statistical difference in myostatin levels between groups (p = 0.21). Irisin levels were positively correlated with free triiodothyronine (FT3), free thyroxine (FT4), thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) (p = 0.03, p = 0.02, p = 0.02, respectively) and negatively correlated with thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) (p = 0.006) in both groups. In multiple regression analysis, the presence of GD was the only significant factor associated with serum irisin levels (β = 0.29, p = 0.01). Myostatin levels were positively correlated with age, body mass index (BMI), FT4, HOMA-IR (p = 0.001, p = 0.04, p = 0.003, p = 0.03, respectively) and negatively correlated with TSH (p = 0.01). Multiple regression analysis also revealed that age and FT4 were the significant factors associated with circulating myostatin levels (β = 0.27, p = 0.02; β = 0.22, p = 0.04, respectively). Our results suggest that increased irisin levels might contribute to altered energy metabolism in hyperthyroidism. Further studies to determine whether myostatin is affected due to hyperthyroidism are needed. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Simultaneous induction of Graves' hyperthyroidism and Graves' ophthalmopathy by TSHR genetic immunization in BALB/c mice.

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    Nan Xia

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is the most common form of autoimmune thyroid disorder, characterized by hyperthyroidism due to circulating autoantibodies. To address the pathological features and establish a therapeutic approach of this disease, an animal model carrying the phenotype of Graves' disease (GD in concert with Graves' Ophthalmopathy (GO will be very important. However, there are no ideal animal models that are currently available. The aim of the present study is to establish an animal model of GD and GO disease, and its pathological features were further characterized.A recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.1- T289 was constructed by inserting the TSHR A-subunit gene into the expression vector pcDNA3.1, and genetic immunization was successfully performed by intramuscular injection of the plasmid pcDNA3.1-T289 on female 8-week-old BALB/c mice. Each injection was immediately followed by in vivo electroporation using ECM830 square wave electroporator. Morphological changes of the eyes were examined using 7.0T MRI scanner. Levels of serum T4 and TSHR antibodies (TRAb were assessed by ELISA. The pathological changes of the thyroid and orbital tissues were examined by histological staining such as H&E staining and Alcian blue staining.More than 90% of the immunized mice spontaneously developed goiter, and about 80% of the immunized mice manifested increased serum T4 and TRAb levels, combined with hypertrophy and hyperplasia of thyroid follicles. A significantly increased synthesis of hyaluronic acid was detected in in the immunized mice compared with the control groups.We have successfully established an animal model manifesting Graves' hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy, which provides a useful tool for future study of the pathological features and the development of novel therapies of the diseases.

  11. Assessing the impoverishment effects of out-of-pocket healthcare payments prior to the uptake of the national health insurance scheme in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akazili, James; Ataguba, John Ele-Ojo; Kanmiki, Edmund Wedam; Gyapong, John; Sankoh, Osman; Oduro, Abraham; McIntyre, Di

    2017-05-22

    There is a global concern regarding how households could be protected from relatively large healthcare payments which are a major limitation to accessing healthcare. Such payments also endanger the welfare of households with the potential of moving households into extreme impoverishment. This paper examines the impoverishing effects of out-of-pocket (OOP) healthcare payments in Ghana prior to the introduction of Ghana's national health insurance scheme. Data come from the Ghana Living Standard Survey 5 (2005/2006). Two poverty lines ($1.25 and $2.50 per capita per day at the 2005 purchasing power parity) are used in assessing the impoverishing effects of OOP healthcare payments. We computed the poverty headcount, poverty gap, normalized poverty gap and normalized mean poverty gap indices using both poverty lines. We examine these indicators at a national level and disaggregated by urban/rural locations, across the three geographical zones, and across the ten administrative regions in Ghana. Also the Pen's parade of "dwarfs and a few giants" is used to illustrate the decreasing welfare effects of OOP healthcare payments in Ghana. There was a high incidence and intensity of impoverishment due to OOP healthcare payments in Ghana. These payments contributed to a relative increase in poverty headcount by 9.4 and 3.8% using the $1.25/day and $2.5/day poverty lines, respectively. The relative poverty gap index was estimated at 42.7 and 10.5% respectively for the lower and upper poverty lines. Relative normalized mean poverty gap was estimated at 30.5 and 6.4%, respectively, for the lower and upper poverty lines. The percentage increase in poverty associated with OOP healthcare payments in Ghana is highest among households in the middle zone with an absolute increase estimated at 2.3% compared to the coastal and northern zones. It is clear from the findings that without financial risk protection, households can be pushed into poverty due to OOP healthcare payments. Even

  12. Therapeutic use of mini-scleral lenses in a patient with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harthan, Jennifer S

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy can be very challenging to manage secondary to the complex nature of their disease presentation. Patients may present with a variety of ocular findings including: lid retraction, periorbital and lid swelling, chemosis, conjunctival hyperemia, proptosis, optic neuropathy, restrictive myopathy, exposure keratopathy and/or keratoconjunctivitis sicca. Mini-scleral and scleral lens designs have been important in the management of irregular and regular corneas, and in the therapy of ocular surface diseases. We present here the case of a 48-year-old Caucasian male who had been diagnosed with Graves' ophthalmopathy 13 years earlier. With significant ocular surface staining and over ten diopters of astigmatism, the patient had never been able to wear contact lenses comfortably. After being fit with the Mini-Scleral Design™ lenses, his vision improved to 20/25 OU, his ocular surface improved, and overall quality of vision increased. Copyright © 2012 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Quality-of-life outcomes in Graves disease patients after total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kus, Lukas H; Hopman, Wilma M; Witterick, Ian J; Freeman, Jeremy L

    2017-01-01

    Historically, research into surgical treatment of Graves disease has assessed subtotal rather than total thyroidectomy. Most clinicians now recommend total thyroidectomy, but little information is available regarding quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes for this procedure. Our aim was to assess QOL after total thyroidectomy. This is a retrospective, pilot study of patients with Graves disease who underwent total thyroidectomy from 1991 to 2007 at a high-volume tertiary referral center in Toronto, Canada. Questionnaires addressing disease-specific symptoms and global QOL concerns were sent to 54 patients. Analyses included parametric and nonparametric tests to assess the differences between perception of symptoms and global QOL before and after surgery. Forty patients responded (response rate: 74%) at a median of 4.8 years postoperatively. On a 10-point scale, overall wellness improved from 4.1 preoperatively to 8.7 postoperatively (p total thyroidectomy. Patients experienced marked and rapid improvement in QOL postoperatively. These findings suggest that total thyroidectomy is a safe and effective treatment.

  14. Association between Age at Diagnosis of Graves' Disease and Variants in Genes Involved in Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurecka-Lubieniecka, Beata; Ploski, Rafal; Kula, Dorota; Krol, Aleksandra; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Kolosza, Zofia; Tukiendorf, Andrzej; Szpak-Ulczok, Sylwia; Stanjek-Cichoracka, Anita; Polanska, Joanna; Jarzab, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background Graves' disease (GD) is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. The aim of the study was to examine the association between genetic variants in genes encoding proteins involved in immune response and the age at diagnosis of GD. Methods 735 GD patients and 1216 healthy controls from Poland were included into the study. Eight genetic variants in the HLA-DRB1, TNF, CTLA4, CD40, NFKb, PTPN22, IL4 and IL10 genes were genotyped. Patients were stratified by the age at diagnosis of GD and the association with genotype was analysed. Results Polymorphism in the HLA-DRB1, TNF and CTLA4 genes were associated with GD. The carriers of the HLA DRB1*03 allele were more frequent in patients with age at GD diagnosis ≤30 years than in patients with older age at GD diagnosis. Conclusions HLADRB1*03 allele is associated with young age at diagnosis of Graves' disease in polish population. PMID:23544060

  15. A mathematical model of optimized radioiodine-131 therapy of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Suhail AR; Loutfi, Issa; Al-Shoumer, Kamal AS

    2001-01-01

    The current status of radioiodine-131 (RaI) dosimetry for Graves' hyperthyroidism is not clear. Recurrent hyperthyroidism and iatrogenic hypothyroidism are two problems which interact such that trying to solve one leads to exacerbation of the other. Optimized RaI therapy has therefore begun to be defined just in terms of early hypothyroidism (ablative therapy) as physicians have given up on reducing hypothyroidism. Optimized therapy is evaluated both in terms of the greatest separation of cure rate from hypothyroidism rate (non-ablative therapy) or in terms of early hypothyroidism (ablative therapy) by mathematical modeling of outcome after radioiodine and critically discussing the three common methods of RaI dosing for Graves' disease. Cure follows a logarithmic relationship to activity administered or absorbed dose, while hypothyroidism follows a linear relationship. The effect of including or omitting factors in the calculation of the administered I–131 activity such as the measured thyroid uptake and effective half-life of RaI or giving extra compensation for gland size is discussed. Very little benefit can be gained by employing complicated methods of RaI dose selection for non-ablative therapy since the standard activity model shows the best potential for cure and prolonged euthyroidism. For ablative therapy, a standard MBq/g dosing provides the best outcome in terms of cure and early hypothyroidism

  16. Thyroid peroxidase antibody positivity and triiodothyronine levels are associated with pediatric Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Park, So Hyun; Koh, Dae Gyun; Suh, Byung Kyu

    2014-05-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) occurs commonly in children with Graves' disease (GD). However, there are limited studies on the clinical manifestations and thyroid autoantibodies in pediatric GO. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of GO in childhood GD. Clinical and biochemical data from children and adolescents with GD were retrospectively reviewed. Eighty patients under 19 years of age were included in the present study. We compared the clinical and biochemical differences between patients with and without GO. Thirty-nine percent of the patients had GO, and 81% of the GO patients were females. Of these, two patients showed unilateral GO. Triiodothyronine (T3) levels were higher in GO patients than in those without GO. Anti-thyroglobulin antibody and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibody titers were not significantly different between the two groups. Anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody (TPO Ab) positivity was 68% in the patients with GO and only 47% in the patients without GO. In multivariate regression analysis, high T3 levels and TPO Ab positivity were related to the presence of GO. In children and adolescents with GD, TPO Ab positivity and high T3 levels could act as predictive factors for the presence of GO.

  17. Rapid resolution of fetal goiter associated with maternal Grave's disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, D R; Rothschild, M A

    2000-08-11

    The incidence of abnormal fetal thyroid function with maternal Grave's disease is about 2-12%. The development of larger fetal goiters can complicate labor and precipitate life-threatening airway obstruction at delivery. A case is presented of a large stable goiter confirmed by sonography, which unexpectedly resolved by the time of parturition. A 3 x 6 cm fetal goiter was detected at 34 weeks gestation in a mother treated with propylthiouracil for Grave's disease. A repeat sonogram at 36 weeks showed no change in goiter size. Umbilical blood sampling showed the fetus to be markedly hyperthyroid. Planned Cesarean section took place 11 days after the final sonogram. A multi-disciplinary operative team was present including the Otolaryngology service with equipment for emergency intubation, bronchoscopy and tracheotomy. Upon delivery, the infant had no evidence of goiter and no airway compromise. Fetal goiter is a rare entity, and recent advances in the field of maternal-fetal medicine have enabled intra-uterine diagnosis and treatment of such conditions. A review of published case reports demonstrates two trends in treated fetuses: preterm progressive resolution of the goiter, or delivery with gross evidence of goiter. This reported case is unique, as a persistent goiter resolved completely in less than 2 weeks. Otolaryngologic response to and management of potential congenital airway compromise is discussed.

  18. Radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease - a dosimetric comparison of different strategies concerning antithyroid drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbannek, V.; Voth, E.; Moka, D.; Schicha, H.

    2001-01-01

    Aim: Premedication with antithyroid drugs (ATD) compared to patients not pretreated with ATD causes a higher failure rate of radioiodine therapy (RITh) or demands higher therapeutical dosage of radioiodine (RI). For clinical reasons and because of accelerated iodine metabolism in hyperthyreosis a compensated thyroid metabolism is desirable. Aim of this study was to investigate the influence of ATD on the biokinetics of RI in case of Graves' disease in order to improve RITh of patients pre-treated with ATD. Methods: 385 consecutive patients who underwent RITh because of Graves' disease for the first time were included: Group A (n = 74): RITh under continuous medication with ATD; Group B (n = 111): Application of RI under continuous medication with ATD, in case of insufficient RI-uptake or shortened effective RI-half-life ATD were stopped 1-5 days after RITh; Group C (n = 200): ATD were stopped 2 days prior to RITh in all patients. We examined the influence of ATD on RI-uptake and effective RI-half-life as well as the absorbed dose achieved on the thyroid in dependence of thyroid volume and applied RI-dosage [TEQ - therapy efficiency quotient, (2)]. Results: In the RI-pretest (all patients under ATD) the RI-uptake was comparable in all three groups. During RITh-RI-uptake, effective RI-half-life and therefore the TEQ were significantly higher in Group C as compared to Groups A and B (p [de

  19. An Analysis of Rural Household Livelihood Change and the Regional Effect in a Western Impoverished Mountainous Area of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuansheng Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Taking Longnan, in the western Qinling Mountains region of Gansu province, China, as our study area, and using the Sixth National Population Census alongside household survey data, we analyze changes in household livelihoods, and consequent regional effects, following the instigation of the “Grain for Green” program in 1999. Our results show rural livelihood changes with respect to natural assets (e.g., reduction of arable land, planting structure changes, human assets (e.g., labor quality improvement, fluidity of population, financial assets (e.g., income channels widening, income increasing, physical assets (e.g., optimized production tools, and social assets (e.g., information network development, increased outreach opportunities. We suggest that increased household livelihoods play an important role in improving land space utilization efficiency, resource conservation and use, and the ecological environment. However, owing to the natural environment, there are also some problems, such as “hollows” in rural production and living spaces, as well as local environmental degradation. To address these issues, regions such as the western, mountainous, impoverished area of our study should establish a policy of using ecosystems, as well as agriculture, for development in order to improve household livelihoods, build an efficient spatial structure, and providing support for the creation of a resource-saving societal system.

  20. Grave's Disease and Primary Biliary Cirrhosis—An Unusual and Challenging Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Shiran; Rajasekaran, Senthilkumar; Venkatakrishnan, Leela

    2013-01-01

    Jaundice in Grave's diseases is uncommon, but when it does occur, complication of thyrotoxicosis (heart failure/infection) or intrinsic liver disease should be considered. Grave's disease can cause asymptomatic elevation of liver enzymes, jaundice and rarely acute liver failure. It is associated with other autoimmune diseases like autoimmune hepatitis, or primary biliary cirrhosis. The cause of jaundice in Grave's disease is multifactorial. PMID:25755537

  1. Nuclear security from cradle to grave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja Adnan, Raja Abdul Aziz

    2016-01-01

    On 8 May 2016, the Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM) finally entered into force, almost eleven years after its adoption. The world will be a more secure place as a result of the commitments that States party to the Amendment have made. The Amendment establishes legally binding commitments for countries to protect nuclear facilities as well as nuclear material in domestic use, storage and transport. Under the Amendment, countries are required to establish appropriate physical protection regimes for nuclear material. They also take on new obligations to share information on sabotage, including on credible threats of sabotage. The entry into force of the Amendment demonstrates the international community’s resolve to act together to strengthen nuclear security globally. It also helps reduce the risk of an attack involving nuclear material, which could have catastrophic consequences.

  2. Attending to Communication and Patterns of Interaction: Culturally Sensitive Mental Health Care for Groups of Urban, Ethnically Diverse, Impoverished, and Underserved Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molewyk Doornbos, Mary; Zandee, Gail Landheer; DeGroot, Joleen

    2014-07-01

    The United States is ethnically diverse. This diversity presents challenges to nurses, who, without empirical evidence to design culturally congruent interventions, may contribute to mental health care disparities. Using Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality, this study documented communication and interaction patterns of ethnically diverse, urban, impoverished, and underserved women. Using a community-based participatory research framework, 61 Black, Hispanic, and White women participated in focus groups around their experiences with anxiety/depression. Researchers recorded verbal communication, nonverbal behavior, and patterns of interaction. The women's communication and interaction patterns gave evidence of three themes that were evident across all focus groups and five subthemes that emerged along ethnic lines. The results suggest cultural universalities and cultural uniquenesses relative to the communication and interaction patterns of urban, ethnically diverse, impoverished, and underserved women that may assist in the design of culturally sensitive mental health care. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. A report of three cases of untreated Graves' disease associated with pancytopenia in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafhati, Abdullah Noor; See, Chee Keong; Hoo, Fan Kee; Badrulnizam, Long Bidin Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Generally, clinical presentations of Graves' disease range from asymptomatic disease to overt symptomatic hyperthyroidism with heat intolerance, tremor, palpitation, weight loss, and increased appetite. However, atypical presentation of Graves' disease with hematological system involvement, notably pancytopenia, is distinctly uncommon. Hereby, we present and discuss a series of three untreated cases of Graves' disease clinically presented with pancytopenia and the hematological abnormalities that responded well to anti-thyroid treatment. With resolution of the thyrotoxic state, the hematological parameters improved simultaneously. Thus, it is crucial that anti-thyroid treatment be considered in patients with Graves' disease and pancytopenia after a thorough hematological evaluation.

  4. Growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor 1 affect the severity of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cerbo, Alfredo; Pezzuto, Federica; Di Cerbo, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Graves' disease, the most common form of hyperthyroidism in iodine-replete countries, is associated with the presence of immunoglobulins G (IgGs) that are responsible for thyroid growth and hyperfunction. In this article, we report the unusual case of a patient with acromegaly and a severe form of Graves' disease. Here, we address the issue concerning the role of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) in influencing thyroid function. Severity of Graves' disease is exacerbated by coexistent acromegaly and both activity indexes and symptoms and signs of Graves' disease improve after the surgical remission of acromegaly. We also discuss by which signaling pathways GH and IGF1 may play an integrating role in regulating the function of the immune system in Graves' disease and synergize the stimulatory activity of Graves' IgGs. Clinical observations have demonstrated an increased prevalence of euthyroid and hyperthyroid goiters in patients with acromegaly.The coexistence of acromegaly and Graves' disease is a very unusual event, the prevalence being Graves' disease associated with acromegaly and show that surgical remission of acromegaly leads to a better control of symptoms of Graves' disease.

  5. Clinical significance of determination of serum BGP levels in patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu Liping; Zhang Chunyan; Wang Linglong; Yu Yuefang; Zhu Weijie; Cai Ao

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum BGP levels in patients with Graves' disease. Methods: Serum BOP levels as well as T 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH, TGA, TMA levels were determined with RIA in 158 patients with Graves' disease and 145 controls. Results: The serum BGP levels in patients with Graves' disease were significantly higher than those in controls (P 3 , T 4 , FT 3 , FT 4 levels, but not with TSH, TGA, TMA. Conclusion: Serum BGP levels is a useful marker for monitoring bone metabolism in patients with Graves' disease. (authors)

  6. Graves, Ancestors and Cement in Land disputes in Acholi and Ikland, Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meinert, Lotte; Willerslev, Rane; Seebach, Sophie Hooge

    2017-01-01

    graves are made concrete and increasingly cemented indices of belonging in wrangles over land. Belonging is often justified through the presence of ancestor graves on land. The cementing of graves turns them into more concrete and durable proofs of ownership, and the reburial of relatives to disputed......The paper explores the roles of graves, ancestors and concrete pillars in disputes over land across different land-systems, -conflicts, and territory making in northern Uganda by comparing extended cases between Acholi in Gulu district and Ik in Kaabong district . In the post-conflict Acholi region...

  7. Comprehensive analysis of the related factors of early hypothyroidism occurring in patients with Graves' disease after 131I treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Jian; Wang Peng; Zhang Lijuan; He Yajing; Wang Renfei

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To make a comprehensive analysis of the related factors of early hypothyroidism occurring in patients with Graves' disease after 131 I treatment. Methods: The information of 131 I treated Graves' disease was collected including general data, clinical observation, laboratory data, thyroid function test, etc. Then a retrospective statistical analysis was carried out, using cluster analysis, factor analysis, discriminant analysis, multivariate regression analysis, etc. Results: 1) Cluster analysis and factor analysis showed that among clinical observation such as clinical course, treatment course, patients' state and disease occurrance, the first three factors correlated highly; among laboratory data such as thyrotrophin receptor antibody (TRAb), thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI), thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) and thyroid microsomal antibody (TMAb), both the first two and the last two correlated highly, each two factors had the similar effect. 2) Fsher discriminant analysis showed that among the thyroid weight, the effective half life, the maximum 131 I uptake percentage, total dose of 131 I and the average dose of 131 I per gram of thyroid, the last one had the most predicting value for incidence of early hypothyroidism. 3) Logistic regression analysis showed that among all the related factors of early hypothyroidism occurred after 131 I treated Graves' disease, thyroid weight, average dose of 131 I per gram of thyroid, the maximum 131 I uptake percentage and the level of TSI were effective factors. Conclusions: The occurrence of early hypothyroidism for 131 I-treated Graves' disease is probably affected by many factors. If more factors are taken into consideration before therapy and the theraputic dose is well adjusted accordingly, it can reduce the incidence of early hypothroidism to a certain extent. (authors)

  8. Cost-utility analysis comparing radioactive iodine, anti-thyroid drugs and total thyroidectomy for primary treatment of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Peter J; McLeod, Donald S A; Little, Richard; Gordon, Louisa

    2016-12-01

    Little data is in existence about the most cost-effective primary treatment for Graves' disease. We performed a cost-utility analysis comparing radioactive iodine (RAI), anti-thyroid drugs (ATD) and total thyroidectomy (TT) as first-line therapy for Graves' disease in England and Australia. We used a Markov model to compare lifetime costs and benefits (quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs)). The model included efficacy, rates of relapse and major complications associated with each treatment, and alternative second-line therapies. Model parameters were obtained from published literature. One-way sensitivity analyses were conducted. Costs were presented in 2015£ or Australian Dollars (AUD). RAI was the least expensive therapy in both England (£5425; QALYs 34.73) and Australia (AUD5601; 30.97 QALYs). In base case results, in both countries, ATD was a cost-effective alternative to RAI (£16 866; 35.17 QALYs; incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) £26 279 per QALY gained England; AUD8924; 31.37 QALYs; ICER AUD9687 per QALY gained Australia), while RAI dominated TT (£7115; QALYs 33.93 England; AUD15 668; 30.25 QALYs Australia). In sensitivity analysis, base case results were stable to changes in most cost, transition probabilities and health-relative quality-of-life (HRQoL) weights; however, in England, the results were sensitive to changes in the HRQoL weights of hypothyroidism and euthyroidism on ATD. In this analysis, RAI is the least expensive choice for first-line treatment strategy for Graves' disease. In England and Australia, ATD is likely to be a cost-effective alternative, while TT is unlikely to be cost-effective. Further research into HRQoL in Graves' disease could improve the quality of future studies. © 2016 European Society of Endocrinology.

  9. Health locus of control in patients with graves-basedow disease and hashimoto disease and their acceptance of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basinska, Malgorzata Anna; Andruszkiewicz, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Adaptation to a chronic somatic disease depends on a variety of factors, including belief in health locus of control. Correlation between health locus of control and illness acceptance in patients with Graves-Basedow and Hashimoto diseases as well as correlation between health locus of control, illness acceptance, sex, and age. THREE METHODS WERE APPLIED: Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale by K.A. Wallston, B.S. Wallston and R. DeVellis; the Acceptance of Illness Scale by B.J. Felton, T.A. Revenson, and G.A. Hinrichsena; and a personal questionnaire. Two groups were subject to the research: 68 patients with Graves-Basedow disease and 54 patients with Hashimoto disease. Patients with Graves-Basedow disease, women above all, have their health locus of control in other persons (P = 0,001) and are less inclined to accept their illness (P = 0,005) when compared to patients with Hashimoto disease. A statistically significant correlation occurred between the age of patients and external (i.e., in other persons) health locus of control. Beliefs in health locus of control and type of illness in female patient group are predictors of illness acceptance (P = 0,0009).

  10. Application of CT-guided percutaneous thyroid biopsy in basic study of interventional therapy for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Genfa; Zhao Wei; Hu Jihong; Jin Cangzheng; Yang Huiying

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of application of CT-guided percutaneous thyroid biopsy in basic study of interventional treatment for Graves disease. Methods: Fifteen patients of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease had been undertaken transcathter arterial embolizsation with PVA micropheres including 52 core needle biopsy(CNB)of pre-or post-interventional procedure. All procedures were divided into 2 groups according to the size of the thyroid enlargement: (1) II degree enlargement (n=19)under palpation puncture. (2) No enlargement or under II degree enlargement (n=33)with palpation and CT-guided puncture. Results: In group (1), 17 of the 19 procedures with palpation puncture were succeeded, reaching a successful rate of 89.5%. For group (2), the successful rate of CT-guided puncture was 91.7%. The difference between the successful rate of two groups showed statistical significance (P<0.05). No complication occurred during procedures in all cases. Conclusions: CT-guided thyroid core needle biopsy is an accurate, safe and high successful procedure providing the basic study for post-interventional treatment of Graves disease. (authors)

  11. Microeconomic loans and health education to families in impoverished communities: implications for the HIV pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Renslow D; Bronson, John D; Teter, Caroline J; Wykoff, Randolph F

    2004-01-01

    Poverty is among the root causes of death and poor health worldwide. Project HOPE's Village Health Bank (VHB) program is a public health intervention that combines integrated microcredit lending and health education. Groups of 18 to 25 women receive small loans, and biweekly, one-hour health education sessions. Since 1993, about 50,000 women in 949 VHBs have participated in seven countries in the Americas, Africa, and Southeast Asia, receiving more than US$25 million in loans and 8,445 hours of health education. Members of VHBs are charged modest interest rates that enable them to become self-sufficient (eg, able to cover all operating charges, including the costs of the health education staff, and the necessary loan capital to continue without infusion of outside resources). The VHB program produces substantial economic improvements for individuals and groups, and benefits in health knowledge and behaviors, including increased utilization of healthcare services. Data from Guatemala, Malawi, and Thailand demonstrate that VHBs in countries with high HIV prevalence have been comparably successful in spite of the enormous added burdens of chronic illness, deaths, and orphans in need of support. For example, in 2004, 48 percent of 266 VHB members in Malawi experienced at least one death in their household in the preceding year, and 67 percent housed one or more orphans with an average of two orphans per household. Because of the unique combination of increased household economic stability and improved health knowledge, the VHB program is now being adapted to families of people affected by HIV/AIDS, including orphans.

  12. Labor, social exclusion, and chronic muscular illness: the case of mid-impoverished sectors in a peripheral neighborhood in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betrisey, Débora

    2009-01-01

    This study analyzes the combination of different and differing representations and care practices that social groups belonging to a mid-impoverished sector of Madrid use to alleviate chronic muscular pain, as well as the consequences that this has for both domestic and work life. I collected empirical evidence in a peripheral neighborhood of Madrid during 2004 using a number of anthropological methods such as participant observation, in-depth interviews, and life-history interviews. The following results can be singled out from the completed investigation: in the context of social impoverishment there are macrostructural factors that are transformed into health-destructive processes that influence the development and incidence of chronic muscular illness. This requires the different social groups that are suffering from this to establish a number of care practices mainly based on the use of Western medicine as well as other medical traditions of self-care. These practices relate to economic, educational, sociocultural, and ideological factors that characterize the lives of these individuals. This essay focuses on perceptions of illness and care practices beyond the biomedical context, as it addresses those representations and practices that these impoverished social groups display in accordance with their way of life and in relation to their ailments.

  13. Place of radiotherapy in the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Maalouf, Toufic; George, Jean-Luc; Bey, Pierre; Leclere, Jacques; Luporsi, Elisabeth

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the response of Graves' orbitopathy to irradiation, and to specify the prognostic factors allowing one to better define the indications of orbital radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: From 1977 to 1996, 199 patients received bilateral orbital irradiation delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions and 2 weeks for a progressive Graves' orbitopathy. 195 patients were seen between 1 and 6 months after radiotherapy. The different symptoms were studied and their response to radiation was analyzed. Factors such as age, sex, evolution of thyroid disease, history of symptoms, and previous or combined treatments were analyzed. Results: The results revealed that 50 patients (26%) had a good or excellent response, 98 (50%) had a partial response, 37 (19%) were stable, 10 (5%) had a progression of disease. The signs that best responded to radiotherapy were the infiltration of soft tissues and the corneal involvement. Responses of proptosis or oculomotor disorders were more complete when these signs were not advanced at the time of treatment. Irradiation seemed to have the same efficacy when applied as first-line treatment or after failure of corticosteroids. Neither modality of treatment of hyperthyroidism nor thyroid status at the time of orbital irradiation modified the results. The best results were recorded for early or moderately advanced presentation (p = 0.05). Patients treated within a delay of 7 months after the beginning of the ophthalmopathy had better responses than patients treated later (p = 0.10). Conclusion: Radiation therapy was successful in Graves' orbitopathy by stopping the progression of disease in almost all cases, by improving the comfort of patients, by obtaining objective responses, and by avoiding surgical treatments particularly when signs were moderate

  14. Characterization of radioiodine therapy failures in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Schreckenberger, M.; Reinartz, P.; Nowak, B.; Ostwald, E.; Schaefer, W.; Block, S.; Setani, K.; Buell, U.

    2001-01-01

    Aim of this study was a characterization of radioiodine therapy (RIT) failures in Graves' disease without simultaneous carbimazole. Method: 226 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of Graves' disease received 686.8 ± 376.4 MBq of iodine-131 orally for thyroid ablation. Target dose was 250 Gy. All patients were followed up for 6 months. Therapy failures were compared with successes regarding possible influencing variables initial thyroid volume, thyroid function, immune activity (TRAb), I-131 uptake, effective half-life, absorbed energy dose, age and gender. Results: 212 of 226 patients (93.8%) were treated successfully, 14 (6.2%) showed a hyperthyroidism relapse within 6 months which required a second radioiodine therapy. A success rate of 92.5% (62/67) could also be achieved with 67 patients who were hyperthyroid at the time of RIT. Compared to the therapy successes, the 14 failures achieved significantly lower absorbed doses (223.8 ± 76.6 Gy vs. 285.2 ± 82.1 Gy, p 0.2). Of the 14 failures, n = 8 reached an absorbed dose 250 Gy. Stepwise logistic regression revealed only absorbed energy dose as a variable significantly influencing therapy success (p 0.2) or gender (p = 0.13). Two-tailed Fisher's exact test showed no significant influence of gender on success rates (failures/successes: male 1/36, female 13/176, p = 0.48). Conclusions: Except for the absorbed energy dose, no other significant variable influencing the outcome of radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease without simultaneous carbimazole could be found. It should be noted, though, that 5 therapy failures (2.2%) reached an absorbed energy dose of >250 Gy. (orig.) [de

  15. Aesthetic refinements in the treatment of graves ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doumit, Gaby; Abouhassan, William; Yaremchuk, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Graves ophthalmopathy is a chronic, multisystem, autoimmune disorder characterized by increased volume of intraorbital fat and hypertrophic extraocular muscles. Proptosis, impaired ocular motility, diplopia, lid retraction, and impaired visual acuity are treated with orbit decompression and fat reduction. The authors present the addition of skeletal augmentation to further improve periorbital aesthetics. Through a transconjunctival with lateral canthotomy incision, a balanced orbital decompression was executed, removing medial and lateral walls and medial floor. Intraorbital fat was excised. All patients underwent placement of porous polyethylene infraorbital rim implants and midface soft-tissue elevation, increasing inferior orbital rim projection and improving the globe-cheek relationship. From 2009 to 2012, 13 patients (11 female and two male; 26 eyes) with Graves ophthalmopathy underwent surgery at two institutions. Outcomes were evaluated for improvements of proptosis, diplopia, dry eye symptoms, and cosmetic satisfaction. Postoperative follow-up ranged from 0.5 to 3 years (median, 1.5 years). The mean improvement on Hertel exophthalmometry was 5.4 mm. Diplopia resolved in three patients (23 percent). No patients had worsening diplopia, and 12 (92 percent) discontinued use of eye lubricants. All patients had cosmetic satisfaction. One patient suffered temporary inferior orbital nerve paresthesia. There were no infections, hematomas, or ocular complications. Skeletal augmentation is a useful adjunct to orbital decompression and fat excision for treating Graves ophthalmopathy. Balanced orbital decompression with infraorbital rim implants is reliable, effective, and safe, with good, lasting results. Resolution of ocular symptoms is improved, as are the patient's personal well-being and social life, with a high-benefit-to-low-risk. Therapeutic, IV.

  16. Development of Graves' ophthalmopathy and uveitis after radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in a patient with HTLA-I associated myelopathy (HAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Yasunori; Migita, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Tomoji; Okuda, Itsuko; Takeshita, Akira; Takagi, Akio; Shishiba, Yoshimasa

    1994-01-01

    HTLV-I carriers or patients with HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM) are prone to immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. We present a 44-year-old female with HAM who developed Graves' disease. She developed severe Graves' ophthalmopathy shortly after 131 I therapy, concurrently with a remarkable increase in TSH-receptor antibody titer. Ophthalmopathy was aggravated in spite of prednisolone therapy and euthyroidism being maintained by thyroxine replacement. Uveitis also developed after 131 I therapy and iridocyclitis finally required trabeculotomy. This case suggests that HAM patients may have a higher risk of immune-mediated Graves' ophthalmopathy after 131 I therapy.(author)

  17. Preeclampsia grave: características y consecuencias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Pérez de Villa Amil Álvarez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento: la preeclampsia es un trastorno hipertensivo del embarazo y es una de las principales causas de morbimortalidad perinatal y materna. Objetivo: identificar los factores maternos, terapéuticos, y daños asociados a la preeclampsia grave en gestantes. Método: estudio de serie de casos, que incluyó 69 pacientes diagnosticadas con preeclampsia grave en el período del 1ro de enero de 2012 al 31 de diciembre de 2013, atendidas en el Hospital General Universitario Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima. Se clasificaron en dos grupos correspondiendo ambos a los criterios de preeclampsia grave con y sin asociación de factores agravantes. Se evaluaron variables relacionadas a: características maternas, características de atención médica, características neonatales y fetales. Se aplicó un formulario confeccionado según los datos obtenidos de las historias clínicas, acorde a la Clasificación Internacional de Enfermedades Décima Revisión. Las comparaciones entre grupos se efectuaron por el estadístico X2 aceptándose como significativo una p<0,05. Resultados: la frecuencia de preeclampsia grave fue de 0,8x100 partos. La mayor frecuencia correspondió al rango de edad de 31-35 años. La eclampsia se observó en 0,91x1000 partos. El daño materno ascendió a 30,4 %. El sulfato de magnesio se utilizó como profilaxis en el 89 % de los casos. La frecuencia de eclampsia en las que no se usó fue del 50 %, mientras que en las que se usó fue de solo 6,4 %. La cesárea se realizó en el 85,5 % de las pacientes. El daño neonatal se asoció al 52,3 %. La mortalidad fetal tardía fue de 4,6x100 nacimientos. En las diferencias intergrupos se observaron divergencias significativas respecto al daño neonatal. Conclusión: es evidente la alta asociación de restricción del crecimiento intrauterino con la prematuridad inducida, alto índice de cesárea primitiva y el elevado daño materno, neonatal y fetal. El uso del sulfato de magnesio impresiona con

  18. Effects of orbital radiotherapy in 199 cases of Graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Bey, Pierre; George, Jean Louis; Maalouf, Toufic; Leclere, Jacques; Werhya, Gerard; Luporsi, Elisabeth

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Retrospective study to assess response of Graves' orbitopathy to standardized retrobulbar radiotherapy. Effects on different classes of signs are analysed and prognostic factors are searched. Indications of this treatment can be precise. Materials and methods: One hundred and ninety-nine consecutive patients who had clinically progressive Graves'orbitopathy were treated with radiotherapy between 1977 and 1996. All patients received a 6 MV Xrays orbital irradiation of 20 Gy in 10 fractions and 2 weeks. Signs and symptoms were classified before and after treatment directly or retrospectively according to the 'NO SPECS' recommended classification [J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1977;44:203]. Index of ophthalmopathy and responses were evaluated as described by Donaldson [J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1973;37:276]. Prognostic factors such as age, gender, therapies and response of hyperthyroidism, duration and associated treatment of eye disease are analysed. An investigation through letters sent to the patients and their ophthalmologists documents long term outcome of 128 patients with a mean follow-up of 6 years (2 to 16 years). Results: On 195 evaluable patients, 50 (26%) achieved a good or excellent response -GER-, 98 (50 %) had slight improvement, 37 (19 %) were stable, 10 (5 %) had progression of Grave's ophthalmopathy. By class of signs, GER occurred in 37%, 34%, 38%, 37.5% of cases, respectively for soft tissues involvement, proptosis, extra ocular muscle involvement and optic neuropathy. Corneal involvements yields the best results with 49% GER. Proptosis when moderate form had good results (55% GER), but advanced presentations had poor responses (17% GER). Proptosis decreased of 1 to 3 mm or remained stable. Six patients treated for optic neuropathy experienced aggravation. Same efficacy was observed when radiotherapy was applied as first line therapy or after failure of corticosteroids and when radiotherapy was delayed up to one year after beginning of

  19. Esclerodermia, tireoidite e miastenia grave: estudo de um caso

    OpenAIRE

    Werneck,Antonio L. dos Santos; Checcacci-Balod,Tamara; Tuma,Graça

    1993-01-01

    Uma paciente de 36 anos com miastenia grave desenvolveu após dois anos intolerância ao frio, o que conduziu ao diagnóstico de tireoidite de Hashimoto. Quatro anos mais tarde apresentou pele espessada nas mãos (esclerodermia limitada). O quadro clínico e os exames complementares encaminharam o diagnóstico para a forma CREST de esclerodermia sistêmica progressiva. Discute-se a dificuldade diagnóstica da esclerodermia, assim como suas síndromes de superposição. Doença de Hashimoto e miastenia gr...

  20. Treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism: evidence-based and emerging modalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    Currently there are three well-established treatment options for hyperthyroid Graves' disease (GD): antithyroid drug therapy with thionamides (ATD), radioactive iodine treatment with (131)I, and thyroid surgery. This article reviews the current evidence so the reader can evaluate advantages...... and disadvantages of these treatment modalities. Surgery is rarely used, except for patients who have a large goiter or ophthalmopathy. Fewer than 50% of patients treated with ATD remain in long-term remission. Therefore, radioactive iodine is used increasingly. No data as yet support the routine use of biologic...

  1. Graves' hyperthyroidism and moderate alcohol consumption: evidence for disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlé, Allan; Bülow Pedersen, Inge; Knudsen, Nils; Perrild, Hans; Ovesen, Lars; Rasmussen, Lone Banke; Jørgensen, Torben; Laurberg, Peter

    2013-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of autoimmune hypothyroidism, similar to findings in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. We aimed to study a possible association between alcohol intake and autoimmune Graves' hyperthyroidism. This is a population-based, case-control study. In a well-defined Danish population (2,027,208 person-years of observation), we prospectively identified patients with new overt thyroid dysfunction and studied 272 patients with Graves' hyperthyroidism. For each patient, we recruited four age-gender-region-matched controls with normal thyroid function (n = 1088). Participants gave detailed information on current and previous alcohol intake as well as other factors to be used for analyses. The association between alcohol intake and development of hyperthyroidism was analysed in conditional multivariate Cox regression models. Graves' patients had a lower reported alcohol consumption than controls (median units of alcohol (12 g) per week: 2 vs 4, P hyperthyroidism. Odds ratios (95% confidence interval) compared with the reference group with a recent (last year) consumption of 1-2 units of alcohol per week were as follows: 0 units/week 1·73 (1·17-2·56), 3-10 units/week 0·56 (0·39-0·79), 11-20 units/week 0·37 (0·21-0·65), ≥21 units/week 0·22 (0·08-0·60). Similar results were found for maximum previous alcohol consumption during a calendar year. No interaction was found with the type of alcohol consumed (wine vs beer), smoking habit, age, gender or region of inhabitancy. Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a considerable reduction in the risk of Graves' disease with hyperthyroidism--irrespective of age and gender. Autoimmune thyroid disease seems to be much more dependent on environmental factors than hitherto anticipated. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Tratamento do hipertireoidismo da Doença de Graves

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Vânia A.; Gross, Jorge L.; Maia, Ana Luiza

    2001-01-01

    A Doença de Graves constitui a forma mais comum de hipertireoidismo e três abordagens terapêuticas são atualmente utilizadas: drogas antitireoidianas (DAT), cirurgia e iodo radioativo (131I). As DAT continuam como tratamento de primeira escolha em pacientes com doença leve, bócios pequenos, crianças e adolescentes, e em situações especiais como na gravidez. Por outro lado, o 131I tem sido cada vez mais utilizado, porque é considerado um tratamento seguro, definitivo e de fácil aplicação. O ri...

  3. The treatment of Graves' disease in children and adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Sang Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease (GD accounts for 10%-15% of thyroid disorders in children and adolescents. The use of antithyroid drugs as the initial treatment option in GD is well accepted. An average two years remission is achieved in about 30% of children treated with antithyroid drugs. However, the optimal treatment duration and the predictive marker of remission after antithyroid drug therapy are still controversial. Additionally, 131I therapy and surgery are considered the option for treatment in children and adolescents with GD. We review the treatment options for pediatric GD and the possible determinants of remission and relapse on antithyroid drug treatment in children and adolescents.

  4. Household catastrophic healthcare expenditure and impoverishment due to rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Tharani; Lee, Way-Seah; Lee, Kok-Foo; Jit, Mark; Ng, Chiu-Wan

    2015-01-01

    While healthcare costs for rotavirus gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization may be burdensome on households in Malaysia, exploration on the distribution and catastrophic impact of these expenses on households are lacking. We assessed the economic burden, levels and distribution of catastrophic healthcare expenditure, the poverty impact on households and inequities related to healthcare payments for acute gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Malaysia. A two-year prospective, hospital-based study was conducted from 2008 to 2010 in an urban (Kuala Lumpur) and rural (Kuala Terengganu) setting in Malaysia. All children under the age of 5 years admitted for acute gastroenteritis were included. Patients were screened for rotavirus and information on healthcare expenditure was obtained. Of the 658 stool samples collected at both centers, 248 (38%) were positive for rotavirus. Direct and indirect costs incurred were significantly higher in Kuala Lumpur compared with Kuala Terengganu (US$222 Vs. US$45; pMalaysia.

  5. Depression treatment for impoverished mothers by point-of-care providers: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segre, Lisa S; Brock, Rebecca L; O'Hara, Michael W

    2015-04-01

    Depression in low-income, ethnic-minority women of childbearing age is prevalent and compromises infant and child development. Yet numerous barriers prevent treatment delivery. Listening Visits (LV), an empirically supported intervention developed for delivery by British home-visiting nurses, could address this unmet mental health need. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) evaluated the effectiveness of LV delivered at a woman's usual point-of-care, including home visits or an ob-gyn office. Listening Visits were delivered to depressed pregnant women or mothers of young children by their point-of-care provider (e.g., home visitor or physician's assistant), all of whom had low levels of prior counseling experience. Three quarters of the study's participants were low-income. Of those who reported ethnicity, all identified themselves as minorities. Participants from 4 study sites (N = 66) were randomized in a 2:1 ratio, to LV or a wait-list control group (WLC). Assessments, conducted at baseline and 8 weeks, evaluated depression, quality of life, and treatment satisfaction. Depressive severity, depressive symptoms, and quality of life significantly improved among LV recipients as compared with women receiving standard social/health services. Women valued LV as evidenced by their high attendance rates and treatment satisfaction ratings. In a stepped model of depression care, LV can provide an accessible, acceptable, and effective first-line treatment option for at-risk women who otherwise are unlikely to receive treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. The relationship of psychological factors to the prognosis of hyperthyroidism in antithyroid drug-treated patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukao, Atsushi; Takamatsu, Junta; Murakami, Yasuhiro; Sakane, Sadaki; Miyauchi, Akira; Kuma, Kanji; Hayashi, Shunichiro; Hanafusa, Toshiaki

    2003-05-01

    The relationship between emotional stress and the onset of hyperthyroidism has been well investigated, but the relationship between psychological factors and prognosis of antithyroid drug-treated hyperthyroidism is not well known. This study has examined not only emotional stresses but also patients' personality traits using specific tests. A prospective cohort study. Sixty-nine patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease in the euthyroid state after 2-5 years of antithyroid drug therapy and 32 healthy subjects as the control group. Patients responded to three types of questionnaires, including the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory for personality traits, the Natsume's Stress Inventory for major life events, and the Hayashi's Daily Life Stress Inventory for daily life stresses. In the Graves' disease patients, stress scores of life events correlated significantly with serum TSH receptor antibody activity (r = 0.424, P thyroid volume (r = 0.480, P < 0.001). When the patients were divided according to prognosis (41 with relapse and 28 with remission), four personality traits including hypochondriasis, depression, paranoia and psychasthenia (mental fatigue) were significantly (P = 0.0146, 0.0052, 0.0125, and 0.0186, respectively) more common in the relapsed Graves' disease group than those of the remitted group. Six personality traits of conversion hysteria, psychopathic deviation, masculinity and feminity, schizophrenia, hypomania, and social introversion were not significantly different between the two groups. The scores of daily hassles (problems of daily life) were also significantly (P = 0.0124) greater in the relapsed Graves' disease group than in the remitted group. The scale scores of depression and psychasthenia showed a positive correlation with scores of daily hassles (r = 0.535, P < 0.0001; r = 0.580, P < 0.0001, respectively), while an inverse correlation with scores of daily uplifts (r = -0.373, P = 0.0332; r = -0.322, P = -0.0120, respectively

  7. Dyslipidaemia and Undernutrition in Children from Impoverished Areas of Maceió, State of Alagoas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma M. M. T. Florêncio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic undernutrition causes reduced growth and endocrine adaptations in order to maintain basic life processes. In the present study, the biochemical profiles of chronically undernourished children were determined in order to test the hypothesis that chronic undernutrition also causes changes in lipid profile in pre-school children. The study population comprised 80 children aged between 12 and 71 months, including 60 with moderate undernutrition [height-for-age Z (HAZ scores ≤ −2 and > −3] and 20 with severe undernutrition (HAZ scores ≤ −3. Socioeconomic, demographic and environmental data were obtained by application of a questionnaire, and anthropometric measurements and information relating to sex, age and feeding habits were collected by a trained nutritionist. Blood samples were analysed for haemoglobin, vitamin A, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and serum lipids, while cortisol was assayed in the saliva. Faecal samples were submitted to parasitological investigation. Analysis of variance and χ2 methods were employed in order to select the variables that participated in the multivariate logistic regression analysis. The study population was socioeconomically homogeneous, while the lack of a treated water supply was clearly associated with the degree of malnutrition. Most children were parasitised and anaemia was significantly more prevalent among the severely undernourished. Levels of IGF-1 decreased significantly with increasing severity of undernutrition. Lipid analysis revealed that almost all of the children had dyslipidemia, while low levels of high-density lipoprotein were associated with the degree of undernutrition. It is concluded that chronic malnutrition causes endocrine changes that give rise to alterations in the metabolic profile of pre-school children.

  8. Paying for hospital-based care of Kala-azar in Nepal: assessing catastrophic, impoverishment and economic consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Shiva R; Maskay, Nephil M; Sharma, Bishnu P

    2009-03-01

    Households obtaining health care services in developing countries incur substantial costs, despite services generally being provided free of charge by public health institutions. This constitutes an economic burden on low-income households, and contributes to deepening their level of poverty. In addition to the economic burden of obtaining health care, the method of financing these payments has implications for the distribution of household assets. This effect on resource-poor households is amplified since they have decreased access to health insurance. Recent literature, however, ignores the importance of the method of financing health care payments. This paper looks at the case of Nepal and highlights the impact on households of paying for hospital-based care of Kala-azar (KA) by analysing the catastrophic, impoverishment and economic consequences of their coping strategies. The paper utilizes micro-data on a random selection of 50% of the KA-affected households of Siraha and Saptari districts of Nepal. The empirical results suggest that direct costs of hospital-based treatment of KA are catastrophic since they consume 17% of annual household income. This expenditure causes more than 20% of KA-affected households to fall below the poverty line, with the remaining households being pushed into the category of marginal poor; the poverty gap ratio is more than 90%. Further, KA incidence can have prolonged and severe economic consequences for the household economy due to the mechanisms of informal sector financing to which households resort. A heavy burden of loan repayments can lead households on a downward spiral that eventually becomes a poverty trap. In other words, the method of financing health care payments is an important ingredient in understanding the economic burden of disease.

  9. Implementing Community-based Health Planning and Services in impoverished urban communities: health workers' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwameme, Adanna Uloaku; Tabong, Philip Teg-Nefaah; Adongo, Philip Baba

    2018-03-20

    Three-quarters of sub-Saharan Africa's urban population currently live under slum conditions making them susceptible to ill health and diseases. Ghana characterizes the situation in many developing countries where the urban poor have become a group much afflicted by complex health problems associated with their living conditions, and the intra-city inequity between them and the more privileged urban dwellers with respect to health care accessibility. Adopting Ghana's rural Community-Based Health Planning and Service (CHPS) programme in urban areas is challenging due to the differences in social networks and health challenges thus making modifications necessary. The Community Health Officers (CHOs) and their supervisors are the frontline providers of health in the community and there is a need to analyze and document the health sector response to urban CHPS. The study was solely qualitative and 19 in-depth interviews were conducted with all the CHOs and key health sector individuals in supervisory/coordinating positions working in urban CHPS zones to elicit relevant issues concerning urban CHPS implementation. Thematic content data analysis was done using the NVivo 7 software. Findings from this appraisal suggest that the implementation of this urban concept of the CHPS programme has been well undertaken by the health personnel involved in the process despite the challenges that they face in executing their duties. Several issues came to light including the lack of first aid drugs, as well as the need for the Integrated Management of Neonatal and Childhood Illnesses (IMNCI) programme and more indepth training for CHOs. In addition, the need to provide incentives for the volunteers and Community Health Committee members to sustain their motivation and the CHOs' apprehensions with regards to furthering their education and progression in their careers were key concerns raised. The establishment of the CHPS concept in the urban environment albeit challenging has been

  10. Sudden unexpected death due to Graves' disease during physical altercation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dengming; Yuan, Xiaogang; Yang, Tiantong; Chang, Lin; Zhang, Xiang; Burke, Allen; Fowler, David; Li, Ling

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a 30-year-old woman who suddenly collapsed after having a physical altercation with her husband. Despite immediate resuscitation, she died on arrival at the hospital. The victim's parents requested an autopsy because they believed that their daughter was killed by her husband. Postmortem examination revealed that the victim had a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland and cardiomegaly with left ventricular hypertrophy. There was no evidence of significant trauma on the body. Further postmortem thyroid function tests and review of her medical history indicated that her death was due to Graves' disease. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported of sudden death due to cardiac arrhythmia from Graves' disease induced by physical and emotional stress associated with the criminal activity of another person. The autopsy findings are described. In addition, the literature is reviewed and the significance of postmortem evaluation of thyroid hormones in the cases of sudden death is discussed. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Radioiodine-induced hypothyroidism in Graves' disease: factors associated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunnien, A.J.; Hay, I.D.; Gorman, C.A.; Offord, K.P.; Scanlon, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was done of the records of 454 patients who received their first 131 I treatment for Graves' disease during six periods covering 1951 to 1978. In the earliest group, 3% of patients were hypothyroid 3 mo after 131 I use, and 40% were hypothyroid at 1 yr. In the most recent group, 36% of patients were hypothyroid at 3 mo and 91% were myxedematous at 1 yr. Although no obvious trends were noted, whether in the number of patients pretreated with thionamide drugs, in the mean 24-hr 131 I uptake, or in the calculated dose of 131 I (muCi/estimated gram of thyroid tissue) during the years of the study, the initial mean dose of 131 I administered increased from 8.1 mCi in the earliest group to 13.8 mCi in the latest group. Concurrently, estimates of gland size increased from a mean of 26 g in the first group to 43 g in the last. If, in patients with Graves' disease, the thyroid gland size did not truly increase during the years of the study, the increasing occurrence of early hypothyroidism seen after 131 I use may reflect the conscious or unconscious decision to use larger doses of 131 I calculated on the basis of inflated estimates of thyroid gland weight

  12. Effect of radioiodine on stimulatory activity of Graves' immunoglobulins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, S.; McGregor, A.M.; Kendall-Taylor, P.; Peterson, M.M.; Smith, B.R.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of 131 I therapy on the activity of thyroid stimulating antibody (TSAb) and thyrotrophin binding inhibiting immunoglobulin (TBII) in nineteen patients with Graves' disease have been studied. Prior to 131 I administration, TSAb was detected in 84%, and TBII in 68% of patients. Following 131 I administration TSAb and TBII were detectable in 100% of patients. The elevation 3 months after treatment of the means of both the TSAb and TBII indices for the group of nineteen patients was highly significant compared with pretreatment values. All the patients went into remission during the course of the study and the TSAb index declined in all patients, becoming undetectable in eleven; TBII also declined in most patients but remained detectable in thirteen. The study furthermore afforded the opportunity for a direct comparison of binding with stimulatory activity. These results show that after 131 I therapy for Graves' hyperthyroidism there is a transient increase in TSAb as well as TBII, followed by a decline, and that the measurement of binding and stimulatory activities are in good general agreement. (author)

  13. Clinical update: treatment of hyperthyroidism in Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Ibrahim; Tordjman, Karen

    2010-03-01

    The presence of thyroid eye disease (TED) may influence the treatment of hyperthyroidism in patients with Graves' disease. Moreover, treatment of hyperthyroidism may affect the course of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO). We review the literature and summarise recent knowledge about the impact of treatment modality for hyperthyroidism in GO. Anti-thyroid drugs (ATDs) remain the simplest and safest way to treat hyperthyroidism in patients with GO, but they are associated with a high relapse rate of hyperthyroidism and they have no effect on the course of GO. Radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment may be associated with exacerbation of GO especially in high risk patients, when glucocorticoid prophylaxis may be indicated. Large prospective trials are still lacking to define the exact effect of RAI on the course of GO, particularly in relation to other known risk factors. Likewise, clear guidelines for prophylactic glucocorticoid therapy are needed. RAI should be cautiously used in patients with more severe ophthalmopathy and concomitant I.V glucocorticoids should be considered. Thyroid surgery, whether total or subtotal thyroidectomy, has no effect on the course of ophthalmopathy. However, total thyroid ablation that combines surgery with radioactive iodine, as a means of achieving thyroid antigen disappearance, is increasingly gaining attention for the treatment of patients with GO, especially those undergoing thyroid surgery, but also for those with severe unresponsive ophthalmopathy. Studies supporting this approach are awaited.

  14. Hyperthyroidism in Graves disease. Current trends in management and diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haibach, H.

    1976-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay for T 3 is now widely available and is a useful diagnostic tool for hyperthyroidism, especially in T 3 -thyrotoxicosis. It is an essential tool in the management of hyperthyroidism that persists after treatment with normal T 4 serum levels or, in euthyroid cases, with low T 4 serum levels. In these conditions, it reflects the metabolic state more accurately than serum levels of T 4 . A promising new test is the response of radioimmunoassayable TSH to protirelin relin (TRH) administration. An absent response indicates pituitary suppression and thyroid autonomy as seen in frank hyperthyroidism or euthyroid Graves disease, treated or untreated. It is safer and quicker than the conventional T 3 suppression test of thyroid radioactive iodine uptake and may replace it at least partly in the future. The recently recognized sharp decline in the remission rate of patients subjected to thyroid drug therapy in the last decade has made this treatment much less efficacious. By necessity, it will probably lead to greater reliance on treatment with radioactive iodine in the majority of the patients with the hyperthyroidism of Graves disease

  15. O mosaico patogênico da pancreatite aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Cavalcante Carneiro

    Full Text Available A pancreatite aguda tem sido alvo de grandes discussões que vão desde o entendimento de sua fisiopatologia até a investigação de novas modalidades terapêuticas. Reconhece-se que a necrose pancreática e a falência orgânica múltipla - mormente associadas à infecção - representam os principais fatores determinantes da evolução para o óbito, mas, apesar dos grandes avanços em seu estudo, a doença permanece como um desafio para o clínico e o cirurgião. Deste modo, um melhor conhecimento dos mecanismos envolvidos em sua fisiopatologia pode ser a chave para um tratamento mais eficaz, principalmente em relação às formas graves, cuja letalidade ainda encontra-se substancialmente elevada. Baseado nestas considerações, o presente trabalho tem por objetivo a revisão bibliográfica da fisiopatologia, dos fatores patogênicos envolvidos na história natural da pancreatite aguda grave e dos eventos associados à síndrome da resposta inflamatória sistêmica e à sepse, esboçando-se assim o mosaico patogênico desta importante condição.

  16. [Severe neonatal hyperthyroidism which reveals a maternal Graves' disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guérin, B; Vautier, V; Boin-Gay, V; Estrade, G; Choulot, J-J; Doireau, V

    2004-04-01

    Two of every thousand pregnancies are complicated by Graves' disease. Diagnosis is suggested by maternal disorders (tachycardia, exophthalmia, weight loss.) or fetal disorders (tachycardia, intra-uterine growth retardation, preterm birth.). Due to transfer into the fetal compartment of maternal antibodies which stimulate the fetal thyroid by binding to the thyroid thyrotropin (TSH) receptor, only 1% of children born to these mothers are described as having hyperthyroidism. Neonatal thyrotoxicosis disappears with clearance of the maternal antibodies; clinical signs usually disappear during the first four Months of life. The most frequent neonatal clinical signs of thyrotoxicosis are tachycardia, goiter, hyperexcitability, poor weight gain, hepatosplenomegaly, stare and eyelid retraction. Diagnosis is based on determination of the blood level of triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) and TSH. To confirm the nature of hyperthyroidism, thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins (TSI) should be assayed. The kinetics of TSI provides a guide for therapeutic adaptation and disappearance of TSI is a sign of recovery. Rare cases of familial non-autoimmune hyperthyroidism have been shown to be caused by germline mutation of the thyrotropin receptor. We report a case of severe neonatal hyperthyroidism which led to the diagnosis of maternal Graves' disease.

  17. Graves' disease: cost-effectiveness of clinical and radioiodine treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz junior, Antonio F.; Takahashi, Miriam H.; Albino, Claudio C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this study, we set out to evaluate the costs and effectiveness of the two most used therapies in Graves' disease: antithyroid drugs (ATD) and radioiodine (RAI). Twenty-tree patients, 7 men and 16 women, with a mean age of 35.4 years, treated with ATD and 35 patients, 5 men and 30 women, mean age of 39.4 years, treated with RAI were studied. After 2 years receiving ATD, 21 patients achieved euthyroidism and 2 remained hyperthyroid. In the RAI group, 21 patients presented hypothyroidism and 13 became euthyroid. To calculate the costs of each therapy, we analysed the number of visits during this period, the laboratory data and the drugs needed, such as tiamazol and/or thyroxine. The group treated only with ATD needed a higher number of visits and laboratory measurements, with the mean total cost of U$ 791.65, while the RAI group spent a mean amount of U$ 366.44. Therefore, the costs of the RAI treatment were 53,7 % lower than clinical therapy with ATD. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that RAI treatment has a lower cost than ATD, being very effective in controlling the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease. (author)

  18. Guidelines for the treatment of childhood-onset Graves' disease in Japan, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamitani, Kanshi; Sato, Hirokazu; Ohye, Hidemi; Harada, Shohei; Arisaka, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    Purpose behind developing these guidelines: Over one decade ago, the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug, 2006" (Japan Thyroid Association (JTA)) were published as the standard drug therapy protocol for Graves' disease. The "Guidelines for the Treatment of Childhood-Onset Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug in Japan, 2008" were published to provide guidance on the treatment of pediatric patients. Based on new evidence, a revised version of the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug, 2006" (JTA) was published in 2011, combined with the "Handbook of Radioiodine Therapy for Graves' Disease 2007" (JTA). Subsequently, newer findings on pediatric Graves' disease have been reported. Propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced serious hepatopathy is an important problem in pediatric patients. The American Thyroid Association's guidelines suggest that, in principle, physicians must not administer PTU to children. On the other hand, the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug, 2011" (JTA) state that radioiodine therapy is no longer considered a "fundamental contraindication" in children. Therefore, the "Guidelines for the Treatment of Childhood-Onset Graves' Disease with Antithyroid Drug in Japan, 2008" required revision.

  19. Hypocalcaemia following thyroidectomy for treatment of Graves' disease: implications for patient management and cost-effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, O R; Scott-Coombes, D M

    2011-08-01

    No consensus exists on optimal treatment for Graves' disease once anti-thyroid medication fails to induce remission. Total thyroidectomy is a more cost-effective treatment than radioactive iodine or life-long anti-thyroid medication, but hypocalcaemia is an important complication, leading to longer hospital admissions and increased prescription costs. This study aimed to compare the relative risk of hypocalcaemia requiring medical treatment for patients with Graves' disease. Prospective cohort study of patients undergoing total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease and for multinodular goitre, calculating serum calcium levels 24-hours post-operatively and prescription rates. Mean corrected calcium concentrations 24 hours post-operatively were 2.05 mmol/l for Graves' disease patients and 2.14 mmol/l for multinodular goitre patients (p = 0.003). Biochemical hypocalcaemia developed in 92 per cent (n = 34) of Graves' disease patients and 71 per cent (n = 43) of multinodular goitre patients (p = 0.012). Graves' disease patients were more likely to be prescribed calcium supplementation pre-discharge (p = 0.037). Total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease carries an increased risk of hypocalcaemia at 24 hours, and of calcium supplementation pre-discharge. Graves' disease patients should be informed of the increased risk of hypocalcaemia associated with total thyroidectomy, and this risk must be factored into future cost-effectiveness analysis.

  20. Fatal and non-fatal adverse events of glucocorticoid therapy for Graves' orbitopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcocci, Claudio; Watt, Torquil; Altea, Maria Antonietta

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the side effects of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy observed by European thyroidologists during the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy (GO).......The objective of this study was to investigate the side effects of glucocorticoid (GC) therapy observed by European thyroidologists during the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy (GO)....

  1. Rectus extraocular muscle paths and decompression surgery for Graves orbitopathy: mechanism of motility disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Kalmann, Rachel; de Graaf, Mieke E. L.; Stilma, Jan S.; Mourits, Maarten P.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study possible causes of motility disturbances that may result from orbital decompression surgery in patients with Graves orbitopathy and especially the role of rectus extraocular muscle paths. METHODS: Sixteen patients with Graves orbitopathy were studied before and 3 to 6 months after

  2. Grave's Eye disease developing following radioiodine treatment for toxic nodular goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahrani, A A; Rangan, S; Moulik, P

    2007-07-01

    The development of Grave's ophthalmopathy (GO) following radioiodine (RI) treatment for Grave's thyrotoxicosis, though controversial, is well described. The development of ophthalmopathy following RI treatment for toxic nodular goitre is much less recognised. We report a 49 year-old female patient who developed thyrotoxicosis and GO after receiving RI treatment for toxic nodular goitre and we also review the relevant literature.

  3. Significance of changes of serum FT3, FT4, s-TSH, TGA, TPO-Ab levels in patients with non-Graves' hyperthyroidism and Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lindi; Xu Changde; Xu Huogen; Wang Wei; Zhang Jie; Nie Shufen; Gu Zhenqi; Zeng Jihua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of the changes of thyroid-related hormones (FT 3 , FT 4 , s-TSH, TGA, TPO-Ab) levels in patients with Graves' and non-Graves' hyperthyroidism. Methods: Serum FT 3 , FT 4 , TGA, TPO-Ab (with RIA) and s-TSH (with IRMA) were determined in 43 patients with non-Graves' hyperthyroidism, 29 patients with Graves' disease and 40 controls. Results: In both groups of hyperthyroid patients, the serum levels of FT 3 (15.01 ± 11.01 pg/ml in the non - Graves' group and 15.23 ± 9.57pg/ml in the Graves' group), FT 4 (38.30 ± 19.82, 38.87 ± 17.39pg/ml), TGA(33.89 ± 22. 43%, 49.72 ± 20.55% ) and TPO-Ab (1319.24 ± 1037.78, 2023.24 ± 621.00IU/ml) were significantly higher than those (FT 3 , 6.76 ± 2.01pg/ml, FT 4 16.16 ± 2.58pg/ml, TGA 6.76 ± 2.01%, TPO-Ab 0.01 ± 0.01IU/ml) in the controls (all P 3 , FT 4 and s-TSH levels in both groups were not significantly different from each other. Conclusion: In this study, serum TGA and TPO -Ab levels were lower in patients with non-Graves' hyperthyroidism than those in patients with Graves' disease. (authors)

  4. Diffusion-weighed MR of the thyroid gland in Graves' disease: assessment of disease activity and prediction of outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek; Sadek, Ahmed Galal; Gaballa, Gada

    2010-06-01

    To assess the activity and clinical course of Graves' disease with diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Fifty-one patients with Graves' disease and 25 volunteers underwent diffusion MR imaging of the thyroid gland using a single shot echo-planar imaging with b-factor of 0, 300 and 600 second/mm(2). The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of the thyroid gland were calculated. Patients with active Graves' disease included untreated patients at initial diagnosis (n = 12), patients under antithyroid drugs (n = 11), and patients in relapse after withdrawal of therapy (n = 13). Patients with inactive disease had a remission of hyperthyroidism (n = 15). The mean ADC values of thyroid gland with active Graves' disease was 0.65 +/- 0.03 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second in patients at initial diagnosis, 0.81 +/- 0.02 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second in patients undergoing antithyroid drug and 0.72 +/- 0.07 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second in patients with relapse of hyperthyroidism. The mean ADC of patients with remission was 0.94 +/- 0.03 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second and for normal volunteer was 1.06 +/- 0.08 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second. There was significant difference in the ADC value of patients with active disease and remission (P = .001). The cutoff ADC value used for differentiating patients with active disease from patients with remission was 0.82 x 10(-3) mm(2)/second. The mean ADC value of thyroid gland had positive correlation with thyroid-stimulating hormone (r = 0.87, P = .001) and negative correlation with serum T4 (r = -0.82, P = .001) and serum T3 (r = -0.71, P = .001). The ADC value of the thyroid gland is a promising non invasive parameter for diagnosis of different clinical stages of Graves' disease. Hence it can be used to assess the activity and predict the outcome of patients during and after medical treatment. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Glucocorticoid administration for Graves' hyperthyroidism treated by radioiodine. A questionnaire survey among members of the European Thyroid Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazarus, J. H.; Bartalena, L.; Marcocci, C.; Kahaly, G. J.; Krassas, G.; Wiersinga, W. M.; Baldeschi, L.; Boboridis, K.; Boschi, A.; Currò, N.; Daumerie, C.; Dickinson, A. J.; Eckstein, A.; Kendall-Taylor, P.; Lane, C. M.; Ludgate, M. E.; Mann, K.; Marinò, M.; Mourits, M. P.; Nardi, M.; Neoh, C.; Orgiazzi, J.; Pearce, S.; Perros, P.; Pinchera, A.; Pitz, S.; Salvi, M.; Sivelli, P.; Stahl, M.; von Arx, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Glucocorticoid prophylaxis is required in some instances after radioiodine (RAI) treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism to prevent progression of Graves' orbitopathy (GO). However, no randomized clinical trial has been performed to ascertain the optimum glucocorticoid therapy. Aim and

  6. Anxiety and depression are more prevalent in patients with graves' disease than in patients with nodular goitre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bové, Kira Bang; Watt, Torquil; Vogel, Asmus

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Graves' disease has been associated with an increased psychiatric morbidity. It is unclarified whether this relates to Graves' disease or chronic disease per se. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with Graves......' disease compared to patients with another chronic thyroid disease, nodular goitre, and to investigate determinants of anxiety and depression in Graves' disease.METHODS: 157 cross-sectionally sampled patients with Graves' disease, 17 newly diagnosed, 140 treated, and 251 controls with nodular goitre......'/probable 'depression'. Determinants of anxiety and depression symptoms in Graves' disease were examined using multiple linear regression.RESULTS: In Graves' disease levels of anxiety (p = 0.008) and depression (p = 0.014) were significantly higher than in controls. The prevalence of depression was 10% in Graves...

  7. Hazardous materials management using a Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjeldgaard, E.; Fish, J.; Campbell, D.; Freshour, N.; Hammond, B.; Bray, O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hollingsworth, M. [Ogden Environmental & Energy Services Co., Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Hazardous materials management includes interactions among materials, personnel, facilities, hazards, and processes of various groups within a DOE site`s environmental, safety & health (ES&H) and line organizations. Although each group is charged with addressing a particular aspect of these properties and interactions, the information it requires must be gathered into a coherent set of common data for accurate and consistent hazardous material management and regulatory reporting. It is these common data requirements which the Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS) is designed to satisfy. CGTIS collects information at the point at which a process begins or a material enters a facility, and maintains that information, for hazards management and regulatory reporting, throughout the entire life-cycle by providing direct on-line links to a site`s multitude of data bases to bring information together into one common data model.

  8. Hyperthyroid patients without Graves' orbitopathy are not at increased risk of developing glaucoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, F; Thvilum, M; Hegedüs, L

    2018-01-01

    PURPOSE: Graves' disease (GD) and toxic nodular goiter (TNG) are associated with various comorbidities. However, it is unclarified whether TNG and GD without orbitopathy are associated with glaucoma. METHODS: This was a case-control study using record-linkage data from nationwide Danish health...... registers. 28,461 patients with GD and 17,283 with TNG were included. Each case was age and sex matched with four non-hyperthyroid controls and followed over a mean period of 8 years. Data on glaucoma was obtained by record linkage within the National Danish Patient Register and/or the Danish National...... Prescription Registry. Logistic and Cox regression models were used to assess the risk of glaucoma before and after the diagnosis of GD and TNG. RESULTS: Compared to controls, there was a significantly increased frequency of glaucoma in patients with GD (4.6 vs. 4.2%, P = 0.006) and in patients with TNG (6...

  9. The impact of graves' disease and its treatment on handwriting characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papi, Giampaolo; Botti, Cristina; Corsello, Salvatore Maria

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid hormones are crucial for metabolism in all tissues in humans, including the nervous system and muscles, and could thus affect handwriting, which is the synthesis of complex and fine movements. Hyperthyroidism, characterized by symptoms such as tremor and weakness, could affect...... handwriting, although this has not been studied yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate handwriting characteristics before and after therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease (GD). METHODS: Twenty-two patients (15 women, 7 men) with untreated GD (median age: 44 years; range: 20-70 years) were asked to write...... a "standard text" before and 12 months after being rendered euthyroid. The letters underwent a standardized detailed analysis by a handwriting expert, through inspection and stereoscopic microscope and magnifying glass. RESULTS: All patients demonstrated handwriting variations, perceptible even to direct...

  10. Hazardous materials management using a Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjeldgaard, E.; Fish, J.; Campbell, D.; Freshour, N.; Hammond, B.; Bray, O.; Hollingsworth, M.

    1995-03-01

    Hazardous materials management includes interactions among materials, personnel, facilities, hazards, and processes of various groups within a DOE site's environmental, safety ampersand health (ES ampersand H) and line organizations. Although each group is charged with addressing a particular aspect of these properties and interactions, the information it requires must be gathered into a coherent set of common data for accurate and consistent hazardous material management and regulatory reporting. It is these common data requirements which the Cradle-to-Grave Tracking and Information System (CGTIS) is designed to satisfy. CGTIS collects information at the point at which a process begins or a material enters a facility, and maintains that information, for hazards management and regulatory reporting, throughout the entire life-cycle by providing direct on-line links to a site's multitude of data bases to bring information together into one common data model

  11. Primary biliary cirrhosis associated with Graves' disease in a male patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuji; Ishida, Kazuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Koeda, Norihiko; Kakisaka, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Akiko; Takikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), which predominantly affects women, has been associated with various autoimmune diseases. Although hypothyroidism accompanying PBC is well documented, the concomitance of PBC and hyperthyroidism is rare. Herein, we report the case of a 62-year-old man who was diagnosed with PBC several years after the development of Graves' disease. This is the first case of a male patient developing PBC with Graves' disease. Both serum alanine aminotransferase levels and serum thyroid hormone levels were normalized after the administration of thiamazole for Graves' disease. However, the cholestatic liver enzyme abnormalities continued, indicating that the PBC was actualized by the administration of thiamazole. After starting ursodeoxycholic acid treatment, cholestatic liver enzyme abnormalities improved. Taken together, when a cholestatic pattern of liver enzymes is observed during follow-up for Graves' disease, an association between Graves' disease and PBC should be considered as a differential diagnosis.

  12. Raman spectroscopy of gemstones on the necklaces from ancient graves at the Castle of Devin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, M.; Vanco, L.; Kadlecikova, M.; Breza, J.

    2013-01-01

    The subjects of Raman and X-ray analyses were the beads from two necklaces found in ancient graves from the 11'"t"h and 12"t"h centuries at the Castle of Devin. One of the necklaces, consisting of 23 beads, was found in tomb 12/1980. Inside the grave, an incomplete skeleton of a woman was found, oriented in the west - east direction. The skull, shoulder blades and lower limbs were preserved in good condition. The grave contained a rich inventory: a silver ear-ring at the left side of the skull, a necklace between the shoulder blades and a ring on the right side at the height of the right hand. The other necklace, consisting of six stones, was found in grave 145/1985 in which, similarly like in the first grave, a woman's skeleton was discovered. The stones were found below the mandible. All beads are drilled through axially. (authors)

  13. Grave 22 of the Belgrade necropolis in Karaburma: Retrospective and perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blečić-Kavur Martina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Almost four decades after its discovery was initially announced, the Celtic necropolis in Karaburma, a suburb of Belgrade, is still one of the most important archaeological sites for the interpretation of the historical, economic, and cultural processes taking place in the central Balkans from the 4th to the end of the 1st centuries B.C. Most of all, it represents a wide-ranging source for explaining the chronology of the oldest Celtic presence in this area, also illustrating cultural exchanges in the network in which they were included. In this necropolis, belonging to the regional military elite, there are several graves in which, in addition to standard offerings relating to the regional material culture, items originating from a wider cultural area were found. Amongst these, grave number 22, the subject of our research, is especially important. In this grave were found objects mainly made of bronze and iron, with a smaller fragment of pottery. The iron items represent the attire of the deceased and his offensive weapons, while bronze items are characteristically imported vessels and a smaller bronze ring (figs. 1, 2. The imported vessels are represented by the well-known situla and cup. According to the basic typological scheme, we can classify the situla within the large group of ovoid situlae with the leaf-shaped or the so-called heart-shaped ornament under the attachment (figs. 1, 9; 2; 3, 7. According to the typological scheme here suggested, the situla found in Karaburma belongs to the first group, namely to its variant b (Ib, which is characterized by situlae with a leaf-shaped ornament on the attachment, separately cast and then pinned down or soldered to the body of the vessel (fig. 3, 7. Also belonging to this group are situlae from Skillountia, Goce Delčev (fig. 3, 8, Vărbica (fig. 3, 9 and from Chirnogi (fig. 3, 10. Situlae from Budva (fig. 3, 11 and Belgrade (fig. 3, 12 should also be included here, probably the one from Bitola

  14. Rescue pre-operative treatment with Lugol's solution in uncontrolled Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calissendorff, Jan; Falhammar, Henrik

    2017-05-01

    Graves' disease is a common cause of hyperthyroidism. Three therapies have been used for decades: pharmacologic therapy, surgery and radioiodine. In case of adverse events, especially agranulocytosis or hepatotoxicity, pre-treatment with Lugol's solution containing iodine/potassium iodide to induce euthyroidism before surgery could be advocated, but this has rarely been reported. All patients hospitalised due to uncontrolled hyperthyroidism at the Karolinska University Hospital 2005-2015 and treated with Lugol's solution were included. All electronic files were carefully reviewed manually, with focus on the cause of treatment and admission, demographic data, and effects of iodine on thyroid hormone levels and pulse frequency. Twenty-seven patients were included. Lugol's solution had been chosen due to agranulocytosis in 9 (33%), hepatotoxicity in 2 (7%), other side effects in 11 (41%) and poor adherence to medication in 5 (19%). Levels of free T4, free T3 and heart rate decreased significantly after 5-9 days of iodine therapy (free T4 53-20 pmol/L, P  = 0.0002; free T3 20-6.5 pmol/L, P  = 0.04; heart rate 87-76 beats/min P  = 0.0007), whereas TSH remained unchanged. Side effects were noted in 4 (15%) (rash n  = 2, rash and vomiting n  = 1, swelling of fingers n  = 1). Thyroidectomy was performed in 26 patients (96%) and one was treated with radioiodine; all treatments were without serious complications. Treatment of uncontrolled hyperthyroidism with Lugol's solution before definitive treatment is safe and it decreases thyroid hormone levels and heart rate. Side effects were limited. Lugol's solution could be recommended pre-operatively in Graves' disease with failed medical treatment, especially if side effects to anti-thyroid drugs have occurred. © 2017 The authors.

  15. Characteristics of patients with graves disease and intrathyroid hypovascularity compared to painless thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Shigihara, Nayumi; Takeno, Kageumi; Komiya, Koji; Goto, Hiromasa; Abe, Hiroko; Sato, Junko; Honda, Akira; Fujitani, Yoshio; Watada, Hirotaka

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the frequency and sonographic and laboratory characteristics of Graves disease with intrathyroid hypovascularity in Japanese patients and to compare these characteristics in patients with painless thyroiditis. A total of 194 consecutive patients with Graves disease and 21 patients with painless thyroiditis were enrolled. The patients underwent thyroid volume measurement, mean superior thyroid artery peak systolic velocity (PSV) measurement, power Doppler sonography, and proper blood testing to discriminate between Graves disease and painless thyroiditis. Based on the power Doppler sonographic findings, they were divided into 4 groups: from pattern 0 (most hypovascular thyroid) to pattern III (most hypervascular thyroid). Comparisons of multiple thyroid parameters were made among the groups. The prevalence of Graves disease with pattern 0 (n = 27) was 13.9% among the patients with Graves disease. The sonographic and laboratory data for patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 were compared to those of the 21 patients with painless thyroiditis, which typically shows intrathyroid hypovascularity. Free triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels and the superior thyroid artery PSV were significantly lower in patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 than those with patterns I, II, and III (P thyroid volume and thyrotropin receptor antibody level were significantly lower in patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 than those with pattern III. In the comparison between patients with Graves disease and pattern 0 and those with painless thyroiditis and pattern 0, apart from thyrotropin receptor antibody, only the superior thyroid artery PSV was different. Although the clinical features of patients with Graves disease and intrathyroid hypovascularity were similar to those patients with painless thyroiditis, the superior thyroid artery PSV showed a moderate ability to discriminate these patients. © 2014 by the American Institute of

  16. Orden constitucional y graves violaciones de Derechos Humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Jimena Quesada

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo afronta un desafío fundamental para el Derecho constitucional, a saber, el análisis del marco constitucional español referente a la responsabilidad por graves violaciones de derechos humanos. En este sentido, en primer lugar, el trabajo introduce una posición original sobre los tipos de graves violaciones de derechos humanos, las cuales están relacionadas con los más horrendos atentados contra la dignidad humana y contra las bases del sistema democrático, teniendo una proyección tanto en el plano constitucional como en el universal. A continuación, en la parte central del trabajo se examina sucesivamente siguiendo un esquema lógico las diversas etapas de lucha contra la impunidad de los individuos responsables por graves violaciones de derechos humanos: la investigación, el enjuiciamiento y la condena por esos actos criminales, sin olvidar la reparación de las víctimas. En todas esas etapas se toma en consideración el marco legal nacional (terrorismo y crímenes contra la humanidad contemplados en el Código penal y el supranacional (crímenes universales previstos en el Estatuto de la Corte Penal Internacional y en otros tratados internacionales de Derecho internacional penal y humanitario, así como en la Unión Europea; y se tiene en cuenta asimismo el progreso conocido en el ámbito de la jurisprudencia nacional (jurisdicción universal y de la jurisprudencia internacional (la puesta en funcionamiento de la Corte Penal Internacional y de los Tribunales Penales para la ex Yugoslavia y para Ruanda. Finalmente, se incluyen unas conclusiones sobre la necesidad de forjar un compromiso en la lucha contra la impunidad universal (tanto por parte de la ciudadanía como por parte de los poderes públicos, especialmente con «voluntad jurisdiccional», así como sobre los nuevos perfiles o desarrollos de los derechos fundamentales en juego (sobre todo, el derecho a la tutela judicial efectiva, el derecho a la informaci

  17. Radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease - A retrospective analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittal, B.R.; Bhattacharya, A.; Dutta, P.; Bhansali, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Radioiodine is a safe form of treatment for all patients with primary hyperthyroidism. The thyroid's unique capacity to store iodine (thus also radioiodine) makes it a natural target for radioiodine therapy. We retrospectively analyzed the outcome of radioiodine therapy in a cohort of 151 patients of primary hyperthyroidism treated on an outpatient basis in our institute from January 2001 to November 2006. Of these 151 patients, 113 (38 male, 75 female; age range: 17- 65 years) were of Graves' disease. The median duration of symptoms in these patients was 4 years. (Range: 3 months to 20 years). Diagnosis was established on basis of clinical, biochemical and scintigraphic features. All the patients were treated medically with Neomercazole (Carbimazole) for varying durations (median 3.5 years). The dose range varied from 5 to 80 mg per day (median 20 mg per day). Clinical assessment of thyroid size revealed 39 patients with grade 0, 14 with grade 1, 30 with grade 2, and 30 with grade 3 goiters. Pre-therapy radioactive iodine uptake was done in 28 patients, which showed median values of 50 % at 4 hrs, 57.45 % at 24 hrs, and 56.2 % at 48 hrs respectively. These patients were treated empirically with I-131 in a dose range of 5 to 15 mCi, depending upon the clinical presentation and the RAIU values. Remission of symptoms with a single dose therapy was noticed in 68 patients. Of the 83 patients, 15 became hypothyroid within 3 months. These patients were on Neomercazole for a varying period of 2 to 20 years, at a dose range of 10 to 80 mg per day. 14 patients achieved remission after 2 doses with a cumulative RAI dose in the range of 10 to 19 mCi, at a median period of 7 to 24 months. Eight patients still showed hyperthyroid activity even after a second dose and are on follow-up. Seven patients achieved remission with a cumulative dose range of 17 to 35 mCi at a median duration of 10 months. One patient of Graves' disease who took Neomercazole for 10 years, at

  18. Thyroid mass estimation in Grave's disease by SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pant, G.S.; Sharma, S.K.; Kumar, R.; Pandey, A.K.; Gupta, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: One of the important parts of treatment of Grave's disease with I-131 is the delivery of accurate dose to the target volume. Three important parameters that need to be accurately measured for dosimetry are; the 24 hr thyroid uptake (%), the thyroid mass and effective half life of I-131 in the gland. In this presentation we describe the estimation thyroid mass by SPECT. We have standardised a method to estimated thyroid volume by SPECT using thyroid phantoms of different sizes and then used them for routine thyroid mass estimation in patients with Graves' disease. Materials and Methods: Due to variation in thyroid weight in patients with Grave's disease, we standardised the scintigraphic (SPECT) technique using thyroid phantoms of different volumes such as 5 ml, 9.5 ml, 10.5 ml, 35 ml, 80 ml, 101ml and 110 ml. Each phantom was filled with 99 mTc solution with different activity concentration (100 μCi, 300 μCi, 600 μCi and 1.0 μCi) and SPECT images were acquired on a VARICAM dual head camera in 128x128 matrix. The acquired data was processed using a standardised Metz filter but without attenuation or scatter correction. Coronal slices were used with suitable threshold for edge detection. An irregular ROI was plotted around each lobe and isthmus of the thyroid gland and the enclosed slice area was measured. The area measured from all the frames was added and multiplied by the slice thickness to get the volume of the thyroid gland. The estimated volume of each phantom was compared and correlated with its actual volume. The thyroid mass in 40 patients was estimated by SPECT and compared with that estimated by ultrasonography.Results and Conclusion: The results of thyroid mass estimation with SPECT in phantom study suggested a 30% threshold for all phantom volumes. However, 35% threshold was used in patients' images for estimating thyroid volume. The estimated volumes by scintigraphy were compared with that estimated by ultrasonography. A correlation coefficient

  19. Enhanced thyroid iodine metabolism in patients with triiodothyronine-predominant Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, J.; Hosoya, T.; Naito, N.; Yoshimura, H.; Kohno, Y.; Tarutani, O.; Kuma, K.; Sakane, S.; Takeda, K.; Mozai, T.

    1988-01-01

    Some patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease have increased serum T3 and normal or even low serum T4 levels during treatment with antithyroid drugs. These patients with elevated serum T3 to T4 ratios rarely have a remission of their hyperthyroidism. The aim of this study was to investigate thyroid iodine metabolism in such patients, whom we termed T3-predominant Graves' disease. Mean thyroid radioactive iodine uptake was 51.0 +/- 18.1% ( +/- SD) at 3 h, and it decreased to 38.9 +/- 20.1% at 24 h in 31 patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease during treatment. It was 20.0 +/- 11.4% at 3 h and increased to 31.9 +/- 16.0% at 24 h in 17 other patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease who had normal serum T3 and T4 levels and a normal serum T3 to T4 ratio during treatment (control Graves' disease). The activity of serum TSH receptor antibodies was significantly higher in the patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in control Graves' disease patients. From in vitro studies of thyroid tissue obtained at surgery, both thyroglobulin content and iodine content in thyroglobulin were significantly lower in patients with T3-predominant Graves' disease than in the control Graves' disease patients. Thyroid peroxidase (TPO) activity determined by a guaiacol assay was 0.411 +/- 0.212 g.u./mg protein in the T3-predominant Graves' disease patients, significantly higher than that in the control Graves' disease patients. Serum TPO autoantibody levels determined by immunoprecipitation also were greater in T3-predominant Graves' disease patients than in control Graves' disease patients. Binding of this antibody to TPO slightly inhibited the enzyme activity of TPO, but this effect of the antibody was similar in the two groups of patients.

  20. Cutoff value of thyroid uptake of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate to discriminate between Graves' disease and painless thyroiditis: a single center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Toyoyoshi; Suzuki, Ruriko; Kasai, Takatoshi; Onose, Hiroyuki; Komiya, Koji; Goto, Hiromasa; Takeno, Kageumi; Ishii, Shinya; Sato, Junko; Honda, Akira; Kawano, Yui; Himuro, Miwa; Yamada, Emiko; Yamada, Tetsu; Watada, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid uptake of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate is a useful way to determine the cause of thyrotoxicosis. In daily clinical practice, (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake is used to discriminate between Graves' disease and painless thyroiditis when clinical information is not enough to make the distinction. However, since the optimal cutoff value of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake has not yet been elucidated, our aim was to determine this value. We recruited patients with thyrotoxicosis in whom (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake was measured in clinical settings between 2009 and 2013. Three experienced endocrinologists (who were blinded to the value of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake and initial treatment) diagnosed the cause of thyrotoxicosis based on thyrotropin, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and thyrotropin receptor antibody levels, and by ultrasound findings and using images of thyroid uptake of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate without the actual values. Ninety-four patients diagnosed as having Graves' disease or painless thyroiditis were finally included. According to the diagnosis, the optimal cutoff value of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake was determined by receiver operating characteristics analysis. A cutoff value of 1.0% provided optimal sensitivity and specificity of 96.6% and 97.1%, respectively. Then, its validity was confirmed in 78 patients with confirmed Graves' disease or painless thyroiditis diagnosed at another institute. Applying this cutoff value to the patients with thyrotoxicosis revealed positive and negative predictive values for Graves' disease of 100% and 88.9%, respectively. In conclusion, a cutoff value for (99m)Tc-pertechnetate uptake of 1.0% was useful to discriminate between Graves' disease and painless thyroiditis.

  1. The influence of immunosuppressive treatment on the progression of Graves' disease after radioiodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurca, T.; Pirnat, E.; Hojker, S.; Avcin, J.

    1994-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) for Graves' disease could produce a rise in autoimmune activity expressed as elevation of antibody against TSH receptors (TSI). In our retrospective study the influence of different immunosuppressive therapy on autoimmune activity was studied. Patients, treated with radioiodine or surgery for the first time, between January 1989 and March 1992 were included in the study, divided in the 5 groups (patients after thyroidectomy, and patients after RIT divided into groups according to treatment with different combinations of corticosteroids and cyclosporine A). Patients were examined and TT 4 , TT 3 TSH and TSI were collected before and 3, 6 and 9 months after treatment. There was no differences between groups before and according to the thyroid status the patients of all groups received antithyroid drugs or substitution therapy after the RIT or surgery. Immunosuppressive therapy was indicated because of Graves' ophthalmopathy. After surgery, the progressive fall of TSI and no relapses of the disease were stated. After first 3 months the situation was very similar in group of patients treated with cyclosporine A after RIT, later after the cessation of treatment, there were a slight elevation of TSI. In all other groups of patients after RIT there was a constant positive trend of TSI and the significant correlation was found between TSI before and after treatment. We conclude, that autoimmune response after RIT is a consequence of activity of T cells and therefore cyclosporine A could be taken in mind when we want to prevent it. Corticosteroids on the other hand had no such an effect. (author)

  2. The Natural History of Subclinical Hyperthyroidism in Graves' Disease: The Rule of Thirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyzhneuskaya, Sviatlana; Addison, Caroline; Tsatlidis, Vasileios; Weaver, Jolanta U; Razvi, Salman

    2016-06-01

    There is little information regarding the natural history of subclinical hyperthyroidism (SH) due to Graves' disease (GD). A prospective analysis was conducted of patients with SH due to GD between 2007 and 2013 with at least 12 months of follow-up. SH was diagnosed if serum thyrotropin (TSH) was below the laboratory reference range (0.4-4.0 mIU/L) and when thyroid hormones were normal. GD was confirmed by either a raised TSH receptor antibody (TRAb) level or uniform uptake on Technetium scan. Forty-four patients (89% female, 16% current smokers, and 5% with active Graves' orbitopathy) were diagnosed with SH due to GD. Over the follow-up period (median 32 months), approximately one third (34%) of the cohort progressed to overt hyperthyroidism, one third (34%) normalized their thyroid function, slightly less than one third (30%) remained in the SH state, while one person became hypothyroid. Multivariate regression analysis showed that older age and positive antithyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibody status had a positive association with risk of progression to overt hyperthyroidism, with hazard ratios of 1.06 ([confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.10], p < 0.01) per year and 10.15 ([CI 1.83-56.23], p < 0.01), respectively, independent of other risk factors including, smoking, TRAb levels at diagnosis, and sex. A third each of patients with SH due to GD progress, normalize, or remain in the SH state. Older people and those with positive anti-TPO antibodies have a higher risk of progression of the disease. These novel data need to be verified and confirmed in larger cohorts and over longer periods of follow-up.

  3. Management of sinonasal complications after endoscopic orbital decompression for Graves' orbitopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antisdel, Jastin L; Gumber, Divya; Holmes, Janalee; Sindwani, Raj

    2013-09-01

    Endoscopic orbital decompression (EnOD) has proven to be safe and effective for the treatment of Graves' orbitopathy; however, complications do occur. Although the literature focuses on orbital complications, sinonasal complications including postobstructive sinusitis, hemorrhage, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak can also be challenging to manage. This study examines the incidence and management of sinonasal complications in these patients. Retrospective review. Clinical data, surgical findings, and postoperative outcomes were reviewed of patients who underwent EnOD for Graves' disease between March 2004 and November 2010. The incidence and management of postoperative sinonasal complications requiring an intervention were examined. The study group consisted of 50 consecutive patients (86 decompression procedures): 11 males and 39 females with an average age of 48.6 years (SD = 12.9). Incidence of significant sinonasal complications was 3.5% (5/86): with one patient experiencing postoperative hemorrhage requiring operative management, three patients with postoperative obstructive sinusitis, and one patient with nasal obstruction secondary to nasal adhesions that required lysis. The maxillary sinus was the most commonly involved and was managed using the mega-antrostomy technique. In the case of frontal sinusitis, an endoscopic transaxillary approach was utilized to avoid injury to decompressed orbital contents. All complications were successfully managed without sequelae. Sinonasal complications following EnOD are uncommon. In the setting of a decompressed orbit, even routine types of postoperative issues can be challenging and require additional considerations. Successful management of postoperative sinusitis related to outflow obstruction may require more extensive approaches and novel techniques. Copyright © 2013 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Nutritional support in patients with severe acute pancreatitis Soporte nutricional en pacientes con pancreatitis aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Marcela Peláez Hernández

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Severe acute pancreatitis is associated with a systemic inflammatory response leading to a hypermetabolic, hypercatabolic condition; for those reasons, patients suffering from this disease require an excellent artificial nutritional support in order to maintain the structural integrity and the function of vital organs with minimal pancreatic secretion. Total parenteral nutrition has been the standard practice in the treatment of patients with severe acute pancreatitis because of the favorable outcomes of early nutritional support while avoiding pancreatic stimulation; however, recent evidence suggests there are potentially greater benefits with enteral as compared with parenteral nutrition, including fewer septic and metabolic complications and lesser costs. That is why present guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis recommend that enteral instead of parenteral nutrition be used in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. La pancreatitis aguda, especialmente en su forma grave, está asociada con una respuesta inflamatoria sistémica que lleva a un estado de hipermetabolismo e hipercatabolismo, en el que se requiere un excelente soporte nutricional que permita mantener la integridad estructural y la función de los órganos vitales con un estímulo mínimo de la secreción pancreática. La nutrición parenteral total era el soporte de elección, que permitía obtener todos los beneficios de la nutrición temprana sin estimular la secreción pancreática; pero la evidencia actual muestra mayores beneficios con la nutrición enteral, porque se asocia con menos complicaciones infecciosas y metabólicas y con disminución en los costos. Por ello las guías actuales de tratamiento de la pancreatitis aguda grave recomiendan como primera elección el soporte nutricional enteral.

  5. Supervoltage orbital radiotherapy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy; Results of a twenty-year experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriss, J.P.; McDougall, I.R. (Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, California (USA)); Petersen, I.A.; Donaldson, S.S. (Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, California (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Since 1968 we have employed supervoltage orbital radiation as treatment for severe progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. A numerical ophthalmic index was used to asess pre- and post-treatment serverity. In the past 20 years we have treated 311 patients of whom 275 have been followed for {le} 1 year or until any eye surgery was performed. An orbital radiation dosage of 2000 rads in 2 weeks was used for the majority of patients (Series I and III). Series II patients received an orbital dose of 3000 rads in 3 weeks. Demographic differences were observed between these series, thus mandating presentation of the results of each separately. Analyses excluded any result achieved by any post-radiation surgical procedure on the eyes. Post-theraphy worsening of ophtalmopathy occurred in only 29 of 1025 observations. Improvement or complete resolution was observed within each category of eye involvement, but lack of favorable response was also recorded in significant numbers. Improvement in proptosis occurred with the lowest frequency and magnitude. About 30% of the patients required eye muscle surgery to correct residual diplopia. Analysis of the data by step-wise linear regression analysis enabled us a. to derive formulae predicting the problable response to radiation therapy according to sign and severity, and b. identify parameters which diminished the likelihood or the extent of a favorable response. The latter included male sex, never thyrotoxic, age greater than 60 years, and requirement for concomitant treatment for hyperthyroidism. No long-term adverse reactions attributable to the radiotherapy have been observed. We conclude that supervoltage orbital radiotherapy, combined with later eye muscle surgery if necessary, is an effective treatment strategy for progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy. (author).

  6. Results of a risk adapted and functional radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkelmann, S.; Neumann, V.; Staub, U.; Groth, P.; Kuenstner, H.; Schuemichen, C. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Zentrum fuer Radiologie, Univ. Rostock (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Aim of this study was to find out, if results of a functional orientated radioiodine therapy in Graves' disease could be optimized using a risk adopted dose concept. Patients, method: 351 patients with Graves' disease were treated for the first time between 11/97 and 8/01. The basic dose was 125 Gy, which was increased up to 250 Gy in a cumulative manner depending on clinical parameters (initial thyroid metabolism, thyroid volume, immunoreactivity). Two different methods of dosimetry were used. Occasional thyreostasis was withdrawn two days before the radioiodine test was started. Follow up was done on overage 8 {+-} 2,4 (4-17,2) months. TSH {>=}0,27 {mu}IU/mL confirmed as a measure of the success. Results: With improved pretherapeutic dosimetry and a mean target dose of 178 {+-} 31 Gy (n = 72) therapeutic success occurred in 66,7%, in 51,4% euthyreosis was restalled and in 15,3% of patients hypothyroidism was seen (TSH >4,20 {mu}IU/mL). With simplified pretherapeutic dosimetry and a mean target dose of 172 {+-} 29 Gy (n = 279) results were moderately impaired (63,8%, 40,1% and 23,7%). With increasing target dose therapeutic failure increased, as unsufficiently adopted risk factors for therapeutic failure turned out the initial thyroid metabolism, the TcTU(s) as the (h)TRAb titer. Conclusion: Functional orientated RIT can be optimized by including illness specific characteristics, principal limitations are a high initial thyroid metabolism, a large thyroid volume and a high (h)TRAb-titer. (orig.)

  7. Physiological and Metabolic Changes During the Transition from Hyperthyroidism to Euthyroidism in Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Chiaw-Ling; Lim, Adoree Yi Ying; Tan, Hong Chang; Kovalik, Jean-Paul; Tham, Kwang Wei; Bee, Yong Mong; Lim, Weiying; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Lai, Oi Fah; Chong, Mary Foong-Fong; Yen, Paul Michael

    2016-10-01

    The serum metabolomic profile and its relationship to physiological changes during hyperthyroidism and restoration to euthyroidism are not known. This study aimed to examine the physiological, adipokine, and metabolomic changes that occur when subjects with Graves' disease transition from hyperthyroidism to euthyroidism with medical treatment. Chinese women between 21 and 50 years of age and with newly diagnosed Graves' disease attending the endocrine outpatient clinics in a single institution were recruited between July 2012 and September 2014. All subjects were treated with thioamides to achieve euthyroidism. Clinical parameters (body weight, body composition via bioelectrical impedance analysis, resting energy expenditure and respiratory quotient via indirect calorimetry, and reported total energy intake via 24 h food diary), biochemical parameters (thyroid hormones, lipid profile, fasting insulin and glucose levels), serum leptin, adiponectin, and metabolomics profiles were measured during hyperthyroidism and repeated in early euthyroidism. Twenty four Chinese women with an average age of 36.3 ± 8.6 years were included in the study. The average duration of treatment that was required to reach euthyroidism for these subjects was 38 ± 16.3 weeks. There was a significant increase in body weight (52.6 ± 9.0 kg to 55.3 ± 9.4 kg; p hyperthyroidism were noted. Serum metabolomics profile changes complemented the physiological changes observed during the transition from hyperthyroidism to euthyroidism. This study provides a comprehensive and integrated view of the changes in fuel metabolism and energy balance that occur following the treatment of hyperthyroidism.

  8. [Influence of selected endogenous and environmental factors on the course and complications of Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzynska, Anna; Przybylik-Mazurek, Elwira; Węgrzynowicz, Katarzyna; Morzywołek, Aleksandra; Wieczorek, Agata; Żarnowska, Maja; Hubalewska-Dydejczyk, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune thyroid disease with complex and not fully established etiology. It occurs when environmental factors influence people genetically prone to this illness. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of selected factors (endogenous and environmental) on the course and complications of disease in patients with recurrent GD. Two hundred and four patients with relapsed GD, treated in the Clinical Department of Endocrinology in University Hospital in Cracow in years 2004-2006 and then in 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. Patients who agreed to participate in the study were sent questionnaire to complete. Demographic and clinical data were collected and entered into a database. Patient data included: gender, place of living, lifestyle (smoking), family history of autoimmune diseases, the course of the disease, its symptoms and the treatment strategy. Furthermore the medical documentation was analyzed. Descriptive statistical analyses were made. The study showed a significant difference in the frequency of appearance of ophthalmopathy between men and women (80% and 37.14%, respectively, p = 0.041), between smokers and nonsmokers (61.9% and 21.05%, respectively, p = 0.022) and between the age of patients with positive and negative family history of autoimmune diseases (37.6 years and 50.5 years respectively, p = 0.002). 1. Male gender is a risk factor for ophthalmopathy in GD. 2. Cigarette smoking affects the risk of Graves' ophthalmopathy. 3. A positive family history of thyroid diseases and/or autoimmune diseases promotes the development of GD at a younger age.

  9. Hypothyroidism caused by 131I treatment for Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Shouzhen; Lin Xiangtong; He Wanting; Zhang Kaili; Zhang Jinming; Kuai Dayu

    1991-01-01

    The refollow-up has been carried out in hypothyroidism caused by 131 I treatment for Graves disease. The serum HS-TSH(IRMA), FT3, TSH(RIA), TT3, TT4, FT4I, MCA, TGA, Cholesterol and Triglyceride has been measured in 26 patient after 131 I treatment for 9.5 years in average. At the same time TRH stimulation test was also performed, and the clinical symptoms and signs assessed. The results showed that TSH is the most sensitive criterion for hypothyroidism, followed by Cholesterol and FT 4 I. The occurence of hypothyroidism may be related to the presence of thyroid antibody as demonstrated by the elevation of serum MCA, TGA. Therefore measurement of serum TSH, FT 4 I and Cholesterol during long term follow-up is beneficial for early diagnosis of hypothyroidism and evaluating the effect of substitution treatment

  10. Current opinions on the radioiodine treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae

    2003-01-01

    Radioactive iodine therapy using I-131 for hyperthyroidism has been used for more than 50 years, and generally considered safe and devoid of major side effects. Appropriate patient selection criteria and clinical judgement concerning patient preparation should be employed for its optimal use. It has not been possible to resolve the trade-off between efficient definite cure of hyperthyroidism and the high incidence of post-therapy hypothyroidism. The dose of the I-131 needed to maintain euthyroid state remains an area of uncertainty and debate. Early side effects are uncommon and readily manageable. Other than the need for long-term monitoring and, in most cases, lifelong thyroid hormone treatment for late adverse consequences of this treatment remains only conjectural. We have reviewed general principles and recent advances in radioiodine treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism, specially regarding to several controversies

  11. Evidence for a major role of heredity in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, T H; Kyvik, K O; Christensen, Kaare

    2001-01-01

    The etiology of Graves' disease (GD), affecting up to 2% of a population in iodine-sufficient areas, is incompletely understood. According to current thinking, the development of GD depends on complex interactions among genetic, environmental, and endogenous factors. However, the relative...... contributions of the genetic and environmental factors remain to be clarified. In this study we report probandwise concordance rates for GD in a new cohort of same sex twin pairs born between 1953 and 1976 (young cohort), ascertained from the nationwide population-based Danish Twin Register. To elucidate...... the magnitude of the genetic and environmental influence in the etiology of GD, these new twin data were pooled with our previously published twin data on GD (old cohort). The old cohort consisted of 2338 same sex twin pairs born between 1870 and 1920 who had participated in questionnaire surveys during...

  12. Marrow hypoplasia: a rare complication of untreated Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Juliana; França, Larissa de; Ellinger, Vivian; Wolff, Mônica

    2014-12-01

    Atypical presentation forms of hyperthyroidism are always a challenge to the clinician. We present a female patient with the typical symptoms of thyrotoxicosis, without any thionamides treatment before, associated with pancytopenia, which recovered after euthyroidism state was achieved. Although the major cases of pancytopenia in Grave's disease are seen as a complication of antithyroid drugs (thioamides), in this case report the alteration in blood tests was associated with untreated hyperthyroidism. In the literature review, we found 19 case reports between 1981 to 2012, but it has been related to a hypercellular bone marrow with periferic destruction. Our case, however, is about a hypocellular bone marrow without fibrosis or fat tissue replacement, which proceeded with a periferic improvement following thyroid treatment. Although rare, pancytopenia, when present, may develop as an unusual and severe manifestation in untreated subjects.

  13. Total thyroidectomy: is morbidity higher for Graves' disease than nontoxic goiter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Kellen C; McHenry, Christopher R

    2011-09-01

    Total thyroidectomy for treatment of Graves' disease is controversial and much of the debate centers on the concern for complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the morbidity of total thyroidectomy for Graves' disease and determine if it is different than for patients with nontoxic nodular goiter. The rates of life threatening neck hematoma, recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) injury, transient hypocalcemia, and hypoparathyroidism were determined for consecutive patients with Graves' disease treated with total thyroidectomy from 1996 to 2010. Results were compared with patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for nontoxic nodular goiter during the same period, matched for the weight of the excised thyroid gland. Total thyroidectomy was performed in 111 patients with Graves' disease (group I) and 283 patients with nontoxic nodular goiter (group II). Parathyroid autotransplantation was performed in 31(28%) patients in group I and 98 (35%) patients in group II (P = NS). Comparative analysis of morbidity revealed no significant difference in neck hematoma, 0(0%) (I) versus 3(1%) (II); permanent RLN injury, 0(0%) (I) versus 2(1%) (II); and permanent hypoparathyroidism in 1(1%) (I) versus 1 (0.4%) (II) (P = NS). Transient hypocalcemia was more common in patients with Graves' disease, 80(72%) (I) versus 170 (60%) (II) (P Graves' disease; only transient hypocalcemia occurred more often than in patients with nodular goiter. Total thyroidectomy should be presented as a therapeutic option for all patients with Graves' disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancement of soluble CD28 levels in the serum of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongwen; Yi, Lixian; Tao, Hong; Huang, Jingfang; Jin, Zhenghong; Xiao, Yang; Feng, Caiyun; Sun, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland mediated by T cells. CD28, a member of costimulatory molecules, plays a pivotal role in regulating T-cell responses. Plasma-soluble CD28 is one form of CD28 in peripheral blood. To investigate the concentrations of soluble CD28 in patients with Graves' disease, we used a sensitive dual monoclonal antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect the soluble form of CD28. Our results suggested that mean concentrations of soluble CD28 in plasma of patients with Graves' disease were 1.79 ±1.52 ng/ml, and levels of soluble CD28 in healthy subjects were only 0.83 ±1.35 ng/ml. Concentrations of soluble CD28 detected in patients with Graves' disease were significantly higher than those of healthy subjects (p Graves' disease. Therefore, aberrant elevation of plasma-soluble CD28 in patients with Graves' disease may reflect the dysregulation of immune system, and may serve as a useful biomarker in Graves' disease diagnosis.

  15. The Role of Oxidative Stress on the Pathogenesis of Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Žarković

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Graves' disease is a most common cause of hyperthyroidism. It is an autoimmune disease, and autoimmune process induces an inflammatory reaction, and reactive oxygen species (ROSs are among its products. When balance between oxidants and antioxidants is disturbed, in favour of the oxidants it is termed “oxidative stress” (OS. Increased OS characterizes Graves' disease. It seems that the level of OS is increased in subjects with Graves' ophthalmopathy compared to the other subjects with Graves' disease. Among the other factors, OS is involved in proliferation of orbital fibroblasts. Polymorphism of the 8-oxoG DNA N-glycosylase 1 (hOGG1 involved in repair of the oxidative damaged DNA increases in the risk for developing Grave's disease. Treatment with glucocorticoids reduces levels of OS markers. A recent large clinical trial evaluated effect of selenium on mild Graves' ophthalmopathy. Selenium treatment was associated with an improved quality of life and less eye involvement and slowed the progression of Graves' orbitopathy, compared to placebo.

  16. Thyrotoxic Graves' disease with normal thyroidal technetium-99m pertechnetate uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikekubo, Katsuji; Hino, Megumu; Ito, Hidetomi; Koh, Toshikiyo; Ishihara, Takashi; Kurahachi, Hiroyuki (Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)); Kasagi, Kanji; Hidaka, Akinari; Mori, Toru

    1990-07-01

    We saw 24 thyrotoxic Graves' patients with normal thyroidal uptake of technetium-99m pertechnetate ({sup 99m}Tc) out of 201 untreated thyrotoxic Graves' patients seen over 4 years. The clinical and laboratory findings for these patients were studied and analyzed. Thyroid uptake and scintigraphic examinations by means of {sup 99m}Tc, TBII and TSab activity measurement clearly distinguished these patients from other thyrotoxic disorders (destruction-induced thyrotoxicosis and autonomously functioning thyroid lesions). Different from other disorders, these patients had not lower but normal thyroid uptake and also showed diffuse and discrete trapping into the enlarged glands. These patients had significantly smaller goiters, a lower serum thyroid hormone level, and lower TBII and TSab activity, when compared with other high {sup 99m}Tc uptake groups with Graves' disease, and their condition could be easily controlled with small amounts of antithyroid drugs. Our study indicates that thyrotoxic Graves' disease with normal {sup 99m}Tc uptake exists and {sup 99m}Tc uptake study and TBII activity measurement is very useful for the diagnosis. The normal {sup 99m}Tc uptake thyrotoxic Graves' patient might be early stage patients with general Graves' disease and their early discrimination from general Graves' patients is very advantageous for treatment and prognosis. (author).

  17. First reported case of unilateral Graves' disease in the left lobe of a bilobar thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Louis C; Green, Jennifer B

    2011-06-01

    Unilateral Graves' disease is a rare disease variant that can occur in a bilobar thyroid gland. We report the first documented case of unilateral Graves' disease in the left lobe of a bilobar thyroid gland and review the pertinent literature. A 48-year-old man presented in June 2010 with thyrotoxicosis. I-131 radioisotope uptake was elevated at 33.4%, and scintigraphy revealed that uptake of the radioisotope was uniformly increased in the left lobe of the thyroid gland. Ultrasonography of the thyroid gland revealed a non-nodular, enlarged, and heterogeneous left lobe; Doppler investigation of the lobe showed hypervascularity classically seen in Graves' disease. The right lobe of the thyroid, on the other hand, appeared homogeneous and hypovascular on ultrasonography. Thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin was significantly elevated at 191% (reference range disease was the most likely diagnosis. As has occasionally been described in the literature, unilateral involvement of the thyroid gland is a rare presentation of Graves' disease. Pre-existing functional or structural differences (either congenital or acquired) between the two lobes may contribute to this rare presentation. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of unilateral Graves' disease presenting in the left lobe of a bilobar thyroid gland. Although the pathophysiology of unilateral Graves's disease has not been clearly elucidated, clinicians should be aware that Graves' disease can present unilaterally in either lobe of the thyroid gland.

  18. Graves' disease associated with infectious mononucleosis due to primary Epstein-Barr virus infection: report of 3 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahori, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Yumie; Saito, Reina; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2010-01-01

    Although the etiology of Graves' disease is still not clear, it is generally suggested that environmental factors such as infections contribute to the development of Graves' disease. We report here three cases of Graves' disease which presented simultaneously with infectious mononucleosis due to primary EBV infection. Acute EBV infection might play an important role in the onset of Graves' disease. These three women complained of a sore throat or neck pain, resembling subacute thyroiditis. In the case of thyrotoxicosis accompanied by sore throat or neck pain, Graves' disease must be distinguished from subacute thyroiditis.

  19. Chylothorax Associated with Substernal Goiter in Graves' Disease Treated with Radioactive Iodine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Oh, Seo; Hyun Kim, Bo; Young Kim, Do; Min Lee, Kyu; Jin Lee, Min; Su Kim, Sung; Ho Kim, Jong; Kyung Jeon, Yun; Soo Kim, Sang; Ki Kim, Yong; Joo Kim, In

    2017-04-01

    We present a rare case of chylothorax associated with an intrathoracic goiter in Graves' disease that was treated with radioactive iodine. A 23-year-old woman with Graves' disease was referred to our clinic with a pleural effusion, dyspnea, characteristic bilateral proptosis, and a diffuse goiter. The pleural fluid biochemistry was consistent with chylothorax. However, the chylothorax did not decrease with conservative therapy. Therefore, RAI was administered. Subsequently, the chylothorax and goiter improved more quickly than expected. This case illustrates that chylothorax associated with a substernal goiter in Graves' disease can be treated successfully with radioactive iodine instead of surgery.

  20. Mortality in Graves' orbitopathy is increased and influenced by gender, age and pre-existing morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwensen, Charlotte F; Hjelm Brandt Kristensen, Frans; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: It is unclear whether the excess mortality associated with Graves' disease differs between individuals with Graves' orbitopathy (GO) or without (GD). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A nationwide, register-based cohort study in which all adult Danes diagnosed with GD (n = 28 461) and GO (n......-existing morbidity using the Charlson score. RESULTS: Adjusted mortality in Graves' disease overall (GD + GO) was significantly increased compared to that in the background population (HR = 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.15-1.21)). In GD and GO separately, adjusted mortality was also significantly higher than...

  1. The curative effect analysis of 131I-therapy on patients with Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Qin; Lu Shujun; Lu Tianhe

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the curative effect of 131 I-therapy on Graves' disease, the authors analyse conditions of patients who have received 131 I-therapy (n -674). These results showed that the incidence of fully recover, improve, Graves' disease and invalid is 80.11%, 7.28%, 11.87% and 0.74% respectively. Therefore, 131 I-therapy on Graves' disease is convenient. It has little side effect, low cost and better curative effect, it is one of the best therapeutic methods to treat hyperthyroidism

  2. The experience of gasless endoscopic-assisted thyroidectomy via the anterior chest approach for Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yun; Yu, Shi-Tong; Cai, Qian; Liang, Fa-Ya; Han, Ping; Huang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, feasibility, effectiveness, and cosmesis of a gasless endoscopic-assisted thyroidectomy via the anterior chest in patients with Graves' disease. We retrospectively reviewed 38 patients with Graves' disease treated with thyroidectomy from November 2007 to June 2015. We analyzed clinical characteristics of patients, type of operation, operative indications, operative duration, length of postoperative hospital stay, and postoperative complications. The thyroidectomies were classified as total thyroidectomy (n = 12) or near-total thyroidectomy with a remnant of Graves' disease is a safe, feasible, and effective and provides an excellent cosmetic outcome procedure. It is a valid option in appropriately selected patients.

  3. Activation of latent Graves' disease in children. Review of possible psychosomatic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo, E; Gardner, L I

    1980-03-01

    In some children, psychological events have appeared to be important in the triggering of Graves' disease. This report examines the case histories of three children in whom the appearance of symptomatology of Graves' disease was associated with depression following the death of a loved one. An analysis of neuroendocrine and immunologie pathways suggests that depression, set off by bereavement, causes low levels of norepinephrine in the brain. The latter in turn may mediate an increase in ACTH and cortisol, leading to reductions in immune surveillance and resultant production of thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulins, hence the development of Graves' disease.

  4. Remission of aplastic anemia induced by treatment for Graves disease in a pediatric patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Prabodh Kumar; Wherrett, Diane; Dror, Yigal

    2007-08-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) is mediated by T-cell autoimmunity in the majority of cases; it is rare and mostly idiopathic in children. We describe a child, who developed AA following Graves' disease which could not be attributed to antithyroid drugs. We hypothesized that both diseases were caused by similar autoimmune process. We monitored the blood counts and did not administer any conventional treatment for AA assuming that the existing anti- hematopoietic stem cell humoral and cellular immunity might subside with induction of remission of Grave's disease. The child went into complete remission with the treatment of the Graves' disease.

  5. Report, realized on behalf of the foreign Affairs, the Defense and the Armed Forces Commission: - on the law project, carried by the Senate, authorizing the approval of the amendment for the 16 september 1987 Montreal protocol relative to the substances which impoverish the ozone layer, adopted at Montreal the 17 september 1997; - and on the law project, carried by the Senate, authorizing the approval of the amendment for the 16 september 1987 Montreal protocol relative to the substances which impoverish the ozone layer, adopted at Pekin the 3 december 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillet, J.J.

    2003-07-01

    The document presents the text of the law projects concerning the substances which impoverish the ozone layer. Facts of science,protection systems and the two amendments adopted at Montreal in 1997 and Pekin in 1999 are discussed. For each countries data on the substances impoverish the ozone layer, are also given. (A.L.B.)

  6. Development of Graves' ophthalmopathy and uveitis after radioiodine therapy for Graves' disease in a patient with HTLA-I associated myelopathy (HAM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Yasunori; Migita, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Tomoji; Okuda, Itsuko; Takeshita, Akira; Takagi, Akio; Shishiba, Yoshimasa (Toranomon Hospital, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-09-01

    HTLV-I carriers or patients with HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM) are prone to immune-mediated inflammatory disorders. We present a 44-year-old female with HAM who developed Graves' disease. She developed severe Graves' ophthalmopathy shortly after [sup 131]I therapy, concurrently with a remarkable increase in TSH-receptor antibody titer. Ophthalmopathy was aggravated in spite of prednisolone therapy and euthyroidism being maintained by thyroxine replacement. Uveitis also developed after [sup 131]I therapy and iridocyclitis finally required trabeculotomy. This case suggests that HAM patients may have a higher risk of immune-mediated Graves' ophthalmopathy after [sup 131]I therapy.(author).

  7. The observation of the therapeutic effectiveness of 131I on 260 youngster with Grave's hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Binwen; Gao Xiusheng; Zhang Yahua; Pu Dongli

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the therapeutic effect and find new ways on treatment of Grave's hyperthyroidism in youngsters. Methods: 260 Grave's hyperthyroidism patients (age under 21 years) treated with 131 I were followed up 1-16 years later. Results: 118 of all patients were cured and 55 cases improved, failed treatment 2 cases, subclinical hypothyroidism 9 cases, clinical hypothyroidism 6 cases. 35 cases were treated with 131 I two or three times. All the patients with subclinical hypothyroidism and clinical hypothyroidism caused by 131 I were cured with medicine. 131 I treatment had no effect on growth and mentality and didn't cause leukemia nor thyroid cancer. Conclusions: The therapy of youngsters with Grave's hyperthyroidism with 131 I has the same effectiveness as adult. To the youngster Grave's patients who failed medical treatment, therapy with 131 I is safe and effective. It leads to temporary hypothyroidism which can be cured with medicine, no delayed hypothyroidism has been found

  8. Important considerations in the management of Graves' disease in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okosieme, Onyebuchi E; Lazarus, John H

    2015-01-01

    Graves' disease is an autoimmune disorder in which autoantibodies to the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor cause hyperthyroidism through unregulated stimulation of the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. Effective management of Graves' disease in pregnancy must address the competing fetal and maternal priorities of controlling hyperthyroidism in the mother on the one hand, and on the other, minimizing the impact of maternal disease and antithyroid drugs on the well-being of the fetus. Optimal strategies for achieving this intricate balance are currently a source of continued debate among thyroid experts and studies in recent decades are now providing greater clarity into the risk posed to the unborn baby by the combination of biochemical, immunological and pharmacological hazards arising from Graves' disease and its therapy. This review summarizes the current best practice and highlights important considerations and areas of uncertainty in the management of Graves' disease in pregnant women.

  9. 131I-therapy of graves' disease and non-immunogenic thyrotoxicosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoeschel, M.; Heinze, H.G.

    1984-01-01

    From 1977 to 1982, 315 patients suffering from thyrotoxicosis with diffuse and/or nodular goitre or Graves' disease were treated with 131 I. In 246 patients, the results of treatment after 7 months to 5 1/2 years could be evaluated. After a single treatment with 131 I, 72% of the patients with hyperthyroid nodular goitre and 61% of those with diffuse goitre, but only 36% of the patients with Graves' disease showed normal thyroid function. By repeated 131 I treatments - as many as 5 for those with Graves' disease - normal thyroid function could be achieved in nearly all patients examined. Patients with immune thyrotoxicosis, type Graves' disease, showed a high resistance to therapy. A dependence was found between the results of these treatments and previous antithyroidal drug therapy or surgery. The rate of hypothyroidism varied between 4 and 15%. The highest rate of hypothyroidism was observed in operated patients with persistent or recurring thyrotoxicosis. (orig.) [de

  10. The observation on plasma endothelin levels in patients with graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Xiaojun; Liu Changshan; Yang Lianrong; Zhang Qiliang; Wang Honggang; Liu Xudong

    2002-01-01

    Observing the plasma endothelin levels in patients with Graves' disease to probe its clinical significance, plasma endothelin levels were measured in 55 cases of Graves' disease before and after treatment respectively, and these were compared with that of 23 health subjects. Results: plasma endothelin levels in patients with Graves' disease significantly increase, compared with heath subjects (150.4 +- 29.31 ng/L vs 42.80 +- 7.58 ng/L, P < 0.01); post-treatment endothelin levels apparently decrease (97.61 +- 15.99 ng/L vs 150.4 +- 29.31 ng/L, P < 0.01). Plasma endothelin levels in patients with Graves' disease significantly increase, and after treatment the endothelin levels decrease following decreasing of thyroid hormone level and high hemodynamics

  11. Modified lateral orbital wall decompression in Graves' orbitopathy using computer-assisted planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalthoff, S; Jehn, P; Zimmerer, R; Rana, M; Gellrich, N-C; Dittmann, J

    2018-02-01

    Graves' orbitopathy, a condition seen in the autoimmune syndrome Graves' disease, affects the fatty tissue and muscles inside the orbit. Graves' orbitopathy is associated with increasing exophthalmos and sometimes leads to compressive dysthyroid optic neuropathy, resulting in progressive vision loss. Dysthyroid compressive optic neuropathy, functional problems, and cosmetic problems are the main indications for surgical decompression of the orbit, especially if conservative treatment has not led to a reduction in symptoms. Many surgical techniques are described in the literature. This article presents a modification of the lateral orbital wall osteotomy, involving the rotation and reduction of the osteotomized bone segment using preoperative planning, intraoperative computed navigation, and piezoelectric surgery. This new method combines the advantages of different techniques and appears to be a valid approach to the treatment of severe cases of Graves' orbitopathy. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cradle to Grave: an Analysis of Female Oppression in Nawal El ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cradle to Grave: an Analysis of Female Oppression in Nawal El Saadawi.s Woman ... An International Journal of Language, Literature and Gender Studies ... Women are subjected to male oppression and suppression at various stages of life.

  13. A 27-year-old woman diagnosed as polycystic ovary syndrome associated with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Jung, Tae Sik; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Ho Soo; Kim, Sungsu; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Deok Ryong; Choi, Won Jun; Seo, Yeong Mi; Chung, Soon Il

    2011-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and Graves' disease are the common causes of menstrual irregularity leading to infertility in women of child-bearing age. A 21-year-old female patient visited us with complaints of oligomenorrhea and hand tremor. She was diagnosed as having PCOS and hyperthyroid Graves' disease, simultaneously. She had low body weight (BMI: 16.4 kg/m(2)), mild hirsutism, and thyrotoxicosis. The patient was treated with anti-thyroid drug and beta-blocker for about two years, and then recovered to normal thyroid function. Although some studies have suggested a connection between PCOS and autoimmune thyroiditis, no study indicated that PCOS is associated with Graves' disease until now. Here, we describe the first case report of a lean woman with normal insulin sensitivity presenting PCOS and Graves' disease simultaneously.

  14. The incidence of diplopia following coronal and translid orbital decompression in Graves' orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paridaens, D.; Hans, K.; van Buitenen, S.; Mourits, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Firstly, to assess the incidence of induced diplopia following orbital decompression in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. Secondly, to assess patient satisfaction after orbital decompression. Thirdly, to determine the factors that contribute to the variable reported incidence of diplopia

  15. Transconjunctival orbital decompression in Graves' ophthalmopathy: lateral wall approach ab interno

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.A. Paridaens (Dion); K. Verhoeff; D. Bouwens; W.A. van den Bosch (Willem)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: A modified surgical technique is described to perform a one, two, or three wall orbital decompression in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. METHODS: The lateral wall was approached ab interno through a "swinging eyelid" approach (lateral canthotomy

  16. Early versus late orbital decompression in Graves' orbitopathy: a retrospective study in 125 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldeschi, Lelio; Wakelkamp, Iris M. M. J.; Lindeboom, Robert; Prummel, Marc F.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if early rehabilitative orbital decompression in Graves' orbitopathy (GO) leads to a more effective postoperative outcome than the same intervention performed at a later, more likely, fibrotic stage. DESIGN: Retrospective comparative case series. PARTICIPANTS: The medical

  17. Agranulocitosis inducida por metimazol en pacientes con enfermedad de Graves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helard Manrique-Hurtado

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Describir las características clínicas y epidemiológicas de los pacientes con enfermedad de Graves que presentaron agranulocitosis inducida por metimazol. Material y métodos: Estudio retrospectivo, tipo serie de casos. Se revisaron las historias clínicas de todos los pacientes con diagnóstico de agranulocitosis inducida por metimazol, atendidos en el Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza, entre enero 2002 y diciembre 2008. Se buscó asociación entre las variables demográficas y clínicas con la mortalidad y el tiempo de recuperación. Resultados: Treinta (0,60% pacientes con enfermedad de Graves fueron hospitalizados con el diagnóstico de agranulocitosis inducida por metimazol. La mediana de la edad fue 33,5 años y 86,67% fueron mujeres. Al ingreso, todos los pacientes presentaron fiebre y dolor de garganta. El manejo incluyó aislamiento invertido, suspensión del metimazol, administración de antibióticos y glucocorticoides. Doce (40% pacientes recibieron GM-CSF. El número de granulocitos se normalizó después de 10,59 días y cuatro (13,33% pacientes murieron por infecciones bacterianas y sepsis. En todos los casos, el tratamiento definitivo fue yodo radioactivo. No hubo diferencia significativa en la edad, sexo, dosis de metimazol, duración del tratamiento y uso de factor estimulante colonia, entre los pacientes fallecidos y los sobrevivientes. Además, el uso de factor estimulante de colonia no redujo el tiempo de recuperación de la agranulocitosis. Conclusión: La agranulocitosis inducida por metimazol es un evento adverso serio y potencialmente mortal. En este grupo de pacientes, la mortalidad fue elevada y el uso de factor estimulante de colonia no disminuyó el tiempo de recuperación.

  18. High-dose radioiodine therapy of Graves disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solodky, V.; Fomin, D.; Pestritskaya, E.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Objectives: to estimate the effectiveness and safety of the disease treatment under different modes of applying RIT. Materials and methods: 67 patients with the thyrotoxicosis condition associated with Graves disease were researched. The patients were divided into 2 groups: a control group with 25 people (18 women and 7 men), who underwent a low-dose therapy of 150-500 MBq; and a main group of 42 people (32 women and 10 men), who underwent a high-dose therapy of 550 and 800 MBq. The volume of thyroid prior to the treatment made up 23.8 ± 20 ml in the main group and 30.2 ± 23 ml in the control one. The average age in the high-dose group was 44.6 ±23 years old and in the low-dose -47.2 ± 24 years old. In terms of the hormone level before the RIT, 52% of the main group patients experienced euthyroidism, while 48% - thyrotoxicosis. The corresponding indices in the control group were 42% and 58% respectively. The cessation of the thyreostatic therapy came on 5. to 21. day prior to the treatment, with the average of 14 ±7 days in both groups. The diagnosis of the disease was based on ultrasonography, planar scintigraphy, the hormone level and antibody titer. The performance was assessed through the attainment of hypo-thyrosis and the transition to a substitutive hormonal therapy with L-thyroxine in 6 months or more. The attainment of euthyroidism was seen as a partial effect due to a possibility of relapse. Results: in 6 months a positive result in the form of hypo-thyrosis was achieved for 39 patients in the main group, which accounted for 93%, and 3 patients (7%) experienced euthyroidism. No symptomatic thyrotoxicosis relapses were revealed. In the control group, hypo-thyrosis was achieved by 18 patients, which accounted for 72%; euthyroidism came up to 12%; 4 patients needed a refresher course of RIT, which made up 16% of the group. 93% of the main group patients tolerated the treatment favourably. 3 patients complained of the

  19. Long-term results of irradiation for patients with progressive GRAVES' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Sheri D.; Lum, Bert L.; McDougall, I. Ross; Katkuri, Shobha; Levin, Peter S.; MacManus, Michael; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the long-term outcome of radiotherapy (RT) in patients with progressively symptomatic thyroid eye disease and to evaluate the potential long-term sequelae. Methods and Materials: Four hundred fifty-three patients provided written informed consent and received retrobulbar RT for Graves' ophthalmopathy at Stanford University Medical Center; 197 with ≥1 year of follow-up were retrospectively analyzed. Of the 197 patients, 189 received RT to the bilateral retrobulbar regions, and 4 received unilateral RT. The technical information was unavailable for 4 patients. Patients were assessed by chart review, telephone interview, questionnaire, and multidisciplinary physician examination. Eye impairment was scored using the SPECS system. The end point review included the before and after treatment SPECS score, surgical intervention, and patient satisfaction. Potential complications, including cataract development, retinopathy, and tumor formation, were investigated. Multivariate analyses were performed to assess the prognostic variables. Results: Improvement or resolution was 89% for soft-tissue findings; 70% for proptosis; 85% for extraocular muscle dysfunction; 96% for corneal abnormalities; and 67% for sight loss. The response to RT may take >6 months to stabilize. Factors predictive of response varied in the individual SPECS categories but included the initial SPECS score, pretreatment thyroid status, female gender, a 20-Gy RT dose, and a history of hypertension. Nonpredictive factors included a history of tobacco use, diabetes mellitus, steroids, and prior cataracts. Only 16% required surgical intervention to preserve their vision or restore binocular vision. Twenty-two patients (12%) developed cataracts after irradiation (median 11 years). No patient developed a tumor within the RT field during the follow-up period (range 1-29 years). Ninety-eight percent of patients were pleased with their results, and 2% believed their symptoms progressed

  20. Unfavourable effect of prolonged treatment with antithyroid drugs on radioiodine therapy outcome in Graves' hyperthyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Rajić, Milena; Vlajković, Marina; Ilić, Slobodan; Stević, Miloš; Sekulić, Vladan; Zečević, Mila

    2014-01-01

    Radioiodine therapy (RIT) of Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) is usually recommended after failure of primary therapy with antithyroid drugs (ATDs), which are commonly prescribed for up to 18-24 months. However, in our region, the prolonged ATDs treatment of the disease is very common. Thus, we assessed the efficacy of RIT after prolonged continual pretreatment with ATDs in Graves' hyperthyroidism. Therapy outcome using a single dose of radioiodine was evaluated after one year in 91 patients (f/m...

  1. Paradoxical euthyroid hormone profile in a case of Graves' disease with cardiac failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapoor Aditya

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cardiac failure is an uncommon complication of juvenile hyperthyroidism. We describe an adolescent boy with Graves' disease who developed manifestations of heart failure while on antithyroid medications. There was no evidence of any underlying cardiac disease. He had paradoxical euthyroid hormone profile which rose to hyperthyroid range when the manifestations of the cardiac failure subsided. The case highlights several unusual features of Graves' disease.

  2. [Grave's disease in children with 22q11 deletion. Report of three cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, J; Lebon-Labich, B; Lucron, H; Marçon, F; Leheup, B

    2004-12-01

    Hypothyroidism is a well recognized complication of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Auto-immune hyperthyroidism is less common. We report three patients with a 22q11.2 deletion and Graves' disease diagnosed at age 17, 14 and 11 years, respectively. The clinical and biological presentation was typical for auto-immune hyperthyroidism. Graves' disease should be periodically sought during the follow-up program of patients with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

  3. Prenatal diagnosis and management of fetal goiter caused by maternal Grave's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, H A; Strickland, D

    1995-07-01

    We present a case of maternal Grave's disease associated with fetal goitrous hyperthyroidism. Fetal goiter was diagnosed by ultrasound and diagnosis of fetal hyperthyroidism was established by umbilical blood sampling. Fetus was successfully treated by increasing maternal propylthiouracil dosage. Fetal thyroid status was normal at birth. Role of sonography and umbilical blood sampling in management of fetal goiter complicated with maternal Grave's disease is discussed.

  4. Graves' disease presenting as right heart failure with severe pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Furqan Mohd Akram Khan; Anannya Mukherji; Shekhar T. Nabar; Ashwini G

    2016-01-01

    We report a patient who presented to our institution with clinical features of right sided heart failure and hyperthyroidism. Diagnosis of grave's disease induced reversible severe pulmonary hypertension leading to severe tricuspid regurgitation and right sided heart failure was made after all the common causes were ruled out using the biochemical and radiological investigations and review of literature. Graves disease is a common cause hyperthyroidism, is an immune system disorder that resul...

  5. Mood and anxiety disorders in women with treated hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy caused by Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunevicius, Robertas; Velickiene, Dzilda; Prange, Arthur J

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in women with treated hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease and to compare them with the prevalence of such findings in women without past or present thyroid disease. Thirty inpatient women with treated hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy caused by Graves' disease and 45 women hospitalized for treatment of gynecologic disorders such as abnormal vaginal bleeding, benign tumors or infertility were evaluated for the prevalence of mood and anxiety diagnoses using a standard Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview and for mood and anxiety ratings using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). At the time of assessment, it was discovered that 14 of 30 women with treated hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease were still hyperthyroid, while 16 women were euthyroid. Significantly greater prevalence of social anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, major depression and total mood and anxiety disorders, as well as higher symptom scores on the POMS, was found in hyperthyroid women with Graves' disease in comparison with the control group. A prevalence of total anxiety disorder, as well as history of mania or hypomania and lifetime bipolar disorder, but not lifetime unipolar depression, was more frequent in both the euthyroid and the hyperthyroid subgroups of study women in comparison with the control group. These results confirm a high prevalence of mood and anxiety disorders in women with treated hyperthyroidism and ophthalmopathy caused by Graves' disease. Hyperthyroidism plays a major role in psychiatric morbidity in Graves' disease.

  6. Case report of recurrent atrial fibrillation induced by thyrotropin-secreting pituitary adenoma with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiaqi; Tan, Huiwen; Huang, Juan; Luo, Dan; Tang, Ying; Yu, Ruichao; Huang, Hui

    2018-06-01

    Thyrotropin-secreting adenoma (TSHoma) is rare. Even though the thyrotoxicosis is mild in patients with TSHoma, it is still a rare cause of arrhythmia, ignore of mild disfunction of thyroid function of TSHoma can lead to the delayed diagnosis of pituitary tumor or leading to recurring of complications. Graves' disease is an auto-immue endocrinological disorder. Association of TSHoma and Graves's disease is extremely rare. Coexistence of these two diseases made the diagnosis and treatment complicated. This patient was a 55-year-old man who had been referred to the department of endocrinology and metabolism of the West China Hospital due to recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF) and thyroxicosis. Examinations revealed pituitary thyrotropin-secreting macroadenoma with Graves' disease. We conducted transsphenoidal surgery. Thyrozol was used to treat the recurrence of Graves' disease after pituitary surgery. The TSHoma was successfully cured, and recurrent Graves' disease was controlled very well. The association of TSHoma and Graves' disease is extremely rare. Even though the clinical features of thyrotoxicosis are milder in patients with TSHoma, thyroid function tests are still important clinical assessment of patients with AF, which is an arrhythmia associated with hyperthyroidism. TSHoma is a rare cause of thyrotoxicosis; however, ignoring of the mild disfunction caused by TSHoma can lead to the delayed diagnosis of pituitary tumors or to recurring of complications of TSHoma.

  7. Thyroid Follicular Carcinoma in a Fourteen-year-old Girl with Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima-Ishii, Kanako; Ihara, Kenji; Ohkubo, Kazuhiro; Matsuo, Terumichi; Toda, Naoko; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Kono, Shinji; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-04-01

    Here we present the case of a 14-yr-old girl who developed thyroid follicular carcinoma accompanied by Graves' disease. She was diagnosed with Graves' disease at 10 yr of age and soon achieved a euthyroid state after starting treatment. When she was 13 yr of age, her hyperthyroidism and goiter worsened despite medical therapy. Multiple nodules were found in her enlarged thyroid gland by ultrasonography. Her serum Tg level seemed within the normal range. She underwent near-total thyroidectomy for control of thyroid function. Histopathological study demonstrated that multiple oxyphilic follicular neoplasms were surrounded by the thyroid tissue compatible with Graves' disease. Capsular invasion was identified in one of the nodules, and thus the histological diagnosis was minimally invasive follicular carcinoma. She did not have signs suggesting metastasis, and has had no relapse for 18 mo after the operation. Although some previous studies showed a high prevalence of thyroid cancer with an aggressive nature in adult patients with Graves' disease, few reports about thyroid cancer accompanied by Graves' disease are available in children. The present case, however, suggests that careful investigation is needed when we detect thyroid nodules or progressive thyroid enlargement, especially in children with Graves' disease.

  8. Treatment choice, satisfaction and quality of life in patients with Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaglen, Helen M; Tamatea, Jade A U; Conaglen, John V; Elston, Marianne S

    2018-04-06

    Thyrotoxicosis, most often caused by Graves' disease (GD), when treated inadequately may result in premature mortality. There is little consensus as to which of the 3 treatment options available - antithyroid drugs (ATD), radioactive iodine (RAI) and surgery, is better. (i) To assess factors involved in treatment choice and treatment satisfaction in patients treated for Graves' disease; (ii) To assess quality of life (QoL) following treatment of Graves' disease. Participants were selected from a prospective study cohort assessing thyrotoxicosis incidence and severity. Of the 172 eligible patients with Graves' disease, 123 treated patients participated (64% had received ATD only, 11% RAI and 25% total thyroidectomy, the latter 2 usually after a period of ATD), along with 18 untreated patients with newly diagnosed Graves' disease (overall participation rate, 73%). Consented patients completed a questionnaire detailing factors involved in treatment choice, QoL and satisfaction with treatment. Participants reported that the most important factors in choosing a treatment were the following: the effects on activities of daily living, concern about use of radioiodine, possibility of depression or anxiety, and doctor's recommendations. Satisfaction levels were high across all 3 treatment types. QoL 1-year following treatment was higher than in untreated patients, and comparable with other international studies. Patient satisfaction with therapy and QoL does not differ by treatment type. Therefore, clinical and social factors, in combination with patient choice and resource availability, should determine which treatment modality patients with Graves' disease should receive. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Measurements of Actual Effective Half - Life in 131I Therapy for Graves' Hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, Yong Seon; Kim, Myung Seon; Kwon, Ki Hyun; Kim, Seok Whan; Kim, Tae Hyung; Han, Sang Woong; Kim, Eun Sil; Kim, Chong Soon

    1996-01-01

    Radioiodine[131I] has been used for the treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism since the late 1940's and is now generally regarded as the treatment of choice for Graves' hyperthyroidism who does not remit following a course of antithyroid drugs. But for the dose given, several different protocols have been described by different centers, each attempting to reduce the incidence of long-term hypothyroidism while maintaining an acceptable rate control of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Our goals were to evaluate effective half-life and predict absorbed dose in Graves' hyperthyroidism patients, therefore, to calculate and read minister radioiodine activity needed to achieve aimed radiation dose. Our data showed that the mean effective 131I half-life for Graves' disease is 5.3 days(S.D=0.88) and mean biologic half-life is 21 days, range 9.5-67.2 days. The mean administered activity and the mean values of absorbed doses wet: 532 MBq(S.D.=254), 112 Gy (S.D.=50.9), respectively. The mean activity needed to achieve aimed radiation dose were 51 MBq and marked differences of 131I thyroidal uptake between tracer and therapy occurred in our study. We are sure that the dose calculation method that uses 5 days thyroidal 131I uptake measurements after tracer and therapy dose, provides sufficient data about the effective treatment in Graves' hyperthyroidism.

  10. Measurements of Actual Effective Half - Life in {sup 131}I Therapy for Graves' Hyperthyroidism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Yong Seon; Kim, Myung Seon; Kwon, Ki Hyun; Kim, Seok Whan; Kim, Tae Hyung; Han, Sang Woong; Kim, Eun Sil; Kim, Chong Soon [Hanil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    Radioiodine[131I] has been used for the treatment of Graves' hyperthyroidism since the late 1940's and is now generally regarded as the treatment of choice for Graves' hyperthyroidism who does not remit following a course of antithyroid drugs. But for the dose given, several different protocols have been described by different centers, each attempting to reduce the incidence of long-term hypothyroidism while maintaining an acceptable rate control of Graves' hyperthyroidism. Our goals were to evaluate effective half-life and predict absorbed dose in Graves' hyperthyroidism patients, therefore, to calculate and read minister radioiodine activity needed to achieve aimed radiation dose. Our data showed that the mean effective 131I half-life for Graves' disease is 5.3 days(S.D=0.88) and mean biologic half-life is 21 days, range 9.5-67.2 days. The mean administered activity and the mean values of absorbed doses wet: 532 MBq(S.D.=254), 112 Gy (S.D.=50.9), respectively. The mean activity needed to achieve aimed radiation dose were 51 MBq and marked differences of 131I thyroidal uptake between tracer and therapy occurred in our study. We are sure that the dose calculation method that uses 5 days thyroidal 131I uptake measurements after tracer and therapy dose, provides sufficient data about the effective treatment in Graves' hyperthyroidism.

  11. [Rationale for a diagnostic approach in non-Graves' orbital inflammation--Report of 61 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavard-Perret, A; Lagier, J; Delmas, J; Delas, J; Adenis, J-P; Robert, P-Y

    2015-12-01

    Orbital inflammatory syndromes include a wide variety of inflammatory intraorbital processes which are very different in terms of clinical presentation and prognosis. We currently prefer to differentiate so-called "specific" inflammations, for which an etiology is able to be identified, from idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndromes (IOIS), for which the etiology remains unknown and the histology is nonspecific. To propose an efficient diagnostic approach for clinicians managing patients with non-Graves' orbital inflammations. This is a retrospective and prospective study concerning 61 patients managed by the medical team for non-Graves' orbital inflammations between May, 1999 and May, 2013 in the ophthalmology departments of Nice and Limoges university hospitals in France. Seventeen specific inflammations, 19 orbital lymphomas and 25 idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndromes were included. Patients were divided into two groups. Thirty-six patients (group 1) underwent primary biopsy, while for the other 25 (group 2), therapy was begun empirically without biopsy. We could therefore compare both approaches in terms of diagnostic efficiency and time until identification of a specific etiology. Our statistical results show that an approach without primary biopsy leads to a number of specific diagnoses statistically much lower than that obtained by the approach with primary biopsy. Also, the risk of missing a specific inflammation (with as a consequence an inappropriate treatment and a risk of functional sequelae as well as a fatal risk of missing a lymphoproliferative pathology) is very clearly higher in the case of not performing primary biopsy. Finally, the average time elapsed between the initial consultation with the ophthalmologist and a specific diagnosis was one month in the case of the first approach, while this delay was almost three times higher with the second approach, with a mean of 2.91 months (P<0.01). Our study shows that biopsy should be the mainstay

  12. An unusual presenting symptom of graves' disease: myalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, N; Perros, P

    2013-01-01

    A 50-year-old female patient presented with severe myalgia involving her proximal muscles for 3-4 weeks. She also reported mild thyrotoxic symptoms over the same time period. Examination revealed mild thyrotoxicosis, a moderate diffuse goiter and no eye signs. The clinical picture was dominated by muscle pain and tenderness involving mainly her proximal arms and legs, her calves and her fingers, requiring opiate analgesia. Muscle power and tendon reflexes were normal. Laboratory evaluation revealed undetectable serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with raised FT4, FT3 and positive TSH receptor antibodies. Treatment with carbimazole was started. Additional laboratory investigations were negative (inflammatory markers, creatine kinase and antibodies to antinuclear antibodies, gastric parietal cell, smooth muscle, mitochondrial, dsDNA, centromere, extractable nuclear antigen (ENA) ribonucleoprotein, ENA Sm, ENA Ro, ENA Anti-La, ENA Scl70, ENA Jo-1, anti-CCP and rheumatoid factor). Further assessment in the rheumatology clinic confirmed there was no small joint tenderness or loss of range of movement of her limbs, but widespread and profound muscle tenderness of the common extensors of the forearms, biceps, trapezius, calves and thighs. She was treated symptomatically with analgesic medication and continued on carbimazole. A month later she was euthyroid and her myalgia had resolved. Hyperthyroidism has a profound effect on skeletal muscle and often leads to myopathy. Severe myalgia in association with Graves' disease is rare and resolves with the restoration of euthyroidism.

  13. Cradle-to-Grave Logistic Technologies for Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broyan, James L.; Ewert, Michael K.; Shull, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Human exploration missions under study are very limited by the launch mass capacity of exiting and planned vehicles. The logistical mass of crew items is typically considered separate from the vehicle structure, habitat outfitting, and life support systems. Consequently, crew item logistical mass is typically competing with vehicle systems for mass allocation. NASA is Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) Project is developing four logistics technologies guided by a systems engineering cradle-to-grave approach to enable used crew items to augment vehicle systems. Specifically, AES LRR is investigating the direct reduction of clothing mass, the repurposing of logistical packaging, the processing of spent crew items to benefit radiation shielding and water recovery, and the conversion of trash to propulsion supply gases. The systematic implementation of these types of technologies will increase launch mass efficiency by enabling items to be used for secondary purposes and improve the habitability of the vehicle as the mission duration increases. This paper provides a description, benefits, and challenges of the four technologies under development and a status of progress at the mid ]point of the three year AES project.

  14. Dilated cardiomyopathy with Graves disease in a young child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jung Choi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Graves disease (GD can lead to complications such as cardiac arrhythmia and heart failure. Although dilated cardiomyopathy (DCMP has been occasionally reported in adults with GD, it is rare in children. We present the case of a 32-month-old boy with DCMP due to GD. He presented with irritability, vomiting, and diarrhea. He also had a history of weight loss over the past few months. On physical examination, he had tachycardia without fever, a mild diffuse goiter, and hepatomegaly. The chest radiograph showed cardiomegaly with pulmonary edema, while the echocardiography revealed a dilated left ventricle with an ejection fraction (EF of 28%. The thyroid function test (TFT showed elevated serum T3 and decreased thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH levels. The TSH receptor autoantibody titer was elevated. He was diagnosed with DCMP with GD; treatment with methylprednisolone, diuretics, inotropics, and methimazole was initiated. The EF improved after the TFT normalized. At follow-up several months later, although the TFT results again showed evidence of hyperthyroidism, his EF had not deteriorated. His cardiac function continues to remain normal 1.5 months after treatment was started, although he still has elevated T3 and high TSH receptor antibody titer levels due to poor compliance with drug therapy. To summarize, we report a young child with GD-induced DCMP who recovered completely with medical therapy and, even though the hyperthyroidism recurred several months later, there was no relapse of the DCMP.

  15. Outcome of very long-term treatment with antithyroid drugs in Graves' hyperthyroidism associated with Graves' orbitopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbers, Laura; Mourits, Maarten; Wiersinga, Wilmar

    2011-03-01

    It is still debated which treatment modality for Graves' hyperthyroidism (GH) is most appropriate when Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is present. The preference in our center has been always to continue antithyroid drugs for GH (as the block-and-replace [B-R] regimen) until all medical and/or surgical treatments for GO are concluded and the eye disease does not require any further therapy (except prescription of lubricants). This usually takes more than 2 years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of long-term B-R regimen for GH in GO patients by assessment (after discontinuation of B-R) of (a) the recurrence rate of GH and (b) the relapse rate of GO and its association with recurrent GH and/or (131)I therapy. A retrospective follow-up study was done among all patients referred to the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam between 1995 and 2005 for GO. The inclusion criteria for the study were a history of GH and GO and a history of treatment for GH with a B-R regimen for more than 2 years. The exclusion criteria were a history of (131)I therapy or thyroidectomy before the end of GO treatment. A questionnaire was sent to 255 patients and returned by 114. Of these patients, 73 qualified for the study. Recurrences of GH and/or GO as indicated by returned questionnaires were checked with treating physicians. Patients were treated with B-R for a median of 41 months (range: 24-132). The median follow-up after discontinuation of the B-R regimen was 57 months (range: 12-170). Recurrent GH occurred in 27 of the 73 study patients (37%) at a median of 3 months (range: 1-65) after withdrawal of antithyroid drug therapy. Nineteen of the 27 patients with recurrent hyperthyroidism were treated with (131)I therapy. A relapse of GO was not encountered in any of the 73 patients. The study suggests that long-term B-R treatment of GH in GO patients is associated with a recurrence rate of hyperthyroidism of about 37%. With the regimen employed, recurrence of hyperthyroidism and

  16. Thyrotropin receptor antibody activities significantly correlate with the outcome of radioiodine ( sup 131 I) therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaise, Kazuro; Kaise, Nobuko; Yoshida, Katsumi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Mori, Koki; Yamamoto, Makiko; Sakurada, Toshiro; Saito, Shintaro; Yoshinaga, Kaoru (Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1991-08-01

    The outcome of {sup 131}I therapy for 109 patients with Graves' disease was analysed according to pretreatment laboratory data including thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) activities. Forty-five percent of patients became euthyroid, and 13% of patients became hypothyroid within one year after {sup 131}I therapy. Forty-two percent of patients remained hyperthyroid one year after {sup 131}I therapy. Pretreatment values for serum T{sub 4}, T{sub 3}, and the estimated weight of the thyroid were significantly higher in the hyperthyroid group. The mean for the TRAb index of the hyperthyroid group was significantly higher than that of the euthyroid group. Life table analysis revealed a significant effect of the TRAb index on the rate of hyperthyroidism after 3 months or later. These results appear to suggest that the TRAb index is one of the factors which influence the outcome of {sup 131}I therapy for Graves' disease. (author).

  17. Chylous Ascites: A Rare Adverse Effect of Methimazole Treatment for Grave's Disease—A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Tawfik; Schneider, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman was admitted due to an urticarial rash that was attributed to recent onset of methimazole treatment for a diagnosis of Grave's disease. The patient had no prior significant medical history and used no medications, including over-the-counter or herbal medications. Her sister had Grave's disease. On admission, the patient received corticosteroids with improvement in her rash. On the second day of the hospitalization, the patient complained of abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a large amount of new onset ascites. Peritoneal tap yielded a milky fluid with high triglyceride level (12.2 mmol/L or 1080 mg/dL), consistent with chylous ascites. After discontinuation of the methimazole, the ascites disappeared. The patient later underwent therapeutic thyroidectomy, after which all features of thyrotoxicosis had improved. PMID:26366308

  18. Chylous Ascites: A Rare Adverse Effect of Methimazole Treatment for Grave's Disease-A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Tawfik; Schneider, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    A 40-year-old woman was admitted due to an urticarial rash that was attributed to recent onset of methimazole treatment for a diagnosis of Grave's disease. The patient had no prior significant medical history and used no medications, including over-the-counter or herbal medications. Her sister had Grave's disease. On admission, the patient received corticosteroids with improvement in her rash. On the second day of the hospitalization, the patient complained of abdominal discomfort. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a large amount of new onset ascites. Peritoneal tap yielded a milky fluid with high triglyceride level (12.2 mmol/L or 1080 mg/dL), consistent with chylous ascites. After discontinuation of the methimazole, the ascites disappeared. The patient later underwent therapeutic thyroidectomy, after which all features of thyrotoxicosis had improved.

  19. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease; Radioiodoterapia em pacientes com doenca de Basedow-Graves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Margarida Maria Galvao; Blum, Bernardo; Pellegrini, Paulo Martins [Instituto Brasileiro de Medicina Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Corbo, Rossana [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia; Rebello, Ana Maria de Oliveira [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2000-04-01

    We studied retrospectively 104 patients with Graves' disease who underwent radioiodine therapy between 1983 and 1993. The administered dose varied from 2.0 to 9.0 mCi (74 to 333 MBq). In 1994 and 1998 the patients were asked to answer a questionnaire and were considered to have hypothyroidism when receiving T4 therapy. The importance of radioiodine therapy, its indications and the different methods of calculating the administered activity were studied. The results were compared with the literature. At the end of the evaluation, 62,4% of the patients presented hypothyroidism and 37,6% euthyroidism. There was no significant difference regarding the development of hypothyroidism when sex, number of doses, total activity (mCi), effective radiation ({mu}Ci per gram of tissue) and use of antithyroid drugs were considered. In conclusion, the period of time of post-radioiodine therapy is the most important factor in the analysis of the results, which may interfere with the development of hypothyroidism. (author)

  20. Celiac disease, iron deficiency anaemia, grave's disease, osteopenia and short stature in single patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radaideh, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is an intestinal immune mediated disorder, triggered by ingestion of gluten-containing diet in genetically susceptible individuals. The genetic pre-disposition is related to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, especially HLA-DQ2 positive patients. The prevalence of celiac disease in high worldwide and it has been estimated to be 1-26% in Western countries. Many auto-immune diseases can be associated with celiac disease including auto-immune thyroid disease; hashimoto thyroiditis and grave's disease. The opposite also appears to be true, celiac disease is found on persons with auto-immune thyroid disorders at high rates than the general population. Celiac disease is also associated with other extraintestinal diseases other the auto-immune diseases like anemia, short stature, metabolic bone disease and others. Screening for celiac disease should be considered in patients with auto-immune thyroid disease, anemia, short stature and metabolic bone disease. The life-long adherence to gluten-free diet is the only cure in celiac disease and can improve the quality of patients life and prevent future complications. This report describes a case of Grave's disease, Iron deficiency anemia, Short stature, Osteopenia, diagnosed to have Celiac disease. (author)

  1. Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy vestibular approach (TOETVA) for Graves' disease: a comparison of surgical results with open thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitpratoom, Pornpeera; Ketwong, Khwannara; Sasanakietkul, Thanyawat; Anuwong, Angkoon

    2016-12-01

    Transoral endoscopic thyroidectomy vestibular approach (TOETVA) provides excellent cosmetic results from its potential for scar-free operation. The procedure has been applied successfully for Graves' disease by the authors of this work and compared with the standard open cervical approach to evaluate its safety and outcomes. From January 2014 to November 2016, a total of 97 patients with Graves' disease were reviewed retrospectively. Open thyroidectomy (OT) and TOETVA were performed in 49 patients and 46 patients, respectively. For TOETVA, a three-port technique through the oral vestibule was utilized. The thyroidectomy was done endoscopically using conventional laparoscopic instruments and an ultrasonic device. Patient demographics and surgical variables, including operative time, blood loss, and complications, were investigated and compared. TOETVA was performed successfully in all 45 patients, although conversion to open surgery was deemed necessary in one patient. All patient characteristics for both groups were similar. Operative time was shorter for the OT group compared to the TOETVA group, which totaled 101.97±24.618 and 134.11±31.48 minutes, respectively (PGraves' disease in comparison to the standard open cervical approach. It is considered a viable alternative for patients who have been indicated for surgery with excellent cosmetic results.

  2. Multi-center study on the characteristics and treatment strategies of patients with Graves' orbitopathy: the first European Group on Graves' Orbitopathy experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prummel, Mark F.; Bakker, Annemieke; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.; Baldeschi, Lelio; Mourits, Maarten P.; Kendall-Taylor, Pat; Perros, Petros; Neoh, Chris; Dickinson, A. Jane; Lazarus, John H.; Lane, Carol M.; Heufelder, Armin E.; Kahaly, George J.; Pitz, Suzanne; Orgiazzi, Jacques; Hullo, Alain; Pinchera, Aldo; Marcocci, Claudio; Sartini, Maria S.; Rocchi, Roberto; Nardi, Marco; Krassas, Gerry E.; Halkias, A.

    2003-01-01

    To improve management of patients with Graves' orbitopathy, a multi-center collaborative approach is necessary in order to have large enough sample sizes for meaningful randomized clinical trials. This is hampered by a lack of consensus on how to investigate the eye condition. The European Group on

  3. The impact of Graves' disease and its treatment on handwriting characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Giampaolo; Botti, Cristina; Corsello, Salvatore Maria; Ciardullo, Anna Vittoria; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2014-08-01

    Thyroid hormones are crucial for metabolism in all tissues in humans, including the nervous system and muscles, and could thus affect handwriting, which is the synthesis of complex and fine movements. Hyperthyroidism, characterized by symptoms such as tremor and weakness, could affect handwriting, although this has not been studied yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate handwriting characteristics before and after therapy for hyperthyroid Graves' disease (GD). Twenty-two patients (15 women, 7 men) with untreated GD (median age: 44 years; range: 20-70 years) were asked to write a "standard text" before and 12 months after being rendered euthyroid. The letters underwent a standardized detailed analysis by a handwriting expert, through inspection and stereoscopic microscope and magnifying glass. All patients demonstrated handwriting variations, perceptible even to direct observation. Graphological examination showed statistically significant changes after patients become euthyroid, in the following parameters: size of letters (4.5±1.1 vs. 5.9±1.3 mm; phandwriting in all patients. Following recovery from hyperthyroidism, a state of hypertrophic and contracted handwriting resulted in greater fluency and fluidity. Variations in handwriting should be included as signs/symptoms in GD.

  4. Exposure to Rats and Rat-Associated Leptospira and Bartonella Species Among People Who Use Drugs in an Impoverished, Inner-City Neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVea, David A; Himsworth, Chelsea G; Patrick, David M; Lindsay, L Robbin; Kosoy, Michael; Kerr, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    Rat infestations are common, particularly in impoverished, inner-city neighborhoods. However, there has been little research into the nature and consequences of rat exposure in these neighborhoods, particularly in Canada. In this study, we sought to characterize exposure to rats and rat-associated Leptospira interrogans and Bartonella tribocorum, as well as risk factors associated with exposure, in residents (n = 202) of the Downtown Eastside (DTES) neighborhood of Vancouver, Canada. There was no evidence of exposure to rat-associated L. interrogans but 6/202 (3.0%) of participants were exposed to B. tribocorum, which is known to be circulating among DTES rats. We also found that frequent and close rat exposure was common among DTES residents, and that this exposure was particularly associated with injection drug use and outdoor income-generating activities (e.g., drug dealing). These risk factors may be good targets for interventions geared toward effectively reducing rat exposure.

  5. Radiotherapy for Graves' orbitopathy: results of a national survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyd, R.; Zamboglou, N.; Heinrich Seegenschmiedt, M.; Strassmann, G.; Micke, O.; Makoski, H.B.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Graves' orbitopathy (GO) is a widely accepted indication for radiation therapy (RT). In conjunction with the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD), a national survey was conducted in order to assess whether or not there is a consensus on the indication for RT and various treatment factors which were studied. Material and Methods: A questionnaire was circulated to 190 RT institutions to obtain relevant data concerning the patients' workload, stage-dependent indication, and diagnostic procedures, which were considered to be necessary. Further questions addressed details on radiation technique and dose-fractionation schedules, the combined use of corticoids, and salvage RT after previous treatment failure following RT. Results: With a response rate of 152/190 (80%), the survey is nationally representative. Based on the case workload, an estimated annual number of 1,600 GO cases are treated in German radiotherapy departments. With an 88% consensus, stages II-V are the typical indications. 85% considered imaging studies necessary for indication and only 48% for laboratory tests. 76% of the institutions used total doses in the range of 15-20 Gy, and conventional fractionation was most common (57%). 82% used a face mask fixation and 67% CT-based treatment planning. Approximately 50% would prescribe salvage RT, and total doses in the range of 20-40 Gy were considered to be acceptable. Conclusions: The survey revealed a consensus concerning most of the factors studied. We recommend to review the patterns of care for RT of other entities of benign diseases and to implement a quality assurance program both on national and international levels. (orig.)

  6. Single dose planning for radioiodine-131 therapy of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Tamotsu; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Kinuya, Seigo; Taki, Junichi; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2004-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied one year after radioiodine-131 therapy to assess the relationship between the effectiveness of the therapy and the radioiodine doses used. Patients were classified into three groups according to thyroid function as hyperthyroidism, euthyroidism and hypothyroidism at one year after I-131 therapy. In these groups we compared the mean values of dose, dose per thyroid weight calculated with I-123 uptake before the therapy (pre D/W), dose per thyroid weight calculated with therapeutic I-131 uptake (post D/W), and absorbed dose. No significant differences were found between the three groups in terms of dose or pre D/W. The mean values of post D/W and absorbed dose in the non-hyperthyroid (euthyroid and hypothyroid) group were significantly greater than those in the hyperthyroid group. Post D/W of 6.3 MBq/g was a threshold separating the non-hyperthyroid group from the hyperthyroid group. There was no correlation between pre D/W and post D/W; however, the mean post D/W was significantly greater than the mean pre D/W. All patients with pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g showed non-hyperthyroidism at one year after the radioiodine treatment. No indicators before the radioiodine therapy had significant relationships with the effectiveness of the therapy at one year after the treatment. However, the single therapy planned for setting the pre D/W above 6.3 MBq/g will certainly make the patients non-hyperthyroid. As this proposal of dose planning is based on a small number of patients, further study is needed. (author)

  7. Lithium as an Alternative Option in Graves Thyrotoxicosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishita Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old woman was admitted with signs and symptoms of Graves thyrotoxicosis. Biochemistry results were as follows: TSH was undetectable; FT4 was >6.99 ng/dL (0.7–1.8; FT3 was 18 pg/mL (3–5; TSI was 658% (0–139. Thyroid uptake and scan showed diffusely increased tracer uptake in the thyroid gland. The patient was started on methimazole 40 mg BID, but her LFTs elevated precipitously with features of fulminant hepatitis. Methimazole was determined to be the cause and was stopped. After weighing pros and cons, lithium was initiated to treat her persistent thyrotoxicosis. Lithium 300 mg was given daily with a goal to maintain between 0.4 and 0.6. High dose Hydrocortisone and propranolol were also administered concomitantly. Free thyroid hormone levels decreased and the patient reached a biochemical and clinical euthyroid state in about 8 days. Though definitive RAI was planned, the patient has been maintained on lithium for more than a month to control her hyperthyroidism. Trial removal of lithium results in reemergence of thyrotoxicosis within 24 hours. Patient was maintained on low dose lithium treatment with lithium level just below therapeutic range which was sufficient to maintain euthyroid state for more than a month. There were no signs of lithium toxicity within this time period. Conclusion. Lithium has a unique physiologic profile and can be used to treat thyrotoxicosis when thionamides cannot be used while awaiting elective radioablation. Lithium levels need to be monitored; however, levels even at subtherapeutic range may be sufficient to treat thyrotoxicosis.

  8. Treatment of Graves' disease in children: The Portuguese experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Olinda; Antunes, Ana; Oliveira, Maria João

    2018-03-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune thyroid disease, common in adults but rare in children. The best therapeutic approach remains controversial. To ascertain the current treatment of pediatric GD in Portugal and to assess the clinical and biochemical factors that determine definitive/long-term remission after treatment with antithyroid drugs (ATDs). A retrospective analysis of data about pediatric GD treatment collected from a nationwide survey conducted by the Portuguese Society of Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology from May to August 2013. Population was categorized based on sex, age, use of ATDs, dosage, treatment duration, adverse reactions, thyrotropin receptor-stimulating antibody (TRAB) titer, remission and remission/relapse rates, and definitive treatment, and divided into group A (with ongoing treatment) and group B (with treatment stopped). Group B was subdivided into 'Remission', 'Remission+relapse' and 'No remission' subgroups based on the course of disease. The same parameters were compared between both groups. Survey response rate was 77%; 152 subjects, 116 female, mean age at diagnosis 11.23±3.46 years. They all started treatment with ATDs, 70.4% with thiamazole, with a mean treatment duration of 32.38±28.29 months, and 5.9% had adverse effects. Remission rate was 32.6%. Lower age at diagnosis correlated with higher remission rates. Treatment duration was longer when propylthiouracil was used. Initial TRAB titer was significantly higher in the 'No remission' group. Surgery and radioiodine were used as second-line treatments. Our study results were similar to those reported in the literature. Age and TRAB titer were identified as potential clinical and laboratory determinants of remission. Based on risk/benefit analysis, it was concluded that treatment should be individualized based on age, accessibility to treatments, and physician's experience. Copyright © 2017 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Recurrent Graves' hyperthyroidism after prolonged radioiodine-induced hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Fariha; Oktaei, Hooman; Solomon, Solomon; Nyenwe, Ebenezer

    2017-07-01

    Radioactive iodine (RAI) is the most cost effective therapy for Graves' disease (GD). Patients with GD who have become hypothyroid after therapeutic RAI, rarely develop recurrence of disease. Herein we describe a case of recurrence of thyrotoxicosis after 2 years of hypothyroidism. We present the clinical features, laboratory findings, imaging and management of an unusual case of recurrent hyperthyroidism. A 48-year-old male presented to the emergency room with a 2-day history of palpitation, chest discomfort and 30 pounds of weight loss. Examination was remarkable for rapid and irregular pulse, diffuse thyromegaly and brisk deep tendon reflexes but no eye changes or tremors. Laboratory tests showed thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) of 20 (1.8-4.7 pg/ml), total thyroxine >800 (80-200 ng/dl). Electrocardiogram showed atrial fibrillation with rapid ventricular response. RAI uptake and scan showed a homogenous gland with 54% uptake in 6 h and 45% in 24 h. He was treated with propranolol and propylthiouracil with some clinical improvement. He subsequently underwent RAI therapy and developed hypothyroidism after 8 weeks. Hypothyroidism was treated with levothyroxine. At 2 years after RAI ablation, he again developed symptoms of hyperthyroidism and had suppressed TSH. The levothyroxine dose was stopped, 3 weeks after discontinuing levothyroxine, he remained hyperthyroid with TSH of 0.008 and FT4 of 1.62 and FT3 of 4.8. RAI uptake demonstrated 17% uptake at 24 h. Recurrent hyperthyroidism in GD is uncommon after development of post-ablative hypothyroidism. Our case illustrates the need for continued surveillance.

  10. Current trends in the management of Graves' disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, B.; Glinoer, D.; Lagasse, R.; Wartofsky, L. (Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-06-01

    Members of the American Thyroid Association were invited to participate in a survey of the management of Graves' disease. One primary case and several variations were provided, which differed in respect to age, sex, goiter size, severity, etc. The questionnaire was based on the format used in a similar survey of members of the European Thyroid Association. The aim of the survey was to determine (1) how expert thyroidologist employ diagnostic procedures for this disorder, and (2) the choice of therapy of the three treatment options and its manner of implementation. Questionnaires were sent only to clinically active members. The overall response rate was 62%. Data analysis was possible on 52% of members surveyed and was performed using SPSS and a specific Fortran program. In the laboratory evaluation of the primary case a radioiodine uptake, scan, serum total T4, and basal TSH were requested by 92%, 47%, 83%, and 66%, respectively, with 84% of respondents using an ultrasensitive TSH assay. For management of the primary case, radioiodine treatment was the first choice of 69% of the respondents. Antithyroid drugs were used briefly (3-7 days) before 131I by 28%, whereas 41% said they would employ thioureas after 131I. Of those using 131I, 66% tailored the dose to achieve euthyroidism as the goal of therapy, while 34% aimed for hypothyroidism requiring T4 replacement. Only 30% of respondents chose thioureas as a first line of treatment (72% propylthiouracil; 28% tapazole). The duration of drug therapy was a predetermined fixed interval for 80% of the respondents, with 90% treating for 1-2 yr. Other specific trends in diagnostic approach and therapeutic preferences were identified for the eight variations on the primary case problem.

  11. Management of Grave's disease is improved by total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annerbo, Maria; Stålberg, Peter; Hellman, Per

    2012-08-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on 267 consecutive patients with Graves' disease (GD). The principal aim of this study was to evaluate the risk for recurrence and complications when changing the surgical method from subtotal (ST) to total thyroidectomy (TT). Information from 267 consecutive patients operated on for GD between 2000 and 2006 was collected at Uppsala University Hospital (143) and Falun County Hospital (128). There were 229 women and 38 men. Four patients were operated on twice. A total of 40 STs and 229 TTs were performed. Results were compared to those of a previous cohort from the same hospital, with a majority of STs (157/176) performed from 1980 to 1992. The risk for relapse of GD was reduced from 20 to 3.3 % after the shift from ST to TT. In terms of surgical complications, 2.2 % demonstrated permanent vocal cord paralysis and 4.5 % had persistent hypocalcemia, not significant when compared to the previous cohort. In spite of TT, there were four recurrences, all due to remnant thyroid tissue high up at the hyoid bone. Changing the surgical method did not affect postoperative progression of dysthyroid ophthalmopathy (DO, 7.0 vs. 7.5 %). There were no differences in outcome with respect to which hospital the patients had their operation. Change from ST to TT dramatically reduced the risk for recurrence of GD without increasing the rate of complications. TT is not more effective than ST in hampering progression of DO as has been advocated by some. Careful surgical dissection up to the hyoid bone is necessary to avoid recurrence.

  12. Geophysical Investigation of an Abandoned Cemetery: Teachers Discover Evidence of Unmarked Graves in Prairie View, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, A. T.; Sawyer, D. S.; Baldwin, R.; Kahera, A.; Thoms, A.

    2007-12-01

    In July 2007, a group of nineteen K-12 teachers investigated an abandoned cemetery in Prairie View, Texas, utilizing ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to image the subsurface. In a period of two weeks, the group acquired and interpreted 59 GPR profiles in Wyatt Chapel Cemetery and surrounding areas in order to determine the local stratigraphy and try to locate unmarked graves. The sandy soil in this area is ideally suited for GPR investigations and numerous geophysical anomalies were identified. Wyatt Chapel Cemetery is located adjacent to the campus of Prairie View A&M University in Prairie View, TX, and is thought to have originated as a slave burial ground in the 1850's. Participants in a summer course at Rice University conducted a geophysical investigation of the site. Participants were in-service K-12 teachers from urban Houston school districts where the majority of students are members of historically underrepresented minority groups. Recruitment efforts targeted educators who are currently teaching science without a science degree. Participants included elementary, middle and high school teachers. This summer experience is followed by a content-intensive academic year course in Physical Geology. GPR is an excellent tool for investigating the sandy soil encountered at Wyatt Chapel Cemetery. The stratigraphy in the area consists of 3-6 feet of reddish-brown, medium-grained sand overlying a light gray, highly compacted clay. The sand-clay boundary appears as a strong reflector on the GPR profiles. Participants identified numerous anomalies in the GPR data and two were excavated. One consisted of a pair of bright hyperbolae, suggesting two edges of a metal object. This excavation resulted in the discovery of a metal plank thought to be a burial cover. The second anomaly consisted of a break in the horizon representing the top of the clay layer, and subsequent excavation revealed a grave shaft. Participants experienced the process of science first-hand and used

  13. Prise en charge des traumatismes graves du rein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakmichi, Mohamed Amine; Jarir, Redouane; Sadiki, Bader; Zehraoui; Bentani; Wakrim, Bader; Dahami, Zakaria; Moudouni; Sarf, Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Les traumatismes graves du rein de grade III, IV et V selon la classification de l'Amercan Society for Surgery For Trauma (ASST) sont plus rares et se retrouvent dans 5% des cas en moyenne. Leur prise en charge est souvent délicate, nécessitant alors des centres expérimentés dotés de moyen adéquats d'imagerie (scanner spiralé). Cependant, durant ces dernières années, la prise en charge de ces traumatismes a évolué vers une attitude de moins en moins chirurgicale grâce à l’évolution des techniques de la radiologie interventionnelle, de l'endourologie et des moyens de surveillance aux urgences et de réanimation. L'objectif de cette étude est d’évaluer notre expérience dans la prise en charge des traumatismes rénaux de haut grade. Notre étude rétrospective porte sur 25 cas de traumatismes grave du rein de grade III, IV et V selon la classification de l'ASST, colligés entre Janvier 2002 et Juin 2009 au service d'urologie du centre Hospitalier Universitaire Mohammed VI, Université Cadi Ayyad de Marrakech, Maroc. Nous avons étudié les données épidémiologiques, les signes cliniques et biologiques à l'admission (état de choc hémorragique, taux d'hémoglobine), les données radiologiques (échographie et scanner), les lésions associées, la prise en charge thérapeutique et les complications. L’âge moyen de nos patients était de 24,9 ans 15 et 58 ans, avec une prédominance masculine (sex-ratio = 7, 3). Le rein droit était intéressé dans 15 cas (60%). Le traumatisme rénal était fermé dans 15 cas, et ouvert par arme blanche dans 10 cas. Huit patients se sont présentés en état de choc hémorragique (32%). Une anémie inférieur à 10g /100ml a été observée dans 10 cas (40%). L'uroscanner fait systématiquement à l'admission a retrouvé un grade III (10 cas), grade IV (13 cas) et grade V (2 cas). La prise en charge a consisté en une exploration chirurgicale avec néphrectomie chez 2 cas de Grade IV pour une instabilité h

  14. Socio-Economic Differentials in Impoverishment Effects of Out-of-Pocket Health Expenditure in China and India: Evidence from WHO SAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushalendra; Singh, Ashish; Kumar, Santosh; Ram, Faujdar; Singh, Abhishek; Ram, Usha; Negin, Joel; Kowal, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives The provision of affordable health care is generally considered a fundamental goal of a welfare state. In addition to its role in maintaining and improving the health status of individuals and households, it impacts the economic prosperity of a society through its positive effects on labor productivity. Given this context, this paper assesses socioeconomic-differentials in the impact of out-of-pocket-health-expenditure (OOPHE) on impoverishment in China and India, two of the fastest growing economies of the world. Data and Methods The paper uses data from the World Health Organisation’s Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (WHO SAGE), and Bivariate as well as Multivariate analyses for investigating the socioeconomic-differentials in the impact of out-of-pocket-health-expenditure (OOPHE) on impoverishment in China and India. Results and Conclusions Annually, about 7% and 8% of the population in China and India, respectively, fall in poverty due to OOPHE. Also, the percentage shortfall in income for the population from poverty line due to OOPHE is 2% in China and 1.3% in India. Further, findings from the multivariate analysis indicate that lower wealth status and inpatient as well as outpatient care increase the odds of falling below poverty line significantly (with the extent much higher in the case of in-patient care) due to OOPHE in both China and India. In addition, having at least an under-5 child in the household, living in rural areas and having a household head with no formal education increases the odds of falling below poverty line significantly (compared to a head with college level education) due to OOPHE in China; whereas having at least an under-5 child, not having health insurance and residing in rural areas increases the odds of becoming poor significantly due to OOPHE in India. PMID:26270049

  15. Socio-Economic Differentials in Impoverishment Effects of Out-of-Pocket Health Expenditure in China and India: Evidence from WHO SAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushalendra; Singh, Ashish; Kumar, Santosh; Ram, Faujdar; Singh, Abhishek; Ram, Usha; Negin, Joel; Kowal, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    The provision of affordable health care is generally considered a fundamental goal of a welfare state. In addition to its role in maintaining and improving the health status of individuals and households, it impacts the economic prosperity of a society through its positive effects on labor productivity. Given this context, this paper assesses socioeconomic-differentials in the impact of out-of-pocket-health-expenditure (OOPHE) on impoverishment in China and India, two of the fastest growing economies of the world. The paper uses data from the World Health Organisation's Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (WHO SAGE), and Bivariate as well as Multivariate analyses for investigating the socioeconomic-differentials in the impact of out-of-pocket-health-expenditure (OOPHE) on impoverishment in China and India. Annually, about 7% and 8% of the population in China and India, respectively, fall in poverty due to OOPHE. Also, the percentage shortfall in income for the population from poverty line due to OOPHE is 2% in China and 1.3% in India. Further, findings from the multivariate analysis indicate that lower wealth status and inpatient as well as outpatient care increase the odds of falling below poverty line significantly (with the extent much higher in the case of in-patient care) due to OOPHE in both China and India. In addition, having at least an under-5 child in the household, living in rural areas and having a household head with no formal education increases the odds of falling below poverty line significantly (compared to a head with college level education) due to OOPHE in China; whereas having at least an under-5 child, not having health insurance and residing in rural areas increases the odds of becoming poor significantly due to OOPHE in India.

  16. Changes in cardiac function and structure in newly diagnosed Graves' disease. A conventional and 2D-speckle tracking echocardiography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroditis, K; Pikilidou, M; Vourvouri, E; Hadjistavri, L; Zebekakis, P; Yovos, J; Efthimiadis, G; Karvounis, H

    2017-02-01

    Overproduction of thyroid hormones leads to structural as well as functional cardiac changes. Conventional echocardiography but also recently developed sophisticated two-dimensional echocardiography speckle (2D-STE) tracking allow elaborate evaluation of these changes. Our purpose was to investigate the effects of thyroid hormones overproduction on the heart in patients with Graves' disease and changes that occur after 6 months thyrostatic therapy. We conducted a prospective, case-control study of 6 months duration. Full echocardiographic assessment at diagnosis and after 6 months of thyrostatic therapy were performed in 44 patients with Graves' disease, aged 37.6 ± 9.1 years. Additionally, 43 euthyroid controls were studied for the same time period. Left ventricular end diastolic diameter (LVEDD) and left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD) were higher in the patient group while triscupid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) was lower in the patient group. Moreover, left ventricular (LV) mass index and left atrium (LA) volume index were higher in the Graves' disease group. Diastolic impairment as assessed with conventional echocardiography including tissue Doppler was present in the patient group (E/A ratio 0.87 ± 0.10,). 2D-STE analysis, revealed an increase in the strain rate at the isovolumic relaxation time (SRIVRT, 0.310 ± 0.07 patients versus 0.298 ± 0.09 s -1 controls). Improvement in diastolic and right systolic function as well as in left ventricular structural parameters was observed after restoration of euthyroidism (E/A ratio from 0.87 ± 0.10 versus 0.9 ± 0.08, p < 0.05). Patients with newly diagnosed Graves' showed an improvement in diastolic function, right systolic function and structural parameters after 6 months of thyrostatic treatment.

  17. Morbidade materna extremamente grave: uso do Sistema de Informação Hospitalar Morbilidad materna extremadamente grave: uso del sistema de información hospitalaria Severe acute maternal morbidity: use of the Brazilian Hospital Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Consolação Magalhães

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estimar a prevalência da morbidade materna extremamente grave e identificar procedimentos hospitalares associados. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizados dados do Sistema de Informação Hospitalar fornecidos pela Secretaria de Saúde de Juiz de Fora, MG, de 2006 a 2007. Foram selecionadas as internações para procedimentos obstétricos (n = 8.620 mulheres cujo diagnóstico principal compreendia todo o capítulo XV, gravidez, parto e puerpério, da Classificação Estatística Internacional de Doenças e Problemas Relacionados à Saúde, Décima Revisão. Foram identificados os códigos dos procedimentos realizados, procedimentos especiais e atos profissionais que pudessem contemplar o critério de morbidade materna extremamente grave da Organização Mundial da Saúde e outros procedimentos não habitualmente utilizados no período gravídico-puerperal. A análise de regressão logística foi utilizada para identificar associações entre desfecho e variáveis selecionadas. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de morbidade materna foi 37,8/1000 mulheres e a proporção de mortalidade foi 12/100.000 mulheres. O tempo de internação > 4 dias foi 13 vezes mais alto entre as mulheres que apresentaram alguma morbidade. Após análise ajustada, os fatores preditores de morbidade materna extremamente grave foram: tempo de internação, número de internações e filhos natimortos, e os procedimentos/condições mais frequentes foram a transfusão de hemoderivados (15,7/1.000, "permanência a maior" (9,5/1.000 e pré-eclâmpsia grave/eclâmpsia (8,2/1.000. CONCLUSÕES: Foi alta a prevalência de morbidade materna extremamente grave, associada principalmente às internações e variáveis relacionadas ao recém-nascido. O critério para identificação dos casos e o uso do Sistema de Informações Hospitalares mostraram-se úteis para a vigilância da morbimortalidade materna e para ampliar o conhecimento sobre os aspectos que a envolvem, contribuindo para a

  18. A patient with stress-related onset and exacerbations of Graves disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Roberto; Lapa, Daniela; Vita, Giuseppe; Trimarchi, Francesco; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2009-01-01

    An 18-year-old, nonsmoking woman presented to her general practitioner with a 1-week history of weakness, fatigue, palpitations, nervousness, tremors, insomnia, heat intolerance, and sudden enlargement of a thyroid goiter that had been detected 2 years earlier. The patient's symptoms had started shortly after she experienced emotional stress. Diagnostic work-up disclosed an avid radioactive iodine uptake by the goiter. On ultrasound examination, the thyroid gland was enlarged with a diffusely hypoechogenic structure and intense vascularization. Thyroid scintigraphy with (131)I; ultrasonography of the thyroid gland; and measurements of serum free T(3), free T(4), TSH levels and thyroid autoantibodies, including autoantibodies against thyroglobulin (TgAb), thyroperoxidase (TPOAb) and TSH receptor (TRAb). Graves disease, with stress-related onset and subsequent stress-related exacerbations. The patient was treated with methimazole to normalize levels of thyroid hormone and thyroid autoantibodies, and with bromazepam to help her cope with stress. The daily dose of methimazole was kept low during pregnancy. Over the 4 year period when the patient was taking methimazole, exacerbations of hyperthyroidism occurred twice: during her first pregnancy and 9 months after her first delivery. On all three occasions, symptoms were preceded by stressful life events. Further exacerbations were avoided by starting bromazepam treatment soon after the patient experienced stressful events.

  19. Aberrant Expression of miRNA and mRNAs in Lesioned Tissues of Graves' Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Qin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Abnormal microRNA (miRNA expression is found in many diseases including autoimmune diseases. However, little is known about the role of miRNA regulation in Graves' disease (GD. Here, we simultaneously detected different expressions of miRNA and mRNAs in thyroid tissues via a high-throughput transcriptomics approach, known as microarray, in order to reveal the relationship between aberrant expression of miRNAs and mRNAs spectrum and GD. Methods: Totally 7 specimens of thyroid tissue from 4 GD patients and 3 controls were obtained by surgery for microarray analysis. Then, 30 thyroid specimens (18 GD and 12 controls were also collected for further validation by quantitative real-time PCR ( qRT-PCR . Results: Statistical analysis showed that the expressions of 5 specific miRNA were increased significantly while those of other 18 miRNA were decreased in thyroid tissue of GD patients (FC≥1.3 or≤0.77 and pConclusion: Our study highlights the possibility that miRNA-target gene network may be involved in the pathogenesis of GD and could provide new insights into understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of GD.

  20. Effect of 131-iodine therapy on Grave ophthalmopathy: How to prevent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duron, F.

    2009-01-01

    The propositions to prepare the patients to ira-therapy are as follow: to try to get the smokers to stop tobacco; to get euthyroidism before the treatment; to avoid ira-therapy for the patients bearers of high title of antibodies ( but often, they are in failure of medical treatment and these ones to who it is proposed a radical treatment; to avoid hypothyroidism by quick establishment (possible choice of two weeks) of a treatment by thyroxine; to counter to ira-therapy for patients reached by severe Basedow orbitopathy; to treat preventively the patients bearers of moderated basedow orbitopathy by corticoids, according to the scheme proposed by Bartalena and al. (0.5 mg/kg of prednisone 48 hours before the treatment and the first following month, then at graduated dose on two months) or an other one; however, these propositions must be validated by prospective studies made on a large scale and including reproducible and homogeneous criteria of evaluation like these ones proposed by the European group 'European group on graves orbitopathy' (E.U.G.O.G.O). (N.C.)

  1. Misdiagnosis of Graves' Disease with Apparent Severe Hyperthyroidism in a Patient Taking Biotin Megadoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbesino, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Accurate immunoassays measuring minute quantities of hormones are the cornerstone of the practice of endocrinology. Despite tremendous advances in this field, novel pitfalls in these tests emerge from time to time. Oral biotin can interfere with immunoassays of several hormones. The purpose of this report is to relate an extreme case of such interference. A patient with progressive multiple sclerosis was found to have extremely elevated free thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and suppressed thyrotropin (TSH) levels. His TSH receptor binding inhibiting antibody level was also elevated. This constellation of laboratory findings suggested a diagnosis of severe Graves' disease. All of the assays yielding abnormal results employed the biotin-streptavidin affinity in their design. The patient had no symptoms of hyperthyroidism, and detailed review of his medications revealed intake of megadoses of biotin. Temporary discontinuation of biotin treatment resulted in complete resolution of the biochemical abnormalities. Non-physiologic biotin supplementation may interfere with several immunoassays, including thyroid hormones, TSH, thyroglobulin, and TSH receptor binding inhibiting antibody, leading to erroneous diagnoses. Questioning for biotin intake should be part of the evaluation for patients undergoing endocrine tests. Interruption of biotin supplementation for at least two days prior to biotin-sensitive tests should be sufficient to avoid major misdiagnoses.

  2. Chronology of 3rd–5th Century Female Graves from Tarasovo Burial Ground

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldina Rimma D.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article represents the concluding part a series of works by the authors on the dating of burials from the unique 1st–5th century Tarasovo burial ground in the Middle Kama region. The first article was dedicated to the chronology of graves dating back to the early Nyrgynda stage (1st–2nd centuries of this monument. The second and third publications feature an analysis of the chronology of 3rd–5th century male burials. The present work describes 160 female burials of 3rd–5th centuries analyzed from the perspective of chronology. Similarly to previous research, the three main methods employed by the authors of this research include those of formal typology, cultural stratigraphy and the nearest neighbour method. A total of 12 chronological groups were singled out as a result: 1st half of 3rd century A.D. (group 1; 2nd half of 3rd century (2; 3rd century (3; 4th century (group 4; 2nd half of 3rd–4th centuries (5а; 3rd–4th centuries (5б; 1st half of 5th century (6; 2nd half of 5th century (7; 5th century (group 8; 2nd half of 4th–5th centuries (9; 4th–5th centuries (10; 2nd half of 3rd–5th centuries

  3. Two adolescent patients with coexistent Graves' disease and Moyamoya disease in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Chong Kun; Kim, Su Yung; Yoo, Jae-Ho

    2014-06-01

    Moyamoya disease is a cerebrovascular condition that results in the narrowing of the vessels of the circle of Willis and collateral vessel formation at the base of the brain. Although relationships between Graves' disease and cerebrovascular accidents in Moyamoya disease are obscure, the coexistence of the two diseases is noteworthy. Moyamoya disease has been rarely reported in adolescent patients with thyrotoxicosis. Recently, we encountered two adolescent Korean patients with Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease who presented with episodic right-sided hemiparesis and syncope. These two girls who had Graves' disease had no history of other diseases or head trauma. A thyroid function test revealed a euthyroid state and a high thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) receptor antibody titer at that time. The patients were diagnosed with Moyamoya disease based on brain magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral four-vessel angiography. The patients underwent cranial revascularization by encephalo-duroarterio-synangiosis as soon as a diagnosis was made, which resulted in successful symptom resolution. They fared well and had no additional neurological symptoms as of their last follow-up visits. Here, we report these two cases of confirmed Moyamoya disease complicated by Graves' disease with a review of the literature, and discuss the possible association between the two diseases. To our knowledge, this is the first report in South Korea on Moyamoya disease associated with Graves' disease in adolescents with a euthyroid.

  4. Magnetic Ghosts: Mineral Magnetic Measurements On Roman and Anglo-saxon Graves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, N.

    The location of inhumations, in the absence of ferrous grave goods, often presents a considerable challenge to archaeological geophysics given the small physical size of the features and the slight contrast between the fill of the grave and the surround- ing subsoil. Even during excavation, the identification of graves may be complicated where site conditions do not favour the preservation of human skeletal remains and often only a subtle soil stain is likely to survive. A recent initiative in the United King- dom has seen the formation of the Buried Organic Matter Decomposition Integrated with Elemental Status (BODIES) research group, to examine the decomposition of organic artefacts in ancient graves with respect to localised changes in pH, redox po- tential and nutrient status. This paper presents initial results from a limited mineral magnetic study of two grave sites in an attempt to ascertain whether the decomposi- tion of organic remains may lead to a detectable magnetic signature within the soil. Results from a series of isothermal, hysteresis and magneto-thermal experiments will be presented together with surface magnetometer and topsoil susceptibility surveys.

  5. Change in Practice over Four Decades in the Management of Graves' Disease in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D M; Dutta, S; Ahmed, F; Thaha, M A

    2016-01-01

    There is continuing debate on the optimal treatment for Grave's thyrotoxicosis with a resultant variation in clinical practice. The present study aimed to ascertain changes in practice in the treatment of Grave's thyrotoxicosis in Tayside, Scotland, over the past four decades. Methods. The "Scottish automated follow-up register" (SAFUR) was queried to identify all patients treated for Grave's thyrotoxicosis from 1968 to 2007 inclusive. Patients were divided into 4 groups (Groups A to D) according to the decades. Demographic profile, treatment modalities, radioactive iodine (RAI) dose, and recurrence rates were studied and outcomes were compared by χ (2) test and ANOVA using SPSS v15.0. A p value of Grave's thyrotoxicosis over the 4 decades. Use of RAI has increased from 43.1% in Group A to 68% in Group D (p Grave's thyrotoxicosis suggests increasing use of RAI as the preferred first line of treatment. Furthermore, using a single higher dose of RAI and adoption of total thyroidectomy have decreased recurrence rates.

  6. [Echo-tracking technology for evaluating femoral artery endothelial function in patients with Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Jingyuan; Zhao, Qiaoling; Yang, Jinru

    2012-10-01

    To assess the value of echo-tracking technology in evaluating endothelial function of the femoral artery in patients with Grave's disease. Thirty-four patients with Grave's disease patients and 30 normal adults as controls were recruited in this study. The intima-media thickness (IMT), arterial stiffness (β), pressure strain elastic modulus (Ep), arterial compliance (AC), pulse wave conducting velocity (PWVβ) and augmentation index (AI) parameters were examined using echo-tracking technology for evaluating the right femoral arterial elasticity. Compared with the control subjects, the patients with Grave's disease showed significantly increased β, Ep, and PWVβ and significantly decreased AC (P0.05). In patients with Grave's disease, β and Ep were positively correlated with FT3, FT4, TT3, TT4, and PWVβ was positively correlated with FT3 and FT4. Echo-tracking technology can provide more accurate quantitative evidences for early diagnosis of femoral artery endothelial dysfunction in patients with Grave's disease, but the influence of procedural factors on the measurement accuracy should be considered in the evaluation.

  7. Anxiety and depression are more prevalent in patients with graves' disease than in patients with nodular goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bové, Kira Bang; Watt, Torquil; Vogel, Asmus; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Bjoerner, Jakob Bue; Groenvold, Mogens; Bonnema, Steen Joop; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2014-09-01

    Graves' disease has been associated with an increased psychiatric morbidity. It is unclarified whether this relates to Graves' disease or chronic disease per se. The aim of our study was to estimate the prevalence of anxiety and depression symptoms in patients with Graves' disease compared to patients with another chronic thyroid disease, nodular goitre, and to investigate determinants of anxiety and depression in Graves' disease. 157 cross-sectionally sampled patients with Graves' disease, 17 newly diagnosed, 140 treated, and 251 controls with nodular goitre completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The differences in the mean HADS scores between the groups were analysed using multiple linear regression, controlling for socio-demographic variables. HADS scores were also analysed dichotomized: a score >10 indicating probable 'anxiety'/probable 'depression'. Determinants of anxiety and depression symptoms in Graves' disease were examined using multiple linear regression. In Graves' disease levels of anxiety (p = 0.008) and depression (p = 0.014) were significantly higher than in controls. The prevalence of depression was 10% in Graves' disease versus 4% in nodular goitre (p = 0.038), anxiety was 18 versus 13% (p = 0.131). Symptoms of anxiety (p = 0.04) and depression (p = 0.01) increased with comorbidity. Anxiety symptoms increased with duration of Graves' disease (p = 0.04). Neither thyroid function nor autoantibody levels were associated with anxiety and depression symptoms. Anxiety and depression symptoms were more severe in Graves' disease than in nodular goitre. Symptoms were positively correlated to comorbidity and duration of Graves' disease but neither to thyroid function nor thyroid autoimmunity.

  8. Radioiodine treatment of recurrent hyperthyroidism in patients previously treated for Graves' disease by subtotal thyroidectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, H; Laurberg, P

    1992-01-01

    showed a higher sensitivity to radioiodine, with more cases of early hypothyroidism, than non-operated patients. However, after 50 months of follow-up the outcome was identical. The results indicate that frequent assessment is necessary after radioiodine treatment of previously operated patients, since......Radioiodine therapy is often employed for treatment of patients with relapse of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease, after previous thyroid surgery. Little is known about the outcome of this treatment compared to patients with no previous surgery. A total of 20 patients who had received surgical...... treatment for Graves' hyperthyroidism 1-46 years previously and with relapse of the hyperthyroidism, and 25 patients with hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease and no previous thyroid surgery were treated with radioiodine, following the same protocol. Early after treatment the previously operated patients...

  9. Radioiodine therapy of autonomously functioning thyroid nodules and of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guhlmann, C.A.; Rendl, J.; Boerner, W.

    1995-01-01

    We studied the effects of radioiodine therapy (RIT) for autonomously functioning thyroid nodules (AFTNs) and Graves' disease on thyroid function and size up to one year after RIT. In 230 patients with AFTNs, a dose of 300 Gy was effective in about 90% of the cases 6 months after RIT. Out of 65 patients suffering from Graves' disease, 5 patients (8%) had persisting hyperthyroidism 6 months after RIT with a dose of 150 Gy. This group consisted exclusively of patients with manifest hyperthyroidism at the time of RIT. As determined by ultrasonography 6 months after RIT, a reduction of thyroid size by about 40% and 60% was observed in patients with AFTNs and Graves' disease, respectively. (orig.) [de

  10. Image and Role of the Queen Mother of the West in Han Grave Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša VAMPELJ SUHADOLNIK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article is a detailed study of the image of an ancient Chinese goddess, The Queen Mother of the West, called Xiwangmu 西王母 in Chinese. In the mythological tradition, Xiwangmu is a goddess who possesses the elixir of immortality and dwells in the western paradise, on the magic mountain Kunlun 崑崙. While her image can be found in mural paintings, and on lacquered objects and bronze mirrors, it appears primarily in the form of relief images on the stones and bricks of grave chambers and temples in the Han (206 BCE–220 CE grave complexes. The literary tradition reveals a multifunctional role of the mother, with her many attributes developing in accordance with the changing values of social and mythological concepts. The article concludes with a detailed discussion of her image and role within the wider cosmological context of Han grave art.

  11. Effects of radioiodine on thyrotrophin binding inhibiting immunoglobulins in Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGregor, A.M.; Petersen, M.M.; Capiferri, R.; Evered, D.C.; Rees Smith, B.; Hall, R.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of 131 I therapy on thyrotrophin binding inhibiting immunoglobulins (TBII) were studied in fifty-five patients with Graves' disease and five patients with toxic multinodular goitre (MNG). A group of forty patients with Graves' disease and four patients with toxic MNG were treated with drugs and acted as controls. In 78% of patients treated with 131 I there was a dramatic increase in serum TBII activity during the 3 months following therapy, whereas drug-treated patients showed a decrease (77%) or no change in TBII activity over the same period. TBII activity was not detectable in patients with toxic MNG before or after drug or 131 I therapy. Consideration of the mechanisms involved in the changes in serum TBII activity after 131 I treatment or during drug treatment provide insight into the basic defects responsible for the development of Graves' disease and suggest that both the thyroid and immune system are involved. (author)

  12. Analysis of adverse reactions and complications of Graves' disease after thyroid arteries embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang Wenquan; Chen Wei; Yang Jianyong; Xiao Haipeng; Huang Yonghui; Li Jiaping; Guo Wenbo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyse the adverse reactions and complications of Graves' disease after thyroid arteries embolization. Methods: 41 patients of Graves' disease underwent interventional embolization have been analysed with its adverse reactions and complications. Polyvinyl alcohol or bletilla microspheres and micro-coils were used in these patients. Results: Laryngopharyngeal and neck pain occurred in all patients. T 3 and T 4 increased in 3 days to one week after the procedure. Thirty of them showed fever. Dystopia embolism happened in two cases with one of transitory hypoparathyroidism. No hypothyroidism or hypoparathyroidism or hoarseness occur during long term follow up. Conclusions: The adverse reactions and complications of Graves disease after thyroid arteries embolization may occur. Some of them are preventable and curable

  13. Acute effects of radioiodine therapy on the voice and larynx of basedow-Graves patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolan-Cury, Roberta Werlang; Cury, Adriano Namo; Monte, Osmar; Silva, Marta Assumpcao de Andrada e; Duprat, Andre; Marone, Marilia; Almeida, Renata de; Iglesias, Alexandre

    2008-01-01

    Graves's disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. There are three current therapeutic options: anti-thyroid medication, surgery, and radioactive iodine (I 131). There are few data in the literature regarding the effects of radioiodine therapy on the larynx and voice. The aim of this study was: to assess the effect of radioiodine therapy on the voice of Basedow-Graves patients. Material and method: A prospective study was done. Following the diagnosis of Grave's disease, patients underwent investigation of their voice, measurement of maximum phonatory time (/a/) and the s/z ratio, fundamental frequency analysis (Praat software), laryngoscopy and (perceptive-auditory) analysis in three different conditions: pre-treatment, 4 days, and 20 days post-radioiodine therapy. Conditions are based on the inflammatory pattern of thyroid tissue (Jones et al. 1999). Results: No statistically significant differences were found in voice characteristics in these three conditions. Conclusion: Radioiodine therapy does not affect voice quality. (author)

  14. Heterotopic relation between media and materiality in children's online memorials and on children's graves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvik, Kjetil; Christensen, Dorthe Refslund

    place across media. We show how the death of an infant can lead to mediation, remediation and mediatization strategies which involves both the uses and arrangement of objects on memorial pages and on children’s graves as well as uses of new social technologies, that produce, negotiate and develop social......In this paper we analyze how bereaved parents make use of various media-strategies on online memorial sites and on children’s graves when performing processes of grief and commemoration for their stillborns and infants, and how these processes are not just linked to one particular media but take...... relations with the dead child and the (re)negotiating of parenthood. We understand media as a function of an object reflected in human practices and embedded and structured by the different materialities they are intertwined with. We argue that the use of media and materiality online and on the graves are...

  15. Reduced parietooccipital white matter glutamine measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in treated graves' disease patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, Else Rubæk; Elberling, T.V.; Rasmussen, Åse Krogh

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: Graves' disease is an autoimmune disease of the thyroid gland. Patients often have affective and cognitive complaints, whether these disappear after treatment remains disputed. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to evaluate cerebral biochemistry in acute and treated Graves' disease. DESIGN: We...... conducted a prospective study, investigating volunteers once and patients before and 1 yr after treatment. SETTING: The study was performed at a radiology department, a memory disorder clinic, and two endocrinology clinics. PATIENTS AND OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Of 53 consecutively referred, newly diagnosed...... and a battery of biochemical, affective, and cognitive tests were used. RESULTS: Previously reported findings of reduced choline and myo-inositol in acute Graves' disease were confirmed and reversibility was demonstrated. Parieto-occipital white matter glutamine was and remained significantly reduced (P

  16. Remission of Grave's disease after oral anti-thyroid drug treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtiaq, Osama; Waseem, Sabiha; Haque, M Naeemul; Islam, Najmul; Jabbar, Abdul

    2009-11-01

    To evaluate remission rate of anti-thyroid drug treatment in patients with Grave's disease, and to study the factors associated with remission. A cross sectional study. The Endocrine Department of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi from 1999 to 2000. Seventy four patients of Grave's disease were recruited who were prescribed medical treatment. Grave's disease was diagnosed in the presence of clinical and biochemical hyperthyroidism along with anti-microsomal (AMA) and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (ATA) and thyroid scan. These patients were prescribed oral anti-thyroid drugs using titration regime and followed at 3, 6, 12 and 18 months. Patients were categorized into two groups: "remission group" and "treatment failure group" and results were compared using a chi-square test, t-test and logistic regression model with significance at p disease on initial presentation.

  17. Secondary Pulmonary Hypertension and Right-Sided Heart Failure at Presentation in Grave's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganeshpure, Swapnil Panjabrao; Vaidya, Gaurang Nandkishor; Gattani, Vipul

    2012-01-01

    A young female presented with evidence of right-sided heart failure and was subsequently found to have significant pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Because of her normal left ventricular function and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, the most probable site of etiology seemed to be the pulmonary vasculature. All the common possible secondary causes of PAH were ruled out, but during the investigations, she was found to have elevated thyroid function tests compatible with the diagnosis of Grave's disease. The treatment of Grave's disease, initially by medications and subsequently by radioiodine therapy, was associated with a significant reduction in the pulmonary artery systolic pressure. The purpose of this case report is to highlight one of the unusual and underdiagnosed presentations of Grave's disease.

  18. Prediction of remission in Graves' disease after thionamide therapy by technetium-99m early uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Takashi; Dokoh, Shigeharu; Koh, Toshikiyo; Shimbo, Shin-ichiro; Hidaka, Akinari; Iida, Yasuhiro; Kasagi, Kanji; Konishi, Junji.

    1991-01-01

    In the clinical management of Graves' thyrotoxicosis, one of the most important subject is when to stop antithyroid drugs after achieving an euthyroid state. T 3 suppression test and other methods have been used to forecast the outcome after drug cessation, but the results were not always satisfactory. We have attempted to predict remission of Graves' disease by single measurement of early technetium uptake without administration of triiodothyronine. Drugs were discontinued in the seventy-five patients with Graves' disease on maintenance doses of either methimazole or propylthiouracil who showed normalized uptake (4.0% or less). Of 64 patients evaluable after twelve months, 55 (86%) remained euthyroid, 8 relapsed, and 1 became hypothyoid. With its accuracy in prediction of short-term remission comparable or superior to T 3 suppression test, this rapid and simple method seemed suitable for routine use in clinical practice. (author)

  19. Report on the behalf of the Foreign Affairs Commission on the bill project authorizing the approval of the amendment to the Montreal protocol of 16 September 1987 related to substances which impoverish the ozone layer, and its Annexe: text of the foreign affairs Commission. Nr 415

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Pompeo, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the Montreal protocol, adopted in 1987, was to banish the chlorofluorocarbons (CFC) used as refrigerants since the 1930's, as they are responsible for the impoverishment of the ozone layer. While this objective has been met (the ozone layer is progressively restored), substitutes to CFC have been developed; however some of these substitutes, hydro-fluorocarbons, have been proved to be powerful greenhouse gases. The banishment of HFCs has thus been decided, leading to the Kigali amendment to the Montreal protocol. This report explains the CFC and HFC context and issues in details, and presents its examination by the French Commission of Foreign Affairs. The full text of the report is included (in an annex) at the end of the report

  20. Radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease and the effects of prior carbimazole therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karyampudi, Arun; Hamide, Abdoul; Halanaik, Dhanapathi; Sahoo, Jaya Prakash; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar

    2014-09-01

    The use of radioiodine as the first line of treatment in Graves' disease is restricted in India because of its limited availability and an unrealistic risk perception associated with it. Additionally, the effectiveness of radioiodine ablation in Graves' disease is influenced by many factors. Prior medical antithyroid therapy is one such important factor. To analyze the efficacy of low dose radioiodine therapy (5 mCi) in treatment of naive patients of Graves' disease in comparison to that in which it was already primed with an antithyroid drug, carbimazole. A non-randomized, interventional study conducted in the Department of Medicine and Endocrinology of a tertiary care institute in South India. The study had two groups; Group A (36 treatment naive, uncomplicated Graves' disease patients) and B (34 Graves' disease patients on carbimazole prior to radioiodine therapy). Both groups had baseline clinical, biochemical evaluation and were reassessed at 3 and 6 months for evaluating the clinical status for possible documentation of cure. The cure rate was 61.1% in drug naive group and 58.8% in pretreated group at 6 months following radioiodine (P = 0.845). Higher baseline 999m technicium (99m Tc) uptake, male gender, BMI and higher baseline free thyroxine (fT4) level predicted treatment failure following radioiodine therapy. Administration of carbimazole prior to low dose radioiodine therapy does not alter the efficacy of radioiodine. Low fixed dose (5 mCi) of radioactive iodine may be a safe and effective primary therapeutic option in Graves' disease patients pretreated with antithyroid drugs.

  1. Mediastinal neoplasms in patients with Graves disease: a possible link between sustained hyperthyroidism and thymic neoplasia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd Jonathan D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anterior mediastinal masses are a rare but well documented finding in Graves disease. The vast majority of these lesions represents benign thymic hypertrophy and regress after treatment of the hyperthyroidism. A small percentage of these cases however represent neoplastic/malignant diseases which require further treatment. Cases 12 year old boy with one year history of refractory Graves disease was found to have an anterior mediastinal mass and underwent curative thyroidectomy for sustained hyperthyroidism. Cervical lymphadenopathy was detected during the procedure and biopsy was obtained. A 23 year old woman who presented with a one month history of hyperthyroid symptoms, was diagnosed with Graves disease and also was found to have an anterior mediastinal mass on imaging. Biopsy of the anterior mediastinal mass was obtained and subsequently the patient underwent robotic thymectomy. Histologic examination and immunophenotyping of the cervical lymph node in a 12 year old boy revealed neoplastic proliferation of T lymphoblasts diagnostic of T lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma. Examination of the anterior mediastinal mass biopsy in the 23 year old woman revealed type B1 thymoma which was confirmed after examination of the subsequent robotic thymectomy specimen. Conclusion This is the first reported case of T cell lymphoblastic lymphoma and the third reported case of thymoma associated with sustained hyperthyroidism due to Graves disease. These cases indicate that an anterior mediastinal mass in a patient with active Graves disease may be due to a neoplastic cause, which may require definitive treatment. Caution should be exercised when dismissing a mediastinal mass as benign thymic hyperplasia in patients with active Graves disease.

  2. Reacciones adversas graves y mortales a los antimicrobianos. Sistema Cubano de Farmacovigilancia, 2003-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismary Alfonso Orta

    Full Text Available Introducción: las reacciones adversas a los antimicrobianos ocasionan más de 142 000 visitas a las salas de urgencias hospitalarias por año en los Estados Unidos. En Cuba han ocupado el primer lugar en el reporte, por ejemplo, en el año 2008 representaron el 31,4 % del total de las reacciones adversas graves y el 25 % de las reacciones adversas mortales. Objetivo: caracterizar las reacciones adversas graves y mortales a los antimicrobianos notificadas a la Unidad Nacional Coordinadora de Farmacovigilancia, durante el periodo 2003-2012. Métodos: se realizó un estudio de farmacovigilancia, observacional, descriptivo y transversal, utilizando la base de datos nacional de farmacovigilancia durante el periodo 2003-2012. Se trabajó con el total de reportes de reacciones adversas graves y mortales a los antimicrobianos. Las reacciones adversas se clasificaron según tipo de reacción, sistema de órgano afectado, imputabilidad y frecuencia. Se identificaron los principales antimicrobianos sospechosos y se estudiaron los pacientes que presentaron reacciones adversas según sexo y edad. Resultados: se detectaron 631 sospechas de reacciones adversas graves y mortales a los antimicrobianos, de ellas fueron 550 graves y 81 mortales. Predominaron el sexo femenino con 60,1 % y 405 adultos. Las reacciones adversas comprometieron los sistemas: general (30,4 %, respiratorio (25,2 % y cardiovascular (14,9 %. El shock anafiláctico fue la reacción más reportada y la penicilina el fármaco más relacionado con esta. El 73,5 % fueron probables y el 58,9 % ocasionales. Conclusiones: las reacciones adversas graves y mortales predominaron en el sexo femenino y en los adultos. La penicilina fue el fármaco más relacionado. Las reacciones adversas probables y ocasionales fueron la mayoría en el estudio.

  3. Management of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease: frequently asked questions and answers (if any).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalena, L; Chiovato, L; Vitti, P

    2016-10-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in iodine-replete areas. Although progress has been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, no treatment targeting pathogenic mechanisms of the disease is presently available. Therapies for Graves' hyperthyroidism are largely imperfect because they are bound to either a high rate of relapsing hyperthyroidism (antithyroid drugs) or lifelong hypothyroidism (radioiodine treatment or thyroidectomy). Aim of the present article is to offer a practical guidance to the reader by providing evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions in clinical practice.

  4. Circulating microRNA-1a is a biomarker of Graves' disease patients with atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Sheng-Jie; Yao, Xuan; Tian, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Ke-Qin; She, Dun-Min; Guo, Fei-Fan; Zhai, Qi-Wei; Ying, Hao; Xue, Ying

    2017-07-01

    It has been increasingly suggested that specific microRNAs expression profiles in the circulation and atrial tissue are associated with the susceptibility to atrial fibrillation. Nonetheless, the role of circulating microRNAs in Graves' disease patients with atrial fibrillation has not yet been well described. The objective of the study was to identify the role of circulating microRNAs as specific biomarkers for the diagnosis of Graves' disease with atrial fibrillation. The expression profiles of eight serum microRNAs, which are found to be critical in the pathogenesis of atrial fibrillation, were determined in patients with Graves' disease with or without atrial fibrillation. MicroRNA expression analysis was performed by real-time PCR in normal control subjects (NC; n = 17), patients with Graves' disease without atrial fibrillation (GD; n = 29), patients with Graves' disease with atrial fibrillation (GD + AF; n = 14), and euthyroid patients with atrial fibrillation (AF; n = 22). Three of the eight serum microRNAs,i.e., miR-1a, miR-26a, and miR-133, had significantly different expression profiles among the four groups. Spearman's correlation analysis showed that the relative expression level of miR-1a was positively correlated with free triiodothyronine (FT3) and free thyroxine (FT4), and negatively related to thyroid stimulating hormone. Spearman's correlations analysis also revealed that the level of miR-1a was negatively correlated with a critical echocardiographic parameter (left atrial diameter), which was dramatically increased in GD + AF group compared to GD group. Furthermore, the receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that, among the eight microRNAs, miR-1a had the largest area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves not only for discriminating between individuals with and without Graves' disease, but also for predicting the presence of atrial fibrillation in patients with Graves' disease. Our findings

  5. Production of non-stimulatory immunoglobulins that inhibit TSH binding in Graves' disease after radioiodine administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bech, K.; Bliddal, H.; Siersbaek-Nielsen, K.; Friis, T.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of single dose of 131 I upon thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins has been studied in twenty-two patients with Graves' disease. The thyroid stimulating immunoglobulins were assessed by parallel measurements of thyrotrophin receptor binding inhibitory immunoglobulins (TBII) and of thyroid adenylate cyclase stimulating immunoglobulins (TACSI) in serum by radioreceptor assay and stimulation of adenylate cyclase respectively. The present study thus confirms that radioiodine therapy is followed by an increase of TBII and TACSI in most patients with Graves' disease. The level of TBII can probably provide a marker for development of hypothyroidism following 131 I therapy and might be involved in its pathogenesis. (author)

  6. Radioreceptor assay study of thyrotropin receptor antibody (TRAb) in Grave's diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Chao; Lin Xiangtong

    1989-01-01

    Here was reported the assay system using pig thyroid TSH receptor and 125 I-bTSH purified by receptor of thyroid cell membrane for the study of TRAb activity. The binding rate of ASH soluble receptor with 125 I-bTSH was 22.2 ∼ 37.4%, while as the control was only 1.0 ∼ 2.1%. TRAb was measured clinically in 48 cases of Grave's diseases and 25 normal persons. The TSH binding inhabitory index(TRII) was introduced for reflection of TRAb activity. The results showed that TBII was positure in 30 of 48 patients of Grave's diseases, the detctactibility was 79.2%

  7. Fenotipo grave en dos medio hermanas con síndrome de Adams Oliver

    OpenAIRE

    Sevilla-Montoya, Rosalba; Ríos-Flores, Braulio; Moreno-Verduzco, Elsa; Domínguez-Castro, Mauricio; Rivera-Pedroza, Carlos I; Aguinaga-Ríos, Dra. Mónica

    2014-01-01

    El síndrome de Adams Oliver (AOS) es una entidad heterogénea con defecto transverso terminal de extremidades (TTLD) y aplasia cutis congénita (ACC) con un amplio espectro fenotípico. Se han descrito diferentes modos de herencia en esta enfermedad; los defectos más graves se han asociado a un patrón autosómico recesivo (AR). Objetivo. presentar a una familia con dos medio hermanas con un fenotipo grave de Adams Oliver, con una madre sana. Reporte del caso: una mujer de 27 años de edad fue refe...

  8. Postpartum thyrotoxicosis in a patient with Graves' disease. Association with low radioactive iodine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckel, R.H.; Green, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with previously diagnosed Graves' hyperthyroidism had a transient episode of thyrotoxicosis three months postpartum. This was associated with a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland, a rise in antithyroid microsomal antibody titer, a 24-hour radioactive iodine uptake (RAIU) of 1%, and an aspiration biopsy specimen suggestive of chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis. An alternative cause for the depressed RAIU was not discovered. This case would suggest that patients with previously diagnosed Graves' disease can have thyrotoxicosis without an enhanced RAIU and that the postpartum thyrotoxin syndrome may involve an immunologic injury causing a release of performed thyroid hormone

  9. [Treatment of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease: what is the recommended antithyroid drug during pregnancy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, P

    2013-05-01

    Clinical hyperthyroidism during the first trimester of pregnancy due to Graves' disease can be associated with maternal, obstetrical and fetal complications, indicating an active treatment to restore normal thyroid function. Antithyroid drugs are the first line treatment in pregnant women with hyperthyroidism. Due to the increased congenital malformations reported in neonates after first-trimester carbimazole/methimazole treatment and propylthiouracil associated hepatotoxicity, the recommended treatment for pregnant women with hyperthyroid Graves' disease is propylthiouracil during the first trimester of pregnancy and following the first trimester, consideration should be given switching to carbimazole/methimazole during the second part of gestation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiotherapy of Graves' ophthalmopathy. State of the art and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eich, H.T.; Micke, O.; Seegenschmiedt, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), the most frequent extrathyroidal manifestation of Graves' disease, is a disorder of autoimmune origin, the pathogenic mechanisms of which are still incompletely understood. Although GO is severe in only 3-5% of affected individuals, quality of life is severely impaired even in patients with mild GO. The role of radiotherapy in the management of GO is discussed controversially. However, recent randomized clinical trials have, with one exception, confirmed that orbital radiotherapy is an effective and safe therapeutic procedure for GO. This article describes the sequences, dosages and fractionation schemes as well as the risks and side effects of the radiotherapy. (orig.)

  11. [Neonatal hyperthyroidism in a premature infant born to a mother with Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaise, C; Gire, C; Brémond, V; Minodier, P; Soula, F; d'Ercole, C; Palix, C

    2000-05-01

    Neonatal thyrotoxicosis is most commonly due to transplacental transfer of maternal thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb). Bioassay of thyrotropin receptor antibodies may help to determine the risk for neonatal hyperthyroidism. Thyrotoxicosis developed in a premature infant born to a mother with Graves' disease, with a low level of TRAb by bioassay. The infant was treated with carbimazole for two months, until TRAb had disappeared. Bioassay TRAb is not always reliable for predicting the development of neonatal hyperthyroidism in infants born to mothers with Graves' disease. Thyroid function should be measured in all these neonates.

  12. Three dimensional orbital magnetic resonance T2-mapping in the evaluation of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Kai; Ai, Tao; Hu, Wei-Kun; Luo, Ban; Wu, Yi-Ping; Liu, Rong

    2017-12-01

    The clinical application of orbital magnetic resonance (MR) T2-mapping imaging in detecting the disease activity of Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), and the predictive values of therapy response to intravenous glucocorticoid (ivGC) were investigated. Approved by the local institutional review board (IRB), 106 consecutive patients with GO were included in this prospective study. All subjects were divided into two groups according to the patients' clinical activity score (CAS): the CAS positive group (CAS ≥3) or the CAS negative group (CAS T2 relaxation time of extraocular muscles (T2RT; ms) and the areas of four extra-ocular muscles (AEOMs; mm 2 ) were measured by 3D T2-mapping MR sequence before and after methylprednisolone treatment, so as the CAS and some ophthalmic examinations including visual acuity, intra-ocular pressure, eyeball movement, diplopia and proptosis. In addition, 24 healthy volunteers were recruited as the control group. The mean T2RT and AEOMs in CAS positive group were higher than those in CAS negative group. Both CAS positive and negative groups had significantly higher mean T2RT and AEOMs than the control group (Pevaluate the activity of GO, CAS was mostly related to inflammation symptoms of ocular surface, more than that, T2RT and AEOMs were also related to abnormal findings of the ophthalmic examinations including high ocular pressure, impaired eyeball movement, diplopia and proptosis. T2RT and AEOMs can reflex the inflammation state of ocular muscles better. CAS combined with 3D T2-mapping MR imaging could improve the sensitivity of detection of active GO so as the prediction and evaluation of the response to methylprednisolone treatment.

  13. ¿Hay diferencias entre la violencia grave y la violencia menos grave contra la pareja?: un análisis comparativo

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique Echeburúa; Javier Fernández-Montalvo; Paz de Corral

    2008-01-01

    En este estudio ex post facto se lleva a cabo una descripción de las características presentadas por 1.081 casos denunciados por violencia contra la mujer en las comisarías de la Ertzaintza del País Vasco. En primer lugar, se presentan las variables psicológicas y sociodemográficas del agresor y de la víctima, así como de la relación de pareja. Y en segundo lugar, se determinan las diferencias más significativas entre la violencia grave y la violencia menos grave en relación con esas mismas v...

  14. Doença de Graves associada à artrite idiopática juvenil Graves' disease associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa de Matos Santos Mendonça Marques

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Os autores relatam o caso de uma menina de 10 anos de idade com diagnóstico de doença de Graves (DG, em tratamento com propiltiouracil, que desenvolveu uveíte e artrite poliarticular e cuja mãe também tem DG e lúpus discoide. São discutidos os diagnósticos diferenciais de artrite inflamatória que surge em uma criança com doença tireoidiana autoimune medicada com drogas antitireóideas.The authors report the case of a 10-year-old girl with Graves' disease (GD, treated with propylthiouracil, who developed uveitis and polyarticular arthritis, and whose mother also had GD and discoid lupus. The differential diagnosis of inflammatory arthritis that appears in a child with autoimmune thyroid disease managed with antithyroid drugs is discussed.

  15. Symmetric increased skeletal muscular uptake of 18F fluoro-deoxyglucose: a clue for the diagnosis of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santhosh, Sampath; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Kashyap, Raghava; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Baljinder

    2011-01-01

    18 F fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in the thyroid and thymus is well reported in patients with Grave's disease. Incidental skeletal muscle uptake has also been reported in other non-musculoskeletal (benign and malignant) pathologies. We report a patient of Grave's disease showing symmetrical skeletal muscle uptake but no thyroidal or thymus uptake of FDG. (author)

  16. Guide-line of the radio-iodine (131I) therapy in Graves' disease and thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Yutaka; Ikekubo, Katsuji

    2005-01-01

    Radio-iodine ( 131 I) therapy has been using in Graves' disease and well differentiated thyroid cancer. The rules of control in the discharge from radio-isotope hospital were notified in 1999 in Japan. Guideline of the 131 I therapy in Graves' disease and thyroid cancer were prepared by sub-group of Japanese Society of Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  17. 78 FR 31570 - Prospective Grant of a Start-Up Exclusive Patent License Agreement: Treatment of Graves' Disease...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ...-Up Exclusive Patent License Agreement: Treatment of Graves' Disease, Hyperthyroidism and Thyroid... Patent License Agreement may be worldwide and the field of use may be limited to: Treatment of Graves' Disease, hyperthyroidism and thyroid cancer. DATES: Only written comments or applications for a license...

  18. Age and stress as determinants of the severity of hyperthyroidism caused by Graves' disease in newly diagnosed patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Xander G.; Smit, Natalie; Endert, Erik; Brosschot, Jos F.; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The evidence that stress may provoke Graves' hyperthyroidism in genetically susceptible subjects is substantial. Whether exposure to stress is related to the severity of thyrotoxicosis has not been studied. Advancing age is associated with not only less severe Graves' hyperthyroidism but

  19. Efficiency analysis of using tailored individual doses of radioiodine and fine tuning using a low-dose antithyroid drug in the treatment of Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Jiang; Dong, Yan-Yu; Wang, Yi-Wei; Wang, Kai-Hua; Zeng, Qun-Yan

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of using tailored individual doses of radioiodine (¹³¹I) and fine tuning using low-dose antithyroid drug (ATD) in the treatment of Graves' disease, and an attempt to establish a therapeutic strategy that can keep both high rate of euthyroidism and low incidence of hypothyroidism. The dose of radioiodine was calculated using the calculated dose formula, and low-dose ATD was used as a way of fine tuning during follow-up. The intended dose of radioiodine was modified according to the patient's age at radioiodine therapy, thyroid size, and duration of hyperthyroidism before radioiodine therapy in the study group; it was set as 2.96 MBq/g of thyroid in the control group. Twenty patients with Graves' disease were nonrandomly assigned to the control group and 98 patients with Graves' disease to the study group. The outcomes, which included euthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and persistent hyperthyroidism, were determined according to the patients' states at the end of follow-up. In the study group, 74 patients (75.5%) achieved the euthyroid state, six patients (6.1%) became hypothyroid, and 18 patients (18.4%) remained hyperthyroid. The rate of euthyroidism was statistically different between the study group and the control group (75.5 vs. 50%, P=0.03). Of 98 patients with Graves' disease in the study group, 19 patients were additionally treated with ATD during follow-up, and 12 patients achieved euthyroidism. In different age groups or duration of hyperthyroidism groups, the rate of euthyroidism was not statistically different among subgroups of goiter grade 1, grade 2, and grade 3 (P>0.05). Similarly, in different age groups or duration of hyperthyroidism groups, the incidence of hypothyroidism was not statistically different among subgroups of goiter grade 1, grade 2, and grade 3 (P>0.05). However, binary logistic regression analysis showed that thyroid size was associated with overtreatment and undertreatment in our study. Individual doses of

  20. ¿Hay diferencias entre la violencia grave y la violencia menos grave contra la pareja?: un análisis comparativo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Echeburúa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available En este estudio ex post facto se lleva a cabo una descripción de las características presentadas por 1.081 casos denunciados por violencia contra la mujer en las comisarías de la Ertzaintza del País Vasco. En primer lugar, se presentan las variables psicológicas y sociodemográficas del agresor y de la víctima, así como de la relación de pareja. Y en segundo lugar, se determinan las diferencias más significativas entre la violencia grave y la violencia menos grave en relación con esas mismas variables. Los resultados ponen de manifiesto que tanto los agresores como las víctimas tienden a ser jóvenes, con una sobrerrepresentación de agresores y víctimas extranjeros inmigrantes. En el caso de los maltratadores graves, tienden a ser celosos o posesivos, a sentirse humillados por la ruptura de la pareja, lo que redunda directamente en un descenso de su autoestima y a consumir abusivamente alcohol o drogas. Por lo que se refiere a las víctimas de la violencia grave, se suelen sentir con frecuencia en peligro de muerte y están más fácilmente en circunstancias de vulnerabilidad, como una edad muy joven, una personalidad muy dependiente, una situación de enfermedad crónica o de dependencia económica, un consumo de drogas o un entorno de soledad. Se comentan las implicaciones de este estudio para la investigación y para la práctica clínica.